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1

Upper Limits from Counting Experiments with Multiple Pipelines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In counting experiments, one can set an upper limit on the rate of a Poisson process based on a count of the number of events observed due to the process. In some experiments, one makes several counts of the number of events, using different instruments, different event detection algorithms, or observations over multiple time intervals. We demonstrate how to generalize the classical frequentist upper limit calculation to the case where multiple counts of events are made over one or more time intervals using several (not necessarily independent) procedures. We show how different choices of the rank ordering of possible outcomes in the space of counts correspond to applying different levels of significance to the various measurements. We propose an ordering that is matched to the sensitivity of the different measurement procedures and show that in typical cases it gives stronger upper limits than other choices. As an example, we show how this method can be applied to searches for gravitational-wave bursts, where multiple burst-detection algorithms analyse the same data set, and demonstrate how a single combined upper limit can be set on the gravitational-wave burst rate.

Patrick J. Sutton

2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

2

Upper Limits on a Stochastic Background of Gravitational Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO) has performed a third science run with much improved sensitivities of all three interferometers. We present an analysis of approximately 200 hours of data acquired during this run, used to search for a stochastic background of gravitational radiation. We place upper bounds on the energy density stored as gravitational radiation for three different spectral power laws. For the flat spectrum, our limit of Omega_0<8.4e-4 in the 69-156 Hz band is ~10^5 times lower than the previous result in this frequency range.

Abbott, B; Adhikari, R; Ageev, A; Allen, B; Amin, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Ashley, M; Asiri, F; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Balasubramanian, R; Ballmer, S; Barish, B C; Barker, C; Barker, D; Barnes, M; Barr, B; Barton, M A; Bayer, K; Beausoleil, R; Belczynski, K; Bennett, R; Berukoff, S J; Betzwieser, J; Bhawal, B; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Black, E; Blackburn, K; Blackburn, L; Bland, B; Bochner, B; Bogue, L; Bork, R; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brown, D A; Bullington, A; Bunkowski, A; Buonanno, A; Burgess, R; Busby, D; Butler, W E; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cantley, C A; Cardenas, L; Carter, K; Casey, M M; Castiglione, J; Chandler, A; Chapsky, J; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chickarmane, V; Chin, D; Christensen, N; Churches, D; Cokelaer, T; Colacino, C; Coldwell, R; Coles, M; Cook, D; Corbitt, T; Coyne, D; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Crooks, D R M; Csatorday, P; Cusack, B J; Cutler, C; D'Ambrosio, E; Danzmann, K; Daw, E; De Bra, D; Delker, T; Dergachev, V; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S V; Di Credico, A; Ding, H; Drever, R W P; Dupuis, R J; Edlund, J A; Ehrens, P; Elliffe, E J; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fairhurst, S; Fallnich, C; Farnham, D; Fejer, M M; Findley, T; Fine, M; Finn, L S; Franzen, K Y; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fyffe, M; Ganezer, K S; Garofoli, J; Giaime, J A; Gillespie, A; Goda, K; González, G; Goler, S; Grandclément, P; Grant, A; Gray, C; Gretarsson, A M; Grimmett, D; Grote, H; Grünewald, S; Günther, M; Gustafson, E; Gustafson, R; Hamilton, W O; Hammond, M; Hanson, J; Hardham, C; Harms, J; Harry, G; Hartunian, A; Heefner, J; Hefetz, Y; Heinzel, G; Heng, I S; Hennessy, M; Hepler, N; Heptonstall, A; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hindman, N; Hoang, P; Hough, J; Hrynevych, M; Hua, W; Ito, M; Itoh, Y; Ivanov, A; Jennrich, O; Johnson, B; Johnson, W W; Johnston, W R; Jones, D I; Jones, L; Jungwirth, D; Kalogera, V; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kells, W; Kern, J; Khan, A; Killbourn, S; Killow, C J; Kim, C; King, C; King, P; Klimenko, S; Koranda, S; Kotter, K; Kovalik, Yu; Kozak, D; Krishnan, B; Landry, M; Langdale, J; Lantz, B; Lawrence, R; Lazzarini, A; Lei, M; Leonor, I; Libbrecht, K; Libson, A; Lindquist, P; Liu, S; Logan, J; Lormand, M; Lubinski, M; Luck, H; Lyons, T T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Majid, W; Malec, M; Mann, F; Marin, A; Marka, S; Maros, E; Mason, J; Mason, K; Matherny, O; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McHugh, M; McNabb, J W C; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messaritaki, E; Messenger, C; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Miyoki, S; Mohanty, S; Moreno, G; Mossavi, K; Müller, G; Mukherjee, S; Murray, P; Myers, J; Nagano, S; Nash, T; Nayak, R; Newton, G; Nocera, F; Noel, J S; Nutzman, P; Olson, T; O'Reilly, B; Ottaway, D J; Ottewill, A; Ouimette, D A; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pan, Y; Papa, M A; Parameshwaraiah, V; Parameswariah, C; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Pitkin, M; Plissi, M; Prix, R; Quetschke, V; Raab, F; Radkins, H; Rahkola, R; Rakhmanov, M; Rao, S R; Rawlins, K; Ray-Majumder, S; Re, V; Redding, D; Regehr, M W; Regimbau, T; Reid, S; Reilly, K T; Reithmaier, K; Reitze, D H; Richman, S; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rivera, B; Rizzi, A; Robertson, D I; Robertson, N A; Robison, L; Roddy, S; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J; Rong, H; Rose, D; Rotthoff, E; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Salzman, I; Sandberg, V; Sanders, G H; Sannibale, V; Sathyaprakash, B; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Sazonov, A; Schilling, R; Schlaufman, K; Schmidt, V; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, S M; Seader, S E; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Seel, S; Seifert, F; Sengupta, A S; Shapiro, C A; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Shu, Q Z; Sibley, A; Siemens, X; Sievers, L; Sigg, D; Sintes, A M; Smith, J R; Smith, M; Smith, M R; Sneddon, P H; Spero, R; Stapfer, G; Steussy, D; Strain, K A; Strom, D; Stuver, A; Summerscales, T; Sumner, M C; Sutton, P J; Sylvestre, J; Takamori, A; Tanner, D B; Tariq, H; Taylor, I; Taylor, R; Taylor, R; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Tibbits, M; Tilav, S; Tinto, M; Tokmakov, K V; Torres, C; Torrie, C; Traylor, G; Tyler, W; Ugolini, D W; Ungarelli, C; Vallisneri, M; Van Putten, M H P M; Vass, S; Vecchio, A; Veitch, J; Vorvick, C; Vyachanin, S P; Wallace, L; Walther, H; Ward, H; Ware, B; Watts, K; Webber, D; Weidner, A; Weiland, U; Weinstein, A; Weiss, R; Welling, H; Wen, L; Wen, S; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; Whiting, B F; Wiley, S; Wilkinson, C; Willems, P A; Williams, P R; Williams, R; Willke, B; Wilson, A; Winjum, B J; Winkler, W; Wise, S; Wiseman, A G; Woan, G; Wooley, R; Worden, J; Wu, W; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yoshida, S; Zaleski, K D; Zanolin, M; Zawischa, I; Zhang, L; Zhu, R; Zotov, N P; Zucker, M; Zweizig, J

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Possible Upper limits on Lorentz Factors in High Energy Astrophysical Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gamma ray bursts (GRBs) are the most luminous physical phenomena in the universe. The relativistic effect on the blast wave associated with the GRB introduces the gamma factor. Here we put an upper limit on the gamma factor via constraints on maximal power allowed by general relativity and hence set upper limits on other observable quantities such as deceleration distance. Also upper limits are set on the high energy particle radiation due to constraints set by cosmic microwave background radiation.

C. Sivaram; Kenath Arun

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

4

What is the upper size limit for cosmopolitan distribution in free-living microorganisms?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

What is the upper size limit for cosmopolitan distribution in free-living microorganisms? ABSTRACT distance apart) is used to try and answer the question `What is the upper size limit for cosmopolitan to 230 lm while the largest cosmopolitan species was 135 lm in size. Comparison of the testate

Brown, Richard

5

First upper limits from LIGO on gravitational wave bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on a search for gravitational wave bursts using data from the first science run of the LIGO detectors. Our search focuses on bursts with durations ranging from 4 ms to 100 ms, and with significant power in the LIGO sensitivity band of 150 to 3000 Hz. We bound the rate for such detected bursts at less than 1.6 events per day at 90% confidence level. This result is interpreted in terms of the detection efficiency for ad hoc waveforms (Gaussians and sine-Gaussians) as a function of their root-sum-square strain h_{rss}; typical sensitivities lie in the range h_{rss} ~ 10^{-19} - 10^{-17} strain/rtHz, depending on waveform. We discuss improvements in the search method that will be applied to future science data from LIGO and other gravitational wave detectors.

Abbott, B; Adhikari, R; Ageev, A N; Allen, B; Amin, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Asiri, F; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S V; Balasubramanian, R; Ballmer, S; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barker-Patton, C; Barnes, M; Barr, B; Barton, M A; Bayer, K; Beausoleil, R; Belczynski, K; Bennett, R; Berukoff,S J; Betzwieser, J; Bhawal, B; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Black, E; Blackburn, K; Bland-Weaver, B; Bochner, B; Bogue, L; Bork, R G; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brown, D A; Brozek, S; Bullington, A; Buonanno, A; Burgess, R; Busby, D; Butler, W E; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cantley, C A; Cardenas, L; Carter, K; Casey, M M; Castiglione, J; Chandler, A; Chapsky, J; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chen, Y; Chickarmane, V; Chin, D; Christensen, N; Churches, D; Colacino, C N; Coldwell, R; Coles, M; Cook, D; Corbitt, T; Coyne, D; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Crooks, D R M; Csatorday, P; Cusack, B J; Cutler, C; D'Ambrosio, E; Danzmann, K; Davies, R; Daw, E; De Bra, D; Delker, T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S V; Ding, H; Drever, R W P; Dupuis, R J; Ebeling, C; Edlund, J; Ehrens, P; Elliffe, E J; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fallnich, C; Farnham, D; Fejer, M M; Fine, M; Finn, L S; Flanagan, E; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V; Fyffe, M; Ganezer, K S; Giaime, J A; Gillespie, A; Goda, K; González, G; Goler, S; Grandclément, P; Grant, A; Gray, C; Gretarsson, A M; Grimmett, D; Grote, H; Grünewald, S; Günther, M; Gustafson, E; Gustafson, R; Hamilton, W O; Hammond, M; Hanson, J; Hardham, C; Harry, G; Hartunian, A; Heefner, J; Hefetz, Y; Heinzel, G; Heng, I S; Hennessy, M; Hepler, N; Heptonstall, A; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hindman, N; Hoang, P; Hough, J; Hrynevych, M; Hua, W; Ingley, R; Ito, M; Itoh, Y; Ivanov, A; Jennrich, O; Johnson, W W; Johnston, W; Jones, L; Jungwirth, D; Kalogera, V; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kells, W; Kern, J; Khan, A; Killbourn, S; Killow, C J; Kim, C; King, C; King, P; Klimenko, S; Kloevekorn, P; Koranda, S; Kotter, K; Kovalik, Yu; Kozak, D; Krishnan, B; Landry, M; Langdale, J; Lantz, B; Lawrence, R; Lazzarini, A; Lei, M; Leonhardt, V; Leonor, I; Libbrecht, K; Lindquist, P; Liu, S; Logan, J; Lormand, M; Lubinski, M; Lück, H B; Lyons, T T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Majid, W; Malec, M; Mann, F; Marin, A; Marka, S; Maros, E; Mason, J; Mason, K O; Matherny, O; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McHugh, M; McNamara, P; Mendell, G; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Miyoki, S; Mohanty, S; Moreno, G; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Müller, G; Mukherjee, S; Myers, J; Nagano, S; Nash, T; Naundorf, H; Nayak, R; Newton, G; Nocera, F; Nutzman, P; Olson, T; O'Reilly, B; Ottaway, D J; Ottewill, A; Ouimette, D A; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Papa, M A; Parameswariah, C; Parameshwaraiah, V; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Pitkin, M; Plissi, M; Pratt, M; Quetschke, V; Raab, F; Radkins, H; Rahkola, R; Rakhmanov, M; Rao, S R; Redding, D; Regehr, M W; Regimbau, T; Reilly, K T; Reithmaier, K; Reitze, D H; Richman, S; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rizzi, A; Robertson, D I; Robertson, N A; Robison, L; Roddy, S; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J; Rong, H; Rose, D; Rotthoff, E; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Salzman, I; Sanders, G H; Sannibale, V; Sathyaprakash, B; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Sazonov, A; Schilling, R; Schlaufman, K; Schmidt, V; Schofield, R; Schrempel, M; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, S M; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Seel, S; Sengupta, A S; Shapiro, C A; Shawhan, P S; Shoemaker, D H; Shu, Q Z; Sibley, A; Siemens, X; Sievers, L; Sigg, D; Sintes, A M; Skeldon, K D; Smith, J R; Smith, M; Smith, M R; Sneddon, P; Spero, R; Stapfer, G; Strain, K A; Strom, D; Stuver, A; Summerscales, T; Sumner, M C; Sutton, P J; Sylvestre, J; Takamori, A; Tanner, D B; Tariq, H; Taylor, I; Taylor, R; Thorne, K S; Tibbits, M; Tilav, S; Tinto, M; Tokmakov, K V; Torres, C; Torrie, C; Traeger, S; Traylor, G; Tyler, W; Ugolini, D W; Vallisneri, M; Van, M; Putten; Vass, S; Vecchio, A; Vorvick, C; Vyachanin, S P; Wallace, L; Walther, H; Ward, H; Ware, B; Watts, K; Webber, D; Weidner, A; Weiland, U; Weinstein, A; Weiss, R; Welling, H; Wen, L; Wen, S; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; Whiting, B F; Willems, P A; Williams, P R; Williams, R; Willke, B; Wilson, A; Winjum, B J; Winkler, W; Wise, S; Wiseman, A G; Woan, G; Wooley, R; Worden, J; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yoshida, S; Zawischa, I; Zhang, L; Zotov, N P; Zucker, M; Zweizig, J

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Strong Upper Limits on Sterile Neutrino Warm Dark Matter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sterile neutrinos are attractive dark matter candidates. Their parameter space of mass and mixing angle has not yet been fully tested despite intensive efforts that exploit their gravitational clustering properties and radiative decays. We use the limits on gamma-ray line emission from the Galactic center region obtained with the SPI spectrometer on the INTEGRAL satellite to set new constraints, which improve on the earlier bounds on mixing by more than 2 orders of magnitude, and thus strongly restrict a wide and interesting range of models.

Yueksel, Hasan [Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Beacom, John F. [Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Watson, Casey R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Millikin University, Decatur, Illinois 62522 (United States)

2008-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

7

The Extended GMRT Radio Halo Survey I: New upper limits on radio halos and mini-halos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A fraction of galaxy clusters host diffuse radio sources called radio halos, radio relics and mini-halos. We present the sample and first results from the Extended GMRT Radio Halo Survey (EGRHS)- an extension of the GMRT Radio Halo Survey (GRHS, Venturi et al. 2007, 2008). It is a systematic radio survey of galaxy clusters selected from the REFLEX and eBCS X-ray catalogs . Analysis of GMRT data at 610/ 235/ 325 MHz on 12 galaxy clusters are presented. We report the detection of a newly discovered mini-halo in the cluster RXJ1532.9+3021 at 610 MHz. A small scale relic (~200 kpc) is suspected in the cluster Z348. We do not detect cluster-scale diffuse emission in 11 clusters. Robust upper limits on the detection of radio halo of size of 1 Mpc are determined. We also present upper limits on the detections of mini-halos in a sub-sample of cool-core clusters. The upper limits for radio halos and mini-halos are plotted in the radio power- X-ray luminosity plane and the correlations are discussed. Diffuse extended e...

Kale, R; Giacintucci, S; Dallacasa, D; Cassano, R; Brunetti, G; Macario, G; Athreya, R

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

CDF Note 9999 Combined Upper Limit on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CDF Note 9999 Combined Upper Limit on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production The CDF Collaboration for the Standard Model Higgs boson at CDF. The six major analyses combined are the WH bÂŻb channels, the WH + ZH E Model decay branching fractions of the Higgs boson and that the ratios of the rates for the WH, ZH, gg

Fermilab

9

Upper Limits on the Number of Small Bodies in Sedna-Like Orbits by the TAOS Project  

SciTech Connect

We present the results of a search for occultation events by objects at distances between 100 and 1000 AU in lightcurves from the Taiwanese-American Occultation Survey (TAOS). We searched for consecutive, shallow flux reductions in the stellar lightcurves obtained by our survey between 7 February 2005 and 31 December 2006 with a total of {approx} 4.5 x 10{sup 9} three-telescope simultaneous photometric measurements. No events were detected, allowing us to set upper limits on the number density as a function of size and distance of objects in Sedna-like orbits, using simple models.

Wang, J; Lehner, M J; Zhang, Z; Bianco, F B; Alcock, C; Chen, W; Axelrod, T; Byun, Y; Coehlo, N K; Cook, K H; Dave, R; de Pater, L; Porrata, R; Kim, D; King, S; Lee, T; Lin, H; Lissauer, J J; Marshall, S L; Protopapas, P; Rice, J A; Schwamb, M E; Wang, S; Wen, C

2009-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

10

Upper limit on spontaneous supercurrents in Sr2RuO4  

SciTech Connect

It is widely believed that the perovskite Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4} is an unconventional superconductor with broken time reversal symmetry. It has been predicted that superconductors with broken time reversal symmetry should have spontaneously generated supercurrents at edges and domain walls. We have done careful imaging of the magnetic fields above Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4} single crystals using scanning Hall bar and SQUID microscopies, and see no evidence for such spontaneously generated supercurrents. We use the results from our magnetic imaging to place upper limits on the spontaneously generated supercurrents at edges and domain walls as a function of domain size. For a single domain, this upper limit is below the predicted signal by two orders of magnitude. We speculate on the causes and implications of the lack of large spontaneous supercurrents in this very interesting superconducting system.

Chung, Suk Bum

2010-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

11

D Note 6229-CONF Combined Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DĂ? Note 6229-CONF Combined Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production from the DĂ?) Searches for standard model Higgs boson production in pÂŻp collisions at s = 1.96 TeV are carried out for Higgs boson masses (mH) in the range 100 mH 200 GeV/c2 . The contributing production processes include

Quigg, Chris

12

Upper limits on the strength of periodic gravitational waves from PSR J1939+2134  

SciTech Connect

The first science run of the LIGO and GEO gravitational wave detectors presented the opportunity to test methods of searching for gravitational waves from known pulsars. Here we present new direct upper limits on the strength of waves from the pulsar PSR J1939+2134 using two independent analysis methods, one in the frequency domain using frequentist statistics and one in the time domain using Bayesian inference. Both methods show that the strain amplitude at Earth from this pulsar is less than a few times 10{sup -22}.

B. Allen et al.

2003-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

13

An Approach to the Detection of Long-Term Trends in Upper Stratospheric Ozone from Space  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A central problem in the detection of long-term trends in upper stratospheric ozone from orbiting remote sensors involves the separation of instrument drifts from true geophysical changes. Periodic flights of a Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet ...

John E. Frederick; Xufeng Niu; Ernest Hilsenrath

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Combined upper limit on Standard Model Higgs boson production at CDF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Higgs boson is the only elementary particle predicted by the Standard Model (SM) that has neither been confirmed nor refuted. The CDF collaboration has performed SM Higgs searches in many channels using $p\\pbar$ collisions at a centre-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s}=1.96\\tev$. We present the latest combined Higgs boson search at CDF. Since the previous year's combination, the sensitivity is increased through the addition of new channels, the improvement of existing channels and the addition of new data samples. We also use the latest parton distribution functions and $gg \\rightarrow H$ theoretical cross sections when modelling the signal event yields. Using integrated luminosities of up to 8.2 $\\invfb$, we observe a good agreement between data and the background prediction. Since we do not see a Higgs boson excess, we set 95% CL upper limits on the Higgs boson cross section in the range between 100 and 200 $\\gevcc$, with 5 $\\gevcc$ increments. The observed (expected) limits for a 115 and a 165 $\\gevcc$ Higgs boson are 1.55 (1.49) and 0.75 (0.79) $\\times$ SM, respectively. Since last year, the Higgs boson excluded range by CDF is extended to 156.5 - 173.7 and 100 - 104.5 $\\gevcc$.

Buzatu Adrian

2012-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

15

Combined upper limit on Standard Model Higgs boson production at CDF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Higgs boson is the only elementary particle predicted by the Standard Model (SM) that has neither been confirmed nor refuted. The CDF collaboration has performed SM Higgs searches in many channels using p{bar p} collisions at a centre-of-mass energy {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. We present the latest combined Higgs boson search at CDF. Since the previous year's combination, the sensitivity is increased through the addition of new channels, the improvement of existing channels and the addition of new data samples. We also use the latest parton distribution functions and gg {yields} H theoretical cross sections when modelling the signal event yields. Using integrated luminosities of up to 8.2 fb{sup -1}, we observe a good agreement between data and the background prediction. Since we do not see a Higgs boson excess, we set 95% CL upper limits on the Higgs boson cross section in the range between 100 and 200 GeV/c{sup 2}, with 5 GeV/c{sup 2} increments. The observed (expected) limits for a 115 and a 165 GeV/c{sup 2} Higgs boson are 1.55 (1.49) and 0.75 (0.79) x SM, respectively. Since last year, the Higgs boson excluded range by CDF is extended to 156.5 - 173.7 and 100 - 104.5 GeV/c{sup 2}.

Adrian, Buzatu; /McGill U.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

IRAS-based whole-sky upper limit on Dyson Spheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Dyson Sphere is a hypothetical construct of a star purposely cloaked by a thick swarm of broken-up planetary material to better utilize all of the stellar energy. A clean Dyson Sphere identification would give a significant signature for intelligence at work. A search for Dyson Spheres has been carried out using the 250,000 source database of the IRAS infrared satellite which covered 96% of the sky. The search has used the Calgary data collection of the IRAS Low Resolution Spectrometer (LRS) to look for fits to blackbody spectra. Searches have been conducted for both pure (fully cloaked) and partial Dyson Spheres in the blackbody temperature region 100 {le} T {le} 600 K. Other stellar signatures that resemble a Dyson Sphere are reviewed. When these signatures are used to eliminate sources that mimic Dyson Spheres very few candidates remain and even these are ambiguous. Upper limits are presented for both pure and partial Dyson Spheres. The sensitivity of the LRS was enough to find solar-sized Dyson Spheres out to 300 pc, a reach that encompasses a million solar-type stars.

Carrigan, Richard A., Jr.; /Fermilab

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

An upper limit on hypertriton production in collisions of Ar(1.76 AGeV)+KCl  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A high-statistic data sample of Ar(1.76 AGeV)+KCl events recorded with HADES is used to search for a hypertriton signal. An upper production limit per centrality-triggered event of $1.04$ x $10^{-3}$ on the $3\\sigma$ level is derived. Comparing this value with the number of successfully reconstructed $\\Lambda$ hyperons allows to determine an upper limit on the ratio $N_{_{\\Lambda}^3H}/N_{\\Lambda}$, which is confronted with statistical and coalescence-type model calculations.

HADES Collaboration; G. Agakishiev; D. Belver; A. Blanco; M. Böhmer; J. L. Boyard; P. Cabanelas; E. Castro; S. Chernenko; M. Destefanis; F. Dohrmann; A. Dybczak; E. Epple; L. Fabbietti; O. Fateev; P. Finocchiaro; P. Fonte; J. Friese; I. Fröhlich; T. Galatyuk; J. A. Garzón; R. Gernhäuser; C. Gilardi; M. Golubeva; D. González-Díaz; F. Guber; M. Gumberidze; T. Heinz; T. Hennino; R. Holzmann; I. Iori; A. Ivashkin; M. Jurkovic; B. Kämpfer; T. Karavicheva; I. Koenig; W. Koenig; B. W. Kolb; R. Kotte; A. Krása; F. Krizek; R. Krücken; H. Kuc; W. Kühn; A. Kugler; A. Kurepin; S. Lang; J. S. Lange; K. Lapidus; T. Liu; L. Lopes; M. Lorenz; L. Maier; A. Mangiarotti; J. Markert; V. Metag; B. Michalska; J. Miche; E. Moriničre; J. Mousa; C. Müntz; L. Naumann; Y. C. Pachmayer; M. Palka; V. Pechenov; O. Pechenova; J. Pietraszko; W. Przygoda; B. Ramstein; L. Rehnisch; A. Reshetin; A. Rustamov; A. Sadovsky; P. Salabura; T. Scheib; A. Schmah; H. Schuldes; E. Schwab; J. Siebenson; Yu. G. Sobolev; S. Spatarof; B. Spruck; H. Ströbele; J. Stroth; C. Sturm; A. Tarantola; K. Teilab; P. Tlusty; M. Traxler; R. Trebacz; H. Tsertos; V. Wagner; M. Weber; C. Wendisch; M. Wisniowski; J. Wüstenfeld; S. Yurevich; Y. Zanevsky

2013-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

18

Final Report - Inspection Limit Confirmation for Upper Head Penetration Nozzle Cracking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ASME Code Case N-729-1 defines alternative examination requirements for the Control Rod Drive Mechanism (CRDM) upper head penetration nozzle welds. The basis for these examination requirements was developed as part of an Industry program conducted by the Materials Reliability Program (MRP) through the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The results of this program were published in MRP-95 Rev. 1 and document a set of finite element weld residual stress analyses conducted on a variety of upper head penetration nozzles. The inspection zone selected by the industry was based on the stress where it was assumed that primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) would not initiate. As explained in MRP-95 Rev. 1, it has been illustrated that PWSCC does not occur in the Alloy 600 tube when the stresses are below the yield strength of that tube. Typical yield strengths at operating conditions for Alloy 600 range from 35 ksi to 65 ksi. A stress less than 20-ksi tension was chosen as a conservative range where PWSCC would not initiate. Over the last several years, Engineering Mechanics Corporation of Columbus (Emc2) has conducted welding residual stress analyses on upper head penetration J-welds made from Alloy 182 weld metal for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff. These efforts were performed as a confirmatory evaluation of the industry’s analyses conducted as part of their MRP-95 Rev. 1 effort. To this point, the analyses conducted by Emc2 have not been compared to the MRP-95 Rev. 1 results or the examination zones defined in the Code Case. Therefore, this report summarizes the past Emc2 CRDM welding analyses and investigates the regions where the welding stresses may be sufficiently high to promote stress corrosion cracking (SCC). In all, 90 welding residual stress analyses were conducted by Emc2 and the largest distance below the weld where the stress drops below 20 ksi was 5 inches for the uphill weld of the 53-degree nozzle case. For the largest distance above the weld where stress drops below 20 ksi, the worst case was 1.5 inches above the downhill side of the 25-degree nozzle case. The inspection zones described in both MRP-95 Rev. 1 and Code Case N-729-1 were set at 1.0 inch for nozzle angles greater than 30 degrees or 1.5 inches for nozzle angles less than 30 degrees, above the highest or below the lowest point on the weld. In all cases analyzed by Emc2 in this effort, there was only one case where the stress was above 20 ksi outside of this inspection zone. For that case, the stresses were very close to 20 ksi at the inspection zone limit and were considered acceptable.

Anderson, Michael T.; Rudland, David L.; Zhang, Tao; Wilkowski, Gery M.

2008-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

19

Detection of $^{133}$Xe from the Fukushima nuclear power plant in the upper troposphere above Germany  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

After the accident in the Japanese Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in March 2011 large amounts of radioactivity were released and distributed in the atmosphere. Among them were also radioactive noble gas isotopes which can be used as tracers to probe global atmospheric circulation models. This work presents unique measurements of the radionuclide $^{133}$Xe from Fukushima in the upper troposphere above Germany. The measurements involve air sampling in a research jet aircraft followed by chromatographic xenon extraction and ultra-low background gas counting with miniaturized proportional counters. With this technique a detection limit of the order of 100 $^{133}$Xe atoms in liter-scale air samples (corresponding to about 100 mBq/m$^3$) is achievable. Our results proof that the $^{133}$Xe-rich ground level air layer from Fukushima was lifted up to the tropopause and distributed hemispherically. Moreover, comparisons with ground level air measurements indicate that the arrival of the radioactive plume in Germany in high altitude is several days earlier than on ground.

Hardy Simgen; Frank Arnold; Heinfried Aufmhoff; Robert Baumann; Florian Kaether; Sebastian Lindemann; Ludwig Rauch; Hans Schlager; Clemens Schlosser; Ulrich Schumann

2013-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

20

A Non-Reflective Upper Boundary Condition for Limited-Height Hydrostatic Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple upper boundary condition for hydrostatic, Boussinesq models is derived from a linear internal wave theory, assuming a uniform stratification and no Coriolis effects. This condition is applied in a two-dimentional nonlinear model of the ...

Philippe Bougeault

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "upper detection limit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Higgs Mass Constraints on a Fourth Family: Upper and Lower Limits on CKM Mixing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

June 25, 2010 Higgs Mass Constraints on a Fourth Family:and experimental limits on the Higgs boson mass restrict CKMGeV lower limit on the Higgs boson mass that is especially

Chanowitz, Michael S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Upper limits to fusion rates of isotopic hydrogen molecules in Pd  

SciTech Connect

We have calculated upper bounds for {ital p}-{ital d} and {ital d}-{ital d} fusion rates at octahedral and tetrahedral sites in saturated PdH. Our molecular potentials include Thomas-Fermi screening for two centers and realistic Pd crystal potentials. Accurate numerical techniques were used to solve for radial wave functions down to {ital r}=0. From these wave functions we find rates that are considerably enhanced over those for the free molecules, but 10--20 orders of magnitude lower than the claims of early experiments.

Alberg, M.A. (Department of Physics, Seattle University, Seattle, Washington 98122 (USA) Department of Physics, Institute for Nuclear Theory, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, (USA)); Wilets, L. (Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, (USA) Institute for Nuclear Theory, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, (USA)); Rehr, J.J.; Mustre de Leon, J. (Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, (USA))

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Upper bound limit analysis model for FRP-reinforced masonry curved structures. Part II: Structural analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A homogenized full 3D limit analysis model for the evaluation of collapse loads of FRP-reinforced masonry vaults is presented. Six-noded rigid infinitely resistant wedges are used to model masonry. Three-noded rigid infinitely resistant triangles are ... Keywords: FRP-reinforcement, Homogenization, Kinematic approach, Limit analysis, Masonry, Vaults

Gabriele Milani; Enrico Milani; Antonio Tralli

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Upper limits on a stochastic gravitational-wave background using LIGO and Virgo interferometers at 600-1000 Hz  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A stochastic background of gravitational waves is expected to arise from a superposition of many incoherent sources of gravitational waves, of either cosmological or astrophysical origin. This background is a target for the current generation of ground-based detectors. In this article we present the first joint search for a stochastic background using data from the LIGO and Virgo interferometers. In a frequency band of 600-1000 Hz, we obtained a 95% upper limit on the amplitude of $\\Omega_{\\rm GW}(f) = \\Omega_3 (f/900 \\mathrm{Hz})^3$, of $\\Omega_3 < 0.33$, assuming a value of the Hubble parameter of $h_{100}=0.72$. These new limits are a factor of seven better than the previous best in this frequency band.

J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. D. Abbott; M. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; R. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; K. Agatsuma; P. Ajith; B. Allen; E. Amador Ceron; D. Amariutei; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. A. Arain; M. C. Araya; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; D. Atkinson; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. Ballmer; J. C. B. Barayoga; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; M. Bastarrika; A. Basti; J. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; D. Beck; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; A. Belletoile; I. Belopolski; M. Benacquista; J. M. Berliner; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; N. Beveridge; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; R. Biswas; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; C. Bogan; R. Bondarescu; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; S. Bose; L. Bosi; B. Bouhou; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; J. Burguet--Castell; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; J. Cannizzo; K. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; S. Caudill; M. Cavagliŕ; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; O. Chaibi; T. Chalermsongsak; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; S. Chelkowski; W. Chen; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; S. S. Y. Chua; C. T. Y. Chung; S. Chung; G. Ciani; D. E. Clark; J. Clark; J. H. Clayton; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; C. N. Colacino; J. Colas; A. Colla; M. Colombini; A. Conte; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; A. M. Cruise; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; R. M. Cutler; K. Dahl; S. L. Danilishin; R. Dannenberg; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; R. De Rosa; D. DeBra; G. Debreczeni; W. Del Pozzo; M. del Prete; T. Dent; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; M. Di Paolo Emilio; A. Di Virgilio; M. Díaz; A. Dietz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; J. -C. Dumas; T. Eberle; M. Edgar; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; G. Endr\\Hoczi; R. Engel; T. Etzel; K. Evans; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Y. Fan; B. F. Farr; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; F. Feroz; I. Ferrante; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; M. Flanigan; S. Foley; E. Forsi; L. A. Forte; N. Fotopoulos; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; D. Friedrich; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; M. -K. Fujimoto; P. J. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; M. Galimberti; L. Gammaitoni; J. Garcia; F. Garufi; M. E. Gáspár; G. Gemme; R. Geng; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. Á. Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; S. Gil; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; L. M. Goggin; G. González; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Goßler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; N. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Greverie; R. Grosso; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; R. Gupta; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; T. Ha; J. M. Hallam; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. -F. Hayau; J. Heefner; A. Heidmann; M. C. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; M. A. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; V. Herrera; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; M. Holtrop; T. Hong; S. Hooper; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; Y. J. Jang; P. Jaranowski; E. Jesse; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; G. Jones; R. Jones; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; R. Kasturi; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; D. Kelley; W. Kells; D. G. Keppel; Z. Keresztes; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili; E. A. Khazanov; B. Kim; C. Kim; H. Kim; K. Kim; N. Kim; Y. -M. Kim; P. J. King; D. L. Kinzel; J. S. Kissel; S. Klimenko; K. Kokeyama; V. Kondrashov; S. Koranda; W. Z. Korth; I. Kowalska; D. Kozak; O. Kranz; V. Kringel; S. Krishnamurthy; B. Krishnan; A. Królak; G. Kuehn; R. Kumar; P. Kwee; P. K. Lam

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

25

Upper limits on a stochastic gravitational-wave background using LIGO and Virgo interferometers at 600-1000 Hz  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A stochastic background of gravitational waves is expected to arise from a superposition of many incoherent sources of gravitational waves, of either cosmological or astrophysical origin. This background is a target for the current generation of ground-based detectors. In this article we present the first joint search for a stochastic background using data from the LIGO and Virgo interferometers. In a frequency band of 600-1000 Hz, we obtained a 95% upper limit on the amplitude of $\\Omega_{\\rm GW}(f) = \\Omega_3 (f/900 \\mathrm{Hz})^3$, of $\\Omega_3 < 0.33$, assuming a value of the Hubble parameter of $h_{100}=0.72$. These new limits are a factor of seven better than the previous best in this frequency band.

Abadie, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adhikari, R; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Arain, M A; Araya, M C; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Baragoya, J C B; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Beck, D; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Belletoile, A; Belopolski, I; Benacquista, M; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biswas, R; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bogan, C; Bondarescu, R; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burguet--Castell, J; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavagliŕ, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chaibi, O; Chalermsongsak, T; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chelkowski, S; Chen, W; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clark, D E; Clark, J; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colacino, C N; Colas, J; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M; Coulon, J -P; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, R M; Dahl, K; Danilishin, S L; Dannenberg, R; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Del Pozzo, W; del Prete, M; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Emilio, M Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A; Díaz, M; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Eberle, T; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Endr?czi, G; Engel, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Farr, B F; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Feroz, F; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Flanigan, M; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fujimoto, M -K; Fulda, P J; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Galimberti, M; Gammaitoni, L; Garcia, J; Garufi, F; Gáspár, M E; Gemme, G; Geng, R; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L Á; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gil, S; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goggin, L M; González, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Gray, N; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Greverie, C; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Gupta, R; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Ha, T; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Hayau, J -F; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hendry, M A; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Herrera, V; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Holtrop, M; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, Y J; Jaranowski, P; Jesse, E; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kasturi, R; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kelley, D; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Keresztes, Z; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B; Kim, C; Kim, H; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, Y -M; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Kranz, O; Kringel, V; Krishnamurthy, S; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, R; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Lastzka, N; Lawrie, C; Lazzarini, A; Leaci, P; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Leong, J R; Leonor, I; Leroy, N; Letendre, N

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Limitations for heterodyne detection of Brillouin scattered light  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One means by which elastic properties of a material may be determined is measuring sound wave velocities in the material, from which elastic moduli of interest can be computed. Velocity can be measured by conventional piezoelectric transduction techniques, by applying laser ultrasonics, or by using Brillouin-scattering methods. Brillouin-scattering techniques for determining the sound wave velocity are particularly attractive since they are completely noninvasive. Only a probe beam of light is required since the thermal energy in the material provides the elastic motion. Heterodyne methods for detection of Brillouin-scattered light are considered one possible means to increase the speed of the scattered light frequency detection. Results of experiments with simulated Brillouin scattering suggest that heterodyne detection of the Brillouin-scattered light is feasible. Experiments to detect Brillouin-scattered light, with water as the scattering medium, were designed and interpreted using the results of the simulated scattering experiments. Overall, results showed that it is difficult to narrow the linewidth for Brillouin scattering to an acceptable level. The results given indicate that heterodyne detection of the Brillouin components requires detection bandwidths that are quite small, perhaps 10 Hz or lower. These small bandwidths can be routinely achieved using lock-in amplifier techniques.

Allemeier, R.T.; Wagner, J.W.; Telschow, K.L.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Quantum Limits of Interferometer Topologies for Gravitational Radiation Detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to expand the astrophysical reach of gravitational wave detectors, several interferometer topologies have been proposed to evade the thermodynamic and quantum mechanical limits in future detectors. In this work, we make a systematic comparison among them by considering their sensitivities and complexities. We numerically optimize their sensitivities by introducing a cost function that tries to maximize the broadband improvement over the sensitivity of current detectors. We find that frequency-dependent squeezed-light injection with a hundred-meter scale filter cavity yields a good broadband sensitivity, with low complexity, and good robustness against optical loss. This study gives us a guideline for the near-term experimental research programs in enhancing the performance of future gravitational-wave detectors.

Haixing Miao; Huan Yang; Rana X Adhikari; Yanbei Chen

2013-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

28

H.E.S.S. upper limit on the very high energy gamma-ray emission from the globular cluster 47 Tucanae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Observations of the globular cluster 47 Tucanae (NGC 104), which contains at least 23 millisecond pulsars, were performed with the H.E.S.S. telescope system. The observations lead to an upper limit of F(E>800 GeV) conversion efficiency of spin-down power to gamma-ray photons or to relativistic leptons.

Aharonian, F

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Limiter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A limiter with a specially contoured front face is provided. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution. This limiter shape accommodates the various power scrape-off distances lambda p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V/sub parallel/, of the impacting particles.

Cohen, S.A.; Hosea, J.C.; Timberlake, J.R.

1984-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

30

Limiter  

SciTech Connect

A limiter with a specially contoured front face accommodates the various power scrape-off distances .lambda..sub.p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V.sub..parallel., of the impacting particles. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution.

Cohen, Samuel A. (Hopewell, NJ); Hosea, Joel C. (Princeton, NJ); Timberlake, John R. (Allentown, NJ)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Extending the Sensitivity to the Detection of WIMP Dark Matter with an Improved Understanding of the Limiting Neutron Backgrounds  

SciTech Connect

The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) uses position-sensitive Germanium and Silicon crystals in the direct detection of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) believed to constitute most of the dark matter in the Universe. WIMP interactions with matter being rare, identifying and eliminating known backgrounds is critical for detection. Event-by-event discrimination by the detectors rejects the predominant gamma and beta backgrounds while Monte Carlo simulations help estimate, and subtract, the contribution from the neutrons. This thesis describes the effort to understand neutron backgrounds as seen in the two stages of the CDMS search for WIMPs. The first stage of the experiment was at a shallow site at the Stanford Underground Facility where the limiting background came from high-energy neutrons produced by cosmic-ray muon interactions in the rock surrounding the cavern. Simulations of this background helped inform the analysis of data from an experimental run at this site and served as input for the background reduction techniques necessary to set new exclusion limits on the WIMP-nucleon cross-section, excluding new parameter space for WIMPs of masses 8-20 GeV/c{sup 2}. This thesis considers the simulation methods used as well as how various event populations in the data served as checks on the simulations to allow them to be used in the interpretation of the WIMP-search data. The studies also confirmed the presence of a limiting neutron background at the shallow site, necessitating the move to the 713-meter deep Soudan Underground Facility. Similar computer-based studies helped quantify the neutron background seen at the deeper site and informed the analysis of the data emerging from the first physics run of the experiment at Soudan. In conjunction with the WIMP-search and calibration data, the simulations confirmed that increased depth considerably reduced the neutron backgrounds seen, greatly improving the sensitivity to WIMP detection. The data run set an upper limit of 4 x 10{sup -43} on the WIMP-nucleon cross section for a WIMP mass of 60 GeV/c{sup 2} . Upper limits to the rate of background neutrons have also been determined.

Kamat, Sharmila; /Case Western Reserve U.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Upper limit on the flux of photons with energies above 10^19 eV using the Telescope Array surface detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We search for ultra-high energy photons by analyzing geometrical properties of shower fronts of events registered by the Telescope Array surface detector. By making use of an event-by-event statistical method, we derive upper limits on the absolute flux of primary photons with energies above 10^19, 10^19.5 and 10^20 eV based on the first three years of data taken.

T. Abu-Zayyad; R. Aida; M. Allen; R. Anderson; R. Azuma; E. Barcikowski; J. W. Belz; D. R. Bergman; S. A. Blake; R. Cady; B. G. Cheon; J. Chiba; M. Chikawa; E. J. Cho; W. R. Cho; H. Fujii; T. Fujii; T. Fukuda; M. Fukushima; D. Gorbunov; W. Hanlon; K. Hayashi; Y. Hayashi; N. Hayashida; K. Hibino; K. Hiyama; K. Honda; T. Iguchi; D. Ikeda; K. Ikuta; N. Inoue; T. Ishii; R. Ishimori; D. Ivanov; S. Iwamoto; C. C. H. Jui; K. Kadota; F. Kakimoto; O. Kalashev; T. Kanbe; K. Kasahara; H. Kawai; S. Kawakami; S. Kawana; E. Kido; H. B. Kim; H. K. Kim; J. H. Kim; J. H. Kim; K. Kitamoto; S. Kitamura; Y. Kitamura; K. Kobayashi; Y. Kobayashi; Y. Kondo; K. Kuramoto; V. Kuzmin; Y. J. Kwon; J. Lan; S. I. Lim; S. Machida; K. Martens; T. Matsuda; T. Matsuura; T. Matsuyama; J. N. Matthews; M. Minamino; K. Miyata; Y. Murano; I. Myers; K. Nagasawa; S. Nagataki; T. Nakamura; S. W. Nam; T. Nonaka; S. Ogio; M. Ohnishi; H. Ohoka; K. Oki; D. Oku; T. Okuda; A. Oshima; S. Ozawa; I. H. Park; M. S. Pshirkov; D. C. Rodriguez; S. Y. Roh; G. I. Rubtsov; D. Ryu; H. Sagawa; N. Sakurai; A. L. Sampson; L. M. Scott; P. D. Shah; F. Shibata; T. Shibata; H. Shimodaira; B. K. Shin; J. I. Shin; T. Shirahama; J. D. Smith; P. Sokolsky; B. T. Stokes; S. R. Stratton; T. Stroman; S. Suzuki; Y. Takahashi; M. Takeda; A. Taketa; M. Takita; Y. Tameda; H. Tanaka; K. Tanaka; M. Tanaka; S. B. Thomas; G. B. Thomson; P. Tinyakov; I. Tkachev; H. Tokuno; T. Tomida; S. Troitsky; Y. Tsunesada; K. Tsutsumi; Y. Tsuyuguchi; Y. Uchihori; S. Udo; H. Ukai; G. Vasiloff; Y. Wada; T. Wong; M. Wood; Y. Yamakawa; R. Yamane; H. Yamaoka; K. Yamazaki; J. Yang; Y. Yoneda; S. Yoshida; H. Yoshii; X. Zhou; R. Zollinger; Z. Zundel

2013-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

33

Combined CDF and D0 Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs-Boson Production with 2.1 - 5.4 fb-1 of Data  

SciTech Connect

We combine results from CDF and D0 on direct searches for a standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) in p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Compared to the previous Tevatron Higgs search combination more data have been added and some previously used channels have been reanalyzed to gain sensitivity. We use the latest parton distribution functions and gg {yields} H theoretical cross sections when comparing our limits to the SM predictions. With 2.0-4.8 fb{sup -1} of data analyzed at CDF, and 2.1-5.4 fb{sup -1} at D0, the 95% C.L. upper limits on Higgs boson production are a factor of 2.70 (0.94) times the SM cross section for a Higgs boson mass of m{sub H} = 115 (165) GeV/c{sup 2}. The corresponding median upper limits expected in the absence of Higgs boson production are 1.78 (0.89). The mass range excluded at 95% C.L. for a SM Higgs is 163 < m{sub H} < 166 GeV/c{sup 2}, with an expected exclusion of 159 < m{sub H} < 168 GeV/c{sup 2}.

Collaboration, The CDF; Collaboration, the D0; Physics, the Tevatron New; Group, Higgs Working

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Method for improving the limit of detection in a data signal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for improving the limit of detection for a data set in which experimental noise is uncorrelated along a given abscissa and an analytical signal is correlated to the abscissa, the steps comprising collecting the data set, converting the data set into a data signal including an analytical portion and the experimental noise portion, designating and adjusting a baseline of the data signal to center the experimental noise numerically about a zero reference, and integrating the data signal preserving the corresponding information for each point of the data signal. The steps of the method produce an enhanced integrated data signal which improves the limit of detection of the data signal.

Synovec, Robert E. (Ames, IA); Yueng, Edward S. (Ames, IA)

1989-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

35

An upper limit on the abundance of small trans-Neptunian objects from X-ray occultations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I describe the detection of 201 highly significant dips in the count rate of Sco X-1 from a search of some 500 ks of archival RXTE PCA data, which could be caused by TNO occultations. I show that most of these dips are ...

Jones, Tucker Anthony

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Upper limit on the gas density in the Beta-Pictoris system: On the effect of gas drag on the dust dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate in this paper the effect of gas drag on the dynamics of the dust particles in the edge-on Beta-Pictoris disc in order to derive an upper limit on the mass of gas in this system. Our study is motivated by the large uncertainties on the amount of gas in the Beta-Pictoris disc currently found in the literature. The dust particles are assumed to originate from a colliding annulus of planetesimals peaked around 100AU from the central star as proposed by Augereau et al.(2001). We consider the various gas densities that have been inferred from independent observing techniques and we discuss their impact on the dust dynamics and on the disc profile in scattered light along the midplane. We show that the observed scattered light profile of the disc cannot be properly reproduced if hydrogen gas number density at 117AU exceeds 10**4 cm**-3. This corresponds to an upper limit on the total gas mass of about 0.4 Mearth assuming the gas density profile inferred by Brandeker et al.(2004) and thus to a gas to dust mass ratio smaller than 1. Our approach therefore provides an independent diagnostic for a gas depletion in the Beta-Pictoris system relative to the dust disc. Such an approach could also be used to constrain the gas content of recently identified systems like the edge-on disc around AUmic.

P. Thebault; J. -C Augereau

2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

37

Combined CDF and D0 Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production with up to 8.6 fb-1 of Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We combine results from CDF and D0 on direct searches for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) in p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Compared to the previous Tevatron Higgs boson search combination more data have been added, additional channels have been incorporated, and some previously used channels have been reanalyzed to gain sensitivity. We use the MSTW08 parton distribution functions and the latest theoretical cross sections when comparing our limits to the SM predictions. With up to 8.2 fb{sup -1} of data analyzed at CDF and up to 8.6 fb{sup -1} at D0, the 95% C.L. our upper limits on Higgs boson production are factors of 1.17, 1.71, and 0.48 times the values of the SM cross section for Higgs bosons of mass m{sub H} = 115 GeV/c{sup 2}, 140 GeV/c{sup 2}, and 165 GeV/c{sup 2}, respectively. The corresponding median upper limits expected in the absence of Higgs boson production are 1.16, 1.16, and 0.57. There is a small ({approx} 1{sigma}) excess of data events with respect to the background estimation in searches for the Higgs boson in the mass range 125 < m{sub H} < 155 GeV/c{sup 2}. We exclude, at the 95% C.L., a new and larger region at high mass between 156 < m{sub H} < 177 GeV/c{sup 2}, with an expected exclusion region of 148 < m{sub H} < 180 GeV/c{sup 2}.

CDF, The; Collaborations, D0; Phenomena, the Tevatron New; Group, Higgs Working

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Combined CDF and D0 Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production with up to 8.6 fb-1 of Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We combine results from CDF and D0 on direct searches for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) in ppbar collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV. Compared to the previous Tevatron Higgs boson search combination more data have been added, additional channels have been incorporated, and some previously used channels have been reanalyzed to gain sensitivity. We use the MSTW08 parton distribution functions and the latest theoretical cross sections when comparing our limits to the SM predictions. With up to 8.2 fb-1 of data analyzed at CDF and up to 8.6 fb-1 at D0, the 95% C.L. our upper limits on Higgs boson production are factors of 1.17, 1.71, and 0.48 times the values of the SM cross section for Higgs bosons of mass m_H=115 GeV/c^2, 140 GeV/c^2, and 165 GeV/c^2, respectively. The corresponding median upper limits expected in the absence of Higgs boson production are 1.16, 1.16, and 0.57. There is a small (approx. 1 sigma) excess of data events with respect to the background estimation in searches for the Higgs boson in the mass range 125

The CDF; D0 Collaborations; the Tevatron New Phenomena; Higgs Working Group

2011-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

39

Method for improving the limit of detection in a data signal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a method for improving the limit of detection for a data set in which experimental noise is uncorrelated along a given abscissa and an analytical signal is correlated to the abscissa, the steps comprising collecting the data set, converting the data set into a data signal including an analytical portion and the experimental noise portion, designating and adjusting a baseline of the data signal to center the experimental noise numerically about a zero reference, and integrating the data signal preserving the corresponding information for each point of the data signal. The steps of the method produce an enhanced integrated data signal which improves the limit of detection of the data signal. 8 figs.

Synovec, R.E.; Yueng, E.S.

1989-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

40

TWO UPPER LIMITS ON THE ROSSITER-MCLAUGHLIN EFFECT, WITH DIFFERING IMPLICATIONS: WASP-1 HAS A HIGH OBLIQUITY AND WASP-2 IS INDETERMINATE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present precise radial-velocity (RV) measurements of WASP-1 and WASP-2 throughout transits of their giant planets. Our goal was to detect the Rossiter-McLaughlin (RM) effect, the anomalous RV observed during eclipses of rotating stars, which can be used to study the obliquities of planet-hosting stars. For WASP-1, a weak signal of a prograde orbit was detected with {approx}2{sigma} confidence, and for WASP-2 no signal was detected. The resulting upper bounds on the RM amplitude have different implications for these two systems because of the contrasting transit geometries and the stellar types. Because WASP-1 is an F7V star, and such stars are typically rapid rotators, the most probable reason for the suppression of the RM effect is that the star is viewed nearly pole-on. This implies that the WASP-1 star has a high obliquity with respect to the edge-on planetary orbit. Because WASP-2 is a K1V star, and is expected to be a slow rotator, no firm conclusion can be drawn about the stellar obliquity. Our data and our analysis contradict an earlier claim that WASP-2b has a retrograde orbit, thereby revoking this system's status as an exception to the pattern that cool stars have low obliquities.

Albrecht, Simon; Winn, Joshua N.; Hirano, Teruyuki [Department of Physics, and Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Johnson, John Asher [California Institute of Technology, Department of Astrophysics, MC249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Paul Butler, R. [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5241 Broad Branch Road NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States); Crane, Jeffrey D.; Shectman, Stephen A.; Thompson, Ian B. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Narita, Norio [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Sato, Bun'ei [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Enya, Keigo [Department of Infrared Astrophysics, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Fischer, Debra [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "upper detection limit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Limitations for detecting small-scale faults using the coherency analysis of seismic data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coherency analyzes the trace to trace amplitude similarities recorded by seismic waves. Coherency algorithms have been used to identify the structural or stratigraphic features of an area but the limitations for detecting small-scale features are not known. These limitations become extremely important when interpreting coherency within poorly acquired or processed data sets. In order to obtain a better understanding of the coherency limitations, various synthetic seismic data sets were created. The sensitivity of the coherency algorithms to variations in wave frequency, signal-to-noise ratio and fault throw was investigated. Correlation between the coherency values of a faulted reflector and the known offset shows that coherency has the ability to detect the presence of various scale features that may be previously thought to be below seismic resolution or difficult to discriminate with conventional interpretation methods. Coherency values had a smaller standard deviation and were less sensitive to noise when processed with a temporal window length less than one period. A fault could be detected by coherency when the signal-to-noise ratio was >3. A fault could also be detected as long as the throw-to-wavelength ratio was >5% or two-way traveltime-toperiod >10%. Therefore, this study suggests that coherency has the ability to detect a fault as long as the frequency of the data imaging that fault has a period no greater than one order of magnitude to the traveltime through the fault and that the signal can easily be distinguished from noise. Results from application of the coherency analysis were applied to the characterization of a very deep fault and fracture system imaged by a field seismic data set. A series of reverse and strike-slip faults were detected and mapped. Magnitudes of the throws for these faults were not known, but subtle amplitude anomalies in seismic sections confirmed the coherency analysis. The results of this study suggest that coherency has demonstrated an ability to detect features that would normally beoverlooked using traditional interpretation methods and has many future implications for poorly imaged seismic areas, such as sub-salt.

Barnett, David Benjamin

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Combined CDF and D0 Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs-Boson Production with up to 6.7 fb$^{-1}$ of Data  

SciTech Connect

We combine results from CDF and D0 on direct searches for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) in p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Compared to the previous Tevatron Higgs search combination more data have been added, additional new channels have been incorporated, and some previously used channels have been reanalyzed to gain sensitivity. We use the latest parton distribution functions and gg {yields} H theoretical cross sections when comparing our limits to the SM predictions. With up to 5.9 fb{sup -1} of data analyzed at CDF, and up to 6.7 fb{sup -1} at D0, the 95% C.L. upper limits on Higgs boson production are factors of 1.56 and 0.68 the values of the SM cross section for a Higgs boson mass of m{sub H} = 115 GeV/c{sup 2} and 165 GeV/c{sup 2}. We exclude, at the 95% C.L., a new and larger region at high mass between 158 < m{sub H} < 175 GeV/c{sup 2}.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

System for detecting and limiting electrical ground faults within electrical devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrical ground fault detection and limitation system for employment with a nuclear reactor utilizing a liquid metal coolant. Elongate electromagnetic pumps submerged within the liquid metal coolant and electrical support equipment experiencing an insulation breakdown occasion the development of electrical ground fault current. Without some form of detection and control, these currents may build to damaging power levels to expose the pump drive components to liquid metal coolant such as sodium with resultant undesirable secondary effects. Such electrical ground fault currents are detected and controlled through the employment of an isolated power input to the pumps and with the use of a ground fault control conductor providing a direct return path from the affected components to the power source. By incorporating a resistance arrangement with the ground fault control conductor, the amount of fault current permitted to flow may be regulated to the extent that the reactor may remain in operation until maintenance may be performed, notwithstanding the existence of the fault. Monitors such as synchronous demodulators may be employed to identify and evaluate fault currents for each phase of a polyphase power, and control input to the submerged pump and associated support equipment.

Gaubatz, Donald C. (Cupertino, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Combined CDF and D0 Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production with up to 8.2 fb-1 of Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We combine results from CDF and D0's direct searches for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) produced in p-pbar collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV. The results presented here include those channels which are most sensitive to Higgs bosons with mass between 130 and 200 GeV/c^2, namely searches targeted at Higgs boson decays to W+W-, although acceptance for decays into tau+tau- and gamma gamma is included. Compared to the previous Tevatron Higgs search combination, more data have been added and the analyses have been improved to gain sensitivity. We use the MSTW08 parton distribution functions and the latest gg to H theoretical cross section predictions when testing for the presence of a SM Higgs boson. With up to 7.1 fb-1 of data analyzed at CDF, and up to 8.2 fb-1 at D0, the 95% C.L. upper limits on Higgs boson production is a factor of 0.54 times the SM cross section for a Higgs boson mass of 165 GeV/c^2. We exclude at the 95% C.L. the region 158

The CDF; D0 Collaborations; the TEVNPHWG Working Group

2011-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

45

Combined CDF and D0 Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production with up to 8.2 fb$^{-1}$ of Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We combine results from CDF and D0's direct searches for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) produced in p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The results presented here include those channels which are most sensitive to Higgs bosons with mass between 130 and 200 GeV/c{sup 2}, namely searches targeted at Higgs boson decays to W{sup +}W{sup -}, although acceptance for decays into {tau}{sup |+} {tau}{sup -} and {gamma}{gamma} is included. Compared to the previous Tevatron Higgs search combination, more data have been added and the analyses have been improved to gain sensitivity. We use the MSTW08 parton distribution functions and the latest gg {yields} H theoretical cross section predictions when testing for the presence of a SM Higgs boson. With up to 7.1 fb{sup -1} of data analyzed at CDF, and up to 8.2 fb{sup -1} at D0, the 95% C.L. upper limits on Higgs boson production is a factor of 0.54 times the SM cross section for a Higgs boson mass of 165 GeV/c{sup 2}. We exclude at the 95% C.L. the region 158 < m{sub H} < 173 GeV/c{sup 2}.

Aaltonen, T.; Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Adelman, J.; Aguilo, E.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys. /Dubna, JINR /Oklahoma U. /Michigan State U. /Tata Inst. /Illinois U., Chicago /Florida State U. /Chicago U., EFI /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /St. Petersburg, INP /Illinois U., Urbana /Sao Paulo, IFT /Munich U. /University Coll. London /Oxford U. /St. Petersburg, INP /Duke U. /Kyungpook Natl. U. /Chonnam Natl. U. /Florida U. /Osaka City U.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Detecting Discontinuities in Time Series of Upper-Air Data: Development and Demonstration of an Adaptive Filter Technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recognizing the need for a long-term database to address the problem of global climate change, the National Climatic Data Center has embarked on a project called the Comprehensive Aerological Reference Data Set to create an upper-air database ...

I. Zurbenko; P. S. Porter; R. Gui; S. T. Rao; J. Y. Ku; R. E. Eskridge

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Tales from the tail: Robust estimation of moments of environmental data with one-sided detection limits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Estimating the means and standard deviations of environmental data remains a great challenge because a substantial percentage of observations lies below or above detection limits. The inadequacy of several common, ad hoc estimation procedures is clear; ... Keywords: Extreme value theory, Generalized Pareto distribution, Peaks over threshold, Rényi representation theorem, Tail index

Ping-Hung Hsieh

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Carbon nanotube synthesis and detection : limiting the environmental impact of novel technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Driven by commercial promise, the carbon nanotube (CNT) industry is growing rapidly, yet little is known about the potential environmental impacts of these novel materials. In particular, there are no methods to detect ...

Plata, Desirée L

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

TWO UPPER LIMITS ON THE ROSSITER-MCLAUGHLIN EFFECT, WITH DIFFERING IMPLICATIONS: WASP-1 HAS A HIGH OBLIQUITY AND WASP-2 IS INDETERMINATE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present precise radial-velocity (RV) measurements of WASP-1 and WASP-2 throughout transits of their giant planets. Our goal was to detect the Rossiter-McLaughlin (RM) effect, the anomalous RV observed during eclipses ...

Albrecht, Simon H.

50

Combined CDF and Dzero Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production at High Mass (155-200 GeV/c2) with 3 fb-1 of data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We combine results from CDF and DO searches for a standard model Higgs boson in ppbar collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron, at sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV. With 3.0 fb-1 of data analyzed at CDF, and at DO, the 95% C.L. upper limits on Higgs boson production are a factor of 1.2, 1.0 and 1.3 higher than the SM cross section for a Higgs boson mass of m_{H}=$165, 170 and 175 GeV, respectively. We exclude at 95% C.L. a standard model Higgs boson of m_H=170 GeV. Based on simulation, the ratios of the corresponding median expected upper limit to the Standard Model cross section are 1.2, 1.4 and 1.7. Compared to the previous Higgs Tevatron combination, more data and refined analysis techniques have been used. These results extend significantly the individual limits of each experiment and provide new knowledge on the mass of the standard model Higgs boson beyond the LEP direct searches.

Tevatron New Phenomena; Higgs working group; CDF Collaboration; D0 Collaboration

2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

51

Detection, size, measurement and structural analysis limits for the 2MASS, UKIDSS-LAS & VISTA VIKING surveys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 2MASS, UKIDSS-LAS and VISTA VIKING surveys have all now observed the GAMA 9hr region in the $K_s$ band. Here we compare the detection rates, photometry, basic size measurements, and single-component GALFIT structural measurements for a sample of 37,591 galaxies. We explore the sensitivity limits where the data agree for a variety of issues including: detection, star-galaxy separation, photometric measurements, size and ellipticity measurements, and S\\'{e}rsic measurements. We find that 2MASS fails to detect at least 20% of the galaxy population within all magnitude bins, however for those that are detected we find photometry is robust ($\\pm$ 0.2 mag) to 14.7 AB mag and star-galaxy separation to 14.8 AB mag. For UKIDSS-LAS we find incompleteness starts to enter at a flux limit of 18.9 AB mag, star-galaxy separation is robust to 16.3 AB mag and structural measurements are robust to 17.7 AB mag. VISTA VIKING data is complete to approximately 20.0 AB mag and structural measurements appear robust to 18.8 AB ma...

Andrews, Stephen K; Driver, Simon P; Robotham, Aaron S G

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Quantum-limited detection of millimeter waves using superconducting tunnel junctions  

SciTech Connect

The quasiparticle tunneling current in a superconductor-insulator- superconductor (SIS) tunnel junction is highly nonlinear. Such a nonlinearity can be used to mix two millimeter wave signals to produce a signal at a much lower intermediate frequency. We have constructed several millimeter and sub-millimeter wave SIS mixers in order to study high frequency response of the quasiparticle tunneling current and the physics of high frequency mixing. We have made the first measurement of the out-of-phase tunneling currents in an SIS tunnel junction. We have developed a method that allows us to determine the parameters of the high frequency embedding circuit by studying the details of the pumped I-V curve. We have constructed a 80--110 GHz waveguide-based mixer test apparatus that allows us to accurately measure the gain and added noise of the SIS mixer under test. Using extremely high quality tunnel junctions, we have measured an added mixer noise of 0.61 {plus_minus} 0.36 quanta, which is within 25 percent of the quantum limit imposed by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. This measured performance is in excellent agreement with that predicted by Tucker`s theory of quantum mixing. We have also studied quasioptically coupled millimeter- and submillimeter-wave mixers using several types of integrated tuning elements. 83 refs.

Mears, C.A.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Quantum-limited detection of millimeter waves using superconducting tunnel junctions  

SciTech Connect

The quasiparticle tunneling current in a superconductor-insulator- superconductor (SIS) tunnel junction is highly nonlinear. Such a nonlinearity can be used to mix two millimeter wave signals to produce a signal at a much lower intermediate frequency. We have constructed several millimeter and sub-millimeter wave SIS mixers in order to study high frequency response of the quasiparticle tunneling current and the physics of high frequency mixing. We have made the first measurement of the out-of-phase tunneling currents in an SIS tunnel junction. We have developed a method that allows us to determine the parameters of the high frequency embedding circuit by studying the details of the pumped I-V curve. We have constructed a 80--110 GHz waveguide-based mixer test apparatus that allows us to accurately measure the gain and added noise of the SIS mixer under test. Using extremely high quality tunnel junctions, we have measured an added mixer noise of 0.61 {plus minus} 0.36 quanta, which is within 25 percent of the quantum limit imposed by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. This measured performance is in excellent agreement with that predicted by Tucker's theory of quantum mixing. We have also studied quasioptically coupled millimeter- and submillimeter-wave mixers using several types of integrated tuning elements. 83 refs.

Mears, C.A.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Kinetics of heterogeneous nucleation in supersaturated vapor: Fundamental limits to neutral particle detection revisited  

SciTech Connect

We examine the nucleated (with barrier) activation of perfectly wetting (zero contact angle) particles ranging from essentially bulk size down to approximately 1-nm mass diameter. While similar studies trace back to the pioneering work of Fletcher, we present here a novel approach to the analysis based on general area constructions that enable key thermodynamic properties, including surface and bulk contributions to nucleation work, to be interpreted geometrically with reference to the Kelvin curve. The kinetics of activation are described in more detail in terms of the mean first passage time (MFPT) for barrier crossing. MFPT theory and benchmark calculations are used to develop and test a new approximate-but-simpler-to-use analytic expression for the barrier crossing rate. The present study is motivated by recent condensation particle counter (CPC) studies that appear to finally establish the long-predicted detection of 'sub-Kelvin' particles in the nano-size regime. Corresponding states thermodynamic and kinetic scaling approaches are used to facilitate the correlation and selection of optimal CPC working fluids and operating conditions based on a new metric for heterogeneous nucleation, the signal-to-noise ratio, and physical and chemical properties.

McGraw R.; Wang, J.; Kuang, C.

2012-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

55

Combined CDF and D0 upper limits on $gg\\to H\\to W^+W^-$ and constraints on the Higgs boson mass in fourth-generation fermion models with up to 8.2 fb$^{-1}$ of data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We combine results from searches by the CDF and D0 Collaborations for a standard model Higgs boson (H) in the processes gg {yields} H {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -} and gg {yields} H {yields} ZZ in p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. With 8.2 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity analyzed at CDF and 8.1 fb{sup -1} at D0, the 95% C.L. upper limit on {sigma}(gg {yields} H) x {Beta}(H {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -}) is 1.01 pb at m{sub H} = 120 GeV, 0.40 pb at m{sub H} = 165 GeV, and 0.47 pb at m{sub H} = 200 GeV. Assuming the presence of a fourth sequential generation of fermions with large masses, we exclude at the 95% Confidence Level a standard-model-like Higgs boson with a mass between 124 and 286 GeV.

Benjamin, Doug; /Tufts U.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Detection of Nonprecipitating Clouds with the WSR-88D: A Theoretical and Experimental Survey of Capabilities and Limitations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Theoretical calculations and experiments verify that the National Weather Service WSR-88D radars have the sensitivity to detect nonprecipitating clouds, but show that significant obstacles impair the generality of this cloud sensing technique. ...

Mark A. Miller; Johannes Verlinde; Craig V. Gilbert; Gregory J. Lehenbauer; Jeffrey S. Tongue; Eugene E. Clothiaux

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

WIMP Dark Matter Limit-Direct Detection Data and Sensitivity Plots from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search II and the University of California at Santa Barbara  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Expectations for non-baryonic dark matter are founded principally in Big Bang nucleosynthesis calculations, which indicate that the missing mass of the universe is not likely to be baryonic. The supersymmetric standard model (SUSY) offers a promising framework for expectations of particle species which could satisfy the observed properties of dark matter. WIMPs are the most likely SUSY candidate for a dark matter particle. The High Energy Physics Group at University of California, Santa Barbara, is part of the CDMSII Collaboration and have provided the Interactive Plotter for WIMP Dark Matter Limit-Direct Detection Data on their website. They invite other collaborations working on dark matter research to submit datasets and, as a result, have more than 150 data sets now available for use with the plotting tool. The published source of the data is provided with each data set.

58

Tolerance Limits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... LIMITS Y ** *** 2-SIDED NORMAL TOLERANCE LIMITS: XBAR +- K*S REFERENCE--CRC HANDBOOK, PAGES 32-35 ...

2010-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

59

The Pionic Contribution to Diffuse Gamma Rays: Upper Limits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diffuse gamma rays probe the highest-energy processes at the largest scales. Here we derive model-independent constraints on the hadronic contribution to the Galactic and extragalactic gamma-ray spectra in the energy range 50 MeV < E_gamma < 10 GeV. The hadronic component is dominated by emission from neutral pions, with a characteristic spectrum symmetric about m_{pi^0}/2. We exploit the well-defined properties of the pion decay spectrum to quantify the maximum pionic fraction of the observed gamma-ray intensity. We find that the Galactic spectrum above 30 MeV can be at most about 50% pionic. The maximum pionic contribution to the extragalactic spectrum is energy dependent; it also depends on the redshift range over which the sources are distributed, ranging from as low as about 20% for pions generated very recently, to as much as 90% if the pions are generated around redshift 10. The implications of these constraints for models of gamma-ray and neutrino emission are briefly discussed.

Tijana Prodanovic; Brian D. Fields

2004-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

60

Upper Stage Explosion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The explosion of a failed launch vehicle upper stage on 16 October created thousands of new debris which pose collision risks to hundreds of satellites operating in low Earth orbit (LEO), including the International Space Station (ISS). Fortunately, the threat will be relatively short-lived with the majority of the debris expected to reenter the atmosphere within one year. The explosion of the Proton Briz-M stage (International Designator 2012-044C, U.S. Satellite Number 38746) occurred just a day after the publication of the October 2012 issue of the Orbital Debris Quarterly News, which contained an article describing the potential for just such a breakup (ODQN, October 2012, pp. 2-3). The stage

Places Leo; Satellites Risk

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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61

Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup The Upper Los Alamos Canyon Project involves cleaning up hazardous materials left over from some of the Laboratory's earliest activities. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Located along Los Alamos Canyon from 7th Street to the Pajarito Ski Hill, the Upper Los Alamos Canyon Project involves examining sites in present and former Laboratory technical areas to see if any further environmental cleanup actions are needed. If not, the Laboratory can apply to have these sites removed permanently from LANL's Hazardous Waste Permit, meaning that no further actions are needed at those sites. Among the 115 sites included in the Upper LA Canyon Project, 54 have been

62

Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

septic tanks, sanitary and industrial waste lines, storm drains, incinerators, transformer sites, and areas in which soil has been contaminated. The Upper Los Alamos Canyon...

63

Self field triggered superconducting fault current limiter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A superconducting fault current limiter array with a plurality of superconductor elements arranged in a meanding array having an even number of supconductors parallel to each other and arranged in a plane that is parallel to an odd number of the plurality of superconductors, where the odd number of supconductors are parallel to each other and arranged in a plane that is parallel to the even number of the plurality of superconductors, when viewed from a top view. The even number of superconductors are coupled at the upper end to the upper end of the odd number of superconductors. A plurality of lower shunt coils each coupled to the lower end of each of the even number of superconductors and a plurality of upper shunt coils each coupled to the upper end of each of the odd number of superconductors so as to generate a generally orthoganal uniform magnetic field during quenching using only the magenetic field generated by the superconductors.

Tekletsadik, Kasegn D. (Rexford, NY)

2008-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

64

New Limits on the Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Neutrino Flux from the ANITA Experiment  

SciTech Connect

We report initial results of the first flight of the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA-1) 2006-2007 Long Duration Balloon flight, which searched for evidence of a diffuse flux of cosmic neutrinos above energies of E{sub v} = 3 x 10{sup 18} eV. ANITA-1 flew for 35 days looking for radio impulses due to the Askaryan effect in neutrino-induced electromagnetic showers within the Antarctic ice sheets. We report here on our initial analysis, which was performed as a blind search of the data. No neutrino candidates are seen, with no detected physics background. We set model-independent limits based on this result. Upper limits derived from our analysis rule out the highest cosmogenic neutrino models. In a background horizontal-polarization channel, we also detect six events consistent with radio impulses from ultrahigh energy extensive air showers.

Gorham, P.W.; Allison, P.; /Hawaii U.; Barwick, S.W.; /UC, Irvine; Beatty, J.J.; /Ohio State U.; Besson, D.Z.; /Kansas U.; Binns, W.R.; /Washington U., St. Louis; Chen, C.; /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U.; Chen, P.; /SLAC; Clem, J.M.; /Delaware U.; Connolly, A.; /University Coll. London; Dowkontt, P.F.; /Washington U., St. Louis; DuVernois, M.A.; /Minnesota U.; Field, R.C.; /SLAC; Goldstein, D.; /UC, Irvine; Goodhue, A.; /UCLA; Hast, C.; /SLAC; Hebert, C.L.; /Hawaii U.; Hoover, S.; /UCLA; Israel, M.H.; /Washington U., St. Louis; Kowalski, J.; Learned, J.G.; /Hawaii U. /Caltech, JPL /Hawaii U. /Minnesota U. /Hawaii U. /Ohio State U. /Hawaii U. /UC, Irvine /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /Caltech, JPL /SLAC /University Coll. London /Ohio State U. /SLAC /Hawaii U. /UCLA /Delaware U. /Hawaii U. /SLAC /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Dynamical and Physical Processes Leading to Tropical Cyclone Intensification under Upper-Level Trough Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rapid intensification of Tropical Cyclone (TC) Dora (2007, southwest Indian Ocean) under upper-level trough forcing is investigated. TC–trough interaction is simulated using a limited-area operational numerical weather prediction model. The ...

Marie-Dominique Leroux; Matthieu Plu; David Barbary; Frank Roux; Philippe Arbogast

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Observations of Planetary Mixed Rossby–Gravity Waves in the Upper Stratosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observational evidence is presented for planetary scale (zonal wave number 1–2) mixed Rossby–gravity (MRG) waves in the equatorial upper stratosphere (35–50 km). These waves are detected in Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS) ...

William J. Randel; Byron A. Boville; John C. Gille

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

The Comprehensive Historical Upper-Air Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To better understand variability in weather and climate, it is vital to address past atmospheric circulation. This need requires meteorological information not just from the surface but also at upper levels. Current global upper-level datasets ...

A. Stickler; A. N. Grant; T. Ewen; T. F. Ross; R. S. Vose; J. Comeaux; P. Bessemoulin; K. Jylhä; W. K. Adam; P. Jeannet; A. Nagurny; A. M. Sterin; R. Allan; G. P. Compo; T. Griesser; S. Brönnimann

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Process Limits on Euclid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Process Limits Process Limits Limit Hard Soft core file size (blocks) 0 unlimited data seg size (kbytes) unlimited unlimited scheduling priority 0 0 file size (blocks) unlimited...

69

Upper Estimates for Banach Spaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the relationship of dominance for sequences and trees in Banach spaces. In the context of sequences, we prove that domination of weakly null sequences is a uniform property. More precisely, if $(v_i)$ is a normalized basic sequence and $X$ is a Banach space such that every normalized weakly null sequence in $X$ has a subsequence that is dominated by $(v_i)$, then there exists a uniform constant $C\\geq1$ such that every normalized weakly null sequence in $X$ has a subsequence that is $C$-dominated by $(v_i)$. We prove as well that if $V=(v_i)_{i=1}^\\infty$ satisfies some general conditions, then a Banach space $X$ with separable dual has subsequential $V$ upper tree estimates if and only if it embeds into a Banach space with a shrinking FDD which satisfies subsequential $V$ upper block estimates. We apply this theorem to Tsirelson spaces to prove that for all countable ordinals $\\alpha$ there exists a Banach space $X$ with Szlenk index at most $\\omega^{\\alpha \\omega +1}$ which is universal for all Banach spaces with Szlenk index at most $\\omega^{\\alpha\\omega}$.

Freeman, Daniel B.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Real-Time Optical Flux Limits From Gamma-Ray Bursts Measured By The GROCSE Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Gamma-Ray Optical Counterpart Search Experiment (GROCSE) presents new experimental upper limits on the optical flux from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Our experiment consisted of a fully-automated very wide-field opto-electronic detection system that imaged locations of GRBs within a few seconds of receiving trigger signals provided by BATSE’s real-time burst coordinate distribution network (BACODINE). The experiment acquired 3800 observing hours, recording 22 gamma-ray burst triggers within ?30 s of the start of the burst event. Some of these bursts were imaged while gamma-ray radiation was being detected by BATSE. We identified no optical counterparts associated with gamma-ray bursts amongst these events at the mV ? 7.0 to 8.5 sensitivity level. We find the ratio of the upper limit to the V-band optical flux, F?, to the gamma-ray fluence, ??, from these data to be 2 × 10?18 gamma rays: bursts – 3 – 1.

H. S. Park; E. Ables; S. D. Barthelmy; R. M. Bionta; P. S. Butterworth; T. L. Cline; D. H. Ferguson; G. J. Fishman; N. Gehrels; K. Hurley; C. Kouveliotou; B. C. Lee; C. A. Meegan; L. L. Ott; E. L. Parker Received Accepted

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Upper bounds on r-mode amplitudes from observations of LMXB neutron stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The r-mode oscillations of neutron stars can be potentially powerful probes of cold ultra-dense matter. In this paper we present upper limits on the amplitude of r-mode oscillations, and their gravitational-radiation-induced spin-down rates, in low mass X-ray binary (LMXB) neutron stars under the assumption that the quiescent neutron star luminosity is powered by dissipation from a steady-state r-mode. We compute results for neutron star models constructed with the APR equation of state for masses of 1.4, 2 and 2.21 M_{sun}. For the lower mass models (1.4 and 2 M_{sun}) we find dimensionless r-mode amplitudes in the range from about 1x10^{-8} to 1.5x10^{-6}. For the accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar (AMXP) sources with known quiescent spin-down rates these limits suggest that about 1% of the observed rate can be due to an unstable r-mode. Interestingly, the AMXP with the highest amplitude limit, NGC 6640, could have an r-mode spin-down rate comparable to the observed, quiescent rate for SAX J1808-3658. Thus, quiescent spin-down measurements for this source would be particularly interesting. For all the sources considered here our amplitude limits suggest that their gravitational wave signals are likely too weak for detection with Advanced LIGO. Our highest mass model (2.21 M_{sun}) can support enhanced, direct Urca neutrino emission in the core and thus can have higher r-mode amplitudes. Indeed, the inferred r-mode spin-down rates at these higher amplitudes are inconsistent with the observed spin-down rates for some of the sources, such as IGR J00291+5934 and XTE J1751-305. This can be used to place an upper limit on the masses of these sources if they are made of normal nuclear matter, or alternatively it could be used to probe the existence of exotic matter in them if their masses were known.

Simin Mahmoodifar; Tod Strohmayer

2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

72

Analysis of Upper-Tropospheric Water Vapor Brightness Temperatures from SSM/T2, HIRS, and GMS-5 VISSR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite microwave and infrared instruments sensitive to upper-tropospheric water vapor (UTWV) are compared using both simulated and observed cloud-cleared brightness temperatures (Tb’s). To filter out cloudy scenes, a cloud detection algorithm ...

Wesley Berg; John J. Bates; Darren L. Jackson

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Performance limits of heliostat fields  

SciTech Connect

Geometric and thermodynamic arguments are used to derive upper limits on the performance of a solar energy collection system, consisting of an axisymmetric heliostat field, a solar tower, secondary optics and a black receiver. Performance limits on collected power, concentration, and work output are presented. Performance of tower systems with several secondary optics options is compared: tower-top Compound Parabolic Concentrator (CPC), Tailored Edge-Ray Concentrator (TERC) approximated by a cone, and Cassegrainian with ground-level CPC or Compound Elliptic Concentrator (CEC). Optimized ray tracing is used to generate the design parameters of the secondary concentrators that yield the highest optical efficiency. The results show that the tower-top Cone provides the best performance regarding both concentration and efficiency, except for very large fields. The Cassegrainian designs come in second, but become equal and even better than the Cone for large fields. The results for the Cassegrainian are sensitive to the value of the reflectivity, due to the additional reflections incurred. The choice of a CEC is better than a CPC for the terminal concentration in a Cassegrainian system, but the difference is small. The suitability of the different design options for high-temperature solar applications is discussed. The recommendations regarding optical configuration depend on field size, as well as on application-specific constraints.

Kribus, A.; Krupkin, V.; Yogev, A. [Weizmann Inst. of Science, Rehovot (Israel). Environmental Sciences and Energy Research Dept.; Spirkl, W. [Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Sektion Physik

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Upper critical field of Mo-Ni heterostructures  

SciTech Connect

Upper critical field and its anisotropy have been measured on two very short wavelength Mo-Ni heterostructures of different degrees of perfection, lambda = 13.8A (disordered structure) and lambda = 16.6A (layered structure). In both cases the parallel critical field has an unexpected temperature dependence, a large and temperature dependent anisotropy, and over 60% enhancement over the Clogston-Chandrasekhar limit. Data are fit to the Werthamer-Helfand-Hohenberg theory and the spin-orbit scattering times are found to be 1.79 x 10 T s and 2 x 10 T s, respectively.

Uher, C.; Watson, W.J.; Cohn, J.L.; Schuller, I.K.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Experimental measurements and modeling prediction of flammability limits of binary hydrocarbon mixtures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flammability limit is a significant safety issue for industrial processes. A certain amount of flammability limit data for pure hydrocarbons are available in the literature, but for industrial applications, there are conditions including different combinations of fuels at standard and non-standard conditions, in which the flammability limit data are scarce and sometimes unavailable. This research is two-fold: (i) Performing experimental measurements to estimate the lower flammability limits and upper flammability limits of binary hydrocarbon mixtures, conducting experimental data numerical analysis to quantitatively characterize the flammability limits of these mixtures with parameters, such as component compositions, flammability properties of pure hydrocarbons, and thermo-kinetic values; (ii) Estimating flammability limits of binary hydrocarbon mixtures through CFT-V modeling prediction (calculated flame temperature at constant volume), which is based on a comprehensive consideration of energy conservation. For the experimental part, thermal detection was used in this experiment. The experimental results indicate that the experimental results fit Le Chatelier’s Law within experimental uncertainty at the lower flammability limit condition. At the upper flammability limit condition, Le Chatelier’s Law roughly fits the saturated hydrocarbon mixture data, while with mixtures that contain one or more unsaturated components, a modification of Le Chatelier’s is preferred to fit the experimental data. The easy and efficient way to modify Le Chatelier’s Law is to power the molar percentage concentrations of hydrocarbon components. For modeling prediction part, the CFT-V modeling is an extended modification of CAFT modeling at constant volume and is significantly related to the reaction vessel configuration. This modeling prediction is consistent with experimental observation and Le Chatelier’s Law at the concentrations of lower flammability limits. When the quenching effect is negligible, this model can be simplified by ignoring heat loss from the reaction vessel to the external surroundings. Specifically, when the total mole changes in chemical reactions can be neglected and the quenching effect is small, CFTV modeling can be simplified to CAFT modeling.

Zhao, Fuman

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Upper Scioto Valley School | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Valley School Valley School Jump to: navigation, search Name Upper Scioto Valley School Facility Upper Scioto Valley School Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Upper Scioto Valley Schools Energy Purchaser Upper Scioto Valley Schools Location McGuffey OH Coordinates 40.691542°, -83.786353° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.691542,"lon":-83.786353,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

77

PV Frontogenesis and Upper-Tropospheric Fronts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Upper-tropospheric fronts and frontogenesis are viewed from a potental vorticity (PV) perspective. The rudiments of this approach are to regard such a front as a zone of strong PV gradient on isentropic surfaces, and to treat the accompanying ...

H. C. Davies; A. M. Rossa

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

A Neutrally Buoyant, Upper Ocean Sediment Trap  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors have designed and deployed a neutrally buoyant sediment trap (NBST) intended for use in the upper ocean. The aim was to minimize hydrodynamic flow interference by making a sediment trap that drifted freely with the ambient current. ...

James R. Valdes; James F. Price

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Balanced and Unbalanced Upper-Level Frontogenesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamics of frontogenesis at upper levels are investigated using a hierarchy of three numerical models. They are, in order of decreasing sophistication, the anelastic (AN), the geostrophic momentum (GM), and the quasi-geostrophic (QG) ...

Michael J. Reeder; Daniel Keyser

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

About Upper Great Plains Regional Office  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Upper Great Plains Region carries out Western's mission in Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Iowa, and Minnesota. We sell more than 9 billion kilowatt-hours of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "upper detection limit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Schlumberger soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River Valleys, Idaho and Utah Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Schlumberger soundings in the Upper...

82

Upper limits on X-ray emission from two rotating radio transients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

X-ray emission from the enigmatic rotating radio transients (RRATs) offers a vital clue to understanding these objects and how they relate to the greater neutron star population. An X-ray counterpart to RRAT J1819?1458 is ...

Kaplan, D. L.

83

Upper Energy Limit of Heavy Baryon Chiral Perturbation Theory in Neutral Pion Photoproduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the availability of the new neutral pion photoproduction from the proton data from the A2 and CB-TAPS Collaborations at Mainz it is mandatory to revisit Heavy Baryon Chiral Perturbation Theory (HBChPT) and address the extraction of the partial waves as well as other issues such as the value of the low-energy constants, the energy range where the calculation provides a good agreement with the data and the impact of unitarity. We find that, within the current experimental status, HBChPT with the fitted LECs gives a good agreement with the existing neutral pion photoproduction data up to $\\sim$170 MeV and that imposing unitarity does not improve this picture. Above this energy the data call for further improvement in the theory such as the explicit inclusion of the \\Delta (1232). We also find that data and multipoles can be well described up to $\\sim$185 MeV with Taylor expansions in the partial waves up to first order in pion energy.

C. Fernandez-Ramirez; A. M. Bernstein

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

84

Detector limitations, STAR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Every detector has limitations in terms of solid angle, particular technologies chosen, cracks due to mechanical structure, etc. If all of the presently planned parts of STAR [Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC] were in place, these factors would not seriously limit our ability to exploit the spin physics possible in RHIC. What is of greater concern at the moment is the construction schedule for components such as the Electromagnetic Calorimeters, and the limited funding for various levels of triggers.

Underwood, D. G.

1998-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

85

Combined SM Higgs Limits at the Tevatron  

SciTech Connect

We combine results from CDF and D{sup 0} on direct searches for a standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) in p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Compared to the previous Higgs Tevatron combination, more data and new channels WH {yields} {tau}{nu}b{bar b}, VH {yields} {tau}{tau}b{bar b}/jj{tau}{tau}, VH {yields} jjb{bar b}, t{bar t}H {yields} t{bar t}b{bar b} have been added. Most previously used channels have been reanalyzed to gain sensitivity. We use the latest parton distribution functions and gg {yields} H theoretical cross sections when comparing our limits to the SM predictions. With 2.0-3.6 fb{sup -1} of data analyzed at CDF, and 0.9-4.2 fb{sup -1} at D{sup 0}, the 95% C.L. upper limits on Higgs boson production are a factor of 2.5 (0.86) times the SM cross section for a Higgs boson mass of m{sub H} = 115 (165) GeV/c{sup 2}. Based on simulation, the corresponding median expected upper limits are 2.4 (1.1). The mass range excluded at 95% C.L. for a SM Higgs has been extended to 160 < m{sub H} < 170 GeV/c{sup 2}.

Krumnack, N.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

ARIZONA COOPERATIVE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH UNIT OCTOBER 2005 Upper Temperature Tolerance of Loach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tolerance. Furthermore, the results of a low-cost method may be useful for identifying the range (45% protein), and 2 parts tropical fish flakes made from brine shrimp, bloodmeal, and spirulina (40 costs associated with remaining at temperatures close to the upper thermal limit for a long period

Bonar, Scott A.

87

Simulant-material experimental investigation of flow dynamics in the CRBR Upper-Core Structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of a simulant-material experimental investigation of flow dynamics in the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) Upper Core Structure are described. The methodology used to design the experimental apparatus and select test conditions is detailed. Numerous comparisons between experimental data and SIMMER-II Code calculations are presented with both advantages and limitations of the SIMMER modeling features identified.

Wilhelm, D.; Starkovich, V.S.; Chapyak, E.J.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Articulated limiter blade for a tokamak fusion reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A limiter blade for a large tokomak fusion reactor includes three articulated blade sections for enabling the limiter blade to be adjusted for plasmas of different sizes. Each blade section is formed of a rigid backing plate carrying graphite tiles coated with titanium carbide, and the limiter blade forms a generally elliptic contour in both the poloidal and toroidal directions to uniformly distribute the heat flow to the blade. The limiter blade includes a central blade section movable along the major radius of the vacuum vessel, and upper and lower pivotal blade sections which may be pivoted by linear actuators having rollers held to the back surface of the pivotal blade sections.

Doll, D.W.

1982-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

89

Articulated limiter blade for a tokamak fusion reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A limiter blade for a large tokomak fusion reactor includes three articulated blade sections for enabling the limiter blade to be adjusted for plasmas of different sizes. Each blade section is formed of a rigid backing plate carrying graphite tiles coated with titanium carbide, and the limiter blade forms a generally elliptic contour in both the poloidal and toroidal directions to uniformly distribute the heat flow to the blade. The limiter blade includes a central blade section movable along the major radius of the vacuum vessel, and upper and lower pivotal blade sections which may be pivoted by linear actuators having rollers held to the back surface of the pivotal blade sections.

Doll, David W. (San Diego, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Limited Warranty Research In Motion Limited (“RIM”), the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Handheld Limited Warranty (Jordan) 072406 (English) (UK Version 082504) 1 Page 2. Handheld Limited Warranty (Jordan ...

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

91

Performance limits of power cycles using low temperature heat sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A systematic analysis of a Rankine cycle using R134a as the working fluid and a finite (314.5 kg/s) low temperature (100 °C) heat source shows that, for any fixed net power output, the evaporation pressure has upper and lower limits which depend ... Keywords: energy analysis, exergy analysis, finite size thermodynamics, optimisation

Mohammed Khennich; Nicolas Galanis

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Limited discrepancy search revisited  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Harvey and Ginsberg's limited discrepancy search (LDS) is based on the assumption that costly heuristic mistakes are made early in the search process. Consequently, LDS repeatedly probes the state space, going against the heuristic (i.e., taking discrepancies) ... Keywords: Heuristic mistakes, limited discrepancy search, performance improvement

Patrick Prosser; Chris Unsworth

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

The Swift short gamma-ray burst rate density: prospects for detecting binary neutron star mergers by aLIGO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Presently only 30% of short gamma ray bursts (SGRBs) have accurate redshifts, and this sample is highly biased by the limited sensitivity of {\\it Swift} to detect SGRBs. We account for the dominant biases to calculate a realistic SGRB rate density out to $z = 0.5$ using the {\\it Swift} sample of peak fluxes, redshifts, and those SGRBs with a beaming angle constraint from X-ray/optical observations. Assuming a significant fraction of binary neutron star mergers produce SGRBs, we calculate lower and upper detection rate limits of (1-180) per Yr by an advanced LIGO and Virgo coincidence search. Our detection rate is compatible with extrapolations using Galactic pulsar observations and population synthesis.

David Coward; Eric Howell; Tsvi Piran; Giulia Stratta; Marica Branchesi; Omer Bromberg; Bruce Gendre; Ronald Burman; Dafne Guetta

2012-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

94

CONTROL LIMITER DEVICE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A control-limiting device for monltoring a control system is described. The system comprises a conditionsensing device, a condition-varying device exerting a control over the condition, and a control means to actuate the condition-varying device. A control-limiting device integrates the total movement or other change of the condition-varying device over any interval of time during a continuum of overlapping periods of time, and if the tothl movement or change of the condition-varying device exceeds a preset value, the control- limiting device will switch the control of the operated apparatus from automatic to manual control.

DeShong, J.A.

1960-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Upper Ocean Response to a Hurricane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The upper ocean response to a moving hurricane is studied using historical air-sea data and a three-dimensional numerical ocean model. Sea surface temperature (SST) response is emphasized. The model has a surface mixed-layer (ML) that entrains ...

James F. Price

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

The Upper Atmosphere of HD17156b  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HD17156b is a newly-found transiting extrasolar giant planet (EGP) that orbits its G-type host star in a highly eccentric orbit (e~0.67) with an orbital semi-major axis of 0.16 AU. Its period, 21.2 Earth days, is the longest among the known transiting planets. The atmosphere of the planet undergoes a 27-fold variation in stellar irradiation during each orbit, making it an interesting subject for atmospheric modelling. We have used a three-dimensional model of the upper atmosphere and ionosphere for extrasolar gas giants in order to simulate the progress of HD17156b along its eccentric orbit. Here we present the results of these simulations and discuss the stability, circulation, and composition in its upper atmosphere. Contrary to the well-known transiting planet HD209458b, we find that the atmosphere of HD17156b is unlikely to escape hydrodynamically at any point along the orbit, even if the upper atmosphere is almost entirely composed of atomic hydrogen and H+, and infrared cooling by H3+ ions is negligible. The nature of the upper atmosphere is sensitive to to the composition of the thermosphere, and in particular to the mixing ratio of H2, as the availability of H2 regulates radiative cooling. In light of different simulations we make specific predictions about the thermosphere-ionosphere system of HD17156b that can potentially be verified by observations.

T. T. Koskinen; A. D. Aylward; S. Miller

2008-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

97

Materials Reliability Program: Qualification Protocol for Pressurized Water Reactor Upper Head Penetration Ultrasonic Examinations-- -2010 Update (MRP-234)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Materials Reliability Program (MRP) has directed the Inspection Issues Task Group (ITG) to establish a qualification program for the examination of pressurized water reactor (PWR) reactor pressure vessel upper head penetrations. This new qualification program is being implemented to provide the utilities with a consistent and reliable examination approach for the upper head penetrations. The program will provide assurance that flaws of similar size and location will be detected reliably throughout th...

2010-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

98

Materials Reliability Program: Qualification Protocol for Pressurized Water Reactor Upper Head Penetration Ultrasonic Examinations - - 2012 Update (MRP-311, Revision 1)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Materials Reliability Program (MRP) has directed the Inspection Technical Advisory Committee to establish a qualification program for the examination of pressurized water reactor (PWR) reactor pressure vessel upper head (RPVUH) penetrations. This qualification program is being implemented to provide the utilities with a consistent and reliable examination approach for upper head penetrations. The program will provide assurance that flaws of similar size and location will be detected reliably ...

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

99

Materials Reliability Program: Qualification Protocol for Pressurized Water Reactor Upper Head Penetration Ultrasonic Examinations 2 011 Update (MRP-311)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Materials Reliability Program (MRP) has directed the Inspection Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) to establish a qualification program for the examination of pressurized water reactor (PWR) reactor pressure vessel upper head penetrations (RPVUHs). This new qualification program was implemented to provide the utilities with a consistent and reliable examination approach for upper head penetrations. The program will provide assurance that flaws of similar size and location will be detected reliably th...

2011-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

100

Reduction of Statistical Power Per Event Due to Upper Lifetime Cuts in Lifetime Measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A cut on the maximum lifetime in a lifetime fit not only reduces the number of events, but also, in some circumstances dramatically, decreases the statistical significance of each event. The upper impact parameter cut in the hadronic B trigger at CDF, which is due to technical limitations, has the same effect. In this note we describe and quantify the consequences of such a cut on lifetime measurements. We find that even moderate upper lifetime cuts, leaving event numbers nearly unchanged, can dramatically increase the statistical uncertainty of the fit result.

Jonas Rademacker

2005-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "upper detection limit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

A prototype system for detecting the radio-frequency pulse associated with cosmic ray air showers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The development of a system to detect the radio-frequency (RF) pulse associated with extensive air showers of cosmic rays is described. This work was performed at the CASA/MIA array in Utah, with the intention of designing equipment that can be used in conjunction with the Auger Giant Array. A small subset of data (less than 40 out of a total of 600 hours of running time), taken under low-noise conditions, permitted upper limits to be placed on the rate for pulses accompanying showers of energies around $10^{17}$ eV.

Kevin Green; Jonathan L. Rosner; Denis A. Suprun; J. F. Wilkerson

2002-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

102

Visible and Infrared Optical Design for the ITER Upper Ports  

SciTech Connect

This document contains the results of an optical design scoping study of visible-light and infrared optics for the ITER upper ports, performed by LLNL under contract for the US ITER Project Office. ITER is an international collaboration to build a large fusion energy tokamak with a goal of demonstrating net fusion power for pulses much longer than the energy confinement time. At the time of this report, six of the ITER upper ports are planned to each to contain a camera system for recording visible and infrared light, as well as other diagnostics. the performance specifications for the temporal and spatial resolution of this system are shown in the Section II, Functional Specifications. They acknowledge a debt to Y. Corre and co-authors of the CEA Cadarache report ''ITER wide-angle viewing and thermographic and visible system''. Several of the concepts used in this design are derived from that CEA report. The infrared spatial resolution for optics of this design is diffraction-limited by the size of the entrance aperture, at lower resolution than listed in the ITER diagnostic specifications. The size of the entrance aperture is a trade-off between spatial resolution, optics size in the port, and the location of relay optics. The signal-to-noise ratio allows operation at the specified time resolutions.

Lasnier, C; Seppala, L; Morris, K; Groth, M; Fenstermacher, M; Allen, S; Synakowski, E; Ortiz, J

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Free Energies of Dilute Bose gases: upper bound  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive a upper bound on the free energy of a Bose gas system at density $\\rho$ and temperature $T$. In combination with the lower bound derived previously by Seiringer \\cite{RS1}, our result proves that in the low density limit, i.e., when $a^3\\rho\\ll 1$, where $a$ denotes the scattering length of the pair-interaction potential, the leading term of $\\Delta f$ the free energy difference per volume between interacting and ideal Bose gases is equal to $4\\pi a (2\\rho^2-[\\rho-\\rhoc]^2_+)$. Here, $\\rhoc(T)$ denotes the critical density for Bose-Einstein condensation (for the ideal gas), and $[\\cdot ]_+$ $=$ $\\max\\{\\cdot, 0\\}$ denotes the positive part.

Jun Yin

2009-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

104

Security Clearances; Limitations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SEC. 1072. SECURITY CLEARANCES; LIMITATIONS. SEC. 1072. SECURITY CLEARANCES; LIMITATIONS. (a) In General.-Title III of the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004 (50 U.S.C. 435b) is amended by adding at the end the following new section: "SEC. 3002. SECURITY CLEARANCES; LIMITATIONS. "(a) Definitions.-In this section: "(1) Controlled substance.-The term `controlled substance' has the meaning given that term in section 102 of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 802). "(2) Covered person.-The term `covered person' means- "(A) an officer or employee of a Federal agency; "(B) a member of the Army, Navy, Air Force, or Marine Corps who is on active duty or is in an active status; and "(C) an officer or employee of a contractor of a Federal agency.

105

LARGE-SCALE DISTRIBUTION OF ARRIVAL DIRECTIONS OF COSMIC RAYS DETECTED ABOVE 10{sup 18} eV AT THE PIERRE AUGER OBSERVATORY  

SciTech Connect

A thorough search for large-scale anisotropies in the distribution of arrival directions of cosmic rays detected above 10{sup 18} eV at the Pierre Auger Observatory is presented. This search is performed as a function of both declination and right ascension in several energy ranges above 10{sup 18} eV, and reported in terms of dipolar and quadrupolar coefficients. Within the systematic uncertainties, no significant deviation from isotropy is revealed. Assuming that any cosmic-ray anisotropy is dominated by dipole and quadrupole moments in this energy range, upper limits on their amplitudes are derived. These upper limits allow us to test the origin of cosmic rays above 10{sup 18} eV from stationary Galactic sources densely distributed in the Galactic disk and predominantly emitting light particles in all directions.

Abreu, P.; Andringa, S. [LIP and Instituto Superior Tecnico, Technical University of Lisbon (Portugal); Aglietta, M. [Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario (INAF), Universita di Torino and Sezione INFN, Torino (Italy); Ahlers, M. [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Ahn, E. J. [Fermilab, Batavia, IL (United States); Albuquerque, I. F. M. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Allard, D. [Laboratoire AstroParticule et Cosmologie (APC), Universite Paris 7, CNRS-IN2P3, Paris (France); Allekotte, I. [Centro Atomico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro (CNEA-UNCuyo-CONICET), San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Allen, J. [New York University, New York, NY (United States); Allison, P. [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Almela, A. [Facultad Regional Buenos Aires, Universidad Tecnologica Nacional, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Alvarez Castillo, J. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D. F. (Mexico); Alvarez-Muniz, J. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Alves Batista, R. [IFGW, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Ambrosio, M.; Aramo, C. [Universita di Napoli 'Federico II' and Sezione INFN, Napoli (Italy); Aminaei, A. [IMAPP, Radboud University Nijmegen (Netherlands); Anchordoqui, L. [University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Antici'c, T. [Rudjer Boskovi'c Institute, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Arganda, E. [IFLP, Universidad Nacional de La Plata and CONICET, La Plata (Argentina); Collaboration: Pierre Auger Collaboration; and others

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

106

Climatic Aspects of the 1993 Upper Mississippi River Basin Flood  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1993 record-breaking summer flood in the Upper Mississippi River Basin resulted from an unprecedentedly persistent heavy rain pattern. Rainfall totals for the Upper Mississippi River Basin were, by a large margin, the largest of this century ...

Kenneth E. Kunkel; Stanley A. Changnon; James R. Angel

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Upper-Tropospheric Water Vapor from UARS MLS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Initial results of upper-tropospheric water vapor obtained from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) are presented. MLS is less affected by clouds than infrared or visible techniques, and the UARS ...

W. G. Read; J. W. Waters; D. A. Flower; L. Froidevaux; R. F. Jarnot; D. L. Hartmann; R. S. Harwood; R. B. Rood

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Upper-Tropospheric Humidity from MLS and ECMWF Reanalyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper compares upper-tropospheric humidity from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite with European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) data. MLS measurements are not included in the ECMWF ...

H. L. Clark; R. S. Harwood

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Marginal Sea Overflows and the Upper Ocean Interaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Marginal sea overflows and the overlying upper ocean are coupled in the vertical by two distinct mechanisms—by an interfacial mass flux from the upper ocean to the overflow layer that accompanies entrainment and by a divergent eddy flux ...

Shinichiro Kida; Jiayan Yang; James F. Price

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Upper internals arrangement for a pressurized water reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a pressurized water reactor with all of the in-core instrumentation gaining access to the core through the reactor head, each fuel assembly in which the instrumentation is introduced is aligned with an upper internals instrumentation guide-way. In the elevations above the upper internals upper support assembly, the instrumentation is protected and aligned by upper mounted instrumentation columns that are part of the instrumentation guide-way and extend from the upper support assembly towards the reactor head in hue with a corresponding head penetration. The upper mounted instrumentation columns are supported laterally at one end by an upper guide tube and at the other end by the upper support plate.

Singleton, Norman R; Altman, David A; Yu, Ching; Rex, James A; Forsyth, David R

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

111

Observed and Simulated Upper-Tropospheric Water Vapor Feedback  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite measurements from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) in the upper troposphere over 4.5 yr are used to assess the covariation of upper-tropospheric humidity and temperature with surface temperatures, which can be used to constrain ...

A. Gettelman; Q. Fu

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Life History of Mobile Troughs in the Upper Westerlies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing evidence indicates that surface cyclogenesis is predominantly a response to the approach of a preexisting trough at upper levels. A question then arises about the origin of the upper-level predecessor. As an initial approach to this ...

Frederick Sanders

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Frontogenesis Processes in the Middle and Upper Troposphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Basic issues regarding upper-level frontogenesis addressed in this paper are: (i) simulated frontogenesis influenced by the initial flow, (ii) upper-level frontogenesis as essentially a two-dimensional process, and (iii) frontal-scale positive ...

Keith M. Hines; Carlos R. Mechoso

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

The Upper-Ocean Response to Surface Heating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Moored observations of atmospheric variables and upper-ocean temperatures from the Long-Term Upper-Ocean Study (LOTUS) and the Frontal Air-Sea Interaction Experiment (FASINEX) are used to examine the upper-ocean response to surface heating. ...

Craig M. Lee; Daniel L. Rudnick

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Beating the spin-down limit on gravitational wave emission from the Vela pulsar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present direct upper limits on continuous gravitational wave emission from the Vela pulsar using data from the Virgo detector's second science run. These upper limits have been obtained using three independent methods that assume the gravitational wave emission follows the radio timing. Two of the methods produce frequentist upper limits for an assumed known orientation of the star's spin axis and value of the wave polarization angle of, respectively, $1.9\\ee{-24}$ and $2.2\\ee{-24}$, with 95% confidence. The third method, under the same hypothesis, produces a Bayesian upper limit of $2.1\\ee{-24}$, with 95% degree of belief. These limits are below the indirect {\\it spin-down limit} of $3.3\\ee{-24}$ for the Vela pulsar, defined by the energy loss rate inferred from observed decrease in Vela's spin frequency, and correspond to a limit on the star ellipticity of $\\sim 10^{-3}$. Slightly less stringent results, but still well below the spin-down limit, are obtained assuming the star's spin axis inclination and the wave polarization angles are unknown.

The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; the Virgo Collaboration; J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; M. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; R. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; B. Allen; G. S. Allen; E. Amador Ceron; D. Amariutei; R. S. Amin; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; F. Antonucci; K. Arai; M. A. Arain; M. C. Araya; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; D. Atkinson; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. Ballmer; D. Barker; S. Barnum; F. Barone; B. Barr; P. Barriga; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; M. Bastarrika; A. Basti; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; A. Belletoile; I. Belopolski; M. Benacquista; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; N. Beveridge; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; S. Birindelli; R. Biswas; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; C. Bogan; R. Bondarescu; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; S. Bose; L. Bosi; B. Bouhou; M. Boyle; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; A. Brummit; R. Budzy?ski; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; J. Burguet--Castell; O. Burmeister; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. Cain; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; E. Campagna; P. Campsie; J. Cannizzo; K. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. Capano; F. Carbognani; S. Caride; S. Caudill; M. Cavagliŕ; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; O. Chaibi; T. Chalermsongsak; E. Chalkley; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; S. Chelkowski; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; N. Christensen; S. S. Y. Chua; C. T. Y. Chung; S. Chung; F. Clara; D. Clark; J. Clark; J. H. Clayton; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; C. N. Colacino; J. Colas; A. Colla; M. Colombini; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; D. M. Coward; D. C. Coyne; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; A. M. Cruise; R. M. Culter; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; K. Dahl; S. L. Danilishin; R. Dannenberg; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; K. Das; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; R. De Rosa; D. DeBra; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; M. del Prete; T. Dent; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; M. Di Paolo Emilio; A. Di Virgilio; M. Díaz; A. Dietz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Dorsher; E. S. D. Douglas; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; J. -C. Dumas; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; M. Edgar; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; R. Engel; T. Etzel; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Y. Fan; B. F. Farr; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; I. Ferrante; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. Flaminio; M. Flanigan; S. Foley; E. Forsi; L. A. Forte; N. Fotopoulos; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; D. Friedrich; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; P. Fulda; M. Fyffe; M. Galimberti; L. Gammaitoni; J. Garcia; J. A. Garofoli; F. Garufi; M. E. Gáspár; G. Gemme; E. Genin; A. Gennai; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; C. Gill; E. Goetz; L. M. Goggin; G. González; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Goßler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Greverie; R. Grosso; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; R. Gupta; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; B. Hage; J. M. Hallam; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. -F. Hayau; T. Hayler; J. Heefner; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; M. A. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; V. Herrera; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; T. Hong; S. Hooper; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; D. Huet; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; P. Jaranowski; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; G. Jones; R. Jones; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; J. B. Kanner; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; W. Kells; M. Kelner; D. G. Keppel; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili; E. A. Khazanov; H. Kim; N. Kim; P. J. King; D. L. Kinzel; J. S. Kissel; S. Klimenko; V. Kondrashov; R. Kopparapu; S. Koranda; W. Z. Korth; I. Kowalska; D. Kozak; V. Kringel; S. Krishnamurthy; B. Krishnan; A. Królak; G. Kuehn; R. Kumar; P. Kwee; M. Landry; B. Lantz; N. Lastzka; A. Lazzarini; P. Leaci; J. Leong; I. Leonor; N. Leroy; N. Letendre; J. Li; T. G. F. Li; N. Liguori; P. E. Lindquist; N. A. Lockerbie; D. Lodhia; M. Lorenzini; V. Loriette; M. Lormand; G. Losurdo; P. Lu; J. Luan; M. Lubinski

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

116

Beating the spin-down limit on gravitational wave emission from the Vela pulsar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present direct upper limits on continuous gravitational wave emission from the Vela pulsar using data from the Virgo detector's second science run. These upper limits have been obtained using three independent methods that assume the gravitational wave emission follows the radio timing. Two of the methods produce frequentist upper limits for an assumed known orientation of the star's spin axis and value of the wave polarization angle of, respectively, $1.9\\ee{-24}$ and $2.2\\ee{-24}$, with 95% confidence. The third method, under the same hypothesis, produces a Bayesian upper limit of $2.1\\ee{-24}$, with 95% degree of belief. These limits are below the indirect {\\it spin-down limit} of $3.3\\ee{-24}$ for the Vela pulsar, defined by the energy loss rate inferred from observed decrease in Vela's spin frequency, and correspond to a limit on the star ellipticity of $\\sim 10^{-3}$. Slightly less stringent results, but still well below the spin-down limit, are obtained assuming the star's spin axis inclination and ...

Abadie, J; Abbott, R; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adhikari, R; Affeldt, C; Allen, B; Allen, G S; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Amin, R S; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Antonucci, F; Arai, K; Arain, M A; Araya, M C; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Barker, D; Barnum, S; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barriga, P; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Basti, A; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Behnke, B; Beker, M BejgerM G; Bell, A S; Belletoile, A; Belopolski, I; Benacquista, M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Birindelli, S; Biswas, R; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bogan, C; Bondarescu, R; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Boyle, M; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brummit, A; Budzy?ski, R; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burguet--Castell, J; Burmeister, O; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cain, J; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campagna, E; Campsie, P; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavagliŕ, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chaibi, O; Chalermsongsak, T; Chalkley, E; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Christensen, N; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Chung, S; Clara, F; Clark, D; Clark, J; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Colacino, C N; Colas, J; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M; Coulon, J -P; Coward, D M; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Culter, R M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dahl, K; Danilishin, S L; Dannenberg, R; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Das, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; del Prete, M; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Emilio, M Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A; Díaz, M; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Dorsher, S; Douglas, E S D; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Dumas, J -C; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Engel, R; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Farr, B F; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Flaminio, R; Flanigan, M; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Galimberti, M; Gammaitoni, L; Garcia, J; Garofoli, J A; Garufi, F; Gáspár, M E; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, C; Goetz, E; Goggin, L M; González, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Greverie, C; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gupta, R; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hage, B; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Hayau, J -F; Hayler, T; Heefner, J; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hendry, M A; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Herrera, V; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Huet, D; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Jaranowski, P; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kanner, J B; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kells, W; Kelner, M; Keppel, D G; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, H; Kim, N; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kondrashov, V; Kopparapu, R; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Kringel, V; Krishnamurthy, S; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, R; Kwee, P; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Lastzka, N; Lazzarini, A; Leaci, P; Leong, J; Leonor, I; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Li, J; Li, T G F; Liguori, N; Lindquist, P E; Lockerbie, N A; Lodhia, D; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lu, P; Luan, J; Lubinski, M; Lück, H; Lundgren, A P; Macdonald, E; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Man, N; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mantovani, M; Marandi, A; Marchesoni, F

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Similarity-based fuzzy limits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the concept of similarity-based fuzzy limits in metric spaces is introduced and it is shown that it is an application of limit maps of topologies on [0,1]-valued sets, introduced by Hohle and Sostak, furthermore it is observed that the ... Keywords: Fuzzy limit, Limit map, Similarity-based fuzzy limit, [0,1]-Valued topology

Gültekin Soylu

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Toroidal midplane neutral beam armor and plasma limiter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

For use in a tokamak fusion reactor having a midplane magnetic coil on the inner wall of an evacuated toriodal chamber within which a neutral beam heated, fusing plasma is magnetically confined, a neutral beam armor shield and plasma limiter is provided on the inner wall of the toroidal chamber to shield the midplane coil from neutral beam shine-thru and plasma deposition. The armor shield/plasma limiter forms a semicircular enclosure around the midplane coil with the outer surface of the armor shield/plasma limiter shaped to match, as closely as practical, the inner limiting magnetic flux surface of the toroidally confined, indented, bean-shaped plasma. The armor shield/plasma limiter includes a plurality of semicircular graphite plates each having a pair of coupled upper and lower sections with each plate positioned in intimate contact with an adjacent plate on each side thereof so as to form a closed, planar structure around the entire outer periphery of the circular midplane coil. The upper and lower plate sections are adapted for coupling to heat sensing thermocouples and to a circulating water conduit system for cooling the armor shield/plasma limiter.The inner center portion of each graphite plate is adapted to receive and enclose a section of a circular diagnostic magnetic flux loop so as to minimize the power from the plasma confinement chamber incident upon the flux loop.

Kugel, Henry W. (Somerset, NJ); Hand, Jr, Samuel W. (Hopewell Township, Mercer County, NJ); Ksayian, Haig (Titusville, NJ)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Upper Cumberland EMC - Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Upper Cumberland EMC - Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Upper Cumberland EMC - Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Upper Cumberland EMC - Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Tennessee Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Residential Heat Pump: $150 per unit Commercial Heat Pump: $150 per three tons Water Heater: $100 Provider Upper Cumberland Electric Membership Corporation Upper Cumberland Electric Membership Corporation (UCEMC), in collaboration with the Tennessee Valley Authority, offers incentives for its customers to purchase and install energy efficient equipment through the Energy Right

120

(Limiting the greenhouse effect)  

SciTech Connect

Traveler attended the Dahlem Research Conference organized by the Freien Universitat, Berlin. The subject of the conference was Limiting the Greenhouse Effect: Options for Controlling Atmospheric CO{sub 2} Accumulation. Like all Dahlem workshops, this was a meeting of scientific experts, although the disciplines represented were broader than usual, ranging across anthropology, economics, international relations, forestry, engineering, and atmospheric chemistry. Participation by scientists from developing countries was limited. The conference was divided into four multidisciplinary working groups. Traveler acted as moderator for Group 3 which examined the question What knowledge is required to tackle the principal social and institutional barriers to reducing CO{sub 2} emissions'' The working rapporteur was Jesse Ausubel of Rockefeller University. Other working groups examined the economic costs, benefits, and technical feasibility of options to reduce emissions per unit of energy service; the options for reducing energy use per unit of GNP; and the significant of linkage between strategies to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions and other goals. Draft reports of the working groups are appended. Overall, the conference identified a number of important research needs in all four areas. It may prove particularly important in bringing the social and institutional research needs relevant to climate change closer to the forefront of the scientific and policy communities than hitherto.

Rayner, S.

1991-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

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121

(Limiting the greenhouse effect)  

SciTech Connect

Traveler attended the Dahlem Research Conference organized by the Freien Universitat, Berlin. The subject of the conference was Limiting the Greenhouse Effect: Options for Controlling Atmospheric CO{sub 2} Accumulation. Like all Dahlem workshops, this was a meeting of scientific experts, although the disciplines represented were broader than usual, ranging across anthropology, economics, international relations, forestry, engineering, and atmospheric chemistry. Participation by scientists from developing countries was limited. The conference was divided into four multidisciplinary working groups. Traveler acted as moderator for Group 3 which examined the question What knowledge is required to tackle the principal social and institutional barriers to reducing CO{sub 2} emissions'' The working rapporteur was Jesse Ausubel of Rockefeller University. Other working groups examined the economic costs, benefits, and technical feasibility of options to reduce emissions per unit of energy service; the options for reducing energy use per unit of GNP; and the significant of linkage between strategies to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions and other goals. Draft reports of the working groups are appended. Overall, the conference identified a number of important research needs in all four areas. It may prove particularly important in bringing the social and institutional research needs relevant to climate change closer to the forefront of the scientific and policy communities than hitherto.

Rayner, S.

1991-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

122

Central Limit Theorem for Branching Random Walks in Random Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider branching random walks in $d$-dimensional integer lattice with time-space i.i.d. offspring distributions. When $d \\ge 3$ and the fluctuation of the environment is well moderated by the random walk, we prove a central limit theorem for the density of the population, together with upper bounds for the density of the most populated site and the replica overlap. We also discuss the phase transition of this model in connection with directed polymers in random environment.

Nobuo Yoshida

2007-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

123

Simulation of Crop Yields Using ERA-40: Limits to Skill and Nonstationarity in Weather–Yield Relationships  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reanalysis data provide an excellent test bed for impacts prediction systems, because they represent an upper limit on the skill of climate models. Indian groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) yields have been simulated using the General Large-Area ...

A. J. Challinor; T. R. Wheeler; J. M. Slingo; P. Q. Craufurd; D. I. F. Grimes

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Fault Current Limiters  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fault Fault Current Limiters Superconducting & Solid-state Power Equipment Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability www.oe.energy.gov Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, OE-1 U.S. Department of Energy - 1000 Independence Avenue, SW - Washington, DC 20585 Plugging America Into the Future of Power What are FCLs? A fault is an unintentional short circuit, or partial short-circuit, in an electric circuit. A variety of factors such as lightning, downed power lines, or crossed power lines cause faults. During a fault, excessive current-called fault current- flows through the electrical system often resulting in a failure of one section of that system by causing a

125

LIMITS ON PROMPT, DISPERSED RADIO PULSES FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have searched for prompt radio emission from nine gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with a 12 m telescope at 1.4 GHz, with a time resolution of 64 {mu}s to 1 s. We detected single dispersed radio pulses with significances >6{sigma} in the few minutes following two GRBs. The dispersion measures of both pulses are well in excess of the expected Galactic values, and the implied rate is incompatible with known sources of single dispersed pulses. The arrival times of both pulses also coincide with breaks in the GRB X-ray light curves. A null trial and statistical arguments rule out random fluctuations as the origin of these pulses with >95% and {approx}97% confidence, respectively, although a simple population argument supports a GRB origin with confidence of only 2%. We caution that we cannot rule out radio frequency interference (RFI) as the origin of these pulses. If the single pulses are not related to the GRBs, we set an upper limit on the flux density of radio pulses emitted between 200 and 1800 s after a GRB of 1.27w {sup -1/2} Jy, where 6.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} s 1 s) variations. These limits are some of the most constraining at high time resolution and GHz frequencies in the early stages of the GRB phenomenon.

Bannister, K. W.; Murphy, T.; Gaensler, B. M. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy (SIfA), School of Physics A29, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Reynolds, J. E., E-mail: keith.bannister@csiro.au [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

126

Upper Peninsula Power Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Peninsula Power Co Peninsula Power Co Jump to: navigation, search Name Upper Peninsula Power Co Place Michigan Utility Id 19578 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png A-1 - Residential Seasonal Service Power Supply Service Residential A-1 - Residential Service Seasonal Residential A-2 - Residential Service Seasonal Residential Capacity Buyback Rider CP-IB

127

Understanding Nuclei in the upper sd - shell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclei in the upper-$sd$ shell usually exhibit characteristics of spherical single particle excitations. In the recent years, employment of sophisticated techniques of gamma spectroscopy has led to observation of high spin states of several nuclei near A$\\simeq$ 40. In a few of them multiparticle, multihole rotational states coexist with states of single particle nature. We have studied a few nuclei in this mass region experimentally, using various campaigns of the Indian National Gamma Array setup. We have compared and combined our empirical observations with the large-scale shell model results to interpret the structure of these nuclei. Indication of population of states of large deformation has been found in our data. This gives us an opportunity to investigate the interplay of single particle and collective degrees of freedom in this mass region.

M. Saha Sarkar; Abhijit Bisoi; Sudatta Ray; Ritesh Kshetri; S. Sarkar

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Upper hybrid solitons and oscillating-two-steam instabilities  

SciTech Connect

A warm two-fluid theory of soliton formation near the upper-hybrid frequency is developed. Several forms of the nonlinear Schroedinger equation are obtained, depending on whether the electric field is completely perpendicular to the dc magnetic field or whether it has an additional small component parallel to the magnetic field. For the perpendicular case, the character of the soliton depends on its scale length, L, and on $beta$. For low $beta$, when L is less than c/$omega$/sub pe/, one finds stationary envelope and hole solitons, whereas when L is greater than c/$omega$/sub pi/ we obtain the super-Alfvenic solitons described by Kaufman and Stenflow by MHD theory. However, the case E/sub parallel/ not equal to 0 may be of more interest, since it couples the pump to the excited waves more efficiently. In the limit of linearization about an infinite wavelength pump, the nonlinear Schroedinger equations yield purely growing (oscillating-two-stream) instabilities in both cases. (auth)

Porkolab, M.; Goldman, M.V.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Thermal Gradient Holes At Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit & Blackwell, 2006) Exploration...

130

Stretches of Upper Mississippi River near record-low levels ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

As a result of last year's drought, stretches of the Upper Mississippi River have approached record lows. These low water levels have jeopardized commercial barge ...

131

Exploration Of The Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nye County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Exploration Of The Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource, Nye County, Nevada...

132

Limit on electron neutrino mass from observation of the beta decay of molecular tritium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the most sensitive upper limit set on the mass of the electron antineutrino. The upper limit of 9.4 eV (95% confidence level) was obtained from a study of the shape of the beta decay spectrum of free molecular tritium. Achieving such a level of sensitivity required precise determinations of all processes that modify the shape of the observed spectrum. This result is in clear disagreement with a reported value for the mass of 26(5) eV. 30 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Wilkerson, J.F.; Bowles, T.J.; Friar, J.L.; Robertson, R.G.H.; Stephenson, G.J. Jr.; Wark, D.L. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Knapp, D.A. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

COMMENTARY:Limits to adaptation  

SciTech Connect

An actor-centered, risk-based approach to defining limits to social adaptation provides a useful analytic framing for identifying and anticipating these limits and informing debates over society s responses to climate change.

Preston, Benjamin L [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Limitations on Carry Lookahead Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fan-in and fan-out limitations imposed by specific gate circuits force corresponding limits-upon the sizes of carry lookahead circuits fabricated from those gates. The relationships between those limits are derived, providing simple formulae that ... Keywords: high-speed arithmetic, Binary addition, carry lookahead

T. Rhyne

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Sampling and analysis of water from Upper Three Runs and its wetlands near Tank 16 and the Mixed Waste Management Facility  

SciTech Connect

In April and September 1993, sampling was conducted to characterize the Upper Three Runs (UTR) wetland waters near the Mixed Waste Management Facility to determine if contaminants migrating from MWMF are outcropping into the floodplain wetlands. For the spring sampling event, 37 wetlands and five stream water samples were collected. Thirty-six wetland and six stream water samples were collected for the fall sampling event. Background seepline and stream water samples were also collected for both sampling events. All samples were analyzed for RCRA Appendix IX volatiles, inorganics appearing on the Target Analyte List, tritium, gamma-emitting radionuclides, and gross radiological activity. Most of the analytical data for both the spring and fall sampling events were reported as below method detection limits. The primary exceptions were the routine water quality indicators (e.g., turbidity, alkalinity, total suspended solids, etc.), iron, manganese, and tritium. During the spring, cadmium, gross alpha, nonvolatile beta, potassium-40, ruthenium-106, and trichloroethylene were also detected above the MCLs from at least one location. A secondary objective of this project was to identify any UTR wetland water quality impacts resulting from leaks from Tank 16 located at the H-Area Tank Farm.

Dixon, K.L.; Cummins, C.L.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

EFSA sets upper intake level for LC-PUFA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article, from our Health & Nutrition News department, discusses EFSA’s establishment of an upper intake level for DHA and EPA and the agency’s work on health claims. EFSA sets upper intake level for LC-PUFA Inform Magazine Biofuels and Bioproducts a

137

Upper Oceanic Energy Response to Tropical Cyclone Passage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The upper oceanic temporal response to tropical cyclone (TC) passage is investigated using a 6-yr daily record of data-driven analyses of two measures of upper ocean energy content based on the U.S. Navy’s Coupled Ocean Data Assimilation System ...

John A. Knaff; Mark DeMaria; Charles R. Sampson; James E. Peak; James Cummings; Wayne H. Schubert

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Toroidal midplane neutral beam armor and plasma limiter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention contemplates an armor shield/plasma limiter positioned upon the inner wall of a toroidal vacuum chamber within which is magnetically confined an energetic plasma in a tokamak nuclear fusion reactor. The armor shield/plasma limiter is thus of a general semi-toroidal shape and is comprised of a plurality of adjacent graphite plates positioned immediately adjacent to each other so as to form a continuous ring upon and around the toroidal chamber's inner wall and the reactor's midplane coil. Each plate has a generally semi-circular outer circumference and a recessed inner portion and is comprised of upper and lower half sections positioned immediately adjacent to one another along the midplane of the plate. With the upper and lower half sections thus joined, a channel or duct is provided within the midplane of the plate in which a magnetic flux loop is positioned. The magnetic flux loop is thus positioned immediately adjacent to the fusing toroidal plasma and serves as a diagnostic sensor with the armor shield/plasma limiter minimizing the amount of power from the energetic plasma as well as from the neutral particle beams heating the plasma incident upon the flux loop.

Kugel, H.W.; Hand, S.W. Jr.; Ksayian, H.

1985-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

139

Intercomparison tests of moored current measurements in the upper ocean  

SciTech Connect

During the August-September 1977 Mixed Layer Experiment (Mile) and the July-September 1978 Joint Air-Sea (Jasin) project, moored current measurements were made in the upper ocean with Savonius rotor and vane vector-averaging current meters (VACM), dual orthogonal propeller vector-measuring current meters (VMCM), and dual orthogonal acoustic travel-time vector-averaging current meters (ACM). Wind speeds and significant wave heights reached 20 m s/sup -1/ and 5m. The influence of mooring motion upon ACM, VACM, and VMCM measurements are described. In the mixed layer above about 30 m depth where mean currents are relatively large, the effect of a surface-following buoy upon ACM, VACM, and VMCM velocity fluctuations at frequencies less than 0.3 cph was negligible; at frequencies above 4 cph, the VACM data contained the largest amount of mooring induced contamination. Below the mixed layer at depths greater than about 75 m, a subsurface mooring should be used; however, when a surface-following buoy was used, then VMCM data better approximated the spectrum of the fluctuations than VACM data. A spar-buoy should not be used to measure currents at depths as deep as 80 m. The frequency-dependent differences between VACM and VMCM and between VACM and ACM measurements are described. At frequencies less than 0.3 cph, the differences between the VACM and ACM or the VMCM records were not significant with 95% confidence limits, were always positive, and above 80 m depth were less than 20%. At frequencies above 4 cph, the VACM-VMCM differences were about 5 times larger than the VACM-ACM differences.

Halpern, D.; Weller, R.A.; Briscoe, M.G.; Davis, R.E.; McCullough, J.R.

1981-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

140

Beating the spin-down limit on gravitational wave emission from the Crab pulsar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present direct upper limits on gravitational wave emission from the Crab pulsar using data from the first nine months of the fifth science run of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO). These limits are based on two searches. In the first we assume that the gravitational wave emission follows the observed radio timing, giving an upper limit on gravitational wave emission that beats indirect limits inferred from the spin-down and braking index of the pulsar and the energetics of the nebula. In the second we allow for a small mismatch between the gravitational and radio signal frequencies and interpret our results in the context of two possible gravitational wave emission mechanisms.

The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; B. Abbott; R. Abbott; R. Adhikari; P. Ajith; B. Allen; G. Allen; R. Amin; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; M. A. Arain; M. Araya; H. Armandula; P. Armor; Y. Aso; S. Aston; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; S. Babak; S. Ballmer; H. Bantilan; B. C. Barish; C. Barker; D. Barker; B. Barr; P. Barriga; M. A. Barton; M. Bastarrika; K. Bayer; J. Betzwieser; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; R. Biswas; E. Black; K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; T. P. Bodiya; L. Bogue; R. Bork; V. Boschi; S. Bose; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; J. E. Brau; M. Brinkmann; A. Brooks; D. A. Brown; G. Brunet; A. Bullington; A. Buonanno; O. Burmeister; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. B. Camp; J. Cannizzo; K. Cannon; J. Cao; L. Cardenas; T. Casebolt; G. Castaldi; C. Cepeda; E. Chalkley; P. Charlton; S. Chatterji; S. Chelkowski; Y. Chen; N. Christensen; D. Clark; J. Clark; T. Cokelaer; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. Corbitt; D. Coyne; J. D. E. Creighton; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; R. M. Cutler; J. Dalrymple; K. Danzmann; G. Davies; D. DeBra; J. Degallaix; M. Degree; V. Dergachev; S. Desai; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; M. Díaz; J. Dickson; A. Dietz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; E. E. Doomes; R. W. P. Drever; I. Duke; J. -C. Dumas; R. J. Dupuis; J. G. Dwyer; C. Echols; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; E. Espinoza; T. Etzel; T. Evans; S. Fairhurst; Y. Fan; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; M. M. Fejer; L. S. Finn; K. Flasch; N. Fotopoulos; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. Fricke; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; M. Fyffe; J. Garofoli; I. Gholami; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; K. Goda; E. Goetz; L. Goggin; G. González; S. Gossler; R. Gouaty; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; M. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; F. Grimaldi; R. Grosso; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; M. Guenther; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; B. Hage; J. M. Hallam; D. Hammer; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. Harry; E. Harstad; K. Hayama; T. Hayler; J. Heefner; I. S. Heng; M. Hennessy; A. Heptonstall; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; E. Hirose; D. Hoak; D. Hosken; J. Hough; S. H. Huttner; D. Ingram; M. Ito; A. Ivanov; B. Johnson; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; G. Jones; R. Jones; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kamat; J. Kanner; D. Kasprzyk; E. Katsavounidis; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; W. Kells; D. G. Keppel; F. Ya. Khalili; R. Khan; E. Khazanov; C. Kim; P. King; J. S. Kissel; S. Klimenko; K. Kokeyama; V. Kondrashov; R. K. Kopparapu; D. Kozak; I. Kozhevatov; B. Krishnan; P. Kwee; P. K. Lam; M. Landry; M. M. Lang; B. Lantz; A. Lazzarini; M. Lei; N. Leindecker; V. Leonhardt; I. Leonor; K. Libbrecht; H. Lin; P. Lindquist; N. A. Lockerbie; D. Lodhia; M. Lormand; P. Lu; M. Lubinski; A. Lucianetti; H. Lück; B. Machenschalk; M. MacInnis; M. Mageswaran; K. Mailand; V. Mandic; S. Márka; Z. Márka; A. Markosyan; J. Markowitz; E. Maros; I. Martin; R. M. Martin; J. N. Marx; K. Mason; F. Matichard; L. Matone; R. Matzner; N. Mavalvala; R. McCarthy; D. E. McClelland; S. C. McGuire; M. McHugh; G. McIntyre; G. McIvor; D. McKechan; K. McKenzie; T. Meier; A. Melissinos; G. Mendell; R. A. Mercer; S. Meshkov; C. J. Messenger; D. Meyers; J. Miller; J. Minelli; S. Mitra; V. P. Mitrofanov; G. Mitselmakher; R. Mittleman; O. Miyakawa; B. Moe; S. Mohanty; G. Moreno; K. Mossavi; C. MowLowry; G. Mueller; S. Mukherjee; H. Mukhopadhyay; H. Müller-Ebhardt; J. Munch; P. Murray; E. Myers; J. Myers; T. Nash; J. Nelson; G. Newton; A. Nishizawa; K. Numata; J. O'Dell; G. Ogin; B. O'Reilly; R. O'Shaughnessy; D. J. Ottaway; R. S. Ottens; H. Overmier; B. J. Owen; Y. Pan; C. Pankow; M. A. Papa; V. Parameshwaraiah; P. Patel; M. Pedraza; S. Penn; A. Perreca; T. Petrie; I. M. Pinto; M. Pitkin; H. J. Pletsch; M. V. Plissi; F. Postiglione; M. Principe; R. Prix; V. Quetschke; F. Raab; D. S. Rabeling; H. Radkins; N. Rainer; M. Rakhmanov; M. Ramsunder; H. Rehbein; S. Reid; D. H. Reitze; R. Riesen; K. Riles; B. Rivera; N. A. Robertson; C. Robinson; E. L. Robinson; S. Roddy; A. Rodriguez; A. M. Rogan; J. Rollins; J. D. Romano; J. Romie; R. Route; S. Rowan; A. Rüdiger; L. Ruet; P. Russell; K. Ryan; S. Sakata; M. Samidi; L. Sancho de la Jordana; V. Sandberg; V. Sannibale; S. Saraf; P. Sarin; B. S. Sathyaprakash; S. Sato; P. R. Saulson; R. Savage; P. Savov; S. W. Schediwy; R. Schilling; R. Schnabel; R. Schofield; B. F. Schutz; P. Schwinberg; S. M. Scott; A. C. Searle; B. Sears; F. Seifert; D. Sellers; A. S. Sengupta; P. Shawhan; D. H. Shoemaker; A. Sibley; X. Siemens; D. Sigg; S. Sinha; A. M. Sintes; B. J. J. Slagmolen; J. Slutsky; J. R. Smith; M. R. Smith; N. D. Smith; K. Somiya; B. Sorazu; L. C. Stein; A. Stochino; R. Stone; K. A. Strain; D. M. Strom; A. Stuver; T. Z. Summerscales; K. -X. Sun; M. Sung; P. J. Sutton; H. Takahashi; D. B. Tanner; R. Taylor; R. Taylor; J. Thacker; K. A. Thorne; K. S. Thorne; A. Thüring; K. V. Tokmakov; C. Torres; C. Torrie; G. Traylor; M. Trias; W. Tyler

2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "upper detection limit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

HDO INFRARED DETECTION SENSITIVITY AND D/H ISOTOPIC EXCHANGE IN AMORPHOUS AND CRYSTALLINE ICE  

SciTech Connect

The sensitivity of the OD stretching band as a probe to detect HDO in astrophysical ice is discussed based on IR laboratory spectra of HDO molecules embedded in H{sub 2}O ice. This band is extremely broad and tends to disappear into the absorption continuum of H{sub 2}O for low-temperature amorphous samples. Detectable HDO/H{sub 2}O ratios with this technique may range from a few percent for amorphous samples to a few per thousand in crystalline ice. These relatively high upper limits and the appreciable dependence of the band shape on temperature, which would complicate the interpretation of data from many lines of sight, decisively limit the usefulness of the technique for HDO detection in astronomical observations. The process of isotopic H/D exchange in mixed ice of H{sub 2}O/D{sub 2}O is also studied through the evolution of the OD band in IR spectra. Isotopic exchange starts at {approx}120 K and is greatly accelerated at 150 K, as crystallization proceeds in the ice. Annealed amorphous samples prove to be more favorable for isotope exchange than samples directly formed in crystalline phase. The annealing process seems to favor a polycrystalline ice morphology with a higher defect activity. These morphology differences can be of relevance for deuterium fractionation in astronomical environments.

Galvez, Oscar; Mate, Belen; Herrero, VIctor J.; Escribano, Rafael [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, IEM-CSIC, Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

2011-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

142

Model Independent Upper Bound on the Lightest Higgs Boson Mass in Supersymmetric Standard Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the main features of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) is the existence of an absolute tree-level upper bound $m_h$ on the mass of the $CP=+1$ lightest Higgs boson, equal to $m_Z$, that could affect detectability at future colliders. The above bound is spoiled by {\\bf radiative corrections} and by an {\\bf enlarged Higgs sector}, as {\\em e.g.} a gauge singlet. Radiative corrections in the MSSM can push the upper bound up to $115\\ GeV$ for $m_t \\simlt 150\\ GeV$. The presence of an enlarged Higgs sector changes the previous upper bound to one depending on the electroweak scale, $\\tan \\beta$ and the gauge and Yukawa couplings of the theory. When radiative corrections are included, the allowed region in the $(m_h,m_t)$ plane depends on the scale $\\Lambda$ below which the theory remains perturbative. In particular, for models with arbitrary Higgs sectors and couplings saturating the scale $\\Lambda=10^{16}\\ GeV$ we find $m_h \\simlt 155\\ GeV$ and $m_t \\simlt 190\\ GeV$.

Mariano Quiros

1993-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

143

Performance limits of gravity-assist heat pipes with simple wick structures  

SciTech Connect

Experiments using gravity-assist heat pipes with simple wick structures were used to establish performance limits due to entrainment of the liquid by the counterflowing vapor. A physical model is postulated which leads to a single correlation predicting entrainment limits for all data investigated. The characteristic length in the entrainment parameter is the depth of the wick structure and the model infers an upper bound on this parameter.

Prenger, F.C. Jr.; Kemme, J.E.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Limit Cycle and Conserved Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate that a potential coexists with limit cycle. Here the potential determines the final distribution of population. Our demonstration consists of three steps: We first show the existence of limit from a typical physical sciences setting: the potential is a type of Mexican hat type, with the strength of a magnetic field scale with the strength the potential gradient near the limit cycle, and the friction goes to zero faster than the potential near the limit cycle. Hence the dynamics at the limit cycle is conserved. The diffusion matrix is nevertheless finite at the limit cycle. Secondly, we construct the potential in the dynamics with limit cycle in a typical dynamical systems setting. Thirdly, we argue that such a construction can be carried out in a more general situation based on a method discovered by one of us. This method of dealing with stochastic differential equation is in general different from both Ito and Stratonovich calculus. Our result may be useful in many related applications, such as in the discussion of metastability of limit cycle and in the construction of Hopfield potential in the neural network computation.

X. -M. Zhu; L. Yin; P. Ao

2004-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

145

FUEL CASK IMPACT LIMITER VULNERABILITIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cylindrical fuel casks often have impact limiters surrounding just the ends of the cask shaft in a typical 'dumbbell' arrangement. The primary purpose of these impact limiters is to absorb energy to reduce loads on the cask structure during impacts associated with a severe accident. Impact limiters are also credited in many packages with protecting closure seals and maintaining lower peak temperatures during fire events. For this credit to be taken in safety analyses, the impact limiter attachment system must be shown to retain the impact limiter following Normal Conditions of Transport (NCT) and Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC) impacts. Large casks are often certified by analysis only because of the costs associated with testing. Therefore, some cask impact limiter attachment systems have not been tested in real impacts. A recent structural analysis of the T-3 Spent Fuel Containment Cask found problems with the design of the impact limiter attachment system. Assumptions in the original Safety Analysis for Packaging (SARP) concerning the loading in the attachment bolts were found to be inaccurate in certain drop orientations. This paper documents the lessons learned and their applicability to impact limiter attachment system designs.

Leduc, D; Jeffery England, J; Roy Rothermel, R

2009-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

146

Offline count-limited certificates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we present the idea of offline count-limited certificates (or clics for short), and show how these can be implemented using minimal trusted hardware functionality already widely available today. Offline count-limited ... Keywords: authentication, offline payments, smartcards, trusted platform module (TPM)

Luis F. G. Sarmenta; Marten van Dijk; Jonathan Rhodes; Srinivas Devadas

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Diffuse supernova neutrino background is detectable in Super-Kamiokande  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The diffuse supernova neutrino background (DSNB) provides an immediate opportunity to study the emission of MeV thermal neutrinos from core-collapse supernovae. The DSNB is a powerful probe of stellar and neutrino physics, provided that the core-collapse rate is large enough and that its uncertainty is small enough. To assess the important physics enabled by the DSNB, we start with the cosmic star formation history of Hopkins and Beacom (2006) and confirm its normalization and evolution by cross-checks with the supernova rate, extragalactic background light, and stellar mass density. We find a sufficient core-collapse rate with small uncertainties that translate into a variation of {+-}40% in the DSNB event spectrum. Considering thermal neutrino spectra with effective temperatures between 4-6 MeV, the predicted DSNB is within a factor 4-2 below the upper limit obtained by Super-Kamiokande in 2003. Furthermore, detection prospects would be dramatically improved with a gadolinium-enhanced Super-Kamiokande: the backgrounds would be significantly reduced, the fluxes and uncertainties converge at the lower threshold energy, and the predicted event rate is 1.2-5.6 events yr{sup -1} in the energy range 10-26 MeV. These results demonstrate the imminent detection of the DSNB by Super-Kamiokande and its exciting prospects for studying stellar and neutrino physics.

Horiuchi, Shunsaku [Department of Physics, School of Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Beacom, John F. [Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Dwek, Eli [Observational Cosmology Lab, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

148

Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area (Redirected from Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure

149

Effects of Penetrative Radiation on the Upper Tropical Ocean Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of penetrative radiation on the upper tropical ocean circulation have been investigated with an ocean general circulation model (OGCM) with attenuation depths derived from remotely sensed ocean color data. The OGCM is a reduced ...

Raghu Murtugudde; James Beauchamp; Charles R. McClain; Marlon Lewis; Antonio J. Busalacchi

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

The Influence of an Upper Thermocline Current on Intrathermocline Eddies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the effect of an upper-layer current on the propagation of intermediate vortices, such as Mediterranean Water eddies, is investigated. The author discusses the advection mechanism proposed by Hogg and Stommel and shows how the ...

Y. G. Morel

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Initiation and Evolution of an Intense Upper-Level Front  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Within confluent northwesterly flow of an intensifying baroclinic wave over North America in late October 1963, an intense frontal zone developed in 12 h near the inflection point in the middle and upper troposphere. By 24 h after its initial ...

Frederick Sanders; Lance F. Bosart; Chung-Chieng Lai

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Upper Skagit Indian Tribe Strategic Energy Planning Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The Upper Skagit Indian Tribe was honored with a grant through the DOE's Tribal Energy Program - Golden Field Office to develop a Strategic Energy Plan for the Tribal Lands.

Lauren Rich

2008-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

153

The Circulation Dynamics and Thermodynamics of Upper Ocean Density Fronts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper extends a previous hydrodynamic circulation model of established, persistent upper ocean density fronts by including a thermodynamic or buoyancy equation in the integral treatment. An analysis is also conducted of the variables related ...

Richard W. Garvine

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Convectively Driven Turbulent Mixing in the Upper Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two experiments were performed to study the characteristics of turbulence in convective mixed layers in the upper Ocean. In the first, a diurnal convective mixed layer developed in the Bahamas under the influence of the cycle of daytime solar ...

T. J. Shay; M. C. Gregg

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Conflicting Signals of Climatic Change in the Upper Indus Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Temperature data for seven instrumental records in the Karakoram and Hindu Kush Mountains of the Upper Indus Basin (UIB) have been analyzed for seasonal and annual trends over the period 1961–2000 and compared with neighboring mountain regions ...

H. J. Fowler; D. R. Archer

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Upper Skagit Indian Tribe Strategic Energy Planning Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The Upper Skagit Indian Tribe was honored with a grant through the DOE's Tribal Energy Program - Golden Field Office to develop a Strategic Energy Plan for the Tribal Lands.

Lauren Rich

2008-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

157

The Upper Equatorial Indian Ocean. The Climatological Seasonal Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The climatological seasonal cycle of the upper equatorial Indian Ocean is discussed. A summary of the observations is given. Near the surface and below the equatorial thermocline, the observations indicate an intense variability of the equatorial ...

Gilles Reverdin

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Radiative Processes in Upper Tropospheric Mixed-Phase Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The diffusional mass evolution of hydrometeors in upper tropospheric clouds for various radiative conditions in the cloud and for varying ambient moisture Supply is simulated using a time dependent microphysical model. Radiation can play an ...

Douglas A. Wesley; Stephen K. Cox

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

An Objective Isobaric/Isentropic Technique for Upper Air Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An objective meteorological analysis technique has been developed to provide both horizontal and vertical (cross-sectional) upper air analyses. The horizontal analyses are made at grid points that lie on isobaric levels in a conventional manner. ...

Robert L. Mancuso; Roy M. Endlich; L. J. Ehernberger

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

A Climatic Review of Summer 1983 in the Upper Midwest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The review of the climate of the summer of 1983 and associated economic impacts were collated by the state climatologists of 12 states of the Upper Midwest. Their data archives and facilities permitted relatively fast analysis of cooperative ...

W. M. Wendland; L. D. Bark; D. R. Clark; R. B. Curry; J. W. Enz; K. G. Hubbard; V. Jones; E. L. Kuehnast; W. Lytle; J. Newman; F. V. Nurnberger; P. Waite

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "upper detection limit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Upper-Layer Circulation in the South China Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Upper-layer circulation is investigated by using all available historical temperature profiles combined with climatological temperature–salinity relationships in the South China Sea. Two cyclonic eddies are revealed: one is located east of ...

Tangdong Qu

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

An Upper-Tropospheric Low over Texas during Summer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

National Meteorological Center 200-mb analyses are used to develop an abridged six-year climatology of the tropical upper-tropospheric trough (TUTT) over the Gulf of Mexico. The climatology reveals large intraseasonal and interannual variability ...

Mary Beth Whitfield; Steven W. Lyons

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

EFFECT OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON WATERSHED RUNOFF FLOW - UPPER COOSA RIVER BASIN UPSTREAM FROM PLANT HAMMOND  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability of water managers to maintain adequate supplies in the coming decades depends on future weather conditions, as climate change has the potential to reduce stream flows from their current values due to potentially less precipitation and higher temperatures, and possibly rendering them unable to meet demand. The upper Coosa River basin, located in northwest Georgia, plays an important role in supplying water for industry and domestic use in northern Georgia, and has been involved in water disputes in recent times. The seven-day ten-year low flow (7Q10 flow) is the lowest average flow for seven consecutive days that has an average recurrence interval of 10 years. The 7Q10 flow is statistically derived from the observed historical flow data, and represents the low flow (drought) condition for a basin. The upper Coosa River basin also supplies cooling water for the 935MW coal-fired Hammond plant, which draws about 65% of the 7Q10 flow of the upper Coosa River to dissipate waste heat. The water is drawn through once and returned to the river directly from the generator (i.e., no cooling tower is used). Record low flows in 2007 led to use of portable cooling towers to meet temperature limits. Disruption of the Plant Hammond operation may trigger closure of area industrial facilities (e.g. paper mill). The population in Georgia is expected to double from 9 million to 18 million residents in the next 25 years, mostly in the metropolitan Atlanta area. Therefore, there will be an even greater demand for potable water and for waste assimilation. Climate change in the form of persistent droughts (causing low flows) and high ambient temperatures create regulatory compliance challenges for Plant Hammond operating with a once-through cooling system. Therefore, the Upper Coosa River basin was selected to study the effect of potential future weather change on the watershed runoff flow.

Chen, K.

2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

164

Upper Snake Provincial Assessment May 2004 APPENDIX 3-1--OVERVIEW OF THE MAJOR CAUSES LIMITING THE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

manufacturers/design firms/service providers are there in a given market, who are the top five, and what (e.g., electric vehicles and ICE equipment) might be adding significant load to the systems? · How on at the national level - especially by policy makers, national labs, and by product manufacturers. At the same time

165

The development of an index for the proximal upper extremity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis techniques specific to the proximal upper extremity have historically been overlooked in the field of ergonomics. This research effort provides a methodology that will allow the ergonomics practitioner to analyze a job and predict whether or not that job exposes workers to increased risk of proximal upper extremity disorders. Literature from the fields of physiology, biomechanics, and epidemiology was assimilated in order to understand the theories of pathogenesis of disorders in the rotator cuff and to identify the risk factors associated with proximal upper extremity disorders. A retrospective epidemiological study was conducted to identify job task variables that may contribute to the occurrence of proximal upper extremity disorders. Two proximal upper extremity constructs were proposed: a fatigue-based model and a compressive load-based model. The constructs incorporated lessons learned from the literature and results from the epidemiological study. Validation of the models was performed using data from the epidemiological study. It was determined that the fatigue-based model was a good predictor of proximal upper extremity disorders.

Walline, Erin Kurusz

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Limits to the power density of very large wind farms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A simple analysis is presented concerning an upper limit of the power density (power per unit land area) of a very large wind farm located at the bottom of a fully developed boundary layer. The analysis suggests that the limit of the power density is about 0.38 times $\\tau_{w0}U_{F0}$, where $\\tau_{w0}$ is the natural shear stress on the ground (that is observed before constructing the wind farm) and $U_{F0}$ is the natural or undisturbed wind speed averaged across the height of the farm to be constructed. Importantly, this implies that the maximum extractable power from such a very large wind farm will not be proportional to the cubic of the wind speed at the farm height, or even the farm height itself, but be proportional to $U_{F0}$.

Nishino, Takafumi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Passive fault current limiting device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A passive current limiting device and isolator is particularly adapted for use at high power levels for limiting excessive currents in a circuit in a fault condition such as an electrical short. The current limiting device comprises a magnetic core wound with two magnetically opposed, parallel connected coils of copper, a high temperature superconductor or other electrically conducting material, and a fault element connected in series with one of the coils. Under normal operating conditions, the magnetic flux density produced by the two coils cancel each other. Under a fault condition, the fault element is triggered to cause an imbalance in the magnetic flux density between the two coils which results in an increase in the impedance in the coils. While the fault element may be a separate current limiter, switch, fuse, bimetal strip or the like, it preferably is a superconductor current limiter conducting one-half of the current load compared to the same limiter wired to carry the total current of the circuit. The major voltage during a fault condition is in the coils wound on the common core in a preferred embodiment. 6 figs.

Evans, D.J.; Cha, Y.S.

1999-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

168

Upper ocean processes observed by underwater gliders in the California Current System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 5 Upper ocean thermohaline structure in thevariability in the upper ocean, J. Geophys. Res. , 105 (C7),Gill, A. E. (1982), Atmosphere-Ocean Dynamics, Int. Geophys.

Todd, Robert E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Cool Customers in the Stellar Graveyard III: Limits to Substellar Objects around nearby White Dwarfs using CFHT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Results from a groundbased high contrast imaging survey of thirteen nearby white dwarfs for substellar objects is presented. We place strict upper limits on the type of substellar objects present, ruling out the presence of anything larger than $\\sim$14 M$_{Jup}$ for eight of the white dwarfs at separations $>$19 AU and corresponding to primordial separations of $\\sim$3-6~AU assuming adiabatic mass loss without tidal interactions. With these results we place the first upper limit on the number of intermediate mass stars with brown dwarfs at separations $>$ 13 AU. We combine these results with previous work to place upper limits on the number of massive Jovian ($>$ 10 M$_{Jup}$) planets in orbit around white dwarfs whose progenitors spanned a mass range of 1-7 M$_{\\odot}$.

J. H. Debes; J. Ge; C. Ftaclas

2005-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

170

Detection device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a detection device comprising: (1) an entrance chamber; (2) a central chamber; and (3) an exit chamber. The central chamber includes an ionizing gas, anode, and means for connecting the anode with an external power supply and pulse counter.

Smith, J.E.

1981-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

171

Detection Apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention concerns a sensitive apparatus for detecting and counting neutrons, particularly neutrons liberated in an alpha, neutron reaction. The apparatus includes an improved ionization chamber structure together with an improved combination alpha-particle source and holder for the material under test.

Anderson, H.L.

1950-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

172

Bioethanol Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bioethanol Limited Bioethanol Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name Bioethanol Limited Place London, United Kingdom Zip SE1 7TJ Sector Renewable Energy Product Aims to develop a global renewable transport fuel business supplying primarily bioethanol but also biodiesel. Coordinates 51.506325°, -0.127144° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.506325,"lon":-0.127144,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

173

Renpro Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renpro Limited Renpro Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name Renpro Limited Place London, England, United Kingdom Zip WC2N 4JF Sector Renewable Energy Product String representation "Founded in 2005 ... newable energy." is too long. Coordinates 51.506325°, -0.127144° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.506325,"lon":-0.127144,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

174

Ablamp Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ablamp Limited Ablamp Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name Ablamp Limited Place Nanhai, Guangdong Province, China Sector Solar Product Manufacturer of energy-saving Compact Fluorescent Light Bulbs, solar-powered lights, LED bulbs, auto lamps and other speciality lamps. Coordinates 23.049681°, 113.173737° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":23.049681,"lon":113.173737,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

175

Solfex Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solfex Limited Solfex Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name Solfex Limited Address Energy Arena Bannister Hall Works Off Shop Lane, Higher Walton Preston, Lancashire PR5 4DZ Place Preston, United Kingdom Sector Solar Product Solar thermal collectors Phone number 01772 312847 Website http://www.solfex.co.uk/home.h Coordinates 53.743452°, -2.64416° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":53.743452,"lon":-2.64416,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

176

Cell Phone Detection Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A team composed of Rick Pratt, Dave Puczyki, Kyle Bunch, Ryan Slaugh, Morris Good, and Doug McMakin teamed together to attempt to exploit cellular telephone features and detect if a person was carrying a cellular telephone into a Limited Area. The cell phone’s electromagnetic properties were measured, analyzed, and tested in over 10 different ways to determine if an exploitable signature exists. The method that appears to have the most potential for success without adding an external tag is to measure the RF spectrum, not in the cell phone band, but between 240 and 400MHz. Figures 1- 7 show the detected signal levels from cell phones from three different manufacturers.

Pratt, Richard M.; Bunch, Kyle J.; Puzycki, David J.; Slaugh, Ryan W.; Good, Morris S.; McMakin, Douglas L.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

178

Experimental Limit to Interstellar 244Pu Abundance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Short-lived nuclides, now extinct in the solar system, are expected to be present in the interstellar medium (ISM). Grains of ISM origin were recently discovered in the inner solar system and at Earth orbit and may accrete onto Earth after ablation in the atmosphere. A favorable matrix for detection of such extraterrestrial material is presented by deep open-sea sediments with very low sedimentation rates (0.8-3 mm/kyr). We report here on the measurement of Pu isotopic abundances in a 1-kg deep-sea dry sediment collected in 1992 in the North Pacific. Our measured value of (3+-3)x10^5 244Pu atoms in the Pu-separated fraction of the sample shows no excess over the expected stratospheric nuclear fallout content and under reasonable assumptions we derive a limit of 2x10^-11 g-244Pu/g-ISM for the abundance of 244Pu in ISM.

Paul, M; Ahmad, I; Berkovits, D; Bordeanu, C; Ghelberg, S; Hashimoto, Y; Hershcovitch, A I; Jiang, S; Nakanishi, T; Sakamoto, K

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Experimental Limit to Interstellar 244Pu Abundance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Short-lived nuclides, now extinct in the solar system, are expected to be present in the interstellar medium (ISM). Grains of ISM origin were recently discovered in the inner solar system and at Earth orbit and may accrete onto Earth after ablation in the atmosphere. A favorable matrix for detection of such extraterrestrial material is presented by deep open-sea sediments with very low sedimentation rates (0.8-3 mm/kyr). We report here on the measurement of Pu isotopic abundances in a 1-kg deep-sea dry sediment collected in 1992 in the North Pacific. Our measured value of (3+-3)x10^5 244Pu atoms in the Pu-separated fraction of the sample shows no excess over the expected stratospheric nuclear fallout content and under reasonable assumptions we derive a limit of 2x10^-11 g-244Pu/g-ISM for the abundance of 244Pu in ISM.

M. Paul; A. Valenta; I. Ahmad; D. Berkovits; C. Bordeanu; S. Ghelberg; Y. Hashimoto; A. Hershkowitz; S. Jiang; T. Nakanishi; K. Sakamoto

2001-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

180

Aluminum Honeycomb Impact Limiter Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scale model testing, static-materials testing, and static and dynamic structural analyses of data on impact limiters provided data for NRC licensing of a spent-fuel transport cask. The analysis of quarter-scale drop test data is reconciled with static and dynamic structural analysis data produced using the ANSYS program.

1991-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "upper detection limit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Heart Disease Detection Using Wavelets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We develop a wavelet based method to obtain standardized gray?scale chart of both healthy hearts and of hearts suffering left ventricular hypertrophy. The hypothesis that early bad functioning of heart can be detected must be tested by comparing the wavelet analysis of the corresponding ECD with the limit cases. Several important parameters shall be taken into account such as age

A. González S.; J. L. Acosta P.; M. Sandoval M.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Direct detection and solar capture of dark matter with momentum and velocity dependent elastic scattering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore the momentum and velocity dependent elastic scattering between the dark matter (DM) particles and the nuclei in detectors and the Sun. In terms of the non-relativistic effective theory, we phenomenologically discuss ten kinds of momentum and velocity dependent DM-nucleus interactions and recalculate the corresponding upper limits on the spin-independent DM-nucleon scattering cross section from the current direct detection experiments. The DM solar capture rate is calculated for each interaction. Our numerical results show that the momentum and velocity dependent cases can give larger solar capture rate than the usual contact interaction case for almost the whole parameter space. On the other hand, we deduce the Super-Kamiokande's constraints on the solar capture rate for eight typical DM annihilation channels. In contrast to the usual contact interaction, the Super-Kamiokande and IceCube experiments can give more stringent limits on the DM-nucleon elastic scattering cross section than the current direct detection experiments for several momentum and velocity dependent DM-nucleus interactions. In addition, we investigate the mediator mass's effect on the DM elastic scattering cross section and solar capture rate.

Wan-Lei Guo; Zheng-Liang Liang; Yue-Liang Wu

2013-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

183

Spectroscopic detection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In embodiments, spectroscopic monitor monitors modulated light signals to detect low levels of contaminants and other compounds in the presence of background interference. The monitor uses a spectrometer that includes a transmissive modulator capable of causing different frequency ranges to move onto and off of the detector. The different ranges can include those with the desired signal and those selected to subtract background contributions from those with the desired signal. Embodiments of the system are particularly useful for monitoring metal concentrations in combustion effluent.

Woskov, Paul P. (Bedford, MA); Hadidi, Kamal (Cambridge, MA)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Experimental Limit to Interstellar 244 Pu Abundance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Short-lived nuclides, now extinct in the solar system, are expected to be present in interstellar matter (ISM). Grains of ISM origin were recently discovered in the inner solar system and at Earth orbit and may accrete onto Earth after ablation in the atmosphere. A favorable matrix for detection of such extraterrestrial material is presented by deep-sea sediments with very low sedimentation rates (0.8–3 mm/kyr). We report here on the measurement of Pu isotopic abundances in a 1-kg deep-sea dry sediment collected in 1992 in the North Pacific. Our estimate of (3 ± 3) × 105 244Pu atoms in the Pu-separated fraction of the sample shows no excess over the expected stratospheric nuclear fallout content and under reasonable assumptions sets a limit of 0.2 244 Pu atoms/cm 2 yr for extra-terrestrial deposition. Using available data on ISM steady-state flux on Earth, we derive a limit of 2 × 10?11 g-244Pu/g-ISM for the abundance of 244Pu in ISM. Subject headings: Nuclear reactions, nucleosynthesis, abundances – ISM: abundances–instrumentation: spectrographs–methods: laboratory

M. Paul; A. Valenta; I. Ahmad; D. Berkovits; C. Bordeanu; S. Ghelberg; A. Hershkowitz; S. Jiang; T. Nakanishi; K. Sakamoto

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Upper Ohio River Valley Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Upper Ohio River Valley Project Upper Ohio River Valley Project In cooperation with key stakeholders including EPA, local and state environmental agencies, industry, and academia, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has established the Upper Ohio River Valley Project (UORVP), a network for monitoring and characterizing PM2.5 in the Upper Ohio River Valley. This region was chosen because it has a high density of coal-fired electric utilities, heavy industries (e.g. coke and steel making), light industry, and transportation emission sources. It is also ideally situated to serve as a platform for the study of interstate pollution transport issues. This region, with its unique topography (hills and river valleys) as well as a good mix of urban and rural areas, has a high population of elderly who are susceptible to health impacts of fine particulate as well as other related environmental issues (e.g., acid rain, Hg deposition, ozone). A world-class medical research/university system is also located in the region, which will facilitate the subsequent use of the air quality data in studies of PM2.5 health effects.

186

A General Circulation Model for Upper Ocean Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A general circulation model (GCM) of the ocean that emphasizes the simulation of the upper ocean has been developed. This emphasis is in keeping with its future intent, that of an air-sea coupled model. The basic model is the primitive equation ...

A. Rosati; K. Miyakoda

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

ENSO Signals in Global Upper-Ocean Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The time-space evolution of the El Nińo-Southern Oscillation in sea surface temperature (SST) and heat storage of the upper 400 m (HS400) for the Pacific, Indian, and Atlantic Oceans is investigated for 13 years (1979–1991). EOF and rotated EOF (...

Yves M. Tourre; Warren B. White

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Closed-Form Upper Bounds in Static Cost Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The classical approach to automatic cost analysis consists of two phases. Given a program and some measure of cost, the analysis first produces cost relations (CRs), i.e., recursive equations which capture the cost of the program in ... Keywords: Abstract interpretation, Automatic complexity analysis, Closed-form upper bounds, Cost analysis, Programming languages, Resource analysis, Static analysis

Elvira Albert; Puri Arenas; Samir Genaim; Germán Puebla

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Upper Snake Provincial Assessment May 2004 5 References  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Hyndman. 1989. Roadside geology of Idaho. Mountain Press Publishing, Missoula, MT. 394 pp. American Fisheries Society (AFS), Idaho Chapter. 2000. Website. http://www.fisheries.org/idaho/. Accessed November. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory: an ecological treasure on the upper Snake River Plain. Rangelands

190

Upper Snake Provincial Assessment May 2004 6. Participants and Affiliations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the Upper Snake Provincial Assessment Idaho Department of Fish and Game: Gregg Servheen Jon Beals Lance-Bannock Tribes Jim Fredericks Idaho Fish and Game Dan Garren Idaho Fish and Game Lauri Hanauska-Brown Idaho Fish Management Jim Mende Idaho Fish and Game Kevin Meyer Idaho Fish and Game Deb Mignogno US Fish and Wildlife

191

Inter-university Upper atmosphere Global Observation NETwork (IUGONET)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

://www.iugonet.org/en IUGONET Development of analysis software The IUGONET project - objectives Metadata DB for Upper Atmosphere on TDAS (THEMIS Data Analysis Software Suite) composed of IDL routines. The software will have capability AE index MAGAS KTB Meteor EAR MU GUI mode Loaded data list Time-range set Choice of instrument Choice

Takada, Shoji

192

Upper-Ocean Heat Balance in the Kuroshio Extension Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A horizontally two-dimensional mixed-layer model is used to study the upper-ocean heat balance in the Kuroshio Extension region (30°–40°N, 141°–175°E). Horizontal dependency is emphasized because, in addition to vertical entrainment and surface ...

Bo Qiu; Kathryn A. Kelly

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Methane-derived hydrocarbons produced under upper-mantle conditions  

SciTech Connect

There is widespread evidence that petroleum originates from biological processes. Whether hydrocarbons can also be produced from abiogenic precursor molecules under the high-pressure, high-temperature conditions characteristic of the upper mantle remains an open question. It has been proposed that hydrocarbons generated in the upper mantle could be transported through deep faults to shallower regions in the Earth's crust, and contribute to petroleum reserves. Here we use in situ Raman spectroscopy in laser-heated diamond anvil cells to monitor the chemical reactivity of methane and ethane under upper-mantle conditions. We show that when methane is exposed to pressures higher than 2 GPa, and to temperatures in the range of 1,000-1,500 K, it partially reacts to form saturated hydrocarbons containing 2-4 carbons (ethane, propane and butane) and molecular hydrogen and graphite. Conversely, exposure of ethane to similar conditions results in the production of methane, suggesting that the synthesis of saturated hydrocarbons is reversible. Our results support the suggestion that hydrocarbons heavier than methane can be produced by abiogenic processes in the upper mantle.

Kolesnikov, Anton; Kutcherov, Vladimir G.; Goncharov, Alexander F.; (CIW); (RITS)

2009-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

194

Channeling and Countercurrent in the Upper Rhine Valley: Numerical Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the upper Rhine Valley, located in the southwest part of the Federal Republic of Germany, a pronounced channeling of the airflow is observed and occasionally also a countercurrent, although the valley is very flat and very broad (35 km), and ...

G. Gross; F. Wippermann

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Optimal estimation with limited measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper introduces a sequential estimation problem with two decision makers, or agents, who work as members of a team. One of the agents sits at an observation post, and makes sequential observations about the state of an underlying stochastic process ... Keywords: WSNs, limited information, networked control systems, optimal estimation, real-time control, real-time monitoring, recursive estimation, sequential estimation, wireless networks, wireless sensor networks

Orhan C. Imer; Tamer Basar

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Hydrogen leak detection - low cost distributed gas sensors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

leak detection that can be economically satisfied using our technology. * Due to limited refinery capacity, downtime in the oil and gas refining industry has become of critical...

197

Heart of Darkness: The Significance of the Zeptobarn Scale for Neutralino Direct Detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The direct detection of dark matter through its elastic scattering off nucleons is among the most promising methods for establishing the particle identity of dark matter. The current bound on the spin-independent scattering cross section is sigma^SI 1 TeV, effectively decoupling squarks and sleptons from neutralino dark matter phenomenology. In this case, we find characteristic cross sections in the narrow range 1 zb 70 GeV. As sfermion masses are lowered to near their experimental limit mtilde ~ 400 GeV, the upper and lower limits of this range are extended, but only by factors of around two, and the lower limit is not significantly altered by relaxing many particle physics assumptions, varying the strange quark content of the nucleon, including the effects of galactic small-scale structure, or assuming other components of dark matter. Experiments are therefore rapidly entering the heart of dark matter-favored supersymmetry parameter space. If no signal is seen, supersymmetric models must contain some level of fine-tuning, and we identify and analyze several possibilities. Barring large cancellations, however, in a large and generic class of models, if thermal relic neutralinos are a significant component of dark matter, experiments will discover them as they probe down to the zeptobarn scale.

Jonathan L. Feng; David Sanford

2010-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

198

New brown dwarfs in Upper Sco using UKIDSS Galactic Cluster Survey science verification data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present first results from a deep (J = 18.7), wide-field (6.5 square degrees) infrared (ZYJHK) survey in the Upper Sco association conducted within the science verification phase of the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey Galactic Cluster Survey (GCS). Cluster members define a sequence well separated from field stars in the (Z-J,Z) colour-magnitude diagram. We have selected a total of 164 candidates with J = 10.5-18.7 mag from the (Z-J,Z) and (Y-J,Y) diagrams. We further investigated the location of those candidates in the other colour-magnitude and colour-colour diagrams to weed out contaminants. The cross-correlation of the GCS catalogue with the 2MASS database confirms the membership of 116 photometric candidates down to 20 Jupiter masses as they lie within a 2 sigma circle centred on the association mean motion. The final list of cluster members contains 129 sources with masses between 0.3 and 0.007 Msun. We extracted a dozen new low-mass brown dwarfs below 20 Mjup, the limit of previous surveys in the region. Finally, we have derived the mass function in Upper Sco over the 0.3-0.01 Msun mass range, best fit by a single segment with a slope of index alpha = 0.6+/-0.1, in agreement with previous determination in open clusters.

N. Lodieu; N. C. Hambly; R. F. Jameson; S. T. Hodgkin; G. Carraro; T. R. Kendall

2006-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

199

Radon detection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A detector for atmospheric radon using a long range alpha detector as its sensing element is described. An electrostatic filter removes ions from ambient air, while allowing radon atoms to pass into a decay cavity. Here, radon atoms are allowed to decay, creating air ions. These air ions are drawn by a fan through a second electrostatic filter which can be activated or deactivated, and into the long range alpha detector. With the second electrostatic filter activated, no air ions are allowed to pass, and the signal output from the long range alpha detector consists of only the electronic background. With the second electrostatic filter deactivated, air ions and cosmic rays will be detected. The cosmic ray contribution can be minimized by shielding. 3 figures.

MacArthur, D.W.; Allander, K.S.; Bounds, J.A.

1994-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

200

Radon detection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A detector for atmospheric radon using a long range alpha detector as its sensing element. An electrostatic filter removes ions from ambient air, while allowing radon atoms to pass into a decay cavity. Here, radon atoms are allowed to decay, creating air ions. These air ions are drawn by a fan through a second electrostatic filter which can be activated or deactivated, and into the long range alpha detector. With the second electrostatic filter activated, no air ions are allowed to pass, and the signal output from the long range alpha detector consists of only the electronic background. With the second electrostatic filter deactivated, air ions and cosmic rays will be detected. The cosmic ray contribution can be minimized by shielding.

MacArthur, Duncan W. (Los Alamos, NM); Allander, Krag S. (Ojo Caliente, NM); Bounds, John A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "upper detection limit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Definition: System Operating Limit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Operating Limit Operating Limit Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png System Operating Limit The value (such as MW, MVar, Amperes, Frequency or Volts) that satisfies the most limiting of the prescribed operating criteria for a specified system configuration to ensure operation within acceptable reliability criteria. System Operating Limits are based upon certain operating criteria. These include, but are not limited to: Facility Ratings (Applicable pre- and post- Contingency equipment or facility ratings), Transient Stability Ratings (Applicable pre- and post-Contingency Stability Limits), Voltage Stability Ratings (Applicable pre- and post- Contingency Voltage Stability), System Voltage Limits (Applicable pre- and post- Contingency Voltage Limits)[1] Also Known As SOL

202

Improved Limits on $B^{0}$ Decays to Invisible $(+gamma)$ Final States  

SciTech Connect

We establish improved upper limits on branching fractions for B{sup 0} decays to final states where the decay products are purely invisible (i.e., no observable final state particles) and for final states where the only visible product is a photon. Within the Standard Model, these decays have branching fractions that are below the current experimental sensitivity, but various models of physics beyond the Standard Model predict significant contributions for these channels. Using 471 million B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon} (4S) resonance by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, we establish upper limits at the 90% confidence level of 2.4 x 10{sup -5} for the branching fraction of B{sup 0} {yields} invisible and 1.7 x 10{sup -5} for the branching fraction of B{sup 0} {yields} invisible + {gamma}.

Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Palano, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; /Bergen U.; Brown, David Nathan; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; So, R.Y.; /British Columbia U.; Khan, A.; /Brunel U.; Blinov, V.E.; /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U., Comp. Sci. Dept. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U.; /more authors.; ,

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Simulating the Upper Barren Zone and the Ore Zone tests performed with the EMC logging tool  

SciTech Connect

The primary purpose of the Multispectral Nuclear Logging project is to assess the effectiveness of applying nuclear borehole-logging techniques to the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environmental Restoration (ER) program, adapt the technology to improve these capabilities, and transfer that technology to industry. The purpose of the Monte Carlo simulations using MCNP is to predict the minimum concentration levels for environmental contaminants that could be detected by Multispectral Logging (MSL). The Monte Carlo code used for this type of simulation, MCNP, should be benchmarked against experimental data to show that the user can accurately reproduce the proper gamma-ray spectrum. Experimental data was obtained from Westinghouse-Hanford Company using the Environmental Measurements Corp. (EMC) logging tool in the Upper Barren Zone (UBZ) and Ore Zone (OZ) calibration models at Grand Junction. This paper continues the discussion of benchmarking MCNP using the UBZ and OZ data.

Frankle, S.C.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

THE SIZE, SHAPE, ALBEDO, DENSITY, AND ATMOSPHERIC LIMIT OF TRANSNEPTUNIAN OBJECT (50000) QUAOAR FROM MULTI-CHORD STELLAR OCCULTATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present results derived from the first multi-chord stellar occultations by the transneptunian object (50000) Quaoar, observed on 2011 May 4 and 2012 February 17, and from a single-chord occultation observed on 2012 October 15. If the timing of the five chords obtained in 2011 were correct, then Quaoar would possess topographic features (crater or mountain) that would be too large for a body of this mass. An alternative model consists in applying time shifts to some chords to account for possible timing errors. Satisfactory elliptical fits to the chords are then possible, yielding an equivalent radius R{sub equiv} = 555 {+-} 2.5 km and geometric visual albedo p{sub V} = 0.109 {+-} 0.007. Assuming that Quaoar is a Maclaurin spheroid with an indeterminate polar aspect angle, we derive a true oblateness of {epsilon}= 0.087{sup +0.0268}{sub -0.0175}, an equatorial radius of 569{sup +24}{sub -17} km, and a density of 1.99 {+-} 0.46 g cm{sup -3}. The orientation of our preferred solution in the plane of the sky implies that Quaoar's satellite Weywot cannot have an equatorial orbit. Finally, we detect no global atmosphere around Quaoar, considering a pressure upper limit of about 20 nbar for a pure methane atmosphere.

Braga-Ribas, F.; Vieira-Martins, R.; Camargo, J. I. B. [Observatorio Nacional, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Sicardy, B.; Lellouch, E.; Lecacheux, J. [Observatoire de Paris, LESIA, F-92195 Meudon (France); Ortiz, J. L.; Morales, N. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia-CSIC, E-18080 Granada (Spain); Tancredi, G.; Roland, S.; Bruzzone, S. [Observatorio Astronomico Los Molinos, Montevideo U-12400 (Uruguay); Assafin, M. [Observatorio do Valongo/UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Behrend, R. [Observatoire de Geneve, Sauverny (Switzerland); Vachier, F.; Colas, F. [Observatoire de Paris, IMCCE, F-75014 Paris (France); Maury, A. [San Pedro de Atacama Celestial Explorations, San Pedro de Atacama (Chile); Emilio, M. [Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, Ponta Grossa (Brazil); Amorim, A. [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis (Brazil); Unda-Sanzana, E. [Unidad de Astronomia, Universidad de Antofagasta, Antofagasta (Chile); Almeida, L. A., E-mail: ribas@on.br [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, DAS, Sao Jose dos Campos (Brazil); and others

2013-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

205

New limits on the ordered moments in ?-Pu and Ga-stabilized ?-Pu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the first µSR measurements ever performed on elemental Pu, and set the most stringent upper limits to date on the magnitude of the ordered moment µord in ?-Pu and ?-stabilized Pu (alloyed with 4.3 at. % Ga). Assuming a nominal hyperfine coupling field of 1 kOe/µB we find µord ? 10 ?3 µB at T ? = 4 K. Key words: plutonium magnetism, f-electron, µSR 1.

R. H. Heffner A; G. D. Morris A

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Detection of pump degradation  

SciTech Connect

This Phase II Nuclear Plant Aging Research study examines the methods of detecting pump degradation that are currently employed in domestic and overseas nuclear facilities. This report evaluates the criteria mandated by required pump testing at U.S. nuclear power plants and compares them to those features characteristic of state-of-the-art diagnostic programs and practices currently implemented by other major industries. Since the working condition of the pump driver is crucial to pump operability, a brief review of new applications of motor diagnostics is provided that highlights recent developments in this technology. The routine collection and analysis of spectral data is superior to all other technologies in its ability to accurately detect numerous types and causes of pump degradation. Existing ASME Code testing criteria do not require the evaluation of pump vibration spectra but instead overall vibration amplitude. The mechanical information discernible from vibration amplitude analysis is limited, and several cases of pump failure were not detected in their early stages by vibration monitoring. Since spectral analysis can provide a wealth of pertinent information concerning the mechanical condition of rotating machinery, its incorporation into ASME testing criteria could merit a relaxation in the monthly-to-quarterly testing schedules that seek to verify and assure pump operability. Pump drivers are not included in the current battery of testing. Operational problems thought to be caused by pump degradation were found to be the result of motor degradation. Recent advances in nonintrusive monitoring techniques have made motor diagnostics a viable technology for assessing motor operability. Motor current/power analysis can detect rotor bar degradation and ascertain ranges of hydraulically unstable operation for a particular pump and motor set. The concept of using motor current or power fluctuations as an indicator of pump hydraulic load stability is presented.

Greene, R.H.; Casada, D.A.; Ayers, C.W. [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Upper Cumberland E M C | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Upper Cumberland E M C Upper Cumberland E M C Place Tennessee Utility Id 19574 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial GSA 1 Commercial Commercial GSA 2 Commercial Commercial GSA 3 Commercial Industrial GSA 1 Industrial Industrial GSA 2 Industrial Industrial GSA 3 Industrial Residential Residential outdoor light(Mercury 175 Watt) Lighting outdoor light(Mercury 400 Watt) Lighting outdoor light(Metal Halide 1000 watt FL) Lighting outdoor light(Metal Halide 250 watt FL) Lighting

208

Instrument Characterization for the Detection of Long-term Changes in Stratospheric Ozone: An Analysis of the SBUY/2 Radiometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scientific objective of unambiguously detecting subtle global trends in upper stratospheric ozone requires that one maintain a thorough understanding of the satellite-based remote sensors intended for this task. The instrument now in use for ...

S. E. Frederick; R. P. Cebula; D. F. Heath

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

EIS-0408: Upper Great Plains Programmatic Wind EIS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EIS, being prepared jointly by DOE's Western Area Power Administration and the Department of the Interior’s Fish and Wildlife Service, will evaluate the environmental impacts of wind energy development in Iowa, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota – Western’s Upper Great Plains customer service region. Western will use the EIS to implement a comprehensive regional program to manage interconnection requests for wind energy projects.

210

Limited-life cartridge primers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cartridge primer is described which utilizes an explosive that can be designed to become inactive in a predetermined period of time: a limited-life primer. The explosive or combustible material of the primer is an inorganic reactive multilayer (RML). The reaction products of the RML are sub-micron grains of non-corrosive inorganic compounds that would have no harmful effects on firearms or cartridge cases. Unlike use of primers containing lead components, primers utilizing RML`s would not present a hazard to the environment. The sensitivity of an RML is determined by the physical structure and the stored interfacial energy. The sensitivity lowers with time due to a decrease in interfacial energy resulting from interdiffusion of the elemental layers. Time-dependent interdiffusion is predictable, thereby enabling the functional lifetime of an RML primer to be predetermined by the initial thickness and materials selection of the reacting layers. 10 figs.

Makowiecki, D.M.; Rosen, R.S.

1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

211

Limited-life cartridge primers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cartridge primer which utilizes an explosive that can be designed to become inactive in a predetermined period of time: a limited-life primer. The explosive or combustible material of the primer is an inorganic reactive multilayer (RML). The reaction products of the RML are sub-micron grains of non-corrosive inorganic compounds that would have no harmful effects on firearms or cartridge cases. Unlike use of primers containing lead components, primers utilizing RML's would not present a hazard to the environment. The sensitivity of an RML is determined by the physical structure and the stored interfacial energy. The sensitivity lowers with time due to a decrease in interfacial energy resulting from interdiffusion of the elemental layers. Time-dependent interdiffusion is predictable, thereby enabling the functional lifetime of an RML primer to be predetermined by the initial thickness and materials selection of the reacting layers.

Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); Rosen, Robert S. (San Ramon, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Green Heat Solutions Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Heat Solutions Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name Green Heat Solutions Limited Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:http:www.greenheating Region Scotland LinkedIn...

213

Local Generation Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Limited Place United Kingdom Sector Biomass Product UK-based biomass firm developing anaerobic digestion plants. References Local Generation Limited1 LinkedIn Connections...

214

Exorka International Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exorka International Limited is a specialist developer of low-temperature geothermal electricity generation, incorporated in England. References Exorka International Limited1...

215

Colony Mills Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mills Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name Colony Mills Limited Place Lahore, Pakistan Sector Solar Product Yarn manufacturer, plans to set up solar thermal plant....

216

Greenergy Biofuels Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenergy Biofuels Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name Greenergy Biofuels Limited Place London, Greater London, United Kingdom Zip WC1V 7BD Sector Biofuels Product Imports,...

217

United Biofuels Private Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon United Biofuels Private Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name United Biofuels Private Limited Place Tamil Nadu, India...

218

China Innovation Investment Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Innovation Investment Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name China Innovation Investment Limited Place Hong Kong Sector Solar Product Hong Kong-listed alternative energy...

219

Undergraduate Program Time Limits and Work Schedules  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Time Limits and Work Schedules Undergraduate Program Time Limits and Work Schedules Point your career towards LANL: work with the best minds on the planet in an inclusive...

220

Are there capacity limitations in symmetry perception?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1980). The demonstration of capacity limitation. Cognitive1972). Visual processing capacity and attentional control.J. (1996). Goodness of CAPACITY LIMIT OF SYMMETRY PERCEPTION

Huang, L Q; Pashler, Harold; Junge, J A

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "upper detection limit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Voith Hydro Wavegen Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Voith Hydro Wavegen Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name Voith Hydro Wavegen Limited Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:www.wavegen.co.uk Region United Kingdom...

222

Prepared for 1 st Upper Midwest Regional Freight Transportation Workshop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We are here at this workshop because of a common interest in freight. We bring a wide variety of perspectives – the typically longer-range perspective of the public providers of highways; the often short-range perspective of the private sector carriers, shippers and logistics managers; and the independent perspective of university researchers. Our immediate goal is to identify critical issues in facilitating regional freight transportation in the Upper Midwest. What are the gaps in current planning, organizational and financial methods? What key infrastructure improvements are needed to make the region competitive in the twenty first century? A regional perspective is logical because most freight does not stay within the borders of an individual state. For the Upper Midwest region Figures 1 and 2 show that the proportion of all ton-miles of truck shipments that stay within a state ranges from a low of 17 % in Indiana to a high of 46 % in Michigan. The regional average is 26 % which is essential the same as the national average of 27 % (1). Because rail shipments tend to be much longer than truck shipments, the proportion of rail shipments that stay within a state are likely to be even smaller. Thus, most freight shipments are affected by conditions outside of the state of origin or destination. By working together states, carriers, shippers and other stakeholders in the Upper

Dr. Robert; L. Smith

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Limits to the muon flux from neutralino annihilations in the Sun with the AMANDA detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A search for an excess of muon-neutrinos from neutralino annihilations in the Sun has been performed with the AMANDA-II neutrino detector using data collected in 143.7 days of live-time in 2001. No excess over the expected atmospheric neutrino background has been observed. An upper limit at 90% confidence level has been obtained on the annihilation rate of captured neutralinos in the Sun, as well as the corresponding muon flux limit at the Earth, both as functions of the neutralino mass in the range 100 GeV-5000 GeV.

The AMANDA collaboration; M. Ackermann

2005-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

224

Arc fault detection system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An arc fault detection system for use on ungrounded or high-resistance-grounded power distribution systems is provided which can be retrofitted outside electrical switchboard circuits having limited space constraints. The system includes a differential current relay that senses a current differential between current flowing from secondary windings located in a current transformer coupled to a power supply side of a switchboard, and a total current induced in secondary windings coupled to a load side of the switchboard. When such a current differential is experienced, a current travels through a operating coil of the differential current relay, which in turn opens an upstream circuit breaker located between the switchboard and a power supply to remove the supply of power to the switchboard.

Jha, Kamal N. (Bethel Park, PA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Arc fault detection system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An arc fault detection system for use on ungrounded or high-resistance-grounded power distribution systems is provided which can be retrofitted outside electrical switchboard circuits having limited space constraints. The system includes a differential current relay that senses a current differential between current flowing from secondary windings located in a current transformer coupled to a power supply side of a switchboard, and a total current induced in secondary windings coupled to a load side of the switchboard. When such a current differential is experienced, a current travels through a operating coil of the differential current relay, which in turn opens an upstream circuit breaker located between the switchboard and a power supply to remove the supply of power to the switchboard. 1 fig.

Jha, K.N.

1999-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

226

Primordial Magnetic Field Limits from CMB Trispectrum - Scalar Modes and Planck Constraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cosmic magnetic fields are observed to be coherent on large scales and could have a primordial origin. Non-Gaussian signals in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) are generated by primordial magnetic fields as the magnetic stresses and temperature anisotropy they induce depend quadratically on the magnetic field. We compute the CMB scalar trispectrum on large angular scales, for nearly scale-invariant magnetic fields, sourced via the Sachs-Wolfe effect. The trispectra induced by magnetic energy density and by magnetic scalar anisotropic stress are found to have typical magnitudes of approximately $10^{-29}$ and $10^{-19}$, respectively. The scalar anisotropic stress trispectrum is also calculated in the flat-sky approximation and yields a similar result. Observational limits on CMB non-Gaussianity from the Planck mission data allow us to set upper limits of $B_0 \\lesssim 0.6 $ nG on the present value of the primordial cosmic magnetic field. Considering the inflationary magnetic curvature mode in the trispectrum can further tighten the magnetic field upper limit to $B_0 \\lesssim 0.05 $ nG. These sub-nanoGauss constraints from the magnetic trispectrum are the most stringent limits so far on the strength of primordial magnetic fields, on megaparsec scales, significantly better than the limits obtained from the CMB bispectrum and the CMB power spectrum.

Pranjal Trivedi; Kandaswamy Subramanian; T. R. Seshadri

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

227

Fuel washout detection system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for detecting grossly failed reactor fuel by detection of particulate matter as accumulated on a filter.

Colburn, Richard P. (Pasco, WA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Regression Forecasting of the Onset of the Indian Summer Monsoon with Antecedent Upper Air Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is shown that the recorded onset dates of the summer monsoon in southwestern India can be closely related functionally to the antecedent upper air conditions. The antecedent upper air conditions are represented by April mean values of the ...

Ernest C. Kung; Taher A. Sharif

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

North Woods River: The St. Croix River in Upper Midwest History  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

>, PhD Student, Department of History, PO Box 6023, BuildingRiver in Upper Midwest History. By McMahon, Eileen M. andRiver in Upper Midwest History. Madison, WI: University of

Karalus, Daniel E

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Can Lightning Observations be Used as an Indicator of Upper-Tropospheric Water Vapor Variability?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lightning activity in thunderstorms is closely related to the intensity of vertical updrafts indeep convective clouds that also transport large amounts of moisture into the upper troposphere. Small changes in the amount of upper-tropospheric ...

Colin Price; Mustafa Asfur

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Global Observations of Upper-Tropospheric Water Vapor Derived from TOVS Radiance Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a physically based method for the retrieval of upper-tropospheric humidity (UTH) and upper-tropospheric column water vapor (UTCWV) based an the use of radiance data collected by the TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS), ...

Graeme L. Stephens; Darren L. Jackson; Ian Wittmeyer

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Observational Analysis of an Upper-Level Inverted Trough during the 2004 North American Monsoon Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Upper-level inverted troughs (IVs) associated with midlatitude breaking Rossby waves or tropical upper-troposphere troughs (TUTTs) have been identified as important contributors to the variability of rainfall in the North American monsoon (NAM) ...

Zachary O. Finch; Richard H. Johnson

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Photon and graviton mass limits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We review past and current studies of possible long-distance, low-frequency deviations from Maxwell electrodynamics and Einstein gravity. Both have passed through three phases: (1) Testing the inverse-square laws of Newton and Coulomb, (2) Seeking a nonzero value for the rest mass of photon or graviton, and (3) Considering more degrees of freedom, allowing mass while preserving gauge or general-coordinate invariance. For electrodynamics there continues to be no sign of any deviation. Since our previous review the lower limit on the photon Compton wavelength (associated with weakening of electromagnetic fields in vacuum over large distance scale) has improved by four orders of magnitude, to about one astronomical unit. Rapid current progress in astronomical observations makes it likely that there will be further advances. These ultimately could yield a bound exceeding galactic dimensions, as has long been contemplated. Meanwhile, for gravity there have been strong arguments about even the concept of a graviton rest mass. At the same time there are striking observations, commonly labeled 'dark matter' and 'dark energy' that some argue imply modified gravity. This makes the questions for gravity much more interesting. For dark matter, which involves increased attraction at large distances, any explanation by modified gravity would be qualitatively different from graviton mass. Because dark energy is associated with reduced attraction at large distances, it might be explained by a graviton-mass-like effect.

Nieto, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Goldhaber Scharff, Alfred [SUNY

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Thermodynamic Limits of Solar Cells with Non-ideal Optical Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Shockley-Queisser (S-Q) theory defines the thermodynamic upper limits for Jsc, Voc, FF, and efficiency of a solar cell. The classical calculation assumes an abrupt onset of absorption at the band-edge, perfect absorption for all energies above the bandgap, and absence of non-radiative recombination. These assumptions are never satisfied for any practical solar cell. In this paper, we explain how the S-Q limits are redefined in the presence of the non-ideal optical effects, and we provide closed-form analytical expressions for the new limits for Jsc, Voc, and FF. Remarkably, these new limits can be achieved to a very high degree, even with significantly imperfect materials.

M. Ryyan Khan; Peter Bermel; Muhammad A. Alam

2013-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

235

A procedure for finding an improved upper bound on the number of optimal design points  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Knowing an upper bound on the number of optimal design points greatly simplifies the search for an optimal design. Caratheodory's Theorem is commonly used to identify an upper bound. However, the upper bound from Caratheodory's Theorem is relatively ... Keywords: Carathéodory's theorem, Cardinality of design, Experimental design, Nonlinear regression

Seung Won Hyun; Min Yang; Nancy Flournoy

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Effects of tensile loading on upper shelf fracture toughness  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Constraint has been an important consideration in fracture mechanics from the earliest work that was done to develop the 1974 version of the ASTM Standard E399. O`Dowd and Shih (1991) have proposed that the difference in crack tip stress fields can be quantified in terms of a field quantity that they have call Q. The Q quantity is a function of J, the crack shape and size, the structural geometry, mode of loading and on the level of deformation and can only be calculated from a high resolution elastic-plastic computational analysis. A similar, simpler, but more controversial approach has been suggested by Betegon and Hancock (1991), who use the non-singular term of the elastic, crack singularity solution, called the T-Stress, as a measure of elastic-plastic crack tip constraint. The objective of this work is to develop some upper shelf, elastic-plastic experimental results to attempt to investigate the applicability of the Q and T stress parameters to the correlation of upper shelf initiation toughness and J resistance curves. The first objective was to obtain upper shelf J resistance curves, J{sub Ic}, and tearing resistance results for a range of applied constraint. The J-Q and J-T stress loci were developed and compared with the expectations of the O`Dowd and Shih and the Betegon and Hancock analyses. Constraint was varied by changing the crack length and also by changing the mode of loading from bending to predominantly tensile. The principle conclusions of this work are that J{sub Ic} does not appear to be dependent on T stress or Q while the material tearing resistance is dependent on T stress and Q, with the tearing modulus increasing as constraint decreases.

Joyce, J.A. [Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD (United States); Link, R.E. [Naval Surface Warfare Center, Annapolis, MD (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Disassembly and defueling of the upper core support assembly  

SciTech Connect

During normal operation of the reactor plant, the upper core support assembly (UCSA) holds the fuel assemblies in a defined geometry and establishes the flow path of the reactor coolant in the reactor vessel. Sometime during the course of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 accident, molten core material melted through a portion of the UCSA and flowed outside the confines of the core region into normally inaccessible areas. As a result, the UCSA must now be disassembled to remove the relocated core material. The paper includes UCSA description, a discussion of equipment design basis, and a discussion of the defueling approach.

Rodabaugh, J.M.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

RO-VIBRATIONAL CO DETECTED IN THE {beta} PICTORIS CIRCUMSTELLAR DISK  

SciTech Connect

We present high-resolution near-infrared spectra of {beta} Pictoris-a nearby young star with a debris disk. Fundamental low-J CO absorption lines are detected and strict upper limits are placed on the flux of v = 2-1 low-J CO emission lines. The limit on the UV fluorescent emission flux in the v = 2-1 lines is used to place a tight constraint on the inner extent of the CO gas. Assuming H I is the primary collision partner, the sub-thermal population of the low-J v = 0 rotational levels constrains the density of the gas in the disk to n{sub H} = (2.5{sup +7.1}{sub -1.2}) x 10{sup 5} cm{sup -3}. If the distribution of hydrogen follows that of the other metals in the disk, we find that the mass of the gas in the disk is 0.17{sup +0.47}{sub -0.08} M{sub +}. We compare this mass to the gas mass necessary to brake the metals in the disk through ion-neutral reactions.

Troutman, Matthew R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri-St. Louis, 8001 Natural Bridge Road, St. Louis, MO 63121 (United States); Hinkle, Kenneth H.; Najita, Joan R. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Rettig, Terrence W. [Center for Astrophysics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Brittain, Sean D., E-mail: mtroutm@clemson.edu, E-mail: khinkle@noao.edu, E-mail: najita@noao.edu, E-mail: trettig@nd.edu, E-mail: sbritt@clemson.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, 118 Kinard Laboratory, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Limits on Very High Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts with the Milagro  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Limits on Very High Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts with the Milagro Observatory Miguel F of Milagro allow it to detect very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray burst emission with much higher sensitivity gamma-ray burst satellites at keV to MeV energies. Even in the absence of a positive detection, VHE

California at Santa Cruz, University of

240

Limits on a muon flux from neutralino annihilations in the Sun with the IceCube 22-string detector  

SciTech Connect

A search for muon neutrinos from neutralino annihilations in the Sun has been performed with the IceCube 22-string neutrino detector using data collected in 104.3 days of live-time in 2007. No excess over the expected atmospheric background has been observed. Upper limits have been obtained on the annihilation rate of captured neutralinos in the Sun and converted to limits on the WIMP-proton cross-sections for WIMP masses in the range 250-5000 GeV. These results are the most stringent limits to date on neutralino annihilation in the Sun.

IceCube Collaboration; Klein, Spencer

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "upper detection limit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

DETECTION OF ELEMENTS AT ALL THREE r-PROCESS PEAKS IN THE METAL-POOR STAR HD 160617  

SciTech Connect

We report the first detection of elements at all three r-process peaks in the metal-poor halo star HD 160617. These elements include arsenic and selenium, which have not been detected previously in halo stars, and the elements tellurium, osmium, iridium, and platinum, which have been detected previously. Absorption lines of these elements are found in archive observations made with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telescope. We present up-to-date absolute atomic transition probabilities and complete line component patterns for these elements. Additional archival spectra of this star from several ground-based instruments allow us to derive abundances or upper limits of 45 elements in HD 160617, including 27 elements produced by neutron-capture reactions. The average abundances of the elements at the three r-process peaks are similar to the predicted solar system r-process residuals when scaled to the abundances in the rare earth element domain. This result for arsenic and selenium may be surprising in light of predictions that the production of the lightest r-process elements generally should be decoupled from the heavier r-process elements.

Roederer, Ian U. [Carnegie Observatories, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Lawler, James E., E-mail: iur@obs.carnegiescience.edu, E-mail: jelawler@wisc.edu [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Definition: Fault Current Limiting | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Limiting Limiting Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Fault Current Limiting Fault current limiting can be achieved through sensors, communications, information processing, and actuators that allow the utility to use a higher degree of network coordination to reconfigure the system to prevent fault currents from exceeding damaging levels. Fault current limiting can also be achieved through the implementation of special stand alone devices known as Fault Current Limiters (FCLs) which act to automatically limit high through currents that occur during faults.[1] Related Terms fault, fault current limiter References ↑ SmartGrid.gov 'Description of Functions' Temp LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. late:ISGANAttributionsmart grid,smart grid,smart grid,smart grid,

243

Definition: Fault Current Limiter | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Limiter Limiter Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Fault Current Limiter A fault current limiter prevents current in an electrical circuit from exceeding a predetermined level by increasing the electrical impedance of that circuit before the current through the circuit exceeds that level. Fault current limiters are designed so as to minimize the impedance of the circuit under normal conditions to reduce losses, but increase the impedance of the circuit under fault conditions to limit fault current.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition A Fault Current Limiter (FCL) is a device which limits the prospective fault current when a fault occurs (e.g. in a power transmission network). The term includes superconducting devices and non-superconducting devices, however some of the more simple non-superconducting devices (such

244

Gujarat Ambuja Cements Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ambuja Cements Limited Ambuja Cements Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name Gujarat Ambuja Cements Limited Place Mumbai, India Zip 400 021 Sector Biomass Product Indian cement company. the company installed a 24MW biomass based captive electric generating stations that will provide electricity to Gujarat Ambuja Cements Limitedâ€(tm)s (“GACL”) facility in Ropar, Punjab. References Gujarat Ambuja Cements Limited[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Gujarat Ambuja Cements Limited is a company located in Mumbai, India . References ↑ "Gujarat Ambuja Cements Limited" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Gujarat_Ambuja_Cements_Limited&oldid=346290

245

Graduate Program Time Limits and Work Schedules  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Time Limits and Work Schedules Graduate Program Time Limits and Work Schedules Point your career towards LANL: work with the best minds on the planet in an inclusive environment...

246

Towards Sustainable Material Usage: Investigating Limits to ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Towards Sustainable Material Usage: Investigating Limits to ... secondary resources decreases energy consumption; this energy advantage ...

247

Soil carbon inventories under a bioenergy crop (switchgrass): Measurement limitations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Approximately 5 yr after planting, coarse root carbon (C) and soil organic C (SOC) inventories were compared under different types of plant cover at four switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) production field trials in the southeastern USA. There was significantly more coarse root C under switchgrass (Alamo variety) and forest cover than tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.), corn (Zea mays L.), or native pastures of mixed grasses. Inventories of SOC under switchgrass were not significantly greater than SOC inventories under other plant covers. At some locations the statistical power associated with ANOVA of SOC inventories was low, which raised questions about whether differences in SOC could be detected statistically. A minimum detectable difference (MDD) for SOC inventories was calculated. The MDD is the smallest detectable difference between treatment means once the variation, significance level, statistical power, and sample size are specified. The analysis indicated that a difference of {approx}50 mg SOC/cm{sup 2} or 5 Mg SOC/ha, which is {approx}10 to 15% of existing SOC, could be detected with reasonable sample sizes and good statistical power. The smallest difference in SOC inventories that can be detected, and only with exceedingly large sample sizes, is {approx}2 to 3%. These measurement limitations have implications for monitoring and verification of proposals to ameliorate increasing global atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations by sequestering C in soils.

Garten, C.T. Jr.; Wullschleger, S.D.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

High temperature superconducting fault current limiter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fault current limiter for an electrical circuit is disclosed. The fault current limiter includes a high temperature superconductor in the electrical circuit. The high temperature superconductor is cooled below its critical temperature to maintain the superconducting electrical properties during operation as the fault current limiter. 15 figs.

Hull, J.R.

1997-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

249

Primordial magnetic field limits from cosmological data  

SciTech Connect

We study limits on a primordial magnetic field arising from cosmological data, including that from big bang nucleosynthesis, cosmic microwave background polarization plane Faraday rotation limits, and large-scale structure formation. We show that the physically relevant quantity is the value of the effective magnetic field, and limits on it are independent of how the magnetic field was generated.

Kahniashvili, Tina [McWilliams Center for Cosmology and Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Department of Physics, Laurentian University, Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C (Canada); Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory, Ilia State University, 2A Kazbegi Ave, Tbilisi, GE-0160 (Georgia); Tevzadze, Alexander G. [Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory, Ilia State University, 2A Kazbegi Ave, Tbilisi, GE-0160 (Georgia); Faculty of Exact and Natural Sciences, Tbilisi State University, 1 Chavchavadze Avenue, Tbilisi, GE-0128 (Georgia); Sethi, Shiv K. [McWilliams Center for Cosmology and Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Raman Research Institute, Sadashivanagar, Bangalore 560080 (India); Pandey, Kanhaiya [Raman Research Institute, Sadashivanagar, Bangalore 560080 (India); Ratra, Bharat [Department of Physics, Kansas State University, 116 Cardwell Hall, Manhattan, Kansas 66506 (United States)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

250

Ups and downs of demand limiting  

SciTech Connect

Electric power load management by limiting power demand can be used for energy conservation. Methods for affecting demand limiting, reducing peak usage in buildings, particularly usage for heating and ventilating systems, and power pricing to encourage demand limiting are discussed. (LCL)

Pannkoke, T.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Impact Capital Partners Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Limited Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name Impact Capital Partners Limited Place Los Angeles, California Zip CA 90067-1509 Product Los Angeles-based, investment intermediary that designs financial solutions and innovative strategies for achieving sustained growth and intrinsic value. References Impact Capital Partners Limited[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Impact Capital Partners Limited is a company located in Los Angeles, California . References ↑ "Impact Capital Partners Limited" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Impact_Capital_Partners_Limited&oldid=346814" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies

252

Bharat Electronics Limited BEL | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Limited BEL Limited BEL Jump to: navigation, search Name Bharat Electronics Limited (BEL) Place Bangalore, India Zip 560015 Sector Solar Product Major supplier of products and turnkey systems with expertise in solar products and systems, defence communication, radars & sensors, telecommunication, broadcasting equipments, e-governance networks and other components. References Bharat Electronics Limited (BEL)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Bharat Electronics Limited (BEL) is a company located in Bangalore, India . References ↑ "Bharat Electronics Limited (BEL)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Bharat_Electronics_Limited_BEL&oldid=342709

253

Carbon Trust Enterprises Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Enterprises Limited Enterprises Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name Carbon Trust Enterprises Limited Place London, United Kingdom Zip WC2A 2AZ Sector Carbon Product Carbon Trust Enterprises creates and invests in new, high growth, carbon reducing businesses. Typically the company focuses on use of mature technologies rather than on technology innovations. References Carbon Trust Enterprises Limited[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Carbon Trust Enterprises Limited is a company located in London, United Kingdom . References ↑ "Carbon Trust Enterprises Limited" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Carbon_Trust_Enterprises_Limited&oldid=343250"

254

How to Detect Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How to Detect Radiation How to Survey Measurement Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration Detection How...

255

Upper Marlboro, Maryland: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marlboro, Maryland: Energy Resources Marlboro, Maryland: Energy Resources (Redirected from Upper Marlboro, MD) Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 38.8159473°, -76.7496909° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.8159473,"lon":-76.7496909,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

256

Upper crustal faulting in an obliquely extending orogen, structural control  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

faulting in an obliquely extending orogen, structural control faulting in an obliquely extending orogen, structural control on permeability and production in the Coso Geothermal Field, eastern California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Upper crustal faulting in an obliquely extending orogen, structural control on permeability and production in the Coso Geothermal Field, eastern California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: New multifold seismic reflection data from the Coso geothermal field in the central Coso Range, eastern California, image brittle faults and other structures in a zone of localized crustal extension between two major strike-slip faults. The Coso Wash fault, a Quaternary-active normal fault that is a locus of surface geothermal activity, is well-imaged as a

257

Upper crustal structure of an obliquely extending orogen, central Coso  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

structure of an obliquely extending orogen, central Coso structure of an obliquely extending orogen, central Coso Range, eastern California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Upper crustal structure of an obliquely extending orogen, central Coso Range, eastern California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Coso Range is an extensional domain in a releasing stepover between major dextral strike-slip faults along the southeastern margin of the Sierra Nevada Microplate. New multifold seismic reflection data from the Coso geothermal field in the central Coso Range image reflectors that resemble suites of structural and magmatic features exposed in many exhumed metamorphic core complexes (MCC). The Coso Wash Fault, a Holocene-active normal fault that is a locus of surface geothermal activity, is imaged as a

258

Time Synchronization Attack in Smart Grid-Part II: Cross Layer Detection Mechanism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A novel time synchronization attack (TSA) on wide area monitoring systems in smart grid has been identified in the first part of this paper. A cross layer detection mechanism is proposed to combat TSA in part II of this paper. In the physical layer, we propose a GPS carrier signal noise ratio (C/No) based spoofing detection technique. In addition, a patch-monopole hybrid antenna is applied to receive GPS signal. By computing the standard deviation of the C/No difference from two GPS receivers, a priori probability of spoofing detection is fed to the upper layer, where power system state is estimated and controlled. A trustworthiness based evaluation method is applied to identify the PMU being under TSA. Both the physical layer and upper layer algorithms are integrated to detect the TSA, thus forming a cross layer mechanism. Experiment is carried out to verify the effectiveness of the proposed TSA detection algorithm.

Zhang, Zhenghao; Dimitrovski, Aleksandar D; Li, Husheng

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Portable modular detection system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Disclosed herein are portable and modular detection devices and systems for detecting electromagnetic radiation, such as fluorescence, from an analyte which comprises at least one optical element removably attached to at least one alignment rail. Also disclosed are modular detection devices and systems having an integrated lock-in amplifier and spatial filter and assay methods using the portable and modular detection devices.

Brennan, James S. (Rodeo, CA); Singh, Anup (Danville, CA); Throckmorton, Daniel J. (Tracy, CA); Stamps, James F. (Livermore, CA)

2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

260

Radiation Detection Instruments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Directory of Accredited Laboratories. Radiation Detection Instruments. In 2005, the Department of Homeland Security requested ...

2013-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "upper detection limit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

A new limit on the CP violating decay KS -> 3pi0 with the KLOE experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have carried out a new direct search for the CP violating decay KS -> 3pi0 with 1.7 fb^-1 of e+e- collisions collected by the KLOE detector at the phi-factory DAFNE. We have searched for this decay in a sample of about 5.9 x 10^8 KS KL events tagging the KS by means of the KL interaction in the calorimeter and requiring six prompt photons. With respect to our previous search, the analysis has been improved by increasing of a factor four the tagged sample and by a more effective background rejection of fake KS tags and spurious clusters. We find no candidates in data and simulated background samples, while we expect 0.12 standard model events. Normalizing to the number of KS -> 2pi0 events in the same sample, we set the upper limit on BR(KS -> 3pi0 < 2.6 x 10^-8 at 90% C.L., five times lower than the previous limit. We also set the upper limit on the eta_000 parameter, |eta_000 | < 0.0088 at 90% C.L., improving by a factor two the latest direct measurement.

Babusci, D; Balwierz-Pytko, I; Bencivenni, G; Bini, C; Bloise, C; Bossi, F; Branchini, P; Budano, A; Balkestahl, L Caldeira; Capon, G; Ceradini, F; Ciambrone, P; Curciarello, F; Czerwinski, E; Dane, E; De Leo, V; De Lucia, E; De Robertis, G; De Santis, A; Di Domenico, A; Di Donato, C; Di Salvo, R; Domenici, D; Erriquez, O; Fanizzi, G; Fantini, A; Felici, G; Fiore, S; Franzini, P; Gauzzi, P; Giardina, G; Giovannella, S; Gonnella, F; Graziani, E; Happacher, F; Heijkenskjold, L; Hoistad, B; Iafolla, L; Jacewicz, M; Johansson, T; Kacprzak, K; Kupsc, A; Lee-Franzini, J; Leverington, B; Loddo, F; Loffredo, S; Mandaglio, G; Martemianov, M; Martini, M; Mascolo, M; Messi, R; Miscetti, S; Morello, G; Moricciani, D; Moskal, P; Nguyen, F; Passeri, A; Patera, V; Longhi, I Prado; Ranieri, A; Redmer, C F; Santangelo, P; Sarra, I; Schioppa, M; Sciascia, B; Silarski, M; Taccini, C; Tortora, L; Venanzoni, G; Wislicki, W; Wolke, M; Zdebik, J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

'Dead Time' Limits Quantum Cryptography Speeds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Not only does dead time limit the transmission rate of a message ... effects and paralyzability in high-speed quantum key distribution, New Journal of ...

2012-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

263

Renewable Fuels Limited RFL | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RFL Jump to: navigation, search Name Renewable Fuels Limited (RFL) Place York, United Kingdom Zip YO19 6ET Sector Biomass Product Supplies various biomass fuels and offers...

264

Caldyne Automatics Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name Caldyne Automatics Limited Place West Bengal, India Zip 700 091 Sector Solar, Wind energy Product Kolkata-based power storage product manufacturer; also makes lighting...

265

ON EFFICIENTLY COMBINING LIMITED MEMORY AND TRUST ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

... Euclidean norm with an insignificant computational overhead compared with the cost of computing the quasi-Newton direction in line-search limited memory ...

266

Centro Renewables Holding Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

developer of wind, solar and water power facilities in China, Taiwan and South Korea. References Centro Renewables Holding Limited1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase...

267

Emergency Management Limited Scope Performance Test Inspectors...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emergency Management Oversight (HS-63) Emergency Management Limited Scope Performance Test Inspectors Guide March 2008 Emergency Management Performance Test Inspectors Guide...

268

Limits to Ice on Asteroids (24) Themis and (65) Cybele  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present optical spectra of (24) Themis and (65) Cybele, two large main-belt asteroids on which exposed water ice has recently been reported. No emission lines, expected from resonance fluorescence in gas sublimated from the ice, were detected. Derived limits to the production rates of water are 0.3) and confined to a fraction of the Earth-facing surface 0.6) then the timescale for sublimation of an optically thick layer can rival the 10^3 yr interval between impacts with bodies this size. In this sense, exposure by impact may be a quasi steady-state feature of ice-containing asteroids at 3 AU.

Jewitt, D

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Food web architecture in natural and impounded rivers of the Upper Parana drainage basin, Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Freshwater ecosystems are some of the most threatened on the planet. Efforts to conserve, restore, or otherwise manage large rivers and the services they provide are hindered by limited understanding of the functional dynamics of these systems. This shortcoming is especially evident with regard to trophic structure and energy flow. In this study I use natural abundances of carbon and nitrogen isotopes to examine patterns of energy flow and food-chain length of large-river food webs characterized by different landscape-scale hydrologic features. Ten locations along an approximately 500 km stretch of the Upper Paran�¡ River Basin, Brazil, provided the setting for this work. Carbon derived from C3 plants and phytoplankton were the dominant energy sources across all webs, but relative contributions differed among landscape types (low-gradient river, high-gradient river, river stretches downstream of reservoirs, and reservoirs). Increases in food chain length corresponded with higher relative importance of phytoplankton derived carbon, likely due to size-structured effects of the phytoplankton-zooplankton-secondary consumer trophic link. River impoundment corresponded with decreased ecological and economic efficiency of fisheries production, an important ecosystem service provided by many tropical rivers.

Hoeinghaus, David Joseph

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Protect and Restore the Upper Lochsa : Annual Progress Report, May 2008 – April 2009.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Upper Lochsa watersheds included in the project contain critical spawning and rearing habitat for anadromous and resident fish (Clearwater National Forest 1999). Species that depend on the tributary habitat include spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), Snake River summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), bull trout (Salvelinus confluentes), and westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi). Steelhead and bull trout populations are currently listed as Threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), and westslope cutthroat trout has been petitioned for listing. Both out-of-basin and in-basin factors threaten fish populations in the Lochsa Drainage (Clearwater Subbasin Plan 2003). Out-of-basin factors include the hydroelectric system and ocean conditions, while in-basin factors include a variety of management activities leading to habitat degradation. This project is implemented under Bonneville Power Administration's Fish and Wildlife program in order to meet National Marine Fisheries Service requirements to offset losses caused by the operation of the hydrosystem by improving tributary habitats to promote increased productivity of salmon and steelhead. The Clearwater Subbasin Plan (2003) defines limiting factors to fisheries in the area as watershed disturbances, habitat degradation, sediment, temperature, and connectivity.

Lloyd, Rebecca; Forestieri, David [Nez Perce Tribe

2009-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

271

Limits of Nanomechanical Resonators - Lawrence Berkeley ...  

communications technology and single-molecule detection schemes. Resonators with exceptionally high quality factors, Q, have been used for exotic physics ...

272

Dark matter limits froma 15 kg windowless bubble chamber  

SciTech Connect

The COUPP collaboration has successfully used bubble chambers, a technology previously applied only to high-energy physics experiments, as direct dark matter detectors. It has produced the world's most stringent spin-dependent WIMP limits, and increasingly competitive spin-independent limits. These limits were achieved by capitalizing on an intrinsic rejection of the gamma background that all other direct detection experiments must address through high-density shielding and empirically-determined data cuts. The history of COUPP, including its earliest prototypes and latest results, is briefly discussed in this thesis. The feasibility of a new, windowless bubble chamber concept simpler and more inexpensive in design is discussed here as well. The dark matter limits achieved with a 15 kg windowless chamber, larger than any previous COUPP chamber (2 kg, 4 kg), are presented. Evidence of the greater radiopurity of synthetic quartz compared to natural is presented using the data from this 15 kg device, the first chamber to be made from synthetic quartz. The effective reconstruction of the three-dimensional positions of bubbles in a highly distorted optical field, with ninety-degree bottom lighting similar to cloud chamber lighting, is demonstrated. Another innovation described in this thesis is the use of the sound produced by bubbles recorded by an array of piezoelectric sensors as the primary means of bubble detection. In other COUPP chambers, cameras have been used as the primary trigger. Previous work on bubble acoustic signature differentiation using piezos is built upon in order to further demonstrate the ability to discriminate between alpha- and neutron-induced events.

Szydagis, Matthew Mark; /Chicago U.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Excitation optimization for damage detection  

SciTech Connect

A technique is developed to answer the important question: 'Given limited system response measurements and ever-present physical limits on the level of excitation, what excitation should be provided to a system to make damage most detectable?' Specifically, a method is presented for optimizing excitations that maximize the sensitivity of output measurements to perturbations in damage-related parameters estimated with an extended Kalman filter. This optimization is carried out in a computationally efficient manner using adjoint-based optimization and causes the innovations term in the extended Kalman filter to be larger in the presence of estimation errors, which leads to a better estimate of the damage-related parameters in question. The technique is demonstrated numerically on a nonlinear 2 DOF system, where a significant improvement in the damage-related parameter estimation is observed.

Bement, Matthew T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bewley, Thomas R [UCSD

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Upper Devonian and Lower Mississippian stratigraphy of Northwestern Montana: a petroleum system approach.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Upper Devonian and Lower Mississippian stratigraphy in the Antler foreland basin of northwestern Montana is the current focus of exploration for several petroleum companies.… (more)

Schietinger, Paul S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

An early history of pure shear in the upper plate of the raft...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

early history of pure shear in the upper plate of the raft river metamorphic core complex- black pine mountains, southern Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL...

276

Upper bound on the efficiency of certain nonimaging concentrators in the physical-optics model  

SciTech Connect

A simple treatment by scalar-wave theory yields upper bounds to the efficiency of nonimaging concentrators that are lower than those given by geometrical optics.

Welford, W.T.; Winston, R.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Limits on tau lepton flavor violating decays in three charged leptons  

SciTech Connect

A search for the neutrinoless, lepton-flavor violating decay of the {tau} lepton into three charged leptons has been performed using an integrated luminosity of 468 fb{sup -1} collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II collider. In all six decay modes considered, the numbers of events found in data are compatible with the background expectations. Upper limits on the branching fractions are set in the range (1.8-3.3) x 10{sup -8} at 90% confidence level.

Cervelli, Alberto

2010-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

278

Graduate Program Time Limits and Work Schedules  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Time Limits and Work Schedules Time Limits and Work Schedules Graduate Program Time Limits and Work Schedules Point your career towards LANL: work with the best minds on the planet in an inclusive environment that is rich in intellectual vitality and opportunities for growth. Contact Student Programs (505) 665-8899 Email Time Limits The length of participation in the graduate program is limited as follows: With a bachelor's pursuing a master's degree: 4 years With a bachelor's pursuing a PhD: 7 years With a master's pursuing a second master's degree: 2 years With a master's pursuing a PhD: 4 years With a master's pursuing a master's and PhD in a new field: 6 years Students may remain in the GRA program for up to three months after receiving their PhD. Work schedules Year-round students Students participating in the MBA program, post-baccalaureate appointments,

279

4C Offshore Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4C Offshore Limited 4C Offshore Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name 4C Offshore Limited Place Suffolk, United Kingdom Country United Kingdom Product Project planning, consulting for offshore industries (wind, oil, gas) Year founded 2009 Company Type For Profit Company Ownership Private Small Business No Affiliated Companies 4C Offshore Limited Technology Offshore Wind Phone number +44 (0)1502 509260 Website http://www.4coffshore.com/ References 4C Offshore website[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. 4C Offshore Limited is a company based in Suffolk, United Kingdom. 4C Offshore is an independent marine consulting firm, that provides advice and consulting services in offshore development, particularly renewables and

280

Undergraduate Program Time Limits and Work Schedules  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Time Limits and Work Schedules Time Limits and Work Schedules Undergraduate Program Time Limits and Work Schedules Point your career towards LANL: work with the best minds on the planet in an inclusive environment that is rich in intellectual vitality and opportunities for growth. Contact Student Programs (505) 665-8899 Email Time limits The length of participation in the undergraduate program is limited to a maximum of six years for students pursuing a bachelor's degree and three years for students pursuing an associate's degree. Work schedules Year-round students Students participating in some special undergraduate programs, post-baccalaureate appointments, post-master's appointments, and GRA students working on a thesis or dissertation are excluded from the 30-hour per week work restriction.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "upper detection limit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Definition: Stability Limit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Limit Limit Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Stability Limit The maximum power flow possible through some particular point in the system while maintaining stability in the entire system or the part of the system to which the stability limit refers.[1] Related Terms power, system, stability References ↑ Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An in LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. line Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Stability_Limit&oldid=480505" Categories: Definitions ISGAN Definitions What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load)

282

Limited English Proficiency | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Limited English Proficiency Limited English Proficiency Limited English Proficiency On August 11, 2000, President Clinton signed Executive Order 13166, "Improving Access to Services for Persons with Limited English Proficiency." The Executive Order requires federal agencies, including the Department of Energy, to examine the programs and services they provide, to determine whether there is a need for language assistance for persons with Limited English proficiency (LEP) related to their programs and services, and to develop and implement a system to provide language assistance to LEP persons (where necessary) to ensure they have meaningful access to their programs and services. The Executive Order also requires Federal agencies, including the Department of Energy, to provide guidance to recipients of

283

Upper Division Hot Spring Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Division Hot Spring Geothermal Area Division Hot Spring Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Upper Division Hot Spring Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":66.35744679,"lon":-156.7663995,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

284

New petrofacies in upper Cretaceous section of southern California  

SciTech Connect

A distinctive sandstone-conglomerate petrofacies is recognized throughout the Late Cretaceous (Maestrichtian-late Campanian) Chatsworth Formation in the Simi Hills. It is named the Woolsey Canyon petrofacies after the district where it was first recognized. The petrofacies is also recognized in the Late Cretaceous (late Campanian and possibly early Maestrichtian) Tuna Canyon Formation of the central Santa Monica Mountains. The conglomerates in the petrofacies are composed predominantly of angular pebble-size clasts of argillite, quartz-rich rocks (orthoquartzarenite, metaorthoquartzarenite, mice quartz schist) and leucocratic plutoniate (granite-granodiorite). The conglomerate texture and composition are mirrored in the sandstone. The uniformly angular character of the conglomerate clasts and the survival of argillite clasts indicate that the detritus underwent no more than 5 mi of subaerial transport before it entered the deep marine realm. Foraminifers collected from mudstones interbedded with the conglomerates indicate upper bathyal water depth at the site of deposition. A source terrane of low to moderate relief is indicated by the absence of cobbles and boulders. Bed forms, sedimentary structures, and textural features indicate the detritus moved north from its source terrane to be deposited by turbidity currents, debris flows, and grain flows on the Chatsworth Submarine Fan. The detritus of the Woolsey Canyon petrofacies was derived from basement rocks, now largely buried beneath the Los Angeles basin, that were being eroded during the formation of the Cretaceous Los Angeles erosion surface. The detritus came from the Los Angeles arch of that surface.

Colburn, I.P.; Oliver, D.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Discovery of carbon monoxide in the upper atmosphere of Pluto  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pluto's icy surface has changed colour and its atmosphere has swelled since its last closest approach to the Sun in 1989. The thin atmosphere is produced by evaporating ices, and so can also change rapidly, and in particular carbon monoxide should be present as an active thermostat. Here we report the discovery of gaseous CO via the 1.3mm wavelength J=2-1 rotational transition, and find that the line-centre signal is more than twice as bright as a tentative result obtained by Bockelee-Morvan et al. in 2000. Greater surface-ice evaporation over the last decade could explain this, or increased pressure could have caused the atmosphere to expand. The gas must be cold, with a narrow line-width consistent with temperatures around 50 K, as predicted for the very high atmosphere, and the line brightness implies that CO molecules extend up to approximately 3 Pluto radii above the surface. The upper atmosphere must have changed markedly over only a decade since the prior search, and more alterations could occur by the...

Greaves, J S; Friberg, P

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

THE FACTORS LIMITING THE UTILIZATION OF ZIRCONIUM ALLOYS IN SUPERHEATED STEAM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

New experimental data and literature data are utilized to determine the upper temperature of usefulness of zirconium alloys. Three basic engineering assumptions are used: (1) service life requirements are on the order of four years; (2) tubular fuel cladding for rod-type fuel is considered with a maximum wall thickness of 1.27 cm; and (3) heat fluxes are above 157 watts/cm/sup 2/. The interrelation of three basic factors, corrosion rate, corrosion embrittiement by hydrogen and oxygen, and strength are considered. An upper limit for an acceptable corrosion rate for a long-term service of 1 mg/dm/sup 2//day is set primarily by the effect of heat-transfer on corrosion. For the best alloys anticipated, this requirement (even without considering transient conditions) limits cladding surface temperatures to less than 540 C. Oxygen embrittiement of the alloy substrate by oxide film dissolution is not expected to be a limiting factor. Corrosion hydrogen embrittiement was studied in detail and found to limit acceptable service to cladding surface temperatures of less than 525 deg C for established experimental alloys. Hydrogen embrittlement may not be a limiting factor if alloys corrosion resistant enough to be acceptable above 600 deg C could be developed. Zirconium alloys designed for higher strength to overcome their inherent rapid loss of creep strength at temperatures above 540 deg C are expected to be more susceptible to corrosion hydrogen embrittlement. The results of this study indicate that there is good promise for developing zirconium alloys for fuel cladding application at temperatures up to 475 deg C. (auth)

Klepfer, H H; Douglass, D L

1963-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

287

Polypyrrole nanoribbon based chemiresistive immunosensors for viral plant pathogen detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

throughout the world and is transmitted by different aphid species to a wide range of vegetable crops detection limit. For this reason, one-dimensional nanostructures including single-walled carbon nanotubes

Chen, Wilfred

288

Soil carbon inventories under a bioenergy crop (switchgrass): measurement limitations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Approximately 5 yr after planting, coarse root (>2 mm) carbon (C) and soil organic C (SOC) inventories (0-40 cm deep) were compared under different types of plant cover at four switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) production field trials in the southeastern USA. There was significantly (p {le} 0.05) more coarse root C under switchgrass (Alamo variety) and forest cover than under tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.), corn (Zea mays L.), or native pastures of mixed grasses. Inventories of SOC under switchgrass were not significantly greater than SOC inventories under other plant covers. At some locations the statistical power associated with ANOVA of SOC inventories was low, which raised questions about whether differences in SOC could be detected statistically. A minimum detectable difference (MDD) for SOC inventories was calculated. The MDD is the smallest detectable difference between treatment means once the variation, significance level, statistical power, and sample size are specified. The analysis indicated that a difference of {approx}50 mg SOC/cm{sup 2} or 5 Mg SOC/ha, which is {approx}10 to 15% of existing SOC, could be detected with reasonable sample sizes (n = 16) and good statistical power (1-{beta} = 0.90). The smallest difference in SOC inventories that can be detected, and only with exceedingly large sample sizes (n > 100), is {approx}2 to 3% ({approx}10 mg SOC/cm{sup 2} or 1 Mg SOC/ha). These measurement limitations have implications for monitoring and verification of proposals to ameliorate increasing global atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations by sequestering C in soils.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Variability in the Upper-Ocean Internal Wave Field at a Sargasso Sea Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two 3.5 month time series records of upper-ocean current and density profiles collected in opposite seasons as part of the LOTUS (Long-Term Upper-Ocean Study) project at 34°N, 70°W indicate substantial variation in the shape of horizontal current ...

Charles C. Eriksen

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Upper-Level Frontogenesis: Two Case Studies from the FRONTS 87 Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study describes the structure of two cold fronts observed during the European experiment FRONTS 87. The selection of these two particular cases is based on the existence of well-marked upper-level features, such as strong jet streams, upper-...

Konstantinos Lagouvardos; Vassiliki Kotroni

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Intrusion Detection: Characterising intrusion detection sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An intrusion detection sensor is defined as a device that collects and analyses network traffic for the purpose of identifying suspicious events. Too often the value of a sensor is associated with its data collection and analysis features. Experience ...

Siraj A. Shaikh; Howard Chivers; Philip Nobles; John A. Clark; Hao Chen

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

A higher limit approach to homology theories.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A lot of well-known functors such as group homology, cyclic homology of algebras can be described as limits of certain simply defined functors over categories of presentations. In this paper, we develop technique for the description of the higher limits over categories of presentations and show that certain homological functors can be described in this way. In particular, we give a description of Hochschild homology and the derived functors of tensor, symmetric and exterior powers in the sense of Dold and Puppe as higher limits.

Sergei O. Ivanov; Roman Mikhailov

293

EIS-0408: Upper Great Plains Programmatic Wind EIS | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8: Upper Great Plains Programmatic Wind EIS 8: Upper Great Plains Programmatic Wind EIS EIS-0408: Upper Great Plains Programmatic Wind EIS Summary This EIS, being prepared jointly by DOE's Western Area Power Administration and the Department of the Interior's Fish and Wildlife Service, will evaluate the environmental impacts of wind energy development in Iowa, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota - Western's Upper Great Plains customer service region. Western will use the EIS to implement a comprehensive regional program to manage interconnection requests for wind energy projects. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. Documents Available for Download March 22, 2013 EIS-0408: Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Upper Great Plains Programmatic Wind EIS

294

Geothermometry At Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit & Blackwell, 2006) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometry At Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit & Blackwell, 2006) Geothermometry At Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit & Blackwell, 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit & Blackwell, 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Ten water samples were collected for chemical analysis and interpretation. Analyses of three samples of the UHCR thermal give predicted subsurface temperatures ranging from 317 to 334 oF from the Na-K-Ca, silica (quartz), and Na-Li geothermometers. The fact that all three thermometers closely agree gives the predictions added credibility. References Dick Benoit, David Blackwell (2006) Exploration Of The Upper Hot

295

SQUID-Detected MRI in the Limit of Zero Static Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

current flows in the flux transformer; this occurs even for static fieldscurrents and lead to very large fields at the SQUID; if the flux

Kelso, Nathan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Computational modeling techniques for biological network productivity increases : optimization and rate-limiting reaction detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The rapid development and applications of high throughput measurement techniques bring the biological sciences into a 'big data' era. The vast available data for enzyme and metabolite concentrations, fluxes, and kinetics ...

Cui, Yuanyuan, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

SQUID-Detected MRI in the Limit of Zero Static Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in The SQUID Handbook, Vol. I: Fundamentals and Technology18] The SQUID Handbook, Vol. I: Fundamentals and Technologyin The SQUID Handbook, Vol. I: Fundamentals and Technology

Kelso, Nathan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

SQUID-Detected MRI in the Limit of Zero Static Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in The SQUID Handbook, Vol. I: Fundamentals and Technology18] The SQUID Handbook, Vol. I: Fundamentals and Technologyin The SQUID Handbook, Vol. I: Fundamentals and Technology

Kelso, Nathan Dean

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

SQUID-Detected MRI in the Limit of Zero Static Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

there are many kinds of “weak links” that could be used [a voltage applied across the weak link changes the phase di?

Kelso, Nathan Dean

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

SQUID-Detected MRI in the Limit of Zero Static Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

there are many kinds of “weak links” that could be used [applied across the weak link changes the phase difference ?.

Kelso, Nathan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "upper detection limit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Parallelizing data race detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detecting data races in multithreaded programs is a crucial part of debugging such programs, but traditional data race detectors are too slow to use routinely. This paper shows how to speed up race detection by spreading the work across multiple cores. ... Keywords: data race detection, uniparallelism

Benjamin Wester; David Devecsery; Peter M. Chen; Jason Flinn; Satish Narayanasamy

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Carnegie Wave Energy Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carnegie Wave Energy Limited Carnegie Wave Energy Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name Carnegie Wave Energy Limited Address 1 124 Stirling Highway Place North Fremantle Zip 6159 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Year founded 1993 Number of employees 25 Website http://www.carnegiewave.com Region Australia LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: CETO La Reunion CETO3 Garden Island Perth Wave Energy Project PWEP This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: CETO Wave Energy Technology This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Carnegie_Wave_Energy_Limited&oldid=678263

303

Performance limits of axial turbomachine stages  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis assesses the limits of stage efficiency for axial compressor and turbine stages. A stage model is developed, consisting of a specified geometry and a surface velocity distribution with turbulent boundary layers. ...

Hall, David Kenneth

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Infinite volume limit for the dipole gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider a classical dipole gas in with low activity and show that the pressure has a limit as the volume goes to infinity. The result is obtained by a renormalization group analysis of the model.

J. Dimock

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

305

Beam limiter for thermonuclear fusion devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A beam limiter circumscribes the interior surface of a vacuum vessel to inhibit collisions of contained plasma and the vessel walls. The cross section of the material making up the limiter has a flatsided or slightly concave portion of increased width towards the plasma and portions of decreased width towards the interior surface of the vessel. This configuration is designed to prevent a major fraction of the material sputtered, vaporized and blistered from the limiter from reaching the plasma. It also allows adequate heat transfer from the wider to the narrower portions. The preferred materials for the beam limiter are solids of sintered, particulate materials of low atomic number with low vapor pressure and low sputtering and blistering yields.

Kaminsky, Manfred S. (Hinsdale, IL)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Studies on the dynamics of limited filaments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study on the dynamics of filaments in the presence of a diagnostic, conductive limiter is presented. Plasma filaments are coherent structures present in many fusion devices and transport a significant amount of particles ...

Bonde, Jeffrey David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Limit order markets, liquidity, and price impact  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, I explore various aspects of market liquidity and analyze its effect on asset prices. First, in a model of a limit order market I explain how to define liquidity and derive a price impact function. Second, ...

Rosu, Ioanid, 1970-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Definition: Interconnection Reliability Operating Limit | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Terms System Operating Limit, System, Cascading Outage, smart grid References Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An inl LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign...

309

Snowfall Limit Forecasts and Hydrological Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrological flood forecasting in mountainous areas requires accurate partitioning between rain and snowfall to properly estimate the extent of runoff contributing areas. Here a method to make use of snowfall limit information—a standard output of ...

Cara Tobin; Andrea Rinaldo; Bettina Schaefli

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

String Scattering Amplitudes in High Energy Limits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A very review of string scattering amplitudes in two important high energy limits: hard scattering and Regge scattering. Recent results of the symmetries in string theory by studying high energy string scattering anplitudes are showed.

Yang, Yi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Fuzzy Limits and Fuzzy Nearness Relation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this paper is to introduce the notion of fuzzy limit within the fuzzy analysis developed in the concept of fuzzy nearness relation. The main results concern the corresponding calculus.

Martin Kalina

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Spectra Computed from a Limited Area Grid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is presented for determining variance spectra of meteorological fields specified on limited-area grids. Spectra so obtained are compared with global spectra of the same data. An example of scale decomposition (i.e., filtering) using this ...

Ronald M. Errico

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

EU Energy Wind Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

company will be concentrating initially on bringing an innovative composite wind tower to market. References EU Energy (Wind) Limited1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No...

314

Pressure limits of an axisymmetric torus  

SciTech Connect

In order to clarify the pressure limit of a toroidal plasma equilibrium in a three-dimensional geometry, an azimuthally symmetric toroidal plasma was considered. In a tokamak-like plasma, the net toroidal current is necessary for a finite ..beta.. plasma equilibrium. If external conductors are used to provide the rotational transform, iota, the plasma pressure is limited to ..beta.. = (iota/2..pi..)/sup 2//2A, where A is the aspect ratio.

Yoshikawa, S.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Temperature limits in laser cooling of free atoms with three-level cascade transitions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We employ semiclassical theoretical analysis to study laser cooling of free atoms using three-level cascade transitions, where the upper transition is much weaker than the lower one. This represents an alternate cooling scheme, particularly useful for group II atoms. We find that temperatures below the Doppler limits associated with each of these transitions are expected. The lowest temperatures arise from a remarkable increase in damping and reduced diffusion compared to two-level cooling. They are reached at the two-photon resonance, where there is a crossing between the narrow and the partially-dark dressed states, and can be estimated simply by the usual Doppler limit considering the decay rate of the optical coherence between these states.

Cruz, Flavio C; Magno, Wictor C

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

On the Effectiveness of Rate Limiting Mechanisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One class of worm defense techniques that received attention of late is to “rate limit ” outbound traffic to contain fast spreading worms. Several proposals of rate limiting techniques have appeared in the literature, each with a different take on the impetus behind rate limiting. This paper presents an empirical analysis on different rate limiting schemes using real traffic and attack traces from a sizable network. In the analysis we isolate and investigate the impact of the critical parameters for each scheme and seek to understand how these parameters might be set in realistic network settings. Analysis shows that using DNS-based rate limiting has substantially lower error rates than schemes based on other traffic statistics. The empirical analysis additionally brings to light a number of issues with respect to rate limiting in practice. We explore the impact of these issues in the context of general worm containment. Acknowledgments: We thank the members and companies of the PDL Consortium for their support. This work was partially supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. CNS-0433540 and ANI-0326472.

Cynthia Wong; Stan Bielski; Ahren Studer; Chenxi Wang

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

State emissions limitations for boilers: particulate matter  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes regulations applicable to boilers as reflected in current state and local air regulations. Not all of these regulations are officially part of Federally-approved State Implementation Plans (SIPs). Several regulations have only recently been adopted by the State and are now undergoing EPA review for incorporation into the SIP. Each summary also contains local regulations more stringent than the State rules. Most local regulations in this handbook are included in the State Implementation Plan. Site-specific emission limits (variances from State limits or limits more stringent than State limits) are not included in these summaries. Appendix A contains maps showing the location of Air Quality Control Regions or other districts by which several States regulate emissions. Appendix B contains a summary of National Ambient Air Quality Standards, which States are required to meet as a minimum. Appendix C contains a description and summary of Federal New Source Performance Standards. Appendix D contains formulas for conversion of emmissions limits expressed in one set of units to the most common units - No. PM/MMBtu. Appendix E contains Figure 2 of ASME APS-1, used for determining particulate emissions limits in some States.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

PROJECTED CONSTRAINTS ON THE COSMIC (SUPER)STRING TENSION WITH FUTURE GRAVITATIONAL WAVE DETECTION EXPERIMENTS  

SciTech Connect

We present projected constraints on the cosmic string tension, G{mu}/c {sup 2}, that could be achieved by future gravitational wave detection experiments and express our results as semi-analytic relations of the form G{mu}({Omega}{sub gw} h {sup 2})/c {sup 2}, to allow for direct computation of the tension constraints for future experiments. These results can be applied to new constraints on {Omega}{sub gw} h {sup 2} as they are imposed. Experiments operating in different frequency bands probe different parts of the gravitational wave spectrum of a cosmic string network and are sensitive to different uncertainties in the underlying cosmic string model parameters. We compute the gravitational wave spectra of cosmic string networks based on the one-scale model, covering all the parameter space accessed by each experiment that is strongly dependent on the birth scale of loops relative to the horizon, {alpha}. The upper limits on the string tension avoid any assumptions on the model parameters. We perform this investigation for Pulsar Timing Array experiments of different durations, as well as ground-based and space-borne interferometric detectors.

Sanidas, Sotirios A.; Battye, Richard A.; Stappers, Benjamin W., E-mail: sotiris.sanidas@gmail.com, E-mail: rbattye@jb.man.ac.uk, E-mail: ben.stappers@manchester.ac.uk [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

2013-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

319

Detecting transmission power misbehaviour in wi-fi networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Wi-Fi networks, transmission (TX) power levels are constrained by regulatory limits. However, the emergence of flexible MAC drivers allows the easy modification of PHY and MAC layer parameters. This has enabled users to attempt to violate these limits. ... Keywords: EIRP, Wi-Fi, detection, misbehaviour, transmission power

Szymon Szott, Marek Sikora, Marek Natkaniec, Krzysztof Loziak

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

THE BAHADUR EFFICIENCY FOR ENERGY DETECTION OF STATIONARY GAUSSIAN PROCESSES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

validates our asymptotic analysis in the finite sample regime. Index Terms- Energy detection, Bahadur is not optimal in gen- eral. Thus, the analysis of the loss or limitation of energy detec- tion compared of energy detection with noise variance uncertainty [3]. In particular, the analysis of per- formance loss

Sung, Youngchul

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "upper detection limit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Time discretisation applied to anomaly detection in a marine engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An introduction to the problems associated with anomaly detection in a marine engine, explaining the benefits that the SAX representation brings to the field. Despite limitations in accuracy of the SAX representation in comparison with the normalised ... Keywords: anomaly detection, discretisation, symbolic aggregate approximation, time series

Ian Morgan; Honghai Liu; George Turnbull; David Brown

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Intrusion detection in sensor networks using clustering and immune systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Security of sensor networks is a complicated task, mostly due to the limited resources of sensor units. Encryption and authentication are useless if an attacker has entered the system. Thus, a second line of defense known as Intrusion Detection must ... Keywords: genetic algorithms, immune systems, intrusion detection, self-organizing maps, wireless sensor networks

Zorana Bankovi?; José M. Moya; Álvaro Araujo; Juan-Mariano De Goyeneche

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

An one-class classification approach to detecting porn image  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Porn image detection has been treated as a binary classification task in previous learning based studies. In binary classification methods, the training samples cannot be collected broadly enough, which will limit the generalization ability of the classifiers. ... Keywords: BoW model, one-class SVM, porn image detection, random forest

Yi Liu; Chuangbai Xiao; Zhe Wang; Chunxiao Bian

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Probabilistic pipe fracture evaluations for leak-rate-detection applications  

SciTech Connect

Regulatory Guide 1.45, {open_quotes}Reactor Coolant Pressure Boundary Leakage Detection Systems,{close_quotes} was published by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in May 1973, and provides guidance on leak detection methods and system requirements for Light Water Reactors. Additionally, leak detection limits are specified in plant Technical Specifications and are different for Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) and Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). These leak detection limits are also used in leak-before-break evaluations performed in accordance with Draft Standard Review Plan, Section 3.6.3, {open_quotes}Leak Before Break Evaluation Procedures{close_quotes} where a margin of 10 on the leak detection limit is used in determining the crack size considered in subsequent fracture analyses. This study was requested by the NRC to: (1) evaluate the conditional failure probability for BWR and PWR piping for pipes that were leaking at the allowable leak detection limit, and (2) evaluate the margin of 10 to determine if it was unnecessarily large. A probabilistic approach was undertaken to conduct fracture evaluations of circumferentially cracked pipes for leak-rate-detection applications. Sixteen nuclear piping systems in BWR and PWR plants were analyzed to evaluate conditional failure probability and effects of crack-morphology variability on the current margins used in leak rate detection for leak-before-break.

Rahman, S.; Ghadiali, N.; Paul, D.; Wilkowski, G. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Combined Tevatron upper limit on gg --> H --> W[superscript +]W[superscript -] and constraints on the Higgs boson mass in fourth-generation fermion models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We combine results from searches by the CDF and D0 collaborations for a standard model Higgs boson (H) in the process gg-->H-->W+W- in pp? collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at [sqrt]s=1.96??TeV. With 4.8??fb-1 ...

Paus, Christoph M. E.

326

Combined upper limit on standard model higgs boson production at D0 in $p \\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96-TeV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The latest searches for the Standard Model Higgs boson at a centre-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV with the D0 and the CDF detectors at the Fermilab Tevatron collider are presented. For the first time since the LEP experiments the sensitivity for a Standard Model Higgs boson has been reached at a Higgs boson mass of 170 GeV/c{sup 2}.

Bernhard, Ralf; /Freiburg U.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

HQFMSP Chapter 2, Limited Areas, Valut-Type Rooms and Temporary Limited  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2, Limited Areas, Valut-Type Rooms and Temporary 2, Limited Areas, Valut-Type Rooms and Temporary Limited Areas HQFMSP Chapter 2, Limited Areas, Valut-Type Rooms and Temporary Limited Areas October 2013 2013 Headquarters Facilities Master Security Plan - Chapter 2, Limited Areas, Valut-Type Rooms and Temporary Limited Areas This chapter covers the establishment, maintenance, and termination of areas within HQ buildings where classified activities take place. It covers the requirements applicable to each type of security area, including physical protection measures, controls on the use of electronic devices, restrictions on what security activities can take place, and what security equipment must be present. The procedures in this chapter were developed and are maintained jointly by HS-91 and the Office of Information Security

328

Quantifying the severity of criticality limit violations  

SciTech Connect

Since August of 1994, the Los Alamos National Laboratory has been using the LANL Categorization Criteria Matrix for determining the need for and level of reporting criticality safety limit violations. The LANL Categorization Criteria Matrix is DOE approved, and is cited in a DOE approved SAR for the LANL Plutonium Facility as the method used to determine whether a criticality limit violation is reportable to DOE via 5000.3B ``Occurrence Categorization, notification and Reporting Requirements`` (replaced by DOE O 232.1). The use of the LANL Categorization Criteria Matrix provides a framework that allows criticality limit violations to be objectively reviewed in terms of what were the consequences of the criticality safety limit violation. Using the LANL Categorization Criteria Matrix helps the criticality safety engineer and line supervision explain to others, in a quantifiable manner, the significance of the criticality limit violation, the levels of margin of safety built into operations, and demonstrate the difference between evaluated conditions and working conditions.

Vessard, S.G. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Steele, C.M. [Dept. of Energy, Los Alamos, NM (United States). Los Alamos Area Office

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

EA-365 Centre Land Trading Limited | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 Centre Land Trading Limited EA-365 Centre Land Trading Limited Order Authorizing Centre Land Trading Limited to export electric energy to Canada EA-365 Centre Land Trading...

330

Limited Test Ban Treaty Signed | National Nuclear Security Administrat...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Timeline > Limited Test Ban Treaty Signed Limited Test Ban Treaty Signed August 05, 1963 Washington, DC Limited Test Ban Treaty Signed The United States, Great Britain, and the...

331

Fundamental limits and insights: from wireless communication to DNA sequencing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fundamental limits and insights: from wireless communicationDavid Aldous Fall 2012 Fundamental limits and insights: fromGuy Bresler Abstract Fundamental limits and insights: from

Bresler, Guy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Representation of Limited Rights Data and Restricted Computer...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Representation of Limited Rights Data and Restricted Computer Software Representation of Limited Rights Data and Restricted Computer Software Representation of Limited Rights Data...

333

Method of using in situ porosity measurements to place an upper bound on geothermal reservoir compaction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Placing an upper bound on reservoir compaction requires placing a lower bound on the reservoir effective compaction modulus. Porosity-depth data can be used to find that lower-bound modulus in a young sedimentary basin. Well-log and sample porosity data from a geothermal field in the Imperial Valley, CA, give a lower-bound modulus of 7.7 x 10{sup 3} psi. This modulus is used with pressure drops calculated for a reservoir to determine an upper bound on reservoir compaction. The effects of partial reinjection and aquifer leakage on upper-bound subsidence estimated from the compaction are illustrated for a hypothetical reservoir and well array.

Schatz, J.F.; Kasameyer, P.W.; Cheney, J.A.

1979-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

334

Upper Higgs boson mass bounds from a chirally invariant lattice Higgs-Yukawa model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We establish the cutoff-dependent upper Higgs boson mass bound by means of direct lattice computations in the framework of a chirally invariant lattice Higgs-Yukawa model emulating the same chiral Yukawa coupling structure as in the Higgs-fermion sector of the Standard Model. As expected from the triviality picture of the Higgs sector, we observe the upper mass bound to decrease with rising cutoff parameter $\\Lambda$. Moreover, the strength of the fermionic contribution to the upper mass bound is explored by comparing to the corresponding analysis in the pure $\\Phi^4$-theory.

P. Gerhold; K. Jansen

2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

335

Symphony Energy Resources Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Symphony Energy Resources Limited Symphony Energy Resources Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name Symphony Energy Resources Limited Place Borehamwood, United Kingdom Zip WD6 1LE Product String representation "Symphony Energy ... dable plastics." is too long. Coordinates 51.65582°, -0.275754° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.65582,"lon":-0.275754,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

336

Mistral Invest Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mistral Invest Limited Mistral Invest Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name Mistral Invest Limited Place London, United Kingdom Zip W1U 7DW Sector Wind energy Product Private Equity Fund aiming to build a portfolio of wind farms in the UK and France, participating early in the project development phase. Coordinates 51.506325°, -0.127144° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.506325,"lon":-0.127144,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

337

Eclectic Energy Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Eclectic Energy Limited Eclectic Energy Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name Eclectic Energy Limited Place Nottinghamshire, United Kingdom Zip NG21 9PR Sector Wind energy Product Design, manufacture D400, StealthGen micro wind, DuoGen wind and water generators. Coordinates 53.145962°, -1.00554° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":53.145962,"lon":-1.00554,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

338

Transmission Capital Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Capital Limited Capital Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name Transmission Capital Limited Place London, United Kingdom Zip EC2V 7HR Sector Renewable Energy, Services Product String representation "Provides adviso ... y arrangements." is too long. Coordinates 51.506325°, -0.127144° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.506325,"lon":-0.127144,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

339

Trina Solar Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trina Solar Limited Trina Solar Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name Trina Solar Limited Place Changzhou, Jiangsu Province, China Zip 213031 Sector Solar Product An integrated solar ingot, wafer, solar cell, module and system manufacturer. Coordinates 31.766211°, 119.94722° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.766211,"lon":119.94722,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

340

Fortune New Energy Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fortune New Energy Limited Fortune New Energy Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name Fortune New Energy Limited Place Tianjin, Tianjin Municipality, China Sector Wind energy Product Tianjin-based wind project developer Coordinates 39.231831°, 117.878502° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.231831,"lon":117.878502,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "upper detection limit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

EPR Ely Power Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EPR Ely Power Limited EPR Ely Power Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name EPR Ely Power Limited Place London, Greater London, United Kingdom Zip SW1Y 5AU Sector Biomass Product Owns and operates the Ely biomass power plant. Coordinates 51.506325°, -0.127144° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.506325,"lon":-0.127144,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

342

Akhter Solar Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Akhter Solar Limited Akhter Solar Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name Akhter Solar Limited Place Islamabad, Pakistan Product Owns a 3MW module assembly line in Pakistan, which uses Q-Cells cells. Coordinates 33.709839°, 73.075912° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.709839,"lon":73.075912,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

343

Central Electronics Limited CEL | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electronics Limited CEL Electronics Limited CEL Jump to: navigation, search Name Central Electronics Limited (CEL) Place Sahibabad, Uttar Pradesh, India Zip 201010 Sector Solar Product String representation "Sahibabad-based ... nment of India." is too long. Coordinates 28.67127°, 77.371002° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":28.67127,"lon":77.371002,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

344

Acquasol Infrastructure Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Acquasol Infrastructure Limited Acquasol Infrastructure Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name Acquasol Infrastructure Limited Place Adelaide, South Australia, Australia Zip 5000 Sector Solar Product Adelaide based solar thermal project and technology developer. Coordinates -34.926102°, 138.599884° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-34.926102,"lon":138.599884,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

345

Biodiesel Energy Trading Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Limited Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name Biodiesel Energy Trading Limited Place London, United Kingdom Zip W1J 8DY Product London-based company focused on trading of biodiesel. Coordinates 51.506325°, -0.127144° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.506325,"lon":-0.127144,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

346

Vihaan Networks Limited VNL | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vihaan Networks Limited VNL Vihaan Networks Limited VNL Jump to: navigation, search Name Vihaan Networks Limited (VNL) Place Gurgaon, Haryana, India Zip 122015 Sector Solar Product Developer of solar-powered GSM system for rural areas in India. Coordinates 28.55114°, 78.89427° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":28.55114,"lon":78.89427,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

347

Amperex Technology Limited ATL | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Amperex Technology Limited ATL Amperex Technology Limited ATL Jump to: navigation, search Name Amperex Technology Limited (ATL) Place N.T., Hong Kong Product Designer and manufacturer of Lithium Ion Polymer (LIP) battery cells and batteries for OEM customers making cell phones, PDA, notebook PC, earphone, and smart card applications. Coordinates 44.994023°, -72.407693° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.994023,"lon":-72.407693,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

348

Armaec Energy Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Armaec Energy Limited Armaec Energy Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name Armaec Energy Limited Place Uxbridge, Greater London, United Kingdom Zip UB10 9NA Sector Wind energy Product London based wind farm developer with a focus on emerging markets such as Armenia, South Africa and India. Coordinates 42.060711°, -71.622467° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.060711,"lon":-71.622467,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

349

Massless Limit of Gravitational Higgs Mechanism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In gravitational Higgs mechanism graviton components acquire mass via spontaneous diffeomorphism breaking by scalar vacuum expectation values. We point out that in the massless limit the resulting theory is not Einstein-Hilbert gravity (EHG) but constrained gravity (CG). Consequently, massive solutions in the massless limit must be compared to those in CG (as opposed to EHG). We discuss spherically symmetric solutions in this context. The Schwarzschild solution in EHG can be coordinate-transformed such that it is also a solution in CG. The resulting solutions are non-perturbative in the asymptotic regime, and are reproduced in the massless limit of asymptotic massive solutions, hence no van Dam-Veltman-Zakharov discontinuity. We point out that higher curvature terms must be included to obtain non-singular spherically symmetric massive solutions and discuss a suitable framework.

Zurab Kakushadze

2007-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

350

Quantum limit in continuous quantum measurement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The quantum noise is calculated based on the description of imprecise measurement theory, which is used to analyse the general detector's quantum limit in continuous quantum measurement. Different from the traditional description of the linear-response theory, we don't introduce the hypotheses on the properties of the susceptibilities of the detector, and first show a rigorous result: The minimum noise added by the detector in quantum measurement is precisely equal to the zero-point noise. We also discuss the statistic characters of the back-action force in quantum measurement and show how to reach the quantum limit.

Shao, ChengGang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Low temperature limit of lattice QCD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the low temperature limit of lattice QCD by using a reduction formula for a fermion determinant. The reduction formula, which is useful in finite density lattice QCD simulations, contains a reduced matrix defined as the product of $N_t$ block-matrices. It is shown that eigenvalues of the reduced matrix follows a scaling law with regard to the temporal lattice size $N_t$. The $N_t$ scaling law leads to two types of expressions of the fermion determinant in the low temperature limit; one is for small quark chemical potentials, and the other is for larger quark chemical potentials.

Nagata, K; Motoki, S

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Indirect detection of dryout in simulated LMFBR fuel assemblies  

SciTech Connect

The method of indirect dryout detection was developed by an examination of the data from THORS Bundle 6A. This was a 19-pin bundle of FFTF configuration. The pin size, wire-wrap size and axial pitch were identical to those in Bundle 9; the major difference between the Bundle 6A and Bundle 9 FPSs was the length of the upper unheated zone, which simulated, in Bundle 6A, the reflector and fission gas plenum in FFTF (1.19 m) and, in Bundle 9, the upper axial blanket and fission gas plenum in CRBR (1.54 m). In addition, Bundle 6A had half-size (0.71 mm) edge channel wire-wraps and a low thermal inertia (0.51 mm thick) duct wall surrounded by calcium silicate insulation in an attempt to flatten the bundle temperature profile.

Levin, A.E.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Monolithic multi-color light emission/detection device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A single-crystal, monolithic, tandem, multi-color optical transceiver device is described, including (a) an InP substrate having upper and lower surfaces, (b) a first junction on the upper surface of the InP substrate, (c) a second junction on the first junction. The first junction is preferably GaInAsP of defined composition, and the second junction is preferably InP. The two junctions are lattice matched. The second junction has a larger energy band gap than the first junction. Additional junctions having successively larger energy band gaps may be included. The device is capable of simultaneous and distinct multi-color emission and detection over a single optical fiber.

Wanlass, Mark W. (Golden, CO)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Sulfide chemiluminescence detection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A method of chemiluminescently determining a sulfide which is either hydrogen sulfide or methyl mercaptan by reacting the sulfide with chlorine dioxide at low pressure and under conditions which allow a longer reaction time in emission of a single photon for every two sulfide containing species, and thereafter, chemiluminescently detecting and determining the sulfide. The invention also relates not only to the detection method, but the novel chemical reaction and a specifically designed chemiluminescence detection cell for the reaction.

Spurlin, Stanford R. (Ames, IA); Yeung, Edward S. (Ames, IA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Sulfide chemiluminescence detection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for chemiluminescently determining a sulfide which is either hydrogen sulfide or methyl mercaptan by reacting the sulfide with chlorine dioxide at low pressure and under conditions which allow a longer reaction time in emission of a single photon for every two sulfide containing species, and thereafter, chemiluminescently detecting and determining the sulfide. The invention also relates not only to the detection method, but the novel chemical reaction and a specifically designed chemiluminescence detection cell for the reaction. 4 figs.

Spurlin, S.R.; Yeung, E.S.

1985-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

356

Neutron-detection apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An atomic fission counting apparatus used for neutron detection is provided with spirally curved electrode plates uniformly spaced apart in a circular array and coated with fissile material.

Kopp, M.K.; Valentine, K.H.

1981-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

357

Liquid level detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses a method. It is for detecting presence of a liquid level at a first predetermined point along the depth of a borehole.

Fryer, C.D.; Stie, K.E.; Wedel, M.W.; Stamper, K.R.

1990-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

358

Neutron detection apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An atomic fission counting apparatus used for neutron detection is provided with spirally curved electrode plates uniformly spaced apart in a circular array and coated with fissile material.

Kopp, Manfred K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Valentine, Kenneth H. (Lenoir City, TN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Analysis of optical CDMA signal transmission: capacity limits and simulation results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present performance limits of the optical code-division multiple-access (OCDMA) networks. In particular, we evaluate the information-theoretical capacity of the OCDMA transmission when single-user detection (SUD) is used by the receiver. First, we ... Keywords: M-ary modulation, channel capacity, multiple-access channels, optical CDMA communication, turbo codes

Aminata A. Garba; Raymond M. H. Yim; Jan Bajcsy; Lawrence R. Chen

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Limitation and Asymptotology of Chemical Reaction Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The concept of the limiting step is extended to the asymptotology of multiscale reaction networks. Complete theory for linear networks with well separated reaction rate constants is developed. We present algorithms for explicit approximations of eigenvalues and eigenvectors of kinetic matrix. Accuracy of estimates is proven. Performance of the algorithms is demonstrated on simple examples. Application of algorithms to nonlinear systems is discussed.

Gorban, A N; Zinovyev, A Yu

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "upper detection limit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Conformal Blocks in the Large D Limit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive conformal blocks in an inverse spacetime dimension expansion. In this large D limit, the blocks are naturally written in terms of a new combination of conformal cross-ratios. We comment on the implications for the conformal bootstrap at large D.

A. Liam Fitzpatrick; Jared Kaplan; David Poland

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

362

DISSOLVED CONCENTRATION LIMITS OF RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to evaluate dissolved concentration limits (also referred to as solubility limits) of elements with radioactive isotopes under probable repository conditions, based on geochemical modeling calculations using geochemical modeling tools, thermodynamic databases, field measurements, and laboratory experiments. The scope of this modeling activity is to predict dissolved concentrations or solubility limits for 14 elements with radioactive isotopes (actinium, americium, carbon, cesium, iodine, lead, neptunium, plutonium, protactinium, radium, strontium, technetium, thorium, and uranium) important to calculated dose. Model outputs for uranium, plutonium, neptunium, thorium, americium, and protactinium are in the form of tabulated functions with pH and log (line integral) CO{sub 2} as independent variables, plus one or more uncertainty terms. The solubility limits for the remaining elements are either in the form of distributions or single values. The output data from this report are fundamental inputs for Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA) to determine the estimated release of these elements from waste packages and the engineered barrier system. Consistent modeling approaches and environmental conditions were used to develop solubility models for all of the actinides. These models cover broad ranges of environmental conditions so that they are applicable to both waste packages and the invert. Uncertainties from thermodynamic data, water chemistry, temperature variation, and activity coefficients have been quantified or otherwise addressed.

NA

2004-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

363

Schlumberger soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River Valleys,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River Valleys, soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River Valleys, Idaho and Utah Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Schlumberger soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River Valleys, Idaho and Utah Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: In 1975, the U.S. Geological Survey made seventy Schlumberger resistivity soundings in the Upper Raft River Valley and in parts of the Raft River Valley. These soundings complement the seventy-nine soundings made previously in the Raft River Valley (Zohdy and others, 1975) and bring the total number of soundings to 149. This work was done as part of a hydrogeologic study of the area. The location, number, and azimuth of all 149 Schlumberger sounding stations are presented. The location of the new

364

A Radiative Upper Boundary Condition Adapted for f-Plane Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under the assumption of weak background rotational and wind shear effects, an attractive computational upper boundary condition capable of transmitting gravity waves is generalized for use in a variety of f-plane models. Issues relating to ...

Stephen T. Garner

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Effects of the Upper Flow Asymmetry on the Future Direction of Motion of Tropical Cyclones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analyses of 200-mb streamlines indicate the existence of a confluence between a tropical cyclone’s main anticyclonic outflow channel aloft and the large-wale environmental upper flow. The confluence produces in the poleward semicircle a ...

F. A. Lajoie

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Evaluation of SSMIS Upper Atmosphere Sounding Channels for High-Altitude Data Assimilation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Upper atmosphere sounding (UAS) channels of the Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS) were assimilated using a high-altitude version of the Navy Global Environmental Model (NAVGEM) in order to investigate their potential for operational ...

Karl W. Hoppel; Stephen D. Eckermann; Lawrence Coy; Gerald E. Nedoluha; Douglas R. Allen; Steven D. Swadley; Nancy L. Baker

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Cloud Layer Thicknesses from a Combination of Surface and Upper-Air Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud layer thicknesses are derived from base and top altitudes by combining 14 years (1975–1988) of surface and upper-air observations at 63 sites in the Northern Hemisphere. Rawinsonde observations are employed to determine the locations of ...

Kirk D. Poore; Junhong Wang; William B. Rossow

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

A Review of the Structure and Dynamics of Upper-Level Frontal Zones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article presents a review of upper-level fronts with the intent of synthesizing observational and modeling studies into a conceptual and dynamical description of these fronts and their evolution relative to the life cycle of midlatitude ...

Daniel Keyser; M. A. Shapiro

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Remote Sensing of Flooding in the U.S. Upper Midwest during the Summer of 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. upper Midwest was subjected to severe flooding during the summer of 1993. Heavy rainfall in the Mississippi River basin from April through July caused flooding of many Midwest rivers, including the Mississippi, Illinois, Missouri, and ...

Liam E. Gumley; Michael D. King

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Exploration Of The Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource, Nye County,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Of The Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource, Nye County, Of The Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource, Nye County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Exploration Of The Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource, Nye County, Nevada Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Upper Hot Creek Ranch (UHCR) geothermal system had seen no significant exploration activity prior to initiation of this GRED III project. Geochemical geothermometers calculated from previously available but questionable quality analyses of the UHCR hot spring waters indicated possible subsurface temperatures of +320 oF. A complex Quaternary and Holocene faulting pattern associated with a six mile step over of the Hot Creek Range near the UHCR also indicated that this area was worthy of some

371

Microsoft Word - Upper Jocko River Final Draft CX 7-15-2013.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Upper Jocko River Property funding Upper Jocko River Property funding Fish and Wildlife Project No. and Contract No.: 2002-003-00, BPA-007168 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.25 Real property transfers for cultural resources protection, habitat preservation, and wildlife management Location: Township 16 North, Range 19 West, Section 10, Lake County, MT Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund the Salish and Kootenai Tribes for the purchase of 5 acres of property, referred to as the Upper Jocko River Land Acqusition in Lake County, MT. The Salish and Kootenai Tribes will own and manage the Upper Jocko River property for fish and wildlife conservation purposes and BPA will receive a conservation

372

A New Method for the Measurement of the Optical Volume Scattering Function in the Upper Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method to measure the optical volume scattering function (VSF) of seawater is presented. The VSF is a fundamental property used in the calculation of radiative transfer for applications as diverse as upper-ocean heating by solar radiation ...

Michael E. Lee; Marlon R. Lewis

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Sensitivity of the Upper Mesosphere to the Lorenz Energy Cycle of the Troposphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The concept of a mechanistic general circulation model that explicitly simulates the gravity wave drag in the extratropical upper mesosphere in a self-consistent fashion is proposed. The methodology consists of 1) a standard spectral dynamical ...

Erich Becker

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

An Integrated Approach to Mid- and Upper-Level Turbulence Forecasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An automated procedure for forecasting mid- and upper-level turbulence that affects aircraft is described. This procedure, termed the Graphical Turbulence Guidance system, uses output from numerical weather prediction model forecasts to derive ...

R. Sharman; C. Tebaldi; G. Wiener; J. Wolff

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Satellite Observations of Variations in Tropical Cyclone Convection Caused by Upper-Tropospheric Troughs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mutual adjustment between upper-tropospheric troughs and the structure of western Atlantic Tropical Cyclones Florence (1988) and Irene (1981) are analyzed using satellite and in situ data. Satellite-observed tracers (e.g., cirrus clouds, ...

Edward B. Rodgers; Simon W. Chang; John Stout; Joseph Steranka; Jainn-Jong Shi

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Geochemical and rheological constraints on the dynamics of the oceanic upper mantle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I provide constraints on mantle convection through observations of the rheology and composition of the oceanic upper mantle. Convection cannot be directly observed, yet is a fundamental part of the plate tectonic cycle. ...

Warren, Jessica Mendelsohn

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Heavy Precipitation Events in New Jersey: Attendant Upper-Air Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first of an anticipated multipart study of atmospheric conditions occurring before and during heavy precipitation events in New Jersey, representative of the mid-Atlantic region, is presented. Upper-air data parameters were analyzed for 81 ...

Robert P. Harnack; Kirk Apffel; Joseph R. Cermak III

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

A Nonreflecting Upper Boundary Condition for Anelastic Nonhydrostatic Mesoscale Gravity-Wave Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A sponge layer is formulated to prevent spurious reflection of vertically propagating quasi-stationary gravity waves at the upper boundary of a two-dimensional numerical anelastic nonhydrostatic model. The sponge layer includes damping of both ...

Young-Joon Kim; Sajal K. Kar; Akio Arakawa

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Effects of Precipitation on the Upper-Ocean Response to a Hurricane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of precipitation on the upper-ocean response during a tropical cyclone passage is investigated using a numerical model in this paper. For realistic wind forcing and empirical rain rates based on satellite climatology, numerical ...

S. Daniel Jacob; Chester J. Koblinsky

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

A Diagnostic Study of Upper Tropospheric Cold Lows Over the Western North Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four summers (1967, 1969, 1970, 1971) of rawinsonde data from four western North Pacific island stations (Guam, Midway, Johnston and Wake) were used to form a three-dimensional composite of the subtropical upper-tropospheric cold-core lows ...

Walker E. Kelly Jr.; Donald R. Mock

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "upper detection limit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

A Global Isopycnal OGCM: Validations Using Observed Upper-Ocean Variabilities during 1992–93  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, a global isopycnal ocean model (GIM) is described and used for a simulation of variabilities of the global upper ocean during 1992–93. The GIM simulations are compared and validated with both the available observations and ...

Dingming Hu; Yi Chao

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

A Composite Study of the Interactions between Tropical Cyclones and Upper-Tropospheric Troughs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to understand how interactions with upper-tropospheric troughs affect the intensity of tropical cyclones. The study includes all named Atlantic tropical cyclones between 1985 and 1996. To minimize other factors ...

Deborah Hanley; John Molinari; Daniel Keyser

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Review of the Unusual Winter of 1982–83 In the Upper Midwest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climatologists from the climate centers of 12 states of the upper Midwest contributed temperature, precipitation, and related data for December 1982, January and February 1983. Analyses present the month-to-month spatial anomaly patterns of these ...

W. M. Wendland; L. D. Bark; D. R. Clark; R. B. Curry; J. W. Enz; K. G. Hubbard; V. Jones; E. L. Kuehnast; W. Lytle; J. Newman; F. V. Nurnberger; P. Waite

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Tropical Cyclone–Induced Upper-Ocean Mixing and Climate: Application to Equable Climates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tropical cyclones instigate an isolated blast of vigorous mixing in the upper tropical oceans, stirring warm surface water with cooler water in the thermocline. Previous work suggests that the frequency, intensity, and lifetime of these storms ...

Robert L. Korty; Kerry A. Emanuel; Jeffery R. Scott

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

A Comparison of in Situ, Reanalysis, and Satellite Water Budgets over the Upper Colorado River Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using in situ, reanalysis, and satellite-derived datasets, surface and atmospheric water budgets of the Upper Colorado River basin are analyzed. All datasets capture the seasonal cycle for each water budget component. For precipitation, all ...

Rebecca A. Smith; Christian D. Kummerow

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Horizontal Wavenumber Spectra of Vertical Vorticity and Horizontal Divergence in the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The author shows that the horizontal two-point correlations of vertical vorticity and the associated vorticity wavenumber spectrum can be constructed from previously measured velocity structure functions in the upper troposphere and lower ...

Erik Lindborg

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Piecewise Tendency Diagnosis of Dynamical Processes Governing the Development of an Upper-Tropospheric Mobile Trough  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The intensification and evolution of midlatitude upper-tropospheric mobile troughs may be viewed in terms of the isentropic advection and deformation of the tropopause potential vorticity gradient. The potential vorticity viewpoint allows one to ...

John W. Nielsen-Gammon; Randy J. Lefevre

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

A Potential Vorticity Diagnostic Approach to Upper-Level Frontogenesis within a Developing Baroclinic Wave  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The process of tropopause folding is studied in the context of the life cycle of baroclinic waves. Previous studies of upper-level frontogenesis have emphasized the role of the vertical circulation in driving stratospheric air down into the ...

Matthew S. Wandishin; John W. Nielsen-Gammon; Daniel Keyser

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Interannual Variability of the Upper Ocean in the Southeast Pacific Stratus Cloud Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Persistent stratus/stratocumulus cloud decks in the southeast Pacific near the coasts of Peru and northern Chile play an important role in regional and global climate variability. Interannual variability of the upper ocean under stratus cloud ...

Toshiaki Shinoda; Jialin Lin

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

A Synoptic Climatology of the Bimodal Precipitation Distribution in the Upper Midwest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an investigation of the synoptic climatology of the precipitation regime in the Upper Midwest. The annual march of precipitation is characterized by a bimodal distribution, with maxima occurring during the months of June and ...

Michael J. Keables

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Is the Upper Ocean Warming? Comparisons of 50-Year Trends from Different Analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is great interest in World Ocean temperature trends, yet the historical global ocean database has very uneven coverage in space and time. Previous work on 50-yr upper ocean temperature trends from the NOAA ocean data archive is extended ...

Mark Carson; D. E. Harrison

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

The upper crustal P-wave velocity structure of Newberry volcano, Central Oregon.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The upper-crustal seismic-velocity structure of Newberry volcano, central Oregon, is imaged using P-wave travel time tomography. The inversion combines a densely-spaced seismic line collected… (more)

Beachly, Matthew William

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

The Upper Crustal P-wave Velocity Structure of Newberry Volcano, Central Oregon.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The upper-crustal seismic-velocity structure of Newberry volcano, central Oregon, is imaged using P-wave travel time tomography. The inversion combines a densely-spaced seismic line collected in… (more)

Beachly, Matthew William, 1986-

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Multimodel Analysis of the Water Vapor Feedback in the Tropical Upper Troposphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Relationships between the mean humidity in the tropical upper troposphere and tropical sea surface temperatures in 17 coupled ocean–atmosphere global climate models were investigated. This analysis builds on a prior study of humidity and surface ...

Ken Minschwaner; Andrew E. Dessler; Parnchai Sawaengphokhai

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Validation of the Upper Tropospheric Relative Humidity Determined from METEOSAT Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this note is to “validate” the upper tropospheric humidity (UTH) operationally extracted from the 6.3 ?m channel data of METEOSAT. The validation is carded out by comparing the satellite data with observed humidifies from the ...

Olli M. Turpeinen; Johannes Schmetz

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

A Combined Barotropic-Baroclinic Instability Study of the Upper Tropospheric Tropical Easterly Jet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A combined barotropic-baroclinic stability analysis is performed for an upper tropospheric tropical easterly jet representing the observed mean monsoon zonal flow during summer. Numerical solutions are obtained by time integration of a 20-layer ...

S. K. Mishra; M. Y. Tandon

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Upper-Ocean Temperature Response to Hurricane Felix as Measured by the Bermuda Testbed Mooring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hurricane Felix passed over the Bermuda testbed mooring on 15 August 1995, providing a unique opportunity to observe the response of the upper ocean to a hurricane. In the vicinity of Bermuda, Felix was a particularly large hurricane with ...

Tommy Dickey; Dan Frye; Joe McNeil; Derek Manov; Norm Nelson; David Sigurdson; Hans Jannasch; David Siegel; Tony Michaels; Rod Johnson

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Observations of 20-Day Period Meridional Current Oscillations in the Upper Ocean along the Pacific Equator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prominent oscillations of the meridional current, with a mean period of approximately 20 days, have been observed in the upper ocean over several years from May 1979 to October 1985 using moored current measurements along the Pacific equator at ...

David Halpern; Robert A. Knox; Douglas S. Luther

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

An Upper Boundary Condition Permitting Internal Gravity Wave Radiation in Numerical Mesoscale Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A radiative upper boundary condition is proposed for numerical mesoscale models which allows vertically propagating internal gravity waves to pass out of the computational domain with minimal reflection. In this formulation, the pressure along ...

Joseph B. Klemp; Dale R. Durran

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Near-N Oscillations and Deep-Cycle Turbulence in an Upper-Equatorial Undercurrent Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is used to investigate the role of shear instabilities in turbulent mixing in a model of the upper Equatorial Undercurrent (EUC). The background flow consists of a westward-moving surface mixed layer above a ...

Hieu T. Pham; Sutanu Sarkar; Kraig B. Winters

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "upper detection limit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

In Situ Measurements of OH and H02 in the Upper Troposphere and Stratosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent aircraft and balloon borne measurements of OH and H02 are reviewed. The authors demonstrate the ability of the laser-induced fluorescence technique to provide accurate, high signal to noise ratio measurements of OH throughout the upper ...

P. O. Wennberg; T. F. Hanisco; R. C. Cohen; R. M. Stimpfle; L. B. Lapson; J. G. Anderson

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

The Objective Use of Upper Air Soundings to Specify Precipitation Type  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Linear screening regression is used to derive relationships between parameters computed from observed upper air soundings (RAOBS) and concurrent observations of precipitation type. Precipitation type is defined as three categories: liquid (rain ...

Joseph R. Bocchieri

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Resolution Dependence of the Tropopause Inversion Layer in an Idealized Model for Upper-Tropospheric Anticyclones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This note investigates the dependence of the extratropical tropopause inversion layer (TIL) on numerical resolution in an idealized modeling framework. Axisymmetric upper-tropospheric anticyclones are constructed by specifying potential vorticity ...

Andreas Müller; Volkmar Wirth

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Intraseasonal Variability of the Upper-Ocean Thermal Structure Observed at 0° and 165°E  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In response to perturbations in surface wind and energy fluxes associated with the atmospheric Madden–Julian oscillation (MJO), the thermal structure of the upper ocean (surface to 300 m) in the equatorial western Pacific exhibits prominent and ...

Chidong Zhang

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Subsidence and Upper-Tropospheric Drying along Trajectories in a General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A trajectory analysis of the Community Climate Model version 3 (CCM3) moisture simulation is used to show that the model simulates upper-tropospheric moisture observations better than would be inferred from a traditional geographical comparison. ...

Eric P. Salathé Jr.; Dennis L. Hartmann

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

The Asymmetry of Western Boundary Currents in the Upper Atlantic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of upper-ocean western boundary current (WBC) transports reveal asymmetries between the Northern and the Southern Hemispheres of the Atlantic Ocean. To find out what mechanism might cause these asymmetries the linearized steady-state ...

Reiner Onken

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Depiction of Upper/Lower Vortex Interaction Associated with Extratropical Cyclogenesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using observed data and model simulations, an attempt is made to verify that baroclinic instability can be viewed as an interaction and mutual amplification of a pair of upper- and lower-tropospheric potential vorticity (PV) perturbations. This ...

Rainer Bleck

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

A Satellite-Based Assessment of Upper-Tropospheric Water Vapor Measurements during AFWEX  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Consistency of upper-tropospheric water vapor measurements from a variety of state-of-the-art instruments was assessed using collocated Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-8 (GOES-8) 6.7-?m brightness temperatures as a common ...

Eui-Seok Chung; Brian J. Soden

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Upper-Tropospheric Winds Derived from Geostationary Satellite Water Vapor Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The coverage and quality of remotely sensed upper-tropospheric moisture parameters have improved considerably with the deployment of a new generation of operational geostationary meteorological satellites: GOES-8/9 and GMS-5. The GOES-8/9 water ...

Christopher S. Velden; Christopher M. Hayden; Steven J. Nieman; W. Paul Menzel; Steven Wanzong; James S. Goerss

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Restratification of the Upper Ocean after the Passage of a Tropical Cyclone: A Numerical Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of baroclinic instability in the restratification of the upper ocean after the passage of a tropical cyclone (TC) is determined by means of numerical simulations. Using a regional ocean model, the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS), a ...

Wei Mei; Claudia Pasquero

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Initial Ice Microparticle Sublimation Measurements from the Levitating Upper-Tropospheric Environmental Simulator (LUTES)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Initial ice particle sublimation data are presented from the new Levitating Upper-Tropospheric Environmental Simulator (LUTES) at The College of New Jersey. This experimental system mimics the conditions of a typical cirrus cloud in order to ...

Nathan Magee; Kayla Spector; Yi-Hsuan Lin; Corey Tong; John Beatty

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Deep-Water Renewal in the Upper Basin of Loch Sunart, a Scottish Fjord  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recording current meters were deployed near the surface and bottom in the upper basin of Loch Sunart during the summers of 1987, 1989, and 1990. The measurements revealed frequent, though irregular, deep-water renewal events when the basin water ...

Philip A. Gillibrand; William R. Turrell; Alan J. Elliott

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

The Global Distribution of Supersaturation in the Upper Troposphere from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is analyzed to examine regions of the upper troposphere that are supersaturated: where the relative humidity (RH) is greater than 100%. AIRS data compare well to other in situ and ...

Andrew Gettelman; Eric J. Fetzer; Annmarie Eldering; Fredrick W. Irion

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Mechanisms Governing Interannual Variability of Upper-Ocean Temperature in a Global Ocean Hindcast Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interannual variability in upper-ocean (0–400 m) temperature and governing mechanisms for the period 1968–97 are quantified from a global ocean hindcast simulation driven by atmospheric reanalysis and satellite data products. The ...

Scott C. Doney; Steve Yeager; Gokhan Danabasoglu; William G. Large; James C. McWilliams

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Seasonal Variations of Upper Ocean Transport from the Pacific to the Indian Ocean via Indonesian Straits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seasonal variations of upper-ocean mass transport between the Pacific and Indian Oceans via the Indonesian Throughflow (ITF) are examined using numerical experiments with a 1˝-layer, reduced-gravity model forced with specific climatological ...

James T. Potemra

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Lower-Stratospheric and Upper-Tropospheric Disturbances Observed by Radiosondes over Thailand during January 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lower-stratospheric and upper-tropospheric disturbances over Thailand during 12–21 January 2000 were studied using the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Asian Monsoon Experiment-Tropics (GAME-T) intensive rawinsonde observations ...

Shin-Ya Ogino; Kaoru Sato; Manabu D. Yamanaka; Akira Watanabe

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

SkinDeEP: A Profiling Instrument for Upper-Decameter Sea Surface Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Skin Depth Experimental Profiler (SkinDeEP) is an autonomous, self-contained, hydrodynamic instrument capable of making repeated, high-resolution profiles of temperature and conductivity within the ocean's upper decameter. Autonomous ...

Brian Ward; Rik Wanninkhof; Peter J. Minnett; Michael J. Head

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Dominant Modes of Wintertime Upper-Tropospheric Temperature Variations over Asia and Links to Surface Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the authors investigate the variations and predictability of wintertime upper-tropospheric temperature (UTT) over Asia, which are often linked to severe climate anomalies, and the associated features of large-scale circulation and ...

Xingwen Jiang; Song Yang; Yueqing Li; Zongjian Ke; Jianping Li; Haoran Hu

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Solar and Thermal Radiation Errors on Upper-Air Radiosonde Temperature Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric temperature and humidity profiles are important for weather prediction, but climate change has increased the interest in upper-air observations asking for very high quality reference measurements. Here we show an experimental approach ...

R. Philipona; A. Kräuchi; G. Romanens; G. Levrat; P. Ruppert; E. Brocard; P. Jeannet; D. Ruffieux; B. Calpini

420

Interannual Variability and Ensemble Forecast of Upper Blue Nile Basin Kiremt Season Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ethiopian agriculture and Nile River flows are heavily dependent upon the Kiremt season (June–September) precipitation in the upper Blue Nile basin, as a means of rain-fed irrigation and streamflow contribution, respectively. Climate diagnostics ...

Paul Block; Balaji Rajagopalan

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "upper detection limit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Aviation and Chemistry and Transport Processes in the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aircraft emissions impact the atmosphere in a variety of ways, including enhancing greenhouse gases, especially water vapor and carbon dioxide, in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, forming persistent contrails, and altering the ...

Darin Toohey; John McConnell; Linnea Avallone; Wayne Evans

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Evaluation of NMC Upper-Stratospheric Temperature Analyses Using Rocketsonde and Lidar Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Daily NMC analyses, constructed from operational TOVS data since 1978, are used to monitor behavior of middle atmospheric temperature. Capability of the upper-stratospheric analyses (5, 2, 1, and 0.4 mb) to provide temporally consistent ...

F. G. Finger; M. E. Gelman; A. J. Miller; J. D. Wild; M. L. Chanin; A. Hauchecorne

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Reference Upper-Air Observations for Climate: Rationale, Progress, and Plans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While the global upper-air observing network has provided useful observations for operational weather forecasting for decades, its measurements lack the accuracy and long-term continuity needed for understanding climate change. Consequently, the ...

Dian J. Seidel; Franz H. Berger; Franz Immler; Michael Sommer; Holger Vömel; Howard J. Diamond; John Dykema; David Goodrich; William Murray; Thomas Peterson; Douglas Sisterson; Peter Thorne; Junhong Wang

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

ENSO and PDO Effects on Hydroclimatic Variations of the Upper Colorado River Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Linkages between tropical Pacific Ocean monthly climatic variables and the Upper Colorado River basin (UCRB) hydroclimatic variations from 1909 to 1998 are analyzed at interseasonal timescales. A study of the changes in these linkages through the ...

Hugo G. Hidalgo; John A. Dracup

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Role of the Seasonal Cycle in the Subduction Rates of Upper–Southern Ocean Waters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A kinematic approach is used to diagnose the subduction rates of upper–Southern Ocean waters across seasonally migrating density outcrops at the base of the mixed layer. From an Eulerian viewpoint, the term representing the temporal change in the ...

Eun Young Kwon; Stephanie M. Downes; Jorge L. Sarmiento; Riccardo Farneti; Curtis Deutsch

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Linear and Nonlinear Diagnostic Models of Stationary Eddies in the Upper Troposphere during Northern Summer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The upper tropospheric circulation during northern summer produced by a general circulation model (GCM) is studied using linear and nonlinear barotropic models and by analysing a streamfunction budget. The model experiments and the budget ...

In-Sik Kang; Isaac M. Held

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Evolution of upper mantle beneath East Asia and the Tibetan Plateau from P-wave tomography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main objective of the research presented in this thesis is to improve our understanding for the evolution of the upper mantle beneath East Asia and the Tibetan Plateau through high resolution P-wave tomography. The ...

Li, Chang, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Characteristics of Wave Packets in the Upper Troposphere. Part II: Seasonal and Hemispheric Variations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gridded 300-hPa meridional wind data produced by the ECMWF reanalysis project were analyzed to document the seasonal and hemispheric variations in the properties of upper-tropospheric wave packets. The properties of the wave packets are mainly ...

Edmund K. M. Chang

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

MODELING OF TSUNAMI GENERATION, PROPAGATION AND REGIONAL IMPACT ALONG THE UPPER U.S. EAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the entire upper US East Coast (USEC), in addition to Puerto Rico and many of the Caribbean islands (e USEC (north of Virginia), here, we simulate tsunami generation and transoceanic propagation to the USEC

Kirby, James T.

430

Observed Oceanic Response over the Upper Continental Slope and Outer Shelf during Hurricane Ivan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hurricane Ivan passed directly over an array of 14 acoustic Doppler current profilers deployed along the outer continental shelf and upper slope in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. Currents in excess of 200 cm s?1 were generated during this ...

W. J. Teague; E. Jarosz; D. W. Wang; D. A. Mitchell

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Variability of Upper Pacific Ocean Overturning in a Coupled Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Variability of subtropical cell (STC) overturning in the upper Pacific Ocean is examined in a coupled climate model in light of large observed changes in STC transport. In a 1000-yr control run, modeled STC variations are smaller than observed, ...

William J. Merryfield; George J. Boer

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Heating Rate within the Upper Ocean in Relation to its Bio–optical State  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar radiation absorption and local heating within the upper layers of the open ocean are strongly influenced by the abundance of phytoplankton as depicted by the chlorophyll concentration. According to whether this concentration is high or low, ...

André Morel; David Antoine

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Interannual Variability of Meridional Heat Transport in a Numerical Model of the Upper Equatorial Pacific ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interannual heat budget of the Pacific equatorial upwelling zone is studied using a primitive equation, a reduced gravity model of the upper Pacific equatorial ocean. The model is forced with monthly mean FSU winds from 1971 to 1990. A ...

Esther C. Brady

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Solar and Thermal Radiation Errors on Upper-Air Radiosonde Temperature Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric temperature and humidity profiles are important for weather prediction, but climate change has increased the interest in upper-air observations asking for very high-quality reference measurements. This paper discusses an experimental ...

R. Philipona; A. Kräuchi; G. Romanens; G. Levrat; P. Ruppert; E. Brocard; P. Jeannet; D. Ruffieux; B. Calpini

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Ice Formation by Sulfate and Sulfuric Acid Aerosol Particles under Upper-Tropospheric Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ice formation in ammoniated sulfate and sulfuric acid aerosol particles under upper-tropospheric conditions was studied using a continuous flow thermal diffusion chamber. This technique allowed for particle exposure to controlled temperatures and ...

Yalei Chen; Paul J. DeMott; Sonia M. Kreidenweis; David C. Rogers; D. Eli Sherman

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

TOGA COARE Upper-Air Sounding Data Archive: Development and Quality Control Procedures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the most important datasets to wine from the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA COARE) is the most complete, high-resolution upper-air sounding dataset ever collected in the equatorial ...

Scot M. Loehrer; Todd A. Edmands; James A. Moore

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

An Intercomparison of Microphysical Retrieval Algorithms for Upper-Tropospheric Ice Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The large horizontal extent, with its location in the cold upper troposphere, and ice composition make cirrus clouds important modulators of the Earth's radiation budget and climate. Cirrus cloud microphysical properties are difficult to measure ...

Jennifer M. Comstock; Sally A. McFarlane; Robert d'Entremont; Daniel DeSlover; David D. Turner; Gerald G. Mace; Sergey Y. Matrosov; Matthew D. Shupe; Patrick Minnis; David Mitchell; Kenneth Sassen; Zhien Wang

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

An arc fault detection system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An arc fault detection system for use on ungrounded or high-resistance-grounded power distribution systems is provided which can be retrofitted outside electrical switchboard circuits having limited space constraints. The system includes a differential current relay that senses a current differential between current flowing from secondary windings located in a current transformer coupled to a power supply side of a switchboard, and a total current induced in secondary windings coupled to a load side of the switchboard. When such a current differential is experienced, a current travels through a operating coil of the differential current relay, which in turn, opens an upstream circuit breaker located between the switchboard and a power supply to remove the supply of power to the switchboard.

Jha, Kamal N.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Energy Detectives Help Pennsylvania Town Reduce Costs | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Detectives Help Pennsylvania Town Reduce Costs Energy Detectives Help Pennsylvania Town Reduce Costs Energy Detectives Help Pennsylvania Town Reduce Costs July 23, 2010 - 3:24pm Addthis Judith Mondre meets with members of the Mondre Energy team. | Photo courtesy of Judith Mondre Judith Mondre meets with members of the Mondre Energy team. | Photo courtesy of Judith Mondre Maya Payne Smart Former Writer for Energy Empowers, EERE What are the key facts? 70 street lights and 25 traffic signals to be replaced via Recovery Act. Town expects 10 percent reduction in energy costs. Judith Mondre spent the past two months learning the ins and outs of Upper Darby Township, Pa.'s energy usage. She's analyzed energy bills, observed town facilities and interviewed staff to put together a plan to help the municipality reduce its total energy usage.

440

A Multidisciplinary Approach To Detect Active Pathways For Magma Migration  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Multidisciplinary Approach To Detect Active Pathways For Magma Migration Multidisciplinary Approach To Detect Active Pathways For Magma Migration And Eruption At Mt Etna (Sicily, Italy) Before The 2001 And 2002-2003 Eruptions Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Multidisciplinary Approach To Detect Active Pathways For Magma Migration And Eruption At Mt Etna (Sicily, Italy) Before The 2001 And 2002-2003 Eruptions Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Two strong flank eruptions occurred in July-August 2001 and from late October 2002 to late January 2003 at Mt. Etna volcano. The two eruptions mainly involved the upper southern flank of the volcano, a particularly active area during the last 30 years, damaging several tourist facilities and threatening some villages. The composite eruptive activity

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "upper detection limit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Energy Detectives Help Pennsylvania Town Reduce Costs | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Detectives Help Pennsylvania Town Reduce Costs Detectives Help Pennsylvania Town Reduce Costs Energy Detectives Help Pennsylvania Town Reduce Costs July 23, 2010 - 3:24pm Addthis Judith Mondre meets with members of the Mondre Energy team. | Photo courtesy of Judith Mondre Judith Mondre meets with members of the Mondre Energy team. | Photo courtesy of Judith Mondre Maya Payne Smart Former Writer for Energy Empowers, EERE What are the key facts? 70 street lights and 25 traffic signals to be replaced via Recovery Act. Town expects 10 percent reduction in energy costs. Judith Mondre spent the past two months learning the ins and outs of Upper Darby Township, Pa.'s energy usage. She's analyzed energy bills, observed town facilities and interviewed staff to put together a plan to help the municipality reduce its total energy usage.

442

Oxygen detected in atmosphere of Saturn's moon Dione  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxygen detected in atmosphere of Saturn's moon Dione Oxygen detected in atmosphere of Saturn's moon Dione Oxygen detected in atmosphere of Saturn's moon Dione Scientists and an international research team have announced discovery of molecular oxygen ions in the upper-most atmosphere of Dione. March 3, 2012 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

443

Flaw Detection and Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 2   Planar flaw classification and NDE detection methods...Lack of bonding Forging or rolling lap Casting cold shut Heat treatment cracks Grinding cracks Plating cracks Fatigue cracks Stress-corrosion cracks Welding cracks Lack of fusion Incomplete penetration Brazing debond NDE detection methods Visual Replication microscopy Magnetic particle Magnetic...

444

On Detecting Spatial Outliers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ever-increasing volume of spatial data has greatly challenged our ability to extract useful but implicit knowledge from them. As an important branch of spatial data mining, spatial outlier detection aims to discover the objects whose non-spatial ... Keywords: algorithm, outlier detection, spatial data mining

Dechang Chen; Chang-Tien Lu; Yufeng Kou; Feng Chen

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Lean blowoff detection sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and method for detecting incipient lean blowoff conditions in a lean premixed combustion nozzle of a gas turbine. A sensor near the flame detects the concentration of hydrocarbon ions and/or electrons produced by combustion and the concentration monitored as a function of time are used to indicate incipient lean blowoff conditions.

Thornton, Jimmy (Morgantown, WV); Straub, Douglas L. (Morgantown, WV); Chorpening, Benjamin T. (Morgantown, WV); Huckaby, David (Morgantown, WV)

2007-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

446

Measurements and modeling of the effect of convective clouds on the upper tropospheric moisture budget  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this study is to determine the upper tropospheric moisture budget associated with convective events, and in particular to extend process models to higher altitudes than have been achieved previously. Although upper tropospheric moisture concentrations are several orders of magnitude lower than those near the surface, upper tropospheric moisture exerts an important influence on climate. On a per-molecule basis, greenhouse absorption due to water vapor is about one hundred times more effective at high altitudes than at low altitudes. Several one-dimensional radiative convective models have been used to demonstrate the importance of upper tropospheric moisture on climate. These models show that for a given fractional increase in water vapor at a given altitude the response or change in surface temperature is qualitatively the same. At present, considerable controversy exists over the nature of the vertical redistribution of water vapor in a changing climate, and particularly the distribution of water vapor in the upper troposphere. Lacking suitable data, this controversy is also reflected in the cumulus parameterization schemes that are currently used in models. Understanding upper tropospheric moistening processes are therefore of prime importance in addressing the water vapor feedback question.

Bisson, S.E.; Goldsmith, J.E.M. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Del Genio, A.D. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, New York, NY (United States). Goddard Inst. for Space Studies

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

LIMITS TO ICE ON ASTEROIDS (24) THEMIS AND (65) CYBELE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present optical spectra of (24) Themis and (65) Cybele, two large main-belt asteroids on which exposed water ice has recently been reported. No emission lines, expected from resonance fluorescence in gas sublimated from the ice, were detected. Derived limits to the production rates of water are {approx}ice because the measured albedos of Themis and Cybele are low ({approx}0.05-0.07). We also rule out models in which a large fraction of the surface is occupied by low-albedo ('dirty') water ice because dirty ice would be warm and would sublimate strongly enough for gaseous products to have been detected. If ice exists on these bodies it must be relatively clean (albedo {approx}>0.3) and confined to a fraction of the Earth-facing surface {approx}ice. If the ice is even more reflective (albedo {approx}>0.6), then the timescale for sublimation of an optically thick layer can rival the {approx}10{sup 3} yr interval between impacts with bodies this size. In this sense, exposure by impact may be a quasi steady-state feature of ice-containing asteroids at 3 AU.

Jewitt, David; Guilbert-Lepoutre, Aurelie, E-mail: jewitt@ucla.edu [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, UCLA, CA 90095 (United States)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

448

The corona and upper transition region of epsilon Eridani  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present analyses of observations of epsilon Eridani (K2 V) made with the Low Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer on Chandra and the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer, supplemented by observations made with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph, the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer and the Reflection Grating Spectrometer on XMM-Newton. The observed emission lines are used to find relative element abundances, to place limits on the electron densities and pressures and to determine the mean apparent emission measure distribution. As in the previous paper by Sim & Jordan (2003a), the mean emitting area as a function of the electron temperature is derived by comparisons with a theoretical emission measure distribution found from energy balance arguments. The final model has a coronal temperature of 3.4 x 10^6 K, an electron pressure of 1.3 x 10^16 cm^-3 K at T_e = 2 x 10^5 K and an area filling factor of 0.14 at 3.2 x 10^5 K. We discuss a number of issues concerning the atomic data currently available. Our analyses are based mainly on the latest version of CHIANTI (v5.2). We conclude that the Ne/O relative abundance is 0.30, larger than that recommended from solar studies, and that there is no convincing evidence for enhanced coronal abundances of elements with low first ionization potentials.

J. -U. Ness; C. Jordan

2007-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

449

ALMA: Exploring theALMA: Exploring the Outer Limits ofOuter Limits of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Z Machines ALMA: Exploring theALMA: Exploring the Outer Limits ofOuter Limits of Redshift Field Rich in Nearby Galaxies, Poor in Distant Galaxies Nearby galaxies in HDF Source: K. Lanzetta, SUNY-SB Distant galaxies in HDF #12;ALMA Deep Field Poor in Nearby Galaxies, Rich in Distant Galaxies Nearby

Groppi, Christopher

450

Analytes Detected from Crude, Dirty Samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Page 5. Kit-Based Platform Explosives detection Fission product detection Nerve agent detection Bioagent detection DNA Extraction? Page 6. ...

2012-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

451

Tidal Energy Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tidal Energy Limited (TEL) Tidal Energy Limited (TEL) Place Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom Zip CF23 8RS Product Tidal stream device developer. Coordinates 51.48125°, -3.180734° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.48125,"lon":-3.180734,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

452

Quantum control limited by quantum decoherence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe quantum controllability under the influences of the quantum decoherence induced by the quantum control itself. It is shown that, when the controller is considered as a quantum system, it will entangle with its controlled system and then cause quantum decoherence in the controlled system. In competition with this induced decoherence, the controllability will be limited by some uncertainty relation in a well-armed quantum control process. In association with the phase uncertainty and the standard quantum limit, a general model is studied to demonstrate the possibility of realizing a decoherence-free quantum control with a finite energy within a finite time. It is also shown that if the operations of quantum control are to be determined by the initial state of the controller, then due to the decoherence which results from the quantum control itself, there exists a low bound for quantum controllability.

Fei Xue; S. X. Yu; C. P. Sun

2005-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

453

How energy conservation limits our measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OObservations in Quantum Mechanics are subject to complex restrictions arising from the principle of energy conservation. Determining such restrictions, however, has been so far an elusive task, and only partial results are known. In this paper we discuss how constraints on the energy spectrum of a measurement device translate into limitations on the measurements which we can effect on a target system with non-trivial energy operator. We provide efficient algorithms to characterize such limitations and we quantify them exactly when the target is a two-level quantum system. Our work thus identifies the boundaries between what is possible or impossible to measure, i.e., between what we can see or not, when energy conservation is at stake.

Miguel Navascues; Sandu Popescu

2012-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

454

Null limits of the C-metric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The C-metric is usually understood as describing two black holes which accelerate in opposite directions under the action of some conical singularity. Here, we examine all the solutions of this type which represent accelerating sources and investigate the null limit in which the accelerations become unbounded. We show that the resulting space-times represent spherical impulsive gravitational waves generated by snapping or expanding cosmic strings.

J. Podolsky; J. B. Griffiths

2000-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

455

Toxicity Data to Determine Refrigerant Concentration Limits  

SciTech Connect

This report reviews toxicity data, identifies sources for them, and presents resulting exposure limits for refrigerants for consideration by qualified parties in developing safety guides, standards, codes, and regulations. It outlines a method to calculate an acute toxicity exposure limit (ATEL) and from it a recommended refrigerant concentration limit (RCL) for emergency exposures. The report focuses on acute toxicity with particular attention to lethality, cardiac sensitization, anesthetic and central nervous system effects, and other escape-impairing effects. It addresses R-11, R-12, R-22, R-23, R-113, R-114, R-116, R-123, R-124, R-125, R-134, R-134a, R-E134, R-141b, R-142b, R-143a, R-152a, R-218, R-227ea, R-236fa, R-245ca, R-245fa, R-290, R-500, R-502, R-600a, R-717, and R-744. It summarizes additional data for R-14, R-115, R-170 (ethane), R-C318, R-600 (n-butane), and R-1270 (propylene) to enable calculation of limits for blends incorporating them. The report summarizes the data a nd related safety information, including classifications and flammability data. It also presents a series of tables with proposed ATEL and RCL concentrations-in dimensionless form and the latter also in both metric (SI) and inch-pound (IP) units of measure-for both the cited refrigerants and 66 zerotropic and azeotropic blends. They include common refrigerants, such as R-404A, R-407C, R-410A, and R-507A, as well as others in commercial or developmental status. Appendices provide profiles for the cited single-compound refrigerants and for R-500 and R-502 as well as narrative toxicity summaries for common refrigerants. The report includes an extensive set of references.

Calm, James M.

2000-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

456

DISSOLVED CONCENTRATION LIMITS OF RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to evaluate dissolved concentration limits (also referred to as solubility limits) of elements with radioactive isotopes under probable repository conditions, based on geochemical modeling calculations using geochemical modeling tools, thermodynamic databases, field measurements, and laboratory experiments. The scope of this activity is to predict dissolved concentrations or solubility limits for elements with radioactive isotopes (actinium, americium, carbon, cesium, iodine, lead, neptunium, plutonium, protactinium, radium, strontium, technetium, thorium, and uranium) relevant to calculated dose. Model outputs for uranium, plutonium, neptunium, thorium, americium, and protactinium are provided in the form of tabulated functions with pH and log fCO{sub 2} as independent variables, plus one or more uncertainty terms. The solubility limits for the remaining elements are either in the form of distributions or single values. Even though selection of an appropriate set of radionuclides documented in Radionuclide Screening (BSC 2002 [DIRS 160059]) includes actinium, transport of Ac is not modeled in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) model because of its extremely short half-life. Actinium dose is calculated in the TSPA-LA by assuming secular equilibrium with {sup 231}Pa (Section 6.10); therefore, Ac is not analyzed in this report. The output data from this report are fundamental inputs for TSPA-LA used to determine the estimated release of these elements from waste packages and the engineered barrier system. Consistent modeling approaches and environmental conditions were used to develop solubility models for the actinides discussed in this report. These models cover broad ranges of environmental conditions so they are applicable to both waste packages and the invert. Uncertainties from thermodynamic data, water chemistry, temperature variation, and activity coefficients have been quantified or otherwise addressed.

P. Bernot

2005-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

457

THE LIMIT OF MAGNETIC-SHEAR ENERGY IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS  

SciTech Connect

It has been found previously, by measuring from active-region magnetograms a proxy of the free energy in the active region's magnetic field, (1) that there is a sharp upper limit to the free energy the field can hold that increases with the amount of magnetic field in the active region, the active region's magnetic flux content, and (2) that most active regions are near this limit when their field explodes in a coronal mass ejection/flare eruption. That is, explosive active regions are concentrated in a main-sequence path bordering the free-energy-limit line in (flux content, free-energy proxy) phase space. Here, we present evidence that specifies the underlying magnetic condition that gives rise to the free-energy limit and the accompanying main sequence of explosive active regions. Using a suitable free-energy proxy measured from vector magnetograms of 44 active regions, we find evidence that (1) in active regions at and near their free-energy limit, the ratio of magnetic-shear free energy to the non-free magnetic energy the potential field would have is of the order of one in the core field, the field rooted along the neutral line, and (2) this ratio is progressively less in active regions progressively farther below their free-energy limit. Evidently, most active regions in which this core-field energy ratio is much less than one cannot be triggered to explode; as this ratio approaches one, most active regions become capable of exploding; and when this ratio is one, most active regions are compelled to explode.

Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, David A.; Sterling, Alphonse C., E-mail: ron.moore@nasa.gov [Heliophysics and Planetary Science Office, ZP13, Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Energy Systems Limited ESL | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Limited ESL Limited ESL Jump to: navigation, search Name Energy Systems Limited- ESL Place Kampala, Uganda Zip 25928 Sector Renewable Energy, Solar Product ESL deals with design, supply, installations and maintenance of solar and other renewable energy systems in Uganda. The company has a special focus on the remote rural communitiies within Uganda. Coordinates 0.3228°, 32.574841° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":0.3228,"lon":32.574841,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

459

GenDrive Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GenDrive Limited GenDrive Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name GenDrive Limited Place Cambridge, United Kingdom Zip CB23 3GY Sector Renewable Energy, Solar, Wind energy Product Developing a range of grid-connected inverters, 'Plug & Play', for renewable energy (mostly solar and wind) systems. These are intended to improve ease of installation. Coordinates 43.003745°, -89.017499° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.003745,"lon":-89.017499,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

460

Conduit Ventures Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Conduit Ventures Limited Conduit Ventures Limited Name Conduit Ventures Limited Address 59-61 Hatton Garden, Unit B, 2nd Floor Colonial Buildings Place London, United Kingdom Zip EC1N 8LS Product Venture capital funding for fuel cells and hydrogen. Phone number +44 (0) 20 7831 3131 Website http://www.conduit-ventures.co Coordinates 51.5179133°, -0.1097391° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.5179133,"lon":-0.1097391,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "upper detection limit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

12 Voltz Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Voltz Limited Voltz Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name 12 Voltz Limited Place Cumbria, United Kingdom Zip LA8 9NH Sector Renewable Energy, Solar, Wind energy Product Selling and delivering broad range of advanced energy generating systems and accessories including wind turbines, solar panels, batteries,regulators,and stables, and as well as developing renewable energy technology and related products. Coordinates 54.63044°, -2.89984° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":54.63044,"lon":-2.89984,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

462

Mass and temperature limits for blackbody radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A spherically symmetric distribution of classical blackbody radiation is considered, at conditions in which gravitational self-interaction effects become not negligible. Static solutions to Einstein field equations are searched for, for each choice of the assumed central energy density. Spherical cavities at thermodynamic equilibrium, i.e. filled with blackbody radiation, are then studied, in particular for what concerns the relation among the mass M of the ball of radiation contained in them and their temperature at center and at the boundary. For these cavities it is shown, in particular, that: i) there is no absolute limit to M as well to their central and boundary temperatures; ii) when radius R is fixed, however, limits exist both for mass and for boundary energy density rho_B: M <= K M_S(R) and rho_B <= Q/R^2, with K = 0.493 and Q = 0.02718, dimensionless, and M_S(R) the Schwarzschild mass for that radius. Some implications of the existence and the magnitude of these limits are considered. Finally the radial profiles for entropy for these systems are studied, in their dependence on the mass (or central temperature) of the ball of radiation.

Alessandro Pesci

2006-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

463

SPDE Limits of Many Server Queues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A many-server queueing system is considered in which customers with independent and identically distributed service times enter service in the order of arrival. The state of the system is represented by a process that describes the total number of customers in the system, as well as a measure-valued process that keeps track of the ages of customers in service, leading to a Markovian description of the dynamics. Under suitable assumptions, a functional central limit theorem is established for the sequence of (centered and scaled) state processes as the number of servers goes to infinity. The limit process describing the total number in system is shown to be an Ito diffusion with a constant diffusion coefficient that is insensitive to the service distribution. The limit of the sequence of (centered and scaled) age processes is shown to be a Hilbert space valued diffusion that can also be characterized as the unique solution of a stochastic partial differential equation that is coupled with the Ito diffusion. Fu...

Kaspi, Haya

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Means for limiting and ameliorating electrode shorting  

SciTech Connect

A fuse and filter arrangement is described for limiting and ameliorating electrode shorting in capacitive deionization water purification systems utilizing carbon aerogel, for example. This arrangement limits and ameliorates the effects of conducting particles or debonded carbon aerogel in shorting the electrodes of a system such as a capacitive deionization water purification system. This is important because of the small interelectrode spacing and the finite possibility of debonding or fragmentation of carbon aerogel in a large system. The fuse and filter arrangement electrically protect the entire system from shutting down if a single pair of electrodes is shorted and mechanically prevents a conducting particle from migrating through the electrode stack, shorting a series of electrode pairs in sequence. It also limits the amount of energy released in a shorting event. The arrangement consists of a set of circuit breakers or fuses with one fuse or breaker in the power line connected to one electrode of each electrode pair and a set of screens of filters in the water flow channels between each set of electrode pairs.

Konynenburg, R.A. van; Farmer, J.C.

1999-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

465

Means for limiting and ameliorating electrode shorting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fuse and filter arrangement for limiting and ameliorating electrode shorting in capacitive deionization water purification systems utilizing carbon aerogel, for example. This arrangement limits and ameliorates the effects of conducting particles or debonded carbon aerogel in shorting the electrodes of a system such as a capacitive deionization water purification system. This is important because of the small interelectrode spacing and the finite possibility of debonding or fragmentation of carbon aerogel in a large system. The fuse and filter arrangement electrically protect the entire system from shutting down if a single pair of electrodes is shorted and mechanically prevents a conducting particle from migrating through the electrode stack, shorting a series of electrode pairs in sequence. It also limits the amount of energy released in a shorting event. The arrangement consists of a set of circuit breakers or fuses with one fuse or breaker in the power line connected to one electrode of each electrode pair and a set of screens of filters in the water flow channels between each set of electrode pairs.

Van Konynenburg, Richard A. (Livermore, CA); Farmer, Joseph C. (Tracy, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Image Change Detection via Ensemble Learning  

SciTech Connect

The concept of geographic change detection is relevant in many areas. Changes in geography can reveal much information about a particular location. For example, analysis of changes in geography can identify regions of population growth, change in land use, and potential environmental disturbance. A common way to perform change detection is to use a simple method such as differencing to detect regions of change. Though these techniques are simple, often the application of these techniques is very limited. Recently, use of machine learning methods such as neural networks for change detection has been explored with great success. In this work, we explore the use of ensemble learning methodologies for detecting changes in bitemporal synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. Ensemble learning uses a collection of weak machine learning classifiers to create a stronger classifier which has higher accuracy than the individual classifiers in the ensemble. The strength of the ensemble lies in the fact that the individual classifiers in the ensemble create a mixture of experts in which the final classification made by the ensemble classifier is calculated from the outputs of the individual classifiers. Our methodology leverages this aspect of ensemble learning by training collections of weak decision tree based classifiers to identify regions of change in SAR images collected of a region in the Staten Island, New York area during Hurricane Sandy. Preliminary studies show that the ensemble method has approximately 11.5% higher change detection accuracy than an individual classifier.

Martin, Benjamin W [ORNL; Vatsavai, Raju [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Detection and Characterization of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Detection and Characterization of Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Detection and Characterization of Degradation Precursors Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Detection and Characterization of Degradation Precursors The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is developing the fundamental scientific basis to understand, predict, and measure changes in materials and systems, structure, and components (SSCs) as they age in environments associated with long-term operations (LTO) of operating commercial nuclear power reactors. The push towards safe long-term operations of light-water reactor (LWR) nuclear power plants (NPPs) brings significant challenges because aging of components can limit the operating lifetime of critical systems (Bond 2010; Bond et al. 2011a). A key element of LTO of LWRs is therefore

468

Use of instrumented charpy tests to determine onset of upper-shelf energy  

SciTech Connect

The Charpy V-notch (C/sub v/) upper-shelf energy is usually defined as that temperature range in which the surface of the C/sub v/ specimen exhibits an appearance indicative of a 100 percent ductile fracture. In an attempt to avoid the need for interpretation, the selection of the C/sub v/ upper-shelf energy is based on the results from an instrumented impact test which provides a permanent record of the load-deflection history of a C/sub v/ specimen during the testing sequence. In the brittle-ductile transition temperature regime, a precipitous drop in the load trace occurs. The amount of the drop decreases at higher temperatures until it is zero, and the zero-drop-in-load temperature is identical to the onset of the C/sub v/ upper shelf. This relationship between the drop in load and energy in an instrumented impact test provides incontestable assurance that the C/sub v/ upper shelf has been obtained. This relationship between drop in load and temperature permits a prediction of the onset of the upper-shelf temperature with as few as two instrumented impact tests. It is also shown that nil-ductility temperature (NDT) (determined by the drop-weight test) is released to the C/sub v/ upper shelf. For the SA-508 Class 2 and SA-533 Grade B Class 1 steels employed in the fabrication of pressure vessels for light-water reactors, C/sub v/ testing at NDT + 180$sup 0$F (100$sup 0$C) will provide upper-shelf energy values. (DLC)

Canonico, D.A.; Stelzman, W.J.; Berggren, R.G.; Nanstad, R.K.

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Detecting Climate Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The likelihood ratio of the data for a hypothesis of some change, relative to the hypothesis of no change, is a suitable statistical measure for the detection of climate change. Likelihood ratios calculated on the basis of Angell and Korshover's (...

Edward S. Epstein

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Detection of counterfeit currency  

SciTech Connect

A method of detecting counterfeit currency by contacting the currency to be tested with near infrared beams in the spectrum below 1250 namometers, measuring reflectance of the near infrared beams and comparing the reflectance values with those from genuine currency.

Burns, Donald A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Theory of space charge limited currents  

SciTech Connect

Space-charge-limited currents are important in energy devices such as solar cells and light-emitting diodes, but the available theory from the 1950's finds it necessary to postulate an exponential density of defect energy levels to match data. Here we revisit the theory and show that this postulate is not warranted. Instead, we demonstrate that dopants and the concomitant Frenkel effect, which have been neglected, control the shape of measured current-voltage characteristics. We also account for the observed peak in the noise power. Finally, the new theory can anchor efforts to develop experimental techniques to measure deep-trap levels.

Zhang, Xiaoguang [ORNL; Pantelides, Sokrates T. [Vanderbilt University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Fundamental limits on NOx reduction by plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the gas-phase reaction mechanisms for removal of NO{sub x} in a plasma. The effect of oxygen content on the competition between the reduction and oxidation processes is discussed. The effect of the electron kinetic energy distribution on the radical production and subsequent chemistry is then discussed in order to predict the best performance that can be achieved for NO{sub x} reduction using the plasma alone. The fundamental limit on the minimum electrical energy consumption that will be required to implement NO{sub x} reduction in any type of plasma reactor is established.

Penetrante, B. M., LLNL

1997-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

473

Energy flux limitation by tame turbulence  

SciTech Connect

A quasi-linear theory of energy flux limitation by ion acoustic turbulence is presented. This distribution function is modelled by a Maxwellian plus an additional piece which carries a heat flux Q. By taking the fourth moment of the Vlasov equation one finds the anomalous thermal conductivity K approximately 3 v/sub e/ delta/sub De/ (e phi/T/sub e/)$sup -2$. Other moments treated self-consistently include anomalous ion heating, electron cooling, current generation and enhanced inverse bremsstrahlung due to the nonthermal ion fluctuations. (auth)

Manheimer, W.M.

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Forecasting Skill Limits of Nested, Limited-Area Models: A Perfect-Model Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fundamental hypothesis underlying the use of limited-area models (LAMs) is their ability to generate meaningful small-scale features from low-resolution information, provided as initial conditions and at their lateral boundaries by a model or ...

Ramón de Ela; René Laprise; Bertrand Denis

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Detecting video events based on action recognition in complex scenes using spatio-temporal descriptor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Event detection plays an essential role in video content analysis and remains a challenging open problem. In particular, the study on detecting human-related video events in complex scenes with both a crowd of people and dynamic motion is still limited. ... Keywords: action recognition, event detection, motion representation, semantic analysis

Guangyu Zhu; Ming Yang; Kai Yu; Wei Xu; Yihong Gong

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Distributed online outlier detection in wireless sensor networks using ellipsoidal support vector machine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Low quality sensor data limits WSN capabilities for providing reliable real-time situation-awareness. Outlier detection is a solution to ensure the quality of sensor data. An effective and efficient outlier detection technique for WSNs not only identifies ... Keywords: Ellipsoidal support vector machine, Outlier detection, Spatial correlation, Temporal correlation, Wireless sensor networks

Yang Zhang; Nirvana Meratnia; Paul J. M. Havinga

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Improved Limits on the Lepton Flavor Violating Decays Tau -> l V^0  

SciTech Connect

The authors search for the neutrinoless, lepton-flavor-violating tau decays {tau}{sup -} {yields} {ell}{sup -}V{sup 0}, where {ell} is an electron or muon and V{sup 0} is a fector meson reconstructed as {phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}, {rho} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, K* {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, {bar K}* {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}. The analysis has been performed using 451 fb{sup -1} of data collected at an e{sup +}e{sup -} center-of-mass energy near 10.58 GeV with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage rings. The number of events found in the data is compatible with the background expectation, and upper limits on the branching fractions are set in the range (2.6-19) x 10{sup -8} at the 90% confidence level.

Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2009-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

478

Uncertainty quantification of limit-cycle oscillations  

SciTech Connect

Different computational methodologies have been developed to quantify the uncertain response of a relatively simple aeroelastic system in limit-cycle oscillation, subject to parametric variability. The aeroelastic system is that of a rigid airfoil, supported by pitch and plunge structural coupling, with nonlinearities in the component in pitch. The nonlinearities are adjusted to permit the formation of a either a subcritical or supercritical branch of limit-cycle oscillations. Uncertainties are specified in the cubic coefficient of the torsional spring and in the initial pitch angle of the airfoil. Stochastic projections of the time-domain and cyclic equations governing system response are carried out, leading to both intrusive and non-intrusive computational formulations. Non-intrusive formulations are examined using stochastic projections derived from Wiener expansions involving Haar wavelet and B-spline bases, while Wiener-Hermite expansions of the cyclic equations are employed intrusively and non-intrusively. Application of the B-spline stochastic projection is extended to the treatment of aerodynamic nonlinearities, as modeled through the discrete Euler equations. The methodologies are compared in terms of computational cost, convergence properties, ease of implementation, and potential for application to complex aeroelastic systems.

Beran, Philip S. [Multidisciplinary Technologies Center, Air Vehicles Directorate, AFRL/VASD, Building 146, 2210 Eighth Street, WPAFB, OH 45433 (United States)]. E-mail: philip.beran@wpafb.af.mil; Pettit, Chris L. [United States Naval Academy, 590 Holloway