National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for upper detection limit

  1. Upper limits on the solar-neutron flux at the Yangbajing neutron monitor from BATSE-detected solar flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Tsuchiya; H. Miyasaka; E. Takahashi; S. Shimoda; Y. Yamada; I. Kondo; K. Makishima; F. Zhu; Y. Tan; H. Hu; Y. Tang; J. Zhang; H. Lu; X. Meng

    2007-03-16

    The purpose of this work is to search the Yangbajing neutron monitor data obtained between 1998 October and 2000 June for solar neutrons associated with solar flares. Using the onset times of 166 BATSE-detected flares with the GOES peak flux (1 -- 8 \\AA) higher than $1.0 \\times 10^{-5}$ $\\mathrm{Wm^{-2}}$, we prepare for each flare a light curve of the Yangbajing neutron monitor, spanning $\\pm$ 1.5 hours from the BATSE onset time. Based on the light curves, a systematic search for solar neutrons in energies above 100 MeV from the 166 flares was performed. No statistically significant signals due to solar neutrons were found in the present work. Therefore, we put upper limits on the $>$ 100 MeV solar-neutron flux for 18 events consisting of 2 X and 16 M class flares. The calculation assumed a power-law shaped neutron energy spectrum and three types of neutron emission profiles at the Sun. Compared with the other positive neutron detections associated with X-class flares, typical 95% confidence level upper limits for the two X-class flares are found to be comparable to the lowest and second lowest neutron fluxes at the top of the atmosphere.In addition, the upper limits for M-class flares scatter in the range of $10^{-2}$ to 1 neutrons $\\mathrm{cm^{-2}s^{-1}}$. This provides the first upper limits on the solar-neutron flux from M-class solar flares, using space observatories as well as ground-based neutron monitors.

  2. ON COMPUTING UPPER LIMITS TO SOURCE INTENSITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kashyap, Vinay L.; Siemiginowska, Aneta [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Van Dyk, David A.; Xu Jin [Department of Statistics, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-1250 (United States); Connors, Alanna [Eureka Scientific, 2452 Delmer Street, Suite 100, Oakland, CA 94602-3017 (United States); Freeman, Peter E. [Department of Statistics, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Zezas, Andreas, E-mail: vkashyap@cfa.harvard.ed, E-mail: asiemiginowska@cfa.harvard.ed, E-mail: dvd@ics.uci.ed, E-mail: jinx@ics.uci.ed, E-mail: aconnors@eurekabayes.co, E-mail: pfreeman@cmu.ed, E-mail: azezas@cfa.harvard.ed [Physics Department, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, GR-710 03, Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2010-08-10

    A common problem in astrophysics is determining how bright a source could be and still not be detected in an observation. Despite the simplicity with which the problem can be stated, the solution involves complicated statistical issues that require careful analysis. In contrast to the more familiar confidence bound, this concept has never been formally analyzed, leading to a great variety of often ad hoc solutions. Here we formulate and describe the problem in a self-consistent manner. Detection significance is usually defined by the acceptable proportion of false positives (background fluctuations that are claimed as detections, or Type I error), and we invoke the complementary concept of false negatives (real sources that go undetected, or Type II error), based on the statistical power of a test, to compute an upper limit to the detectable source intensity. To determine the minimum intensity that a source must have for it to be detected, we first define a detection threshold and then compute the probabilities of detecting sources of various intensities at the given threshold. The intensity that corresponds to the specified Type II error probability defines that minimum intensity and is identified as the upper limit. Thus, an upper limit is a characteristic of the detection procedure rather than the strength of any particular source. It should not be confused with confidence intervals or other estimates of source intensity. This is particularly important given the large number of catalogs that are being generated from increasingly sensitive surveys. We discuss, with examples, the differences between these upper limits and confidence bounds. Both measures are useful quantities that should be reported in order to extract the most science from catalogs, though they answer different statistical questions: an upper bound describes an inference range on the source intensity, while an upper limit calibrates the detection process. We provide a recipe for computing upper limits that applies to all detection algorithms.

  3. Extending the Upper Temperature Limit for Life

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    ) un- der N2-CO2 (80:20) in sealed culture tubes that con- tained formate (10 mM) as the electron donor that permit strain 121 to grow at such high temperatures are unknown. It is gen- erally assumed that the upperExtending the Upper Temperature Limit for Life Kazem Kashefi and Derek R. Lovley* The upper

  4. Upper Limits from Counting Experiments with Multiple Pipelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick J. Sutton

    2010-04-07

    In counting experiments, one can set an upper limit on the rate of a Poisson process based on a count of the number of events observed due to the process. In some experiments, one makes several counts of the number of events, using different instruments, different event detection algorithms, or observations over multiple time intervals. We demonstrate how to generalize the classical frequentist upper limit calculation to the case where multiple counts of events are made over one or more time intervals using several (not necessarily independent) procedures. We show how different choices of the rank ordering of possible outcomes in the space of counts correspond to applying different levels of significance to the various measurements. We propose an ordering that is matched to the sensitivity of the different measurement procedures and show that in typical cases it gives stronger upper limits than other choices. As an example, we show how this method can be applied to searches for gravitational-wave bursts, where multiple burst-detection algorithms analyse the same data set, and demonstrate how a single combined upper limit can be set on the gravitational-wave burst rate.

  5. Upper limits on gravitational wave emission from 78 radio pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; B. Abbott; M. Kramer; A. G. Lyne

    2007-10-12

    We present upper limits on the gravitational wave emission from 78 radio pulsars based on data from the third and fourth science runs of the LIGO and GEO600 gravitational wave detectors. The data from both runs have been combined coherently to maximise sensitivity. For the first time pulsars within binary (or multiple) systems have been included in the search by taking into account the signal modulation due to their orbits. Our upper limits are therefore the first measured for 56 of these pulsars. For the remaining 22, our results improve on previous upper limits by up to a factor of 10. For example, our tightest upper limit on the gravitational strain is 2.6e-25 for PSRJ1603-7202, and the equatorial ellipticity of PSRJ2124-3358 is less than 10^{-6}. Furthermore, our strain upper limit for the Crab pulsar is only 2.2 times greater than the fiducial spin-down limit.

  6. Upper limit map of a background of gravitational waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbott, B; Adhikari, R; Agresti, J; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Amin, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arain, M; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Ashley, M; Aston, S; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Ballmer, S; Bantilan, H; Barish, B C; Barker, C; Barker, D; Barr, B; Barriga, P; Barton, M A; Bayer, K; Belczynski, K; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bhawal, B; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Biswas, R; Black, E; Blackburn, K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Bogenstahl, J; Bogue, L; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brinkmann, M; Brooks, A; Brown, D A; Bullington, A; Bunkowski, A; Buonanno, A; Burmeister, O; Busby, D; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Cantley, C A; Cao, J; Cardenas, L; Casey, M M; Castaldi, G; Cepeda, C; Chalkey, E; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chiadini, F; Chin, D; Chin, E; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Clark, J; Cochrane, P; Cokelaer, T; Colacino, C N; Coldwell, R; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T; Coward, D; Coyne, D; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Croce, R P; Crooks, D R M; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Dalrymple, J; D'Ambrosio, E; Danzmann, K; Davies, G; De Bra, D; Degallaix, J; Degree, M; Demma, T; Dergachev, V; Desai, S; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S V; Díaz, M; Dickson, J; Di Credico, A; Diederichs, G; Dietz, A; Doomes, E E; Drever, R W P; Dumas, J C; Dupuis, R J; Dwyer, J G; Ehrens, P; Espinoza, E; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Fazi, D; Fejer, M M; Finn, L S; Fiumara, V; Fotopoulos, N; Franzen, A; Franzen, K Y; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fyffe, M; Galdi, V; Garofoli, J; Gholami, I; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Goda, K; Goetz, E; Goggin, L; González, G; Gossler, S; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Gray, M; Greenhalgh, J; Gretarsson, A M; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grünewald, S; Günther, M; Gustafson, R; Hage, B; Hammer, D; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G; Harstad, E; Hayler, T; Heefner, J; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hirose, E; Hoak, D; Hosken, D; Hough, J; Howell, E; Hoyland, D; Huttner, S H; Ingram, D; Innerhofer, E; Ito, M; Itoh, Y; Ivanov, A; Jackrel, D; Johnson, B; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, Peter Ignaz Paul; Kalogera, V; Kasprzyk, D; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalili, F Ya; Kim, C; King, P; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Kopparapu, R K; Kozak, D; Krishnan, B; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Lazzarini, A; Lee, B; Lei, M; Leiner, J; Leonhardt, V; Leonor, I; Libbrecht, K; Lindquist, P; Lockerbie, N A; Longo, M; Lormand, M; Lubinski, M; Luck, H; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Malec, M; Mandic, V; Marano, S; Marka, S; Markowitz, J; Maros, E; Martin, I; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Matone, L; Matta, V; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McHugh, M; McKenzie, K; McNabb, J W C; McWilliams, S; Meier, T; Melissinos, A C; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messaritaki, E; Messenger, C J; Meyers, D; Mikhailov, E; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Mohanty, S; Moreno, G; Mossavi, K; Mow Lowry, C; Moylan, A; Mudge, D; Müller, G; Mukherjee, S; Muller-Ebhardt, H; Munch, J; Murray, P; Myers, E; Myers, J; Newton, G; Nishizawa, A; Numata, K; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ottaway, D J; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pan, Y; Papa, M A; Parameshwaraiah, V; Patel, P; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Pierro, V; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Pletsch, H; Plissi, M V; Postiglione, F; Prix, R; Quetschke, V; Raab, F; Rabeling, D; Radkins, H; Rahkola, R; Rainer, N; Rakhmanov, M; Ray-Majumder, S; Re, V; Rehbein, H; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Ribichini, L; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rivera, B; Robertson, N A; Robinson, C; Robinson, E L; Roddy, S; Rodríguez, A; Rogan, A M; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J; Route, R; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruet, L; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Sakata, S; Samidi, M; Sancho de la Jordana, L; Sandberg, V; Sannibale, V; Saraf, S; Sarin, P; Sathyaprakash, B S; Sato, S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Savov, P; Schediwy, S; Schilling, R; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, S M; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Seifert, F; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sibley, A; Sidles, J A; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Sinha, S; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B; Slutsky, J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Somiya, K; Strain, K A; Strom, D M; Stuver, A; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, K X; Sung, M; Sutton, P J; Takahashi, H; Tanner, D B; Tarallo, M; Taylor, R; Thacker, J; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thüring, A; Tokmakov, K V; Torres, C; Torrie, C; Traylor, G; Trias, M; Tyler, W; Ugolini, D W; Ungarelli, C; Urbanek, K; Vahlbruch, H; Vallisneri, M; Van Den Broeck, C; Varvella, M; Vass, S; Vecchio, A; Veitch, J; Veitch, P; Villar, A; Vorvick, C; Vyachanin, S P; Waldman, S J; Wallace, L

    2007-01-01

    We searched for an anisotropic background of gravitational waves using data from the LIGO S4 science run and a method that is optimized for point sources. This is appropriate if, for example, the gravitational wave background is dominated by a small number of distinct astrophysical sources. No signal was seen. Upper limit maps were produced assuming two different power laws for the source strain power spectrum. For an f^-3 power law and using the 50 Hz to 1.8 kHz band the upper limits on the source strain power spectrum vary between 1.2e-48 Hz^-1 (100 Hz/f)^3 and 1.2e-47 Hz^-1 (100 Hz /f)^3, depending on the position in the sky. Similarly, in the case of constant strain power spectrum, the upper limits vary between 8.5e-49 Hz^-1 and 6.1e-48 Hz^-1. As a side product a limit on an isotropic background of gravitational waves was also obtained. All limits are at the 90% confidence level. Finally, as an application, we focused on the direction of Sco-X1, the closest low-mass X-ray binary. We compare the upper limi...

  7. An upper limit on electron antineutrino mass from Troitsk experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. N. Aseev; A. I. Belesev; A. I. Berlev; E. V. Geraskin; A. A. Golubev; N. A. Likhovid; V. M. Lobashev; A. A. Nozik; V. S. Pantuev; V. I. Parfenov; A. K. Skasyrskaya; F. V. Tkachov; S. V. Zadorozhny

    2011-12-13

    An electron antineutrino mass has been measured in tritium beta-decay in the "Troitsk nu-mass" experiment. The setup consists of a windowless gaseous tritium source and an electrostatic electron spectrometer. The whole data set acquired from 1994 to 2004 was reanalysed. A thorough selection of data with the reliable experimental conditions has been performed. We checked every known systematic effect and got the following experimental estimate for neutrino mass squared m_{nu}^{2}=-0.67+/- 2.53 {eV}^{2}. This gives an experimental upper sensitivity limit of m_{nu}<2.2 eV and upper limit estimates m_{nu}<2.12 eV, 95% C.L. for Bayesian statistics and m_{nu}<2.05 eV, 95% C.L. for the Feldman and Cousins approach.

  8. A very reduced upper limit on the interstellar abundance of beryllium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillaume Hébrard; Martin Lemoine; Roger Ferlet; Alfred Vidal-Madjar

    1997-02-26

    We present the results of observations of the $\\lambda 3130.4$ \\AA interstellar absorption line of Be II in the direction of zeta Per. The data were obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii 3.6m Telescope using the Coud\\'e f/4 Gecko spectrograph at a resolving power $\\simeq 1.1 \\times 10^5$, and a signal-to-noise ratio S/N $\\simeq$ 2000. The Be II line is not detected, and we obtain an upper limit on the equivalent width $W_{3130.4}\\leq30$ $\\mu$\\AA. This upper limit is 7 times below the lowest upper limit ever reported hitherto. The derived interstellar abundance is ($^9$Be/H) $\\leq 7 \\times 10^{-13}$, not corrected for the depletion of Be onto interstellar grains; it corresponds to an upper limit $\\delta_{Be} \\leq -1.5$ dex on the depletion factor of Be. As such, it argues in favour of models of formation of dust grains in stellar atmospheres.

  9. MAGIC upper limits on the GRB 090102 afterglow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aleksi?, J; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Babic, A; Bangale, P; de Almeida, U Barres; Barrio, J A; González, J Becerra; Bednarek, W; Berger, K; Bernardini, E; Biland, A; Blanch, O; Bock, R K; Bonnefoy, S; Bonnoli, G; Borracci, F; Bretz, T; Carmona, E; Carosi, A; Fidalgo, D Carreto; Colin, P; Colombo, E; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Covino, S; Da Vela, P; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; De Caneva, G; De Lotto, B; Mendez, C Delgado; Doert, M; Domínguez, A; Prester, D Dominis; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Einecke, S; Eisenacher, D; Elsaesser, D; Farina, E; Ferenc, D; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Frantzen, K; Fruck, C; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Terrats, D Garrido; Gaug, M; Giavitto, G; Godinovi?, N; Muñoz, A González; Gozzini, S R; Hadasch, D; Hayashida, M; Herrero, A; Hildebrand, D; Hose, J; Hrupec, D; Idec, W; Kadenius, V; Kellermann, H; Knoetig, M L; Kodani, K; Konno, Y; Krause, J; Kubo, H; Kushida, J; La Barbera, A; Lelas, D; Lewandowska, N; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; López, M; López-Coto, R; López-Oramas, A; Lorenz, E; Lozano, I; Makariev, M; Mallot, K; Maneva, G; Mankuzhiyil, N; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Marcote, B; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Menzel, U; Meucci, M; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Moralejo, A; Munar-Adrover, P; Nakajima, D; Niedzwiecki, A; Nilsson, K; Nishijima, K; Nowak, N; Orito, R; Overkemping, A; Paiano, S; Palatiello, M; Paneque, D; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Paredes-Fortuny, X; Partini, S; Persic, M; Prada, F; Moroni, P G Prada; Prandini, E; Preziuso, S; Puljak, I; Reinthal, R; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Garcia, J Rodriguez; Rügamer, S; Saggion, A; Saito, T; Saito, K; Salvati, M; Satalecka, K; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schultz, C; Schweizer, T; Shore, S N; Sillanpää, A; Sitarek, J; Snidaric, I; Sobczynska, D; Spanier, F; Stamatescu, V; Stamerra, A; Steinbring, T; Storz, J; Sun, S; Suri?, T; Takalo, L; Takami, H; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Terzi?, T; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Thaele, J; Tibolla, O; Torres, D F; Toyama, T; Treves, A; Vogler, P; Wagner, R M; Zandanel, F; Zanin, R; Bouvier, A; Tajima, H; Longo, F

    2013-01-01

    Indications of a GeV component in the emission from GRBs are known since the EGRET observations during the 1990's and they have been confirmed by the data of the Fermi satellite. These results have, however, shown that our understanding of GRB physics is still unsatisfactory. The new generation of Cherenkov observatories and in particular the MAGIC telescope, allow for the first time the possibility to extend the measurement of GRBs from several tens up to hundreds of GeV energy range. Both leptonic and hadronic processes have been suggested to explain the possible GeV/TeV counterpart of GRBs. Observations with ground-based telescopes of very high energy photons (E>30 GeV) from these sources are going to play a key role in discriminating among the different proposed emission mechanisms, which are barely distinguishable at lower energies. MAGIC telescope observations of the GRB 090102 (z=1.547) field and Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data in the same time interval are analysed to derive upper limits of the ...

  10. Possible Upper limits on Lorentz Factors in High Energy Astrophysical Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Sivaram; Kenath Arun

    2010-08-31

    Gamma ray bursts (GRBs) are the most luminous physical phenomena in the universe. The relativistic effect on the blast wave associated with the GRB introduces the gamma factor. Here we put an upper limit on the gamma factor via constraints on maximal power allowed by general relativity and hence set upper limits on other observable quantities such as deceleration distance. Also upper limits are set on the high energy particle radiation due to constraints set by cosmic microwave background radiation.

  11. Upper limits on the total cosmic-ray luminosity of individual sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anjos, R.C.; De Souza, V.; Supanitsky, A.D. E-mail: vitor@ifsc.usp.br

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, upper limits on the total luminosity of ultra-high-energy cosmic-rays (UHECR) E > 10{sup 18} eV) are determined for five individual sources. The upper limit on the integral flux of GeV--TeV gamma-rays is used to extract the upper limit on the total UHECR luminosity of individual sources. The correlation between upper limit on the integral GeV--TeV gamma-ray flux and upper limit on the UHECR luminosity is established through the cascading process that takes place during propagation of the cosmic rays in the background radiation fields, as explained in reference [1]. Twenty-eight sources measured by FERMI-LAT, VERITAS and MAGIC observatories have been studied. The measured upper limit on the GeV--TeV gamma-ray flux is restrictive enough to allow the calculation of an upper limit on the total UHECR cosmic-ray luminosity of five sources. The upper limit on the UHECR cosmic-ray luminosity of these sources is shown for several assumptions on the emission mechanism. For all studied sources an upper limit on the ultra-high-energy proton luminosity is also set.

  12. H.E.S.S. upper limits for Kepler's supernova remnant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aharonian, F; Barresde Almeida, U; Bazer-Bachi, A R; Behera, B; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Berge, D; Bernlöhr, K; Boisson, C; Bolz, O; Borrel, V; Braun, I; Brion, E; Brucker, J; Buhler, R; Bulik, T; Büsching, I; Boutelier, T; Carrigan, S; Chadwick, P M; Chounet, L M; Clapson, A C; Coignet, G; Cornils, R; Costamante, L; Dalton, M; Degrange, B; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ata, A; Domainko, i W; O'Connor-Drury, L; Dubois, F; Dubus, G; Dyks, J; Egberts, K; Emmanoulopoulos, D; Espigat, P; Farnier, C; Feinstein, F; Fiasson, A; Förster, A; Fontaine, G; Fuling, M; Gallant, Y A; Giebels, B; Glück, B; Goret, P; Hadjichristidis, C; Hauser, D; Hauser, M; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, J F Glicenstein G; Hinton, J A; Hoffmann, A; Hofmann, W; Holleran, M; Hoppe, S; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; De Jager, O C; Jung, I; Katarzynski, K; Kendziorra, E; Kerschhaggl, M; Khelifi, B; Keogh, D; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Lamanna, G; Latham, I J; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lenain, J P; Lohse, T; Martin, J M; Martineau-Huynh, O; Marcowith, A; Masterson, C; Maurin, D; McComb, T J L; Moderski, R; Moulin, E; Naumann-Godo, M; De Naurois, Mathieu; Nedbal, D; Nekrassov, D; Nolan, S J; Ohm, S; Olive, J P; de Ona Wilhelmi, E; Orford, K J; Osborne, J L; Ostrowski, M; Panter, M; Pedaletti, G; Pelletier, G; Petrucci, P O; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, Andreas G; Raubenheimer, B C; Raue, M; Rayner, S M; Renaud, M; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Ruppel, J; Sahakian, V V; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Schock, F M; Schroder, R; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Shalchi, A; Sol, H; Spangler, D; Stawarz, L; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Superina, G; Tam, P H; Tavernet, J P; Terrier, R; Van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Vialle, J P; Vincent, P; Vivier, M; Völk, H J; Volpe, F; Ward, M; Zdziarski, A A; Wagner, A; Zech, J

    2008-01-01

    Observations of Kepler's supernova remnant (G4.5+6.8) with the H.E.S.S. telescope array in 2004 and 2005 with a total live time of 13 h are presented. Stereoscopic imaging of Cherenkov radiation from extensive air showers is used to reconstruct the energy and direction of the incident gamma rays. No evidence for a very high energy (VHE: >100 GeV) gamma-ray signal from the direction of the remnant is found. An upper limit (99% confidence level) on the energy flux in the range 230 GeV - 12.8 TeV of 8.6 x 10^{-13} erg cm^{-2} s^{-1} is obtained. In the context of an existing theoretical model for the remnant, the lack of a detectable gamma-ray flux implies a distance of at least 6.4 kpc. A corresponding upper limit for the density of the ambient matter of 0.7 cm^{-3} is derived. With this distance limit, and assuming a spectral index Gamma = 2, the total energy in accelerated protons is limited to E_p law measured by RX...

  13. Upper limit power for self-guided propagation of intense lasers in plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Weimin; Hu Zhidan; Chen Liming; Li Yutong; Sheng Zhengming; Zhang Jie; Zeng Ming; Liu Yue; Kawata, Shigeo; Zheng Chunyang; Mori, Warren B.

    2012-10-29

    It is shown that there is an upper-limit laser power for self-focusing of a laser pulse in plasma in addition to the well-known lower-limit critical power set by the relativistic effect. This upper limit is caused by the transverse ponderomotive force of the laser, which tends to expel plasma electrons from the laser propagating area. Furthermore, there is a lower-limit plasma density for a given laser spot size, below which self-focusing does not occur for any laser power. Both the lower-limit density and the upper-limit power are derived theoretically and verified by two-dimensional and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. It is also found that plasma channels may be unfavorable for stable guiding of lasers above the upper-limit power.

  14. Quantum nonlocality with arbitrary limited detection efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilles Pütz; Nicolas Gisin

    2015-07-17

    The demonstration and use of nonlocality, as defined by Bell's theorem, rely strongly on dealing with non-detection events due to losses and detector inefficiencies. Otherwise, the so-called detection loophole could be exploited. The only way to avoid this is to have detection efficiencies that are above a certain threshold. We introduce the intermediate assumption of limited detection efficiency, e.g. in each run of the experiment the overall detection efficiency is lower bounded by $\\eta_{min} > 0$. Hence, in an adversarial scenario, the adversaries have arbitrary large but not full control over the inefficiencies. We analyze the set of possible correlations that fulfil Limited Detection Locality (LDL) and show that they necessarily satisfy some linear Bell-like inequalities. We prove that quantum theory predicts violation of one of these inequalities for all $\\eta_{min} > 0$. Hence, nonlocality can be demonstrated with arbitrarily small limited detection efficiencies. Finally we propose a generalized scheme that uses this characterization to deal with detection inefficiencies, which interpolates between the two usual schemes, postselection and outcome assignment.

  15. Upper limits to surface-force disturbances on LISA proof masses and the possibility of observing galactic binaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carbone, Ludovico; Ciani, Giacomo; Dolesi, Rita; Hueller, Mauro; Tombolato, David; Vitale, Stefano; Weber, William Joseph; Cavalleri, Antonella

    2007-02-15

    We have measured surface-force noise on a hollow replica of a LISA proof mass surrounded by its capacitive motion sensor. Forces are detected through the torque exerted on the proof mass by means of a torsion pendulum in the 0.1-30 mHz range. The sensor and electronics have the same design as for the flight hardware, including 4 mm gaps around the proof mass. The measured upper limit for forces would allow detection of a number of galactic binaries signals with signal-to-noise ratio up to {approx_equal}40 for 1 yr integration. We also discuss how LISA Pathfinder will substantially improve this limit, approaching the LISA performance.

  16. Upper Bounds on ErrorCorrecting RunlengthLimited Block Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ytrehus, Ã?yvind

    . Inf. Th. May 1991, pp. 941--945 Abstract --- Upper bounds are derived on the number of codewords­limited codes, error­correction. This work was supported by the Norwegian Research Council for Science on the size of (d; k)­ constrained, simple­error correcting block codes. There are two directions in which one

  17. CDF Note 9674 Combined Upper Limit on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production for Winter 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fermilab

    CDF Note 9674 Combined Upper Limit on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production for Winter 2009 The CDF of searches for the Standard Model Higgs boson at CDF. The six major analyses combined are the WH bV/c2 in steps of 5 GeV/c2 , assuming Standard Model decay branching fractions of the Higgs boson

  18. CDF Note 9999 Combined Upper Limit on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fermilab

    CDF Note 9999 Combined Upper Limit on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production The CDF Collaboration for the Standard Model Higgs boson at CDF. The six major analyses combined are the WH b¯b channels, the WH + ZH E Model decay branching fractions of the Higgs boson and that the ratios of the rates for the WH, ZH, gg

  19. THE WHITE MOUNTAIN POLARIMETER TELESCOPE AND AN UPPER LIMIT ON COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND POLARIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timbie, Peter

    THE WHITE MOUNTAIN POLARIMETER TELESCOPE AND AN UPPER LIMIT ON COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND. Wuensche5 Received 2007 June 10; accepted 2008 March 16 ABSTRACT The White Mountain Polarimeter (WMPol microwave background. WMPol is located at an altitude of 3880 m on a plateau in the White Mountains

  20. Discovery and Upper Limits in Search for Exotic Physics with Neutrino Telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan Conrad

    2006-12-04

    This note gives a short review of the statistical issues concerning upper limit calculation and claiming of discovery arising in the search for exotic physics with neutrino telescopes. Low sample sizes and significant instrumental uncertainties require special consideration. Methods for treating instrumental or theoretical uncertainties in the calculation of limits or discovery are described. Software implementing these methods is presented. The issue of optimization of analysis cuts and definition of sensitivity is briefly discussed.

  1. Detection of $^{133}$Xe from the Fukushima nuclear power plant in the upper troposphere above Germany

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simgen, Hardy; Aufmhoff, Heinfried; Baumann, Robert; Kaether, Florian; Lindemann, Sebastian; Rauch, Ludwig; Schlager, Hans; Schlosser, Clemens; Schumann, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    After the accident in the Japanese Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in March 2011 large amounts of radioactivity were released and distributed in the atmosphere. Among them were also radioactive noble gas isotopes which can be used as tracers to probe global atmospheric circulation models. This work presents unique measurements of the radionuclide $^{133}$Xe from Fukushima in the upper troposphere above Germany. The measurements involve air sampling in a research jet aircraft followed by chromatographic xenon extraction and ultra-low background gas counting with miniaturized proportional counters. With this technique a detection limit of the order of 100 $^{133}$Xe atoms in liter-scale air samples (corresponding to about 100 mBq/m$^3$) is achievable. Our results proof that the $^{133}$Xe-rich ground level air layer from Fukushima was lifted up to the tropopause and distributed hemispherically. Moreover, comparisons with ground level air measurements indicate that the arrival of the radioactive plume in ...

  2. The White Mountain Polarimeter Telescope and an Upper Limit on CMB Polarization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alan R. Levy; Rodrigo Leonardi; Markus Ansmann; Marco Bersanelli; Jeffery Childers; Terrence D. Cole; Ocleto D'Arcangelo; G. Vietor Davis; Philip M. Lubin; Joshua Marvil; Peter R. Meinhold; Gerald Miller; Hugh O`Neill; Fabrizio Stavola; Nathan C. Stebor; Peter T. Timbie; Maarten van der Heide; Fabrizio Villa; Thyrso Villela; Brian D. Williams; Carlos A. Wuensche

    2008-04-23

    The White Mountain Polarimeter (WMPol) is a dedicated ground-based microwave telescope and receiver system for observing polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background. WMPol is located at an altitude of 3880 meters on a plateau in the White Mountains of Eastern California, USA, at the Barcroft Facility of the University of California White Mountain Research Station. Presented here is a description of the instrument and the data collected during April through October 2004. We set an upper limit on $E$-mode polarization of 14 $\\mu\\mathrm{K}$ (95% confidence limit) in the multipole range $170<\\ell<240$. This result was obtained with 422 hours of observations of a 3 $\\mathrm{deg}^2$ sky area about the North Celestial Pole, using a 42 GHz polarimeter. This upper limit is consistent with $EE$ polarization predicted from a standard $\\Lambda$-CDM concordance model.

  3. An upper limit to ground state energy fluctuations in nuclear masses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirsch, Jorge G.; Frank, Alejandro; Barea, Jose [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, AP 70-543, 04510 Mexico DF (Mexico); Velazquez, Victor [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, AP 70-348, 04511 Mexico DF (Mexico); Isacker, Piet van [GANIL, BP 55027, F-14076 Caen Cedex 5 (France); Zuker, Andres P. [IReS, Ba27-CNRS/Universite Louis Pasteur BP 28, F-67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France)

    2007-02-12

    Shell model calculations are employed to estimate un upper limit of statistical fluctuations in the nuclear ground state energies. In order to mimic the presence of quantum chaos associated with neutron resonances at energies between 6 to 10 MeV, calculations include random interactions in the upper shells. The upper bound for the energy fluctuations at mid-shell is shown to have the form {sigma}(A) {approx_equal} 20A-1.34 MeV. This estimate is consistent with the mass errors found in large shell model calculations along the N=126 line, and with local mass error estimated using the Garvey-Kelson relations, all being smaller than 100 keV.

  4. Upper limit on spontaneous supercurrents in Sr2RuO4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, Suk Bum

    2010-04-05

    It is widely believed that the perovskite Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4} is an unconventional superconductor with broken time reversal symmetry. It has been predicted that superconductors with broken time reversal symmetry should have spontaneously generated supercurrents at edges and domain walls. We have done careful imaging of the magnetic fields above Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4} single crystals using scanning Hall bar and SQUID microscopies, and see no evidence for such spontaneously generated supercurrents. We use the results from our magnetic imaging to place upper limits on the spontaneously generated supercurrents at edges and domain walls as a function of domain size. For a single domain, this upper limit is below the predicted signal by two orders of magnitude. We speculate on the causes and implications of the lack of large spontaneous supercurrents in this very interesting superconducting system.

  5. D Note 6229-CONF Combined Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quigg, Chris

    D� Note 6229-CONF Combined Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production from the D�) Searches for standard model Higgs boson production in p¯p collisions at s = 1.96 TeV are carried out for Higgs boson masses (mH) in the range 100 mH 200 GeV/c2 . The contributing production processes include

  6. DETERMINATION OF AN UPPER LIMIT FOR THE WATER OUTGASSING RATE OF MAIN-BELT COMET P/2012 T1 (PANSTARRS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Rourke, L.; Teyssier, D.; Kueppers, M. [European Space Astronomy Centre, ESAC, Villanueva de la Canada, E-28691 Madrid (Spain); Snodgrass, C.; De Val-Borro, M.; Hartogh, P. [Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Max-Planck-Str. 2, D-37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany); Biver, N.; Bockelee-Morvan, D. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, UPMC, Universite Paris-Diderot, 5 place Jules Janssen, F-92195 Meudon (France); Hsieh, H.; Micheli, M. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Fernandez, Y., E-mail: lorourke@esa.int [Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, 4000 Central Florida Blvd, Orlando, FL 32816-2385 (United States)

    2013-09-01

    A new Main-Belt Comet (MBC) P/2012 T1 (PANSTARRS) was discovered on 2012 October 6, approximately one month after its perihelion, by the Pan-STARRS1 survey based in Hawaii. It displayed cometary activity upon its discovery with one hypothesis being that the activity was driven by sublimation of ices; as a result, we searched for emission assumed to be driven by the sublimation of subsurface ices. Our search was of the H{sub 2}O 1{sub 10}-1{sub 01} ground state rotational line at 557 GHz from P/2012 T1 (PANSTARRS) with the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared on board the Herschel Space Observatory on 2013 January 16, when the object was at a heliocentric distance of 2.504 AU and a geocentric distance of 2.064 AU. Perihelion was in early 2012 September at a distance of 2.411 AU. While no H{sub 2}O line emission was detected in our observations, we were able to derive sensitive 3{sigma} upper limits for the water production rate and column density of <7.63 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 25} molecules s{sup -1} and of <1.61 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2}, respectively. An observation taken on 2013 January 15 using the Very Large Telescope found the MBC to be active during the Herschel observation, suggesting that any ongoing sublimation due to subsurface ice was lower than our upper limit.

  7. Recovery Efficiency, False Negative Rate, and Limit of Detection...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Recovery Efficiency, False Negative Rate, and Limit of Detection Performance of a Validated Macrofoam-Swab Sampling Method with Low Surface Concentrations of Two Bacillus anthracis...

  8. Upper limits for the photoproduction cross section for the ???(1860) pentaquark state off the deuteron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egiyan, H.; Langheinrich, J.; Gothe, R. W.; Graham, L.; Holtrop, M.; Lu, H.; Mattione, P.; Mutchler, G.; Park, K.; Smith, E. S.; Stepanyan, S.; Zhao, Z. W.; Adhikari, K. P.; Aghasyan, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Ball, J.; Baltzell, N. A.; Battaglieri, M.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bennett, R. P.; Biselli, A. S.; Bookwalter, C.; Branford, D.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Contalbrigo, M.; D’Angelo, A.; Daniel, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Dey, B.; Dickson, R.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fradi, A.; Gabrielyan, M. Y.; Gevorgyan, N.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Guler, N.; Guo, L.; Gyurjyan, V.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Heddle, D.; Hicks, K.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Khetarpal, P.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Livingston, K.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Mao, Y.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Mokeev, V.; Munevar, E.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Ni, A.; Niculescu, G.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paolone, M.; Pappalardo, L.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Phelps, E.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Protopopescu, D.; Raue, B. A.; Ricco, G.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B. G.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Sabatié, F.; Saini, M. S.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Seraydaryan, H.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D. I.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Tang, W.; Taylor, C. E.; Tedeschi, D. J.; Ungaro, M.; Voutier, E.; Watts, D. P.; Weinstein, L. B.; Weygand, D. P.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhao, B.

    2012-01-30

    We searched for the ???(1860) pentaquark in the photoproduction process off the deuteron in the ????-decay channel using CLAS. The invariant-mass spectrum of the ???? system does not indicate any statistically significant enhancement near the reported mass M=1.860 GeV. The statistical analysis of the sideband-subtracted mass spectrum yields a 90%-confidence-level upper limit of 0.7 nb for the photoproduction cross section of ???(1860) with a consecutive decay into???? in the photon-energy range 4.5GeV?<5.5GeV.

  9. An upper limit to photons from first data taken by the Pierre Auger Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markus Risse

    2007-01-03

    Many models for ultra-high energy cosmic rays postulate exotic scenarios to explain the sources or the nature of these particles. A characteristic feature of these models is the prediction of a significant flux of photons at ultra-high energy. The Pierre Auger Observatory offers a great potential to search for such photons. We present shower observables with sensitivity to photons and the search strategy employed. An upper limit to photon primaries is derived from first Auger data. Prospects for constraining theoretical source models are discussed.

  10. Upper limits for the photoproduction cross section for the ???(1860) pentaquark state off the deuteron

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Egiyan, H.; Langheinrich, J.; Gothe, R. W.; Graham, L.; Holtrop, M.; Lu, H.; Mattione, P.; Mutchler, G.; Park, K.; Smith, E. S.; et al

    2012-01-30

    We searched for the ???(1860) pentaquark in the photoproduction process off the deuteron in the ????-decay channel using CLAS. The invariant-mass spectrum of the ???? system does not indicate any statistically significant enhancement near the reported mass M=1.860 GeV. The statistical analysis of the sideband-subtracted mass spectrum yields a 90%-confidence-level upper limit of 0.7 nb for the photoproduction cross section of ???(1860) with a consecutive decay into???? in the photon-energy range 4.5GeV?<5.5GeV.

  11. Limits on the thermoacoustic detectability of electric and magnetic charges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akerlof, C.W.

    1982-09-01

    The energy loss is estimated for a slow magnetic monopole traveling through a conductor. The thermoacoustic signal derived from this process is compared to the acoustic phonon fluctuation pressure. The results show that single-monopole detectability is strongly limited by thermal noise. These calculations also imply severe limits for the detectability of charged-particle cascades.

  12. Detection of $^{133}$Xe from the Fukushima nuclear power plant in the upper troposphere above Germany

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardy Simgen; Frank Arnold; Heinfried Aufmhoff; Robert Baumann; Florian Kaether; Sebastian Lindemann; Ludwig Rauch; Hans Schlager; Clemens Schlosser; Ulrich Schumann

    2014-12-05

    After the accident in the Japanese Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in March 2011 large amounts of radioactivity were released and distributed in the atmosphere. Among them were also radioactive noble gas isotopes which can be used as tracers to test global atmospheric circulation models. This work presents unique measurements of the radionuclide $^{133}$Xe from Fukushima in the upper troposphere above Germany. The measurements involve air sampling in a research jet aircraft followed by chromatographic xenon extraction and ultra-low background gas counting with miniaturized proportional counters. With this technique a detection limit of the order of 100 $^{133}$Xe atoms in litre-scale air samples (corresponding to about 100 mBq/m$^3$) is achievable. Our results provide proof that the $^{133}$Xe-rich ground level air layer from Fukushima was lifted up to the tropopause and distributed hemispherically. Moreover, comparisons with ground level air measurements indicate that the arrival of the radioactive plume at high altitude over Germany occurred several days before the ground level plume.

  13. Upper limits on the VHE $\\gamma$-ray flux from the ULIRG Arp 220 and other galaxies with VERITAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleischhack, Henrike

    2015-01-01

    The cores of ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) are very dense environments, with a high rate of star formation and supernova explosions. They are thought to be sites of cosmic-ray acceleration, and are predicted to emit $\\gamma$-rays in the GeV to TeV range. So far, no ULIRG has been detected in $\\gamma$-rays. Arp 220, the closest ULIRG to Earth, has been well studied, and detailed models of $\\gamma$-ray production in this galaxy are available. They predict a rather hard $\\gamma$-ray spectrum up to several TeV. Due to its large rate of star formation, high gas density, and its close proximity to Earth, Arp 220 is thought to be a very good candidate for observations in very-high-energy (VHE; 100 GeV - 100 TeV) $\\gamma$-rays. Arp 220 was observed by the VERITAS telescopes for more than 30 hours with no significant excess over the cosmic-ray background. The upper limits on the VHE $\\gamma$-ray flux of Arp 220 derived from these observations are the most sensitive limits presented so far and are starting ...

  14. Combined upper limit on Standard Model Higgs boson production at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adrian, Buzatu; /McGill U.

    2012-02-01

    The Higgs boson is the only elementary particle predicted by the Standard Model (SM) that has neither been confirmed nor refuted. The CDF collaboration has performed SM Higgs searches in many channels using p{bar p} collisions at a centre-of-mass energy {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. We present the latest combined Higgs boson search at CDF. Since the previous year's combination, the sensitivity is increased through the addition of new channels, the improvement of existing channels and the addition of new data samples. We also use the latest parton distribution functions and gg {yields} H theoretical cross sections when modelling the signal event yields. Using integrated luminosities of up to 8.2 fb{sup -1}, we observe a good agreement between data and the background prediction. Since we do not see a Higgs boson excess, we set 95% CL upper limits on the Higgs boson cross section in the range between 100 and 200 GeV/c{sup 2}, with 5 GeV/c{sup 2} increments. The observed (expected) limits for a 115 and a 165 GeV/c{sup 2} Higgs boson are 1.55 (1.49) and 0.75 (0.79) x SM, respectively. Since last year, the Higgs boson excluded range by CDF is extended to 156.5 - 173.7 and 100 - 104.5 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  15. Combined upper limit on Standard Model Higgs boson production at CDF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buzatu Adrian

    2012-02-09

    The Higgs boson is the only elementary particle predicted by the Standard Model (SM) that has neither been confirmed nor refuted. The CDF collaboration has performed SM Higgs searches in many channels using $p\\pbar$ collisions at a centre-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s}=1.96\\tev$. We present the latest combined Higgs boson search at CDF. Since the previous year's combination, the sensitivity is increased through the addition of new channels, the improvement of existing channels and the addition of new data samples. We also use the latest parton distribution functions and $gg \\rightarrow H$ theoretical cross sections when modelling the signal event yields. Using integrated luminosities of up to 8.2 $\\invfb$, we observe a good agreement between data and the background prediction. Since we do not see a Higgs boson excess, we set 95% CL upper limits on the Higgs boson cross section in the range between 100 and 200 $\\gevcc$, with 5 $\\gevcc$ increments. The observed (expected) limits for a 115 and a 165 $\\gevcc$ Higgs boson are 1.55 (1.49) and 0.75 (0.79) $\\times$ SM, respectively. Since last year, the Higgs boson excluded range by CDF is extended to 156.5 - 173.7 and 100 - 104.5 $\\gevcc$.

  16. Upper and lower limits on the Crab pulsar's astrophysical parameters set from gravitational wave observations by LIGO: braking index and energy considerations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giovanni Santostasi

    2008-07-16

    The Laser Interferometer Gravitational Observatory (LIGO) has recently reached the end of its fifth science run (S5), having collected more than a year worth of data. Analysis of the data is still ongoing but a positive detection of gravitational waves, while possible, is not realistically expected for most likely sources. This is particularly true for what concerns gravitational waves from known pulsars. In fact, even under the most optimistic (and not very realistic) assumption that all the pulsar's observed spin-down is due to gravitational waves, the gravitational wave strain at earth from all the known isolated pulsars (with the only notable exception of the Crab pulsar) would not be strong enough to be detectable by existing detectors. By August 2006, LIGO had produced enough data for a coherent integration capable to extract signal from noise that was weaker than the one expected from the Crab pulsar's spin-down limit. No signal was detected, but beating the spin-down limit is a considerable achievement for the LIGO Scientific Collaboration (LSC). It is customary to translate the upper limit on strain from a pulsar into a more astrophysically significant upper limit on ellipticity. Once the spin-down limit has been beaten, it is possible to release the constraint that all the spin-down is due to gravitational wave emission. A more complete model with diverse braking mechanisms can be used to set limits on several astrophysical parameters of the pulsar. This paper shows possible values of such parameters for the Crab pulsar given the current limit on gravitational waves from this neutron star.

  17. Upper limit on the cross section for reactor antineutrinos changing 22Na decay rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. J. de Meijer; S. W. Steyn

    2014-09-23

    In this paper we present results of a long-term observation of the decay of 22Na in the presence of a nuclear fission reactor. The measurements were made outside the containment wall of and underneath the Koeberg nuclear power plant near Cape Town, South Africa. Antineutrino fluxes ranged from ~5*10^11 to 1.6*10^13 cm^-2 s^-1 during this period. We show that the coincidence summing technique provides a sensitive tool to measure a change in the total decay constant as well as the branching ratio between EC and beta+ decay of 22Na to the first excited state in 22Ne. We observe a relative change in count rate between reactor-ON and reactor-OFF equal to (-0.51+/-0.11)*10^-4. After evaluating possible systematic uncertainties we conclude that the effect is either due to a hidden instrumental cause or due to an interaction between antineutrinos and the 22Na nucleus. An upper limit of ~0.03 barn has been deduced for observing any change in the decay rate of 22Na due to antineutrino interactions.

  18. Upper limits on the probability of an interstellar civilization arising in the local Solar neighborhood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cartin, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    At this point in time, there is very little empirical evidence on the likelihood of a space-faring species originating in the biosphere of a habitable world. However, there is a tension between the expectation that such a probability is relatively high (given our own origins on Earth), and the lack of any basis for believing the Solar System has ever been visited by an extraterrestrial colonization effort. This paper seeks to place upper limits on the probability of an interstellar civilization arising on a habitable planet in its stellar system, using a percolation model to simulate the progress of such a hypothetical civilization's colonization efforts in the local Solar neighborhood. To be as realistic as possible, the actual physical positions and characteristics of all stars within 40 parsecs of the Solar System are used as possible colony sites in the percolation process. If an interstellar civilization is very likely to have such colonization programs, and they can travel over large distances, then the...

  19. Upper Limit on the Central Density of Dark Matter in the Eddington inspired Born-Infield (EiBI) Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Izmailov, Ramil; Filippov, Alexander I; Ghosh, Mithun; Nandi, Kamal K

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the stability of circular material orbits in the analytic galactic metric recently derived by Harko \\textit{et al.} (2014). It turnsout that stability depends more strongly on the dark matter central density $%\\rho_{0}$ than on other parameters of the solution. This property then yields an upper limit on $\\rho _{0}$ for each individual galaxy, which we call here $\\rho _{0}^{\\text{upper}}$, such that stable circular orbits are possible \\textit{only} when the constraint $\\rho _{0}\\leq \\rho _{0}^{\\text{upper}}$ is satisfied. This is our new result. To approximately quantify the upper limit, we consider as a familiar example our Milky Way galaxy that has a projected dark matter radius $R_{\\text{DM}}\\sim 180$ kpc and find that $\\rho _{0}^{\\text{upper}}\\sim 2.37\\times 10^{11}$ $M_{\\odot }$kpc$^{-3}$. This limit turns out to be about four orders of magnitude larger than the latest data on central density $\\rho _{0}$ arising from the fit to the Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) and Burkert density profiles. Su...

  20. Upper Limit on the Central Density of Dark Matter in the Eddington inspired Born-Infield (EiBI) Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramil Izmailov; Alexander A. Potapov; Alexander I. Filippov; Mithun Ghosh; Kamal K. Nandi

    2015-06-11

    We investigate the stability of circular material orbits in the analytic galactic metric recently derived by Harko \\textit{et al.} (2014). It turnsout that stability depends more strongly on the dark matter central density $%\\rho_{0}$ than on other parameters of the solution. This property then yields an upper limit on $\\rho _{0}$ for each individual galaxy, which we call here $\\rho _{0}^{\\text{upper}}$, such that stable circular orbits are possible \\textit{only} when the constraint $\\rho _{0}\\leq \\rho _{0}^{\\text{upper}}$ is satisfied. This is our new result. To approximately quantify the upper limit, we consider as a familiar example our Milky Way galaxy that has a projected dark matter radius $R_{\\text{DM}}\\sim 180$ kpc and find that $\\rho _{0}^{\\text{upper}}\\sim 2.37\\times 10^{11}$ $M_{\\odot }$kpc$^{-3}$. This limit turns out to be about four orders of magnitude larger than the latest data on central density $\\rho _{0}$ arising from the fit to the Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) and Burkert density profiles. Such consistency indicates that the EiBI solution could qualify as yet another viable alternative model for dark matter.

  1. Status of Design and Manufacture of the Upper Coils and Outer Poloidal Limiter Coils Subsystems for the JET-EP Magnetic Diagnostic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Status of Design and Manufacture of the Upper Coils and Outer Poloidal Limiter Coils Subsystems for the JET-EP Magnetic Diagnostic

  2. Detection limits in plasmonic whispering gallery mode biosensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swaim, Jon D; Bowen, Warwick P

    2011-01-01

    We analyze a whispering gallery mode biosensor with a metallic nanorod bound to its surface. It is found that a localized surface plasmon resonance in the nanorod can reduce the optical mode volume of the resonator by as much as four orders of magnitude via a local enhancement of the electric field, thus improving the detection sensitivity. Optical frequency shifts as large as 15 MHz are predicted for typical proteins and, for typical experimental parameters, the biosensor is predicted to be limited by laser frequency noise, leading to a minimum detectable polarizability on the order of 10 cubic angstroms.

  3. UPPER MASS LIMITS FOR KNOWN RADIAL VELOCITY PLANETS FROM HIPPARCOS INTERMEDIATE ASTROMETRIC DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reffert, Sabine

    is not sufficient to detect the as­ trometric signature of the planetary companion (see e.g. Pourbaix & Arenou 2001

  4. An upper limit for the water outgassing rate of the main-belt comet 176P/LINEAR observed with Herschel/HIFI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Val-Borro, M; Hartogh, P; Biver, N; Bockelée-Morvan, D; Crovisier, J; Küppers, M; Lis, D C; Szutowicz, S; Blake, G A; Emprechtinger, M; Jarchow, C; Jehin, E; Kidger, M; Lara, L -M; Lellouch, E; Moreno, R; Rengel, M

    2012-01-01

    176P/LINEAR is a member of the new cometary class known as main-belt comets (MBCs). It displayed cometary activity shortly during its 2005 perihelion passage that may be driven by the sublimation of sub-surface ices. We have therefore searched for emission of the H2O 110-101 ground state rotational line at 557 GHz toward 176P/LINEAR with the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared (HIFI) on board the Herschel Space Observatory on UT 8.78 August 2011, about 40 days after its most recent perihelion passage, when the object was at a heliocentric distance of 2.58 AU. No H2O line emission was detected in our observations, from which we derive sensitive 3-sigma upper limits for the water production rate and column density of < 4e25 molec/s and of < 3e10 cm^{-2}, respectively. From the peak brightness measured during the object's active period in 2005, this upper limit is lower than predicted by the relation between production rates and visual magnitudes observed for a sample of comets by Jorda et al. (2008...

  5. Upper limits on a stochastic gravitational-wave background using LIGO and Virgo interferometers at 600-1000 Hz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abadie, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adhikari, R; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Arain, M A; Araya, M C; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Baragoya, J C B; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Beck, D; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Belletoile, A; Belopolski, I; Benacquista, M; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biswas, R; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bogan, C; Bondarescu, R; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burguet--Castell, J; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chaibi, O; Chalermsongsak, T; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chelkowski, S; Chen, W; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clark, D E; Clark, J; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colacino, C N; Colas, J; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M; Coulon, J -P; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, R M; Dahl, K; Danilishin, S L; Dannenberg, R; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Del Pozzo, W; del Prete, M; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Emilio, M Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A; Díaz, M; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Eberle, T; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Endr?czi, G; Engel, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Farr, B F; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Feroz, F; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Flanigan, M; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fujimoto, M -K; Fulda, P J; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Galimberti, M; Gammaitoni, L; Garcia, J; Garufi, F; Gáspár, M E; Gemme, G; Geng, R; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L Á; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gil, S; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goggin, L M; González, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Gray, N; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Greverie, C; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Gupta, R; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Ha, T; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Hayau, J -F; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hendry, M A; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Herrera, V; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Holtrop, M; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, Y J; Jaranowski, P; Jesse, E; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kasturi, R; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kelley, D; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Keresztes, Z; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B; Kim, C; Kim, H; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, Y -M; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Kranz, O; Kringel, V; Krishnamurthy, S; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, R; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Lastzka, N; Lawrie, C; Lazzarini, A; Leaci, P; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Leong, J R; Leonor, I; Leroy, N; Letendre, N

    2011-01-01

    A stochastic background of gravitational waves is expected to arise from a superposition of many incoherent sources of gravitational waves, of either cosmological or astrophysical origin. This background is a target for the current generation of ground-based detectors. In this article we present the first joint search for a stochastic background using data from the LIGO and Virgo interferometers. In a frequency band of 600-1000 Hz, we obtained a 95% upper limit on the amplitude of $\\Omega_{\\rm GW}(f) = \\Omega_3 (f/900 \\mathrm{Hz})^3$, of $\\Omega_3 < 0.33$, assuming a value of the Hubble parameter of $h_{100}=0.72$. These new limits are a factor of seven better than the previous best in this frequency band.

  6. Upper limits on a stochastic gravitational-wave background using LIGO and Virgo interferometers at 600-1000 Hz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. D. Abbott; M. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; R. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; K. Agatsuma; P. Ajith; B. Allen; E. Amador Ceron; D. Amariutei; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. A. Arain; M. C. Araya; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; D. Atkinson; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. Ballmer; J. C. B. Barayoga; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; M. Bastarrika; A. Basti; J. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; D. Beck; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; A. Belletoile; I. Belopolski; M. Benacquista; J. M. Berliner; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; N. Beveridge; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; R. Biswas; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; C. Bogan; R. Bondarescu; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; S. Bose; L. Bosi; B. Bouhou; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; J. Burguet--Castell; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; J. Cannizzo; K. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; S. Caudill; M. Cavaglià; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; O. Chaibi; T. Chalermsongsak; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; S. Chelkowski; W. Chen; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; S. S. Y. Chua; C. T. Y. Chung; S. Chung; G. Ciani; D. E. Clark; J. Clark; J. H. Clayton; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; C. N. Colacino; J. Colas; A. Colla; M. Colombini; A. Conte; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; A. M. Cruise; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; R. M. Cutler; K. Dahl; S. L. Danilishin; R. Dannenberg; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; R. De Rosa; D. DeBra; G. Debreczeni; W. Del Pozzo; M. del Prete; T. Dent; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; M. Di Paolo Emilio; A. Di Virgilio; M. Díaz; A. Dietz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; J. -C. Dumas; T. Eberle; M. Edgar; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; G. Endr\\Hoczi; R. Engel; T. Etzel; K. Evans; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Y. Fan; B. F. Farr; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; F. Feroz; I. Ferrante; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; M. Flanigan; S. Foley; E. Forsi; L. A. Forte; N. Fotopoulos; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; D. Friedrich; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; M. -K. Fujimoto; P. J. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; M. Galimberti; L. Gammaitoni; J. Garcia; F. Garufi; M. E. Gáspár; G. Gemme; R. Geng; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. Á. Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; S. Gil; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; L. M. Goggin; G. González; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Goßler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; N. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Greverie; R. Grosso; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; R. Gupta; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; T. Ha; J. M. Hallam; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. -F. Hayau; J. Heefner; A. Heidmann; M. C. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; M. A. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; V. Herrera; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; M. Holtrop; T. Hong; S. Hooper; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; Y. J. Jang; P. Jaranowski; E. Jesse; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; G. Jones; R. Jones; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; R. Kasturi; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; D. Kelley; W. Kells; D. G. Keppel; Z. Keresztes; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili; E. A. Khazanov; B. Kim; C. Kim; H. Kim; K. Kim; N. Kim; Y. -M. Kim; P. J. King; D. L. Kinzel; J. S. Kissel; S. Klimenko; K. Kokeyama; V. Kondrashov; S. Koranda; W. Z. Korth; I. Kowalska; D. Kozak; O. Kranz; V. Kringel; S. Krishnamurthy; B. Krishnan; A. Królak; G. Kuehn; R. Kumar; P. Kwee; P. K. Lam

    2012-02-23

    A stochastic background of gravitational waves is expected to arise from a superposition of many incoherent sources of gravitational waves, of either cosmological or astrophysical origin. This background is a target for the current generation of ground-based detectors. In this article we present the first joint search for a stochastic background using data from the LIGO and Virgo interferometers. In a frequency band of 600-1000 Hz, we obtained a 95% upper limit on the amplitude of $\\Omega_{\\rm GW}(f) = \\Omega_3 (f/900 \\mathrm{Hz})^3$, of $\\Omega_3 < 0.33$, assuming a value of the Hubble parameter of $h_{100}=0.72$. These new limits are a factor of seven better than the previous best in this frequency band.

  7. Calculating exclusion limits for Weakly Interacting Massive Particle direct detection experiments without background subtraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anne M Green

    2001-10-04

    Competitive limits on the weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) spin-independent scattering cross section are currently being produced by 76Ge detectors originally designed to search for neutrinoless double beta decay, such as the Heidelberg-Moscow and IGEX experiments. In the absence of background subtraction, limits on the WIMP interaction cross section are set by calculating the upper confidence limit on the theoretical event rate, given the observed event rate. The standard analysis technique involves calculating the 90% upper confidence limit on the number of events in each bin, and excluding any set of parameters (WIMP mass and cross-section) which produces a theoretical event rate for any bin which exceeds the 90% upper confidence limit on the event rate for that bin. We show that, if there is more than one energy bin, this produces exclusion limits that are actually at a lower degree of confidence than 90%, and are hence erroneously tight. We formulate criteria which produce true 90% confidence exclusion limits in these circumstances, including calculating the individual bin confidence limit for which the overall probability that no bins exceeds this confidence limit is 90% and calculating the 90% minimum confidence limit on the number of bins which exceed their individual bin 90% confidence limits. We then compare the limits on the WIMP cross-section produced by these criteria with those found using the standard technique, using data from the Heidelberg-Moscow and IGEX experiments.

  8. Increasing the upper-limit intensity and temperature range for thermal self-focusing of a laser beam by using plasma density ramp-up

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bokaei, B.; Niknam, A. R.

    2014-03-15

    This work is devoted to improving relativistic and ponderomotive thermal self-focusing of the intense laser beam in an underdense plasma. It is shown that the ponderomotive nonlinearity induces a saturation mechanism for thermal self-focusing. Therefore, in addition to the well-known lower-limit critical intensity, there is an upper-limit intensity for thermal self-focusing above which the laser beam starts to experience ponderomotive defocusing. It is indicated that the upper-limit intensity value is dependent on plasma and laser parameters such as the plasma electron temperature, plasma density, and laser spot size. Furthermore, the effect of the upward plasma density ramp profile on the thermal self-focusing is studied. Results show that by using the plasma density ramp-up, the upper-limit intensity increases and the self-focusing temperature range expands.

  9. Improved Upper Limits on the Stochastic Gravitational-Wave Background from 2009-2010 LIGO and Virgo Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aasi, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Alemic, A; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Amariutei, D; Andersen, M; Anderson, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Austin, L; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barbet, M; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Belczynski, C; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Bergmann, G; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biscans, S; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bloemen, S; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, Sukanta; Bosi, L; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brückner, F; Buchman, S; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burman, R; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Bustillo, J Calderón; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K C; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Castiglia, A; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Celerier, C; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S S Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Collette, C; Colombini, M; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corpuz, A; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dahl, K; Canton, T Dal; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Donath, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Dossa, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edo, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Endr?czi, G; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Feldbaum, D; Feroz, F; Ferrante, I; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S; Garufi, F; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Gräf, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gushwa, K; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanke, M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hart, M; Hartman, M T; Haster, C -J; Haughian, K; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Hooper, S; Hopkins, P; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hu, Y; Huerta, E; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, H; Jaranowski, P; Ji, Y; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, Haris; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Karlen, J; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Keiser, G M; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, C; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, N G; Kim, Y -M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J; Koehlenbeck, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z

    2014-01-01

    Gravitational waves from a variety of sources are predicted to superpose to create a stochastic background. This background is expected to contain unique information from throughout the history of the universe that is unavailable through standard electromagnetic observations, making its study of fundamental importance to understanding the evolution of the universe. We carry out a search for the stochastic background with the latest data from LIGO and Virgo. Consistent with predictions from most stochastic gravitational-wave background models, the data display no evidence of a stochastic gravitational-wave signal. Assuming a gravitational-wave spectrum of Omega_GW(f)=Omega_alpha*(f/f_ref)^alpha, we place 95% confidence level upper limits on the energy density of the background in each of four frequency bands spanning 41.5-1726 Hz. In the frequency band of 41.5-169.25 Hz for a spectral index of alpha=0, we constrain the energy density of the stochastic background to be Omega_GW(f)<5.6x10^-6. For the 600-1000...

  10. Fermi-LAT Upper Limit for NGC 4151 and its Implications for Physics of Hot Accretion Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wojaczynski, Rafal; Xie, Fu-Guo

    2015-01-01

    We present preliminary results of our analysis of the {\\it Fermi}-LAT data from the direction of NGC 4151. We find a new gamma-ray source with a statistical significance sigma > 5, shifted by 0.5degr from the position of NGC 4151. Apparently, the source was bright only during a 1.5-year period between December 2011 and June 2013 and it strongly contaminated the signal from NGC 4151. Therefore, we neglect this period in our analysis. We find two additional, persistent gamma-ray sources with high sigma, shifted from NGC 4151 by ~1.5degr and 5degr, whose presence has been recently confirmed in the Third Fermi Catalog. After subtracting the above sources, we still see a weak residual, with sigma ~< 3, at the position of NGC 4151. We derive an upper limit (UL) for the gamma-ray flux from NGC 4151 and we compare it with predictions of the ADAF model which can explain the X-ray observations of this object. We find that the Fermi UL strongly constrains non-thermal acceleration processes in hot flows as well as the...

  11. Decentralized detection in resource-limited sensor network architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tay, Wee Peng

    2008-01-01

    We consider the problem of decentralized binary detection in a network consisting of a large number of nodes arranged as a tree of bounded height. We show that the error probability decays exponentially fast with the number ...

  12. High Yield Silicon Photonic Crystal Microcavity Biosensors with 100fM Detection Limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Ray

    High Yield Silicon Photonic Crystal Microcavity Biosensors with 100fM Detection Limit Yi Zou a silicon photonic crystal (PC) microcavity biosensor with 50 femto-molar detection limit. Our devices have, photonic crystal microcavity, biosensor, sub-wavelength grating coupler. *yzou@utexas.edu, swapnajit

  13. Upper limit of the energy of the photon and the phase change of photon to material particles at the Scwartzschild radius

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Radhakrishnan Nair

    2005-06-10

    The concept of Scwartzschild radius is extended to the photon and the upper limit imposed on the energy of a photon as a result of the three characteristics of the photon--the constancy of the velocity of light, the spin value of $1\\hslash$ and the zero rest mass of the photon--is shown. Further the phase change that occurs to the photon at the Scwartzschild radius, from energy to matter as a result of vacuum fluctuations is indicated.

  14. The Carnot efficiencybetween these temperatures is: This provides an absolute upper limit to the Rankine cycle effi-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Y. A.

    to the Rankine cycle effi- ciency. Heat Absorbed from Stream 3 Power Produced by Steam Turbine Required Power a steam cycle alongsidethe gas turbine cycle. LITERATURE CITED Christodoulou,K., Diploma Thesis, N Output of Gas Turbine For the Gas Turbine Cycle Calculated for Case 2, Upper Exhaust Temperature T6

  15. Determination of Method Detection Limits for Trace 232-Thorium and 238-Uranium in Copper using Ion Exchange and ICPMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoppe, Eric W.; LaFerriere, Brian D.; Maiti, Tapas C.; Soin, Aleksandr

    2014-04-15

    Determination of Method Detection Limits for Trace 232-Thorium and 238-Uranium in Copper using Ion Exchange and ICPMS

  16. Method for improving the limit of detection in a data signal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Synovec, Robert E. (Ames, IA); Yueng, Edward S. (Ames, IA)

    1989-10-17

    A method for improving the limit of detection for a data set in which experimental noise is uncorrelated along a given abscissa and an analytical signal is correlated to the abscissa, the steps comprising collecting the data set, converting the data set into a data signal including an analytical portion and the experimental noise portion, designating and adjusting a baseline of the data signal to center the experimental noise numerically about a zero reference, and integrating the data signal preserving the corresponding information for each point of the data signal. The steps of the method produce an enhanced integrated data signal which improves the limit of detection of the data signal.

  17. COMPUTATION OF UPPER AND LOWER BOUNDS IN LIMIT ANALYSIS USING SECOND-ORDER CONE PROGRAMMING AND MESH ADAPTIVITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peraire, Jaime

    structures or the analysis of soil mechanics. Assuming a rigid, perfectly- plastic solid subject to a static hciria@mit.edu, peraire@mit.edu 9th ASCE Specialty Conference on Probabilistic Mechanics and Structural, the continuous problem, under the form of the static principle of limit analysis, is discretized twice (one per

  18. Accepted Applied Optics, May 2001 Thermal Infrared Spectral Band Detection Limits for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirkland, Laurel

    for in the remotely sensed spectral data base. Second, since the spectral shape varies with particle size, weathering kirkland@lpi.usra.edu. K. Herr is with The Aerospace Corporation, Los Angeles, California, 90009. J; revised manuscript received 3 April 2001. examined detection limits based on spectral signature mapping

  19. Combined CDF and D0 Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production with up to 8.6 fb-1 of Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The CDF; D0 Collaborations; the Tevatron New Phenomena; Higgs Working Group

    2011-09-20

    We combine results from CDF and D0 on direct searches for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) in ppbar collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV. Compared to the previous Tevatron Higgs boson search combination more data have been added, additional channels have been incorporated, and some previously used channels have been reanalyzed to gain sensitivity. We use the MSTW08 parton distribution functions and the latest theoretical cross sections when comparing our limits to the SM predictions. With up to 8.2 fb-1 of data analyzed at CDF and up to 8.6 fb-1 at D0, the 95% C.L. our upper limits on Higgs boson production are factors of 1.17, 1.71, and 0.48 times the values of the SM cross section for Higgs bosons of mass m_H=115 GeV/c^2, 140 GeV/c^2, and 165 GeV/c^2, respectively. The corresponding median upper limits expected in the absence of Higgs boson production are 1.16, 1.16, and 0.57. There is a small (approx. 1 sigma) excess of data events with respect to the background estimation in searches for the Higgs boson in the mass range 125

  20. Combined CDF and D0 Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production with up to 8.6 fb-1 of Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CDF, The; Collaborations, D0; Phenomena, the Tevatron New; Group, Higgs Working

    2011-07-01

    We combine results from CDF and D0 on direct searches for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) in p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Compared to the previous Tevatron Higgs boson search combination more data have been added, additional channels have been incorporated, and some previously used channels have been reanalyzed to gain sensitivity. We use the MSTW08 parton distribution functions and the latest theoretical cross sections when comparing our limits to the SM predictions. With up to 8.2 fb{sup -1} of data analyzed at CDF and up to 8.6 fb{sup -1} at D0, the 95% C.L. our upper limits on Higgs boson production are factors of 1.17, 1.71, and 0.48 times the values of the SM cross section for Higgs bosons of mass m{sub H} = 115 GeV/c{sup 2}, 140 GeV/c{sup 2}, and 165 GeV/c{sup 2}, respectively. The corresponding median upper limits expected in the absence of Higgs boson production are 1.16, 1.16, and 0.57. There is a small ({approx} 1{sigma}) excess of data events with respect to the background estimation in searches for the Higgs boson in the mass range 125 < m{sub H} < 155 GeV/c{sup 2}. We exclude, at the 95% C.L., a new and larger region at high mass between 156 < m{sub H} < 177 GeV/c{sup 2}, with an expected exclusion region of 148 < m{sub H} < 180 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  1. Interferometric Upper Limits on Millimeter Polarization of the Disks around DG Tau, GM Aur, and MWC 480

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, A M; Wilner, D J; Plambeck, R L

    2013-01-01

    Millimeter-wavelength polarization measurements offer a promising method for probing the geometry of magnetic fields in circumstellar disks. Single dish observations and theoretical work have hinted that magnetic field geometries might be predominantly toroidal, and that disks should exhibit millimeter polarization fractions of 2-3%. While subsequent work has not confirmed these high polarization fractions, either the wavelength of observation or the target sources differed from the original observations. Here we present new polarimetric observations of three nearby circumstellar disks at 2" resolution with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) and the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter Astronomy (CARMA). We reobserve GM Aur and DG Tau, the systems in which millimeter polarization detections have been claimed. Despite higher resolution and sensitivity at wavelengths similar to the previous observations, the new observations do not show significant polarization. We also add observations of a new HAeBe system, M...

  2. Limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cohen, S.A.; Hosea, J.C.; Timberlake, J.R.

    1984-10-19

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face is provided. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution. This limiter shape accommodates the various power scrape-off distances lambda p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V/sub parallel/, of the impacting particles.

  3. TWO UPPER LIMITS ON THE ROSSITER-MCLAUGHLIN EFFECT, WITH DIFFERING IMPLICATIONS: WASP-1 HAS A HIGH OBLIQUITY AND WASP-2 IS INDETERMINATE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albrecht, Simon; Winn, Joshua N.; Hirano, Teruyuki; Johnson, John Asher; Paul Butler, R.; Crane, Jeffrey D.; Shectman, Stephen A.; Thompson, Ian B.; Narita, Norio; Sato, Bun'ei; Enya, Keigo; Fischer, Debra

    2011-09-01

    We present precise radial-velocity (RV) measurements of WASP-1 and WASP-2 throughout transits of their giant planets. Our goal was to detect the Rossiter-McLaughlin (RM) effect, the anomalous RV observed during eclipses of rotating stars, which can be used to study the obliquities of planet-hosting stars. For WASP-1, a weak signal of a prograde orbit was detected with {approx}2{sigma} confidence, and for WASP-2 no signal was detected. The resulting upper bounds on the RM amplitude have different implications for these two systems because of the contrasting transit geometries and the stellar types. Because WASP-1 is an F7V star, and such stars are typically rapid rotators, the most probable reason for the suppression of the RM effect is that the star is viewed nearly pole-on. This implies that the WASP-1 star has a high obliquity with respect to the edge-on planetary orbit. Because WASP-2 is a K1V star, and is expected to be a slow rotator, no firm conclusion can be drawn about the stellar obliquity. Our data and our analysis contradict an earlier claim that WASP-2b has a retrograde orbit, thereby revoking this system's status as an exception to the pattern that cool stars have low obliquities.

  4. Combined Tevatron upper limit on gg?H?W^(+)W^(?) and constraints on the Higgs boson mass in fourth-generation fermion models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Chen, C.; Clutter, Justace Randall; McGivern, Carrie Lynne; Moulik, Tania; Sekaric, Jadranka; Wilson, Graham Wallace; Aaltonen, T.; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.

    2010-07-15

    Combined Tevatron upper limit on gg! H! WþW#1; and constraints on the Higgs boson mass in fourth-generation fermion models T. Aaltonen,15,a V.M. Abazov,48,b B. Abbott,116,b M. Abolins,101,b B. S. Acharya,35,b M. Adams,79,b T. Adams,75,b J. Adelman...,78,a E. Aguilo,7,b G.D. Alexeev,48,b G. Alkhazov,52,b A. Alton,99,ii B. A´lvarez Gonza´lez,56,aa G. Alverson,94,b G. A. Alves,2,b S. Amerio,39a,a D. Amidei,99,a A. Anastassov,81,a L. S. Ancu,47,b A. Annovi,37,a J. Antos,53,a M. Aoki,77,b G. Apollinari...

  5. Method for improving the limit of detection in a data signal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Synovec, R.E.; Yueng, E.S.

    1989-10-17

    Disclosed is a method for improving the limit of detection for a data set in which experimental noise is uncorrelated along a given abscissa and an analytical signal is correlated to the abscissa, the steps comprising collecting the data set, converting the data set into a data signal including an analytical portion and the experimental noise portion, designating and adjusting a baseline of the data signal to center the experimental noise numerically about a zero reference, and integrating the data signal preserving the corresponding information for each point of the data signal. The steps of the method produce an enhanced integrated data signal which improves the limit of detection of the data signal. 8 figs.

  6. Limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cohen, Samuel A. (Hopewell, NJ); Hosea, Joel C. (Princeton, NJ); Timberlake, John R. (Allentown, NJ)

    1986-01-01

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face accommodates the various power scrape-off distances .lambda..sub.p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V.sub..parallel., of the impacting particles. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution.

  7. Detection limits for real-time source water monitoring using indigenous freshwater microalgae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez Jr, Miguel; Greenbaum, Elias

    2009-01-01

    This research identified toxin detection limits using the variable fluorescence of naturally occurring microalgae in source drinking water for five chemical toxins with different molecular structures and modes of toxicity. The five chemicals investigated were atrazine, Diuron, paraquat, methyl parathion, and potassium cyanide. Absolute threshold sensitivities of the algae for detection of the toxins in unmodified source drinking water were measured. Differential kinetics between the rate of action of the toxins and natural changes in algal physiology, such as diurnal photoinhibition, are significant enough that effects of the toxin can be detected and distinguished from the natural variance. This is true even for physiologically impaired algae where diminished photosynthetic capacity may arise from uncontrollable external factors such as nutrient starvation. Photoinhibition induced by high levels of solar radiation is a predictable and reversible phenomenon that can be dealt with using a period of dark adaption of 30 minutes or more.

  8. Combined CDF and D0 Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production with up to 8.2 fb-1 of Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The CDF; D0 Collaborations; the TEVNPHWG Working Group

    2011-08-16

    We combine results from CDF and D0's direct searches for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) produced in p-pbar collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV. The results presented here include those channels which are most sensitive to Higgs bosons with mass between 130 and 200 GeV/c^2, namely searches targeted at Higgs boson decays to W+W-, although acceptance for decays into tau+tau- and gamma gamma is included. Compared to the previous Tevatron Higgs search combination, more data have been added and the analyses have been improved to gain sensitivity. We use the MSTW08 parton distribution functions and the latest gg to H theoretical cross section predictions when testing for the presence of a SM Higgs boson. With up to 7.1 fb-1 of data analyzed at CDF, and up to 8.2 fb-1 at D0, the 95% C.L. upper limits on Higgs boson production is a factor of 0.54 times the SM cross section for a Higgs boson mass of 165 GeV/c^2. We exclude at the 95% C.L. the region 158

  9. System for detecting and limiting electrical ground faults within electrical devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gaubatz, Donald C. (Cupertino, CA)

    1990-01-01

    An electrical ground fault detection and limitation system for employment with a nuclear reactor utilizing a liquid metal coolant. Elongate electromagnetic pumps submerged within the liquid metal coolant and electrical support equipment experiencing an insulation breakdown occasion the development of electrical ground fault current. Without some form of detection and control, these currents may build to damaging power levels to expose the pump drive components to liquid metal coolant such as sodium with resultant undesirable secondary effects. Such electrical ground fault currents are detected and controlled through the employment of an isolated power input to the pumps and with the use of a ground fault control conductor providing a direct return path from the affected components to the power source. By incorporating a resistance arrangement with the ground fault control conductor, the amount of fault current permitted to flow may be regulated to the extent that the reactor may remain in operation until maintenance may be performed, notwithstanding the existence of the fault. Monitors such as synchronous demodulators may be employed to identify and evaluate fault currents for each phase of a polyphase power, and control input to the submerged pump and associated support equipment.

  10. Detection limits for actinides in a monochromatic, wavelength-dispersive x-ray fluorescence instrument

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, Michael L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Havrilla, George J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Recent developments in x-ray optics have made it possible to examine the L x-rays of actinides using doubly-curved crystals in a bench-top device. A doubly-curved crystal (DCC) acts as a focusing monochromatic filter for polychromatic x-rays. A Monochromatic, Wavelength-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (MWDXRF) instrument that uses DCCs to measure Cm and Pu in reprocessing plant liquors was proposed in 2007 by the authors at Los Alamos National Laboratory. A prototype design of this MWDXRF instrument was developed in collaboration with X-ray Optical Systems Inc. (XOS), of East Greenbush, New York. In the MWDXRF instrument, x-rays from a Rhodium-anode x-ray tube are passed through a primary DCC to produce a monochromatic beam of 20.2-keV photons. This beam is focused on a specimen that may contain actinides. The 20.2-keV interrogating beam is just above the L3 edge of Californium; each actinide (with Z = 90 to 98) present in the specimen emits characteristic L x-rays as the result of L3-shell vacancies. In the LANL-XOS prototype MWDXRf, these x-rays enter a secondary DCC optic that preferentially passes 14.961-keV photons, corresponding to the L-alpha-1 x-ray peak of Curium. In the present stage of experimentation, Curium-bearing specimens have not been analyzed with the prototype MWDXRF instrument. Surrogate materials for Curium include Rubidium, which has a K-beta-l x-ray at 14.961 keV, and Yttrium, which has a K-alpha-1 x-ray at 14.958 keV. In this paper, the lower limit of detection for Curium in the LANL-XOS prototype MWDXRF instrument is estimated. The basis for this estimate is described, including a description of computational models and benchmarking techniques used. Detection limits for other actinides are considered, as well as future safeguards applications for MWDXRF instrumentation.

  11. Portable TXRF Spectrometer with 10{sup -11}g Detection Limit and Portable XRF Spectromicroscope with Sub-mm Spatial Resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kunimura, Shinsuke; Hatakeyama, So; Sasaki, Nobuharu; Yamamoto, Takashi; Kawai, Jun

    2010-04-06

    A portable total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometer that we have developed is applied to trace elemental analysis of water solutions. Although a 5 W X-ray tube is used in the portable TXRF spectrometer, detection limits of several ppb are achieved for 3d transition metal elements and trace elements in a leaching solution of soils, a leaching solution of solder, and alcoholic beverages are detected. Portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectromicroscopes with a 1 W X-ray tube and an 8 W X-ray tube are also presented. Using the portable XRF spectromicroscope with the 1 W X-ray tube, 93 ppm of Cr is detected with an about 700 {mu}m spatial resolution. Spatially resolved elemental analysis of a mug painted with blue, red, green, and white is performed using the two portable spectromicroscopes, and the difference in elemental composition at each paint is detected.

  12. SQUID-Detected MRI in the Limit of Zero Static Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelso, Nathan

    2009-01-01

    for MRI in zero static field. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .acquired in the zero-static-field limit . . . . . 6.3.2versus power dissipated in a static field . . . . . . 7.4

  13. Carbon nanotube synthesis and detection : limiting the environmental impact of novel technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plata, Desirée L

    2009-01-01

    Driven by commercial promise, the carbon nanotube (CNT) industry is growing rapidly, yet little is known about the potential environmental impacts of these novel materials. In particular, there are no methods to detect ...

  14. Combined CDF and Dzero Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production at High Mass (155-200 GeV/c2) with 3 fb-1 of data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tevatron New Phenomena; Higgs working group; CDF Collaboration; D0 Collaboration

    2008-08-05

    We combine results from CDF and DO searches for a standard model Higgs boson in ppbar collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron, at sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV. With 3.0 fb-1 of data analyzed at CDF, and at DO, the 95% C.L. upper limits on Higgs boson production are a factor of 1.2, 1.0 and 1.3 higher than the SM cross section for a Higgs boson mass of m_{H}=$165, 170 and 175 GeV, respectively. We exclude at 95% C.L. a standard model Higgs boson of m_H=170 GeV. Based on simulation, the ratios of the corresponding median expected upper limit to the Standard Model cross section are 1.2, 1.4 and 1.7. Compared to the previous Higgs Tevatron combination, more data and refined analysis techniques have been used. These results extend significantly the individual limits of each experiment and provide new knowledge on the mass of the standard model Higgs boson beyond the LEP direct searches.

  15. Maximum patch method for directional dark matter detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, Shawn; Monroe, Jocelyn; Fisher, Peter [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Laboratory for Nuclear Science, MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Present and planned dark matter detection experiments search for WIMP-induced nuclear recoils in poorly known background conditions. In this environment, the maximum gap statistical method provides a way of setting more sensitive cross section upper limits by incorporating known signal information. We give a recipe for the numerical calculation of upper limits for planned directional dark matter detection experiments, that will measure both recoil energy and angle, based on the gaps between events in two-dimensional phase space.

  16. SQUID-Detected MRI in the Limit of Zero Static Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelso, Nathan Dean

    2010-01-01

    image acquired in the zero-static-?eld limit . . . . . 6.3.2Protocol for MRI in zero static ?power dissipated in a static ?eld . . . . . . 7.4 Comparison

  17. Limitations for detecting small-scale faults using the coherency analysis of seismic data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnett, David Benjamin

    2006-08-16

    be distinguished from noise. Results from application of the coherency analysis were applied to the characterization of a very deep fault and fracture system imaged by a field seismic data set. A series of reverse and strike-slip faults were detected and mapped...

  18. Far-IR Detection Limits I: Sky Confusion Due to Galactic Cirrus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woong-Seob Jeong; Hyung Mok Lee; Soojong Pak; Takao Nakagawa; Suk Minn Kwon; Chris P. Pearson; Glenn J. White

    2004-11-16

    Fluctuations in the brightness of the background radiation can lead to confusion with real point sources. Such background emission confusion will be important for infrared observations with relatively large beam sizes since the amount of fluctuation tends to increase with angular scale. In order to quantitively assess the effect of the background emission on the detection of point sources for current and future far-infrared observations by space-borne missions such as Spitzer, ASTRO-F, Herschel and SPICA, we have extended the Galactic emission map to higher angular resolution than the currently available data. Using this high resolution map, we estimate the sky confusion noise due to the emission from interstellar dust clouds or cirrus, based on fluctuation analysis and detailed photometry over realistically simulated images. We find that the confusion noise derived by simple fluctuation analysis agrees well with the result from realistic simulations. Although the sky confusion noise becomes dominant in long wavelength bands (> 100 um) with 60 - 90cm aperture missions, it is expected to be two order of magnitude smaller for the next generation space missions with larger aperture sizes such as Herschel and SPICA.

  19. ASTROMETRY AND RADIAL VELOCITIES OF THE PLANET HOST M DWARF GJ 317: NEW TRIGONOMETRIC DISTANCE, METALLICITY, AND UPPER LIMIT TO THE MASS OF GJ 317b

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anglada-Escude, Guillem; Boss, Alan P.; Weinberger, Alycia J.; Butler, R. Paul; Thompson, Ian B.; Vogt, Steven S.; Rivera, Eugenio J.

    2012-02-10

    We have obtained precision astrometry of the planet host M dwarf GJ 317 in the framework of the Carnegie Astrometric Planet Search project. The new astrometric measurements give a distance determination of 15.3 pc, 65% further than previous estimates. The resulting absolute magnitudes suggest that it is metal-rich and more massive than previously assumed. This result strengthens the correlation between high metallicity and the presence of gas giants around low-mass stars. At 15.3 pc, the minimal astrometric amplitude for planet candidate GJ 317b is 0.3 mas (edge-on orbit), just below our astrometric sensitivity. However, given the relatively large number of observations and good astrometric precision, a Bayesian Monte Carlo Markov Chain analysis indicates that the mass of planet b has to be smaller than twice the minimum mass with a 99% confidence level, with a most likely value of 2.5 M{sub Jup}. Additional radial velocity (RV) measurements obtained with Keck by the Lick-Carnegie Planet search program confirm the presence of an additional very long period planet candidate, with a period of 20 years or more. Even though such an object will imprint a large astrometric wobble on the star, its curvature is yet not evident in the astrometry. Given high metallicity, and the trend indicating that multiple systems are rich in low-mass companions, this system is likely to host additional low-mass planets in its habitable zone that can be readily detected with state-of-the-art optical and near-infrared RV measurements.

  20. Swift detection of all previously undetected blazars in a micro-wave flux-limited sample of WMAP foreground sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Giommi; M. Capalbi; E. Cavazzuti; S. Colafrancesco; A. Cucchiara; A. Falcone; J. Kennea; R. Nesci; M. Perri; G. Tagliaferri; A. Tramacere; G. Tosti; A. J. Blustin; G. Branduardi-Raymont; D. N. Burrows; G. Chincarini; A. J. Dean; N. Gehrels; H. Krimm; F. Marshall; A. M. Parsons; B. Zhang

    2007-03-07

    Almost the totality of the bright foreground sources in the WMAP CMB maps are blazars, a class of sources that show usually also X-ray emission. However, 23 objects in a flux-limited sample of 140 blazars of the WMAP catalog (first year) were never reported before as X-ray sources. We present here the results of 41 Swift observations which led to the detection of all these 23 blazars in the 0.3-10 keV band. We conclude that all micro-wave selected blazars are X-ray emitters and that the distribution of the micro-wave to X-ray spectral slope $\\alpha_{mu x}$ of LBL blazars is very narrow, confirming that the X-ray flux of most blazars is a very good estimator of their micro-wave emission. The X-ray spectral shape of all the objects that were observed long enough to allow spectral analysis is flat and consistent with inverse Compton emission within the commonly accepted view where the radiation from blazars is emitted in a Sychrotron-Inverse-Compton scenario. We predict that all blazars and most radio galaxies above the sensitivity limit of the WMAP and of the Planck CMB missions are X-ray sources detectable by the present generation of X-ray satellites. An hypothetical all-sky soft X-ray survey with sensitivity of approximately $10^{-15}$ erg/s would be crucial to locate and remove over 100,000 blazars from CMB temperature and polarization maps and therefore accurately clean the primordial CMB signal from the largest population of extragalactic foreground contaminants.

  1. detection

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    of 25 Million Grant to Improve Technological Capabilities for Detecting Nuclear Proliferation http:www.nnsa.energy.govmediaroompressreleasesncstateconsortium

  2. Swift detection of all previously undetected blazars in a micro-wave flux-limited sample of WMAP foreground sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giommi, P; Cavazzuti, E; Colafrancesco, S; Cucchiara, A; Falcone, A; Kennea, J; Nesci, R; Perri, M; Tagliaferri, G; Tramacere, A; Tosti, G; Blustin, A J; Branduardi-Raymont, G; Burrows, D N; Chincarini, G; Dean, A J; Gehrels, N; Krimm, H; Marshall, F; Parsons, A M; Zhang, B

    2007-01-01

    Almost the totality of the bright foreground sources in the WMAP CMB maps are blazars, a class of sources that show usually also X-ray emission. However, 23 objects in a flux-limited sample of 140 blazars of the WMAP catalog (first year) were never reported before as X-ray sources. We present here the results of 41 Swift observations which led to the detection of all these 23 blazars in the 0.3-10 keV band. We conclude that all micro-wave selected blazars are X-ray emitters and that the distribution of the micro-wave to X-ray spectral slope $\\alpha_{mu x}$ of LBL blazars is very narrow, confirming that the X-ray flux of most blazars is a very good estimator of their micro-wave emission. The X-ray spectral shape of all the objects that were observed long enough to allow spectral analysis is flat and consistent with inverse Compton emission within the commonly accepted view where the radiation from blazars is emitted in a Sychrotron-Inverse-Compton scenario. We predict that all blazars and most radio galaxies a...

  3. 17 Koerselman, W. and Meuleman, A.F.M.The vegetation N:Pratio: a new tool to detect the nature of nutrient limitation, J.App!. Ecol.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohn, Joshua R.

    Koerselman, W. (1992)The nature of nutrient limitation in Dutch dune slacks, in Coastal Dunes: GeomorphologyR E VIE WS 17 Koerselman, W. and Meuleman, A.F.M.The vegetation N:Pratio: a new tool to detect.G.M.and De Swart, E.O.A.M. (1994)Nutrientconcentrations in mire vegetation as a measure of nutrient

  4. Sample-morphology effects on x-ray photoelectron peak intensities. II. Estimation of detection limits for thin-film materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, Cedric J.; Werner, Wolfgang S. M.; Smekal, Werner

    2014-09-01

    The authors show that the National Institute of Standards and Technology database for the simulation of electron spectra for surface analysis (SESSA) can be used to determine detection limits for thin-film materials such as a thin film on a substrate or buried at varying depths in another material for common x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurement conditions. Illustrative simulations were made for a W film on or in a Ru matrix and for a Ru film on or in a W matrix. In the former case, the thickness of a W film at a given depth in the Ru matrix was varied so that the intensity of the W 4d{sub 5/2} peak was essentially the same as that for a homogeneous RuW{sub 0.001} alloy. Similarly, the thickness of a Ru film at a selected depth in the W matrix was varied so that the intensity of the Ru 3p{sub 3/2} peak matched that from a homogeneous WRu{sub 0.01} alloy. These film thicknesses correspond to the detection limits of each minor component for measurement conditions where the detection limits for a homogeneous sample varied between 0.1 at.?% (for the RuW{sub 0.001} alloy) and 1 at.?% (for the WRu{sub 0.01} alloy). SESSA can be similarly used to convert estimates of XPS detection limits for a minor species in a homogeneous solid to the corresponding XPS detection limits for that species as a thin film on or buried in the chosen solid.

  5. WIMP Dark Matter Limit-Direct Detection Data and Sensitivity Plots from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search II and the University of California at Santa Barbara

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Expectations for non-baryonic dark matter are founded principally in Big Bang nucleosynthesis calculations, which indicate that the missing mass of the universe is not likely to be baryonic. The supersymmetric standard model (SUSY) offers a promising framework for expectations of particle species which could satisfy the observed properties of dark matter. WIMPs are the most likely SUSY candidate for a dark matter particle. The High Energy Physics Group at University of California, Santa Barbara, is part of the CDMSII Collaboration and have provided the Interactive Plotter for WIMP Dark Matter Limit-Direct Detection Data on their website. They invite other collaborations working on dark matter research to submit datasets and, as a result, have more than 150 data sets now available for use with the plotting tool. The published source of the data is provided with each data set.

  6. Upper bound analysis for drag anchors in soft clay 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Byoung Min

    2007-04-25

    This study presents an upper bound plastic limit analysis for predicting drag anchor trajectory and load capacity. The shank and fluke of the anchor are idealized as simple plates. The failure mechanism involves the motion ...

  7. Tritium Detection Methods and Limitations

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    NY (1994). ION CHAMBER DETECTORS * PORTABLE ION CHAMBERS * AREA (ROOM) ION CHAMBERS * EFFLUENT (STACK) ION CHAMBERS PORTABLE ION CHAMBERS 200 to 400 cc active volume 5 to 10 uCim3...

  8. Tritium Detection Methods and Limitations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation from the 33rd Tritium Focus Group Meeting held in Aiken, South Carolina on April 22-24, 2014.

  9. Recovery Efficiency, False Negative Rate, and Limit of Detection Performance of a Validated Macrofoam-Swab Sampling Method with Low Surface Concentrations of Two Bacillus anthracis Surrogates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Hutchison, Janine R.; Deatherage Kaiser, Brooke L; Amidan, Brett G.; Sydor, Michael A.; Barrett, Christopher A.

    2015-03-31

    The performance of a macrofoam-swab sampling method was evaluated using Bacillus anthracis Sterne (BAS) and Bacillus atrophaeus Nakamura (BG) spores applied at nine low target amounts (2-500 spores) to positive-control plates and test coupons (2 in. × 2 in.) of four surface materials (glass, stainless steel, vinyl tile, and plastic). Test results from cultured samples were used to evaluate the effects of surrogate, surface concentration, and surface material on recovery efficiency (RE), false negative rate (FNR), and limit of detection. For RE, surrogate and surface material had statistically significant effects, but concentration did not. Mean REs were the lowest for vinyl tile (50.8% with BAS, 40.2% with BG) and the highest for glass (92.8% with BAS, 71.4% with BG). FNR values ranged from 0 to 0.833 for BAS and 0 to 0.806 for BG, with values increasing as concentration decreased in the range tested (0.078 to 19.375 CFU/cm2, where CFU denotes ‘colony forming units’). Surface material also had a statistically significant effect. A FNR-concentration curve was fit for each combination of surrogate and surface material. For both surrogates, the FNR curves tended to be the lowest for glass and highest for vinyl title. The FNR curves for BG tended to be higher than for BAS at lower concentrations, especially for glass. Results using a modified Rapid Viability-Polymerase Chain Reaction (mRV-PCR) analysis method were also obtained. The mRV-PCR results and comparisons to the culture results will be discussed in a subsequent report.

  10. Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    septic tanks, sanitary and industrial waste lines, storm drains, incinerators, transformer sites, and areas in which soil has been contaminated. The Upper Los Alamos Canyon...

  11. Limits on iron-dominated fallback disk in SN 1987A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Werner; T. Nagel; T. Rauch

    2007-03-20

    The non-detection of a point source in SN1987A imposes an upper limit for the optical luminosity of L=2L_sun. This limits the size of a possible fallback disk around the stellar remnant. Assuming a steady-state thin disk with blackbody emission requires a disk smaller than 100,000 km if the accretion rate is at 30% of the Eddington rate (Graves et al. 2005). We have performed detailed non-LTE radiation transfer calculations to model the disk spectrum more realistically. It turns out that the observational limit on the disk extension becomes even tighter, namely 70,000 km.

  12. Upper limits of possible photochemical hazes on Pluto

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stansberry, J.A.; Lunine, J.I.; Tomasko, M.G. (Univ. of Arizona, Tucson (USA))

    1989-11-01

    Elliot et al. (1989) invoked a haze layer near the surface of Pluto to explain certain features of a stellar occultation by that planet in June, 1988. The primary requirements for this haze layer were that it achieve unity tangential optical depth at a radius of 1174 km and be essentially transparent above 1189 km. The authors explore here the possibility that aerosols generated through methane photolysis could be responsible for such a haze layer. A comprehensive model of aerosol production, particle growth, sedimentation and condensation is applied to the atmosphere of Pluto using pressures, temperatures and composition derived from the stellar occultation and other data. They test two atmosphere models proposed in the literature, one from Elliot et al. (1989), and one from Hubbard et al. (1989), as well as a range of optical properties for the particles. In order to produce a haze with unity tangential optical depth at 1174 km, they had to use an aerosol mass production rate equal to twice the total methane dissociation rate due to solar UV expected for Pluto and assume that the particles produced were 10 times more absorbing than those in other hazes in the outer solar system. The possibility of condensation in the atmosphere was considered but did not result in distinctly different haze optical depths. If a photochemical haze on Pluto was responsible for the occultation lightcurve measured by Elliot et al., operation of a photochemical system different from those on Titan, Uranus or Neptune is indicated.

  13. UPPER SACRAMENTO RIVER SPORT FISHERY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UPPER SACRAMENTO RIVER SPORT FISHERY Marine Biological Laborato«y L I B R. A. R "ST OCT 2 31950 significant changes in the environmental conditions which affect fisheries in Sacramento River have resulted number of sportsmen who are turning to the Upper Sacramento River is indicative of the magnitude

  14. Limiting efficiencies of solar energy conversion and photo-detection via internal emission of hot electrons and hot holes in gold

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boriskina, Svetlana V; Hsu, Wei-Chun; Liao, Bolin; Chen, Gang

    2015-01-01

    We evaluate the limiting efficiency of full and partial solar spectrum harvesting via the process of internal photoemission in Au-semiconductor Schottky junctions. Our results based on the ab initio calculations of the electron density of states (e-DOS) reveal that the limiting efficiency of the full-spectrum Au converter based on hot electron injection is below 4%. This value is even lower than previously established limit based on the parabolic approximation of the Au electron energy bands. However, we predict limiting efficiency exceeding 10% for the hot holes collection through the Schottky junction between Au and p-type semiconductor. Furthermore, we demonstrate that such converters have more potential if used as a part of the hybrid system for harvesting high- and low-energy photons of the solar spectrum.

  15. Influence Of Upper Air Conditions On The Patagonia Icefields L. A. Rasmussen, H. Conway, C. F. Raymond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rasmussen, L.A.

    Influence Of Upper Air Conditions On The Patagonia Icefields L. A. Rasmussen, H. Conway, C. F, Second Fig ABSTRACT. Upper-air conditions archived in the NCEP-NCAR Reanalysis have been used cannot be determined, so the investigation is limited to examining relative changes in those upper air

  16. A geometric approach for the upper bound theorem for Minkowski sums of convex polytopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karavelas, Menelaos

    the tightness of the upper bounds. 1998 ACM Subject Classification F.2.2 Nonnumerical Algorithms and Problems sum, upper bound Digital Object Identifier 10.4230/LIPIcs.xxx.yyy.p 1 Introduction Given two sets algebra, collision detection, computer-aided design, graphics, robot motion planning and game theory, just

  17. Ground state energy of the low density Hubbard model. An upper bound.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roma "La Sapienza", Università di

    Ground state energy of the low density Hubbard model. An upper bound. Alessandro Giuliani an upper bound on the ground state energy of the three-dimensional (3D) repulsive Hubbard model on the cubic lattice agreeing in the low density limit with the known asymptotic expression of the ground state

  18. New Limits on the Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Neutrino Flux from the ANITA Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorham, P.W.; Allison, P.; Barwick, S.W.; Beatty, J.J.; Besson, D.Z.; Binns, W.R.; Chen, C.; Chen, P.; Clem, J.M.; Connolly, A.; Dowkontt, P.F.; DuVernois, M.A.; Field, R.C.; Goldstein, D.; Goodhue, A.; Hast, C.; Hebert, C.L.; Hoover, S.; Israel, M.H.; Kowalski, J.; Learned, J.G.; /Hawaii U. /Caltech, JPL /Hawaii U. /Minnesota U. /Hawaii U. /Ohio State U. /Hawaii U. /UC, Irvine /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /Caltech, JPL /SLAC /University Coll. London /Ohio State U. /SLAC /Hawaii U. /UCLA /Delaware U. /Hawaii U. /SLAC /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U.

    2011-12-01

    We report initial results of the first flight of the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA-1) 2006-2007 Long Duration Balloon flight, which searched for evidence of a diffuse flux of cosmic neutrinos above energies of E{sub v} = 3 x 10{sup 18} eV. ANITA-1 flew for 35 days looking for radio impulses due to the Askaryan effect in neutrino-induced electromagnetic showers within the Antarctic ice sheets. We report here on our initial analysis, which was performed as a blind search of the data. No neutrino candidates are seen, with no detected physics background. We set model-independent limits based on this result. Upper limits derived from our analysis rule out the highest cosmogenic neutrino models. In a background horizontal-polarization channel, we also detect six events consistent with radio impulses from ultrahigh energy extensive air showers.

  19. LARGE ABUNDANCES OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN TITAN'S UPPER ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez-Puertas, M.; Funke, B.; Garcia-Comas, M.; Dinelli, B. M.; Adriani, A.; D'Aversa, E.; Moriconi, M. L.; Boersma, C.; Allamandola, L. J.

    2013-06-20

    In this paper, we analyze the strong unidentified emission near 3.28 {mu}m in Titan's upper daytime atmosphere recently discovered by Dinelli et al. We have studied it by using the NASA Ames PAH IR Spectroscopic Database. The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), after absorbing UV solar radiation, are able to emit strongly near 3.3 {mu}m. By using current models for the redistribution of the absorbed UV energy, we have explained the observed spectral feature and have derived the vertical distribution of PAH abundances in Titan's upper atmosphere. PAHs have been found to be present in large concentrations, about (2-3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} particles cm{sup -3}. The identified PAHs have 9-96 carbons, with a concentration-weighted average of 34 carbons. The mean mass is {approx}430 u; the mean area is about 0.53 nm{sup 2}; they are formed by 10-11 rings on average, and about one-third of them contain nitrogen atoms. Recently, benzene together with light aromatic species as well as small concentrations of heavy positive and negative ions have been detected in Titan's upper atmosphere. We suggest that the large concentrations of PAHs found here are the neutral counterpart of those positive and negative ions, which hence supports the theory that the origin of Titan main haze layer is located in the upper atmosphere.

  20. An Intrusion Detection Game with Limited Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpcan, Tansu

    is with the Deutsche Telekom Laboratories, Technische Universit¨at Berlin, Ernst-Reuter-Platz 7, 10587 Berlin, Germany¸ar is with the Coordinated Science Laboratory, University of Illinois, 1308 West Main Street, Urbana, IL 61801 USA. E

  1. Limits in Predicting and Detecting Benthic Community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jumars, Pete

    impacted by mining-induced resuspension and redeposition, the extent of this effect depending of resolution at the level of effects leading to the appearance or disappearance of individuals, to actual changes in com- munity composition . Physiological changes that are not likely to lead to altered

  2. Self field triggered superconducting fault current limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tekletsadik, Kasegn D. (Rexford, NY)

    2008-02-19

    A superconducting fault current limiter array with a plurality of superconductor elements arranged in a meanding array having an even number of supconductors parallel to each other and arranged in a plane that is parallel to an odd number of the plurality of superconductors, where the odd number of supconductors are parallel to each other and arranged in a plane that is parallel to the even number of the plurality of superconductors, when viewed from a top view. The even number of superconductors are coupled at the upper end to the upper end of the odd number of superconductors. A plurality of lower shunt coils each coupled to the lower end of each of the even number of superconductors and a plurality of upper shunt coils each coupled to the upper end of each of the odd number of superconductors so as to generate a generally orthoganal uniform magnetic field during quenching using only the magenetic field generated by the superconductors.

  3. Upper Klamath Lake Seismic Liberty and Pratt, 2000 1 Upper Klamath Lake Seismic Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Upper Klamath Lake Seismic Liberty and Pratt, 2000 1 Upper Klamath Lake Seismic Results October, 98195 Summary We collected greater than 200 km of seismic reflection data in Upper Klamath Lake independent seismic systems to digitally image subsurface sediment and rock interfaces to help DOGAMI complete

  4. Relativistic Cyclotron Radiation Detection of Tritium Decay Electrons as a New Technique for Measuring the Neutrino Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin Monreal; Joseph A. Formaggio

    2009-04-18

    The shape of the beta decay energy distribution is sensitive to the mass of the electron neutrino. Attempts to measure the endpoint shape of tritium decay have so far seen no distortion from the zero-mass form, thus placing an upper limit of m_nu_beta detect the coherent cyclotron radiation emitted by an energetic electron in a magnetic field. For mildly relativistic electrons, like those in tritium decay, the relativistic shift of the cyclotron frequency allows us to extract the electron energy from the emitted radiation. We present calculations for the energy resolution, noise limits, high-rate measurement capability, and systematic errors expected in such an experiment.

  5. Upper Year Progression YWA 5059% for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinnamon, Gordon J.

    5059% for 2nd time YWA >60% Continue to next year Adjudication comments: Failed year Must Upper Year Progression YWA repeat all courses under 60% (including labs and tutorials) Leave UWO for one year ­ reapply

  6. Limits on optical polarization during the prompt phase of GRB 140430A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kopac, D; Japelj, J; Arnold, D M; Steele, I A; Guidorzi, C; Dichiara, S; Kobayashi, S; Gomboc, A; Harrison, R M; Lamb, G P; Melandri, A; Smith, R J; Virgili, F J; Castro-Tirado, A J; Gorosabel, J; Jarvinen, A; Sanchez-Ramirez, R; Oates, S R; Jelinek, M

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray burst GRB 140430A was detected by the Swift satellite and observed promptly with the imaging polarimeter RINGO3 mounted on the Liverpool Telescope, with observations beginning while the prompt $\\gamma$-ray emission was still ongoing. In this paper, we present densely sampled (10-second temporal resolution) early optical light curves in 3 optical bands and limits to the degree of optical polarization. We compare optical, X-ray and gamma-ray properties and present an analysis of the optical emission during a period of high-energy flaring. The complex optical light curve cannot be explained merely with a combination of forward and reverse shock emission from a standard external shock, implying additional contribution of emission from internal shock dissipation. We estimate an upper limit for time averaged optical polarization during the prompt phase to be as low as P optical flares and early afterglow emission in this GRB are not highly polarized. Alternativ...

  7. The Swift short gamma-ray burst rate density: prospects for detecting binary neutron star mergers by aLIGO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Coward; Eric Howell; Tsvi Piran; Giulia Stratta; Marica Branchesi; Omer Bromberg; Bruce Gendre; Ronald Burman; Dafne Guetta

    2012-06-22

    Presently only 30% of short gamma ray bursts (SGRBs) have accurate redshifts, and this sample is highly biased by the limited sensitivity of {\\it Swift} to detect SGRBs. We account for the dominant biases to calculate a realistic SGRB rate density out to $z = 0.5$ using the {\\it Swift} sample of peak fluxes, redshifts, and those SGRBs with a beaming angle constraint from X-ray/optical observations. Assuming a significant fraction of binary neutron star mergers produce SGRBs, we calculate lower and upper detection rate limits of (1-180) per Yr by an advanced LIGO and Virgo coincidence search. Our detection rate is compatible with extrapolations using Galactic pulsar observations and population synthesis.

  8. Upper Middle Mainstem Columbia River Subbasin Water Quality Parameters Affected by Hydropower Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    hydroelectric projects are run-of-river facilities with very limited capability for storage and flow regulationAppendix E Upper Middle Mainstem Columbia River Subbasin Water Quality Parameters Affected in the Columbia River was identified in the 1960's and 1970's as a potential detriment to salmon. Those concerns

  9. Limits on Enhanced Radio Wave Scattering by Supernova Remnants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura G. Spitler; Steven R. Spangler

    2005-06-28

    We report multifrequency observations with the NRAO Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) of the compact radio sources J0128+6306 and J0547+2721, which are viewed through the supernova remnants G127.1+0.5 and S147, respectively. Observations were made at frequencies of 1.427, 1.667, 2.271, and 4.987 GHz. The lines of sight to these sources pass through the shock wave and upstream and downstream turbulent layers of their respective supernova remnants, and thus might detect cosmic-ray generated turbulence produced during the Fermi acceleration process. For both sources, we detect interstellar scattering, characterized by a component of the angular size which scales as the square of the observing wavelength. The magnitude of the scattering is characterized by an effective scattering angular size theta_S0 at a frequency of 1 GHz of 13.2 +/- 2.6 milliarcseconds (mas) for J0128+6306 and 6.7 +/- 2.2 mas for J0547+2721. These angular sizes are consistent with the ``incidental'' scattering for any line of sight out of the galaxy at similar galactic latitudes and longitudes. There is therefore no evidence for enhanced turbulence at these supernova remnants. We establish upper limits to the supernova remnant-associated scattering measures of 8.1-14.8 m^-20/3-pc for J0128+6306 and 3.0 m^-20/3-pc for J0547+2721.

  10. Upper bounds for Steklov eigenvalues on surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Girouard, Alexandre

    2012-01-01

    We give explicit isoperimetric upper bounds for all Steklov eigenvalues of a compact orientable surface with boundary, in terms of the genus, the length of the boundary, and the number of boundary components. Our estimates generalize a recent result of Fraser-Schoen, as well as the classical inequalites obtained by Hersch-Payne-Schiffer, whose approach is used in the present paper.

  11. LARGE-SCALE DISTRIBUTION OF ARRIVAL DIRECTIONS OF COSMIC RAYS DETECTED ABOVE 10{sup 18} eV AT THE PIERRE AUGER OBSERVATORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu, P.; Andringa, S.; Aglietta, M.; Ahlers, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aramo, C.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Antici'c, T.; Arganda, E.; Collaboration: Pierre Auger Collaboration; and others

    2012-12-15

    A thorough search for large-scale anisotropies in the distribution of arrival directions of cosmic rays detected above 10{sup 18} eV at the Pierre Auger Observatory is presented. This search is performed as a function of both declination and right ascension in several energy ranges above 10{sup 18} eV, and reported in terms of dipolar and quadrupolar coefficients. Within the systematic uncertainties, no significant deviation from isotropy is revealed. Assuming that any cosmic-ray anisotropy is dominated by dipole and quadrupole moments in this energy range, upper limits on their amplitudes are derived. These upper limits allow us to test the origin of cosmic rays above 10{sup 18} eV from stationary Galactic sources densely distributed in the Galactic disk and predominantly emitting light particles in all directions.

  12. Free Energies of Dilute Bose gases: upper bound

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun Yin

    2010-12-19

    We derive a upper bound on the free energy of a Bose gas system at density $\\rho$ and temperature $T$. In combination with the lower bound derived previously by Seiringer \\cite{RS1}, our result proves that in the low density limit, i.e., when $a^3\\rho\\ll 1$, where $a$ denotes the scattering length of the pair-interaction potential, the leading term of $\\Delta f$ the free energy difference per volume between interacting and ideal Bose gases is equal to $4\\pi a (2\\rho^2-[\\rho-\\rhoc]^2_+)$. Here, $\\rhoc(T)$ denotes the critical density for Bose-Einstein condensation (for the ideal gas), and $[\\cdot ]_+$ $=$ $\\max\\{\\cdot, 0\\}$ denotes the positive part.

  13. Seasonal ozone variations in the upper mesosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, R.J. (Univ. of Colorado, Boulder (United States))

    1990-05-20

    The global daytime ozone was measured by the Solar Mesosphere Explorer satellite (SME) for 5 years. The measurements extend through the mesosphere, covering from 50 km to over 90 km. The ozone in the upper mesosphere varies annually by up to a factor of 3. The observed seasonal variations may be summarized in several different ways. From year to year there is a great deal of repeatability of these variations. This repeatability occurs in most of the upper mesosphere outside the tropics. Near 0.01 mbar (80 km) the mid- and high-latitude mixing ratio peaks each year in mid-April. A secondary maximum in the altitude profile of ozone density usually occurs near 85 km. Changes in this structure are directly related to the April maximum and other seasonal changes seen at 0.01 mbar. The changing seasonal structure produces a bump at the ozone mixing ratio minimum that is largest just after spring equinox. This perturbation to the mixing ratio profile seems to move upward during the first half of the year. The seasonal changes of ozone were analyzed in terms of annual and semiannual structure. The variations generally have both an annual and semiannual component depending on altitude and latitude. The phases of the variations change quickly with both altitude and latitude. The semiannual component peaks in April, over most of the upper mesosphere.

  14. First detection of VHE gamma-rays from SN 1006 by H.E.S.S

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acero, F; Akhperjanian, A G; Anton, G; de Almeida, U Barres; Bazer-Bachi, A R; Becherini, Y; Behera, B; Beilicke, M; Bernlöhr, K; Bochow, A; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Borrel, V; Brucker, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bühler, R; Bulik, T; Büsching, I; Boutelier, T; Chadwick, P M; Charbonnier, A; Chaves, R C G; Cheesebrough, A; Conrad, J; Chounet, L -M; Clapson, A C; Coignet, G; Dalton, M; Daniel, M K; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Drury, L O'C; Dubois, F; Dubus, G; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Egberts, K; Eger, P; Espigat, P; Fallon, L; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Feinstein, F; Fiasson, A; Förster, A; Fontaine, G; Füßling, M; Gabici, S; Gallant, Y A; Gérard, L; Gerbig, D; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Glück, B; Goret, P; Göring, D; Hauser, D; Hauser, M; Heinz, S; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hinton, J A; Hoffmann, A; Hofmann, W; Hofverberg, P; Holleran, M; Hoppe, S; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; de Jager, O C; Jahn, C; Jung, I; Katarzy'nski, K; Katz, U; Kaufmann, S; Kerschhaggl, M; Khangulyan, D; Khélifi, B; Keogh, D; Klochkov, D; Klu'zniak, W; Kneiske, T; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Kossakowski, R; Lamanna, G; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lenain, J -P; Lohse, T; Marandon, V; Marcowith, A; Masbou, J; Maurin, D; McComb, T J L; Medina, M C; Méhault, J; Moulin, E; Naumann-Godo, M; de Naurois, M; Nedbal, D; Nekrassov, D; Nicholas, B; Niemiec, J; Nolan, S J; Ohm, S; Olive, J-F; Orford, E de Ona Wilhelmi K J; Ostrowski, M; Panter, M; Pedaletti, M Paz Arribas G; Pelletier, G; Petrucci, P -O; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, 12 G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raubenheimer, B C; Raue, M; Rayner, S M; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; Reyes, R de los; Rieger, F; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Ruppel, J; Ryde, F; Sahakian, V; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Schöck, F M; Schönwald, A; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Shalchi, A; Sushch, I; Sikora, M; Skilton, J L; Sol, H; Stawarz, ?; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Superina, G; Szostek, A; Tam, P H; Tavernet, J -P; Terrier, R; Tibolla, O; Tluczykont, M; van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Venter, L; Vialle, J P; Vincent, P; Vink, J; Vivier, M; Völk, H J; Volpe, F; Vorobiov, S; Wagner, S J; Ward, M; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A

    2010-01-01

    Recent theoretical predictions of the lowest very high energy (VHE) luminosity of SN 1006 are only a factor 5 below the previously published H.E.S.S. upper limit, thus motivating further in-depth observations of this source. Deep observations at VHE energies (above 100 GeV) were carried out with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) of Cherenkov Telescopes from 2003 to 2008. More than 100 hours of data have been collected and subjected to an improved analysis procedure. Observations resulted in the detection of VHE gamma-rays from SN 1006. The measured gamma-ray spectrum is compatible with a power-law, the flux is of the order of 1% of that detected from the Crab Nebula, and is thus consistent with the previously established H.E.S.S. upper limit. The source exhibits a bipolar morphology, which is strongly correlated with non-thermal X-rays. Because the thickness of the VHE-shell is compatible with emission from a thin rim, particle acceleration in shock waves is likely to be the origin of the gamma-r...

  15. Use of instrumented Charpy tests to determine onset of upper-shelf energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canonico, D.A.; Stelzman, W.J., Berggren, R.G.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1981-05-01

    Identifying the onset of C/sub v/ upper-shelf toughness is of paramount importance to the continued integrity of a pressure vessel. Most in-service surveillance programs require that the C/sub v/ upper-shelf toughness be determined. This is particularly true for the surveillance programs for nuclear pressure vessels. In the nuclear systems the change in C/sub v/ upper-shelf energy due to irradiation must frequently be determined with a limited number of surveillance specimens. Currently, fracture appearance is the criterion used to assure that the tests are being conducted in the C/sub v/ upper-shelf temperature range. This procedure is satisfactory when a number of specimens are available and accessible for interpretation. This is not always the case; irradiated specimens must be remotely tested and interpreted. Examining a specimen remotely may result in an erroneous interpretation of the fracture surface. To avoid this possibility we have developed a procedure, using an instrumented Charpy impact tester, that by linear extrapolation can identify the onset of the C/sub v/ upper-shelf toughness regime with as few as two specimens. This paper discusses the development of the procedure and its application.

  16. Heat up and potential failure of BWR upper internals during a severe accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robb, Kevin R

    2015-01-01

    In boiling water reactors, the steam dome, steam separators, and dryers above the core are comprised of approximately 100 tons of stainless steel. During a severe accident in which the coolant boils away and exothermic oxidation of zirconium occurs, gases (steam and hydrogen) are superheated in the core region and pass through the upper internals. Historically, the upper internals have been modeled using severe accident codes with relatively simple approximations. The upper internals are typically modeled in MELCOR as two lumped volumes with simplified heat transfer characteristics, with no structural integrity considerations, and with limited ability to oxidize, melt, and relocate. The potential for and the subsequent impact of the upper internals to heat up, oxidize, fail, and relocate during a severe accident was investigated. A higher fidelity representation of the shroud dome, steam separators, and steam driers was developed in MELCOR v1.8.6 by extending the core region upwards. This modeling effort entailed adding 45 additional core cells and control volumes, 98 flow paths, and numerous control functions. The model accounts for the mechanical loading and structural integrity, oxidation, melting, flow area blockage, and relocation of the various components. The results indicate that the upper internals can reach high temperatures during a severe accident; they are predicted to reach a high enough temperature such that they lose their structural integrity and relocate. The additional 100 tons of stainless steel debris influences the subsequent in-vessel and ex-vessel accident progression.

  17. Upper internals arrangement for a pressurized water reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singleton, Norman R; Altman, David A; Yu, Ching; Rex, James A; Forsyth, David R

    2013-07-09

    In a pressurized water reactor with all of the in-core instrumentation gaining access to the core through the reactor head, each fuel assembly in which the instrumentation is introduced is aligned with an upper internals instrumentation guide-way. In the elevations above the upper internals upper support assembly, the instrumentation is protected and aligned by upper mounted instrumentation columns that are part of the instrumentation guide-way and extend from the upper support assembly towards the reactor head in hue with a corresponding head penetration. The upper mounted instrumentation columns are supported laterally at one end by an upper guide tube and at the other end by the upper support plate.

  18. Sandia Energy - Upper Rio Grande Simulation Model (URGSiM)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Upper Rio Grande Simulation Model (URGSiM) Home Climate & Earth Systems WaterEnergy Nexus Decision Models for Integrating EnergyWater Systems Modeling Upper Rio Grande Simulation...

  19. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Acupuncture for Upper-Extremity Rehabilitation in Chronic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaechter, Judith D.

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Acupuncture for Upper-Extremity Rehabilitation in Chronic Stroke: A Randomized. Acupuncture for upper- extremity rehabilitation in chronic stroke: a randomized sham- controlled study. Arch acci- dent; Hemiparesis; Muscle spasticity; Range of motion, artic- ular; Rehabilitation. © 2005

  20. Limit on an Isotropic Diffuse Gamma-Ray Population with HAWC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,

    2015-01-01

    Data from 105 days from the High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory (HAWC) have been used to place a new limit on an isotropic diffuse gamma-ray population above 10 TeV. High- energy isotropic diffuse gamma-ray emission is produced by unresolved extragalactic objects such as active galactic nuclei, with potential contributions from interactions of high-energy cosmic rays with the inter-Galactic medium, or dark matter annihilation. Isotropic diffuse gamma-ray emission has been observed up to nearly 1 TeV. Above this energy, only upper limits have been reported. Observations or limits of the isotropic photon population above these energies are very sensitive to local astrophysical particle production. Of particular note, we expect a photon population to accompany the TeV-PeV astrophysical neutrino detection seen in the IceCube instrument. Observations or limits of a photon population above this energy can point to the origin of these neutrinos, indicating whether they are within the gamma-ray horizon or not. ...

  1. New Computational Upper Bounds for Ramsey Numbers R(3, k)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radziszowski, Stanislaw P.

    New Computational Upper Bounds for Ramsey Numbers R(3, k) Jan Goedgebeur Department of Applied computational techniques we derive six new upper bounds on the classical two- color Ramsey numbers: R(3, 10) 42) 42. Keywords: Ramsey number; upper bound; computation the electronic journal of combinatorics XX

  2. SALMON RUNS -UPPER COLUMBIA RIVER, 1956-57

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    364; SALMON RUNS - UPPER COLUMBIA RIVER, 1956-57 Marine Biological Laboratory WOODS HOLE, MAt L. McKernan, Director SALMON RUNS - UPPER COLUMBIA RIVER. 1956-57 by R. R. French and R. J. Wahle Dams. IV #12;SALMON RUNS - UPPER COLUMBIA RIVER, 1956-57 by R. R. French and R. J. Wahle ABSTRACT

  3. Upper limit map of a background of gravitational waves B. Abbott,14

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanner, David B.

    . Belczynski,24 J. Betzwieser,17 P. T. Beyersdorf,27 B. Bhawal,14 I. A. Bilenko,21 G. Billingsley,14 R. Biswas. Kozak,14 B. Krishnan,1 P. Kwee,36 P. K. Lam,4 M. Landry,15 B. Lantz,30 A. Lazzarini,14 B. Lee,50 M. Lei

  4. Upper limits on gravitational wave emission from 78 radio pulsars B. Abbott,15

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanner, David B.

    . Billingsley,15 R. Biswas,52 E. Black,15 K. Blackburn,15 L. Blackburn,18 D. Blair,51 B. Bland,16 J. Bogenstahl. Lazzarini,15 B. Lee,51 M. Lei,15 J. Leiner,54 V. Leonhardt,24 I. Leonor,44 K. Libbrecht,15 P. Lindquist,15 N

  5. Higgs Mass Constraints on a Fourth Family: Upper and Lower Limits on CKM Mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chanowitz, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    the e?ect of adding low energy data to the EWWG data set.in table 3. The low energy data has little e?ect except forcontours include the low energy data. The vertical dotted

  6. Upper limits to the masses of objects in the solar comet cloud

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hills, J.G.

    1985-01-01

    The lack of a large steady stream of long-period comets with semi-major axes less than 2 x 10/sup 4/ AU rules out the sun having a companion more massive than about 0.01 M/sub solar/ with a semi-major axis less than about 1 x 10/sup 4/ AU. Any companion with a semi-major axis between 1 x 10/sup 4/ AU and 5 x 10/sup 4/ AU has more than a 50% probability of having entered the planetary system during the lifetime of the Solar System. The lack of apparent damage to the planetary system rules out any companion more massive than about 0.02 M/sub solar/ with a semi-major axis less than about 5 x 10/sup 4/ AU.

  7. Upper Limit on the Cosmological Gamma-ray Background (Journal Article) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of rare Kaonfor Direct Measurement of Plutonium inConnect

  8. Upper Limit on the Cosmological Gamma-ray Background (Journal Article) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of rare Kaonfor Direct Measurement of Plutonium inConnectSciTech

  9. Sedimentary parameters of upper Barataria Bay, Louisiana 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegert, Rudolf B

    1961-01-01

    SEDIMENTARY PARAMETERS OF UPPER BARATARIA BAY, LOUISIANA A Thesis Rudolf Bernhardt Siegert Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural snd Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the reGulremente for the d. agree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1961 Ma)or Sub)ect GeologP SEDYIKNTARY PARAI'ZTEHS OF DT'PBR BARATARIA BAY, LOUISIANA A Thesis By Rudolf Bernhardt Siegert Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of C 'tice Bea of Department or Student Advisor...

  10. Upper Scioto Valley School | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThin FilmUnited States: EnergyUpper Cumberland E M C Jump

  11. Articulated limiter blade for a tokamak fusion reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doll, D.W.

    1982-10-21

    A limiter blade for a large tokomak fusion reactor includes three articulated blade sections for enabling the limiter blade to be adjusted for plasmas of different sizes. Each blade section is formed of a rigid backing plate carrying graphite tiles coated with titanium carbide, and the limiter blade forms a generally elliptic contour in both the poloidal and toroidal directions to uniformly distribute the heat flow to the blade. The limiter blade includes a central blade section movable along the major radius of the vacuum vessel, and upper and lower pivotal blade sections which may be pivoted by linear actuators having rollers held to the back surface of the pivotal blade sections.

  12. Articulated limiter blade for a tokamak fusion reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doll, David W. (San Diego, CA)

    1985-01-01

    A limiter blade for a large tokomak fusion reactor includes three articulated blade sections for enabling the limiter blade to be adjusted for plasmas of different sizes. Each blade section is formed of a rigid backing plate carrying graphite tiles coated with titanium carbide, and the limiter blade forms a generally elliptic contour in both the poloidal and toroidal directions to uniformly distribute the heat flow to the blade. The limiter blade includes a central blade section movable along the major radius of the vacuum vessel, and upper and lower pivotal blade sections which may be pivoted by linear actuators having rollers held to the back surface of the pivotal blade sections.

  13. An Upper Bound on Neutron Star Masses from Models of Short Gamma-ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Scott; Bedaque, Paulo F; Miller, M Coleman

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of two neutron stars with gravitational masses $\\approx 2~M_\\odot$ has placed a strong lower limit on the maximum mass of a slowly rotating neutron star, and with it a strong constraint on the properties of cold matter beyond nuclear density. Current upper mass limits are much looser. Here we note that, if most short gamma-ray bursts are produced by the coalescence of two neutron stars, and if the merger remnant collapses quickly, then the upper mass limit is constrained tightly. We find that if the rotation of the merger remnant is limited only by mass-shedding (which seems plausible based on current numerical studies), then the maximum gravitational mass of a slowly rotating neutron star is between $\\approx 2~M_\\odot$ and $\\approx 2.2~M_\\odot$ if the masses of neutron stars that coalesce to produce gamma-ray bursts are in the range seen in Galactic double neutron star systems. These limits are increased by $\\sim 4$% if the rotation is slowed by $\\sim 30$%, and by $\\sim 15$% if the merger remna...

  14. DETECTION OF POTENTIAL TRANSIT SIGNALS IN THE FIRST 12 QUARTERS OF KEPLER MISSION DATA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tenenbaum, Peter; Jenkins, Jon M.; Seader, Shawn; Burke, Christopher J.; Christiansen, Jessie L.; Rowe, Jason F.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Clarke, Bruce D.; Li, Jie; Quintana, Elisa V.; Smith, Jeffrey C.; Thompson, Susan E.; Twicken, Joseph D.; Girouard, Forrest R. [Orbital Sciences Corporation and others

    2013-05-01

    We present the results of a search for potential transit signals in the first three years of photometry data acquired by the Kepler mission. The targets of the search include 112,321 targets that were observed over the full interval and an additional 79,992 targets that were observed for a subset of the full interval. From this set of targets we find a total of 11,087 targets that contain at least one signal that meets the Kepler detection criteria: periodicity of the signal, an acceptable signal-to-noise ratio, and three tests that reject false positives. Each target containing at least one detected signal is then searched repeatedly for additional signals, which represent multi-planet systems of transiting planets. When targets with multiple detections are considered, a total of 18,406 potential transiting planet signals are found in the Kepler mission data set. The detected signals are dominated by events with relatively low signal-to-noise ratios and by events with relatively short periods. The distribution of estimated transit depths appears to peak in the range between 20 and 30 parts per million, with a few detections down to fewer than 10 parts per million. The detections exhibit signal-to-noise ratios from 7.1{sigma}, which is the lower cutoff for detections, to over 10,000{sigma}, and periods ranging from 0.5 days, which is the shortest period searched, to 525 days, which is the upper limit of achievable periods given the length of the data set and the requirement that all detections include at least three transits. The detected signals are compared to a set of known transit events in the Kepler field of view, many of which were identified by alternative methods; the comparison shows that the current search recovery rate for targets with known transit events is 98.3%.

  15. LIMITS ON PROMPT, DISPERSED RADIO PULSES FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannister, K. W.; Murphy, T.; Gaensler, B. M. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy (SIfA), School of Physics A29, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Reynolds, J. E., E-mail: keith.bannister@csiro.au [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)

    2012-09-20

    We have searched for prompt radio emission from nine gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with a 12 m telescope at 1.4 GHz, with a time resolution of 64 {mu}s to 1 s. We detected single dispersed radio pulses with significances >6{sigma} in the few minutes following two GRBs. The dispersion measures of both pulses are well in excess of the expected Galactic values, and the implied rate is incompatible with known sources of single dispersed pulses. The arrival times of both pulses also coincide with breaks in the GRB X-ray light curves. A null trial and statistical arguments rule out random fluctuations as the origin of these pulses with >95% and {approx}97% confidence, respectively, although a simple population argument supports a GRB origin with confidence of only 2%. We caution that we cannot rule out radio frequency interference (RFI) as the origin of these pulses. If the single pulses are not related to the GRBs, we set an upper limit on the flux density of radio pulses emitted between 200 and 1800 s after a GRB of 1.27w {sup -1/2} Jy, where 6.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} s < w < 32 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} s is the pulse width. We set a limit of less than 760 Jy for long timescale (>1 s) variations. These limits are some of the most constraining at high time resolution and GHz frequencies in the early stages of the GRB phenomenon.

  16. detonation detection

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Satellite Carrying NNSA-provided Nuclear Detonation Detection Sensors http:www.nnsa.energy.govmediaroompressreleasesafsatellite

  17. Low temperature upper critical eld studies in organic superconductor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuo, Fulin

    Low temperature upper critical eld studies in organic superconductor 00 -BEDT-TTF2SF5CH2CF2SO3 F 00-BEDT-TTF2SF5CH2CF2SO3: For eld parallel to the superconducting layers, the upper critical eldCH2CF2SO3 at low temperatures and eld up to 18 Tesla. For eld parallel to the planes, the upper

  18. Upper critical fields in liquid-quenched metastable superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, K.M.; Cotts, E.J.; Poon, S.J.

    1984-08-01

    A systematic and quantitative study of upper critical fields in alloys with increasing atomic number is carried out. The alloys are prepared by the technique of liquid (splat) quenching. They include the metastable body-centered-cubic (..beta..) phase of Ti-Pd, Zr-Mo, Zr-Pd, and Hf-Mo, amorphous phase of Zr-Rh, and the stable ..beta.. phase of Ti-Mo and Ta-Hf. Measurements are made in magnetic fields up to 90 kG and in temperatures down to 0.5 K. The results are analyzed within the framework of the dirty-limit theory of Werthamer, Helfand, Hohenberg, and Maki (WHHM). A least-squares fitting routine is performed using all the data (weighted equally) for a given sample. It is emphasized that the visual critical-field gradient near the transition temperature cannot be taken as the actual gradient in the presence of Pauli paramagnetic limitation. The main findings are the following: (i) Even without including renormalization corrections due to electron-phonon and electron-electron interactions, very good fits to the WHHM theory are obtained; (ii) critical-field data for all our samples (with minor exceptions in Hf-Mo)= are found to fall below or on the Maki curve (i.e., when the spin-orbit scattering parameter lambda/sub s.o./ goes to infinity); (iii) values of lambda/sub s.o./ are observed to range from 0.28 to 2.51 for the 3d and 4d alloys; (iv) the spin-orbit scattering rates 1/tau/sub s.o./ are found to compare well with theoretical estimation using results from band-structure calculation. The effect of sample inhomogeneity on the value of lambda/sub s.o./ in Zr-Mo alloys is also illustrated.

  19. Crust and Upper Mantle P Wave Velocity Structure Beneath Valles...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Crust and Upper Mantle P Wave Velocity Structure Beneath Valles Caldera, New Mexico- Results from the Jemez Teleseismic Tomography Experiment Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

  20. An Integrated Geophysical Analysis Of The Upper Crust Of The...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Of The Upper Crust Of The Southern Kenya Rift Abstract Previous interpretations of seismic data collected by the Kenya Rift International Seismic Project (KRISP) experiments...

  1. Seismic anisotropy changes across upper mantle phase transitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, K; Beghein, C

    2013-01-01

    P. , 2000. Upper mantle seismic discontinuities. In: Karato,2005. Global azimuthal seismic anisotropy and the unique2255–2258. Karato, S. , 1998. Seismic anisotropy in the deep

  2. Sharp upper bounds on the number of the scattering poles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    We study the scattering poles of a compactly supported “black box” perturbations of the Laplacian in Rn, n odd. We prove a sharp upper bound of the counting ...

  3. A New Limit on the Flux of Cosmic Antihelium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saeki, T; Orito, S; Ormes, J F; Imori, M; Kimbell, B L; Makida, Y; Matsumoto, H; Matsunaga, H; Mitchell, J; Motoki, M; Nishimura, J; Nozaki, M; Otoba, M; Sanuki, T; Streitmatter, R E; Suzuki, J; Tanaka, K; Ueda, I; Yajima, N; Yamagami, T; Yamamoto, A; Yoshida, T; Yoshimura, K

    1998-01-01

    A very sensitive search for cosmic-ray antihelium was performed using data obtained from three scientific flights of BESS magnetic rigidity spectrometer. We have not observed any antihelium; this places a model-independent upper limit (95 % C.L.) on the antihelium flux of 6*10**(-4) m**(-2)sr**(-1)s**(-1) at the top of the atmosphere in the rigidity region 1 to 16 GV, after correcting for the estimated interaction loss of antihelium in the air and in the instrument. The corresponding upper limit on the Hebar/He flux ratio is 3.1*10**(-6), 30 times more stringent than the limits obtained in similar rigidity regions with magnetic spectrometers previous to BESS.

  4. A New Limit on the Flux of Cosmic Antihelium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Saeki; K. Anraku; S. Orito; J. Ormes; M. Imori; B. Kimbell; Y. Makida; H. Matsumoto; H. Matsunaga; J. Mitchell; M. Motoki; J. Nishimura; M. Nozaki; M. Otoba; T. Sanuki; R. Streitmatter; J. Suzuki; K. Tanaka; I. Ueda; N. Yajima; T. Yamagami; A. Yamamoto; T. Yoshida; K. Yoshimura

    1997-10-21

    A very sensitive search for cosmic-ray antihelium was performed using data obtained from three scientific flights of BESS magnetic rigidity spectrometer. We have not observed any antihelium; this places a model-independent upper limit (95 % C.L.) on the antihelium flux of 6*10**(-4) m**(-2)sr**(-1)s**(-1) at the top of the atmosphere in the rigidity region 1 to 16 GV, after correcting for the estimated interaction loss of antihelium in the air and in the instrument. The corresponding upper limit on the Hebar/He flux ratio is 3.1*10**(-6), 30 times more stringent than the limits obtained in similar rigidity regions with magnetic spectrometers previous to BESS.

  5. Limited Test Ban Treaty

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Satellite Carrying NNSA-provided Nuclear Detonation Detection Sensors http:www.nnsa.energy.govmediaroompressreleasesafsatellite

  6. Incorporation of hydroxyl in upper-mantle clinopyroxenes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smyth, Joseph R.

    Incorporation of hydroxyl in upper-mantle clinopyroxenes J. R.J. R. S m y t hS m y t h *, D. R., D, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA WATER (and hydroxyl, OH) plays hydroxyl-bearing phases found in rocks from the upper mantle, phlogopite and amphibole, are not believed

  7. Detection of Formaldehyde Towards the Extreme Carbon Star IRC+10216

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, K E S; Schilke, P; Melnick, G J; Neufeld, David A.; Schilke, Peter; Melnick, Gary J.

    2004-01-01

    We report the detection of H2CO (formaldehyde) around the carbon-rich AGB star, IRC+10216. We find a fractional abundance with respect to molecular hydrogen of x(H2CO)= (1.3 {+1.5}{-0.8}) x 10^{-8}. This corresponds to a formaldehyde abundance with respect to water vapor of x(H2CO)/x(H2O)=(1.1 +/- 0.2) x 10^{-2}, in line with the formaldehyde abundances found in Solar System comets, and indicates that the putative extrasolar cometary system around IRC+10216 may have a similar chemical composition to Solar System comets. However, we also failed to detect CH3OH (methanol) around IRC+10216 and our upper limit of x(CH3OH)/x(H2O) formaldehyde has an extended source in the envelope of IRC+10216 and may be produced by the photodissociation of a parent molecule, similar to the production mechanism for formaldehyde in Solar System come...

  8. Detection of Formaldehyde Towards the Extreme Carbon Star IRC+10216

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. E. Saavik Ford; David A. Neufeld; Peter Schilke; Gary J. Melnick

    2004-07-07

    We report the detection of H2CO (formaldehyde) around the carbon-rich AGB star, IRC+10216. We find a fractional abundance with respect to molecular hydrogen of x(H2CO)= (1.3 {+1.5}{-0.8}) x 10^{-8}. This corresponds to a formaldehyde abundance with respect to water vapor of x(H2CO)/x(H2O)=(1.1 +/- 0.2) x 10^{-2}, in line with the formaldehyde abundances found in Solar System comets, and indicates that the putative extrasolar cometary system around IRC+10216 may have a similar chemical composition to Solar System comets. However, we also failed to detect CH3OH (methanol) around IRC+10216 and our upper limit of x(CH3OH)/x(H2O) formaldehyde has an extended source in the envelope of IRC+10216 and may be produced by the photodissociation of a parent molecule, similar to the production mechanism for formaldehyde in Solar System comet comae. Preliminary mapping observations also indicate a possible asymmetry in the spatial distribution of formaldehyde around IRC+10216, but higher signal-to-noise observations are required to confirm this finding. This study is based on observations carried out with the IRAM 30m telescope. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany) and IGN (Spain). (abridged)

  9. SEARCH FOR POINT-LIKE SOURCES OF ULTRA-HIGH ENERGY NEUTRINOS AT THE PIERRE AUGER OBSERVATORY AND IMPROVED LIMIT ON THE DIFFUSE FLUX OF TAU NEUTRINOS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu, P.; Andringa, S. [LIP and Instituto Superior Tecnico, Technical University of Lisbon (Portugal); Aglietta, M. [Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario (INAF), Universita di Torino and Sezione INFN, Torino (Italy); Ahlers, M. [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Ahn, E. J. [Fermilab, Batavia, IL (United States); Albuquerque, I. F. M. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Fisica, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Allard, D. [Laboratoire AstroParticule et Cosmologie (APC), Universite Paris 7, CNRS-IN2P3, Paris (France); Allekotte, I. [Centro Atomico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro (CNEA-UNCuyo-CONICET), San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Allen, J. [New York University, New York, NY (United States); Allison, P. [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Almela, A. [Universidad Tecnologica Nacional - Facultad Regional Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Alvarez Castillo, J. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Alvarez-Muniz, J. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Alves Batista, R. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, IFGW, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Ambrosio, M.; Aramo, C. [Universita di Napoli 'Federico II' and Sezione INFN, Napoli (Italy); Aminaei, A. [IMAPP, Radboud University Nijmegen (Netherlands); Anchordoqui, L. [University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Antici'c, T. [Rudjer Boskovi'c Institute, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Collaboration: Pierre Auger Collaboration; and others

    2012-08-10

    The surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory can detect neutrinos with energy E{sub {nu}} between 10{sup 17} eV and 10{sup 20} eV from point-like sources across the sky south of +55 Degree-Sign and north of -65 Degree-Sign declinations. A search has been performed for highly inclined extensive air showers produced by the interaction of neutrinos of all flavors in the atmosphere (downward-going neutrinos), and by the decay of tau leptons originating from tau neutrino interactions in Earth's crust (Earth-skimming neutrinos). No candidate neutrinos have been found in data up to 2010 May 31. This corresponds to an equivalent exposure of {approx}3.5 years of a full surface detector array for the Earth-skimming channel and {approx}2 years for the downward-going channel. An improved upper limit on the diffuse flux of tau neutrinos has been derived. Upper limits on the neutrino flux from point-like sources have been derived as a function of the source declination. Assuming a differential neutrino flux k{sub PS} {center_dot} E {sup -2}{sub {nu}} from a point-like source, 90% confidence level upper limits for k{sub PS} at the level of Almost-Equal-To 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} and 2.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} GeV cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} have been obtained over a broad range of declinations from the searches for Earth-skimming and downward-going neutrinos, respectively.

  10. Lower and upper estimates on the excitation threshold for breathers in discrete nonlinear Schroedinger lattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuevas, J.; Palmero, F.

    2009-11-15

    We propose analytical lower and upper estimates on the excitation threshold for breathers (in the form of spatially localized and time periodic solutions) in discrete nonlinear Schroedinger (DNLS) lattices with power nonlinearity. The estimation, depending explicitly on the lattice parameters, is derived by a combination of a comparison argument on appropriate lower bounds depending on the frequency of each solution with a simple and justified heuristic argument. The numerical studies verify that the analytical estimates can be of particular usefulness, as a simple analytical detection of the activation energy for breathers in DNLS lattices.

  11. A Derivation of the $Z\\to\\infty$ Limit for Atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edouard B. Manoukian; Jarin Osaklung

    2007-06-13

    Upper and lower bounds are derived for the ground-state energy of neutral atoms which for $Z\\to\\infty$ both involve the limits of exact Green's functions with one-body potentials. The limits of both bounds are shown to coincide with the Thomas-Fermi ground-state energy.

  12. Limits on Fast Radio Bursts at 145 MHz with ARTEMIS, a real-time software backend

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karastergiou, A; Armour, W; Williams, C; Mort, B; Dulwich, F; Salvini, S; Magro, A; Roberts, S; Serylak, M; Doo, A; Bilous, A V; Breton, R P; Falcke, H; Griessmeier, J -M; Hessels, J W T; Keane, E F; Kondratiev, V I; Kramer, M; van Leeuwen, J; Noutsos, A; Oslowski, S; Sobey, C; Stappers, B W; Weltevrede, P

    2015-01-01

    Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs), are millisecond radio signals that exhibit dispersion larger than what the Galactic electron density can account for. We have conducted a 1446 hour survey for Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) at 145~MHz, covering a total of 4193 sq. deg on the sky. We used the UK station of the LOFAR radio telescope -- the Rawlings Array -- , accompanied for a majority of the time by the LOFAR station at Nan\\c{c}ay, observing the same fields at the same frequency. Our real-time search backend, ARTEMIS, utilizes graphics processing units to search for pulses with dispersion measures up to 320 cm$^{-3}$ pc. Previous derived FRB rates from surveys around 1.4~GHz, and favoured FRB interpretations, motivated this survey, despite all previous detections occurring at higher dispersion measures. We detected no new FRBs above a signal-to-noise threshold of 10, leading to the most stringent upper limit yet on the FRB event rate at these frequencies: 29 sky$^{-1}$ day$^{-1}$ for 5~ms-duration pulses above 62~Jy. The no...

  13. Fingerprint detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Saunders, George C. (Rt. 1, Box 428B, Espanola, NM 87532)

    1992-01-01

    A method for detection and visualization of latent fingerprints is provided and includes contacting a substrate containing a latent print thereon with a colloidal metal composition for time sufficient to allow reaction of said colloidal metal composition with said latent print, and preserving or recording the observable print. Further, the method for detection and visualization of latent fingerprints can include contacting the metal composition-latent print reaction product with a secondary metal-containing solution for time sufficient to allow precipitation of said secondary metal thereby enhancing the visibility of the latent print, and preserving or recording the observable print.

  14. Detection device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Jay E. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1984-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a detection device comprising: (1) an entrance chamber, (2) a central chamber, and (3) an exit chamber. The central chamber includes an ionizing gas, anode, and means for connecting the anode with an external power supply and pulse counter.

  15. Hydrology and Glaciers in the Upper Indus Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Winston

    Examines the state of the science associated with the snow and ice hydrology in the Upper Indus Basin (IUB), reviewing the literature and data available on the present and projected role of glaciers, snow fields, and stream ...

  16. An equivalent form of Young's inequality with upper bound

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Minguzzi

    2008-08-05

    Young's integral inequality is complemented with an upper bound to the remainder. The new inequality turns out to be equivalent to Young's inequality, and the cases in which the equality holds become particularly transparent in the new formulation.

  17. Improvable upper bounds to the piezoelectric polaron ground state energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Soldatov

    2014-12-31

    It was shown that an infinite sequence of improving non-increasing upper bounds to the ground state energy (GSE) of a slow-moving piezoeletric polaron can be devised.

  18. Upper bounds on minimum distance of nonbinary quantum stabilizer codes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Santosh

    2005-11-01

    The most popular class of quantum error correcting codes is stabilizer codes. Binary quantum stabilizer codes have been well studied, and Calderbank, Rains, Shor and Sloane (July 1998) have constructed a table of upper bounds on the minimum distance...

  19. Floristic study of the Upper Frio River, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swihart, Theresa Irene

    2006-08-16

    Vascular plant collections and field data compiled during a one and a half year period for the upper Frio River, Texas, produced a flora that comprises 78 families, 223 genera and 319 species. Vascular plants were collected ...

  20. Comparison of hydrocarbon production trends in Middle and Upper members of Minnelusa formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reel, C.L.; Horne, J.C.; Kelly, A.O.

    1985-05-01

    The main reservoir rocks in the upper and middle members of the Minnelusa Formation consist of wind blown dunal sands in the area surrounding the Lusk embayment. Changes in the local depositional setting, tectonic framework, and eustatic sea level controlled the distribution and reservior quality of these sandstones. The middle member exhibits two production trends. Age-equivalent Tensleep rocks deposited along the western margin of the embayment produce from sandstones accumulated in a sand sea paleoenvironment. Structure is atnececessary for trapping owing to permeability continuity. Along the eastern margin of the embayment, production comes from isolated accumulations of sandstone deposited as dunes on broad coastal sabkhas. Fields in these sandstones define a linear trend due to the coast-parallel alignment of these dunes. Production from the upper member defines four major trends. Upper member sandstones in the southern part of the basin, similar to Leo reservoirs, produce from sediments deposited as coast-parallel dunes in a northwest-southeast alignment. In the northern portion of the basin, production is from sandstones deposited in broad, flat eolian sand seas. Because of the permeability continuity of these sandstones, structural closure is necessary for trapping hydrocarbons. Upper member production has been influenced by the unconformity developed at the top of the Minnelusa. Movement along the Rosebud arch resulted in a southwest-northeast production trend apparent in each sandstone unit reflecting their northwestward erosional limits. The last, and most apparent, production trend, results from the Opeche Shale infilling of northwest-southeast-oriented stream valleys. Most production to date has been from sandstones following this alignment juxta-posed downdip of these impermeable shales.

  1. EFFECT OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON WATERSHED RUNOFF FLOW - UPPER COOSA RIVER BASIN UPSTREAM FROM PLANT HAMMOND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, K.

    2011-10-24

    The ability of water managers to maintain adequate supplies in the coming decades depends on future weather conditions, as climate change has the potential to reduce stream flows from their current values due to potentially less precipitation and higher temperatures, and possibly rendering them unable to meet demand. The upper Coosa River basin, located in northwest Georgia, plays an important role in supplying water for industry and domestic use in northern Georgia, and has been involved in water disputes in recent times. The seven-day ten-year low flow (7Q10 flow) is the lowest average flow for seven consecutive days that has an average recurrence interval of 10 years. The 7Q10 flow is statistically derived from the observed historical flow data, and represents the low flow (drought) condition for a basin. The upper Coosa River basin also supplies cooling water for the 935MW coal-fired Hammond plant, which draws about 65% of the 7Q10 flow of the upper Coosa River to dissipate waste heat. The water is drawn through once and returned to the river directly from the generator (i.e., no cooling tower is used). Record low flows in 2007 led to use of portable cooling towers to meet temperature limits. Disruption of the Plant Hammond operation may trigger closure of area industrial facilities (e.g. paper mill). The population in Georgia is expected to double from 9 million to 18 million residents in the next 25 years, mostly in the metropolitan Atlanta area. Therefore, there will be an even greater demand for potable water and for waste assimilation. Climate change in the form of persistent droughts (causing low flows) and high ambient temperatures create regulatory compliance challenges for Plant Hammond operating with a once-through cooling system. Therefore, the Upper Coosa River basin was selected to study the effect of potential future weather change on the watershed runoff flow.

  2. Toroidal midplane neutral beam armor and plasma limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kugel, Henry W. (Somerset, NJ); Hand, Jr, Samuel W. (Hopewell Township, Mercer County, NJ); Ksayian, Haig (Titusville, NJ)

    1986-01-01

    For use in a tokamak fusion reactor having a midplane magnetic coil on the inner wall of an evacuated toriodal chamber within which a neutral beam heated, fusing plasma is magnetically confined, a neutral beam armor shield and plasma limiter is provided on the inner wall of the toroidal chamber to shield the midplane coil from neutral beam shine-thru and plasma deposition. The armor shield/plasma limiter forms a semicircular enclosure around the midplane coil with the outer surface of the armor shield/plasma limiter shaped to match, as closely as practical, the inner limiting magnetic flux surface of the toroidally confined, indented, bean-shaped plasma. The armor shield/plasma limiter includes a plurality of semicircular graphite plates each having a pair of coupled upper and lower sections with each plate positioned in intimate contact with an adjacent plate on each side thereof so as to form a closed, planar structure around the entire outer periphery of the circular midplane coil. The upper and lower plate sections are adapted for coupling to heat sensing thermocouples and to a circulating water conduit system for cooling the armor shield/plasma limiter.The inner center portion of each graphite plate is adapted to receive and enclose a section of a circular diagnostic magnetic flux loop so as to minimize the power from the plasma confinement chamber incident upon the flux loop.

  3. Exoplanet Detection Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Debra A; Laughlin, Greg P; Macintosh, Bruce; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Sahlmann, Johannes; Yee, Jennifer C

    2015-01-01

    We are still in the early days of exoplanet discovery. Astronomers are beginning to model the atmospheres and interiors of exoplanets and have developed a deeper understanding of processes of planet formation and evolution. However, we have yet to map out the full complexity of multi-planet architectures or to detect Earth analogues around nearby stars. Reaching these ambitious goals will require further improvements in instrumentation and new analysis tools. In this chapter, we provide an overview of five observational techniques that are currently employed in the detection of exoplanets: optical and IR Doppler measurements, transit photometry, direct imaging, microlensing, and astrometry. We provide a basic description of how each of these techniques works and discuss forefront developments that will result in new discoveries. We also highlight the observational limitations and synergies of each method and their connections to future space missions.

  4. Cell Phone Detection Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratt, Richard M.; Bunch, Kyle J.; Puzycki, David J.; Slaugh, Ryan W.; Good, Morris S.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2007-10-01

    A team composed of Rick Pratt, Dave Puczyki, Kyle Bunch, Ryan Slaugh, Morris Good, and Doug McMakin teamed together to attempt to exploit cellular telephone features and detect if a person was carrying a cellular telephone into a Limited Area. The cell phone’s electromagnetic properties were measured, analyzed, and tested in over 10 different ways to determine if an exploitable signature exists. The method that appears to have the most potential for success without adding an external tag is to measure the RF spectrum, not in the cell phone band, but between 240 and 400MHz. Figures 1- 7 show the detected signal levels from cell phones from three different manufacturers.

  5. Quantum Limits of Thermometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas M. Stace

    2010-06-08

    The precision of typical thermometers consisting of $N$ particles is shot noise limited, improving as $\\sim1/\\sqrt{N}$. For high precision thermometry and thermometric standards this presents an important theoretical noise floor. Here it is demonstrated that thermometry may be mapped onto the problem of phase estimation, and using techniques from optimal phase estimation, it follows that the scaling of the precision of a thermometer may in principle be improved to $\\sim1/N$, representing a Heisenberg limit to thermometry.

  6. Upper Turkey Creek, Merriam, Kansas Feasibility Report Flood Risk Management Project Report Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Upper Turkey Creek, Merriam, Kansas Feasibility Report Flood Risk Management Project Report Summary 1 REPORT SUMMARY UPPER TURKEY CREEK BASIN PROJECT FEASIBILITY REPORT AND INTEGRATED ENVIRONMENTAL Study Authority. The Upper Turkey Creek Basin Project, Flood Risk Management Feasibility Study (the

  7. Factors influencing the road mortality of snakes on the Upper Snake River Plain, Idaho

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jochimsen, Denim M.

    2005-01-01

    loop on the upper Snake River Plain in southeastern Idahoof snakes on the upper Snake River Plain; (2) measure anyedge of the upper Snake River Plain located in southeastern

  8. Beyond Density: Measuring Neighborhood Form in New England's Upper Connecticut River Valley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owens, Peter Marshall

    2005-01-01

    in New England’s Upper Connecticut River Valley by Peterin New England’s Upper Connecticut River Valley by Peterof New England’s Upper Connecticut River Valley encompassing

  9. Detecting cosmic rays of the highest energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Vannucci

    2001-06-06

    Charged cosmic rays have been measured up to macroscopic energies. Concerning neutrinos, the detection is still limited to terrestrial ones (apart from supernova production). A new way to search for extragalactic neutrinos is discussed.

  10. Detection Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent BondingMeeting |Design CompetitionsFuelof 12Detecting

  11. Spectroscopic detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woskov, Paul P. (Bedford, MA); Hadidi, Kamal (Cambridge, MA)

    2003-01-01

    In embodiments, spectroscopic monitor monitors modulated light signals to detect low levels of contaminants and other compounds in the presence of background interference. The monitor uses a spectrometer that includes a transmissive modulator capable of causing different frequency ranges to move onto and off of the detector. The different ranges can include those with the desired signal and those selected to subtract background contributions from those with the desired signal. Embodiments of the system are particularly useful for monitoring metal concentrations in combustion effluent.

  12. Detection of an unidentified emission line in the stacked X-ray spectrum of galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bulbul, Esra; Foster, Adam; Smith, Randall K.; Randall, Scott W.; Markevitch, Maxim; Loewenstein, Michael

    2014-07-01

    We detect a weak unidentified emission line at E = (3.55-3.57) ± 0.03 keV in a stacked XMM-Newton spectrum of 73 galaxy clusters spanning a redshift range 0.01-0.35. When the full sample is divided into three subsamples (Perseus, Centaurus+Ophiuchus+Coma, and all others), the line is seen at >3? statistical significance in all three independent MOS spectra and the PN 'all others' spectrum. It is also detected in the Chandra spectra of the Perseus Cluster. However, it is very weak and located within 50-110 eV of several known lines. The detection is at the limit of the current instrument capabilities. We argue that there should be no atomic transitions in thermal plasma at this energy. An intriguing possibility is the decay of sterile neutrino, a long-sought dark matter particle candidate. Assuming that all dark matter is in sterile neutrinos with m{sub s} = 2E = 7.1 keV, our detection corresponds to a neutrino decay rate consistent with previous upper limits. However, based on the cluster masses and distances, the line in Perseus is much brighter than expected in this model, significantly deviating from other subsamples. This appears to be because of an anomalously bright line at E = 3.62 keV in Perseus, which could be an Ar XVII dielectronic recombination line, although its emissivity would have to be 30 times the expected value and physically difficult to understand. Another alternative is the above anomaly in the Ar line combined with the nearby 3.51 keV K line also exceeding expectation by a factor of 10-20. Confirmation with Astro-H will be critical to determine the nature of this new line.

  13. Optical limiting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McBranch, D.W.; Mattes, B.R.; Koskelo, A.C.; Heeger, A.J.; Robinson, J.M.; Smilowitz, L.B.; Klimov, V.I.; Cha, M.; Sariciftci, N.S.; Hummelen, J.C.

    1998-04-21

    Methanofullerenes, fulleroids and/or other fullerenes chemically altered for enhanced solubility, in liquid solution, and in solid blends with transparent glass (SiO{sub 2}) gels or polymers, or semiconducting (conjugated) polymers, are shown to be useful as optical limiters (optical surge protectors). The nonlinear absorption is tunable such that the energy transmitted through such blends saturates at high input energy per pulse over a wide range of wavelengths from 400--1,100 nm by selecting the host material for its absorption wavelength and ability to transfer the absorbed energy into the optical limiting composition dissolved therein. This phenomenon should be generalizable to other compositions than substituted fullerenes. 5 figs.

  14. Using Pulsars to Detect Massive Black Hole Binaries via Gravitational Radiation: Sagittarius A* and Nearby Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrea N. Lommen; Donald C. Backer

    2001-07-24

    Pulsar timing measurements can be used to detect gravitational radiation from massive black hole binaries. The ~106d quasi-periodic flux variations in Sagittarius A* at radio wavelengths reported by Zhao, Bower, & Goss (2001) may be due to binarity of the massive black hole that is presumed to be responsible for the radio emission. A 106d equal-mass binary black hole is unlikely based on its short inspiral lifetime and other arguments. Nevertheless the reported quasi-periodicity has led us to consider whether the long-wavelength gravitational waves from a conjectured binary might be detected in present or future precision timing of millisecond pulsars. While present timing cannot reach the level expected for an equal-mass binary, we estimate that future efforts could. This inquiry has led us to further consider the detection of binarity in the massive black holes now being found in nearby galaxies. For orbital periods of ~2000d where the pulsar timing measurements are most precise, we place upper limits on the mass ratio of binaries as small as 0.06.

  15. Detection Efficiency of Asteroid Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tricarico, Pasquale

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive characterization of the detection efficiency of nine of the major asteroid surveys which have been active over the past two decades is presented. The detection efficiency is estimated on a nightly basis by comparing the detected asteroids with the complete catalog of known asteroids propagated to the same observing epoch. Results include a nightly estimate of the detection efficiency curves as a function of apparent magnitude and apparent velocity of the asteroids, as well as a cumulative analysis to estimate the overall performance of each survey. The limiting magnitude distribution is estimated for each survey, and it is then modeled as a function of telescope aperture to obtain an estimate over a wide range of apertures.

  16. Airborne lidar detection and characterization of internal waves in a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Joseph A.

    on the strength of the wind. This tends to create a layer of less dense water on top of the more dense water below of water with lower density at the surface. This layer is typically mixed with the water below. The airborne lidar detected a thin plankton layer at the bottom of the upper layer of the water

  17. Heart of Darkness: The Significance of the Zeptobarn Scale for Neutralino Direct Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonathan L. Feng; David Sanford

    2011-05-12

    The direct detection of dark matter through its elastic scattering off nucleons is among the most promising methods for establishing the particle identity of dark matter. The current bound on the spin-independent scattering cross section is sigma^SI 1 TeV, effectively decoupling squarks and sleptons from neutralino dark matter phenomenology. In this case, we find characteristic cross sections in the narrow range 1 zb 70 GeV. As sfermion masses are lowered to near their experimental limit mtilde ~ 400 GeV, the upper and lower limits of this range are extended, but only by factors of around two, and the lower limit is not significantly altered by relaxing many particle physics assumptions, varying the strange quark content of the nucleon, including the effects of galactic small-scale structure, or assuming other components of dark matter. Experiments are therefore rapidly entering the heart of dark matter-favored supersymmetry parameter space. If no signal is seen, supersymmetric models must contain some level of fine-tuning, and we identify and analyze several possibilities. Barring large cancellations, however, in a large and generic class of models, if thermal relic neutralinos are a significant component of dark matter, experiments will discover them as they probe down to the zeptobarn scale.

  18. DETECTION OF THERMAL EMISSION FROM A SUPER-EARTH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demory, Brice-Olivier; Seager, Sara; Benneke, Bjoern; Gillon, Michaeel; Deming, Drake; Jackson, Brian

    2012-06-01

    We report on the detection of infrared light from the super-Earth 55 Cnc e, based on four occultations obtained with Warm Spitzer at 4.5 {mu}m. Our data analysis consists of a two-part process. In a first step, we perform individual analyses of each data set and compare several baseline models to optimally account for the systematics affecting each light curve. We apply independent photometric correction techniques, including polynomial detrending and pixel mapping, that yield consistent results at the 1{sigma} level. In a second step, we perform a global Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis, including all four data sets that yield an occultation depth of 131 {+-} 28 ppm, translating to a brightness temperature of 2360 {+-} 300 K in the IRAC 4.5 {mu}m channel. This occultation depth suggests a low Bond albedo coupled to an inefficient heat transport from the planetary day side to the night side, or else possibly that the 4.5 {mu}m observations probe atmospheric layers that are hotter than the maximum equilibrium temperature (i.e., a thermal inversion layer or a deep hot layer). The measured occultation phase and duration are consistent with a circular orbit and improves the 3{sigma} upper limit on 55 Cnc e's orbital eccentricity from 0.25 to 0.06.

  19. Smoke detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warmack, Robert J. Bruce; Wolf, Dennis A.; Frank, Steven Shane

    2015-10-27

    Various apparatus and methods for smoke detection are disclosed. In one embodiment, a method of training a classifier for a smoke detector comprises inputting sensor data from a plurality of tests into a processor. The sensor data is processed to generate derived signal data corresponding to the test data for respective tests. The derived signal data is assigned into categories comprising at least one fire group and at least one non-fire group. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) training is performed by the processor. The derived signal data and the assigned categories for the derived signal data are inputs to the LDA training. The output of the LDA training is stored in a computer readable medium, such as in a smoke detector that uses LDA to determine, based on the training, whether present conditions indicate the existence of a fire.

  20. Smoke detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warmack, Robert J Bruce; Wolf, Dennis A.; Frank, Steven Shane

    2015-11-05

    Various apparatus and methods for smoke detection are disclosed. In one embodiment, a method of training a classifier for a smoke detector comprises inputting sensor data from a plurality of tests into a processor. The sensor data is processed to generate derived signal data corresponding to the test data for respective tests. The derived signal data is assigned into categories comprising at least one fire group and at least one non-fire group. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) training is performed by the processor. The derived signal data and the assigned categories for the derived signal data are inputs to the LDA training. The output of the LDA training is stored in a computer readable medium, such as in a smoke detector that uses LDA to determine, based on the training, whether present conditions indicate the existence of a fire.

  1. Radon detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacArthur, D.W.; Allander, K.S.; Bounds, J.A.

    1994-01-25

    A detector for atmospheric radon using a long range alpha detector as its sensing element is described. An electrostatic filter removes ions from ambient air, while allowing radon atoms to pass into a decay cavity. Here, radon atoms are allowed to decay, creating air ions. These air ions are drawn by a fan through a second electrostatic filter which can be activated or deactivated, and into the long range alpha detector. With the second electrostatic filter activated, no air ions are allowed to pass, and the signal output from the long range alpha detector consists of only the electronic background. With the second electrostatic filter deactivated, air ions and cosmic rays will be detected. The cosmic ray contribution can be minimized by shielding. 3 figures.

  2. Radon detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacArthur, Duncan W. (Los Alamos, NM); Allander, Krag S. (Ojo Caliente, NM); Bounds, John A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1994-01-01

    A detector for atmospheric radon using a long range alpha detector as its sensing element. An electrostatic filter removes ions from ambient air, while allowing radon atoms to pass into a decay cavity. Here, radon atoms are allowed to decay, creating air ions. These air ions are drawn by a fan through a second electrostatic filter which can be activated or deactivated, and into the long range alpha detector. With the second electrostatic filter activated, no air ions are allowed to pass, and the signal output from the long range alpha detector consists of only the electronic background. With the second electrostatic filter deactivated, air ions and cosmic rays will be detected. The cosmic ray contribution can be minimized by shielding.

  3. Upper bounds on wavepacket spreading for random Jacobi matrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Svetlana Jitomirskaya; Hermann Schulz-Baldes

    2007-02-15

    A method is presented for proving upper bounds on the moments of the position operator when the dynamics of quantum wavepackets is governed by a random (possibly correlated) Jacobi matrix. As an application, one obtains sharp upper bounds on the diffusion exponents for random polymer models, coinciding with the lower bounds obtained in a prior work. The second application is an elementary argument (not using multiscale analysis or the Aizenman-Molchanov method) showing that under the condition of uniformly positive Lyapunov exponents, the moments of the position operator grow at most logarithmically in time.

  4. Vertical flow chemical detection portal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Linker, Kevin L. (Albuquerque, NM); Hannum, David W. (Albuquerque, NM); Conrad, Frank James (Russellville, SC)

    1999-01-01

    A portal apparatus for screening objects or persons for the presence of trace amounts of chemical substances such as illicit drugs or explosives. The apparatus has a test space, in which a person may stand, defined by two generally upright sides spanned by a horizontal transom. One or more fans in the transom generate a downward air flow (uni-directional) within the test space. The air flows downwardly from a high pressure upper zone, past the object or person to be screened. Air moving past the object dislodges from the surface thereof both volatile and nonvolatile particles of the target substance. The particles are entrained into the air flow which continues flowing downward to a lower zone of reduced pressure, where the particle-bearing air stream is directed out of the test space and toward preconcentrator and detection components. The sides of the portal are specially configured to partially contain and maintain the air flow.

  5. Vertical flow chemical detection portal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Linker, K.L.; Hannum, D.W.; Conrad, F.J.

    1999-06-22

    A portal apparatus is described for screening objects or persons for the presence of trace amounts of chemical substances such as illicit drugs or explosives. The apparatus has a test space, in which a person may stand, defined by two generally upright sides spanned by a horizontal transom. One or more fans in the transom generate a downward air flow (uni-directional) within the test space. The air flows downwardly from a high pressure upper zone, past the object or person to be screened. Air moving past the object dislodges from the surface thereof both volatile and nonvolatile particles of the target substance. The particles are entrained into the air flow which continues flowing downward to a lower zone of reduced pressure, where the particle-bearing air stream is directed out of the test space and toward preconcentrator and detection components. The sides of the portal are specially configured to partially contain and maintain the air flow. 3 figs.

  6. Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carla Aramo

    2005-09-06

    The paper describes methods used for the detection of cosmic rays with energies above 10^18 eV (UHECR, UltraHigh Energy Cosmic Rays). It had been anticipated there would be a cutoff in the energy spectrum of primary cosmic rays around 3 10^19 eV induced by their interaction with the 2.7 K primordial photons. This has become known as the GZK cutoff. However, several showers have been detected with estimated primary energy exceeding this limit.

  7. Diversity in the upper management of leading Texas contractors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Anne Nicole

    2003-01-01

    and mailed to a group of upper managers representing the top contractors in Texas. This group was composed of 79 companies who were on Engineering News-Record's 2001 Top 400 Contractors List (with an office in Texas) and companies on the Department...

  8. Methane-derived hydrocarbons produced under upper-mantle conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolesnikov, Anton; Kutcherov, Vladimir G.; Goncharov, Alexander F.

    2009-08-13

    There is widespread evidence that petroleum originates from biological processes. Whether hydrocarbons can also be produced from abiogenic precursor molecules under the high-pressure, high-temperature conditions characteristic of the upper mantle remains an open question. It has been proposed that hydrocarbons generated in the upper mantle could be transported through deep faults to shallower regions in the Earth's crust, and contribute to petroleum reserves. Here we use in situ Raman spectroscopy in laser-heated diamond anvil cells to monitor the chemical reactivity of methane and ethane under upper-mantle conditions. We show that when methane is exposed to pressures higher than 2 GPa, and to temperatures in the range of 1,000-1,500 K, it partially reacts to form saturated hydrocarbons containing 2-4 carbons (ethane, propane and butane) and molecular hydrogen and graphite. Conversely, exposure of ethane to similar conditions results in the production of methane, suggesting that the synthesis of saturated hydrocarbons is reversible. Our results support the suggestion that hydrocarbons heavier than methane can be produced by abiogenic processes in the upper mantle.

  9. Upper Trinity River Central City Modified Project Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Appendix A Upper Trinity River Central City Modified Project Report Certifications This Appendix on technical components used in the preparation of the Modified Central City Project Report. The certifications November 2007. · Internal Quality Assurance reviews of the Modified Project Report, conducted by the Fort

  10. Control of a Pneumatic Orthosis for Upper Extremity Stroke Rehabilitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bobrow, James E.

    Control of a Pneumatic Orthosis for Upper Extremity Stroke Rehabilitation Eric T. Wolbrecht, John Leavitt, David J. Reinkensmeyer, and James E. Bobrow Abstract-- A key challenge in rehabilitation robotics rehabilitation of the arm. Pneumatic actuators can potentially help meet this challenge because of their high

  11. New Computational Upper Bounds for Ramsey Numbers R(3, k)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radziszowski, Stanislaw P.

    New Computational Upper Bounds for Ramsey Numbers R(3, k) Jan Goedgebeur Department of Applied@cs.rit.edu Kolloquium über Kombinatorik Berlin, November 16, 2012 1/25 Avoiding Triangles in Ramsey Graphs or independence in triangle-free graphs 1 Ramsey Numbers R(3, k) Asymptotics Some background and history Lower

  12. ICHTHYOSAURIA FROM THE UPPER LIAS OF STRAWBERRY BANK, ENGLAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benton, Michael

    ICHTHYOSAURIA FROM THE UPPER LIAS OF STRAWBERRY BANK, ENGLAND by HANNAH CAINE and MICHAEL J. BENTON of Strawberry Bank, Ilminster, Somerset, UK (Text-fig. S1). These fossils are part of the Charles Moore crocodilian Pela- gosaurus in the same collection (Pierce and Benton 2006). The Strawberry Bank ichthyosaurs

  13. Upper Snake Provincial Assessment May 2004 6. Participants and Affiliations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the Upper Snake Provincial Assessment Idaho Department of Fish and Game: Gregg Servheen Jon Beals Lance Chad Colter Shoshone-Bannock Tribes Larry Dickerson US Fish and Wildlife Service John Fred Shoshone-Bannock Tribes Jim Fredericks Idaho Fish and Game Dan Garren Idaho Fish and Game Lauri Hanauska-Brown Idaho Fish

  14. CRANIAL ANATOMY, TAXONOMIC IMPLICATIONS AND PALAEOPATHOLOGY OF AN UPPER JURASSIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benton, Michael

    of a pliosaur from the Kimmeridge Clay Forma- tion (Kimmeridgian) of Westbury, Wiltshire, UK, is an important, Kimmeridge Clay, Upper Jurassic, palaeopathology. P liosaurus is an enigmatic, advanced sauroptery- gian of the genus Pliosaurus (BRSMG Cd6172) recovered from the Kimmeridge Clay at the Lafarge cement works, Wilt

  15. SOIL MOISTURE CHARACTERISTICS IN UPPER PART OF HINDON RIVER CATCHMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, C.P.

    1 SOIL MOISTURE CHARACTERISTICS IN UPPER PART OF HINDON RIVER CATCHMENT C. P. Kumar* Vijay Kumar** Vivekanand Singh*** ABSTRACT Knowledge of the physics of soil water movement is crucial to the solution for estimating the soil hydraulic properties are required for prediction of soil water flow. This paper presents

  16. Upper Respiratory Infections Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maroncelli, Mark

    throat rapidly followed by nasal congestion, possible low grade fever and finally coughing. The nasal aches, and occasionally white spots on the tonsils. Runny nose and cough are not common with a bacterial discharge, an unpleasant taste in the mouth, pain in the upper teeth, fever, sore throat, or cough

  17. Architecture of the upper Sego Sandstone, Book Cliffs, Utah 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birkhead, Stanley Scott

    2006-04-12

    ................................................................................................................... 22 SEDIMENTOLOGY.................................................................................................... 26 Marine Shale with Wavy Sandstones............................................................... 26 Highly... surfaces. The cross-section defines an 8.5 kilometer section that begins in Sego Canyon outside of Thompson Springs, Figure 12-Bedding diagram of major facies transitions with sedimentary logs overlain. SEDIMENTOLOGY Upper Sego Sandstone deposits can...

  18. Tracking and Modifying Upper-body Human Motion Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zordan, Victor

    of humanlike characters affect the believability, aesthetic, and impact of an animation or virtual environment the dynamics of the animated character. Figure 1 shows a human actor and two animated characters tracking hisTracking and Modifying Upper-body Human Motion Data with Dynamic Simulation Victor B. Zordan

  19. FREQUENCY LIMITS ON NAKED-EYE OPTICAL TRANSIENTS LASTING FROM MINUTES TO YEARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shamir, Lior; Nemiroff, Robert J. E-mail: nemiroff@mtu.edu

    2009-09-15

    How often do bright optical transients occur on the sky but go unreported? To constrain the bright end of the astronomical transient function, a systematic search for transients that become bright enough to be noticed by the unaided eye was conducted using the all-sky monitors of the Night Sky Live network. Two fisheye CONtinuous CAMeras operating over three years created a database that was searched for transients that appeared in time-contiguous CCD frames. Although a single candidate transient was found, the lack of more transients is used here to deduce upper limits to the general frequency of bright transients. To be detected, a transient must have increased by over three visual magnitudes to become brighter than visual magnitude 5.5 on the timescale of minutes to years. It is concluded that, on the average, fewer than 0.0040 (t {sub dur}/60 s) transients with duration t {sub dur} between minutes and hours, occur anywhere on the sky at any one time. For transients on the order of months to years, fewer than 160 (t {sub dur}/1 year) occur, while for transients on the order of years to millennia, fewer than 50 (t {sub dur}/1 year){sup 2} occur.

  20. The Limit of Mental Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandler, George

    2013-01-01

    of constructing such structures. References A cautionaryTHE LIMIT OF MENTAL STRUCTURES Asch, S. E. , & Ebenholtz, S.100. THE LIMIT OF MENTAL STRUCTURES Halford, G. S. , Cowan,

  1. Tentative detection of the nitrosylium ion in space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cernicharo, J.; Tercero, B.; Bailleux, S.; Alekseev, E.; Fuente, A.; Bachiller, R.; Roueff, E.; Gerin, M.; Treviño-Morales, S. P.; Marcelino, N.; Lefloch, B.

    2014-11-01

    We report the tentative detection in space of the nitrosylium ion, NO{sup +}. The observations were performed toward the cold dense core Barnard 1-b. The identification of the NO{sup +} J = 2-1 line is supported by new laboratory measurements of NO{sup +} rotational lines up to the J = 8-7 transition (953207.189 MHz), which leads to an improved set of molecular constants: B {sub 0} = 59597.1379(62) MHz, D {sub 0} = 169.428(65) kHz, and eQq {sub 0}(N) = –6.72(15) MHz. The profile of the feature assigned to NO{sup +} exhibits two velocity components at 6.5 and 7.5 km s{sup –1}, with column densities of 1.5 × 10{sup 12} and 6.5 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup –2}, respectively. New observations of NO and HNO, also reported here, allow us to estimate the following abundance ratios: X(NO)/X(NO{sup +}) ? 511, and X(HNO)/X(NO{sup +}) ? 1. This latter value provides important constraints on the formation and destruction processes of HNO. The chemistry of NO{sup +} and other related nitrogen-bearing species is investigated by the means of a time-dependent gas phase model which includes an updated chemical network according to recent experimental studies. The predicted abundance for NO{sup +} and NO is found to be consistent with the observations. However, that of HNO relative to NO is too high. No satisfactory chemical paths have been found to explain the observed low abundance of HNO. HSCN and HNCS are also reported here with an abundance ratio of ? 1. Finally, we have searched for NNO, NO{sub 2}, HNNO{sup +}, and NNOH{sup +}, but only upper limits have been obtained for their column density, except for the latter for which we report a tentative 3? detection.

  2. Fault current limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Darmann, Francis Anthony

    2013-10-08

    A fault current limiter (FCL) includes a series of high permeability posts for collectively define a core for the FCL. A DC coil, for the purposes of saturating a portion of the high permeability posts, surrounds the complete structure outside of an enclosure in the form of a vessel. The vessel contains a dielectric insulation medium. AC coils, for transporting AC current, are wound on insulating formers and electrically interconnected to each other in a manner such that the senses of the magnetic field produced by each AC coil in the corresponding high permeability core are opposing. There are insulation barriers between phases to improve dielectric withstand properties of the dielectric medium.

  3. Neutrino mass limits: robust information from the power spectrum of galaxy surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonio J. Cuesta; Viviana Niro; Licia Verde

    2015-11-18

    We present cosmological upper limits on the sum of active neutrino masses using large-scale power spectrum data from the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey and from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey - Data Release 7 (SDSS-DR7) sample of Luminous Red Galaxies (LRG). Combining measurements on the Cosmic Microwave Background temperature and polarisation anisotropies by the Planck satellite together with WiggleZ power spectrum results in a neutrino mass bound of 0.43 eV at 95% C.L., while replacing WiggleZ by the SDSS-DR7 LRG power spectrum, the 95% C.L. bound on the sum of neutrino masses improves to 0.17 eV. Adding Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) distance scale measurements, the neutrino mass upper limits greatly improve, since BAO data break degeneracies in parameter space. Within a $\\Lambda$CDM model, we find an upper limit of 0.11 eV (0.15 eV) at 95% C.L., when using SDSS-DR7 LRG (WiggleZ) together with BAO and Planck. The addition of BAO data makes the neutrino mass upper limit robust, showing only a weak dependence on the power spectrum used. We also quantify the dependence of neutrino mass limit reported here on the CMB lensing information. The tighter upper limit (0.11 eV) obtained with SDSS-DR7 LRG is very close to that recently obtained using Lyman-alpha clustering data, yet uses a completely different probe and redshift range, further supporting the robustness of the constraint. This constraint puts under some pressure the inverted mass hierarchy and favours the normal hierarchy.

  4. (Limiting the greenhouse effect)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayner, S.

    1991-01-07

    Traveler attended the Dahlem Research Conference organized by the Freien Universitat, Berlin. The subject of the conference was Limiting the Greenhouse Effect: Options for Controlling Atmospheric CO{sub 2} Accumulation. Like all Dahlem workshops, this was a meeting of scientific experts, although the disciplines represented were broader than usual, ranging across anthropology, economics, international relations, forestry, engineering, and atmospheric chemistry. Participation by scientists from developing countries was limited. The conference was divided into four multidisciplinary working groups. Traveler acted as moderator for Group 3 which examined the question What knowledge is required to tackle the principal social and institutional barriers to reducing CO{sub 2} emissions'' The working rapporteur was Jesse Ausubel of Rockefeller University. Other working groups examined the economic costs, benefits, and technical feasibility of options to reduce emissions per unit of energy service; the options for reducing energy use per unit of GNP; and the significant of linkage between strategies to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions and other goals. Draft reports of the working groups are appended. Overall, the conference identified a number of important research needs in all four areas. It may prove particularly important in bringing the social and institutional research needs relevant to climate change closer to the forefront of the scientific and policy communities than hitherto.

  5. Arc fault detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jha, Kamal N. (Bethel Park, PA)

    1999-01-01

    An arc fault detection system for use on ungrounded or high-resistance-grounded power distribution systems is provided which can be retrofitted outside electrical switchboard circuits having limited space constraints. The system includes a differential current relay that senses a current differential between current flowing from secondary windings located in a current transformer coupled to a power supply side of a switchboard, and a total current induced in secondary windings coupled to a load side of the switchboard. When such a current differential is experienced, a current travels through a operating coil of the differential current relay, which in turn opens an upstream circuit breaker located between the switchboard and a power supply to remove the supply of power to the switchboard.

  6. Arc fault detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jha, K.N.

    1999-05-18

    An arc fault detection system for use on ungrounded or high-resistance-grounded power distribution systems is provided which can be retrofitted outside electrical switchboard circuits having limited space constraints. The system includes a differential current relay that senses a current differential between current flowing from secondary windings located in a current transformer coupled to a power supply side of a switchboard, and a total current induced in secondary windings coupled to a load side of the switchboard. When such a current differential is experienced, a current travels through a operating coil of the differential current relay, which in turn opens an upstream circuit breaker located between the switchboard and a power supply to remove the supply of power to the switchboard. 1 fig.

  7. Mass-transport models to predict toxicity of inhaled gases in the upper respiratory tract

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hubal, E.A.C.; Fedkiw, P.S.; Kimbell, J.S. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Mass-transport (the movement of a chemical species) plays an important role in determining toxic responses of the upper respiratory tract (URT) to inhaled chemicals. Mathematical dosimetry models incorporate physical characteristics of mass transport and are used to predict quantitative uptake (absorption rate) and distribution of inhaled gases and vapors in the respiratory tract. Because knowledge of dose is an essential component of quantitative risk assessment, dosimetry modeling plays an important role in extrapolation of animal study results to humans. A survey of existing mathematical dosimetry models for the URT is presented, limitations of current models are discussed, and adaptations of existing models to produce a generally applicable model are suggested. Reviewed URT dosimetry models are categorized as early, lumped-parameter, and distributed-parameter models. Specific examples of other relevant modeling work are also presented. 35 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  8. The Weak-Coupling Limit of Simplicial Quantum Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Thorleifsson; P. Bialas; B. Petersson

    1998-12-23

    In the weak-coupling limit, kappa_0 going to infinity, the partition function of simplicial quantum gravity is dominated by an ensemble of triangulations with the ratio N_0/N_D close to the upper kinematic limit. For a combinatorial triangulation of the D--sphere this limit is 1/D. Defining an ensemble of maximal triangulations, i.e. triangulations that have the maximal possible number of vertices for a given volume, we investigate the properties of this ensemble in three dimensions using both Monte Carlo simulations and a strong-coupling expansion of the partition function, both for pure simplicial gravity and a with a suitable modified measure. For the latter we observe a continuous phase transition to a crinkled phase and we investigate the fractal properties of this phase.

  9. Power and efficiency limits for internal combustion engines via methods of finite-time thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berry, R. Stephen

    Power and efficiency limits for internal combustion engines via methods of finite publication 17 June 1993) Analytical expressionsfor the upper bounds of power and efficiency of an internal and expensiveto compute and analyze.2If we are interestedin maximum power output or in maximum effi- ciency

  10. Neutrino mass limits: robust information from the power spectrum of galaxy surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cuesta, Antonio J; Verde, Licia

    2015-01-01

    We present cosmological upper limits on the sum of active neutrino masses using large-scale power spectrum data from the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey and from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey - Data Release 7 (SDSS-DR7) sample of Luminous Red Galaxies (LRG). Combining measurements on the Cosmic Microwave Background temperature and polarisation anisotropies by the Planck satellite together with WiggleZ power spectrum results in a neutrino mass bound of 0.43 eV at 95% C.L., while replacing WiggleZ by the SDSS-DR7 LRG power spectrum, the 95% C.L. bound on the sum of neutrino masses improves to 0.17 eV. Adding Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) distance scale measurements, the neutrino mass upper limits greatly improve, since BAO data break degeneracies in parameter space. Within a $\\Lambda$CDM model, we find an upper limit of 0.11 eV (0.15 eV) at 95% C.L., when using SDSS-DR7 LRG (WiggleZ) together with BAO and Planck. The addition of BAO data makes the neutrino mass upper limit robust, showing only a weak dependence o...

  11. Continuum-Limit of the Upper Critical-Field H-Star-C2 for Superconducting Networks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Chia-Ren.

    1987-01-01

    , and T,u is the superconducting transi- tion temperature of the material at zero applied field. They checked Eq. (1) against two-dimensional square, tri- angular, and honeycomb lattices and three-dimensional simple cubic and centered cubic lattices... (s) BX tly 4k + 1+cosOg'(T) I crossing at the centers of the squares), and found that Eq. (1) holds for this case. Our third example is a square lattice with the cross- sectional areas of the horizontal strands Sl being, in gen- eral...

  12. The supernova progenitor mass distributions of M31 and M33: further evidence for an upper mass limit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jennings, Zachary G.; Weisz, Daniel R. [University of California Observatories, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Williams, Benjamin F.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Fouesneau, Morgan [Box 351580, The University of Washington Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Murphy, Jeremiah W. [Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew E., E-mail: zgjennin@ucsc.edu, E-mail: adolphin@raytheon.com [Raytheon, 1151 E. Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85706 (United States)

    2014-11-10

    Using Hubble Space Telescope photometry to measure star formation histories, we age-date the stellar populations surrounding supernova remnants (SNRs) in M31 and M33. We then apply stellar evolution models to the ages to infer the corresponding masses for their supernova progenitor stars. We analyze 33 M33 SNR progenitors and 29 M31 SNR progenitors in this work. We then combine these measurements with 53 previously published M31 SNR progenitor measurements to bring our total number of progenitor mass estimates to 115. To quantify the mass distributions, we fit power laws of the form dN/dM?M {sup –?}. Our new larger sample of M31 progenitors follows a distribution with ?=4.4{sub ?0.4}{sup +0.4}, and the M33 sample follows a distribution with ?=3.8{sub ?0.5}{sup +0.4}. Thus both samples are consistent within the uncertainties, and the full sample across both galaxies gives ?=4.2{sub ?0.3}{sup +0.3}. Both the individual and full distributions display a paucity of massive stars when compared to a Salpeter initial mass function, which we would expect to observe if all massive stars exploded as SN that leave behind observable SNR. If we instead fix ? = 2.35 and treat the maximum mass as a free parameter, we find M {sub max} ? 35-45 M {sub ?}, indicative of a potential maximum cutoff mass for SN production. Our results suggest that either SNR surveys are biased against finding objects in the youngest (<10 Myr old) regions, or the highest mass stars do not produce SNe.

  13. SHORT COMMUNICATION Wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) detectability from helicopters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, Mark C.

    SHORT COMMUNICATION Wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) detectability from helicopters for wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) populations has been limited. We surveyed Rio Grande wild turkey (M and examine power to detect trends in population change. We observed that wild turkey flock detectability

  14. Upper Bound on Fidelity of Classical Sagnac Gyroscope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas B. Bahder

    2011-01-24

    Numerous quantum mechanical schemes have been proposed that are intended to improve the sensitivity to rotation provided by the classical Sagnac effect in gyroscopes. A general metric is needed that can compare the performance of the new quantum systems with the classical systems. The fidelity (Shannon mutual information between the measurement and the rotation rate) is proposed as a metric that is capable of this comparison. A theoretical upper bound is derived for the fidelity of an ideal classical Sagnac gyroscope. This upper bound for the classical Sagnac gyroscope should be used as a benchmark to compare the performance of proposed enhanced classical and quantum rotation sensors. In fact, the fidelity is general enough to compare the quality of two different apparatuses (two different experiments) that attempt to measure the same quantity.

  15. Toroidal midplane neutral beam armor and plasma limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kugel, H.W.; Hand, S.W. Jr.; Ksayian, H.

    1985-05-31

    This invention contemplates an armor shield/plasma limiter positioned upon the inner wall of a toroidal vacuum chamber within which is magnetically confined an energetic plasma in a tokamak nuclear fusion reactor. The armor shield/plasma limiter is thus of a general semi-toroidal shape and is comprised of a plurality of adjacent graphite plates positioned immediately adjacent to each other so as to form a continuous ring upon and around the toroidal chamber's inner wall and the reactor's midplane coil. Each plate has a generally semi-circular outer circumference and a recessed inner portion and is comprised of upper and lower half sections positioned immediately adjacent to one another along the midplane of the plate. With the upper and lower half sections thus joined, a channel or duct is provided within the midplane of the plate in which a magnetic flux loop is positioned. The magnetic flux loop is thus positioned immediately adjacent to the fusing toroidal plasma and serves as a diagnostic sensor with the armor shield/plasma limiter minimizing the amount of power from the energetic plasma as well as from the neutral particle beams heating the plasma incident upon the flux loop.

  16. High upper critical field in disordered niobium nitride superconductor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baskaran, R., E-mail: baskaran@igcar.gov.in; Thanikai Arasu, A. V.; Amaladass, E. P.; Janawadkar, M. P. [Materials Science Group, IGCAR, Kalpakkam-603102 (India)

    2014-10-28

    Superconducting Niobium Nitride thin films have been deposited on glass, aluminum nitride buffered glass, and oxidized silicon substrates by reactive DC magnetron sputtering at ambient substrate temperatures. The crystal structure of these thin films has been determined to be cubic fcc B1 structure by Glancing Incidence X-Ray Diffraction analysis. The superconducting transition temperatures of the thin films were measured to be greater than 11.6?K with a maximum of 13.4?K. The negative temperature coefficient of resistance observed in these thin films indicates the presence of disorder. Magneto-resistance measurements have been carried out on these thin films patterned into standard four probe geometry upto a maximum magnetic field of 12?T for two films and upto 15?T for the other two films. The dependence of transition temperature on the applied field is analyzed to estimate the upper critical field. The upper critical field for most of the films was estimated to exceed 35?T, while one of the most disordered films had an estimated upper critical field greater than 70?T.

  17. Displacement currents in semiconductor quantum dots embedded dielectric media: A method for room temperature photon detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matsik, Steven G.

    embedded in paraffin wax is devised to illustrate the principle, giving 0.6 A/W as an upper limitS Qds embedded in paraffin wax Fig. 1 a . PbS Qds embedded paraffin wax films were prepared wax melting point 64 °C, dielec- tric constant=2.4 and a thin layer of wax was spread on the surface

  18. Initiative for Explosives Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of electromagnetic radiation, or to detect with currently fielded technologies. Approaches to improving detectionInitiative for Explosives Detection Highly Concealed Bulk Explosives Detection This focus area emphasizes the detection of explosives or IEDs hidden in vehicles, buildings or various types of containers

  19. What is the probability that direct detection experiments have observed dark matter?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bozorgnia, Nassim [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Schwetz, Thomas, E-mail: n.bozorgnia@uva.nl, E-mail: schwetz@fysik.su.se [Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, Department of Physics, Stockholm University, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-12-01

    In Dark Matter direct detection we are facing the situation of some experiments reporting positive signals which are in conflict with limits from other experiments. Such conclusions are subject to large uncertainties introduced by the poorly known local Dark Matter distribution. We present a method to calculate an upper bound on the joint probability of obtaining the outcome of two potentially conflicting experiments under the assumption that the Dark Matter hypothesis is correct, but completely independent of assumptions about the Dark Matter distribution. In this way we can quantify the compatibility of two experiments in an astrophysics independent way. We illustrate our method by testing the compatibility of the hints reported by DAMA and CDMS-Si with the limits from the LUX and SuperCDMS experiments. The method does not require Monte Carlo simulations but is mostly based on using Poisson statistics. In order to deal with signals of few events we introduce the so-called ''signal length'' to take into account energy information. The signal length method provides a simple way to calculate the probability to obtain a given experimental outcome under a specified Dark Matter and background hypothesis.

  20. COMMENTARY:Limits to adaptation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preston, Benjamin L

    2013-01-01

    An actor-centered, risk-based approach to defining limits to social adaptation provides a useful analytic framing for identifying and anticipating these limits and informing debates over society s responses to climate change.

  1. Upper critical fields and two-band superconductivity in Sr1-xEux(Fe0.89Co0.11)?As? (x=0.20 and 0.46)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hu, Rongwei; Mun, Eun Deok; Altarawneh, M. M.; Mielke, C. H.; Zapf, V. S.; Bud'ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.

    2012-02-13

    The upper critical fields Hc2(T) of single crystals of Sr1-xEux(Fe?.??Co?.??)?As? (x=0.20 and 0.46) were determined by radio-frequency penetration depth measurements in pulsed magnetic fields. Hc2(T) approaches the Pauli limiting field but shows an upward curvature with an enhancement from the orbital limited field, as inferred from the Werthamer-Helfand-Hohenberg theory. We discuss the temperature dependence of the upper critical fields and the decreasing anisotropy using a two-band BCS model.

  2. Global distributions of carbonyl sulfide in the upper troposphere and stratosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Paul

    Global distributions of carbonyl sulfide in the upper troposphere and stratosphere Michael P upper tropospheric and stratospheric global distributions of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) observed from space034270. 1. Introduction [2] Carbonyl sulfide (OCS) is the most abundant sulfur- containing gas

  3. Thermochronology, geochronology, and upper crustal structure of the Cordillera Real: Implications for Cenozoic exhumation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horton, Brian K.

    Thermochronology, geochronology, and upper crustal structure of the Cordillera Real: Implications] Structural mapping, 40 Ar/39 Ar and fission track thermochronology, U-Pb geochronology, and basin analysis. Grove (2006), Thermochronology, geochronology, and upper crustal structure of the Cordillera Real

  4. Empirical assessment of the detection efficiency of CR-39 at high proton fluence and a compact, proton detector for high-fluence applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenberg, M. J., E-mail: mrosenbe@mit.edu; Séguin, F. H.; Waugh, C. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Orozco, D.; Frenje, J. A.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Sio, H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)] [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Glebov, V. Yu.; Stoeckl, C.; Hohenberger, M.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)] [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); LePape, S.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Bionta, R. M.; Landen, O. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2014-04-15

    CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detectors are widely used in physics and in many inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, and under ideal conditions these detectors have 100% detection efficiency for ?0.5–8 MeV protons. When the fluence of incident particles becomes too high, overlap of particle tracks leads to under-counting at typical processing conditions (5 h etch in 6N NaOH at 80?°C). Short etch times required to avoid overlap can cause under-counting as well, as tracks are not fully developed. Experiments have determined the minimum etch times for 100% detection of 1.7–4.3-MeV protons and established that for 2.4-MeV protons, relevant for detection of DD protons, the maximum fluence that can be detected using normal processing techniques is ?3?×?10{sup 6} cm{sup ?2}. A CR-39-based proton detector has been developed to mitigate issues related to high particle fluences on ICF facilities. Using a pinhole and scattering foil several mm in front of the CR-39, proton fluences at the CR-39 are reduced by more than a factor of ?50, increasing the operating yield upper limit by a comparable amount.

  5. Empirical assessment of the detection efficiency of CR-39 at high proton fluence and a compact, proton detector for high-fluence applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Seguin, F. H.; Waugh, C. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Orozco, D.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Sio, H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Stoeckl, C.; Hohenberger, M.; Sangster, T. C.; LePape, S.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Bionta, R. M.; Landen, O. L.; Zacharias, R. A.; Kim, Y.; Herrmann, H. W.; Kilkenny, J. D.

    2014-04-01

    CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detectors are widely used in physics and in many inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, and under ideal conditions these detectors have 100% detection efficiency for ~0.5–8 MeV protons. When the fluence of incident particles becomes too high, overlap of particle tracks leads to under-counting at typical processing conditions (5 h etch in 6N NaOH at 80 °C). Short etch times required to avoid overlap can cause under-counting as well, as tracks are not fully developed. Experiments have determined the minimum etch times for 100% detection of 1.7–4.3-MeV protons and established that for 2.4-MeV protons, relevant for detection of DD protons, the maximum fluence that can be detected using normal processing techniques is ?3 × 106 cm-2. A CR-39-based proton detector has been developed to mitigate issues related to high particle fluences on ICF facilities. Using a pinhole and scattering foil several mm in front of the CR-39, proton fluences at the CR-39 are reduced by more than a factor of ~50, increasing the operating yield upper limit by a comparable amount.

  6. Modeling the three-dimensional upper ocean heat budget and subduction rate during the Subduction Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the evolution of the upper ocean thermal structure and provide a useful tool for the analysis of air

  7. Seismic tomography shows that upwelling beneath Iceland is confined to the upper mantle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foulger, G. R.

    of the upper mantle was determined using the ACH damped least-squares method and involved 42 stations, 3159 P

  8. Upper Digestive Disorders Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee 02/2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maroncelli, Mark

    Upper Digestive Disorders Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee 02/2012 Revised 02/08/12 Page 1 of 2 Upper Digestive Tract Anatomy Esophagus: A long muscular tube in the chest area occurs in the duodenum. Upper Digestive Disorders Reflux with Esophagitis: The flowing back (or reflux

  9. New code upper bounds from the Terwilliger algebra and semidefinite programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrijver, Alexander

    1 New code upper bounds from the Terwilliger algebra and semidefinite programming Alexander n and minimum distance at least d. It is based on block­diagonalising the Terwilliger alge­ bra, Terwilliger algebra, upper bounds. I. DESCRIPTION OF THE METHOD We present a new upper bound on A(n, d

  10. New code upper bounds from the Terwilliger algebra and semidefinite programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrijver, Alexander

    1 New code upper bounds from the Terwilliger algebra and semidefinite programming Alexander and minimum distance at least d. It is based on block-diagonalising the Terwilliger alge- bra of the Hamming, Terwilliger algebra, upper bounds. I. DESCRIPTION OF THE METHOD We present a new upper bound on A(n, d

  11. Testing upper motor neuron function in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: the most difficult

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooper, Robin L.

    Testing upper motor neuron function in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: the most difficult task of neurophysiology Clinical signs of upper motor neuron involvement are an essential observation to support the diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral scler- osis. However, clinical signs of upper motor neuron can be difficult

  12. WETLAND USE AND FEEDING BY LESSER SCAUP DURING SPRING MIGRATION ACROSS THE UPPER MIDWEST, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Afton, Alan D.

    bordering the Gulf of Mexico and migrates along the Mississippi River valley and through the upper MidwestWETLAND USE AND FEEDING BY LESSER SCAUP DURING SPRING MIGRATION ACROSS THE UPPER MIDWEST, USA reserves of lesser scaup (Aythya affinis; hereafter scaup) during spring migration in the upper Midwest may

  13. Demonstration Sites of Best Management Practices: A Manual for the Upper Etowah River Alliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radcliffe, David

    Demonstration Sites of Best Management Practices: A Manual for the Upper Etowah River Alliance Practices: A Manual for the Upper Etowah River Alliance Organization Contents i. Introduction and is for the Upper Etowah River Alliance (UERA), their counterparts and our successors under the CWA grant

  14. Penetration of solar radiation in the upper ocean: A numerical model for oceanic and coastal waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Zhongping

    Penetration of solar radiation in the upper ocean: A numerical model for oceanic and coastal waters (2005), Penetration of solar radiation in the upper ocean: A numerical model for oceanic and coastal; Siegel et al., 1995] have demonstrated that the penetration of EVIS in the upper layer of the ocean plays

  15. Effects of tensile loading on upper shelf fracture toughness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joyce, J.A. [Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD (United States); Link, R.E. [Naval Surface Warfare Center, Annapolis, MD (United States)

    1994-03-01

    Constraint has been an important consideration in fracture mechanics from the earliest work that was done to develop the 1974 version of the ASTM Standard E399. O`Dowd and Shih (1991) have proposed that the difference in crack tip stress fields can be quantified in terms of a field quantity that they have call Q. The Q quantity is a function of J, the crack shape and size, the structural geometry, mode of loading and on the level of deformation and can only be calculated from a high resolution elastic-plastic computational analysis. A similar, simpler, but more controversial approach has been suggested by Betegon and Hancock (1991), who use the non-singular term of the elastic, crack singularity solution, called the T-Stress, as a measure of elastic-plastic crack tip constraint. The objective of this work is to develop some upper shelf, elastic-plastic experimental results to attempt to investigate the applicability of the Q and T stress parameters to the correlation of upper shelf initiation toughness and J resistance curves. The first objective was to obtain upper shelf J resistance curves, J{sub Ic}, and tearing resistance results for a range of applied constraint. The J-Q and J-T stress loci were developed and compared with the expectations of the O`Dowd and Shih and the Betegon and Hancock analyses. Constraint was varied by changing the crack length and also by changing the mode of loading from bending to predominantly tensile. The principle conclusions of this work are that J{sub Ic} does not appear to be dependent on T stress or Q while the material tearing resistance is dependent on T stress and Q, with the tearing modulus increasing as constraint decreases.

  16. Challenging packaging limits and infectivity of phage ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elmar Nurmemmedov; Martin Castelnovo; Elizabeth Medina; Carlos Enrique Catalano; Alex Evilevitch

    2011-11-09

    The terminase motors of bacteriophages have been shown to be among the strongest active machines in the biomolecular world, being able to package several tens of kilobase pairs of viral genome into a capsid within minutes. Yet these motors are hindered at the end of the packaging process by the progressive build-up of a force resisting packaging associated with already packaged DNA. In this experimental work, we raise the issue of what sets the upper limit on the length of the genome that can be packaged by the terminase motor of phage {\\lambda} and still yield infectious virions, and the conditions under which this can be efficiently performed. Using a packaging strategy developed in our laboratory of building phage {\\lambda} from scratch, together with plaque assay monitoring, we have been able to show that the terminase motor of phage {\\lambda} is able to produce infectious particles with up to 110% of the wild-type (WT) {\\lambda}-DNA length. However, the phage production rate, and thus the infectivity, decreased exponentially with increasing DNA length, and was a factor of 103 lower for the 110% {\\lambda}-DNA phage. Interestingly, our in vitro strategy was still efficient in fully packaging phages with DNA lengths as high as 114% of the WT length, but these viruses were unable to infect bacterial cells efficiently. Further, we demonstrated that the phage production rate is modulated by the presence of multivalent ionic species. The biological consequences of these finding are discussed.

  17. Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin, New York:Power CompanyCROSS-VALIDATION OFUpper Arlington,Upper

  18. Nannoplankton as indicators of climatic variability in the Upper Pliocene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chepstow-Lusty, Alexander John

    . pentaradiatus ? Discussion Summary CHAPTER 6: OXYGEN ISOTOPE STRATIGRAPHY AND ORBITALLY TUNED TIMESCALES FOR DISCOASTER ABUNDANCE (WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO DSDP 607 AND ODP 677). 217 231 242 246 6:1 6:2 Introduction 248 6:3 6:4 6:6 6... to 3.5 Ma. 1:2 Selection of sites To develop a global perspective of Discoaster abundance changes in the upper Pliocene, the sites in this study had to be carefully selected (Table 1:2, Fig 1:2). The sites had to contain undisturbed sequences...

  19. Lower and upper probabilities in the distributive lattice of subsystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Vourdas

    2014-10-08

    The set of subsystems of a finite quantum system (with variables in Z(n)) together with logical connectives, is a distributive lattice. With regard to this lattice, the (where P(m) is the projector to) obeys a supermodularity inequality, and it is interpreted as a lower probability in the sense of the Dempster-Shafer theory, and not as a Kolmogorov probability. It is shown that the basic concepts of the Dempster-Shafer theory (lower and upper probabilities and the Dempster multivaluedness) are pertinent to the quantum formalism of finite systems.

  20. Upper Cumberland E M C | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThin FilmUnited States: EnergyUpper Cumberland E M C Jump to:

  1. Upper Midwest Hydrogen Initiative UMHI | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThin FilmUnited States: EnergyUpper Cumberland E M C Jump to:Midwest

  2. Upper crustal faulting in an obliquely extending orogen, structural control

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThin FilmUnited States: EnergyUpper Cumberland E M C Jumpon

  3. Upper crustal structure of an obliquely extending orogen, central Coso

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThin FilmUnited States: EnergyUpper Cumberland E M C JumponRange,

  4. Sandia Energy - Upper Rio Grande Simulation Model (URGSiM)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)GeothermalFuel MagnetizationTransportation EnergyUncertaintyUpper Rio

  5. Time Synchronization Attack in Smart Grid-Part II: Cross Layer Detection Mechanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Zhenghao; Dimitrovski, Aleksandar D; Li, Husheng

    2012-01-01

    A novel time synchronization attack (TSA) on wide area monitoring systems in smart grid has been identified in the first part of this paper. A cross layer detection mechanism is proposed to combat TSA in part II of this paper. In the physical layer, we propose a GPS carrier signal noise ratio (C/No) based spoofing detection technique. In addition, a patch-monopole hybrid antenna is applied to receive GPS signal. By computing the standard deviation of the C/No difference from two GPS receivers, a priori probability of spoofing detection is fed to the upper layer, where power system state is estimated and controlled. A trustworthiness based evaluation method is applied to identify the PMU being under TSA. Both the physical layer and upper layer algorithms are integrated to detect the TSA, thus forming a cross layer mechanism. Experiment is carried out to verify the effectiveness of the proposed TSA detection algorithm.

  6. Limits to the power density of very large wind farms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nishino, Takafumi

    2013-01-01

    A simple analysis is presented concerning an upper limit of the power density (power per unit land area) of a very large wind farm located at the bottom of a fully developed boundary layer. The analysis suggests that the limit of the power density is about 0.38 times $\\tau_{w0}U_{F0}$, where $\\tau_{w0}$ is the natural shear stress on the ground (that is observed before constructing the wind farm) and $U_{F0}$ is the natural or undisturbed wind speed averaged across the height of the farm to be constructed. Importantly, this implies that the maximum extractable power from such a very large wind farm will not be proportional to the cubic of the wind speed at the farm height, or even the farm height itself, but be proportional to $U_{F0}$.

  7. ITER Generic Diagnostic Upper Port Plug Nuclear Heating and Personnel Dose Rate Assesment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell E. Feder and Mahmoud Z. Youssef

    2009-01-28

    Neutronics analysis to find nuclear heating rates and personnel dose rates were conducted in support of the integration of diagnostics in to the ITER Upper Port Plugs. Simplified shielding models of the Visible-Infrared diagnostic and of a large aperture diagnostic were incorporated in to the ITER global CAD model. Results for these systems are representative of typical designs with maximum shielding and a small aperture (Vis-IR) and minimal shielding with a large aperture. The neutronics discrete-ordinates code ATTILA® and SEVERIAN® (the ATTILA parallel processing version) was used. Material properties and the 500 MW D-T volume source were taken from the ITER “Brand Model” MCNP benchmark model. A biased quadrature set equivelant to Sn=32 and a scattering degree of Pn=3 were used along with a 46-neutron and 21-gamma FENDL energy subgrouping. Total nuclear heating (neutron plug gamma heating) in the upper port plugs ranged between 380 and 350 kW for the Vis-IR and Large Aperture cases. The Large Aperture model exhibited lower total heating but much higher peak volumetric heating on the upper port plug structure. Personnel dose rates are calculated in a three step process involving a neutron-only transport calculation, the generation of activation volume sources at pre-defined time steps and finally gamma transport analyses are run for selected time steps. ANSI-ANS 6.1.1 1977 Flux-to-Dose conversion factors were used. Dose rates were evaluated for 1 full year of 500 MW DT operation which is comprised of 3000 1800-second pulses. After one year the machine is shut down for maintenance and personnel are permitted to access the diagnostic interspace after 2-weeks if dose rates are below 100 ?Sv/hr. Dose rates in the Visible-IR diagnostic model after one day of shutdown were 130 ?Sv/hr but fell below the limit to 90 ?Sv/hr 2-weeks later. The Large Aperture style shielding model exhibited higher and more persistent dose rates. After 1-day the dose rate was 230 ?Sv/hr but was still at 120 ?Sv/hr 4-weeks later.

  8. Portable modular detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brennan, James S. (Rodeo, CA); Singh, Anup (Danville, CA); Throckmorton, Daniel J. (Tracy, CA); Stamps, James F. (Livermore, CA)

    2009-10-13

    Disclosed herein are portable and modular detection devices and systems for detecting electromagnetic radiation, such as fluorescence, from an analyte which comprises at least one optical element removably attached to at least one alignment rail. Also disclosed are modular detection devices and systems having an integrated lock-in amplifier and spatial filter and assay methods using the portable and modular detection devices.

  9. Effects of constraint on upper shelf fracture toughness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joyce, J.A.; Link, R.E.

    1995-12-31

    The upper shelf fracture toughness and tearing resistance of two structural steels, HY-100 and ASTM A533, Gr. B, were determined over a wide range of applied constraint. The constraint conditions were varied by changes in specimen geometry and loading mode. Bend specimens with shallow and deep cracks, compact specimens, and single and double edge notched tension specimens were used in this study. A rotation correction was developed for the single edge notch tension specimen which greatly improved the behavior of the J-R curves determined using this specimen. The experimental results were used to investigate the applicability of the Q and T stress parameters to the correlation of upper shelf initiation toughness, J{sub Ic}, and tearing resistance, T{sub mat}. The J-Q and J-T stress loci, and corresponding plots of material tearing resistance plotted against Q and T, were developed and compared with the expectations of the O`Dowd and Shih and the Betegon and Hancock analyses. The principle conclusions of this work are that J{sub Ic} does not appear to be dependent on T stress or Q while the material tearing resistance, T{sub mat}, is dependent on T stress and Q, with the tearing modulus increasing as constraint decreases.

  10. Spectroscopic Detection of Pathogens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ALAM,M. KATHLEEN; TIMLIN,JERILYN A.; MARTIN,LAURA E.; HJELLE,DRIAN; LYONS,RICK; GARRISON,KRISTIN

    2000-11-01

    The goal of this LDRD Research project was to provide a preliminary examination of the use of infrared spectroscopy as a tool to detect the changes in cell cultures upon activation by an infectious agent. Due to a late arrival of funding, only 5 months were available to transfer and setup equipment at UTTM,develop cell culture lines, test methods of in-situ activation and collect kinetic data from activated cells. Using attenuated total reflectance (ATR) as a sampling method, live cell cultures were examined prior to and after activation. Spectroscopic data were collected from cells immediately after activation in situ and, in many cases for five successive hours. Additional data were collected from cells activated within a test tube (pre-activated), in both transmission mode as well as in ATR mode. Changes in the infrared data were apparent in the transmission data collected from the pre-activated cells as well in some of the pre-activated ATR data. Changes in the in-situ activated spectral data were only occasionally present due to (1) the limited time cells were studied and (2) incomplete activation. Comparison of preliminary data to infrared bands reported in the literature suggests the primary changes seen are due an increase in ribonucleic acid (RNA) production. This work will be continued as part of a 3 year DARPA grant.

  11. Advancing Explosives Detection Capabilities: Vapor Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atkinson, David

    2012-10-15

    A new, PNNL-developed method provides direct, real-time detection of trace amounts of explosives such as RDX, PETN and C-4. The method selectively ionizes a sample before passing the sample through a mass spectrometer to detect explosive vapors. The method could be used at airports to improve aviation security.

  12. Advancing Explosives Detection Capabilities: Vapor Detection

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Atkinson, David

    2014-07-24

    A new, PNNL-developed method provides direct, real-time detection of trace amounts of explosives such as RDX, PETN and C-4. The method selectively ionizes a sample before passing the sample through a mass spectrometer to detect explosive vapors. The method could be used at airports to improve aviation security.

  13. Bridge Detection By Road Detection Jeff Kaufman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danner, Andrew

    Bridge Detection By Road Detection Jeff Kaufman cbr@sccs.swarthmore.edu 1 Introduction It is useful, with local min- ima: cells from which there is no direction of descent. A common cause of this is bridges. The area over which a bridge passes shows up in the digital elevation as being of a height greater than

  14. FUEL CASK IMPACT LIMITER VULNERABILITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leduc, D; Jeffery England, J; Roy Rothermel, R

    2009-02-09

    Cylindrical fuel casks often have impact limiters surrounding just the ends of the cask shaft in a typical 'dumbbell' arrangement. The primary purpose of these impact limiters is to absorb energy to reduce loads on the cask structure during impacts associated with a severe accident. Impact limiters are also credited in many packages with protecting closure seals and maintaining lower peak temperatures during fire events. For this credit to be taken in safety analyses, the impact limiter attachment system must be shown to retain the impact limiter following Normal Conditions of Transport (NCT) and Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC) impacts. Large casks are often certified by analysis only because of the costs associated with testing. Therefore, some cask impact limiter attachment systems have not been tested in real impacts. A recent structural analysis of the T-3 Spent Fuel Containment Cask found problems with the design of the impact limiter attachment system. Assumptions in the original Safety Analysis for Packaging (SARP) concerning the loading in the attachment bolts were found to be inaccurate in certain drop orientations. This paper documents the lessons learned and their applicability to impact limiter attachment system designs.

  15. Revolution in Detection Affairs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stern W.

    2013-11-02

    The detection of nuclear or radioactive materials for homeland or national security purposes is inherently difficult. This is one reason detection efforts must be seen as just one part of an overall nuclear defense strategy which includes, inter alia, material security, detection, interdiction, consequence management and recovery. Nevertheless, one could argue that there has been a revolution in detection affairs in the past several decades as the innovative application of new technology has changed the character and conduct of detection operations. This revolution will likely be most effectively reinforced in the coming decades with the networking of detectors and innovative application of anomaly detection algorithms.

  16. Challenges and Solutions for Intrusion Detection in Wireless Mesh Networks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassanzadeh, Amin

    2014-05-03

    The problem of intrusion detection in wireless mesh networks (WMN) is challenging, primarily because of lack of single vantage points where traffic can be analyzed and the limited resources available to participating nodes. Although the problem has...

  17. Finite range and upper branch effects on itinerant ferromagnetism in repulsive Fermi gases: Bethe–Goldstone ladder resummation approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Lianyi

    2014-12-15

    We investigate the ferromagnetic transition in repulsive Fermi gases at zero temperature with upper branch and effective range effects. Based on a general effective Lagrangian that reproduces precisely the two-body s-wave scattering phase shift, we obtain a nonperturbative expression of the energy density as a function of the polarization by using the Bethe–Goldstone ladder resummation. For hard sphere potential, the predicted critical gas parameter k{sub F}a=0.816 and the spin susceptibility agree well with the results from fixed-node diffusion Monte Carlo calculations. In general, positive and negative effective ranges have opposite effects on the critical gas parameter k{sub F}a: While a positive effective range reduces the critical gas parameter, a negative effective range increases it. For attractive potential or Feshbach resonance model, the many-body upper branch exhibits an energy maximum at k{sub F}a=? with ?=1.34 from the Bethe–Goldstone ladder resummation, which is qualitatively consistent with experimental results. The many-body T-matrix has a positive-energy pole for k{sub F}a>? and it becomes impossible to distinguish the bound state and the scattering state. These positive-energy bound states become occupied and therefore the upper branch reaches an energy maximum at k{sub F}a=?. In the zero range limit, there exists a narrow window (0.86upper branch Fermi gas. - Highlights: • Nonperturbative interaction energy is obtained within the Bethe–Goldstone ladder resummation approach. • Positive and negative effective ranges have opposite effects on the critical gas parameter. • The upper branch Fermi gas exhibits an energy maximum and reentrant ferromagnetic transition. • The ferromagnetic phase disappears for large and negative effective ranges.

  18. The 125 MW Upper Mahiao geothermal power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forte, N.

    1996-12-31

    The 125 MW Upper Mahiao power plant, the first geothermal power project to be financed under a Build-Own-Operate-and-Transfer (BOOT) arrangement in the Philippines, expected to complete its start-up testing in August of this year. This plant uses Ormat`s environmentally benign technology and is both the largest geothermal steam/binary combined cycle plant as well as the largest geothermal power plant utilizing air cooled condensers. The Ormat designed and constructed plant was developed under a fast track program, with some two years from the April 1994 contract signing through design, engineering, construction and startup. The plant is owned and operated by a subsidiary of CalEnergy Co., Inc. and supplies power to PNOC-Energy Development Corporation for the National Power Corporation (Napocor) national power grid in the Philippines.

  19. Project design criteria manual: Upper Mechanicville Hydroelectric Redevelopment Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-12-01

    The design criteria presented in this manual are to be used as the bases for the detailed design for the Upper Mechanicville (NY) Hydroelectric Redevelopment Project. The manual refers to codes and standards which are to be used in the design of the project. Design approaches not covered by existing codes and standards are also given for all phases of the project. The manual is divided into six sections: civil design, hydraulic design, geotechnical design, electrical systems, mechanical systems, and major equipment. These design criteria are to be used as a guide for design. When changes become necessary, these shall be documented by the engineer responsible for the design. This documentation shall be sent to the Project Engineer and Project Manager for submission to the client for reference. The documentation shall specify the reason for the change and shall be routed to all Department Coordinators.

  20. Lesson 8 Infinite Limits and One-sided Limits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-09-06

    Sep 6, 2013 ... long-term behavior. A common model for the population of a species in an area is the logistic model: Lesson 8 Infinite Limits and One-sided ...

  1. Interior intrusion detection systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, J.R.; Matter, J.C. ); Dry, B. )

    1991-10-01

    The purpose of this NUREG is to present technical information that should be useful to NRC licensees in designing interior intrusion detection systems. Interior intrusion sensors are discussed according to their primary application: boundary-penetration detection, volumetric detection, and point protection. Information necessary for implementation of an effective interior intrusion detection system is presented, including principles of operation, performance characteristics and guidelines for design, procurement, installation, testing, and maintenance. A glossary of sensor data terms is included. 36 figs., 6 tabs.

  2. Nuclear Structure at the Limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nazarewicz, W.

    1998-01-12

    One of the frontiers of today?s nuclear science is the ?journey to the limits? of atomic charge and nuclear mass, of neutron-to-proton ratio, and of angular momentum. The tour to the limits is not only a quest for new, exciting phenomena, but the new data are expected, as well, to bring qualitatively new information about the fundamental properties of the nucleonic many-body system, the nature of the nuclear interaction, and nucleonic correlations at various energy-distance scales. In this series of lectures, current developments in nuclear structure at the limits are discussed from a theoretical perspective, mainly concentrating on medium-mass and heavy nuclei.

  3. Nuclear Structure at the Limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nazarewicz, Witold

    1997-12-31

    One of the frontiers of today`s nuclear science is the ``journey to the limits``: of atomic charge and nuclear mass, of neutron-to-proton ratio, and of angular momentum. The tour to the limits is not only a quest for new, exciting phenomena but the new data are expected, as well, to bring qualitatively new information about the fundamental properties of the nucleonic many-body system, the nature of the nuclear interaction, and nucleonic correlations at various energy-distance scales. In this talk, current developments in nuclear structure at the limits are discussed from a theoretical perspective.

  4. Improved Limits on $B^{0}$ Decays to Invisible $(+gamma)$ Final States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Palano, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; /Bergen U.; Brown, David Nathan; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; So, R.Y.; /British Columbia U.; Khan, A.; /Brunel U.; Blinov, V.E.; /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U., Comp. Sci. Dept. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U.; /more authors.; ,

    2013-11-01

    We establish improved upper limits on branching fractions for B{sup 0} decays to final states where the decay products are purely invisible (i.e., no observable final state particles) and for final states where the only visible product is a photon. Within the Standard Model, these decays have branching fractions that are below the current experimental sensitivity, but various models of physics beyond the Standard Model predict significant contributions for these channels. Using 471 million B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon} (4S) resonance by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, we establish upper limits at the 90% confidence level of 2.4 x 10{sup -5} for the branching fraction of B{sup 0} {yields} invisible and 1.7 x 10{sup -5} for the branching fraction of B{sup 0} {yields} invisible + {gamma}.

  5. Empirical assessment of the detection efficiency of CR-39 at high proton fluence and a compact, proton detector for high-fluence applications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Séguin, F. H.; Waugh, C. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Orozco, D.; Frenje, J. A.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Sio, H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Sinenian, N.; et al

    2014-04-14

    CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detectors are widely used in physics and in many inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, and under ideal conditions these detectors have 100% detection efficiency for ~0.5–8 MeV protons. When the fluence of incident particles becomes too high, the overlap of particle tracks leads to under-counting at typical processing conditions (5h etch in 6N NaOH at 80°C). Short etch times required to avoid overlap can cause under-counting as well, as tracks are not fully developed. Experiments have determined the minimum etch times for 100% detection of 1.7–4.3-MeV protons and established that for 2.4-MeV protons, relevant for detectionmore »of DD protons, the maximum fluence that can be detected using normal processing techniques is ?3 ×106 cm-2. A CR-39-based proton detector has been developed to mitigate issues related to high particle fluences on ICF facilities. Using a pinhole and scattering foil several mm in front of the CR-39, proton fluences at the CR-39 are reduced by more than a factor of ~50, increasing the operating yield upper limit by a comparable amount.« less

  6. THE FADING OF TWO TRANSIENT ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCES TO BELOW THE STELLAR MASS EDDINGTON LIMIT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burke, Mark J.; Raychaudhury, Somak [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Kraft, Ralph P.; Forman, William R.; Jones, Christine; Murray, Stephen S. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Soria, Roberto [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia); Maccarone, Thomas J. [Astronomy and Astrophysics Group, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409-105 (United States); Sivakoff, Gregory R. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E1 (Canada); Birkinshaw, Mark; Worrall, Diana M. [HH Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Brassington, Nicola J.; Hardcastle, Martin J., E-mail: mburke@star.sr.bham.ac.uk [School of Physics, Astronomy, and Mathematics, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield, AL10 9AB (United Kingdom)

    2013-09-20

    We report new detections of the two transient ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) in NGC 5128 from an ongoing series of Chandra observations. Both sources have previously been observed L{sub x} (2-3) × ?10{sup 39} erg s{sup –1}, at the lower end of the ULX luminosity range. The new observations allow us to study these sources in the luminosity regime frequented by the Galactic black hole X-ray binaries (BH XBs). We present the recent lightcurves of both ULXs. 1RXH J132519.8-430312 (ULX1) was observed at L{sub x} ? 1 × 10{sup 38} erg s{sup –1}, while CXOU J132518.2-430304 (ULX2) declined to L{sub x} ? 2 × 10{sup 37} erg s{sup –1} and then lingered at this luminosity for hundreds of days. We show that a reasonable upper limit for both duty cycles is 0.2, with a lower limit of 0.12 for ULX2. This duty cycle is larger than anticipated for transient ULXs in old stellar populations. By fitting simple spectral models in an observation with ?50 counts we recover properties consistent with Galactic BH XBs, but inconclusive as to the spectral state. We utilize quantile analyses to demonstrate that the spectra are generally soft, and that in one observation the spectrum of ULX2 is inconsistent with a canonical hard state at >95% confidence. This is contrary to what would be expected of an accreting intermediate mass black hole primary, which we would expect to be in the hard state at these luminosities. We discuss the paucity of transient ULXs discovered in early-type galaxies and excogitate explanations. We suggest that the number of transient ULXs scales with the giant and sub-giant populations, rather than the total number of XBs.

  7. Protect and Restore the Upper Lochsa : Annual Progress Report, May 2008 – April 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lloyd, Rebecca; Forestieri, David

    2009-08-13

    The Upper Lochsa watersheds included in the project contain critical spawning and rearing habitat for anadromous and resident fish (Clearwater National Forest 1999). Species that depend on the tributary habitat include spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), Snake River summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), bull trout (Salvelinus confluentes), and westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi). Steelhead and bull trout populations are currently listed as Threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), and westslope cutthroat trout has been petitioned for listing. Both out-of-basin and in-basin factors threaten fish populations in the Lochsa Drainage (Clearwater Subbasin Plan 2003). Out-of-basin factors include the hydroelectric system and ocean conditions, while in-basin factors include a variety of management activities leading to habitat degradation. This project is implemented under Bonneville Power Administration's Fish and Wildlife program in order to meet National Marine Fisheries Service requirements to offset losses caused by the operation of the hydrosystem by improving tributary habitats to promote increased productivity of salmon and steelhead. The Clearwater Subbasin Plan (2003) defines limiting factors to fisheries in the area as watershed disturbances, habitat degradation, sediment, temperature, and connectivity.

  8. The ground state energy of a low density Bose gas: a second order upper bound

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laszlo Erdos; Benjamin Schlein; Horng-Tzer Yau

    2009-02-12

    Consider $N$ bosons in a finite box $\\Lambda= [0,L]^3\\subset \\bR^3$ interacting via a two-body nonnegative soft potential $V= \\lambda \\tilde V$ with $\\tilde V$ fixed and $\\lambda>0$ small. We will take the limit $L, N \\to \\infty$ by keeping the density $\\varrho= N/L^{3}$ fixed and small. We construct a variational state which gives an upper bound on the ground state energy per particle $\\e$ $$ \\e \\le 4\\pi\\varrho a \\Big [1+ \\frac{128}{15\\sqrt{\\pi}}(\\varrho a^3)^{1/2}S_\\lambda \\Big ] + O(\\varrho^2|\\log\\varrho|), \\quad {as $\\varrho\\to 0$} $$ with a constant satisfying $$ 1\\leq S_\\lambda \\leq 1+C\\lambda. $$ Here $a$ is the scattering length of $V$ and thus depends on $\\lambda$. In comparison, the prediction by Lee-Yang \\cite{LYang} and Lee-Huang-Yang \\cite{LHY} asserts that $S_\\lambda=1$ independent of $\\lambda$.

  9. A Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis Limit on the Neutral Fermion Decays into Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motohiko Kusakabe; A. B. Balantekin; Toshitaka Kajino; Y. Pehlivan

    2013-04-09

    Using the primordial helium abundance, an upper limit to the magnetic moments for Dirac neutrinos had been provided by imposing restrictions on the number of the additional helicity states. Considering non-thermal photons produced in the decay of the heavy sterile mass eigenstates due to the neutrino magnetic moment, we explore the constraints imposed by the observed abundances of all the light elements produced during the Big Bang nucleosynthesis.

  10. Volume II, Chapter 12 Lewis River Subbasin--Upper North Fork

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volume II, Chapter 12 Lewis River Subbasin--Upper North Fork #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS.................................................................................................. 12-17 12.5.3 Water Quality

  11. Paleoecology and Geochemistry of the Upper Kellwasser Black Shale and Extinction Event

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haddad, Emily Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    A.D. , 2009. When do black shales tell molybdenum isotopeand redox facies in core shales of Upper PennsylvanianB.B. , 1994. Marine black shales: depositional mechanisms

  12. Preliminary potentiometric map and flow dynamic characteristics for the upper-basalt confined aquifer system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spane, F.A. Jr.; Raymond, R.G.

    1993-09-01

    This report presents the first comprehensive Hanford Site-wide potentiometric map for the upper-basalt confined aquifer system (i.e., the upper Saddle Mountains Basalt). In constructing the potentiometric map, over forty on-site and off-site monitoring wells and boreholes were used. The potentiometric map developed for the upper-basalt confined aquifer is consistent with the areal head pattern indicated for the Mabton interbed, which is a deeper and more areally extensive confined aquifer underlying the Hanford Site. Salient features for the upper-basalt confined aquifer system potentiometric map are described.

  13. Updated flood frequencies and a canal breach on the upper Klamath River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fahey, Dan

    2006-01-01

    Updated flood frequencies and a canal breach on the upperI updated existing flood frequency analyses for four gaugesdetermined that the new flood frequencies reduce the return

  14. Functional anatomy and feeding biomechanics of a giant Upper Jurassic pliosaur (Reptilia: Sauropterygia)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benton, Michael

    Functional anatomy and feeding biomechanics of a giant Upper Jurassic pliosaur (Reptilia and feeding biomechanics are poorly understood. A new, well-preserved pliosaur from the Kimmeridgian

  15. Paleoecology and Geochemistry of the Upper Kellwasser Black Shale and Extinction Event

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haddad, Emily Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Comparative taphonomy and paleoecology of Middle DevonianC.W. , 1974. Marine paleoecology in the Upper Devonian ofOF CALIFORNIA RIVERSIDE Paleoecology and Geochemistry of the

  16. Predetermining acceptable noise limits in EXAFS spectra in the limit of stochastic noise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Yung-Jin; Booth, Corwin H

    2009-12-14

    EXAFS measurements are used to probe a variety of experimental systems, but excel at elucidating local structure in samples which have slight disorder or no long-range crystalline order. Of special interest to the authors is the use of EXAFS in understanding the molecular-level binding structure and characteristics of actinides on the surface of environmental minerals and model mineral analogs. In environmental systems the element of interest can be on the order of 10-7% by weight of the total sample. Obviously such samples would be impossible to measure using EXAFS techniques. It is therefore essential to increase the concentration of the element of interest while still preserving a sample's ability to represent environmental conditions. Under such low concentration limits it is expected that the collected data is countrate, or stochastically limited. This condition occurs as we approach the signal-to-noise (S/N) limit of the technique where the random noise of the measurement process dominates over possible systematic errors. When stochastic error is expected to dominate systematic error, it is possible to predict, with the use of simulations, the ability of model fits to tolerate a certain level of stochastic noise. Elsewhere in these proceedings, we discuss how to tell when systematic errors dominate in measured EXAFS spectrum. Here, we outline a technique for determining the number of EXAFS scans necessary to test the relevance of a given structural model. Appropriate stochastic noise levels are determined for each point in r-space by collecting data on a real system. These noise levels are then applied to EXAFS simulations using a test model. In this way, all significant systematic error sources are eliminated in the simulated data. The structural model is then fit to the simulated data, decreasing the noise and increasing the k-range of the fit until the veracity of the model passes an F-test. This paper outlines a method of testing model systems in EXAFS fitting before measurements are conducted to determine the quality of measured data required for fitting of a particular model system with statistical confidence. It is important to reiterate that the calculated {alpha}surface in figure 1 is only applicable to the particular model presented in this paper. Furthermore, this procedure only takes into account stochastic noise; consequentially any confidence levels calculated should be viewed as upper limits to the confidence levels in systems which also contain a significant amount of systematic noise.

  17. Stratigraphic cyclicity and reservoir heterogeneity within upper San Andres and Grayburg strata (upper Permian-Guadalupian), Maljamar field, Se New Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modica, Christopher James

    1997-01-01

    Cores, logs, and 3D seismic data from Maljamar field (Lea County, southeast New Mexico) were examined in this study and used to construct a detailed sequence stratigraphic framework. Upper San Andres strata are divided ...

  18. The NANOGrav Nine-year Data Set: Limits on the Isotropic Stochastic Gravitational Wave Background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arzoumanian, Zaven; Burke-Spolaor, Sarah; Chamberlin, Sydney; Chatterjee, Shami; Christy, Brian; Cordes, Jim; Cornish, Neil; Demorest, Paul; Deng, Xihao; Dolch, Tim; Ellis, Justin; Ferdman, Rob; Fonseca, Emmanuel; Garver-Daniels, Nate; Jenet, Fredrick; Jones, Glenn; Kaspi, Vicky; Koop, Michael; Lam, Michael; Lazio, Joseph; Levin, Lina; Lommen, Andrea; Lorimer, Duncan; Luo, Jin; Lynch, Ryan; Madison, Dustin; McLaughlin, Maura; McWilliams, Sean; Mingarelli, Chiara; Nice, David; Palliyaguru, Nipuni; Pennucci, Tim; Ransom, Scott; Sampson, Laura; Sanidas, Sotiris; Sesana, Alberto; Siemens, Xavier; Simon, Joseph; Stairs, Ingrid; Stinebring, Dan; Stovall, Kevin; Swiggum, Joseph; Taylor, Stephen; Vallisneri, Michele; van Haasteren, Rutger; Wang, Yan; Zhu, Weiwei

    2015-01-01

    We compute upper limits on the nanohertz-frequency isotropic stochastic gravitational wave background (GWB) using the 9-year data release from the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) collaboration. We set upper limits for a GWB from supermassive black hole binaries under power law, broken power law, and free spectral coefficient GW spectrum models. We place a 95\\% upper limit on the strain amplitude (at a frequency of yr$^{-1}$) in the power law model of $A_{\\rm gw} law model, we place priors on the strain amplitude derived from simulations of Sesana (2013) and McWilliams et al. (2014). We find that the data favor a broken power law to a pure power law with odds ratios of 22 and 2.2 to one for the McWilliams and Sesana prior models, respectively. The McWilliams model is essentially ruled out by the data, and the Sesana model is in tension with the data under the assumption of a pure power law. Using the broken power-law analysis ...

  19. Detection of neutral phosphorus in the near-ultraviolet spectra of late-type stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roederer, Ian U. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 1085 South University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Jacobson, Heather R.; Thanathibodee, Thanawuth; Frebel, Anna; Toller, Elizabeth, E-mail: iur@umich.edu [Department of Physics and Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2014-12-10

    We report the detection of several absorption lines of neutral phosphorus (P, Z = 15) in archival near-ultraviolet spectra obtained with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telescope. We derive phosphorus abundances or interesting upper limits in 14 late-type stars with metallicities spanning –3.8 < [Fe/H] <–0.1. Previously, phosphorus had only been studied in Galactic stars with –1.0 < [Fe/H] <+0.3. Iron lines reveal abundance offsets between the optical and ultraviolet regions, and we discuss and apply a correction factor to account for this offset. In stars with [Fe/H] >–1.0, the [P/Fe] ratio decreases toward the solar value with increasing metallicity, in agreement with previous observational studies. In stars with [Fe/H] <–1.0, ([P/Fe]) = +0.04 ± 0.10, which overlaps with the [P/Fe] ratios found in several high-redshift damped Lyman-? systems. This behavior hints at a primary origin in massive stars.

  20. Modeling pCO sub 2 in the upper ocean

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Archer, D.

    1990-12-01

    This report summarizes our current understanding of the physical, chemical, and biological processes that control the natural cycling of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in the surface ocean. Because the physics of mixing at the ocean surface creates the essential framework for the chemistry and biology, and because the literature on surface ocean mixing is extensive, a major focus of the report is to review existing mixed layer models for the upper ocean and their implementation in global ocean circulation models. Three families of mixed layer models have been developed. The integrated turbulent kinetic energy'' (TKE) models construct a budget for surface ocean TKE, using the wind stress as source and dissipation as sink for TKE. The shear instability'' models maintain profiles of current velocity resulting from the wind stress. Turbulence closure'' models are the most general and the most complicated of the three types, and are based on laboratory studies of fluid turbulence. This paper explores behavioral distinctions between the three types of models, and summarizes previously published comparisons of the generality, accuracy, and computational requirements of the three models. The application of mixed layer models to treatment of sea ice is also reviewed. 101 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Limits on Very High Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts with the Milagro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Limits on Very High Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts with the Milagro Observatory Miguel F of Milagro allow it to detect very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray burst emission with much higher sensitivity gamma-ray burst satellites at keV to MeV energies. Even in the absence of a positive detection, VHE

  2. Generalized Geometric Quantum Speed Limits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diego Paiva Pires; Marco Cianciaruso; Lucas C. Céleri; Gerardo Adesso; Diogo O. Soares-Pinto

    2015-09-30

    The attempt to gain a theoretical understanding of the concept of time in quantum mechanics has triggered significant progress towards the search for faster and more efficient quantum technologies. One of such advances consists in the interpretation of the time-energy uncertainty relations as lower bounds for the minimal evolution time between two distinguishable states of a quantum system, also known as quantum speed limits. We investigate how the non uniqueness of a bona fide measure of distinguishability defined on the quantum state space affects the quantum speed limits and can be exploited in order to derive improved bounds. Specifically, we establish an infinite family of quantum speed limits valid for unitary and nonunitary evolutions, based on an elegant information geometric formalism. Our work unifies and generalizes existing results on quantum speed limits, and provides instances of novel bounds which are tighter than any established one based on the conventional quantum Fisher information. We illustrate our findings with relevant examples, clarifying the role of classical populations versus quantum coherences in the determination and saturation of the speed limits. Our results can find applications in the optimization and control of quantum technologies such as quantum computation and metrology, and might provide new insights in fundamental investigations of quantum thermodynamics.

  3. GROUND-BASED INFRARED DETECTIONS OF CO IN THE CENTAUR-COMET 29P/SCHWASSMANN-WACHMANN 1 AT 6.26 AU FROM THE SUN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paganini, Lucas; Mumma, Michael J.; DiSanti, Michael A.; Villanueva, Geronimo L.; Bonev, Boncho P.; Boehnhardt, Hermann; Lippi, Manuela; Kaeufl, Hans U.; Blake, Geoffrey A.

    2013-04-01

    We observed Comet 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1 (hereafter, 29P) in 2012 February and May with CRIRES/VLT and NIRSPEC/Keck-II, when the comet was at 6.26 AU from the Sun and about 5.50 AU from Earth. With CRIRES, we detected five CO emission lines on several nights in each epoch, confirming the ubiquitous content and release of carbon monoxide from the nucleus. This is the first simultaneous detection of multiple lines from any (neutral) gaseous species in comet 29P at infrared wavelengths. It is also the first extraction of a rotational temperature based on the intensities of simultaneously measured spectral lines in 29P, and the retrieved rotational temperature is the lowest obtained in our infrared survey to date. We present the retrieved production rates ({approx}3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 28} molecules s{sup -1}) and remarkably low ({approx}5 K) rotational temperatures for CO, and compare them with results from previous observations at radio wavelengths. Along with CO, we pursued detections of other volatiles, namely H{sub 2}O, C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, HCN, NH{sub 3}, and CH{sub 3}OH. Although they were not detected, we present sensitive upper limits. These results establish a new record for detections by infrared spectroscopy of parent volatiles in comets at large heliocentric distances. Until now considered to be a somewhat impossible task with IR ground-based facilities, these discoveries demonstrate new opportunities for targeting volatile species in distant comets.

  4. Observations on student difficulties with mathematics in upper-division electricity and magnetism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    Observations on student difficulties with mathematics in upper-division electricity and magnetism Initiative and Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA (Received 28 July 2011; published 27 March 2012) We discuss common difficulties in upper-division electricity

  5. E.2. Electronic Appendix -Food Web Elements of the Fraser River Upper River (above rkm 210)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 E.2. Electronic Appendix - Food Web Elements of the Fraser River Basin Upper River (above rkm 210) Food webs: Microbenthic algae (periphyton), detritus from riparian vegetation and littoral insects). Stressors: Water quality and habitat conditions have changed food webs in specific locations in the upper

  6. Impact of Environmental Factors on Efficacy of Upper-Room Air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pace, Norman

    Impact of Environmental Factors on Efficacy of Upper-Room Air Ultraviolet Germicidal Irradiation of an upper-room air ultravioletgermicidalirradiation(UVGI)system for inactivating airborne bacteria, which was skewed to one side compared to being evenly dispersed, and the room air temperature was stratified from

  7. Relation between subduction megathrust earthquakes, trench sediment thickness and upper plate strain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conrad, Clint

    and compressive upper plate strain. Extensional upper plate strain and trench fill , if not all, of Earth's subduction zones can produce such devastating events [e.g., Ruff and Kanamori, 1980, 2000; Wang and Bilek, 2011]). Spring-block, gelatin-sand paper analogue models of subduction thrust

  8. Negative ion chemistry in Titan's upper atmosphere V. Vuitton a,b,, P. Lavvas b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yelle, Roger V.

    Negative ion chemistry in Titan's upper atmosphere V. Vuitton a,b,Ã, P. Lavvas b , R.V. Yelle b , M April 2009 Keywords: Atmospheres Composition Ionospheres Organic chemistry Titan a b s t r a c the existence of numerous negative ions in Titan's upper atmosphere. The observations at closest approach ($1000

  9. Global empirical wind model for the upper mesosphere/lower thermosphere. I. Prevailing wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Global empirical wind model for the upper mesosphere/lower thermosphere. I. Prevailing wind Y. I. An updated empirical climatic zonally aver- aged prevailing wind model for the upper mesosphere/ lower of monthly mean winds from meteor radar and MF radar measurements at more than 40 stations, well distributed

  10. Effects of ozone cooling in the tropical lower stratosphere and upper troposphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Effects of ozone cooling in the tropical lower stratosphere and upper troposphere Piers M. Forster lower stratosphere and upper troposphere and elucidate the key role of ozone changes in driving of tropical ozone decreases at 70 hPa and lower pressures can lead to significant cooling not only

  11. Variation of the Thermohaline Structure in the Western Equatorial Pacific Upper Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luther, Douglas S.

    Variation of the Thermohaline Structure in the Western Equatorial Pacific Upper Ocean;Abstract Processes which control the upper ocean thermohaline structure in the western equa- torial Pacific forcing data have indicated that the thick isothermal layer in the western equatorial Pacific is found

  12. Reduced Order Modeling of the Upper Tropical Pacific Ocean Model Using Proper Orthogonal Decomposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aluffi, Paolo

    Reduced Order Modeling of the Upper Tropical Pacific Ocean Model Using Proper Orthogonal of a large-scale upper ocean circulation in the tropic Pacific domain. We construct different POD models-scale seasonal variability of the tropic Pacific obtained by the original model is well captured by a low

  13. Upper Permian vertebrates and their sedimentological context in the South Urals, Russia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benton, Michael

    Upper Permian vertebrates and their sedimentological context in the South Urals, Russia Valentin P in the Upper Permian of the Southern Urals area of European Russia. The first sites were found in the 1940s; Amphibian; Reptile; Russia; Urals; Stratigraphy 1. Introduction The end-Permian crisis was the largest mass

  14. Upper and Lower Ramsey Bounds in Bounded (appears in Annals of Pure and Applied

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lisboa, Universidade Técnica de

    Upper and Lower Ramsey Bounds in Bounded Arithmetic (appears in Annals of Pure and Applied Logic bound on the Ramsey number Rr(k) (the r refers to the number of colors, assigned to edges; the k refers to prove two "reversals." To explain this idea we note that the Ramsey upper bound proof for k = 3 (when

  15. Long-Term Sediment Generation Rates for the Upper Rio Chagres Basin: Implications for Panama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nichols, Kyle K.

    Chapter 19 Long-Term Sediment Generation Rates for the Upper Rio Chagres Basin: Implications: We measured in situ-produced cosmogenic 10 Be in 17 sand-sized sediment samples (0.25 to 0.85 mm) to estimate the rate and distribution of sediment generation in the upper Chagres watershed over the last 10

  16. MODELLING GROUNDWATER FLOW ON THE REGIONAL SCALE IN THE UPPER DANUBE CATCHMENT (GERMANY)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    MODELLING GROUNDWATER FLOW ON THE REGIONAL SCALE IN THE UPPER DANUBE CATCHMENT (GERMANY) Roland.barthel@iws.uni-stuttgart.de Abstract. A groundwater flow model for the Upper Danube catchment (A=77,000km2 at gauge Passau, Germany coupled models. Modelling of groundwater flow, using coupled deterministic and hydrological approaches

  17. Studio optics: Adapting interactive engagement pedagogy to upper-division physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zollman, Dean

    Studio optics: Adapting interactive engagement pedagogy to upper-division physics Christopher M describe the development and implementation of a Studio Optics course for upper-division physics majors course in optics at the junior-senior and first year graduate student level that incorporates the methods

  18. Sources of HOx and production of ozone in the upper troposphere over the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob, Daniel J.

    1 Sources of HOx and production of ozone in the upper troposphere over the United States L. Jaegl. Campos,3 G. W. Sachse4 Abstract. The sources of HOx (OH+peroxy radicals) and the as- sociated production injection of peroxides (CH3OOH and H2O2) and formaldehyde (CH2O) from the boundary layer to the upper tro

  19. Cognitive Issues in Upper-Division Electricity & Magnetism Steven J. Pollock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    Cognitive Issues in Upper-Division Electricity & Magnetism Steven J. Pollock and Stephanie V Electricity & Magnetism I (Electro- and Magneto-Statics). As part of our efforts to systematically improve interventions ­at the upper division. Keywords: physics education research, course reform, electricity

  20. viscosity in the upper mantle, the result of an ancient, failed rift in the region.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, David A.

    penetration in the upper ocean, and can be related to phy- toplankton abundance. Along with measure- ments biomass is a crucial measure of the health of ocean ecosystems. An impressive synthesis of the relevant of the upper-ocean concentration of chlorophyll, which is found in all phytoplank- ton, Secchi-disk depths

  1. Seismic tomography shows that upwelling beneath Iceland is confined to the upper mantle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Richard M.

    Seismic tomography shows that upwelling beneath Iceland is confined to the upper mantle G. R of Iceland, Bustadavegi 9, Reykjavik, Iceland 5 National Energy Authority, Grensasvegi 9, Reykjavik, Iceland of the highest-resolution teleseismic tomography study yet performed of the upper mantle beneath Iceland

  2. ORIGINAL PAPER Modeling of SMF tsunami hazard along the upper US

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    ORIGINAL PAPER Modeling of SMF tsunami hazard along the upper US East Coast: detailed impact around+Business Media Dordrecht 2014 Abstract With support from the US National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program (NTHMP), the authors have been developing tsunami inundation maps for the upper US East Coast (USEC), using high

  3. THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO AN UPPER BOUND ON THE FREE ENERGY OF THE TRANSITION STATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sosnick, Tobin R.

    THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO AN UPPER BOUND ON THE FREE ENERGY OF THE TRANSITION STATE..................................................................................50 3 An Upper Bound on the Free Energy of the Transition State of the Ubiquitin Folding Pathway ...................................................................................4 1.2 Transition States of Protein Folding Pathways

  4. Novel 16-Channel Receive Coil Array for Accelerated Upper Airway MRI at 3 Tesla

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    Novel 16-Channel Receive Coil Array for Accelerated Upper Airway MRI at 3 Tesla Yoon-Chul Kim,1 a novel 16-channel 3 Tesla receive coil that is highly sensitive to the human upper airway and investigate on articulatory timing may illuminate the general question of how language-specific knowledge is related to motor

  5. New York Harbor Chart 12334 New York Harbor Upper Bay and Narrows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New York Harbor Chart 12334 ­ New York Harbor Upper Bay and Narrows Anchorage Chart Booklet, the nation's chartmaker #12;United States ­ East Coast NEW YORK ­ NEW JERSEY NEW YORK HARBOR UPPER BAY.noaa.gov/WarOf1812. #12;Because of its importance as a hub of international commerce, New York City served several

  6. 2008-601-00 ISRP FAN 1 Upper Lemhi River Acquisition 1 Narrative Preamble

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­ Acquisition 2 Upper Salmon and historically a major spawning and rearing tributary for Snake River spring/summer-run tributary streams to the Lemhi River to benefit all life stages of Snake River spring/summer-run Chinook2008-601-00 ISRP FAN 1 Upper Lemhi River ­ Acquisition 1 Narrative Preamble: The Columbia Basin

  7. SECTION 35 Table of Contents 35 Upper Columbia Research, Monitoring and Evaluation Plan.....................2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    35-1 SECTION 35 ­ Table of Contents 35 Upper Columbia Research, Monitoring and Evaluation Plan.....................2 #12;35-2 35 Upper Columbia Research, Monitoring and Evaluation Plan In light of the various of the subbasin management plans, and from the province level, were then linked in Table 35.1 to: o The type

  8. Fast Neutron Detection Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKigney, Edward A.; Stange, Sy

    2014-03-17

    These slides present a summary of previous work, conclusions, and anticipated schedule for the conclusion of our fast neutron detection evaluation.

  9. Evaluating Radiative Closure in the Middle-to-Upper Troposhere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tobin, David C; Turner, David D; Knuteson, Robert O

    2013-01-02

    This project had two general objectives. The first is the characterization and improvement of the radiative transfer parameterization in strongly absorbing water vapor bands, as these strongly absorbing bands dictate the clear sky radiative heating rate. The second is the characterization and improvement of the radiative transfer in cirrus clouds, with emphasis on ensuring that the parameterization of the radiative transfer is consistent and accurate across the spectrum. Both of these objectives are important for understanding the radiative processes in the mid-to-upper troposphere. The research on this project primarily involved analysis of data from the First and Second Radiative Heating in Underexplored Bands Campaigns, RHUBC-I and II. This included a climate model sensitivity study using results from RHUBC-I. The RHUBC experiments are ARM-funded activities that directly address the objectives of this research project. A secondary effort was also conducted that investigated the trends in the long-term (~14 year) dataset collected by the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) at the ARM Southern Great Plains site. This work, which was primarily done by a post-doc at the University of Wisconsin �������¢���������������� Madison under Dr. Turner�������¢����������������s direction, uses the only NIST-traceable instrument at the ARM site that has a well-documented calibration and uncertainty performance to investigate long-term trends in the downwelling longwave radiance above this site.

  10. Quantum Noise Limits in White-Light-Cavity-Enhanced Gravitational Wave Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minchuan Zhou; Zifan Zhou; Selim M. Shahriar

    2015-09-03

    Previously, we had proposed a gravitational wave detector that incorporates the white light cavity (WLC) effect using a compound cavity for signal recycling (CC-SR). Here, we first use an idealized model for the negative dispersion medium (NDM), and use the Caves model for phase-insensitive linear amplifier to account for the quantum noise (QN) from the NDM, to determine the upper bound of the enhancement in the sensitivity-bandwidth product. We calculate the quantum noise limited sensitivity curves for the CC-SR design, and find that the broadening of sensitivity predicted by the classical analysis is also present in these curves, but is somewhat reduced. Furthermore, we find that the curves always stay above the standard quantum limit (SQL). To circumvent this limitation, we modify the dispersion to compensate the non-linear phase variation produced by the opto-mechanical (OM) resonance effects. We find that the upper bound of the factor by which the sensitivity-bandwidth product is increased, compared to the highest sensitivity result predicted by Bunanno and Chen [Phys. Rev. D 64, 042006 (2001)], is ~14. We also present a simpler scheme (WLC-SR) where a dispersion medium is inserted in the SR cavity. For this scheme, we found the upper bound of the enhancement factor to be ~18. We then consider an explicit system for realizing the NDM, which makes use of five energy levels in M-configuration to produce Gain, accompanied by Electromagnetically Induced Transparency (the GEIT system). For this explicit system, we employ the rigorous approach based on Master Equation (ME) to compute the QN contributed by the NDM, thus enabling us to determine the enhancement in the sensitivity-bandwidth product definitively rather than the upper bound thereof. Specifically, we identify a set of parameters for which the sensitivity-bandwidth product is enhanced by a factor of 17.66.

  11. Factory capacity limits Machine dependencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foley, Simon

    Factory capacity limits Machine dependencies Employee scheduling Raw material availability Other internal operations (and also possibly the actions of other suppliers that supply raw materials) and at an international workshop at the multi-agent conference (AAMAS'06). Manufacturer Customer demand Penalties for non

  12. Lean blowoff detection sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thornton, Jimmy (Morgantown, WV); Straub, Douglas L. (Morgantown, WV); Chorpening, Benjamin T. (Morgantown, WV); Huckaby, David (Morgantown, WV)

    2007-04-03

    Apparatus and method for detecting incipient lean blowoff conditions in a lean premixed combustion nozzle of a gas turbine. A sensor near the flame detects the concentration of hydrocarbon ions and/or electrons produced by combustion and the concentration monitored as a function of time are used to indicate incipient lean blowoff conditions.

  13. Array for detecting microbes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andersen, Gary L.; DeSantis, Todd D.

    2014-07-08

    The present embodiments relate to an array system for detecting and identifying biomolecules and organisms. More specifically, the present embodiments relate to an array system comprising a microarray configured to simultaneously detect a plurality of organisms in a sample at a high confidence level.

  14. Limits on a muon flux from neutralino annihilations in the Sun with the IceCube 22-string detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    IceCube Collaboration; Klein, Spencer

    2009-04-28

    A search for muon neutrinos from neutralino annihilations in the Sun has been performed with the IceCube 22-string neutrino detector using data collected in 104.3 days of live-time in 2007. No excess over the expected atmospheric background has been observed. Upper limits have been obtained on the annihilation rate of captured neutralinos in the Sun and converted to limits on the WIMP-proton cross-sections for WIMP masses in the range 250-5000 GeV. These results are the most stringent limits to date on neutralino annihilation in the Sun.

  15. Image Change Detection via Ensemble Learning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Benjamin W [ORNL] [ORNL; Vatsavai, Raju [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    The concept of geographic change detection is relevant in many areas. Changes in geography can reveal much information about a particular location. For example, analysis of changes in geography can identify regions of population growth, change in land use, and potential environmental disturbance. A common way to perform change detection is to use a simple method such as differencing to detect regions of change. Though these techniques are simple, often the application of these techniques is very limited. Recently, use of machine learning methods such as neural networks for change detection has been explored with great success. In this work, we explore the use of ensemble learning methodologies for detecting changes in bitemporal synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. Ensemble learning uses a collection of weak machine learning classifiers to create a stronger classifier which has higher accuracy than the individual classifiers in the ensemble. The strength of the ensemble lies in the fact that the individual classifiers in the ensemble create a mixture of experts in which the final classification made by the ensemble classifier is calculated from the outputs of the individual classifiers. Our methodology leverages this aspect of ensemble learning by training collections of weak decision tree based classifiers to identify regions of change in SAR images collected of a region in the Staten Island, New York area during Hurricane Sandy. Preliminary studies show that the ensemble method has approximately 11.5% higher change detection accuracy than an individual classifier.

  16. NEW LIMITS ON GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, Rhiannon D.; Dai, Xinyu; Kochanek, Christopher S. E-mail: xdai@ou.edu

    2014-11-01

    Galaxy clusters are predicted to produce ?-rays through cosmic ray interactions and/or dark matter annihilation, potentially detectable by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT). We present a new, independent stacking analysis of Fermi-LAT photon count maps using the 78 richest nearby clusters (z < 0.12) from the Two Micron All Sky Survey cluster catalog. We obtain the lowest limit on the photon flux to date, 2.3 × 10{sup –11} photons cm{sup –2} s{sup –1} (95% confidence) per cluster in the 0.8-100 GeV band, which corresponds to a luminosity limit of 3.5 × 10{sup 44} photons s{sup –1}. We also constrain the emission limits in a range of narrower energy bands. Scaling to recent cosmic ray acceleration and ?-ray emission models, we find that cosmic rays represent a negligible contribution to the intra-cluster energy density and gas pressure.

  17. INTEGRAL serendipitous detection of the gamma-ray microquasar LS 5039

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Goldoni; M. Ribo; T. Di Salvo; J. M. Paredes; V. Bosch-Ramon; M. Rupen

    2006-09-26

    LS 5039 is the only X-ray binary persistently detected at TeV energies by the Cherenkov HESS telescope. It is moreover a gamma-ray emitter in the GeV and possibly MeV energy ranges. To understand important aspects of jet physics, like the magnetic field content or particle acceleration, and emission processes, such as synchrotron and inverse Compton (IC), a complete modeling of the multiwavelength data is necessary. LS 5039 has been detected along almost all the electromagnetic spectrum thanks to several radio, infrared, optical and soft X-ray detections. However, hard X-ray detections above 20 keV have been so far elusive and/or doubtful, partly due to source confusion for the poor spatial resolution of hard X-ray instruments. We report here on deep (300 ksec) serendipitous INTEGRAL hard X-ray observations of LS 5039, coupled with simultaneous VLA radio observations. We obtain a 20-40 keV flux of 1.1 +/- 0.3 mCrab (5.9 (+/-1.6) X 10^{-12} erg cm^{-2} s^{-1}), a 40-100 keV upper limit of 1.5 mCrab (9.5 x 10^{-12} erg cm^{-2}s^{-1}), and typical radio flux densities of about 25 mJy at 5GHz. These hard X-ray fluxes are significantly lower than previous estimates obtained with BATSE in the same energy range but, in the lower interval, agree with extrapolation of previous RXTE measurements. The INTEGRAL observations also hint to a break in the spectral behavior at hard X-rays. A more sensitive characterization of the hard X-ray spectrum of LS 5039 from 20 to 100 keV could therefore constrain key aspects of the jet physics, like the relativistic particle spectrum and the magnetic field strength. Future multiwavelength observations would allow to establish whether such hard X-ray synchrotron emission is produced by the same population of relativistic electrons as those presumably producing TeV emission through IC.

  18. Axions - Motivation, limits and searches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georg G. Raffelt

    2006-11-09

    The axion solution of the strong CP problem provides a number of possible windows to physics beyond the standard model, notably in the form of searches for solar axions and for galactic axion dark matter, but in a broader context also inspires searches for axion-like particles in pure laboratory experiments. We briefly review the motivation for axions, astrophysical limits, their possible cosmological role, and current searches for axions and axion-like particles.

  19. Fundamental Limits to Cellular Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pieter Rein ten Wolde; Nils B. Becker; Thomas E. Ouldridge; A. Mugler

    2015-05-25

    In recent years experiments have demonstrated that living cells can measure low chemical concentrations with high precision, and much progress has been made in understanding what sets the fundamental limit to the precision of chemical sensing. Chemical concentration measurements start with the binding of ligand molecules to receptor proteins, which is an inherently noisy process, especially at low concentrations. The signaling networks that transmit the information on the ligand concentration from the receptors into the cell have to filter this noise extrinsic to the cell as much as possible. These networks, however, are also stochastic in nature, which means that they will also add noise to the transmitted signal. In this review, we will first discuss how the diffusive transport and binding of ligand to the receptor sets the receptor correlation time, and then how downstream signaling pathways integrate the noise in the receptor state; we will discuss how the number of receptors, the receptor correlation time, and the effective integration time together set a fundamental limit on the precision of sensing. We then discuss how cells can remove the receptor noise while simultaneously suppressing the intrinsic noise in the signaling network. We describe why this mechanism of time integration requires three classes of resources---receptors and their integration time, readout molecules, energy---and how each resource class sets a fundamental sensing limit. We also briefly discuss the scheme of maximum-likelihood estimation, the role of receptor cooperativity, and how cellular copy protocols differ from canonical copy protocols typically considered in the computational literature, explaining why cellular sensing systems can never reach the Landauer limit on the optimal trade-off between accuracy and energetic cost.

  20. Renewable Surface Biosensors With Optical Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J.; Ackerman, Eric J.; Dockendorff, Brian P.; Holman, David A.; Grate, Jay W.

    2001-12-01

    One major challenge in the development of biosensors is the limited lifetime of a chemically selective surface that includes biomolecules. Renewable surface biosensors address this issue by using fresh aliquots of derivatized microbeads for each analysis. The analyte detection can then occur on the microbeads, or downstream from the microbeads. In this paper, we will describe two types of renewable surface biosensors. The first renewable biosensor system includes on-column optical detection for monitoring the binding of biomolecules onto protein or DNA-derivatized Sepharose beads. The second renewable biosensor system includes detection downstream from the microparticles and is based on the use of derivatized magnetic particles for selective binding. The magnetic particles are fluidically captured and released in a sequential injection system to allow the automation of an Enzyme Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay.

  1. Renewable Surface Biosensors with Optical Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Ackerman, Eric J.; Dockendorff, Brian P.; Holman, David A.; Grate, Jay W.

    2001-04-30

    One major challenge in the development of biosensors is the limited lifetime of a chemically selective surface that includes biomolecules. Renewable surface biosensors address this issue by using fresh aliquots of derivatized microbeads for each analysis. The analyte detection can then occur on the microbeads, or downstream from the microbeads. In this paper, we will describe two types of renewable surface biosensors. The first renewable biosensor system includes on-column optical detection for monitoring the binding of biomolecules onto protein or DNA-derivatized Sepharose beads. The second renewable biosensor system includes detection downstream from the microparticles and is based on the use of derivatized magnetic particles for selective binding. The magnetic particles are fluidically captured and released in a sequential injection system to allow the automation of an Enzyme Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay.

  2. Upper Higgs boson mass bounds from a chirally invariant lattice Higgs-Yukawa model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Gerhold; K. Jansen

    2010-02-23

    We establish the cutoff-dependent upper Higgs boson mass bound by means of direct lattice computations in the framework of a chirally invariant lattice Higgs-Yukawa model emulating the same chiral Yukawa coupling structure as in the Higgs-fermion sector of the Standard Model. As expected from the triviality picture of the Higgs sector, we observe the upper mass bound to decrease with rising cutoff parameter $\\Lambda$. Moreover, the strength of the fermionic contribution to the upper mass bound is explored by comparing to the corresponding analysis in the pure $\\Phi^4$-theory.

  3. Composition for detecting uranyl

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baylor, Lewis C. (North Augusta, SC); Stephens, Susan M. (Athens, GA)

    1995-01-01

    A composition for detecting the presence and concentration of a substance such as uranyl, comprising an organohalide covalently bonded to an indicator for said substance. The composition has at least one active OH site for forming a complex with the substance to be detected. The composition is made by reacting equimolar amounts of the indicator and the organohalide in a polar organic solvent. The absorbance spectrum of the composition-uranyl complex is shifted with respect to the absorbance spectrum of the indicator-uranyl complex, to provide better spectral resolution for detecting uranyl.

  4. Leak detection aid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steeper, T.J.

    1989-12-26

    A leak detection apparatus and method for detecting leaks across an O-ring sealing a flanged surface to a mating surface is an improvement in a flanged surface comprising a shallow groove following O-ring in communication with an entrance and exit port intersecting the shallow groove for injecting and withdrawing, respectively, a leak detection fluid, such as helium. A small quantity of helium injected into the entrance port will flow to the shallow groove, past the O-ring and to the exit port. 2 figs.

  5. Leak detection aid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steeper, Timothy J. (Graniteville, SC)

    1989-01-01

    A leak detection apparatus and method for detecting leaks across an O-ring sealing a flanged surface to a mating surface is an improvement in a flanged surface comprising a shallow groove following O-ring in communication with an entrance and exit port intersecting the shallow groove for injecting and withdrawing, respectively, a leak detection fluid, such as helium. A small quantity of helium injected into the entrance port will flow to the shallow groove, past the O-ring and to the exit port.

  6. United Biofuels Private Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    United Biofuels Private Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name: United Biofuels Private Limited Place: Tamil Nadu, India Sector: Biomass Product: India-based owner and operator...

  7. The end of the MACHO era, revisited: New limits on MACHO masses from halo wide binaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monroy-Rodríguez, Miguel A.; Allen, Christine

    2014-08-01

    In order to determine an upper bound for the mass of the massive compact halo objects (MACHOs), we use the halo binaries contained in a recent catalog by Allen and Monroy-Rodríguez. To dynamically model their interactions with massive perturbers, a Monte Carlo simulation is conducted, using an impulsive approximation method and assuming a galactic halo constituted by massive particles of a characteristic mass. The results of such simulations are compared with several subsamples of our improved catalog of candidate halo wide binaries. In accordance with Quinn et al., we also find our results to be very sensitive to the widest binaries. However, our larger sample, together with the fact that we can obtain galactic orbits for 150 of our systems, allows a more reliable estimate of the maximum MACHO mass than that obtained previously. If we employ the entire sample of 211 candidate halo stars we, obtain an upper limit of 112 M{sub ?}. However, using the 150 binaries in our catalog with computed galactic orbits, we are able to refine our fitting criteria. Thus, for the 100 most halo-like binaries we obtain a maximum MACHO mass of 21-68 M{sub ?}. Furthermore, we can estimate the dynamical effects of the galactic disk using binary samples that spend progressively shorter times within the disk. By extrapolating the limits obtained for our most reliable—albeit smallest—sample, we find that as the time spent within the disk tends to zero, the upper bound of the MACHO mass tends to less than 5 M{sub ?}. The non-uniform density of the halo has also been taken into account, but the limit obtained, less than 5 M{sub ?}, does not differ much from the previous one. Together with microlensing studies that provide lower limits on the MACHO mass, our results essentially exclude the existence of such objects in the galactic halo.

  8. Idaho Explosive Detection System

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Klinger, Jeff

    2013-05-28

    Learn how INL researchers are making the world safer by developing an explosives detection system that can inspect cargo. For more information about INL security research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory

  9. Explosive Detection Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-10-26

    To standardize and accelerate implementation of the Department of Energy (DOE) explosive detection program. DOE N 251.40, dated 5/3/01, extends this directive until 12/31/01.

  10. Energy Detectives (3 Activities)

    K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

    Students explore the classroom as they look and feel for signs of energy. They record the ways they use energy throughout a typical day in an energy detective journal.

  11. Hudol Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources JumpNewTexas: Energy Resources Jump to:Huber Heights,Hudol Limited

  12. Novacem Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg, Oregon: EnergyNongqishiCleanAlinca AgricolaNovacem Limited

  13. Hestiun Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA JumpDuimen River PowerHeckert BXTHengyuanUmweltHestiun Limited Jump

  14. Plaxica Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly SmartDB-2, Blue MountainSchool DistrictPlaxica Limited Jump to:

  15. Dose Limits | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department8,Department of2 Federal Register / Vol.DollarDorm RoomLimits

  16. Processes controlling upper-ocean heat content in Drake Passage Gordon R. Stephenson Jr.,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gille, Sarah T.

    Processes controlling upper-ocean heat content in Drake Passage Gordon R. Stephenson Jr.,1,2 Sarah importance of sources of nonsea- sonal variability in controlling upper-ocean heat content in the Drake Passage is used to examine variability in upper-ocean heat content that is not associated with the annual

  17. Nonlinear transforms of momenta and Planck scale limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Chakrabarti

    2003-01-13

    Starting with the generators of the Poincar\\'e group for arbitrary mass (m) and spin (s) a nonunitary transformation is implemented to obtain momenta with an absolute Planck scale limit. In the rest frame (for $m>0$) the transformed energy coincides with the standard one, both being $m$. As the latter tends to infinity under Lorentz transformations the former tends to a finite upper limit $m\\coth(lm) = l^{-1}+ O(l)$ where $l$ is the Planck length and the mass-dependent nonleading terms vanish exactly for zero rest mass.The invariant $m^{2}$ is conserved for the transformed momenta. The speed of light continues to be the absolute scale for velocities. We study various aspects of the kinematics in which two absolute scales have been introduced in this specific fashion. Precession of polarization and transformed position operators are among them. A deformation of the Poincar\\'e algebra to the SO(4,1) deSitter one permits the implementation of our transformation in the latter case. A supersymmetric extension of the Poincar\\'e algebra is also studied in this context.

  18. An early history of pure shear in the upper plate of the raft...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    early history of pure shear in the upper plate of the raft river metamorphic core complex- black pine mountains, southern Idaho Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

  19. Development of a Robotic Device for the Physical Training of Human Upper Extremity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramos, Jorge Adrian

    2013-04-22

    This thesis focuses on the development of a robotic device to be used in parallel with observational learning techniques for facilitating the recovery of the upper limb in post-stroke patients. It has been shown in the existing observational...

  20. The oceanic and cratonic upper mantle: Clues from joint interpretation of global velocity and attenuation models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asthenosphere Seismic attenuation Seismic velocity Anelasticity Partial melt Combined interpretation of seismicThe oceanic and cratonic upper mantle: Clues from joint interpretation of global velocity anelastic dispersion (Karato and Jung, 1998; Karato, 2003). A unique interpretation of seismological models

  1. Characterization of Section 404 Permit Mitigation Plans, Coastal Margin and Associated Watersheds, Upper Texas Coast 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conkey, April A.

    2010-01-14

    A predicted loss of agricultural rice-wetlands and increasing urbanization and development threatens the remaining freshwater wetlands along the upper Texas coast. To avoid, minimize, and mitigate wetland loss, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers...

  2. Geochemical and rheological constraints on the dynamics of the oceanic upper mantle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren, Jessica Mendelsohn

    2007-01-01

    I provide constraints on mantle convection through observations of the rheology and composition of the oceanic upper mantle. Convection cannot be directly observed, yet is a fundamental part of the plate tectonic cycle. ...

  3. Non-healing verrucous plaque over upper limb for 1 year in a tea garden worker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandal, Rajesh Kumar; Banerjee, Sabyasachi; Kumar, Piyush; Chakrabarti, Indranil

    2013-01-01

    upper limb for 1 year in a tea garden worker Rajesh KumarIndia Abstract A 55-year-old tea garden worker presentedH&E x400) A 55-year-old tea garden worker presented with a

  4. Terry sandstone member of the Pierre Shale, Upper Cretaceous, Spindle field, Denver Basin, Colorado 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helsley, Robert James

    1985-01-01

    of the first oil produc- tion was discovered in 1901 from the Upper Cretaceous Terry and Hygiene members of the Pierre Shale. After that initial production, the Terry and Hygiene members did not again become important reser- voirs for some 70 years despite...TERRY SANDSTONE MEMBER OF THE PIERRE SHALE, UPPER CRETACEOUS, SPINDLE FIELD, DENVER BASIN, COLORADO A Thesis by ROBERT JAMES HELSLEY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement...

  5. Trace fossils of Fort Hays Limestone Member of Niobrara Chalk (Upper Cretaceous), west-central Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, R. W.

    1970-07-17

    THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS PALEONTOLOGICAL CONTRIBUTIONS ARTICLE 53 (CRETACEOUS 2) TRACE FOSSILS OF FORT HAYS LIMESTONE MEMBER OF NIOBRARA CHALK (UPPER CRETACEOUS), WEST-CENTRAL KANSAS ROBERT W. FREY University of Georgia Marine Institute, Sapelo... Figures, 10 Plates, 4 Tables TRACE FOSSILS OF FORT HAYS LIMESTONE MEMBER OF NIOBRARA CHALK (UPPER CRETACEOUS), WEST-CENTRAL KANSAS' ROBERT W. FREY University of Georgia Marine Institute, Sapelo Island, Georgia CONTENTS PAGE PAGE ABSTRACT 5 Thalassinoides...

  6. Mechanical characteristics of folds in Upper Cretaceous strata in the Disturbed Belt of northwestern Montana 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Pat Kader

    1974-01-01

    MECHANICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF FOLDS IN UPPER CRETACEOUS STRATA IN THE DISTURBED BELT OF NORTHWESTERN MONTANA A Thesis by PAT KADER GILBERT Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1974 Major Subject: Geology MECHANICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF FOLDS IN UPPER CRETACEOUS STRATA IN THE DISTURBED BELT OF NORTHWESTERN MONTANA A Thesis by PAT KADER GILBERT Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman...

  7. Energy-limited escape revised

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salz, M; Czesla, S; Schmitt, J H M M

    2015-01-01

    Gas planets in close proximity to their host stars experience photoevaporative mass loss. The energy-limited escape concept is generally used to derive estimates for the planetary mass-loss rates. Our photoionization hydrodynamics simulations of the thermospheres of hot gas planets show that the energy-limited escape concept is valid only for planets with a gravitational potential lower than $\\log_\\mathrm{10}\\left( -\\Phi_{\\mathrm{G}}\\right) < 13.11~$erg$\\,$g$^{-1}$ because in these planets the radiative energy input is efficiently used to drive the planetary wind. Massive and compact planets with $\\log_\\mathrm{10}\\left( -\\Phi_{\\mathrm{G}}\\right) \\gtrsim 13.6~$erg$\\,$g$^{-1}$ exhibit more tightly bound atmospheres in which the complete radiative energy input is re-emitted through hydrogen Ly$\\alpha$ and free-free emission. These planets therefore host hydrodynamically stable thermospheres. Between these two extremes the strength of the planetary winds rapidly declines as a result of a decreasing heating eff...

  8. On the simulation of limit thresholds for ISOLDE decay station neutron detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arce Gamboa, José Rafael

    2015-01-01

    The recently comissioned ISOLDE decay station neutron detector (IDSN) efficiency was calibrated with a standard 252Cf neutron source, using lower threshold limits set at 0, 31 keV and 59.5 keV, and upper threhold of 3840 keV. Geant4 simulations were run to compare with the experimental efficiency where new detector limits were sought to fit the experimental data. Suitable values of limit thresholds were found that properly fit the simulation with experimental lower neutron energies, below 1 MeV, but strongly departs from data above it. It is concluded that the simulation is incomplete at this point, and so a review must be done on the nuclear physics and scintillation light Geant4 packages in order to properly reproduce the detector properties.

  9. An improved limit on the axion-photon coupling from the CAST experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CAST Collaboration

    2007-03-23

    We have searched for solar axions or similar particles that couple to two photons by using the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) setup with improved conditions in all detectors. From the absence of excess X-rays when the magnet was pointing to the Sun, we set an upper limit on the axion-photon coupling of 8.8 x 10^{-11} GeV^{-1} at 95% CL for m_a <~ 0.02 eV. This result is the best experimental limit over a broad range of axion masses and for m_a <~ 0.02 eV also supersedes the previous limit derived from energy-loss arguments on globular-cluster stars.

  10. Polymorphisms of the Hypoxia Inducible Factor 1 and microRNA Related Genes and the Susceptibility and Survival of Lung Cancer and Upper Aero-Digestive Tract Cancers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    YANG, YING

    2014-01-01

    1 I. Lung and upper aero-digestive tractof Lung Cancer and Upper Aero-Digestive Tract Cancers Aof Lung Cancer and Upper Aero-Digestive Tract Cancers by

  11. Faraday rotation limits on a primordial magnetic field from Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe five-year data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kahniashvili, Tina [Department of Physics and McWilliams Center for Cosmology, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Department of Physics, Laurentian University, Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, ON P3E 2C6 (Canada); National Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory, Ilia Chavchavadze State University, 2A Kazbegi Ave, Tbilisi, GE-0160 (Georgia); Maravin, Yurii [Department of Physics, Kansas State University, 116 Cardwell Hall, Manhattan, Kansas 66506 (United States); Kosowsky, Arthur [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, 3941 O'Hara Street, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 (United States)

    2009-07-15

    A primordial magnetic field in the early universe will cause Faraday rotation of the linear polarization of the cosmic microwave background generated via Compton scattering at the surface of last scattering. This rotation induces a nonzero parity-odd (B-mode) polarization component. The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe 5-year data puts an upper limit on the magnitude of the B-polarization power spectrum; assuming that the B-polarization signal is totally due to the Faraday rotation effect, the upper limits on the comoving amplitude of a primordial stochastic magnetic field range from 6x10{sup -8} to 2x10{sup -6} G on a comoving length scale of 1 Mpc, depending on the power spectrum of the magnetic field.

  12. Temperature differential detection device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Girling, Peter M. (Allentown, PA)

    1986-01-01

    A temperature differential detection device for detecting the temperature differential between predetermined portions of a container wall is disclosed as comprising a Wheatstone bridge circuit for detecting resistance imbalance with a first circuit branch having a first elongated wire element mounted in thermal contact with a predetermined portion of the container wall, a second circuit branch having a second elongated wire element mounted in thermal contact with a second predetermined portion of a container wall with the wire elements having a predetermined temperature-resistant coefficient, an indicator interconnected between the first and second branches remote from the container wall for detecting and indicating resistance imbalance between the first and second wire elements, and connector leads for electrically connecting the wire elements to the remote indicator in order to maintain the respective resistance value relationship between the first and second wire elements. The indicator is calibrated to indicate the detected resistance imbalance in terms of a temperature differential between the first and second wall portions.

  13. Tau-neutrino mass limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.

    1987-05-01

    was supported in part by the U.S. Depart- ment of Energy under Contracts Nos. W-31-109-Eng-38, DE-AC02-76ER011 12, DE-AC03-76S F000998, DE- AC02-76ER01428, and DE-AC02-84ER40125. This ex- periment was made possible by the support provided by the SLAC PEP staff... articles is followed, and page proofs are sent to authors. Tau-neutrino mass limit S. Abachi, P. Baringer, B. G. Bylsma, R. De Bonte, D. Koltick, F. J. Loeffler, E. H. Low, R. L. McIlwain, D. H. Miller, C. R. Ng, L. K. Rangan, and E. I. Shibata Purdue...

  14. Physics of the Shannon Limits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merhav, Neri

    2009-01-01

    We provide a simple physical interpretation, in the context of the second law of thermodynamics, to the information inequality (a.k.a. the Gibbs' inequality, which is also equivalent to the log-sum inequality), asserting that the relative entropy between two probability distributions cannot be negative. Since this inequality stands at the basis of the data processing theorem (DPT), and the DPT in turn is at the heart of most, if not all, proofs of converse theorems in Shannon theory, it is observed that conceptually, the roots of fundamental limits of Information Theory can actually be attributed to the laws of physics, in particular, to the second law of thermodynamics, and at least indirectly, also to the law of energy conservation. By the same token, in the other direction: one can view the second law as stemming from information-theoretic principles.

  15. The limits of filopodium stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sander Pronk; Phillip L. Geissler; Daniel A. Fletcher

    2008-03-03

    Filopodia are long, finger-like membrane tubes supported by cytoskeletal filaments. Their shape is determined by the stiffness of the actin filament bundles found inside them and by the interplay between the surface tension and bending rigidity of the membrane. Although one might expect the Euler buckling instability to limit the length of filopodia, we show through simple energetic considerations that this is in general not the case. By further analyzing the statics of filaments inside membrane tubes, and through computer simulations that capture membrane and filament fluctuations, we show under which conditions filopodia of arbitrary lengths are stable. We discuss several in vitro experiments where this kind of stability has already been observed. Furthermore, we predict that the filaments in long, stable filopodia adopt a helical shape.

  16. Limited-life cartridge primers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; Rosen, Robert S.

    2005-04-19

    A cartridge primer which utilizes an explosive that can be designed to become inactive in a predetermined period of time: a limited-life primer. The explosive or combustible material of the primer is an inorganic reactive multilayer (RML). The reaction products of the RML are sub-micron grains of non-corrosive inorganic compounds that would have no harmful effects on firearms or cartridge cases. Unlike use of primers containing lead components, primers utilizing RML's would not present a hazard to the environment. The sensitivity of an RML is determined by the physical structure and the stored interfacial energy. The sensitivity lowers with time due to a decrease in interfacial energy resulting from interdiffusion of the elemental layers. Time-dependent interdiffusion is predictable, thereby enabling the functional lifetime of an RML primer to be predetermined by the initial thickness and materials selection of the reacting layers.

  17. Limited-life cartridge primers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, D.M.; Rosen, R.S.

    1998-06-30

    A cartridge primer is described which utilizes an explosive that can be designed to become inactive in a predetermined period of time: a limited-life primer. The explosive or combustible material of the primer is an inorganic reactive multilayer (RML). The reaction products of the RML are sub-micron grains of non-corrosive inorganic compounds that would have no harmful effects on firearms or cartridge cases. Unlike use of primers containing lead components, primers utilizing RML`s would not present a hazard to the environment. The sensitivity of an RML is determined by the physical structure and the stored interfacial energy. The sensitivity lowers with time due to a decrease in interfacial energy resulting from interdiffusion of the elemental layers. Time-dependent interdiffusion is predictable, thereby enabling the functional lifetime of an RML primer to be predetermined by the initial thickness and materials selection of the reacting layers. 10 figs.

  18. Limited-life cartridge primers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); Rosen, Robert S. (San Ramon, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A cartridge primer which utilizes an explosive that can be designed to become inactive in a predetermined period of time: a limited-life primer. The explosive or combustible material of the primer is an inorganic reactive multilayer (RML). The reaction products of the RML are sub-micron grains of non-corrosive inorganic compounds that would have no harmful effects on firearms or cartridge cases. Unlike use of primers containing lead components, primers utilizing RML's would not present a hazard to the environment. The sensitivity of an RML is determined by the physical structure and the stored interfacial energy. The sensitivity lowers with time due to a decrease in interfacial energy resulting from interdiffusion of the elemental layers. Time-dependent interdiffusion is predictable, thereby enabling the functional lifetime of an RML primer to be predetermined by the initial thickness and materials selection of the reacting layers.

  19. Limited View Angle Iterative CT Reconstruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Connelly, "CT Technologies," in Aspects of Explosives Detection, Elsevier 2009. Dual energy CT Z. Ying, R. Nam and C. R. Crawford, "Dual energy computed tomography for explosive detection," Journal of X

  20. Anisotropy reversal of the upper critical field at low temperatures and spin-locked superconductivity in K2Cr3As3

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Balakirev, F. F.; Kong, T.; Jaime, M.; McDonald, R. D.; Mielke, C. H.; Gurevich, A.; Canfield, P. C.; Bud'ko, S. L.

    2015-06-23

    We report measurements of the anisotropic upper critical field Hc2(T) for K2Cr3As3 single crystals up to 60 T and T>0.6K. Our results show that the upper critical field parallel to the Cr chains, H?c2(T), exhibits a paramagnetically limited behavior, whereas the shape of the H?c2(T) curve (perpendicular to the Cr chains) has no evidence of paramagnetic effects. As a result, the curves H?c2(T) and H?c2(T) cross at T?4K, so that the anisotropy parameter ?H(T)=H?c2/H?c2(T)increases from ?H(Tc)?0.35 near Tc to ?H(0)?1.7 at 0.6 K. The paramagnetically limited behavior of H?c2(T) is inconsistent with triplet superconductivity but suggests a form of singletmore »superconductivity with the electron spins locked onto the direction of Cr chains.« less

  1. Negative Backaction Noise in Interferometric Detection of a Microlever

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Laurent; A. Mosset; O. Arcizet; J. Chevrier; S. Huant; H. Sellier

    2011-07-22

    Interferometric detection of mirror displacements is intrinsically limited by laser shot noise. In practice, however, it is often limited by thermal noise. Here we report on an experiment performed at the liquid helium temperature to overcome the thermal noise limitation and investigate the effect of classical laser noise on a microlever that forms a Fabry-Perot cavity with an optical fiber. The spectral noise densities show a region of negative contribution of the backaction noise close to the resonance frequency. We interpret this noise reduction as a coherent coupling of the microlever to the laser intensity noise. This optomechanical effect could be used to improve the detection sensitivity as discussed in proposals going beyond the Standard Quantum Limit.

  2. Nucleic acid detection kits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Mast, Andrea L.; Brow, Mary Ann; Kwiatkowski, Robert W.; Vavra, Stephanie H.

    2005-03-29

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based on charge. The present invention also provides methods for the detection of non-target cleavage products via the formation of a complete and activated protein binding region. The invention further provides sensitive and specific methods for the detection of nucleic acid from various viruses in a sample.

  3. Solar system fault detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farrington, R.B.; Pruett, J.C. Jr.

    1984-05-14

    A fault detecting apparatus and method are provided for use with an active solar system. The apparatus provides an indication as to whether one or more predetermined faults have occurred in the solar system. The apparatus includes a plurality of sensors, each sensor being used in determining whether a predetermined condition is present. The outputs of the sensors are combined in a pre-established manner in accordance with the kind of predetermined faults to be detected. Indicators communicate with the outputs generated by combining the sensor outputs to give the user of the solar system and the apparatus an indication as to whether a predetermined fault has occurred. Upon detection and indication of any predetermined fault, the user can take appropriate corrective action so that the overall reliability and efficiency of the active solar system are increased.

  4. Solar system fault detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farrington, Robert B. (Wheatridge, CO); Pruett, Jr., James C. (Lakewood, CO)

    1986-01-01

    A fault detecting apparatus and method are provided for use with an active solar system. The apparatus provides an indication as to whether one or more predetermined faults have occurred in the solar system. The apparatus includes a plurality of sensors, each sensor being used in determining whether a predetermined condition is present. The outputs of the sensors are combined in a pre-established manner in accordance with the kind of predetermined faults to be detected. Indicators communicate with the outputs generated by combining the sensor outputs to give the user of the solar system and the apparatus an indication as to whether a predetermined fault has occurred. Upon detection and indication of any predetermined fault, the user can take appropriate corrective action so that the overall reliability and efficiency of the active solar system are increased.

  5. Error detection method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olson, Eric J.

    2013-06-11

    An apparatus, program product, and method that run an algorithm on a hardware based processor, generate a hardware error as a result of running the algorithm, generate an algorithm output for the algorithm, compare the algorithm output to another output for the algorithm, and detect the hardware error from the comparison. The algorithm is designed to cause the hardware based processor to heat to a degree that increases the likelihood of hardware errors to manifest, and the hardware error is observable in the algorithm output. As such, electronic components may be sufficiently heated and/or sufficiently stressed to create better conditions for generating hardware errors, and the output of the algorithm may be compared at the end of the run to detect a hardware error that occurred anywhere during the run that may otherwise not be detected by traditional methodologies (e.g., due to cooling, insufficient heat and/or stress, etc.).

  6. Composition for detecting uranyl

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baylor, L.C.; Stephens, S.M.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention relates to an indicator composition for use in spectrophotometric detection of a substance in a solution, and a method for making the composition. Useful indicators are sensitive to the particular substance being measured, but are unaffected by the fluid and other chemical species that may be present in the fluid. Optical indicators are used to measure the uranium concentration of process solutions in facilities for extracting uranium from ores, production of nuclear fuels, and reprocessing of irradiated fuels. The composition comprises an organohalide covalently bonded to an indicator for the substance, in such a manner that the product is itself an indicator that provides increased spectral resolution for detecting the substance. The indicator is preferably arsenazo III and the organohalide is preferably cyanuric chloride. These form a composition that is ideally suited for detecting uranyl.

  7. Relating to ion detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Christopher Henry (Calderbridge, GB); Luff, Craig Janson (Calderbridge, GB); Dockray, Thomas (Calderbridge, GB); Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore (Los Alamos, NM)

    2001-01-01

    The apparatus and method provide a technique for improving detection of alpha and/or beta emitting sources on items or in locations using indirect means. The emission forms generate ions in a medium surrounding the item or location and the medium is then moved to a detecting location where the ions are discharged to give a measure of the emission levels. To increase the level of ions generated and render the system particularly applicable for narrow pipes and other forms of conduits, the medium pressure is increased above atmospheric pressure. STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT

  8. Detection of solar events

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fischbach, Ephraim; Jenkins, Jere

    2013-08-27

    A flux detection apparatus can include a radioactive sample having a decay rate capable of changing in response to interaction with a first particle or a field, and a detector associated with the radioactive sample. The detector is responsive to a second particle or radiation formed by decay of the radioactive sample. The rate of decay of the radioactive sample can be correlated to flux of the first particle or the field. Detection of the first particle or the field can provide an early warning for an impending solar event.

  9. Detection of neutrinos

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fischbach, Ephraim; Jenkins, Jere

    2014-02-04

    A flux detection apparatus can include a radioactive sample having a decay rate capable of changing in response to interaction with a first particle or a field, and a detector associated with the radioactive sample. The detector is responsive to a second particle or radiation formed by decay of the radioactive sample. The rate of decay of the radioactive sample can be correlated to flux of the first particle or the field. Detection of the first particle or the field can provide an early warning for an impending solar event.

  10. Reaching the quantum limit of sensitivity in electron spin resonance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Bienfait; J. J. Pla; Y. Kubo; M. Stern; X. Zhou; C. C. Lo; C. D. Weis; T. Schenkel; M. L. W. Thewalt; D. Vion; D. Esteve; B. Julsgaard; K. Moelmer; J. J. L. Morton; P. Bertet

    2015-07-24

    We report pulsed electron-spin resonance (ESR) measurements on an ensemble of Bismuth donors in Silicon cooled at 10mK in a dilution refrigerator. Using a Josephson parametric microwave amplifier combined with high-quality factor superconducting micro-resonators cooled at millikelvin temperatures, we improve the state-of-the-art sensitivity of inductive ESR detection by nearly 4 orders of magnitude. We demonstrate the detection of 1700 bismuth donor spins in silicon within a single Hahn echo with unit signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio, reduced to just 150 spins by averaging a single Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill sequence. This unprecedented sensitivity reaches the limit set by quantum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field instead of thermal or technical noise, which constitutes a novel regime for magnetic resonance.

  11. Shear wall ultimate drift limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffey, T.A.; Goldman, A.; Farrar, C.R.

    1994-04-01

    Drift limits for reinforced-concrete shear walls are investigated by reviewing the open literature for appropriate experimental data. Drift values at ultimate are determined for walls with aspect ratios ranging up to a maximum of 3.53 and undergoing different types of lateral loading (cyclic static, monotonic static, and dynamic). Based on the geometry of actual nuclear power plant structures exclusive of containments and concerns regarding their response during seismic (i.e.,cyclic) loading, data are obtained from pertinent references for which the wall aspect ratio is less than or equal to approximately 1, and for which testing is cyclic in nature (typically displacement controlled). In particular, lateral deflections at ultimate load, and at points in the softening region beyond ultimate for which the load has dropped to 90, 80, 70, 60, and 50 percent of its ultimate value, are obtained and converted to drift information. The statistical nature of the data is also investigated. These data are shown to be lognormally distributed, and an analysis of variance is performed. The use of statistics to estimate Probability of Failure for a shear wall structure is illustrated.

  12. Detection of counterfeit currency

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burns, D.A.

    1998-05-26

    A method is disclosed of detecting counterfeit currency by contacting the currency to be tested with near infrared beams in the spectrum below 1,250 nanometers, measuring reflectance of the near infrared beams and comparing the reflectance values with those from genuine currency. 18 figs.

  13. An Improved Experimental Limit on the Electric Dipole Moment of the Neutron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. A. Baker; D. D. Doyle; P. Geltenbort; K. Green; M. G. D. van der Grinten; P. G. Harris; P. Iaydjiev; S. N. Ivanov; D. J. R. May; J. M. Pendlebury; J. D. Richardson; D. Shiers; K. F. Smith

    2006-09-28

    An experimental search for an electric-dipole moment (EDM) of the neutron has been carried out at the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL), Grenoble. Spurious signals from magnetic-field fluctuations were reduced to insignificance by the use of a cohabiting atomic-mercury magnetometer. Systematic uncertainties, including geometric-phase-induced false EDMs, have been carefully studied. Two independent approaches to the analysis have been adopted. The overall results may be interpreted as an upper limit on the absolute value of the neutron EDM of |d_n| < 2.9 x 10^{-26} e cm (90% CL).

  14. Limits on tau lepton flavor violating decays in three charged leptons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cervelli, Alberto

    2010-04-29

    A search for the neutrinoless, lepton-flavor violating decay of the {tau} lepton into three charged leptons has been performed using an integrated luminosity of 468 fb{sup -1} collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II collider. In all six decay modes considered, the numbers of events found in data are compatible with the background expectations. Upper limits on the branching fractions are set in the range (1.8-3.3) x 10{sup -8} at 90% confidence level.

  15. Correlation and image compression for limited-bandwidth CCD.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, Douglas G.

    2005-07-01

    As radars move to Unmanned Aerial Vehicles with limited-bandwidth data downlinks, the amount of data stored and transmitted with each image becomes more significant. This document gives the results of a study to determine the effect of lossy compression in the image magnitude and phase on Coherent Change Detection (CCD). We examine 44 lossy compression types, plus lossless zlib compression, and test each compression method with over 600 CCD image pairs. We also derive theoretical predictions for the correlation for most of these compression schemes, which compare favorably with the experimental results. We recommend image transmission formats for limited-bandwidth programs having various requirements for CCD, including programs which cannot allow performance degradation and those which have stricter bandwidth requirements at the expense of CCD performance.

  16. Dark matter limits froma 15 kg windowless bubble chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szydagis, Matthew Mark; /Chicago U.

    2010-12-01

    The COUPP collaboration has successfully used bubble chambers, a technology previously applied only to high-energy physics experiments, as direct dark matter detectors. It has produced the world's most stringent spin-dependent WIMP limits, and increasingly competitive spin-independent limits. These limits were achieved by capitalizing on an intrinsic rejection of the gamma background that all other direct detection experiments must address through high-density shielding and empirically-determined data cuts. The history of COUPP, including its earliest prototypes and latest results, is briefly discussed in this thesis. The feasibility of a new, windowless bubble chamber concept simpler and more inexpensive in design is discussed here as well. The dark matter limits achieved with a 15 kg windowless chamber, larger than any previous COUPP chamber (2 kg, 4 kg), are presented. Evidence of the greater radiopurity of synthetic quartz compared to natural is presented using the data from this 15 kg device, the first chamber to be made from synthetic quartz. The effective reconstruction of the three-dimensional positions of bubbles in a highly distorted optical field, with ninety-degree bottom lighting similar to cloud chamber lighting, is demonstrated. Another innovation described in this thesis is the use of the sound produced by bubbles recorded by an array of piezoelectric sensors as the primary means of bubble detection. In other COUPP chambers, cameras have been used as the primary trigger. Previous work on bubble acoustic signature differentiation using piezos is built upon in order to further demonstrate the ability to discriminate between alpha- and neutron-induced events.

  17. Rapid detection of Ebola virus with a reagent-free, point-of-care biosensor

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Baca, Justin T.; Severns, Virginia; Lovato, Debbie; Branch, Darren W.; Larson, Richard S.

    2015-04-14

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors can rapidly detect Ebola antigens at the point-of-care without the need for added reagents, sample processing, or specialized personnel. This preliminary study demonstrates SAW biosensor detection of the Ebola virus in a concentration-dependent manner. The detection limit with this methodology is below the average level of viremia detected on the first day of symptoms by PCR. We observe a log-linear sensor response for highly fragmented Ebola viral particles, with a detection limit corresponding to 1.9 × 10? PFU/mL prior to virus inactivation. We predict greatly improved sensitivity for intact, infectious Ebola virus. This point-of-care methodologymore »has the potential to detect Ebola viremia prior to symptom onset, greatly enabling infection control and rapid treatment. This biosensor platform is powered by disposable AA batteries and can be rapidly adapted to detect other emerging diseases in austere conditions.« less

  18. Neural substrates of cognitive capacity limitations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buschman, Tim

    Cognition has a severely limited capacity: Adult humans can retain only about four items “in mind”. This limitation is fundamental to human brain function: Individual capacity is highly correlated with intelligence measures ...

  19. Graduate Program Time Limits and Work Schedules

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Time Limits and Work Schedules Graduate Program Time Limits and Work Schedules Point your career towards Los Alamos Lab: work with the best minds on the planet in an inclusive...

  20. FUNDAMENTAL PERFORMANCE LIMITS OF WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Baochun

    FUNDAMENTAL PERFORMANCE LIMITS OF WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORKS ZHIHUA HU, BAOCHUN LI Abstract. Understanding the fundamental performance limits of wireless sensor networks is critical towards. In addition to presenting the general results with respect to the maximum sustainable throughput of wireless

  1. Trace Explosive Detection using Photothermal Deflection Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krause, Adam R; Van Neste, Charles W; Senesac, Larry R; Thundat, Thomas George; Finot, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Satisfying the conditions of high sensitivity and high selectivity using portable sensors that are also reversible is a challenge. Miniature sensors such as microcantilevers offer high sensitivity but suffer from poor selectivity due to the lack of sufficiently selective receptors. Although many of the mass deployable spectroscopic techniques provide high selectivity, they do not have high sensitivity. Here, we show that this challenge can be overcome by combining photothermal spectroscopy on a bimaterial microcantilever with the mass induced change in the cantilever's resonance frequency. Detection using adsorption-induced resonant frequency shift together with photothermal deflection spectroscopy shows extremely high selectivity with a subnanogram limit of detection for vapor phase adsorbed explosives, such as pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX), and trinitrotoluene (TNT).

  2. Primordial magnetic field limits from cosmological data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kahniashvili, Tina [McWilliams Center for Cosmology and Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Department of Physics, Laurentian University, Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C (Canada); Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory, Ilia State University, 2A Kazbegi Ave, Tbilisi, GE-0160 (Georgia); Tevzadze, Alexander G. [Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory, Ilia State University, 2A Kazbegi Ave, Tbilisi, GE-0160 (Georgia); Faculty of Exact and Natural Sciences, Tbilisi State University, 1 Chavchavadze Avenue, Tbilisi, GE-0128 (Georgia); Sethi, Shiv K. [McWilliams Center for Cosmology and Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Raman Research Institute, Sadashivanagar, Bangalore 560080 (India); Pandey, Kanhaiya [Raman Research Institute, Sadashivanagar, Bangalore 560080 (India); Ratra, Bharat [Department of Physics, Kansas State University, 116 Cardwell Hall, Manhattan, Kansas 66506 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    We study limits on a primordial magnetic field arising from cosmological data, including that from big bang nucleosynthesis, cosmic microwave background polarization plane Faraday rotation limits, and large-scale structure formation. We show that the physically relevant quantity is the value of the effective magnetic field, and limits on it are independent of how the magnetic field was generated.

  3. High temperature superconducting fault current limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, J.R.

    1997-02-04

    A fault current limiter for an electrical circuit is disclosed. The fault current limiter includes a high temperature superconductor in the electrical circuit. The high temperature superconductor is cooled below its critical temperature to maintain the superconducting electrical properties during operation as the fault current limiter. 15 figs.

  4. High temperature superconducting fault current limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL)

    1997-01-01

    A fault current limiter (10) for an electrical circuit (14). The fault current limiter (10) includes a high temperature superconductor (12) in the electrical circuit (14). The high temperature superconductor (12) is cooled below its critical temperature to maintain the superconducting electrical properties during operation as the fault current limiter (10).

  5. Economic Growth, Physical Limits and Liveability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Economic Growth, Physical Limits and Liveability: Can Metro Vancouver Achieve all Three? by Jeremy of Thesis: Economic Growth, Physical Limits and Liveability: Can Metro Vancouver Achieve all Three. The Local Energy scenario adds a local energy limit. For each scenario I assume continuous economic

  6. Method for early detection of cooling-loss events

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bermudez, Sergio A.; Hamann, Hendrik F.; Marianno, Fernando J.

    2015-12-22

    A method of detecting cooling-loss event early is provided. The method includes defining a relative humidity limit and change threshold for a given space, measuring relative humidity in the given space, determining, with a processing unit, whether the measured relative humidity is within the defined relative humidity limit, generating a warning in an event the measured relative humidity is outside the defined relative humidity limit and determining whether a change in the measured relative humidity is less than the defined change threshold for the given space and generating an alarm in an event the change is greater than the defined change threshold.

  7. Parallel Heuristics for Scalable Community Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Howard; Kalyanaraman, Anantharaman; Halappanavar, Mahantesh; Choudhury, Sutanay

    2014-05-17

    Community detection has become a fundamental operation in numerous graph-theoretic applications. It is used to reveal natural divisions that exist within real world networks without imposing prior size or cardinality constraints on the set of communities. Despite its potential for application, there is only limited support for community detection on large-scale parallel computers, largely owing to the irregular and inherently sequential nature of the underlying heuristics. In this paper, we present parallelization heuristics for fast community detection using the Louvain method as the serial template. The Louvain method is an iterative heuristic for modularity optimization. Originally developed by Blondel et al. in 2008, the method has become increasingly popular owing to its ability to detect high modularity community partitions in a fast and memory-efficient manner. However, the method is also inherently sequential, thereby limiting its scalability to problems that can be solved on desktops. Here, we observe certain key properties of this method that present challenges for its parallelization, and consequently propose multiple heuristics that are designed to break the sequential barrier. Our heuristics are agnostic to the underlying parallel architecture. For evaluation purposes, we implemented our heuristics on shared memory (OpenMP) and distributed memory (MapReduce-MPI) machines, and tested them over real world graphs derived from multiple application domains (internet, biological, natural language processing). Experimental results demonstrate the ability of our heuristics to converge to high modularity solutions comparable to those output by the serial algorithm in nearly the same number of iterations, while also drastically reducing time to solution.

  8. Hydrochemistry and hydrogeologic conditions within the Hanford Site upper basalt confined aquifer system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spane, F.A. Jr.; Webber, W.D.

    1995-09-01

    As part of the Hanford Site Ground-Water Surveillance Project, Flow System Characterization Task. Pacific Northwest Laboratory examines the potential for offsite migration of contamination within the upper basalt confined aquifer system for the US Department of Energy (DOE). As part of this activity, groundwater samples were collected over the past 2 years from selected wells completed in the upper Saddle Mountains Basalt. The hydrochemical and isotopic information obtained from these groundwater samples provides hydrologic information concerning the aquifer-flow system. Ideally, when combined with other hydrologic property information, hydrochemical and isotopic data can be used to evaluate the origin and source of groundwater, areal groundwater-flow patterns, residence and groundwater travel time, rock/groundwater reactions, and aquifer intercommunication for the upper basalt confined aquifer system. This report presents the first comprehensive Hanford Site-wide summary of hydrochemical properties for the upper basalt confined aquifer system. This report provides the hydrogeologic characteristics (Section 2.0) and hydrochemical properties (Section 3.0) for groundwater within this system. A detailed description of the range of the identified hydrochemical parameter subgroups for groundwater in the upper basalt confined aquifer system is also presented in Section 3.0. Evidence that is indicative of aquifer contamination/aquifer intercommunication and an assessment of the potential for offsite migration of contaminants in groundwater within the upper basalt aquifer is provided in Section 4.0. The references cited throughout the report are given in Section 5.0. Tables that summarize groundwater sample analysis results for individual test interval/well sites are included in the Appendix.

  9. Protein detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fruetel, Julie A. (Livermore, CA); Fiechtner, Gregory J. (Bethesda, MD); Kliner, Dahv A. V. (San Ramon, CA); McIlroy, Andrew (Livermore, CA)

    2009-05-05

    The present embodiment describes a miniature, microfluidic, absorption-based sensor to detect proteins at sensitivities comparable to LIF but without the need for tagging. This instrument utilizes fiber-based evanescent-field cavity-ringdown spectroscopy, in combination with faceted prism microchannels. The combination of these techniques will increase the effective absorption path length by a factor of 10.sup.3 to 10.sup.4 (to .about.1-m), thereby providing unprecedented sensitivity using direct absorption. The coupling of high-sensitivity absorption with high-performance microfluidic separation will enable real-time sensing of biological agents in aqueous samples (including aerosol collector fluids) and will provide a general method with spectral fingerprint capability for detecting specific bio-agents.

  10. Chlorofluorocarbon leak detection technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munday, E.B.

    1990-12-01

    There are about 590 large coolant systems located at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) and the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) leaking nearly 800,000 lb of R-114 refrigerant annually (1989 estimate). A program is now under way to reduce the leakage to 325,000 lb/year -- an average loss of 551 lb/year (0.063 lb/h) per coolant system, some of which are as large as 800 ft. This report investigates leak detection technologies that can be used to locate leaks in the coolant systems. Included are descriptions, minimum leak detection rate levels, advantages, disadvantages, and vendor information on the following technologies: bubbling solutions; colorimetric leak testing; dyes; halogen leak detectors (coronea discharge detectors; halide torch detectors, and heated anode detectors); laser imaging; mass spectroscopy; organic vapor analyzers; odorants; pressure decay methods; solid-state electrolytic-cell gas sensors; thermal conductivity leak detectors; and ultrasonic leak detectors.

  11. May Gravity detect Tsunami ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fargion, D

    2004-01-01

    The present gravitational wave detectors are reaching lowest metric deviation fields able to detect galactic and extra-galactic gravitational waves, related to Supernova explosions up to Virgo cluster. The same gravitational wave detector are nevertheless almost able to reveal near field gravitational perturbations due to fast huge mass displacements as the ones occurring during largest Earth-Quake or Tsunami as the last on 26th December 2004 in Asiatic area. The prompt gravitational near field deformation by the Tsunami may reach the LIGO threshold sensitivity within 3000-10000 km distances. Their eventual discover (in LIGO data or in future on-line detector arrays) may offer the most rapid warning alarm system on earth. Nevertheless the later continental mass rearrangement and their gravitational field assessment on Earth must induce, for Richter Magnitude 9 Tsunami, a different terrestrial inertia momentum and a different rotation axis, as well as a detectable shrinking of the Earth radius of nearly R =1.7...

  12. Solar neutrino detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lino Miramonti

    2009-01-22

    More than 40 years ago, neutrinos where conceived as a way to test the validity of the solar models which tell us that stars are powered by nuclear fusion reactions. The first measurement of the neutrino flux, in 1968 in the Homestake mine in South Dakota, detected only one third of the expected value, originating what has been known as the Solar Neutrino Problem. Different experiments were built in order to understand the origin of this discrepancy. Now we know that neutrinos undergo oscillation phenomenon changing their nature traveling from the core of the Sun to our detectors. In the work the 40 year long saga of the neutrino detection is presented; from the first proposals to test the solar models to last real time measurements of the low energy part of the neutrino spectrum.

  13. Termination Detection of Local Computations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Godard, Emmanuel; Tel, Gerard

    2010-01-01

    Contrary to the sequential world, the processes involved in a distributed system do not necessarily know when a computation is globally finished. This paper investigates the problem of the detection of the termination of local computations. We define four types of termination detection: no detection, detection of the local termination, detection by a distributed observer, detection of the global termination. We give a complete characterisation (except in the local termination detection case where a partial one is given) for each of this termination detection and show that they define a strict hierarchy. These results emphasise the difference between computability of a distributed task and termination detection. Furthermore, these characterisations encompass all standard criteria that are usually formulated : topological restriction (tree, rings, or triangu- lated networks ...), topological knowledge (size, diameter ...), and local knowledge to distinguish nodes (identities, sense of direction). These re- sult...

  14. Upper Devonian and Lower Mississippian conodont zones in Montana, Wyoming, and South Dakota

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klapper, G.

    1966-05-23

    of the Cheiloceras-Stufe in New York are the same as HASS ' lower Gassaway faunal zone in its New York occurrence, with the exception of the South Wales Member of the Perrysburg Formation. The upper Gassaway fau- nal zone of the Chattanooga Shale (51, p. 22... of the Cheiloceras-Stufe in New York are the same as HASS ' lower Gassaway faunal zone in its New York occurrence, with the exception of the South Wales Member of the Perrysburg Formation. The upper Gassaway fau- nal zone of the Chattanooga Shale (51, p. 22...

  15. Effect of wind speed on the growth of the upper convective zone in a solar pond 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMinn, Steven Lee

    1990-01-01

    EFFECT OF WIND SPEED ON THE GROWTH OF THE UPPER CONVECTIVE ZONE IN A SOLAR POND A Thesis by STEVEN LEE MCMINN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1990 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering EFFECT OF WIND SPEED ON THE GROWTH OF THE UPPER CONVECTIVE ZONE IN A SOLAR POND A Thesis by STEVEN LEE MCMINN Approved as to style and content by: W. R. Laster (Chair...

  16. 2009 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved. An optoelectronic nose for the detection of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    ). Specific examples of such sensors include conductive polymers and polymer composites, multiple polymers­8 , it is the composite response of the chemical reactivity of such an array that identifies an odorant or mixture or conductivity) or occur after physisorption on surfaces (for example, analyte oxidation on heated metal oxides

  17. Fundamental Limits on Secure Clock Synchronization and Man-In-The-Middle Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    be built, including routing protocols and more sophisticated heavyweight protocols. I. INTRODUCTION to conserve power. If synchronization is lost or tampered with in such systems, nodes may waste power waking up and transmitting at times when other nodes are asleep. Thus, secure clock synchronization

  18. Computational modeling techniques for biological network productivity increases : optimization and rate-limiting reaction detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yuanyuan, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01

    The rapid development and applications of high throughput measurement techniques bring the biological sciences into a 'big data' era. The vast available data for enzyme and metabolite concentrations, fluxes, and kinetics ...

  19. Detection Limit of H and D for Tritium Process R&D

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation from the 35th Tritium Focus Group Meeting held in Princeton, New Jersey on May 05-07, 2015.

  20. Method for detecting biomolecules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huo, Qisheng (Albuquerque, NM); Liu, Jun (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-08-12

    A method for detecting and measuring the concentration of biomolecules in solution, utilizing a conducting electrode in contact with a solution containing target biomolecules, with a film with controllable pore size distribution characteristics applied to at least one surface of the conducting electrode. The film is functionalized with probe molecules that chemically interact with the target biomolecules at the film surface, blocking indicator molecules present in solution from diffusing from the solution to the electrode, thereby changing the electrochemical response of the electrode

  1. Fraud Detection in Healthcare

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandola, Varun; Schryver, Jack C; Sukumar, Sreenivas R

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the problem of fraud detection in healthcare in this chapter. Given the recent scrutiny of the ineciencies in the US healthcare system, identifying fraud has been on the forefront of the eorts towards reducing the healthcare costs. In this chapter we will focus on understanding the issue of healthcare fraud in detail, and review methods that have been proposed in the literature to combat this issue using data driven approach.

  2. Combined Tevatron upper limit on gg --> H --> W[superscript +]W[superscript -] and constraints on the Higgs boson mass in fourth-generation fermion models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paus, Christoph M. E.

    We combine results from searches by the CDF and D0 collaborations for a standard model Higgs boson (H) in the process gg-->H-->W+W- in pp? collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at [sqrt]s=1.96??TeV. With 4.8??fb-1 ...

  3. Combined upper limit on standard model higgs boson production at D0 in $p \\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernhard, Ralf; /Freiburg U.

    2010-12-01

    The latest searches for the Standard Model Higgs boson at a centre-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV with the D0 and the CDF detectors at the Fermilab Tevatron collider are presented. For the first time since the LEP experiments the sensitivity for a Standard Model Higgs boson has been reached at a Higgs boson mass of 170 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  4. Nucleic acid detection methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, C.L.; Yaar, R.; Szafranski, P.; Cantor, C.R.

    1998-05-19

    The invention relates to methods for rapidly determining the sequence and/or length a target sequence. The target sequence may be a series of known or unknown repeat sequences which are hybridized to an array of probes. The hybridized array is digested with a single-strand nuclease and free 3{prime}-hydroxyl groups extended with a nucleic acid polymerase. Nuclease cleaved heteroduplexes can be easily distinguish from nuclease uncleaved heteroduplexes by differential labeling. Probes and target can be differentially labeled with detectable labels. Matched target can be detected by cleaving resulting loops from the hybridized target and creating free 3-hydroxyl groups. These groups are recognized and extended by polymerases added into the reaction system which also adds or releases one label into solution. Analysis of the resulting products using either solid phase or solution. These methods can be used to detect characteristic nucleic acid sequences, to determine target sequence and to screen for genetic defects and disorders. Assays can be conducted on solid surfaces allowing for multiple reactions to be conducted in parallel and, if desired, automated. 18 figs.

  5. Nucleic Acid Detection Methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Cassandra L. (Boston, MA); Yaar, Ron (Brookline, MA); Szafranski, Przemyslaw (Boston, MA); Cantor, Charles R. (Boston, MA)

    1998-05-19

    The invention relates to methods for rapidly determining the sequence and/or length a target sequence. The target sequence may be a series of known or unknown repeat sequences which are hybridized to an array of probes. The hybridized array is digested with a single-strand nuclease and free 3'-hydroxyl groups extended with a nucleic acid polymerase. Nuclease cleaved heteroduplexes can be easily distinguish from nuclease uncleaved heteroduplexes by differential labeling. Probes and target can be differentially labeled with detectable labels. Matched target can be detected by cleaving resulting loops from the hybridized target and creating free 3-hydroxyl groups. These groups are recognized and extended by polymerases added into the reaction system which also adds or releases one label into solution. Analysis of the resulting products using either solid phase or solution. These methods can be used to detect characteristic nucleic acid sequences, to determine target sequence and to screen for genetic defects and disorders. Assays can be conducted on solid surfaces allowing for multiple reactions to be conducted in parallel and, if desired, automated.

  6. Remote detection of fissile material : Cherenkov counters for gamma detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erickson, Anna S

    2011-01-01

    The need for large-size detectors for long-range active interrogation (Al) detection has generated interest in water-based detector technologies. AI is done using external radiation sources to induce fission and to detect, ...

  7. Revolution in nuclear detection affairs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stern, Warren M.

    2014-05-09

    The detection of nuclear or radioactive materials for homeland or national security purposes is inherently difficult. This is one reason detection efforts must be seen as just one part of an overall nuclear defense strategy which includes, inter alia, material security, detection, interdiction, consequence management and recovery. Nevertheless, one could argue that there has been a revolution in detection affairs in the past several decades as the innovative application of new technology has changed the character and conduct of detection operations. This revolution will likely be most effectively reinforced in the coming decades with the networking of detectors and innovative application of anomaly detection algorithms.

  8. Statistical detection and imaging of objects hidden in turbid media using ballistic photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Statistical detection and imaging of objects hidden in turbid media using ballistic photons Sina-resolution imaging through scattering media with ballistic photons. We derive the fundamental limits on the accuracy

  9. Limits on a muon flux from Kaluza-Klein dark matter annihilations in the Sun from the IceCube 22-string detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    IceCube Collaboration; Abbasi, R.; al., et

    2009-10-23

    A search for muon neutrinos from Kaluza-Klein dark matter annihilations in the Sun has been performed with the 22-string configuration of the IceCube neutrino detector using data collected in 104.3 days of live-time in 2007. No excess over the expected atmospheric background has been observed. Upper limits have been obtained on the annihilation rate of captured lightest Kaluza-Klein particle (LKP) WIMPs in the Sun and converted to limits on the LKP-proton cross-sections for LKP masses in the range 250 - 3000 GeV. These results are the most stringent limits to date on LKP annihilation in the Sun.

  10. A Cavity-backed Slot Antenna with High Upper Hemisphere Efficiency for Sewer Sensor Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tentzeris, Manos

    A Cavity-backed Slot Antenna with High Upper Hemisphere Efficiency for Sewer Sensor Network of Technology Atlanta, GA Abstract--A wireless sewer sensor network has been widespread to monitor combined sewer overflow (CSO) causing human health and environmental hazards. To enable the wireless

  11. Evolution of the Upper Rhone River discharge and suspended sediment load during the last 80 years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    , numerous hydroelectric dams have been constructed on the course of the Rhone River tributaries. At present hydroelectric dams have been constructed on tributaries of the Upper Rhone River, the principal river electric power supply, have been reviewed by Grandjean (1990). These include both flood control (cf

  12. Improvements on Taylor's Upper Bound for Rigid/Plastic Composites \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Tamara

    Improvements on Taylor's Upper Bound for Rigid/Plastic Composites \\Lambda Tamara Olson y Brigham of a mixture composed of anisotropic rigid/plastic materials. It is assumed that the only mechanism for deformation is plastic deformation of individual grains and that the set of stresses causing plastic flow (the

  13. Depositional environment of upper Cretaceous woodbine sandstones, Kurten field, Brazos County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watkins, John Mark

    1982-01-01

    lens builds up above the sea floor so that it comes in contact with wave action and final; y, tidal flow. This would cause the upper part of each lens to become cl caner than the 1 ower part, as seen in these ba r s. The increase upward...

  14. A comparison of flooded forest and floating meadow fish assemblages in an upper Amazon floodplain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fussman, Gregor

    A comparison of flooded forest and floating meadow fish assemblages in an upper Amazon floodplain S of gillnets of different mesh-sizes were used to evaluate the degree to which contiguous and connected flooded forest and floating meadow habitats are characterized by distinct fish faunas during the flooding season

  15. Upper crustal evolution across the Juan de Fuca ridge flanks Mladen R. Nedimovic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nedimoviæ, Mladen R.

    as a thermal insulator, has been proposed to further accelerate layer 2A evolution by enhancing mineral ridge multichannel seismic data to determine upper crustal structure at $3 km intervals along 300 km with increasing crustal age or sediment blanketing but persists as a relatively low seismic velocity layer capping

  16. New upper bounds for nonbinary codes Dion Gijswijt , Alexander Schrijver y , Hajime Tanaka z

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrijver, Alexander

    - diagonalizing the Terwilliger algebra of the nonbinary Hamming scheme, the bound can be calculated in time bounds for binary codes. Keywords: codes, nonbinary codes, upper bounds, Delsarte bound, Terwilliger alge with the Terwilliger algebra [7] of H(n; q). In section 3 it is shown how the algebra A q;n can be used to obtain a new

  17. Upper mantle Q and thermal structure beneath Tanzania, East Africa from teleseismic P wave spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritsema, Jeroen

    Upper mantle Q and thermal structure beneath Tanzania, East Africa from teleseismic P wave spectra-focus earthquakes recorded at broadband seismic stations of the Tanzania network to estimate regional variation of sublithospheric mantle attenuation beneath the Tanzania craton and the eastern branch of the East African Rift

  18. CHANGES IN SANDSTONE DISTRIBUTIONS BETWEEN THE UPPER, MIDDLE, AND LOWER FAN IN THE ARKANSAS JACKFORK GROUP 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mack, Clayton P.

    2010-07-14

    outcrops, it is clear there is an obvious change in the sandstone percentage and distribution. The upper fan deposit has an overall sandstone percentage of approximately 77.5% and is deposited in beds that are mainly amalgamated; 10-30m thick. Sandstone...

  19. Facies architecture of the Upper Sego member of the Mancos Shale Formation, Book Cliffs, Utah 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, Eric D.

    2006-04-12

    The Late Cretaceous upper Sego Member of the Mancos Shale exposed in the Book Cliffs of east-central Utah is a 30 m thick sandstone wedge that overlies the Anchor Mine Tongue of the Mancos Shale and underlies coastal plain deposits of the Neslen...

  20. Upper tropospheric drying and the ``transition to break'' in the Indian summer monsoon during 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roca, Rémy

    level convergence. A rapid shift occurs in divergence field during transition with convergence replacing to transition in to a break phase from an active monsoon phase. 1.1. Active and Break Spells [3] Infra RedUpper tropospheric drying and the ``transition to break'' in the Indian summer monsoon during 1999

  1. Upper and lower Higgs boson mass bounds from a chirally invariant lattice Higgs-Yukawa model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Upper and lower Higgs boson mass bounds from a chirally invariant lattice Higgs-Yukawa model of the Standard Model Higgs boson based on first principle calculations, in par- ticular not relying on additional for the intended Higgs boson mass determination. These are the complex Higgs doublet as well as the top and bottom

  2. SNOWPACK RECONSTRUCTIONS INCORPORATING CLIMATE IN THE UPPER GREEN RIVER BASIN (WYOMING)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

    . In the 1976 report, two headwaters gage reconstructions were completed for the Green River at Warren BridgeSNOWPACK RECONSTRUCTIONS INCORPORATING CLIMATE IN THE UPPER GREEN RIVER BASIN (WYOMING) SALLYROSE of Sustainability and Multidisciplinary Research, Las Vegas, NV 89054 USA ABSTRACT The Green River is the largest

  3. Testing a blowing snow model against distributed snow measurements at Upper Sheep Creek,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarboton, David

    Testing a blowing snow model against distributed snow measurements at Upper Sheep Creek, Idaho S. Seyfried5 Abstract. In this paper a physically based snow transport model (SnowTran-3D) was used to simulate snow drifting over a 30 m grid and was compared to detailed snow water equivalence (SWE) surveys

  4. Upper Temperature Tolerance of Loach Minnow under Acute, Chronic, and Fluctuating Thermal Regimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonar, Scott A.

    of loach minnow Rhinichthys cobitis: the lethal thermal method (LTM), chronic lethal method (CLMUpper Temperature Tolerance of Loach Minnow under Acute, Chronic, and Fluctuating Thermal Regimes, Tucson, Arizona 85748, USA Abstract.--We used four methods to estimate the upper lethal temperature

  5. A NEW SUCHIAN ARCHOSAUR FROM THE UPPER TRIASSIC OF NORTH CAROLINA KARIN PEYER,*,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsen, Paul E.

    ARTICLE A NEW SUCHIAN ARCHOSAUR FROM THE UPPER TRIASSIC OF NORTH CAROLINA KARIN PEYER,*,1 JOSEPH G Sciences, University of North Carolina, Mitchell Hall, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, treatise@unc.edu; 3 National basin, Newark Supergroup, North Carolina, represents a new species of Postosuchus Chatterjee, 1985

  6. FIRST OCCURRENCE OF FOOTPRINTS OF LARGE THERAPSIDS FROM THE UPPER PERMIAN OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benton, Michael

    have been found in the Cis-Urals region of European Russia. The foot- print horizon is in Late PermianFIRST OCCURRENCE OF FOOTPRINTS OF LARGE THERAPSIDS FROM THE UPPER PERMIAN OF EUROPEAN RUSSIA, Russia; e-mail: SurkovMV@info.sgu.ru Department of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1

  7. Solubility and freezing effects of Fe2+ solutions representative of upper tropospheric and lower

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solubility and freezing effects of Fe2+ and Mg2+ in H2SO4 solutions representative of upper, it is unclear how these impurities could affect particle freezing. To address these questions, we have particles. Bulk freezing experiments were also carried out on H2SO4 solutions containing amounts

  8. Using a Multi-touch Tabletop for Upper Extremity Motor Rehabilitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alberta, University of

    261 Using a Multi-touch Tabletop for Upper Extremity Motor Rehabilitation Michelle Annett, Fraser,frasera}@cs.ualberta.ca Darrell Goertzen, Jonathan Halton, Quentin Ranson Glenrose Rehabilitation Hospital Edmonton, Alberta into rehabilitation programs to improve their motor functioning and quality of life. Currently, many of the activities

  9. Design of a Mobile, Inexpensive Device for Upper Extremity Rehabilitation at Home

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amaral, Luis A.N.

    Design of a Mobile, Inexpensive Device for Upper Extremity Rehabilitation at Home James S. Sulzer-joint manipulandum for clinical and home use. I. INTRODUCTION For most stroke survivors, the need for rehabilitation University, Evanston, IL 60208, USA and the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL, 60611 USA

  10. Lake Level Controlled Sedimentological I Heterogenity of Oil Shale, Upper Green River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gani, M. Royhan

    Chapter 3 Lake Level Controlled Sedimentological 1:'_i 'I I Heterogenity of Oil Shale, Upper Green email: mgani@uno.edu t",. The Green River Formation comprises the world's largest deposit of oil-shale characterization of these lacustrine oil-shale deposits in the subsurface is lacking. This study analyzed ~300 m

  11. ASSESSMENT OF NATURAL GROUND WATER RECHARGE IN UPPER GANGA CANAL COMMAND AREA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, C.P.

    ASSESSMENT OF NATURAL GROUND WATER RECHARGE IN UPPER GANGA CANAL COMMAND AREA C. P. Kumar* and P. V. Seethapathi** SYNOPSIS Quantification of the rate of natural ground water recharge is a pre-requisite for efficient ground water resource management. It is particularly important in regions with large demands

  12. FINANCE MAJOR UPPER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS FOR 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009 & 2010 CATALOG YEARS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponce, V. Miguel

    FINANCE MAJOR UPPER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS FOR 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009 & 2010 CATALOG YEARS Course of Finance Minimum grade of C required for Finance majors IDS 302: Intro to Operations Management MGT 350 Financial Accounting FIN 321: Managerial Economics FIN 325: Intermediate Finance FIN 323 with a C FIN 327

  13. FINANCE MAJOR UPPER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS FOR 2011/12 CATALOG YEAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponce, V. Miguel

    FINANCE MAJOR UPPER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS FOR 2011/12 CATALOG YEAR Course Grade Prerequisites/Notes BA 300 Ethical Decision Making in Business (1 unit) FIN 323: Fundamentals of Finance Minimum grade of C required for Finance majors MIS 302: Intro to Operations Management MGT 350: Management

  14. Distinctive upper mantle anisotropy beneath the High Lava Plains and Eastern Snake River Plain,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Distinctive upper mantle anisotropy beneath the High Lava Plains and Eastern Snake River Plain and continuing with the still- ongoing volcanism in the High Lava Plains (HLP) and eastern Snake River Plain (SRP waves; shear wave splitting; high lava plains; Snake River Plain; Yellowstone. Index Terms: 8137

  15. Radon emanation from brittle fracturing in granites under upper crustal conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolas, Chamot-Rooke

    Radon emanation from brittle fracturing in granites under upper crustal conditions Aurélien Nicolas CEA, DAM, DIF, Arpajon, France Abstract Radon-222, a radioactive gas naturally produced in the Earth precursor. Here we investigate the effects of mechanical and thermal damage on the radon emanation from

  16. The geoarchaeology and archaeology of Stud'onoye, an Upper Paleolithic site in Siberia 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buvit, Ian

    2000-01-01

    In 1998 geoarchaeological research was carried out at Stud'onoye, a late Upper Paleolithic site in the Transbaikal region of Russia. The site is situated on two terraces. The oldest terrace (T?) is composed of three depositional units. Moreover, T?...

  17. Plant biodiversity and ethnobotany inside the projected impact area of the Upper Seti Hydropower Project,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asselin, Hugo

    Plant biodiversity and ethnobotany inside the projected impact area of the Upper Seti Hydropower hydropower project, currently under feasibility study. The objective of the study was to document plant the construction of major hydropower infrastructure (Pokharel 2001; Bartle 2002). However, potential impacts

  18. Z .Lithos 48 1999 5780 Imaging the continental upper mantle using electromagnetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Alan G.

    Z .Lithos 48 1999 57­80 Imaging the continental upper mantle using electromagnetic methods Alan G, such as olivine, are presented. q 1999 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Electrical for such flow models, as shown in the paper by De Smet Z .et al. 1999, this issue . Deductions about the depth

  19. NOAA Technical Memorandum NWS HYDRO 39 PROBABLE MAXIMUM PRECIPITATION FOR THE UPPER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Memorandum NWS HYDRO 39 PROBABLE MAXIMUM PRECIPITATION FOR THE UPPER DEERFIELD RIVER The Office of Hydrology (HYDRO) of the National Weather Service (NWS) develops procedures for making river agencies, and conducts pertinent research and development. NOAA Technical Memorandums in the NWS HYDRO

  20. Using upper-air conditions to estimate South Cascade Glacier (U.S.A.) summer balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rasmussen, L.A.

    Using upper-air conditions to estimate South Cascade Glacier (U.S.A.) summer balance L. A-air conditions from the NCEP-NCAR Reanalysis database to estimate summer balance of South Cascade Glacier each error. The model relates summer balance linearly to temperature T > 0 C at 2000 m and to snow flux

  1. Upper Middle Mainstem Columbia River Subbasin Focal Species Information, Red-winged Blackbird

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix C Upper Middle Mainstem Columbia River Subbasin Focal Species Information, Red-winged Blackbird Introduction The red-winged black bird is one of the most abundant birds in North America (Marshall et al. 2003). Red-winged Blackbirds are extremely adaptable; successfully colonizing many small

  2. High energy neutrinos from astrophysical sources: An upper bound Eli Waxman* and John Bahcall +

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahcall, John

    luminous AGN accelerator of high­energy protons. The hypothesized black­hole accelerators are ``neutrinoHigh energy neutrinos from astrophysical sources: An upper bound Eli Waxman* and John BahcallV/cm 2 s sr to the intensity of high­energy neutrinos produced by photo­meson ~or p­p! interactions

  3. High energy neutrinos from astrophysical sources: An upper bound Eli Waxman* and John Bahcall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahcall, John

    neutrinos for, or against, the hypothesized luminous AGN accelerator of high-energy protonsHigh energy neutrinos from astrophysical sources: An upper bound Eli Waxman* and John Bahcall to the intensity of high-energy neutrinos produced by photo-meson or p-p interactions in sources of size not much

  4. But Does It Last? Sustaining a Research-Based Curriculum in Upper-Division Electricity & Magnetism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    But Does It Last? Sustaining a Research-Based Curriculum in Upper-Division Electricity & Magnetism course approach in junior-level electricity and magnetism (E&M). Almost all developed materials (i, electricity and magnetism, assessment PACS: 01.30.Ib, 01.40.Di, 01.40.Fk, 01.40.G-, 01.40.gb INTRODUCTION

  5. New constraints on the upper mantle structure of the Slave craton from Rayleigh wave inversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rondenay, Stephane

    New constraints on the upper mantle structure of the Slave craton from Rayleigh wave inversion Chin recorded by the POLARIS broadband seismic network and the Yellowknife array. Phase velocities obtained of its high degree of mantle depletion. The one-dimensional inversion of phase velocities yields high

  6. TP53 gene mutations of lung cancer patients in upper northern Thailand and environmental risk factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TP53 gene mutations of lung cancer patients in upper northern Thailand and environmental risk mutations are observed in about 40e70% of lung cancer tissues, and the hot spot codon mu- tations factors that influence TP53 gene mutation in lung cancer patients residing areas with high lung cancer

  7. Evaluating the effect of interannual variations of surface chlorophyll on upper ocean temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of interactions between ocean biology, ocean dynamics, and irradiance penetration. The bulk of the essential]. The biota, in turn, modulate the penetration of solar radia- tion in the upper ocean and control, to some that the SST differences are not the result of the direct effect of ocean biota on light penetration. Rather

  8. Tropical Cyclone Energy Dispersion in a Three-Dimensional Primitive Equation Model: Upper-Tropospheric Influence*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuqing

    The three-dimensional (3D) Rossby wave energy dispersion of a tropical cyclone (TC) is studied using of the beta effect. A synoptic-scale wave train forms in its wake a few days later. The energy energy. Because of the vertical differential inertial stability, the upper-level wave train develops

  9. Value Creation with Dye's Disclosure Option: Optimal Risk-Shielding with an Upper Tailed Disclosure Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haase, Markus

    Value Creation with Dye's Disclosure Option: Optimal Risk-Shielding with an Upper Tailed Disclosure) 040 0286 e-mail: m.b.gietzmann@city.ac.uk (May 2006) This version October 2007 DisclosureRiskShielding put' which o¤ers a shield against risk of disclosure of low value. The strategic analysis is further

  10. VERTICALLY INHOMOGENEOUS MODELS OF THE UPPER CRUSTAL STRUCTURE IN THE WEST-BOHEMIAN SEISMOACTIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    VERTICALLY INHOMOGENEOUS MODELS OF THE UPPER CRUSTAL STRUCTURE IN THE WEST-BOHEMIAN SEISMOACTIVE in the year 2000, three profiles traversed the region of earthquake swarms in West- Bohemia/Vogtland. The shots were also recorded at the permanent stations of the local seismic networks. The travel times of P

  11. Bio-Climatic Analysis and Thermal Performance of Upper Egypt A Case Study Kharga Region 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khalil, M. H.

    2012-01-01

    and Upper Egypt. In the recent century the most attentions of the government is the creation of new wadi parallel to Nile wadi in the west desert. Kharga Oasis is 25 degrees 26'56?North latitude and 30 degrees 32'24?East longitude. This oasis, is the largest...

  12. Improved upper critical field in bulk-form magnesium diboride by mechanical alloying with carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eom, Chang Beom

    pressing and Mg vapor annealing have achieved upper critical fields in excess of 32 T and critical current stainless steel tubes and hot isostatic pressed HIP at 1000 °C and 30 ksi for 200 min. These HIP were welded into evacuated stainless steel tubing with a quantity o

  13. Z .Lithos 48 1999 5780 Imaging the continental upper mantle using electromagnetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Alan G.

    . Jones Geological SurÕey of Canada, 615 Booth St., Room 218, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0E9 Received 27 are complementary in that the seismic parameters usually represent bulk properties of the rock, whereas electrical the state of knowledge of the continental upper mantle obtained primarily from the natural-source

  14. MATH MINOR REQUIREMENTS Minimum units required: 18 total, 6 upper-division (2015 catalog)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fatkullin, Ibrahim

    . Complete one linear algebra course: o MATH 313: Introduction to Linear Algebra o MATH 310: Applied Linear Algebra 4. Choose one additional upper-division course from the following: MATH 315, 322, 323, 330, 361 linear algebra course: o MATH 313: Introduction to Linear Algebra o MATH 310: Applied Linear Algebra 4

  15. Natural Arsenic in Groundwater and Alkaline Lakes at the upper Paraguay basin, Pantanal, Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Natural Arsenic in Groundwater and Alkaline Lakes at the upper Paraguay basin, Pantanal, Brazil L, Brazil d Université de Provence, Aix Marseille 1, France e Departamento de Geografia, Universidade Federal do Mato Grosso do Sul, Três Lagoas, Brazil f Laboratoire de Géomophologie Appliquée, Université de

  16. The role of pressure solution creep in the ductility of the Earth's upper crust

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    theoretical creep laws. Laboratory experiments are implemented in order to test the models and to measure1 The role of pressure solution creep in the ductility of the Earth's upper crust Jean, France The aim of this review is to characterize the role of pressure solution creep in the ductility

  17. Lake Level Controlled Sedimentological I Heterogenity of Oil Shale, Upper Green River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gani, M. Royhan

    Chapter 3 Lake Level Controlled Sedimentological 1:'_i 'I I Heterogenity of Oil Shale, Upper Green-shale and has enormous potential to meet global energy requirements, yet a detailed sedimentological Formation is obvious. Yet, sedimentology of the oil-shale bearing units of the Green River Formation

  18. Towards a Wireless Building Management System Requiring no Change to Upper-layer Protocols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Dan

    communications to support transmission, design protocols for sensor networking and conduct application that converts existing wired sensor network into wireless without changing upper layer protocols decent understanding on the design within a wireless sensor network, e.g., OS, programming languages

  19. Energetic electron precipitation and the NO abundance in the upper atmosphere: A direct

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Østgaard, Nikolai

    Energetic electron precipitation and the NO abundance in the upper atmosphere: A direct comparison precipitating energetic electrons. The comparisons are done for the beginning of a geomagnetic storm event on 2 of the NO g-band. Since a significant part of the electron precipitation takes place during the night

  20. Time_Limit_Extension_Form.docx | Revised: 10/13/2014 Time Limit Extension Request Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    Time_Limit_Extension_Form.docx | Revised: 10/13/2014 Time Limit Extension Request Form OFFICE on your request. PURPOSE The Time Limit Extension may be filed when a student nears the end of the time limitation for completion of the requirements for their degree but needs more time to complete the degree

  1. Nucleic acid detection assays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann; Dahlberg, James E.

    2005-04-05

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  2. Nucleic acid detection compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prudent, James R. (Madison, WI); Hall, Jeff G. (Madison, WI); Lyamichev, Victor I. (Madison, WI); Brow, Mary Ann (Madison, WI); Dahlberg, James L. (Madison, WI)

    2008-08-05

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  3. Flaw detection and evaluation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilks, Robert S. (Plum, PA); Sturges, Jr., Robert H. (Plum, PA)

    1983-01-01

    The invention provides a method of and apparatus for optically inspecting nuclear fuel pellets for surface flaws. The inspection system includes a prism and lens arrangement for scanning the surface of each pellet as the same is rotated. The resulting scan produces data indicative of the extent and shape of each flaw which is employed to generate a flaw quality index for each detected flaw. The flaw quality indexes from all flaws are summed and compared with an acceptable surface quality index. The result of the comparison is utilized to control the acceptance or rejection of the pellet.

  4. Opaque cloud detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roskovensky, John K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-01-20

    A method of detecting clouds in a digital image comprising, for an area of the digital image, determining a reflectance value in at least three discrete electromagnetic spectrum bands, computing a first ratio of one reflectance value minus another reflectance value and the same two values added together, computing a second ratio of one reflectance value and another reflectance value, choosing one of the reflectance values, and concluding that an opaque cloud exists in the area if the results of each of the two computing steps and the choosing step fall within three corresponding predetermined ranges.

  5. PETER GRINDROD Numbercraft Limited Version 1.0 March 2001 Bioinformatics for Functional Genomics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scheichl, Robert

    PETER GRINDROD Numbercraft Limited Version 1.0 March 2001 Bioinformatics for Functional Genomics 1 UK Bioinformatics for Functional Genomics: Watching the Detectives Executive Summary The ability research spending aimed at underpinning the UK's position within the post genome economy. An informal

  6. Design of proximity detecting codes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perisetty, Srinivas

    1997-01-01

    class of codes called Proximity Detecting Codes can be used to overcome this problem associated with asynchronous channels. A t-proximity detecting (t-PD) code can detect when a received word is within distance t from the transmitted codeword, when using...

  7. Basic category theory -Limits Gouter des doctorants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doyen, Laurent

    Basic category theory - Limits Gouter des doctorants Jérémy Dubut LSV, ENS Cachan Friday, 3rd April, 2015 Jérémy Dubut (LSV, ENS Cachan) Basic category theory - Limits Friday, 3rd April, 2015 1 / 8 #12 not necessarily exist Jérémy Dubut (LSV, ENS Cachan) Basic category theory - Limits Friday, 3rd April, 2015 2 / 8

  8. Hydrogenation of Dislocation-Limited Heteroepitaxial Silicon...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Hydrogenation of Dislocation-Limited Heteroepitaxial Silicon Solar Cells: Preprint Bolen, M. L.; Grover, S.; Teplin, C. W.; Bobela, D.; Branz, H. M.; Stradins, P. 08 HYDROGEN; 14...

  9. Distributed Detection and Localization of Events in Large Ad Hoc Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Anurag

    are application­specific networks that com- prise a large number of tiny, energy­limited, smart sensor devices by . This formulation is motivated by the change detection/isolation framework introduced by Nikiforov [6]. We extend decisions of ALL toggle rapidly. Motivated by this fact, we propose a distributed change detection

  10. An Improved Labelling for the INRIA Person Data Set for Pedestrian Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    An Improved Labelling for the INRIA Person Data Set for Pedestrian Detection Matteo Taiana, Jacinto is very popular in the Pedestrian Detection community, both for training detectors and reporting results. Yet, the labelling of its test set has some limitations: some of the pedestrians are not labelled

  11. Eddy Current Testing for Detecting Small Defects in Thin Films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Obeid, Simon; Tranjan, Farid M. [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, UNCC (United States); Dogaru, Teodor [Albany Instruments, 426-O Barton Creek, Charlotte, NC 28262 (United States)

    2007-03-21

    Presented here is a technique of using Eddy Current based Giant Magneto-Resistance sensor (GMR) to detect surface and sub-layered minute defects in thin films. For surface crack detection, a measurement was performed on a copper metallization of 5-10 microns thick. It was done by scanning the GMR sensor on the surface of the wafer that had two scratches of 0.2 mm, and 2.5 mm in length respectively. In another experiment, metal coatings were deposited over the layers containing five defects with known lengths such that the defects were invisible from the surface. The limit of detection (resolution), in terms of defect size, of the GMR high-resolution Eddy Current probe was studied using this sample. Applications of Eddy Current testing include detecting defects in thin film metallic layers, and quality control of metallization layers on silicon wafers for integrated circuits manufacturing.

  12. Ultrasensitive measurement of MEMS cantilever displacement sensitivity below the shot noise limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pooser, R C

    2014-01-01

    The displacement of micro-electro-mechanical-systems(MEMs) cantilevers is used to measure a variety of phenomena in devices ranging from force microscopes for single spin detection[1] to biochemical sensors[2] to uncooled thermal imaging systems[3]. The displacement readout is often performed optically with segmented detectors or interference measurements. Until recently, various noise sources have limited the minimum detectable displacement in MEMs systems, but it is now possible to minimize all other sources[4] so that the noise level of the coherent light field, called the shot noise limit(SNL), becomes the dominant source. Light sources dis- playing quantum-enhanced statistics below this limit are available[5, 6], with applications in gravitational wave astronomy[7] and bioimaging[8], but direct displacement measurements of MEMS cantilevers below the SNL have been impossible until now. Here, we demonstrate the first direct measurement of a MEMs cantilever displacement with sub-SNL sensitivity, thus enabli...

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF A 3D GRID, FRACTURE AND PROPERTY MODELS FOR THE UPPER FREEPORT COAL AND OVERBURDEN USING 3D

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Thomas H.

    DEVELOPMENT OF A 3D GRID, FRACTURE AND PROPERTY MODELS FOR THE UPPER FREEPORT COAL AND OVERBURDEN Richard A. Bajura, Director, National Research Center for Coal and Energy, West Virginia University Park, PA. Abstract Discrete fracture networks within a CO2 injection zone (the Upper Freeport coal

  14. Upper critical field in nanostructured Nb: Competing effects of the reduction in density of states and the mean free path

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raychaudhuri, Pratap

    Upper critical field in nanostructured Nb: Competing effects of the reduction in density of states and the mean free path Sangita Bose,1 Pratap Raychaudhuri,1 Rajarshi Banerjee,2 and Pushan Ayyub1 1Department December 2006 We show that the upper critical field in nanometer-sized Nb particles is governed

  15. Shear wave splitting in SE Brazil: an eect of active or fossil upper mantle ow, or both?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barruol, Guilhem

    Shear wave splitting in SE Brazil: an e¡ect of active or fossil upper mantle £ow, or both?§ Maggy, Brazil c Universidade de SaBrazil Received 26 the structure of the upper mantle beneath southeastern Brazil using teleseismic shear wave splitting

  16. Journal of Statistical Physics, Vol. 65, Nos. 1/2, 1991 Upper Bound on the Condensate in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tóth, Bálint

    Journal of Statistical Physics, Vol. 65, Nos. 1/2, 1991 Upper Bound on the Condensate in the Hard by G. Roepstorf, we prove an upper bound for the amount of condensate in a hard-core Bose lattice gas on the amount of condensate for a Bose gas in R d, d/> 3, with arbitrary pair interaction. Exploiting the same

  17. The upper Lyapunov exponent of S1(2,R) cocycles: Discontinuity and the problem of positivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knill, Oliver

    The upper Lyapunov exponent of S1(2,R) cocycles: Discontinuity and the problem of positivity Oliver of a standard probability space (X,m). Let V be the subset ofA= L°°(X% 5/(2, R)) where the upper Lyapunov points inAwhere the Lyapunov exponents are discontinuous. We show further that the decision whether

  18. Analyses and simulations of the upper ocean's response to Hurricane Felix at the Bermuda Testbed Mooring site: 1323 August 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, Sara Irina

    Analyses and simulations of the upper ocean's response to Hurricane Felix at the Bermuda Testbed; 31°440 N, 64°100 W) site on 15 August 1995. Data collected in the upper ocean from the BTM during. The MY2 model predicted more sea surface cooling and greater depth penetration of kinetic energy than

  19. HIERARCHICAL CENSORING FOR DISTRIBUTED DETECTION IN WIRELESS SENSOR Neal Patwari and Alfred O. Hero III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patwari, Neal

    maximizes system lifetime. If energy consumption can be sufficiently reduced, solar power or energy will require aggressive energy limitation. Equivalently, given a battery size, minimizing energy consumption]@eecs.umich.edu. ABSTRACT In energy-limited wireless sensor networks, detection using `cen- soring sensors' reduces

  20. Limiting Emission Angle for Improved Solar Cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limiting Emission Angle for Improved Solar Cell Performance While direct light enters a solar cell will explore the potential benefits to limiting the emission angles of realistic solar cells, with efficiencies cooling, waste heat recovery and solar electricity generation, low values of the thermoelectric figure

  1. Re-visit of HST FUV observations of hot-Jupiter system HD 209458: No Si III detection and the need for COS transit observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ballester, G E

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of OI atoms and CII ions in the upper atmosphere of HD 209458b, made with the Hubble Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) using the G140L grating, showed that these heavy species fill an area comparable to the planet's Roche lobe. The derived ~10% transit absorption depths require super-thermal processes and/or supersolar abundances. From subsequent Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) observations, CII absorption was reported with tentative velocity signatures, and absorption by SiIII ions was also claimed in disagreement with a negative STIS G140L detection. Here, we revisit the COS dataset showing a severe limitation in the published results from having contrasted the in-transit spectrum against a stellar spectrum averaged from separate observations, at planetary phases 0.27, 0.72, and 0.49. We find variable stellar SiIII and CII emissions that were significantly depressed not only during transit but also at phase 0.27 compared to phases 0.72 and 0.49. Their respective off-transit 7.5 and...

  2. SOFIA Observations of SN 2010jl: Another Non-Detection of the 9.7 $\\mu$m Silicate Dust Feature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Brian J

    2015-01-01

    We present photometric observations from the {\\it Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA)} at 11.1 $\\mu$m of the Type IIn supernova (SN IIn) 2010jl. The SN is undetected by {\\it SOFIA}, but the upper limits obtained, combined with new and archival detections from {\\it Spitzer} at 3.6 \\& 4.5 $\\mu$m allow us to characterize the composition of the dust present. Dust in other Type IIn SNe has been shown in previous works to reside in a circumstellar shell of material ejected by the progenitor system in the few millenia prior to explosion. Our model fits show that the dust in the system shows no evidence for the strong, ubiquitous 9.7 $\\mu$m feature from silicate dust, suggesting the presence of carbonaceous grains. The observations are best fit with 0.01-0.05 $\\msun$ of carbonaceous dust radiating at a temperature of $\\sim 550-620$ K. The dust composition may reveal clues concerning the nature of the progenitor system, which remains ambiguous for this subclass. Most of the single star progeni...

  3. The high-energy gamma-ray detection of G73.9+0.9, a supernova remnant interacting with a molecular cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A; Wilhelmi, Emma de Ona; Pedaletti, Giovanna; Yang, Ruizhi; Chernyakova, Maria; Lopez-Caniego, Marcos; Mikolajewska, Joanna; Basak, Rupal

    2015-01-01

    We have analysed the Fermi LAT data on the SNR G73.9+0.9. We have confirmed a previous detection of high-energy gamma-rays from this source at a high significance of $\\simeq 12\\sigma$. The observed spectrum shows a significant curvature, peaking in $E F_E$ at $\\sim$1 GeV. We have also calculated the flux upper limits in the mm-wavelength and X-ray ranges from Planck and XMM-Newton, respectively. We have inspected the intensity of the CO (1$\\rightarrow $0) emission line and found a large peak at a velocity range corresponding to the previously estimated source distance of $\\sim$4 kpc, which may indicate an association between a molecular cloud and the SNR. The gamma-ray emission appears due to interaction of accelerated particles within the SNR with the matter of the cloud. The most likely radiative process responsible for the gamma-ray emission is decay of neutral pions produced in ion-ion collisions. While a dominant leptonic origin of this emission can be ruled out, the relativistic electron population rela...

  4. Detection of gas leakage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thornberg, Steven (Peralta, NM); Brown, Jason (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-06-19

    A method of detecting leaks and measuring volumes as well as an apparatus, the Power-free Pump Module (PPM), that is a self-contained leak test and volume measurement apparatus that requires no external sources of electrical power during leak testing or volume measurement, where the invention is a portable, pneumatically-controlled instrument capable of generating a vacuum, calibrating volumes, and performing quantitative leak tests on a closed test system or device, all without the use of alternating current (AC) power. Capabilities include the ability is to provide a modest vacuum (less than 10 Torr), perform a pressure rise leak test, measure the gas's absolute pressure, and perform volume measurements. All operations are performed through a simple rotary control valve which controls pneumatically-operated manifold valves.

  5. Digital quadrature phase detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, James A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Johnson, John A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1992-01-01

    A system for detecting the phase of a frequency of phase modulated signal that includes digital quadrature sampling of the frequency or phase modulated signal at two times that are one quarter of a cycle of a reference signal apart, determination of the arctangent of the ratio of a first sampling of the frequency or phase modulated signal to the second sampling of the frequency or phase modulated signal, and a determination of quadrant in which the phase determination is increased by 2.pi. when the quadrant changes from the first quadrant to the fourth quadrant and decreased by 2.pi. when the quadrant changes from the fourth quadrant to the first quadrant whereby the absolute phase of the frequency or phase modulated signal can be determined using an arbitrary reference convention.

  6. Digital quadrature phase detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, J.A.; Johnson, J.A.

    1992-05-26

    A system for detecting the phase of a frequency or phase modulated signal that includes digital quadrature sampling of the frequency or phase modulated signal at two times that are one quarter of a cycle of a reference signal apart, determination of the arctangent of the ratio of a first sampling of the frequency or phase modulated signal to the second sampling of the frequency or phase modulated signal, and a determination of quadrant in which the phase determination is increased by 2[pi] when the quadrant changes from the first quadrant to the fourth quadrant and decreased by 2[pi] when the quadrant changes from the fourth quadrant to the first quadrant whereby the absolute phase of the frequency or phase modulated signal can be determined using an arbitrary reference convention. 6 figs.

  7. Target detection portal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Linker, Kevin L. (Albuquerque, NM); Brusseau, Charles A. (Tijeras, NM)

    2002-01-01

    A portal apparatus for screening persons or objects for the presence of trace amounts of target substances such as explosives, narcotics, radioactive materials, and certain chemical materials. The portal apparatus can have a one-sided exhaust for an exhaust stream, an interior wall configuration with a concave-shape across a horizontal cross-section for each of two facing sides to result in improved airflow and reduced washout relative to a configuration with substantially flat parallel sides; air curtains to reduce washout; ionizing sprays to collect particles bound by static forces, as well as gas jet nozzles to dislodge particles bound by adhesion to the screened person or object. The portal apparatus can be included in a detection system with a preconcentrator and a detector.

  8. Weld failure detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pennell, William E. (Unity Township, Westmoreland County, PA); Sutton, Jr., Harry G. (Mt. Lebanon, PA)

    1981-01-01

    Method and apparatus for detecting failure in a welded connection, particrly applicable to not readily accessible welds such as those joining components within the reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor system. A preselected tag gas is sealed within a chamber which extends through selected portions of the base metal and weld deposit. In the event of a failure, such as development of a crack extending from the chamber to an outer surface, the tag gas is released. The environment about the welded area is directed to an analyzer which, in the event of presence of the tag gas, evidences the failure. A trigger gas can be included with the tag gas to actuate the analyzer.

  9. Waveguide disturbance detection method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korneev, Valeri A. (Albany, CA); Nihei, Kurt T. (Oakland, CA); Myer, Larry R. (Benicia, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A method for detection of a disturbance in a waveguide comprising transmitting a wavefield having symmetric and antisymmetric components from a horizontally and/or vertically polarized source and/or pressure source disposed symmetrically with respect to the longitudinal central axis of the waveguide at one end of the waveguide, recording the horizontal and/or vertical component or a pressure of the wavefield with a vertical array of receivers disposed at the opposite end of the waveguide, separating the wavenumber transform of the wavefield into the symmetric and antisymmetric components, integrating the symmetric and antisymmetric components over a broad frequency range, and comparing the magnitude of the symmetric components and the antisymmetric components to an expected magnitude for the symmetric components and the antisymmetric components for a waveguide of uniform thickness and properties thereby determining whether or not a disturbance is present inside the waveguide.

  10. Self-triggering superconducting fault current limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yuan, Xing (Albany, NY); Tekletsadik, Kasegn (Rexford, NY)

    2008-10-21

    A modular and scaleable Matrix Fault Current Limiter (MFCL) that functions as a "variable impedance" device in an electric power network, using components made of superconducting and non-superconducting electrically conductive materials. The matrix fault current limiter comprises a fault current limiter module that includes a superconductor which is electrically coupled in parallel with a trigger coil, wherein the trigger coil is magnetically coupled to the superconductor. The current surge doing a fault within the electrical power network will cause the superconductor to transition to its resistive state and also generate a uniform magnetic field in the trigger coil and simultaneously limit the voltage developed across the superconductor. This results in fast and uniform quenching of the superconductors, significantly reduces the burnout risk associated with non-uniformity often existing within the volume of superconductor materials. The fault current limiter modules may be electrically coupled together to form various "n" (rows).times."m" (columns) matrix configurations.

  11. Complementarity of direct dark matter detection and indirect detection through gamma-rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lars Bergstrom; Torsten Bringmann; Joakim Edsjo

    2011-02-23

    We show, by using an extensive sample of viable supersymmetric models as templates, that indirect detection of dark matter through gamma rays may have a large potential for identifying the nature of dark matter. This is in particular true also for models that give too weak dark matter-nucleon scattering cross sections to be probed by present and planned direct detection experiments. Also models with a mass scale too high to be accessible at CERN's LHC accelerator may show up in next-generation imaging Cherenkov telescope arrays. Based on our our findings, we therefore suggest to view indirect searches as genuine particle physics experiments, complementing other strategies to probe so far unknown regions in the parameter space of e.g. supersymmetric models, and propose a new approach that would make use of telescopes dedicated for dark matter searches. As a concrete example for the potential of such an approach, we consider an array of imaging air Cherenkov telescopes, the Dark Matter Array (DMA), and show that such an experiment could extend present-day limits by several orders of magnitude, reaching a large class of models that would remain undetected in both direct detection experiments and searches at the LHC. In addition, in a sizable part of the parameter space, signals from more than one type of dark matter detection experiment would be possible, something that may eventually be necessary in order to identify the dark matter candidate.

  12. Complementarity of direct dark matter detection and indirect detection through gamma rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergstroem, Lars; Bringmann, Torsten; Edsjoe, Joakim

    2011-02-15

    We show, by using an extensive sample of viable supersymmetric models as templates, that indirect detection of dark matter through gamma rays may have a large potential for identifying the nature of dark matter. This is, in particular, true also for models that give too weak dark matter-nucleon scattering cross sections to be probed by present and planned direct detection experiments. Also models with a mass scale too high to be accessible at CERN's LHC accelerator may show up in next-generation imaging Cherenkov telescope arrays. Based on our findings, we therefore suggest to view indirect searches as genuine particle physics experiments, complementing other strategies to probe so far unknown regions in the parameter space of e.g. supersymmetric models, and propose a new approach that would make use of telescopes dedicated for dark matter searches. As a concrete example for the potential of such an approach, we consider an array of imaging air Cherenkov telescopes, the Dark Matter Array (DMA), and show that such an experiment could extend present-day limits by several orders of magnitude, reaching a large class of models that would remain undetected in both direct detection experiments and searches at the LHC. In addition, in a sizable part of the parameter space, signals from more than one type of dark matter detection experiment would be possible, something that may eventually be necessary in order to identify the dark matter candidate.

  13. LOCA analyses for nuclear steam supply systems with upper head injection. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byers, R.K.; Bartel, T.J.

    1980-01-01

    The term Upper Head Injection describes a relatively new addition to a nuclear reactor's emergency cooling system. With this feature, water is delivered directly to the top of the reactor vessel during a loss-of-coolant accident, in addition to the later injection of coolant into the primary operating loops. Established computer programs, with various modifications to models for heat transfer and two-phase flow, were used to analyze a transient following a large break in one of the main coolant loops of a reactor equipped with upper head injection. The flow and heat transfer modifications combined to yield fuel cladding temperatures during blowdown which were as much as 440K (800/sup 0/F) lower than were obtained with standard versions of the codes (for best estimate calculations). The calculations also showed the need for more uniformity of applications of heat transfer models in the computer programs employed.

  14. Effects of a potential fourth fermion generation on the upper and lower Higgs boson mass bounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philipp Gerhold; Karl Jansen; Jim Kallarackal

    2010-10-28

    We study the effect of a potential fourth fermion generation on the upper and lower Higgs boson mass bounds. This investigation is based on the numerical evaluation of a chirally invariant lattice Higgs-Yukawa model emulating the same Higgs-fermion coupling structure as in the Higgs sector of the electroweak Standard Model. In particular, the considered model obeys a Ginsparg-Wilson version of the underlying ${SU}(2)_L\\times {U}(1)_Y$ symmetry, being a global symmetry here due to the neglection of gauge fields in this model. We present our results on the modification of the upper and lower Higgs boson mass bounds induced by the presence of a hypothetical very heavy fourth quark doublet. Finally, we compare these findings to the standard scenario of three fermion generations.

  15. A Review of Student Difficulties in Upper-Level Quantum Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Chandralekha

    2015-01-01

    Learning advanced physics, in general, is challenging not only due to the increased mathematical sophistication but also because one must continue to build on all of the prior knowledge acquired at the introductory and intermediate levels. In addition, learning quantum mechanics can be especially challenging because the paradigms of classical mechanics and quantum mechanics are very different. Here, we review research on student reasoning difficulties in learning upper-level quantum mechanics and research on students' problem-solving and metacognitive skills in these courses. Some of these studies were multi-university investigations. The investigations suggest that there is large diversity in student performance in upper-level quantum mechanics regardless of the university, textbook, or instructor and many students in these courses have not acquired a functional understanding of the fundamental concepts. The nature of reasoning difficulties in learning quantum mechanics is analogous to reasoning difficulties...

  16. Bifurcation and chaos in the simple passive dynamic walking model with upper body

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Qingdu; Guo, Jianli; Yang, Xiao-Song

    2014-09-01

    We present some rich new complex gaits in the simple walking model with upper body by Wisse et al. in [Robotica 22, 681 (2004)]. We first show that the stable gait found by Wisse et al. may become chaotic via period-doubling bifurcations. Such period-doubling routes to chaos exist for all parameters, such as foot mass, upper body mass, body length, hip spring stiffness, and slope angle. Then, we report three new gaits with period 3, 4, and 6; for each gait, there is also a period-doubling route to chaos. Finally, we show a practical method for finding a topological horseshoe in 3D Poincaré map, and present a rigorous verification of chaos from these gaits.

  17. Biological monitoring of Upper Three Runs Creek, Savannah River Plant, Aiken County, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Specht, W.L.

    1991-10-01

    In anticipation of the fall 1988 start up of effluent discharges into Upper Three Creek by the F/H Area Effluent Treatment Facility of the Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC, a two and one half year biological study was initiated in June 1987. Upper Three Runs Creek is an intensively studied fourth order stream known for its high species richness. Designed to assess the potential impact of F H area effluent on the creek, the study includes qualitative and quantitative macroinvertebrate stream surveys at five sites, chronic toxicity testing of the effluent, water chemistry and bioaccumulation analysis. This final report presents the results of both pre-operational and post-operational qualitative and quantitative (artificial substrate) macroinvertebrate studies. Six quantitative and three qualitative studies were conducted prior to the initial release of the F/H ETF effluent and five quantitative and two qualitative studies were conducted post-operationally.

  18. Second-harmonic generation of upper-hybrid radiation in a plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tewari, D.P.; Tripathi, V.K.

    1980-05-01

    Employing the fluid model for the nonlinear response of electrons, we have studied the phenomenon of second-harmonic generation of upper-hybrid electromagnetic radiation in an inhomogeneous plasma. In the case of laser-pallet fusion, the maximum contribution for harmonic generation comes from the vicinity of the upper-hybrid layer, and the harmonic conversion efficiency turns out to be approx.0.1% at the power densities approx.10/sup 14/ W/cm/sup 2/ (CO/sub 2/ laser), the same order as observed experimentally. In the case of electron cyclotron heating experiments of tokamak, a strong second harmonic must be generated at the cyclotron resonance layer. The wave-number-matching condition could be satisfied in a tokamak, which adds to the conversion efficiency.

  19. Method for universal detection of two-photon polarization entanglement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karol Bartkiewicz; Pawe? Horodecki; Karel Lemr; Adam Miranowicz; Karol ?yczkowski

    2015-04-10

    Detecting and quantifying quantum entanglement of a given unknown state poses problems that are fundamentally important for quantum information processing. Surprisingly, no direct (i.e., without quantum tomography) universal experimental implementation of a necessary and sufficient test of entanglement has been designed even for a general two-qubit state. Here we propose an experimental method for detecting a collective universal witness, which is a necessary and sufficient test of two-photon polarization entanglement. It allows us to detect entanglement for any two-qubit mixed state and to establish tight upper and lower bounds on its amount. A different element of this method is the sequential character of its main components, which allows us to obtain relatively complicated information about quantum correlations with the help of simple linear-optical elements. As such, this proposal realizes a universal two-qubit entanglement test within the present state of the art of quantum optics. We show the optimality of our setup with respect to the minimal number of measured quantities.

  20. Depositional environment and reservoir morphology of the Upper Wilcox sandstones, Katy gas field, Waller County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DePaul, Gilbert John

    1979-01-01

    and structural characteristics of the field. The Upper Wilcox is divided into the following units, in ascending order, "First Lower Massive" sandstones and "D", "C", "B", "A", "Second Wilcox" and "First Wilcox" interbedded sandstones and shales. The reservoir... and are generally abruptly overla1n by sandstones with sharp or erosional bases. The sandstones change laterally to thin sandstones interlaminated with thick shales. The thick sandstones are submarine, constructional- channel deposits with associated thin...