Sample records for upper containment chamber

  1. Characteristics of the upper crust and magma chambers along the spreading centers of the Lau back-arc basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dingler, Allison Maria Jacobs

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    G. , 1990. Origin of petrology and geochemistry of submarinerate, morphology, and petrology. Upper crustal refractione.g. , morphology, petrology, seismicity, and hydrothermal

  2. Exposure chamber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moss, Owen R. (Kennewick, WA)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A chamber for exposing animals, plants, or materials to air containing gases or aerosols is so constructed that catch pans for animal excrement, for example, serve to aid the uniform distribution of air throughout the chamber instead of constituting obstacles as has been the case in prior animal exposure chambers. The chamber comprises the usual imperforate top, bottom and side walls. Within the chamber, cages and their associated pans are arranged in two columns. The pans are spaced horizontally from the walls of the chamber in all directions. Corresponding pans of the two columns are also spaced horizontally from each other. Preferably the pans of one column are also spaced vertically from corresponding pans of the other column. Air is introduced into the top of the chamber and withdrawn from the bottom. The general flow of air is therefore vertical. The effect of the horizontal pans is based on the fact that a gas flowing past the edge of a flat plate that is perpendicular to the flow forms a wave on the upstream side of the plate. Air flows downwardly between the chamber walls and the outer edges of the pan. It also flows downwardly between the inner edges of the pans of the two columns. It has been found that when the air carries aerosol particles, these particles are substantially uniformly distributed throughout the chamber.

  3. Ionization chamber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walenta, Albert H. (Port Jefferson Station, NY)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ionization chamber has separate drift and detection regions electrically isolated from each other by a fine wire grid. A relatively weak electric field can be maintained in the drift region when the grid and another electrode in the chamber are connected to a high voltage source. A much stronger electric field can be provided in the detection region by connecting wire electrodes therein to another high voltage source. The detection region can thus be operated in a proportional mode when a suitable gas is contained in the chamber. High resolution output pulse waveforms are provided across a resistor connected to the detection region anode, after ionizing radiation enters the drift region and ionize the gas.

  4. Flow chamber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morozov, Victor (Manassas, VA)

    2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A flow chamber having a vacuum chamber and a specimen chamber. The specimen chamber may have an opening through which a fluid may be introduced and an opening through which the fluid may exit. The vacuum chamber may have an opening through which contents of the vacuum chamber may be evacuated. A portion of the flow chamber may be flexible, and a vacuum may be used to hold the components of the flow chamber together.

  5. Main Chamber Pressure why do we care about it?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitcher, C. S.

    .main chamber recycling 3.ion flux to the upper part of the outer plate 4.upper divertor leakage #12Main Chamber Pressure why do we care about it? - neutrals in the main chamber imply a particle-surface interaction there which may result in impurity production and erosion - neutrals in the main chamber may

  6. Chamber transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    OLSON,CRAIG L.

    2000-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Heavy ion beam transport through the containment chamber plays a crucial role in all heavy ion fusion (HIF) scenarios. Here, several parameters are used to characterize the operating space for HIF beams; transport modes are assessed in relation to evolving target/accelerator requirements; results of recent relevant experiments and simulations of HIF transport are summarized; and relevant instabilities are reviewed. All transport options still exist, including (1) vacuum ballistic transport, (2) neutralized ballistic transport, and (3) channel-like transport. Presently, the European HIF program favors vacuum ballistic transport, while the US HIF program favors neutralized ballistic transport with channel-like transport as an alternate approach. Further transport research is needed to clearly guide selection of the most attractive, integrated HIF system.

  7. Nuclear reactor melt-retention structure to mitigate direct containment heating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tutu, Narinder K. (Manorville, NY); Ginsberg, Theodore (East Setauket, NY); Klages, John R. (Mattituck, NY)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A light water nuclear reactor melt-retention structure to mitigate the extent of direct containment heating of the reactor containment building. The structure includes a retention chamber for retaining molten core material away from the upper regions of the reactor containment building when a severe accident causes the bottom of the pressure vessel of the reactor to fail and discharge such molten material under high pressure through the reactor cavity into the retention chamber. In combination with the melt-retention chamber there is provided a passageway that includes molten core droplet deflector vanes and has gas vent means in its upper surface, which means are operable to deflect molten core droplets into the retention chamber while allowing high pressure steam and gases to be vented into the upper regions of the containment building. A plurality of platforms are mounted within the passageway and the melt-retention structure to direct the flow of molten core material and help retain it within the melt-retention chamber. In addition, ribs are mounted at spaced positions on the floor of the melt-retention chamber, and grid means are positioned at the entrance side of the retention chamber. The grid means develop gas back pressure that helps separate the molten core droplets from discharged high pressure steam and gases, thereby forcing the steam and gases to vent into the upper regions of the reactor containment building.

  8. Sleeve reaction chamber system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Northrup, M. Allen (Berkeley, CA); Beeman, Barton V. (San Mateo, CA); Benett, William J. (Livermore, CA); Hadley, Dean R. (Manteca, CA); Landre, Phoebe (Livermore, CA); Lehew, Stacy L. (Livermore, CA); Krulevitch, Peter A. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2009-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A chemical reaction chamber system that combines devices such as doped polysilicon for heating, bulk silicon for convective cooling, and thermoelectric (TE) coolers to augment the heating and cooling rates of the reaction chamber or chambers. In addition the system includes non-silicon-based reaction chambers such as any high thermal conductivity material used in combination with a thermoelectric cooling mechanism (i.e., Peltier device). The heat contained in the thermally conductive part of the system can be used/reused to heat the device, thereby conserving energy and expediting the heating/cooling rates. The system combines a micromachined silicon reaction chamber, for example, with an additional module/device for augmented heating/cooling using the Peltier effect. This additional module is particularly useful in extreme environments (very hot or extremely cold) where augmented heating/cooling would be useful to speed up the thermal cycling rates. The chemical reaction chamber system has various applications for synthesis or processing of organic, inorganic, or biochemical reactions, including the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or other DNA reactions, such as the ligase chain reaction.

  9. Target Chamber

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGESafety Tag:8, 2013 FINALTarget Chamber The

  10. TRU waste characterization chamber gloveboxes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, D. S.

    1998-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) is participating in the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Transuranic Waste Program in support of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The Laboratory's support currently consists of intrusive characterization of a selected population of drums containing transuranic waste. This characterization is performed in a complex of alpha containment gloveboxes termed the Waste Characterization Gloveboxes. Made up of the Waste Characterization Chamber, Sample Preparation Glovebox, and the Equipment Repair Glovebox, they were designed as a small production characterization facility for support of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). This paper presents salient features of these gloveboxes.

  11. Contained Firing Facility | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    information visit the CFF webpage. CFF The containment chamber at LLNL's Contained Firing Facility Related Topics Maintaining the Stockpile stockpile stewardship R&D llnl Related...

  12. BNL | ATF Experimental Chambers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laser Injection Vacuum Chamber Located on beam line 1, the "Smith-Purcell box" has 140 liters of usable volume. Due to its size, it is mounted on a fixed platform. Hosted...

  13. BNL | ATF Interaction Chambers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    chamber can be used for more than just plasma wakefield experiments. Dedicated 500 ls turbo pump and one auxiliary 200 ls turbo pump port. Normally operates in the 10-8 Torr...

  14. BNL | ATF Interaction Chambers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with translation actuators. Beam profile monitors at interaction region as well as chamber entrance and exit. Available port for 200 ls turbo pump. Operates in the 10-8 Torr range...

  15. BNL | ATF Experimental Chambers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    entrance and exit. Dedicated ion pumps (250 ls total) with a port for one 200 ls turbo pump. Operates in the 10-8 Torr range. Photo of open DWFA chamber, in-situ on beam...

  16. Automated soil gas monitoring chamber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Edwards, Nelson T.; Riggs, Jeffery S.

    2003-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A chamber for trapping soil gases as they evolve from the soil without disturbance to the soil and to the natural microclimate within the chamber has been invented. The chamber opens between measurements and therefore does not alter the metabolic processes that influence soil gas efflux rates. A multiple chamber system provides for repetitive multi-point sampling, undisturbed metabolic soil processes between sampling, and an essentially airtight sampling chamber operating at ambient pressure.

  17. Liquid Wall Chambers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, W R

    2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The key feature of liquid wall chambers is the use of a renewable liquid layer to protect chamber structures from target emissions. Two primary options have been proposed and studied: wetted wall chambers and thick liquid wall (TLW) chambers. With wetted wall designs, a thin layer of liquid shields the structural first wall from short ranged target emissions (x-rays, ions and debris) but not neutrons. Various schemes have been proposed to establish and renew the liquid layer between shots including flow-guiding porous fabrics (e.g., Osiris, HIBALL), porous rigid structures (Prometheus) and thin film flows (KOYO). The thin liquid layer can be the tritium breeding material (e.g., flibe, PbLi, or Li) or another liquid metal such as Pb. TLWs use liquid jets injected by stationary or oscillating nozzles to form a neutronically thick layer (typically with an effective thickness of {approx}50 cm) of liquid between the target and first structural wall. In addition to absorbing short ranged emissions, the thick liquid layer degrades the neutron flux and energy reaching the first wall, typically by {approx}10 x x, so that steel walls can survive for the life of the plant ({approx}30-60 yrs). The thick liquid serves as the primary coolant and tritium breeding material (most recent designs use flibe, but the earliest concepts used Li). In essence, the TLW places the fusion blanket inside the first wall instead of behind the first wall.

  18. Secondary emission gas chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. In'shakov; V. Kryshkin; V. Skvortsov

    2014-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    For a hadron calorimeter active element there is considered a gaseous secondary emis-sion detector (150 micron gap, 50 kV/cm). Such one-stage parallel plate chamber must be a radiation hard, fast and simple. A model of such detector has been produced, tested and some characteristics are presented.

  19. Multi-chamber deposition system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Richard L. (Roseville, MN); Jeffrey, Frank R. (Shoreview, MN); Westerberg, Roger K. (Cottage Grove, MN)

    1989-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for the simultaneous deposition of different coatings onto a thin web within a large volume vacuum chamber is disclosed which chamber is provided with a plurality of deposition chambers in which the different layers are deposited onto the film as its moves from a supply roll to a finished take-up roll of coated web. The deposition chambers provided within the large vacuum chamber are provided with separate seals which minimize back diffusion of any dopant gas from adjacent deposition chambers.

  20. Multi-chamber deposition system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Richard L. (Roseville, MN); Jeffrey, Frank R. (Shoreview, MN); Westerberg, Roger K. (Cottage Grove, MN)

    1989-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for the simultaneous deposition of different coatings onto a thin web within a large volume vacuum chamber is disclosed which chamber is provided with a plurality of deposition chambers in which the different layers are deposited onto the film as its moves from a supply roll to a finished take-up roll of coated web. The deposition chambers provided within the large vacuum chamber are provided with separate seals which minimize back diffusion of any dopant gas from adjacent deposition chambers.

  1. Three chamber negative ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA); Ehlers, Kenneth W. (Alamo, CA); Hiskes, John R. (Livermore, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A negative ion vessel is divided into an excitation chamber, a negative ionization chamber and an extraction chamber by two magnetic filters. Input means introduces neutral molecules into a first chamber where a first electron discharge means vibrationally excites the molecules which migrate to a second chamber. In the second chamber a second electron discharge means ionizes the molecules, producing negative ions which are extracted into or by a third chamber. A first magnetic filter prevents high energy electrons from entering the negative ionization chamber from the excitation chamber. A second magnetic filter prevents high energy electrons from entering the extraction chamber from the negative ionizing chamber. An extraction grid at the end of the negative ion vessel attracts negative ions into the third chamber and accelerates them. Another grid, located adjacent to the extraction grid, carries a small positive voltage in order to inhibit positive ions from migrating into the extraction chamber and contour the plasma potential. Additional electrons can be suppressed from the output flux using ExB forces provided by magnetic field means and the extractor grid electric potential.

  2. Ionization chamber dosimeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Renner, Tim R. (Berkeley, CA); Nyman, Mark A. (Berkeley, CA); Stradtner, Ronald (Kensington, CA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for fabricating an ion chamber dosimeter collecting array of the type utilizing plural discrete elements formed on a uniform collecting surface which includes forming a thin insulating layer over an aperture in a frame having surfaces, forming a predetermined pattern of through holes in the layer, plating both surfaces of the layer and simultaneously tilting and rotating the frame for uniform plate-through of the holes between surfaces. Aligned masking and patterned etching of the surfaces provides interconnects between the through holes and copper leads provided to external circuitry.

  3. Neutron Detection via Bubble Chambers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, David V.; Ely, James H.; Peurrung, Anthony J.; Bond, Leonard J.; Collar, J. I.; Flake, Matthew; Knopf, Michael A.; Pitts, W. K.; Shaver, Mark W.; Sonnenschein, Andrew; Smart, John E.; Todd, Lindsay C.

    2005-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) exploratory research project investigating the feasibility of fast neutron detection using a suitably prepared and operated, pressure-cycled bubble chamber are described. The research was conducted along two parallel paths. Experiments with a slow pressure-release Halon chamber at the Enrico Fermi Institute at the University of Chicago showed clear bubble nucleation sensitivity to an AmBe neutron source and insensitivity to the 662 keV gammas from a 137Cs source. Bubble formation was documented via high-speed (1000 frames/sec) photography, and the acoustic signature of bubble formation was detected using a piezo-electric transducer element mounted on the base of the chamber. The chamber’s neutron sensitivity as a function of working fluid temperature was mapped out. The second research path consisted of the design, fabrication, and testing of a fast pressure-release Freon-134a chamber at PNNL. The project concluded with successful demonstrations of the PNNL chamber’s AmBe neutron source sensitivity and 137Cs gamma insensitivity. The source response tests of the PNNL chamber were documented with high-speed photography.

  4. Ion chamber based neutron detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Derzon, Mark S; Galambos, Paul C; Renzi, Ronald F

    2014-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron detector with monolithically integrated readout circuitry, including: a bonded semiconductor die; an ion chamber formed in the bonded semiconductor die; a first electrode and a second electrode formed in the ion chamber; a neutron absorbing material filling the ion chamber; and the readout circuitry which is electrically coupled to the first and second electrodes. The bonded semiconductor die includes an etched semiconductor substrate bonded to an active semiconductor substrate. The readout circuitry is formed in a portion of the active semiconductor substrate. The ion chamber has a substantially planar first surface on which the first electrode is formed and a substantially planar second surface, parallel to the first surface, on which the second electrode is formed. The distance between the first electrode and the second electrode may be equal to or less than the 50% attenuation length for neutrons in the neutron absorbing material filling the ion chamber.

  5. A time dependent solution for the operation of ion chambers in a high ionization background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christos Velissaris

    2005-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We have derived a time dependent solution describing the development of space charge inside an ion chamber subjected to an externally caused ionization rate N. The solution enables the derivation of a formula that the operational parameters of the chamber must satisfy for saturation free operation. This formula contains a correction factor to account for the finite duration of the ionization rate N.

  6. The TESLA Time Projection Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabil Ghodbane

    2002-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A large Time Projection Chamber is proposed as part of the tracking system for a detector at the TESLA electron positron linear collider. Different ongoing R&D studies are reviewed, stressing progress made on a new type readout technique based on Micro-Pattern Gas Detectors.

  7. VERTEX CHAMBERS TARGET CELL CALORIMETER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DRIFT VC 1/2 FC 1/2 VERTEX CHAMBERS TARGET CELL DVC MC 1­3 HODOSCOPE H0 MONITOR BC 1/2 BC 3/4 TRD at Threashold Lambda Physics (u ­L spin transfer) Motivation: ­ W L Target cell e beam L p p e ­ Elastic: Peltier elements ( T ~ ­20C ) ­ Custom built electronics + HELIX chips low autgassing (

  8. Blood meal host preferences of Culex salinarius Coquillett (Diptera : culicidae) in Chambers County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grieco, John Paul

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on a monthly basis from three field sites in Chambers County, TX. The source of blood contained in each specimen was determined using a modified precipitin test. The results were used to calculate seasonal foraging ratios for mosquito populations...

  9. Chamber dynamic research with pulsed power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PETERSON,ROBERT R.; OLSON,CRAIG L.; RENK,TIMOTHY J.; ROCHAU,GARY E.; SWEENEY,MARY ANN

    2000-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE), Target Chamber Dynamics (TCD) is an integral part of the target chamber design and performance. TCD includes target output deposition of target x-rays, ions and neutrons in target chamber gases and structures, vaporization and melting of target chamber materials, radiation-hydrodynamics in target chamber vapors and gases, and chamber conditions at the time of target and beam injections. Pulsed power provides a unique environment for IFE-TCD validation experiments in two important ways: they do not require the very clean conditions which lasers need and they currently provide large x-ray and ion energies.

  10. Transporting container for an amputated extremity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammerman, S.W.

    1988-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A container assembly for transporting of an amputated extremity to a location for replantation is described comprising: an inner compartment adapted to receive an amputated extremity, the inner compartment being defined by a wall, an access opening providing access into the inner compartment, the access opening being closable; a completely closed outer compartment surrounding the inner compartment, the outer compartment abutting the wall; and cooling bags located within the outer compartment, Each cooling bag contains a pair of substances when mixed results in the production of a cooling affect. Each cooling bag contains chambers. The chambers are connected but separate. One of the substances is a granulized solid. The granulized solid is located within the separate chambers, whereby upon mixing occurring of the substances substantially even distribution of the cooling affect is obtained across the entire width of the inner compartment due to mixing between the substances occurring within each chamber.

  11. Containment system for supercritical water oxidation reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chastagner, P.

    1994-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is described for containment of a supercritical water oxidation reactor in the event of a rupture of the reactor. The system includes a containment for housing the reaction vessel and a communicating chamber for holding a volume of coolant, such as water. The coolant is recirculated and sprayed to entrain and cool any reactants that might have escaped from the reaction vessel. Baffles at the entrance to the chamber prevent the sprayed coolant from contacting the reaction vessel. An impact-absorbing layer is positioned between the vessel and the containment to at least partially absorb momentum of any fragments propelled by the rupturing vessel. Remote, quick-disconnecting fittings exterior to the containment, in cooperation with shut-off valves, enable the vessel to be isolated and the system safely taken off-line. Normally-closed orifices throughout the containment and chamber enable decontamination of interior surfaces when necessary. 2 figures.

  12. Containment system for supercritical water oxidation reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chastagner, Philippe (3134 Natalie Cir., Augusta, GA 30909-2748)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for containment of a supercritical water oxidation reactor in the event of a rupture of the reactor. The system includes a containment for housing the reaction vessel and a communicating chamber for holding a volume of coolant, such as water. The coolant is recirculated and sprayed to entrain and cool any reactants that might have escaped from the reaction vessel. Baffles at the entrance to the chamber prevent the sprayed coolant from contacting the reaction vessel. An impact-absorbing layer is positioned between the vessel and the containment to at least partially absorb momentum of any fragments propelled by the rupturing vessel. Remote, quick-disconnecting fittings exterior to the containment, in cooperation with shut-off valves, enable the vessel to be isolated and the system safely taken off-line. Normally-closed orifices throughout the containment and chamber enable decontamination of interior surfaces when necessary.

  13. Self contained, independent, in-vacuum spinner motor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ayers, Marion J. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An independent, self contained apparatus for operation within a vacuum chamber. A sealed enclosure is located in the chamber. The enclosure contains its own atmosphere independent of the vacuum in the chamber. A motor, power unit, and controls are located entirely within the enclosure. They do not have a direct structural connection outside of the enclosure in any way that would effect the atmosphere within the enclosure. The motor, power unit, and controls drive a spinner plate located outside the enclosure but within the vacuum chamber.

  14. Vacuum chamber for ion manipulation device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsung-Chi; Tang, Keqi; Ibrahim, Yehia M; Smith, Richard D; Anderson, Gordon A; Baker, Erin M

    2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion manipulation method and device is disclosed. The device includes a pair of substantially parallel surfaces. An array of inner electrodes is contained within, and extends substantially along the length of, each parallel surface. The device includes a first outer array of electrodes and a second outer array of electrodes. Each outer array of electrodes is positioned on either side of the inner electrodes, and is contained within and extends substantially along the length of each parallel surface. A DC voltage is applied to the first and second outer array of electrodes. A RF voltage, with a superimposed electric field, is applied to the inner electrodes by applying the DC voltages to each electrode. Ions either move between the parallel surfaces within an ion confinement area or along paths in the direction of the electric field, or can be trapped in the ion confinement area. A predetermined number of pairs of surfaces are disposed in one or more chambers, forming a multiple-layer ion mobility cyclotron device.

  15. Fluidized wall for protecting fusion chamber walls

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maniscalco, James A. (Danville, CA); Meier, Wayne R. (Livermore, CA)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for protecting the inner wall of a fusion chamber from microexplosion debris, x-rays, neutrons, etc. produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) targets imploded within the fusion chamber. The apparatus utilizes a fluidized wall similar to a waterfall comprising liquid lithium or solid pellets of lithium-ceramic, the waterfall forming a blanket to prevent damage of the structural materials of the chamber.

  16. The Mark II Vertex Drift Chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexander, J.P.; Baggs, R.; Fujino, D.; Hayes, K.; Hoard, C.; Hower, N.; Hutchinson, D.; Jaros, J.A.; Koetke, D.; Kowalski, L.A.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have completed constructing and begun operating the Mark II Drift Chamber Vertex Detector. The chamber, based on a modified jet cell design, achieves 30 {mu}m spatial resolution and <1000 {mu}m track-pair resolution in pressurized CO{sub 2} gas mixtures. Special emphasis has been placed on controlling systematic errors including the use of novel construction techniques which permit accurate wire placement. Chamber performance has been studied with cosmic ray tracks collected with the chamber located both inside and outside the Mark II. Results on spatial resolution, average pulse shape, and some properties of CO{sub 2} mixtures are presented. 10 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Temperature Studies for ATLAS MDT BOS Chambers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Engl; O. Biebel; R. Hertenberger; R. Mameghani; D. Merkl; F. Rauscher; D. Schaile; R. Stroehmer

    2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Data sets with high statistics taken at the cosmic ray facility, equipped with 3 ATLAS BOS MDT chambers, in Garching (Munich) have been used to study temperature and pressure effects on gas gain and drifttime. The deformation of a thermally expanded chamber was reconstructed using the internal RasNik alignment monitoring system and the tracks from cosmic data. For these studies a heating system was designed to increase the temperature of the middle chamber by up to 20 Kelvins over room temperature. For comparison the temperature effects on gas properties have been simulated with Garfield. The maximum drifttime decreased under temperature raise by -2.21 +- 0.08 ns/K, in agreement with the results of pressure variations and the Garfield simulation. The increased temperatures led to a linear increase of the gas gain of about 2.1% 1/K. The chamber deformation has been analyzed with the help of reconstructed tracks. By the comparison of the tracks through the reference chambers with these through the test chamber the thermal expansion has been reconstructed and the result shows agreement with the theoretical expansion coefficient. As the wires are fixed at the end of the chamber, the wire position calculation can not provide a conclusion for the chamber middle. The complete deformation has been identified with the analysis of the monitoring system RasNik, whose measured values have shown a homogeneous expansion of the whole chamber, overlayed by a shift and a rotation of the chamber middle with respect to the outer part of the chamber. The established results of both methods are in agreement. We present as well a model for the position-drifttime correction as function of temperature.

  18. Chamber for the optical manipulation of microscopic particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buican, Tudor N. (Los Alamos, NM); Upham, Bryan D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A particle control chamber enables experiments to be carried out on biological cells and the like using a laser system to trap and manipulate the particles. A manipulation chamber provides a plurality of inlet and outlet ports for the particles and for fluids used to control or to contact the particles. A central manipulation area is optically accessible by the laser and includes first enlarged volumes for containing a selected number of particles for experimentation. A number of first enlarged volumes are connected by flow channels through second enlarged volumes. The second enlarged volumes act as bubble valves for controlling the interconnections between the first enlarged volumes. Electrode surfaces may be applied above the first enlarged volumes to enable experimentation using the application of electric fields within the first enlarged volumes. A variety of chemical and environmental conditions may be established within individual first enlarged volumes to enable experimental conditions for small scale cellular interactions.

  19. IFE Chamber Technology Testing Program In NIF and Chamber Development Test Plan Mohamed A. Abdou

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    IFE Chamber Technology Testing Program In NIF and Chamber Development Test Plan Mohamed A. Abdou chamber technology testing program in NIF involoving: criteria for evaluation and costs of the more complex experiments in NIF. I. Introduction One important class of issues concerning

  20. Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup The Upper Los Alamos Canyon Project involves cleaning up hazardous materials left over from some of the Laboratory's earliest activities. Contact...

  1. Commissioning of SLAC SLD 45-Degree Chambers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. O. Eschenburg

    2002-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The SLD experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center had a significant gap in its muon tracking coverage, provided by the Warm Iron Calorimeter. Supplemental planes of limited streamer tube chambers were added to improve the coverage in the vicinity of the gap at 0.65 commissioning of the forty-five degree chamber region of the SLAC SLD Warm Iron Calorimeter is presented. This task involved the completion of the forty-five degree chamber region geometry for the Warm Iron Calorimeter's fitter and swimmer and the changing of the way multiple scattering effects are treated in the fitter algorithm.

  2. Simulation of chamber transport for heavy-ion fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulation of Chamber Transport for Heavy-Ion Fusion W. M.et al. , “Modeling Chamber Transport for Heavy-Ion Fusion,”et al. , "Chamber Transport of `Foot' Pulses for Heavy-Ion

  3. Intense ion beam propagation in a reactor sized chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vay, J.L.; Deutsch, C.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    beams in a heavy ion fusion reactor chamber filled with lowIon Fusion, Intense Ion Beams, Reaction Chamber. P.A.C.S.heavy ion beam propagation in the reaction chamber, Fus.

  4. Modeling chamber transport for heavy-ion fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modeling Chamber Transport for Heavy-Ion Fusion W. M. Sharp,Peterson, "Chamber Transport of 'Foot' Pulses for Heavy-Ionstate of beam ions. Although several chamber- transport

  5. Chamber transport of "foot" pulses for heavy-ion fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharp, W.M.; Callahan-Miller, D.A.; Tabak, M.; Yu, S.S.; Peterson, P.F.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutralization on Heavy-Ion-Fusion Chamber Transport," to beChamber transport of "foot" pulses for heavy-ion fusion W.chamber-transport effectiveness is the fraction of enclosed beam ions

  6. Combustion of Shock-Dispersed Fuels in a Chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neuwald, P; Reichenbach, H; Kuhl, A L

    2003-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In previous studies we have investigated after-burning effects of a fuel-rich explosive (TNT). In that case the detonation only releases about 30 % of the available energy, but generates a hot cloud of fuel that can burn in the ambient air, thus evoking an additional energy release that is distributed in space and time. The current series of small-scale experiments can be looked upon as a natural generalization of this mechanism: a booster charge disperses a (non-explosive) fuel, provides mixing with air and - by means of the hot detonation products - energy to ignite the fuel. The current version of our miniature Shock-Dispersed-Fuel (SDF) charges consists of a spherical booster charge of 0.5 g PETN, embedded in a paper cylinder of approximately 2.2 cm3, which is filled with powdered fuel compositions. The main compositions studied up to now contain aluminum powder, hydrocarbon powders like polyethylene or sucrose and/or carbon particles. These charges were studied in three different chambers of 4-1, 6.6-1 and 40.5-1 volume. In general, the booster charge was sufficient to initiate burning of the fuel. This modifies the pressure signatures measured with a number of wall gages and increases the quasi-static overpressure level obtained in the chambers. On the one hand the time-scale and the yield of the pressure rise depend on the fuel and its characteristics. On the other hand they also depend on the flow dynamics in the chamber, which is dominated by shock reverberations, and thus on the chamber geometry and volume. The paper gives a survey of the experimental results and discusses the possible influences of some basic parameters.

  7. An environmental sample chamber for reliable scanning transmission...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    environmental sample chamber for reliable scanning transmission x-ray microscopy measurements under water vapor. An environmental sample chamber for reliable scanning transmission...

  8. Mini-PROTEAN Multi-Casting Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raizada, Manish N.

    ºC for future use. 1.2 Specifications Materials of construction Clamps Glass filled polycarbonate Casting chamber, sealing plate Molded polycarbonate Gasket Silicone tubing Overall size 10 cm x 10 cm x 16

  9. Formation mechanisms of combustion chamber deposits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, Christopher J. (Christopher John)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Combustion chamber deposits are found in virtually all internal combustion engines after a few hundred hours of operation. Deposits form on cylinder, piston, and head surfaces that are in contact with fuel-air mixture ...

  10. Anode supported single chamber solid oxide fuel cells operating in exhaust gases of thermal engine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Anode supported single chamber solid oxide fuel cells operating in exhaust gases of thermal engine. Conventional solid oxide fuel cells are separated into two compartments containing each electrode split hydrocarbons, pollutant emissions reduction hal-01056363,version1-21Aug2014 #12;1. Introduction Solid oxide

  11. Introduction Container Library Container Tools FUSE Container File System Evaluation Container Library and FUSE Container File

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The library was completely overhauled It now provides consistently named functions and data types The commentsIntroduction Container Library Container Tools FUSE Container File System Evaluation Container Library and FUSE Container File System Softwarepraktikum f¨ur Fortgeschrittene Michael Kuhn Parallele und

  12. Photoreactor with self-contained photocatalyst recapture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gering, Kevin L.

    2004-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for the continuous use and recapture of a catalyst in liquid, comprising: a generally vertical reactor having a reaction zone with generally downwardly flowing liquid, and a catalyst recovery chamber adjacent the reaction zone containing a catalyst consisting of buoyant particles. The liquid in the reaction zone flows downward at a rate which exceeds the speed of upward buoyant migration of catalyst particles in the liquid, whereby catalyst particles introduced into the liquid in the reaction zone are drawn downward with the liquid. A slow flow velocity flotation chamber disposed below the reaction zone is configured to recapture the catalyst particles and allow them to float back into the catalyst recovery chamber for recycling into the reaction zone, rather than being swept downstream. A novel 3-dimensionally adjustable solar reflector directs light into the reaction zone to induce desired photocatalytic reactions within the liquid in the reaction zone.

  13. Recent Advances in Chamber Science and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    with RAFS Advanced: He gas cooling system with SiC/SiC Research on several advanced concepts: FLiBe, Li, Li cooled blanket system for higher thermal efficiency - High temperature gas cooled blanket system with Si Programs on Chamber/Blanket · Recent Progress on Liquid Walls - IFE & MFE - Basic Principles - Plasma

  14. Lifetime tests for MAC vertex chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, H.N.

    1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A vertex chamber for MAC was proposed to increase precision in the measurement of the B hadron and tau lepton lifetimes. Thin-walled aluminized mylar drift tubes were used for detector elements. A study of radiation hardness was conducted under the conditions of the proposed design using different gases and different operating conditions. (LEW)

  15. Shock-Dispersed-Fuel Charges: Combustion in Chambers and Tunnels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neuwald, P; Reichenbach, H; Kuhl, A L

    2003-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In previous studies we have investigated after-burning effects of a fuel-rich explosive (TNT). In that case the detonation only releases about 30% of the available energy, but generates a hot cloud of fuel that can burn in the ambient air, thus evoking an additional energy release that is distributed in space and time. The current series of small-scale experiments can be looked upon as a natural generalization of this mechanism: a booster charge disperses a (non-explosive) fuel, provides mixing with air and, by means of the hot detonation products, the energy to ignite the fuel. The current version of our miniature Shock-Dispersed-Fuel (SDF) charges consists of a spherical booster charge of 0.5 g PETN, embedded in a paper cylinder of approximately 2.2 cm, which is filled with powdered fuel compositions. The main compositions studied up to now contain aluminum flakes, hydrocarbon powders like polyethylene or hexosen (sucrose) and/or carbon particles. These charges were studied in four different chambers: two cylindrical vessels of 6.6-1 and 40.5-1 volume with a height-to-diameter ratio of approximately 1, a rectangular chamber of 41 (10.5 x 10.5 x 38.6 cm) and a 299.6 cm long tunnel model with a cross section of 8 x 8 cm (volume 19.21) closed at both ends.

  16. Atmospheric-pressure plasma decontamination/sterilization chamber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Herrmann, Hans W. (Los Alamos, NM); Selwyn, Gary S. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An atmospheric-pressure plasma decontamination/sterilization chamber is described. The apparatus is useful for decontaminating sensitive equipment and materials, such as electronics, optics and national treasures, which have been contaminated with chemical and/or biological warfare agents, such as anthrax, mustard blistering agent, VX nerve gas, and the like. There is currently no acceptable procedure for decontaminating such equipment. The apparatus may also be used for sterilization in the medical and food industries. Items to be decontaminated or sterilized are supported inside the chamber. Reactive gases containing atomic and metastable oxygen species are generated by an atmospheric-pressure plasma discharge in a He/O.sub.2 mixture and directed into the region of these items resulting in chemical reaction between the reactive species and organic substances. This reaction typically kills and/or neutralizes the contamination without damaging most equipment and materials. The plasma gases are recirculated through a closed-loop system to minimize the loss of helium and the possibility of escape of aerosolized harmful substances.

  17. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Leaching Chambers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2000-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Leaching chambers distribute treated wastewater into the soil. This publication lists the advantages and disadvantages of leaching chamber systems, explains how to maintain them and gives estimates of costs....

  18. Artificial ovitrap preferences and biting activity of Culex salinarius (Diptera: Culicidae) on the upper Texas Gulf coast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoel, David Franklin

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of monitoring 8 differing artificial ovitraps set at 7 different sites in Chambers County, TX, from March 1990 to December 1991 indicate that adult female Cx. salinarius prefer to oviposit in black ovitraps containing grass infusion...

  19. Engineering analyses of large precision cathode strip chambers for GEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horvath, J.A.; Belser, F.C.; Pratuch, S.M.; Wuest, C.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Mitselmakher, G. [Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (United States)] [Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (United States); Gordeev, A. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Johnson, C.V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); [Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (United States); Polychronakos, V.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Golutvin, I.A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)] [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    1993-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Structural analyses of large precision cathode strip chambers performed up to the date of this publication are documented. Mechanical property data for typical chamber materials are included. This information, originally intended to be an appendix to the {open_quotes}CSC Structural Design Bible,{close_quotes} is presented as a guide for future designers of large chambers.

  20. Chapter 7.32 Centura-MxP+ Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Healy, Kevin Edward

    P+ is a magnetically enhanced reactive ion etch chamber typically used for etching oxide and nitride patternsChapter 7.32 Centura-MxP+ Chamber (centura-mxp) (586) 1.0 Equipment Purpose 1.1 The Centura Mx in the wafer. 1.2 The Centura platform is a fully automated, multi-wafer capacity, multi-chamber system

  1. Overview of Chamber and Power Plant Designs for IFE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Overview of Chamber and Power Plant Designs for IFE Wayne Meier Deputy Program Leader Fusion Energy power plant are illustrated here Target Factory and Injector Fusion ChamberDriver Power Conversion Review 1/30/11 4 Tritium Processing #12;There have been >50 IFE chamber design concepts and power plant

  2. Impact of beam transport method on chamber and driver design for heavy ion inertial fusion energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, D.V.; Welch, D.R.; Olson, C.L.; Yu, S.S.; Neff, S.; Sharp, W.M.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    neutralization on heavy-ion fusion chamber transport,” totechniques for heavy ion fusion chamber transport,” Nucl.liquid heavy-ion fusion target chambers,” Fusion Technol.

  3. IFE chamber technology testing program in NIF and chamber development test plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdou, M.A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Issues concerning chamber technology testing program in NIF involving: criteria for evaluation/prioritization of experiments, engineering scaling requirements for test article design and material selection and R and D plan prior to NIF testing were addressed in this paper. In order to maximize the benefits of testing program in NIF, the testing in NIF should provide the experimental data relevant to DEMO design choice or to DEMO design predictive capability by utilizing engineering scaling test article designs. Test plans were developed for 2 promising chamber design concepts. Early testing in non-fusion/non-ignition prior to testing in ignition facility serves a critical role in chamber R and D test plans in order to reduce the risks and costs of the more complex experiments in NIF.

  4. A spark chamber for cosmic ray research 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jelinek, Al Vincent

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    chambez *re r- -e evenis, anc to obtain good sta- s s ical data with the prese. . i sysiezz wou'8 require t! e exarina- iion o" severs' '. '. ous" no. pictures. ne effic ency zoz two simu ianeous particles in argon oius alcohol vspour is e timasec.... to be 75I15~ji. The effic ency of the . con-he' ium and the helium-alcohol vapour zillings are 1 igner about 85- 5(i. 3. Spurious Sparking Spurious sparks in the chamber can be attributed to a num- ber of factors. The most probable cause is ions left...

  5. The Monitored Drift Tube Chambers of Atlas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ventura, S. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (Italy)

    2005-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Atlas experiment has been designed to explore the high energy physics frontier at the TeV energy scale and to investigate on the physics of the Standard Model and beyond at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at Cern. The Muon Spectrometer represents the most part of the Atlas detector. It has been designed to provide standalone measurement of the transverse muon momenta with a relative accuracy of 3% over a wide momentum range up to 10% for momenta of 1 TeV. This high accuracy is provided by the Monitored Drift-Tube chambers (MDT) which can determine the track trajectory with a precision of 40 {mu}m.

  6. Draft Inventory Upper Snake Province

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Draft Inventory Upper Snake Province Submitted To The Northwest Power and Conservation Council Portland, Oregon Prepared by December 2004 #12;BOI043620012.DOC/KG ii Contents Section Page Inventory

  7. COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC RECONSTRUCTION OF BEAM PROFILES WITH A MULTI-WIRE CHAMBER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alonso, J.R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the beam with a small ion chamber. Both of these techniquesstudies of the chamber. A for heav;' ion radiotherapy beam

  8. Explosive parcel containment and blast mitigation container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sparks, Michael H. (Frederick County, MD)

    2001-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a containment structure for containing and mitigating explosions. The containment structure is installed in the wall of the building and has interior and exterior doors for placing suspicious packages into the containment structure and retrieving them from the exterior of the building. The containment structure has a blast deflection chute and a blowout panel to direct over pressure from explosions away from the building, surrounding structures and people.

  9. Optical Alignment System for the PHENIX Muon Tracking Chambers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Murata; A. Al-Jamel; R. L. Armendariz; M. L. Brooks; T. Horaguchi; N. Kamihara; H. Kobayashi; D. M. Lee; T. -A. Shibata; W. E. Sondheim

    2002-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A micron-precision optical alignment system (OASys) for the PHENIX muon tracking chambers is developed. To ensure the required mass resolution of vector meson detection, the relative alignment between three tracking station chambers must be monitored with a precision of 25$\\mu$m. The OASys is a straightness monitoring system comprised of a light source, lens and CCD camera, used for determining the initial placement as well as for monitoring the time dependent movement of the chambers on a micron scale.

  10. An internal view of the vacuum chamber containing the fusion device, showing two

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    . The device is filled with deuterium gas -- a more massive cousin of hydrogen with an extra neutron in its nucleus. The electric field rips electrons from the gas, creating deuterium ions and accelerating them into a deuterium target on one of the crystals. When the particles smash into the target, neutrons are emitted

  11. Dielectric liquid ionization chambers for detecting fast neutrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyd, Erin M

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three ionization chambers with different geometries have been constructed and filled with dielectric liquids for detection of fast neutrons. The three dielectric liquids studied were Tetramethylsilane (TMS), Tetramethylpentane ...

  12. air wall ionization chambers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of California eScholarship Repository Summary: chamber, passive sampling, passive solar house, measurementhouse, we planed the distribution of fresh air, passivepassive...

  13. The hydrogen bubble chamber and the strange resonances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvarez, L.W.

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The author's recollections of his experience in the use of bubble chambers and the discoveries of strange resonances are given. (LEW)

  14. Self-contained hot-hollow cathode gun source assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zeren, Joseph D. (Boulder, CO)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A self-contained hot-hollow cathode gun source assembly for use in a vacuum chamber includes a crucible block having a hot-hollow cathode gun mounted underneath and providing a hole for the magnetic deflection of the ion/electron beam into a crucible on top the block.

  15. Self-contained hot-hollow cathode gun source assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zeren, J.D.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A self-contained hot-hollow cathode gun source assembly for use in a vacuum chamber includes a crucible block having a hot-hollow cathode gun mounted underneath and providing a hole for the magnetic deflection of the ion/electron beam into a crucible on top the block.

  16. Miniature self-contained vacuum compatible electronic imaging microscope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Naulleau, Patrick P. (Oakland, CA); Batson, Phillip J. (Alameda, CA); Denham, Paul E. (Crockett, CA); Jones, Michael S. (San Francisco, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A vacuum compatible CCD-based microscopic camera with an integrated illuminator. The camera can provide video or still feed from the microscope contained within a vacuum chamber. Activation of an optional integral illuminator can provide light to illuminate the microscope subject. The microscope camera comprises a housing with a objective port, modified objective, beam-splitter, CCD camera, and LED illuminator.

  17. Exciting Internship at the American Arab Chamber of Commerce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cinabro, David

    Exciting Internship at the American Arab Chamber of Commerce Take advantage of the opportunity@americanarab.com with the subject "Internship Opportunity." Include a brief statement on why you would like to work at the American Arab Chamber of Commerce, along with your availability. If you are looking for an internship to fulfill

  18. aerosol test chamber: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aerosol test chamber First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 IFE Chamber Technology Testing...

  19. EFFECTS OF CHAMBER GEOMETRY AND GAS PROPERTIES ON HYDRODYNAMIC EVOLUTION OF IFE Zoran Dragojlovic1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najmabadi, Farrokh

    -rays and ions travel through the chamber and deposit some of their energy in the chamber background gas; the effects of various heat sources and transfer mechanisms such as photon and ion heat deposition and chamberEFFECTS OF CHAMBER GEOMETRY AND GAS PROPERTIES ON HYDRODYNAMIC EVOLUTION OF IFE CHAMBERS Zoran

  20. Depositional environments of Pennsylvanian Upper Strawn Group in McCulloch and San Saba Counties, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamieson, W.H. Jr.

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Upper Strawn Group (Desmoinesean) represents a transition to fluvial facies from progradational deltaic facies. The lower part of the upper Strawn is composed mostly of horizontally bedded, fine-grained sandstones and shales of a distal delta-front origin. These sandstones and shales exhibit foreset bed dips of up to 15/sup 0/. In addition to the dipping foreset beds, the delta-front facies on occasion contain small listric normal faults, resulting from periodic higher rates of sedimentation. The middle parts of the upper Strawn consist predominantly of massive, fine to medium-grained, mature sandstones which represent distributary-mouth-bar deposits, as well as other proximal delta-front deposits such as distributary channels. The upper part of the upper Strawn consists of fluvial trough cross-bedded sandstones and chert-pebble conglomerates. These overlie the deltaic facies and indicate the final stages of upper Strawn deposition. The upper Strawn is overlain by the Adams Branch limestone and shales which represent marine transgression and subsequent shallow-marine deposition. The upper Strawn Group in McCulloch and San Saba Counties, Texas, represents continued filling of the Fort Worth basin during Desmoinesean time. The upper Strawn overlies the lower Strawn, an older, deeper water facies, in most parts of the study area. The upper Strawn overlies the Atokan age Marble Falls Limestone in an isolated section of the study area due to its position there on the Concho arch.

  1. May 31-June 1, 2001 A. R. Raffray, et al., Assessment of Dry Chamber Walls as Preliminary Step in Defining Key Processes for Chamber Clearing Code 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    in Defining Key Processes for Chamber Clearing Code 6 Photon and Ion Attenuations in Carbon and Tungsten #12May 31-June 1, 2001 A. R. Raffray, et al., Assessment of Dry Chamber Walls as Preliminary Step in Defining Key Processes for Chamber Clearing Code 1 Assessment of Dry Chamber Wall Configurations

  2. Turbine component cooling channel mesh with intersection chambers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Marra, John J

    2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A mesh (35) of cooling channels (35A, 35B) with an array of cooling channel intersections (42) in a wall (21, 22) of a turbine component. A mixing chamber (42A-C) at each intersection is wider (W1, W2)) than a width (W) of each of the cooling channels connected to the mixing chamber. The mixing chamber promotes swirl, and slows the coolant for more efficient and uniform cooling. A series of cooling meshes (M1, M2) may be separated by mixing manifolds (44), which may have film cooling holes (46) and/or coolant refresher holes (48).

  3. IMAGING WITH A MULTIPLANE MULTIWIRE PROPORTIONAL CHAMBER USING HEAVY ION BEAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, W.T.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1. When the he^vy ions penetrate the chamber, the resultingMULTIWIRE PROPORTIONAL CHAMBER USING HEAVY-ION BEAMS* U. T.Ion Beam Studies and Imaging with a Nultiplane Multiwire Proportional Chamber,"

  4. A Proposal to Operate the COUPP-60 Bubble Chamber at SNOLAB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collar, Juan; Dahl, C.Eric; Fustin, Drew; Goetzke, Luke; Riley, Nathan; Schimmelpfennig, Hannes; Szydagis, Matthew; /KICP, Chicago; Behnke, Ed; Hinnefeld, Henry; Levine, Ilan; Palenchar, Andrea; /Indiana U., South Bend /Fermilab

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bubble chambers are promising devices for the detection of WIMP dark matter, due to their easy scalability to large target masses and insensitivity to background {gamma} and {beta} radiation. The COUPP collaboration has constructed small chambers which have achieved competitive sensitivity for spin-dependent WIMP-nucleon scattering. A new chamber, COUPP-60, containing 60-kg of CF{sub 3}I target liquid, has been built and is being commissioned at Fermilab. We propose to move this detector to SNOLAB after completing tests in a shallow underground site at Fermilab. At SNOLAB, we expect the sensitivity of the experiment to be determined by the level of {alpha}emitting contamination in the target liquid. If we achieve state-of-the-art levels of {alpha} emitting contamination, we will improve current sensitivity by approximately four orders of magnitude beyond our published limits, to the region of 10{sup -4} pb for a 30 GeV WIMP interacting by spin-dependent couplings to the proton. This will allow a first exploration of the phase space favored by supersymmetric models in this regime.

  5. Sealed vacuum canister and method for pick-up and containment of material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stoutenburgh, R.R.

    1996-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A vacuum canister is described including a housing with a sealed vacuum chamber having a predetermined vacuum pressure therein and a valve having a first port for fluid communication with the vacuum chamber and a second port for receiving at least one of a fluid and a particulate material. The valve is operable between a first position to seal the vacuum chamber and retain the predetermined vacuum within the vacuum chamber, and a second position to access the vacuum chamber to permit vacuum fluid flow through the valve from the second port into the vacuum chamber. The vacuum canister, in the operation to pick up material with the valve in the second position, when the second port is located adjacent at least one of a fluid and a particulate material, is effective to displace through the valve at least one of a fluid and a particulate material into the housing. The vacuum canister is desirably suitable for picking up and containing hazardous material such as radioactive material, in which the vacuum canister includes a protective layer of lead having a predetermined thickness that is effective to shield radiation emitted from the radioactive material contained within the housing. Advantageously, the vacuum canister includes a vacuum means for establishing a predetermined vacuum pressure within the vacuum chamber. 6 figs.

  6. Sealed vacuum canister and method for pick-up and containment of material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stoutenburgh, Roger R. (Cutchogue, NY)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A vacuum canister including a housing with a sealed vacuum chamber having a predetermined vacuum pressure therein and a valve having a first port for fluid communication with the vacuum chamber and a second port for receiving at least one of a fluid and a particulate material. The valve is operable between a first position to seal the vacuum chamber and retain the predetermined vacuum within the vacuum chamber, and a second position to access the vacuum chamber to permit vacuum fluid flow through the valve from the second port into the vacuum chamber. In operation of the vacuum canister to pick up material with the valve in the second position, when the second port is located adjacent at least one of a fluid and a particulate material, is effective to displace through the valve at least one of a fluid and a particulate material into the housing. The vacuum canister is desirably suitable for picking up and containing hazardous material such as radioactive material, in which the vacuum canister includes a protective layer of lead having a predetermined thickness that is effective to shield radiation emitted from the radioactive material contained within the housing. Advantageously, the vacuum canister includes a vacuum means for establishing a predetermined vacuum pressure within the vacuum chamber.

  7. Microionization chamber air-kerma calibration coefficients as a function of photon energy for x-ray spectra in the range of 20-250 kVp relative to {sup 60}Co

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snow, J. R.; Micka, J. A.; DeWerd, L. A. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate the applicability of a wide range of microionization chambers for reference dosimetry measurements in low- and medium-energy x-ray beams. Methods: Measurements were performed with six cylindrical microchamber models, as well as one scanning chamber and two Farmer-type chambers for comparison purposes. Air-kerma calibration coefficients were determined at the University of Wisconsin Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory for each chamber for a range of low- and medium-energy x-ray beams (20-250 kVp), with effective energies ranging from 11.5 keV to 145 keV, and a {sup 60}Co beam. A low-Z proof-of-concept microchamber was developed and calibrated with and without a high-Z silver epoxy on the collecting electrode. Results: All chambers composed of low-Z materials (Z{<=} 13), including the Farmer-type chambers, the scanning chamber, and the PTW TN31014 and the proof-of-concept microchambers, exhibited air-kerma calibration coefficients with little dependence on the quality of the beam. These chambers typically exhibited variations in calibration coefficients of less than 3% with the beam quality, for medium energy beams. However, variations in air-kerma calibration coefficients of greater than 50% were measured over the range of medium-energy x-ray beams for each of the microchambers containing high-Z collecting electrodes (Z > 13). For these high-Z chambers, which include the Exradin A14SL and A16 chambers, the PTW TN31006 chamber, the IBA CC01 chamber, and the proof-of-concept chamber containing silver, the average variation in air-kerma calibration coefficients between any two calibration beams was nearly 25% over the entire range of beam qualities investigated. Conclusions: Due to the strong energy dependence observed with microchambers containing high-Z components, these chambers may not be suitable dosimeters for kilovoltage x-ray applications, as they do not meet the TG-61 requirements. It is recommended that only microchambers containing low-Z materials (Z{<=} 13) be considered for air-kerma calibrations for reference dosimetry in low- and medium-energy x-ray beams.

  8. Environmental chamber studies of atmospheric reactivities of volatile organic compounds: Effects of varying chamber and light source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, W.; Luo, D.; Malkina, I.; Pierce, J. [California Univ., Riverside, CA (United States)

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photochemical oxidant models are essential tools for assessing effects of emissions changes on ground-level ozone formation. Such models are needed for predicting the ozone impacts of increased alternative fuel use. The gas-phase photochemical mechanism is an important component of these models because ozone is not emitted directly, but is formed from the gas-phase photochemical reactions of the emitted volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) in air. The chemistry of ground level ozone formation is complex; hundreds of types of VOCs being emitted into the atmosphere, and most of their atmospheric reactions are not completely understood. Because of this, no chemical model can be relied upon to give even approximately accurate predictions unless it has been evaluated by comparing its predictions with experimental data. Therefore an experimental and modeling study was conducted to assess how chemical mechanism evaluations using environmental chamber data are affected by the light source and other chamber characteristics. Xenon arc lights appear to give the best artificial representation of sunlight currently available, and experiments were conducted in a new Teflon chamber constructed using such a light source. Experiments were also conducted in an outdoor Teflon Chamber using new procedures to improve the light characterization, and in Teflon chambers using blacklights. These results, and results of previous runs other chambers, were compared with model predictions using an updated detailed chemical mechanism. The magnitude of the chamber radical source assumed when modeling the previous runs were found to be too high; this has implications in previous mechanism evaluations. Temperature dependencies of chamber effects can explain temperature dependencies in chamber experiments when Ta-300{degree}K, but not at temperatures below that.

  9. Extending the Upper Temperature Limit for Life

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    ) un- der N2-CO2 (80:20) in sealed culture tubes that con- tained formate (10 mM) as the electron donor that permit strain 121 to grow at such high temperatures are unknown. It is gen- erally assumed that the upperExtending the Upper Temperature Limit for Life Kazem Kashefi and Derek R. Lovley* The upper

  10. November 8-9, 2005 Blanket Design for Large Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    - Max. FS/Li interface temp. ODS Advanced Case Advanced Case RAFS RAFS ODS FS ODS FS Chamber radius, Rchamb (m) 10.5 10.5 11 11 Rep rate 5

  11. Neutral Gas Expansion in a Cylindrical Helicon Discharge Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Mitchell

    ­1500 G) magnetic field parallel to the axis of the tube. In many helicon experiments for basic plasma research, the discharge chamber is composed of a small diameter (2­10 cm), relatively long (0.5­1.75 m

  12. atlas muon chamber: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    detectors and a calibrated BF3 neutron detector provided monitoring of the neutron flux-density and energy. The sensitivity of the drift chamber to the neutrons was measured...

  13. atlas mdt chambers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    detectors and a calibrated BF3 neutron detector provided monitoring of the neutron flux-density and energy. The sensitivity of the drift chamber to the neutrons was measured...

  14. atlas muon chambers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    detectors and a calibrated BF3 neutron detector provided monitoring of the neutron flux-density and energy. The sensitivity of the drift chamber to the neutrons was measured...

  15. Carrying Semiautomatic Pistols with a Round in the Chamber

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Sets forth requirements for a DOE security police officer who must carry a round in the chamber of a semiautomatic pistol while on duty. Does not cancel other directives.

  16. Development of the Captive Aerosol Growth and Evolution Chamber System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonietti, Carlos G

    2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Captive Aerosol Growth and Evolution (CAGE) Chamber System is an tool designed to study the evolution of aerosols under conditions identical or similar to those of the surrounding environment. Our motivation was to quantify the sensitivity...

  17. A self-triggered readout for a time projection chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Werner, Andrew Thompson, 1981-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A self-triggering readout for a time projection chamber (TPC) is presented, with applications to novel forms of data acquisition for high energy physics application. The construction and initial testing of the readout ...

  18. E-Cloud Build-up in Grooved Chambers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venturini, Marco

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and F. Zimmermann, ”LC e-Cloud Activities at CERN”, talkal. , Simulations of the Electron Cloud for Vari- ous Con?E-CLOUD BUILD-UP IN GROOVED CHAMBERS ? M. Venturini † LBNL,

  19. Chamber technology concepts for inertial fusion energy: Three recent examples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, W.R.; Moir, R.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Abdou, M.A. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1997-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The most serious challenges in the design of chambers for inertial fusion energy (IFE) are 1) protecting the first wall from fusion energy pulses on the order of several hundred megajoules released in the form of x rays, target debris, and high energy neutrons, and 2) operating the chamber at a pulse repetition rate of 5-10 Hz (i.e., re-establishing, the wall protection and chamber conditions needed for beam propagation to the target between pulses). In meeting these challenges, designers have capitalized on the ability to separate the fusion burn physics from the geometry and environment of the fusion chamber. Most recent conceptual designs use gases or flowing liquids inside the chamber. Thin liquid layers of molten salt or metal and low pressure, high-Z gases can protect the first wall from x rays and target debris, while thick liquid layers have the added benefit of protecting structures from fusion neutrons thereby significantly reducing the radiation damage and activation. The use of thick liquid walls is predicted to 1) reduce the cost of electricity by avoiding the cost and down time of changing damaged structures, and 2) reduce the cost of development by avoiding the cost of developing a new, low-activation material. Various schemes have been proposed to assure chamber clearing and renewal of the protective features at the required pulse rate. Representative chamber concepts are described, and key technical feasibility issues are identified for each class of chamber. Experimental activities (past, current, and proposed) to address these issues and technology research and development needs are discussed.

  20. Laser calibration system for the CERES Time Projection Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dariusz Miskowiec; Peter Braun-Munzinger

    2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A Nd:YAG laser was used to simulate charged particle tracks at known positions in the CERES Time Projection Chamber at the CERN SPS. The system was primarily developed to study the response of the readout electronics and to calibrate the electron drift velocity. Further applications were the determination of the gating grid transparency, the chamber position calibration, and long-term monitoring of drift properties of the gas in the detector.

  1. Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrinceton PlasmaAfternoon TalksDigitalRevisionof EnergyUpper Los

  2. Eigenmodes in Two Simplified Chamber Structures Studied for Spurious Microwaves in the APS Storage Ring Beam Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    calculate the transverse electric field Ey at two points BPM+ and BPM - shown in Figures 2 and 3 the transverse electric field Ey at two points BPM+ and BPM - in the simplified chamber structure with a short

  3. Characteristics of the upper crust and magma chambers along the spreading centers of the Lau back-arc basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dingler, Allison Maria Jacobs

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    locations we create a vehicle to quickly recognize potential geo-hazardouslocation of the 25 most populated cities in the world, we can identify the most potentially geo-hazardous

  4. LARGE ABUNDANCES OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN TITAN'S UPPER ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez-Puertas, M.; Funke, B.; Garcia-Comas, M. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (CSIC), E-18080 Granada (Spain); Dinelli, B. M. [ISAC-CNR, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Adriani, A.; D'Aversa, E. [IAPS-INAF, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Moriconi, M. L. [ISAC-CNR, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Boersma, C.; Allamandola, L. J., E-mail: puertas@iaa.es [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035-1000 (United States)

    2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we analyze the strong unidentified emission near 3.28 {mu}m in Titan's upper daytime atmosphere recently discovered by Dinelli et al. We have studied it by using the NASA Ames PAH IR Spectroscopic Database. The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), after absorbing UV solar radiation, are able to emit strongly near 3.3 {mu}m. By using current models for the redistribution of the absorbed UV energy, we have explained the observed spectral feature and have derived the vertical distribution of PAH abundances in Titan's upper atmosphere. PAHs have been found to be present in large concentrations, about (2-3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} particles cm{sup -3}. The identified PAHs have 9-96 carbons, with a concentration-weighted average of 34 carbons. The mean mass is {approx}430 u; the mean area is about 0.53 nm{sup 2}; they are formed by 10-11 rings on average, and about one-third of them contain nitrogen atoms. Recently, benzene together with light aromatic species as well as small concentrations of heavy positive and negative ions have been detected in Titan's upper atmosphere. We suggest that the large concentrations of PAHs found here are the neutral counterpart of those positive and negative ions, which hence supports the theory that the origin of Titan main haze layer is located in the upper atmosphere.

  5. Results from the DCH-1 (Direct Containment Heating) experiment. [Pressurized melt ejection and direct containment heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarbell, W.W.; Brockmann, J.E.; Pilch, M.; Ross, J.E.; Oliver, M.S.; Lucero, D.A.; Kerley, T.E.; Arellano, F.E.; Gomez, R.D.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The DCH-1 (Direct Containment Heating) test was the first experiment performed in the Surtsey Direct Heating Test Facility. The test involved 20 kg of molten core debris simulant ejected into a 1:10 scale model of the Zion reactor cavity. The melt was produced by a metallothermic reaction of iron oxide and aluminum powders to yield molten iron and alumina. The cavity model was placed so that the emerging debris propagated directly upwards along the vertical centerline of the chamber. Results from the experiment showed that the molten material was ejected from the caviity as a cloud of particles and aerosol. The dispersed debris caused a rapid pressurization of the 103-m/sup 3/ chamber atmosphere. Peak pressure from the six transducers ranged from 0.09 to 0.13 MPa (13.4 to 19.4 psig) above the initial value in the chamber. Posttest debris collection yielded 11.6 kg of material outside the cavity, of which approximately 1.6 kg was attributed to the uptake of oxygen by the iron particles. Mechanical sieving of the recovered debris showed a lognormal size distribution with a mass mean size of 0.55 mm. Aerosol measurements indicated a subsantial portion (2 to 16%) of the ejected mass was in the size range less than 10 m aerodynamic equivalent diameter.

  6. Vegetable Gardening in Containers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cotner, Sam

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    shade than those which bear fruit, such as cucumbers, peppers, toma toes and eggplant. One advan tage to container gardening is mobility. Container gardening makes it possible to position the vegetables in areas where they can receive the best...

  7. Accident resistant transport container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andersen, John A. (Albuquerque, NM); Cole, James K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to a container for the safe air transport of plutonium having several intermediate wood layers and a load spreader intermediate an inner container and an outer shell for mitigation of shock during a hypothetical accident.

  8. Dark matter limits froma 15 kg windowless bubble chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szydagis, Matthew Mark; /Chicago U.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The COUPP collaboration has successfully used bubble chambers, a technology previously applied only to high-energy physics experiments, as direct dark matter detectors. It has produced the world's most stringent spin-dependent WIMP limits, and increasingly competitive spin-independent limits. These limits were achieved by capitalizing on an intrinsic rejection of the gamma background that all other direct detection experiments must address through high-density shielding and empirically-determined data cuts. The history of COUPP, including its earliest prototypes and latest results, is briefly discussed in this thesis. The feasibility of a new, windowless bubble chamber concept simpler and more inexpensive in design is discussed here as well. The dark matter limits achieved with a 15 kg windowless chamber, larger than any previous COUPP chamber (2 kg, 4 kg), are presented. Evidence of the greater radiopurity of synthetic quartz compared to natural is presented using the data from this 15 kg device, the first chamber to be made from synthetic quartz. The effective reconstruction of the three-dimensional positions of bubbles in a highly distorted optical field, with ninety-degree bottom lighting similar to cloud chamber lighting, is demonstrated. Another innovation described in this thesis is the use of the sound produced by bubbles recorded by an array of piezoelectric sensors as the primary means of bubble detection. In other COUPP chambers, cameras have been used as the primary trigger. Previous work on bubble acoustic signature differentiation using piezos is built upon in order to further demonstrate the ability to discriminate between alpha- and neutron-induced events.

  9. Upper arun hydroelectric project feasibility study (phase 1). Volume 2. Appendix. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report was prepared for Nepal Electricity Authority (NEA). The primary objective of the study was to compare several alternative development schemes to drive an optimum development plan for exploiting the hydroelectric potential of the Upper Arun River, to be further investigated in phase 2 of the feasibility study. The report presents the result of the phase I studies investigations recommends the alternatives to be pursued to develop the Upper Arun River. Volume 2 contains tables, figures and other supporting materials.

  10. June 17-21, 2007 SOFE07, Albuquerque 1 Conceptual Study of Integrated Chamber Core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    as advanced option to reduce or eliminate ion threat on chamber wall · Chamber core concept based on magnetic target (~24% of the energy is in ions and ~1% in photons), a large chamber (~10.75 m) is required options that would reduce the ion threat spectra on the armor and allow for more compact chambers

  11. LASER IFE DIRECT DRIVE CHAMBER CONCEPTS WITH MAGNETIC INTERVENTION A. R. Raffray1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    is the survival of the chamber wall under the ion threat spectra (representing ~25% of the yield energy). The possibility of steering the ions away from the chamber to specially-designed dump chambers using magnetic to accommodate the ion fluxes in the dump chamber provided the right measures are taken to prevent the liquid

  12. Aug. 8-9, 2006 HAPL meeting, GA Advanced Chamber Concept with Magnetic Intervention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    Aug. 8-9, 2006 HAPL meeting, GA 1 Advanced Chamber Concept with Magnetic Intervention: - Ion Dump and Thermal Response of Dump Plates Estimated for Cone-Shaped Chamber · For example case with ~10%of ion wall chamber to satisfy target and laser requirements ·Separate wetted wall chamber to accommodate ions

  13. High pressure argon ionization chamber systems for the measurement of environmental radiation exposure rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeCampo, J A; Raft, P D

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High pressure argon ionization chamber systems for the measurement of environmental radiation exposure rates

  14. Reanalysis of bubble chamber measurements of muon-neutrino induced single pion production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Callum Wilkinson; Philip Rodrigues; Susan Cartwright; Lee Thompson; Kevin McFarland

    2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    There exists a longstanding disagreement between bubble chamber measurements of the single pion production channel $\

  15. Reservoir characterization of the upper Merecure and lower Oficina Formations sands in the Leona Este Field, Eastern Venezuela Basin 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flores Millan, Maria Carolina

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The "S5", "T" and "U1" sands, traditionally described as part of the lower section of the "Oficina" Formation, and the "U2" sand, as part of the upper interval of the "Merecure" Formation, contain the largest oil remaining ...

  16. Initial Back-to-Back Fission Chamber Testing in ATRC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benjamin Chase; Troy Unruh; Joy Rempe

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Development and testing of in-pile, real-time neutron sensors for use in Materials Test Reactor experiments is an ongoing project at Idaho National Laboratory. The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility has sponsored a series of projects to evaluate neutron detector options in the Advanced Test Reactor Critical Facility (ATRC). Special hardware was designed and fabricated to enable testing of the detectors in the ATRC. Initial testing of Self-Powered Neutron Detectors and miniature fission chambers produced promising results. Follow-on testing required more experiment hardware to be developed. The follow-on testing used a Back-to-Back fission chamber with the intent to provide calibration data, and a means of measuring spectral indices. As indicated within this document, this is the first time in decades that BTB fission chambers have been used in INL facilities. Results from these fission chamber measurements provide a baseline reference for future measurements with Back-to-Back fission chambers.

  17. Beta-dependent upper bound on ion temperature anisotropy in a laboratory plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keiter, Paul A. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States)] [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Scime, Earl E. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States)] [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Balkey, Matthew M. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States)] [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Boivin, Robert [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States)] [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Kline, John L. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States)] [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Gary, S. Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

    2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser induced fluorescence measurements of ion temperatures, parallel and perpendicular to the local magnetic field, in the Large Experiment on Instabilities and Anisotropies space simulation chamber (a steady-state, high beta, argon plasma) display an inverse correlation between the upper bound on the ion temperature anisotropy and the parallel ion beta ({beta}=8{pi}nkT/B{sup 2}). These observations are consistent with in situ spacecraft measurements in the Earth's magnetosheath and with a theoretical/computational model that predicts that such an upper bound is imposed by scattering from enhanced fluctuations due to growth of the ion cyclotron anisotropy instability (the Alfven ion cyclotron instability). (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  18. Biological Survey of the Upper Purgatoire Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biological Survey of the Upper Purgatoire Watershed Las Animas County, CO John Carney Colorado ...............................................................................................................9 Management Urgency Ranks ........................................................................................................10 POTENTIAL CONSERVATION SITE PLANNING BOUNDARIES........................................12 Off

  19. Upper Cumberland EMC- Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Upper Cumberland Electric Membership Corporation (UCEMC), in collaboration with the Tennessee Valley Authority, offers incentives for its customers to purchase and install energy efficient...

  20. Extreme-UV lithography vacuum chamber zone seal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haney, Steven J. (Tracy, CA); Herron, Donald Joe (Manteca, CA); Klebanoff, Leonard E. (San Ramon, CA); Replogle, William C. (Livermore, CA)

    2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Control of particle contamination on the reticle and carbon contamination of optical surfaces in photolithography systems can be achieved by the establishment of multiple pressure zones in the photolithography systems. The different zones will enclose the reticle, projection optics, wafer, and other components of system. The system includes a vacuum apparatus that includes: a housing defining a vacuum chamber; one or more metrology trays situated within the vacuum chamber each of which is supported by at least one support member, wherein the tray separates the vacuum chamber into a various compartments that are maintained at different pressures; and conductance seal devices for adjoining the perimeter of each tray to an inner surface of the housing wherein the tray is decoupled from vibrations emanating from the inner surface of the housing.

  1. Extreme-UV lithography vacuum chamber zone seal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haney, Steven J. (Tracy, CA); Herron, Donald Joe (Manteca, CA); Klebanoff, Leonard E. (San Ramon, CA); Replogle, William C. (Livermore, CA)

    2003-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Control of particle contamination on the reticle and carbon contamination of optical surfaces in photolithography systems can be achieved by the establishment of multiple pressure zones in the photolithography systems. The different zones will enclose the reticle, projection optics, wafer, and other components of system. The system includes a vacuum apparatus that includes: a housing defining a vacuum chamber; one or more metrology trays situated within the vacuum chamber each of which is supported by at least one support member, wherein the tray separates the vacuum chamber into a various compartments that are maintained at different pressures; and conductance seal devices for adjoining the perimeter of each tray to an inner surface of the housing wherein the tray is decoupled from vibrations emanating from the inner surface of the housing.

  2. Extreme-UV lithography vacuum chamber zone seal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haney, Steven J. (Tracy, CA); Herron, Donald Joe (Manteca, CA); Klebanoff, Leonard E. (San Ramon, CA); Replogle, William C. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Control of particle contamination on the reticle and carbon contamination of optical surfaces in photolithography systems can be achieved by the establishment of multiple pressure zones in the photolithography systems. The different zones will enclose the reticle, projection optics, wafer, and other components of system. The system includes a vacuum apparatus that includes: a housing defining a vacuum chamber; one or more metrology trays situated within the vacuum chamber each of which is supported by at least one support member, wherein the tray separates the vacuum chamber into a various compartments that are maintained at different pressures; and conductance seal devices for adjoining the perimeter of each tray to an inner surface of the housing wherein the tray is decoupled from vibrations emanating from the inner surface of the housing.

  3. The PEP-II Lower Pressure HER Vacuum Chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeBarger, S.; Metcalfe, S.; Seeman, J.; Sullivan, M.; Wienands, U.; Wright, D.; /SLAC

    2006-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This new vacuum chamber has been installed from 12 to 21 meters upstream of the BaBar detector in the PEP-II High Energy Ring (HER) to reduce lost particle backgrounds. The backgrounds from HER now dominate the backgrounds in the BaBar detector and the present vacuum pressure is 1 x 10{sup -9} Torr. The new chamber will increase the pumping significantly by adding 18 x 2000 l/s titanium sublimation pumps to the existing 5 x 440 l/s ion pumps, and is expected to reduce the pressure by about a factor of five. Features of the chamber include improved water cooling, improved vacuum conductance through copper RF screens featuring over 15,000 small square holes and the ability to sublimate titanium while the beam is still on.

  4. Chamber Design for the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Latkowski, J F; Abbott, R P; Aceves, S; Anklam, T; Badders, D; Cook, A W; DeMuth, J; Divol, L; El-Dasher, B; Farmer, J C; Flowers, D; Fratoni, M; ONeil, R G; Heltemes, T; Kane, J; Kramer, K J; Kramer, R; Lafuente, A; Loosmore, G A; Morris, K R; Moses, G A; Olson, B; Pantano, C; Reyes, S; Rhodes, M; Roe, K; Sawicki, R; Scott, H; Spaeth, M; Tabak, M; Wilks, S

    2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) concept is being designed to operate as either a pure fusion or hybrid fusion-fission system. The present work focuses on the pure fusion option. A key component of a LIFE engine is the fusion chamber subsystem. It must absorb the fusion energy, produce fusion fuel to replace that burned in previous targets, and enable both target and laser beam transport to the ignition point. The chamber system also must mitigate target emissions, including ions, x-rays and neutrons and reset itself to enable operation at 10-15 Hz. Finally, the chamber must offer a high level of availability, which implies both a reasonable lifetime and the ability to rapidly replace damaged components. An integrated design that meets all of these requirements is described herein.

  5. Method to calibrate fission chambers in Campbelling mode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geslot, Benoit; Filliatre, Philippe; Jammes, Christian; Di Salvo, Jacques; Breaud, Stephane; Villard, Jean-Francois [CEA, DEN, Cadarache, SPEx, LDCI, F-13108 S Paul Lez Durance, (France); Unruh, Troy C. [INL, Idaho Natl Lab, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Fission chambers are neutron detectors which are widely used to instrument experimental reactors such as material testing reactors or zero power reactors. In the presence of a high level mixed gamma and neutron flux, fission chambers can be operated in Campbelling mode (also known as 'fluctuation mode' or 'mean square voltage mode') to provide reliable and precise neutron related measurements. Fission chamber calibration in Campbelling mode (in terms of neutron flux) is usually done empirically using a calibrated reference detector. A major drawback of this method is that calibration measurements have to be performed in a neutron environment very similar to the one in which the calibrated detector will be used afterwards. What is proposed here is a different approach based on characterizing the fission chamber response in terms of fission rate. This way, the detector calibration coefficient is independent from the neutron spectrum and can be determined prior to the experiment. The fissile deposit response to the neutron spectrum can then be assessed independently by other means (experimental or numerical). In this paper, the response of CEA-made miniature fission chambers in Campbelling mode is studied. A theoretical model of the signal is used to calculate the calibration coefficient. The model's input parameters come from statistical distribution of individual pulses. Supporting measurements were made in the CEA Cadarache zero power reactor MINERVE and results are compared to an empirical Campbelling mode calibration. The tested fission chamber calibration coefficient is roughly 2*10{sup -26} A{sup 2}/Hz/(c/s). Both numerical and empirical methods give consistent results, however a deviation of about 15% was observed. (authors)

  6. Chamber and target technology development for inertial fusion energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdou, M; Besenbruch, G; Duke, J; Forman, L; Goodin, D; Gulec, K; Hoffer, J; Khater, H; Kulcinsky, G; Latkowski, J F; Logan, B G; Margevicious, B; Meier, W R; Moir, R W; Morley, N; Nobile, A; Payne, S; Peterson, P F; Peterson, R; Petzoldt, R; Schultz, K; Steckle, W; Sviatoslavsky, L; Tillack, M; Ying, A

    1999-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Fusion chambers and high pulse-rate target systems for inertial fusion energy (IFE) must: regenerate chamber conditions suitable for target injection, laser propagation, and ignition at rates of 5 to 10 Hz; extract fusion energy at temperatures high enough for efficient conversion to electricity; breed tritium and fuel targets with minimum tritium inventory; manufacture targets at low cost; inject those targets with sufficient accuracy for high energy gain; assure adequate lifetime of the chamber and beam interface (final optics); minimize radioactive waste levels and annual volumes; and minimize radiation releases under normal operating and accident conditions. The primary goal of the US IFE program over the next four years (Phase I) is to develop the basis for a Proof-of-Performance-level driver and target chamber called the Integrated Research Experiment (IRE). The IRE will explore beam transport and focusing through prototypical chamber environment and will intercept surrogate targets at high pulse rep-rate. The IRE will not have enough driver energy to ignite targets, and it will be a non-nuclear facility. IRE options are being developed for both heavy ion and laser driven IFE. Fig. 1 shows that Phase I is prerequisite to an IRE, and the IRE plus NIF (Phase II) is prerequisite to a high-pulse rate. Engineering Test Facility and DEMO for IFE, leading to an attractive fusion power plant. This report deals with the Phase-I R&D needs for the chamber, driver/chamber interface (i.e., magnets for accelerators and optics for lasers), target fabrication, and target injection; it is meant to be part of a more comprehensive IFE development plan which will include driver technology and target design R&D. Because of limited R&D funds, especially in Phase I, it is not possible to address the critical issues for all possible chamber and target technology options for heavy ion or laser fusion. On the other hand, there is risk in addressing only one approach to each technology option. Therefore, in the following description of these specific feasibility issues, we try to strike a balance between narrowing the range of recommended R&D options to minimize cost, and keeping enough R&D options to minimize risk.

  7. Single chamber fuel cells: Flow geometry, rate and composition considerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefan, Ionel C.; Jacobson, Craig P.; Visco, Steven J.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2003-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Four different single chamber fuel cell designs were compared using propane-air gas mixtures. Gas flow around the electrodes has a significant influence on the open circuit voltage and the power density of the cell. The strong influence of flow geometry is likely due to its effect on gas composition, particularly on the oxygen chemical potential at the two electrodes as a result of gas mixing. The chamber design which exposes the cathode first to the inlet gas was found to yield the best performance at lower flow rates, while the open tube design with the electrodes equally exposed to the inlet gas worked best at higher flow rates.

  8. Pressure suppression containment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gluntz, D.M.; Townsend, H.E.

    1994-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A pressure suppression containment system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The wetwell pool includes a plenum for receiving the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA). The wetwell plenum is vented to a plenum above the GDCS pool following the LOCA for suppressing pressure rise within the containment vessel. A method of operation includes channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the wetwell pool for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith. The GDCS pool is then drained by gravity, and the wetwell plenum is vented into the GDCS plenum for channeling the non-condensable gas thereto. 6 figures.

  9. Passive containment cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Billig, P.F.; Cooke, F.E.; Fitch, J.R.

    1994-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A passive containment cooling system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel and is vented to the drywell. An isolation pool is disposed above the GDCS pool and includes an isolation condenser therein. The condenser has an inlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for receiving the non-condensable gas along with any steam released therein following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The condenser also has an outlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for returning to the drywell both liquid condensate produced upon cooling of the steam and the non-condensable gas for reducing pressure within the containment vessel following the LOCA. 1 figure.

  10. Pressure suppression containment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gluntz, Douglas M. (San Jose, CA); Townsend, Harold E. (San Jose, CA)

    1994-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A pressure suppression containment system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The wetwell pool includes a plenum for receiving the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of coolant-accident (LOCA). The wetwell plenum is vented to a plenum above the GDCS pool following the LOCA for suppressing pressure rise within the containment vessel. A method of operation includes channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the wetwell pool for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith. The GDCS pool is then drained by gravity, and the wetwell plenum is vented into the GDCS plenum for channeling the non-condensable gas thereto.

  11. Passive containment cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Billig, Paul F. (San Jose, CA); Cooke, Franklin E. (San Jose, CA); Fitch, James R. (San Jose, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A passive containment cooling system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel and is vented to the drywell. An isolation pool is disposed above the GDCS pool and includes an isolation condenser therein. The condenser has an inlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for receiving the non-condensable gas along with any steam released therein following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The condenser also has an outlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for returning to the drywell both liquid condensate produced upon cooling of the steam and the non-condensable gas for reducing pressure within the containment vessel following the LOCA.

  12. Passive containment cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Conway, Lawrence E. (Robinson Township, Allegheny County, PA); Stewart, William A. (Penn Hills Township, Allegheny County, PA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A containment cooling system utilizes a naturally induced air flow and a gravity flow of water over the containment shell which encloses a reactor core to cool reactor core decay heat in two stages. When core decay heat is greatest, the water and air flow combine to provide adequate evaporative cooling as heat from within the containment is transferred to the water flowing over the same. The water is heated by heat transfer and then evaporated and removed by the air flow. After an initial period of about three to four days when core decay heat is greatest, air flow alone is sufficient to cool the containment.

  13. CONTAIN independent peer review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyack, B.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Corradini, M.L. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Nuclear Engineering Dept.; Denning, R.S. [Battelle Memorial Inst., Columbus, OH (United States); Khatib-Rahbar, M. [Energy Research Inc., Rockville, MD (United States); Loyalka, S.K. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Smith, P.N. [AEA Technology, Dorchester (United Kingdom). Winfrith Technology Center

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CONTAIN code was developed by Sandia National Laboratories under the sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to provide integrated analyses of containment phenomena. It is used to predict nuclear reactor containment loads, radiological source terms, and associated physical phenomena for a range of accident conditions encompassing both design-basis and severe accidents. The code`s targeted applications include support for containment-related experimental programs, light water and advanced light water reactor plant analysis, and analytical support for resolution of specific technical issues such as direct containment heating. The NRC decided that a broad technical review of the code should be performed by technical experts to determine its overall technical adequacy. For this purpose, a six-member CONTAIN Peer Review Committee was organized and a peer review as conducted. While the review was in progress, the NRC issued a draft ``Revised Severe Accident Code Strategy`` that incorporated revised design objectives and targeted applications for the CONTAIN code. The committee continued its effort to develop findings relative to the original NRC statement of design objectives and targeted applications. However, the revised CONTAIN design objectives and targeted applications. However, the revised CONTAIN design objectives and targeted applications were considered by the Committee in assigning priorities to the Committee`s recommendations. The Committee determined some improvements are warranted and provided recommendations in five code-related areas: (1) documentation, (2) user guidance, (3) modeling capability, (4) code assessment, and (5) technical assessment.

  14. Computation of azimuthal combustion instabilities in an helicopter combustion chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicoud, Franck

    Computation of azimuthal combustion instabilities in an helicopter combustion chamber C. Sensiau to compute azimuthal combustion instabilities is presented. It requires a thermoacoustic model using a n - formulation for the coupling between acoutics and combustion. The parameters n and are computed from a LES

  15. LASER FUSION CHAMBER DESIGN James P. Blanchard1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    the energy emitted by the target in such a way that the plant can achieve a commercially viable power approaches required for commercially viable laser fusion power plants, the issues driving those designs define the chamber size by providing flux limits for the various threats. In cases where a dry

  16. Thermodynamic Analysis of a single chamber Microbial Eric A. Zielke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thermodynamic Analysis of a single chamber Microbial Fuel Cell Eric A. Zielke May 5, 2006 #12;Microbial Fuel Cell Zielke ii List of Tables 1 First Law Thermodynamic Efficiencies from Experimental Data . . . . . . . 9 #12;Microbial Fuel Cell Zielke iii List of Figures 1 Representation of Anaerobic (anode portion

  17. QER- Comment of PA Chamber of Business and Industry

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On behalf of Gene Barr, President & CEO of the Pennsylvania Chamber of Business and Industry, please find attached our comments regarding Natural Gas Transmission, Storage & Distribution, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania July 21, 2014. Thanks in advance for the attention to our comments and for holding a hearing today in our state. All the best, Kevin

  18. Modeling chamber transport for heavy-ion fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharp, W.M.; Callahan, D.A.; Tabak, M.; Yu, S.S.; Peterson, P.F.; Welch, D.R.; Rose, D.V.; Olson, C.L.

    2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a typical thick-liquid-wall scenario for heavy-ion fusion (HIF), between seventy and two hundred high-current beams enter the target chamber through ports and propagate about three meters to the target. Since molten-salt jets are planned to protect the chamber wall, the beams move through vapor from the jets, and collisions between beam ions and this background gas both strip the ions and ionize the gas molecules. Radiation from the preheated target causes further beam stripping and gas ionization. Due to this stripping, beams for heavy-ion fusion are expected to require substantial neutralization in a target chamber. Much recent research has, therefore, focused on beam neutralization by electron sources that were neglected in earlier simulations, including emission from walls and the target, photoionization by the target radiation, and pre-neutralization by a plasma generated along the beam path. When these effects are included in simulations with practicable beam and chamber parameters, the resulting focal spot is approximately the size required by a distributed radiator target.

  19. Portable containment sleever apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rea, Michael J. (North Augusta, SC); Brown, Roger A. (North Augusta, SC)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sleever apparatus includes an inner member with a central passage through which an item to be sleeved is passed. An outer member surrounds the inner member and defines a space between the members for holding a supply of containment material, which is preferably plastic sleeving. The apparatus has a handle which allows a user to hold the apparatus and walk the apparatus along the length of the item to be sleeved. As the user passes the item through the sleever apparatus, the containment material exits through a slit at one end of the apparatus in order to contain the item. The sleever apparatus may be formed of disposable materials, such as cardboard, and may be intended for a single use application. Alternatively, the sleever apparatus may be comprised of more permanent materials such as PVC or fiberglass. The sleever apparatus may include a serrated end for cutting the containment material and may include appropriate tubing and valves for either directing an inert gas into the containment material around the item or for withdrawing air from within the containment material in order to create a vacuum. In one embodiment, the sleever apparatus has a cartridge that can be replaced with another cartridge once the supply of the containment material has been depleted.

  20. Reactor refueling containment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gillett, J.E.; Meuschke, R.E.

    1995-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of refueling a nuclear reactor is disclosed whereby the drive mechanism is disengaged and removed by activating a jacking mechanism that raises the closure head. The area between the barrier plate and closure head is exhausted through the closure head penetrations. The closure head, upper drive mechanism, and bellows seal are lifted away and transported to a safe area. The barrier plate acts as the primary boundary and each drive and control rod penetration has an elastomer seal preventing excessive tritium gases from escaping. The individual instrumentation plugs are disengaged allowing the corresponding fuel assembly to be sealed and replaced. 2 figs.

  1. Reactor refueling containment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gillett, James E. (Greensburg, PA); Meuschke, Robert E. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of refueling a nuclear reactor whereby the drive mechanism is disengaged and removed by activating a jacking mechanism that raises the closure head. The area between the barrier plate and closure head is exhausted through the closure head penetrations. The closure head, upper drive mechanism, and bellows seal are lifted away and transported to a safe area. The barrier plate acts as the primary boundary and each drive and control rod penetration has an elastomer seal preventing excessive tritium gases from escaping. The individual instrumentation plugs are disengaged allowing the corresponding fuel assembly to be sealed and replaced.

  2. Lightweight flywheel containment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, James R. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A lightweight flywheel containment composed of a combination of layers of various material which absorb the energy of a flywheel structural failure. The various layers of material act as a vacuum barrier, momentum spreader, energy absorber, and reaction plate. The flywheel containment structure has been experimentally demonstrated to contain carbon fiber fragments with a velocity of 1,000 m/s and has an aerial density of less than 6.5 g/square centimeters. The flywheel containment, may for example, be composed of an inner high toughness structural layer, and energy absorbing layer, and an outer support layer. Optionally, a layer of impedance matching material may be utilized intermediate the flywheel rotor and the inner high toughness layer.

  3. Lightweight flywheel containment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, James R.

    2004-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A lightweight flywheel containment composed of a combination of layers of various material which absorb the energy of a flywheel structural failure. The various layers of material act as a vacuum barrier, momentum spreader, energy absorber, and reaction plate. The flywheel containment structure has been experimentally demonstrated to contain carbon fiber fragments with a velocity of 1,000 m/s and has an aerial density of less than 6.5 g/square centimeters. The flywheel containment, may for example, be composed of an inner high toughness structural layer, and energy absorbing layer, and an outer support layer. Optionally, a layer of impedance matching material may be utilized intermediate the flywheel rotor and the inner high toughness layer.

  4. FREIGHT CONTAINER LIFTING STANDARD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    POWERS DJ; SCOTT MA; MACKEY TC

    2010-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This standard details the correct methods of lifting and handling Series 1 freight containers following ISO-3874 and ISO-1496. The changes within RPP-40736 will allow better reading comprehension, as well as correcting editorial errors.

  5. ROQUEFORT: Containment data report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stubbs, T.; Heinle, R.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information on the ROQUEFORT event at the Nevada Test Site is given. Emphasis is on emplacement conditions and stemming performance, especially pressures, radiation dose rates, and ground motion. The containment was considered successful.

  6. Paper Containers Hardcover books

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Awtar, Shorya

    Paper Containers Secondary Materials To Hardcover books CDs Jewel cases VHS tapes Slides DVDs Millk cartons Water bottles Juice boxes Steel cans Plastic bottles labeled #1 or #2 Laundry detergent

  7. WPo4.9 SIMULATION OF IFE CHAMBER DYNAMIC RESPONSE BY A SECOND ORDER GODUNOV METHOD WITH ARBITRARY GEOMETRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najmabadi, Farrokh

    explosion. After the target-generated X-rays and ion debris traverse the chamber, the chamber environment scale occur in the chamber following the target explosion. The resultant X-rays, ion debris and neutron from the target travel through the chamber. Depending on the chamber constituents, X-rays and ion

  8. Container cover closure apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Griesau, Richard A. (Scotia, NY)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates generally to handling and/or storing hazardous waste materials, such as radioactive materials, and is more specifically directed to loading and/or unloading radioactive material into or out of a container, such as a drum, by remote operation, and more particularly the present invention relates to the remote opening and/or closing of a container secured by a compression ring.

  9. Shielding analysis for a heavy ion beam chamber with plasma channels for ion transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sawan, M.E.; Peterson, R.R.; Yu, S.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis for a Heavy Ion Beam Chamber with Plasma Channelsthe target chamber wall, an adiabatic lens to focus the ionchamber that utilizes pre-formed plasma channels for heavy ion

  10. Cosmic Ray Test of Mini-drift Thick Gas Electron Multiplier Chamber for Transition Radiation Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Yang; S. Das; B. Buck; C. Li; T. Ljubicic; R. Majka; M. Shao; N. Smirnov; G. Visser; Z. Xu; Y. Zhou

    2015-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A thick gas electron multiplier (THGEM) chamber with an effective readout area of 10$\\times$10 cm$^{2}$ and a 11.3 mm ionization gap has been tested along with two regular gas electron multiplier (GEM) chambers in a cosmic ray test system. The thick ionization gap makes the THGEM chamber a mini-drift chamber. This kind mini-drift THGEM chamber is proposed as part of a transition radiation detector (TRD) for identifying electrons at an Electron Ion Collider (EIC) experiment. Through this cosmic ray test, an efficiency larger than 94$\\%$ and a spatial resolution $\\sim$220 $\\mu$m are achieved for the THGEM chamber at -3.65 kV. Thanks to its outstanding spatial resolution and thick ionization gap, the THGEM chamber shows excellent track reconstruction capability. The gain uniformity and stability of the THGEM chamber are also presented.

  11. Passivity Based Adaptive Control of a Two Chamber Single Rod Hydraulic Actuator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Perry Y.

    Passivity Based Adaptive Control of a Two Chamber Single Rod Hydraulic Actuator Meng Wang and Perry based backstepping controller using a physical compressibility energy function for a chamber hydraulic produces an accurate trajectory tracking performance. I. INTRODUCTION Electronically controlled hydraulic

  12. SciTech Connect: ON THE ANALYSIS OF BUBBLE CHAMBER TRACKS

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    THE ANALYSIS OF BUBBLE CHAMBER TRACKS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ON THE ANALYSIS OF BUBBLE CHAMBER TRACKS Since its invention by Glaser in 1953, the bubble...

  13. Computing flux upper-limits for non-detections F. Masci, 10/25/2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masci, Frank

    to "real" detections (e.g., in a spectrum), the quoted upper limits often lack probabilistic power. One in the first place, i.e., has flux measurement > some threshold set according to some maximum tolerable interval) that probably contains the true flux can then be assigned using the uncertainties. If a source

  14. Airtight container for the transfer of atmosphere-sensitive materials into vacuum-operated characterization instruments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaume, Romain M. [CREOL, the College of Optics and Photonics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816-2700 (United States); Joubert, Lydia-Marie [Cell Sciences Imaging Facility, Beckman Center, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the design and operation of a simple airtight container devised to facilitate the transfer of atmosphere-sensitive samples from a glovebox to the vacuum chamber of an analytical instrument such as a scanning electron microscope. The use of this device for characterizing the microstructure of highly hygroscopic strontium iodide ceramics by scanning electron microscopy is illustrated as an application example.

  15. The Laser Calibration System of the ALICE Time Projection Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Renault; B. S. Nielsen; J. Westergaard; J. J. Gaardhøje

    2005-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE) is the only experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) dedicated to the study of heavy ion collisions. The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is the main tracking detector covering the pseudo rapidity range $|\\eta|laser system is to simulate ionizing tracks at predifined positions throughout the drift volume in order to monitor the TPC response to a known source. In particular, the alignment of the read-out chambers will be performed, and variations of the drift velocity due to drift field imperfections can be measured and used as calibration data in the physics data analysis. In this paper we present the design of the pulsed UV laser and optical system, together with the control and monitoring systems.

  16. HOM Sensitivity in the PEP-II HER Vacuum Chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weathersby, Stephen; Novokhatski, Alexander; Sullivan, Mike; /SLAC

    2010-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Synchrotron radiation is the main source of vacuum chamber heating in the PEP-II storage ring collider. This heating is reduced substantially as lattice energy is lowered. Energy scans over {Upsilon} energy states were performed by varying the high energy ring (HER) lattice energy at constant gap voltage and frequency. We observed unexpected temperature rise at particular locations when HER lattice energy was lowered from 8.6 GeV ({Upsilon}(3S)) to 8.0 GeV ({Upsilon}(2S)) while most other temperatures decreased. Bunch length measurements reveal a shorter bunch at the lower energy. The shortened bunch overheated a beam position monitoring electrode causing a vacuum breach. We explain the unexpected heating as a consequence of increased higher order mode (HOM) power generated by a shortened bunch. In this case, temperature rise helps to identify HOM sources and HOM sensitive vacuum chamber elements. Reduction of gap voltage helps to reduce this unexpected heating.

  17. Using sputter coated glass to stabilize microstrip gas chambers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gong, Wen G. (Albany, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By sputter coating a thin-layer of low-resistive, electronically-conductive glass on various substrates (including quartz and ceramics, thin-film Pestov glass), microstrip gas chambers (MSGC) of high gain stability, low leakage current, and a high rate capability can be fabricated. This design can make the choice of substrate less important, save the cost of ion-implantation, and use less glass material.

  18. Low Pressure Negative Ion Drift Chamber for Dark Matter Search

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. P. Snowden-Ifft; C. J. Martoff; J. M. Burwell

    1999-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) are an attractive candidate for the dark matter thought to make up the bulk of the mass of our universe. We explore here the possibility of using a low pressure negative ion drift chamber to search for WIMPs. The innovation of drifting ions, instead of electrons, allows the design of a detector with exceptional sensitivity to, background rejection from, and signature of WIMPs.

  19. Ion Chamber Arrays for the Numi Beam at Fermilab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Indurthy; Z. Pavlovic; R. Zwaska; R. Keisler; S. Mendoza; S. Kopp; M. Proga; D. Harris; A. Marchionni; J. Morfin; A. Erwin; H. Ping; C. Velissaris; M. Bishai; M. Diwan; B. Viren; D. Naples; D. Northacker; J. McDonald

    2005-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) beamline will deliver an intense muon neutrino beam by focusing a beam of mesons into a long evacuated decay volume. We have built 4 arrays of ionization chambers to monitor the neutrino beam direction and quality. The arrays are located at 4 stations downstream of the decay volume, and measure the remnant hadron beam and tertiary muons produced along with neutrinos in meson decays.

  20. Progress and critical issues for IFE blanket and chamber research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdou, M.; Kulcinski, G.L.; Latkowski, J.F.; Logan, B.G.; Meier, W.R.; Moir, R.W.; Nobile, A.; Peterson, P.F.; Petti, D.; Schultz, K.R.; Tillack, M.S.

    1999-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Advances in high gain target designs for Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE), and the initiation of construction of large megajoule-class laser facilities in the U.S. (National Ignition Facility) and France (Laser-Megajoule) capable of testing the requirements for inertial fusion ignition and propagating burn, have improved the prospects for IFE. Accordingly, there have recently been modest increases in the US fusion research program related to the feasibility of IFE. These research areas include heavy-ion accelerators, Krypton-Fluoride (KrF) gas lasers, diode-pumped, solid-state (DPSSL) lasers, IFE target designs for higher gains, feasibility of low cost IFE target fabrication and accurate injection, and long-lasting IFE fusion chambers and final optics. Since several studies of conceptual IFE power plant and driver designs were completed in 1992-1996 [1-5], U.S. research in the IFE blanket, chamber, and target technology areas has focused on the critical issues relating to the feasibility of IFE concepts towards the goal of achieving economically-competitive and environmentally-attractive fusion energy. This paper discusses the critical issues in these areas, and the approaches taken to address these issues. The U.S. research in these areas, called IFE Chamber and Target Technologies, is coordinated through the Virtual Laboratory for Technology (VLT) formed by the Department of Energy in December 1998.

  1. Dry Chamber Wall Thermo-Mechanical Behavior and Lifetime under IFE Cyclic Energy Deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    assessment of dry chamber wall based on ion and photon spectra from a new direct-drive target proposed by NRLDry Chamber Wall Thermo-Mechanical Behavior and Lifetime under IFE Cyclic Energy Deposition Lifetime is a key issue for the IFE dry chamber wall configuration. Past studies, such as SOMBRERO

  2. IMPACT OF BEAM TRANSPORT METHOD ON CHAMBER AND DRIVER DESIGN FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IMPACT OF BEAM TRANSPORT METHOD ON CHAMBER AND DRIVER DESIGN FOR HEAVY ION INERTIAL FUSION ENERGY D propagate in thick-liquid-wall, wetted-wall, and dry-wall chambers. KEYWORDS: heavy ion fusion, ion beam transport, reactor chamber design I. INTRODUCTION The U.S. heavy ion fusion ~HIF! program is working toward

  3. September 29, 2008 TOFE08, San Francisco 1 Laser IFE Direct Drive Chamber Concepts with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    ion threat with dry chamber wall · Magnetic intervention as advanced option to reduce or eliminate ion MJ target (~24% of the energy is in ions and ~1% in photons), a large chamber (~10.75 m) is required chamber as baseline and look at options to accommodate ion threat spectra on the armor. - Engineered armor

  4. Characterization and performances of a monitoring ionization chamber dedicated to IBA-universal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    an Ionization Chamber in col- laboration with the company IBA (Ion Beam Applications). This monitoring deviceCharacterization and performances of a monitoring ionization chamber dedicated to IBA patented and five IC2/3 chambers were de- Preprint submitted to Elsevier June 28, 2013 in2p3

  5. IFE chamber walls: requirements, design options, and synergy with MFE plasma facing components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najmabadi, Farrokh

    rights reserved. PACS: 52.40.H Keywords: Internal fusion; Chamber wall material; X-ray deposition; Ion and ion energy deposition while providing the required lifetime. Chamber concepts utilizing both solid injected into the chamber. The driver (laser or heavy ion) beam is focused on the target, compressing

  6. Dry Chamber Wall Thermo-Mechanical Behavior and Lifetime under IFE Cyclic Energy Deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    provided a more detailed assessment of dry chamber wall based on ion and photon spectra from a new direct much faster than the ions and would reach the chamber wall within about 20 ns in the case without protective gas. The ions take longer to reach the chamber wall. As an example, a simple estimate of the ion

  7. CLOUD CHAMBER: A PERFORMANCE INVOLVING REAL TIME TWO-WAY INTERACTION BETWEEN SUBATOMIC RADIOACTIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miranda, Eduardo Reck

    " by the radiation-generated ion patterns in the glass chamber. If John plays in one way the ion particlesCLOUD CHAMBER: A PERFORMANCE INVOLVING REAL TIME TWO-WAY INTERACTION BETWEEN SUBATOMIC RADIOACTIVE, Harwell, Oxford, UK ABSTRACT ,,Cloud Chamber is a live performance created by composer Alexis Kirke

  8. October 27-28, 2004 HAPL meeting, PPPL Overview of the Components of an IFE Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    of MFE design and R&D info) System (including power cycle) Dry wall chamber (armor must accommodate ion Spectra and Chamber Conditions Prior to Each Shot Must Be Well Characterized (UW) · Attenuation of ion 29% 48% Re-radiation Time Scale (µs) 300-700 300-700 Chamber Gas Ion and Photon Attenuation

  9. Dec 12-13, 2006 HAPL meeting, PPPL Advanced Chamber Concept with Magnetic Intervention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    Dec 12-13, 2006 HAPL meeting, PPPL 1 Advanced Chamber Concept with Magnetic Intervention: - Ion; provision of samples for additional testing elsewhere to follow. · Separate ion dump chamber for magnetic-change dry wall or wetted wall chamber to accommodate ions and provide long life. · Have to make sure

  10. IFSA, Kyoto, Japan, September 2001 1 Dry Chamber Wall Thermo-Mechanical Behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    assessment of dry chamber wall [6] based on ion and photon spectra from new direct-drive target from NRL [3 for an Example Case Without a Protective Chamber Gas #12;IFSA, Kyoto, Japan, September 2001 8 Photon and Ion Time of Temporal Distribution for Photons and Ions Based on Direct Drive Spectrum and 6.5 m Chamber without

  11. Technique to Collimate Ions in a Hall-Effect Thruster Discharge Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Mitchell

    Technique to Collimate Ions in a Hall-Effect Thruster Discharge Chamber Kunning G. Xu and Mitchell in the discharge chamber to repel ions away from the wall and focus them toward centerline. The electrodes repel ions with trajectories that intersect the chamber wall, which results in a more collimated ion exhaust

  12. March 21-22, 2006 HAPL meeting, ORNL Status of Chamber and Blanket Effort

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    Spectra Spectra in a 10.75 m Chamber #12;March 21-22, 2006 HAPL meeting, ORNL 5 Smoothness of Plot of Ion Plates Estimated for Cone-Shaped Chamber · Duck bill configuration assumed for the equatorial ion dumpMarch 21-22, 2006 HAPL meeting, ORNL 1 Status of Chamber and Blanket Effort A. René Raffray UCSD

  13. MOBILITIES OF POSITIVE IONS IN SOME GAS MIXTURES USED IN PROPORTIONAL AND DRIFT CHAMBERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    67 MOBILITIES OF POSITIVE IONS IN SOME GAS MIXTURES USED IN PROPORTIONAL AND DRIFT CHAMBERS G proportional chambers or drift chambers with gas mixtures, using isobutane as a quencher. The positive ions, révisé le 11 juin 1976, accepté le 2 septembre 1976) Résumé. 2014 Le coefficient de mobilité des ions

  14. Recent advances in single-chamber fuel-cells: Experiment and modeling , Zongping Shao b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haile, Sossina M.

    Recent advances in single-chamber fuel-cells: Experiment and modeling Yong Hao a , Zongping Shao b; accepted 6 May 2006 Abstract Single-chamber fuel cells (SCFC) are ones in which the fuel and oxidizer is discussed. © 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Solid oxide fuel cell; Single chamber

  15. Advanced Containment System

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kostelnik, Kevin M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kawamura, Hideki (Tokyo, JP); Richardson, John G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Noda, Masaru (Tokyo, JP)

    2004-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An advanced containment system for containing buried waste and associated leachate. A trench is dug on either side of the zone of interest containing the buried waste so as to accommodate a micro tunnel boring machine. A series of small diameter tunnels are serially excavated underneath the buried waste. The tunnels are excavated by the micro tunnel boring machine at a consistent depth and are substantially parallel to each other. As tunneling progresses, steel casing sections are connected end to end in the excavated portion of the tunnel so that a steel tube is formed. Each casing section has complementary interlocking structure running its length that interlocks with complementary interlocking structure on the adjacent casing section. Thus, once the first tube is emplaced, placement of subsequent tubes is facilitated by the complementary interlocking structure on the adjacent, previously placed, casing sections.

  16. Advanced Containment System

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kostelnik, Kevin M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kawamura, Hideki (Tokyo, JP); Richardson, John G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Noda, Masaru (Tokyo, JP)

    2005-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    An advanced containment system for containing buried waste and associated leachate. A trench is dug on either side of the zone of interest containing the buried waste so as to accommodate a micro tunnel boring machine. A series of small diameter tunnels are serially excavated underneath the buried waste. The tunnels are excavated by the micro tunnel boring machine at a consistent depth and are substantially parallel to each other. As tunneling progresses, steel casing sections are connected end to end in the excavated portion of the tunnel so that a steel tube is formed. Each casing section has complementary interlocking structure running its length that interlocks with complementary interlocking structure on the adjacent casing section. Thus, once the first tube is emplaced, placement of subsequent tubes is facilitated by the complementary interlocking structure on the adjacent, previously placed, casing sections.

  17. Complete fabrication of target experimental chamber and implement initial target diagnostics to be used for the first target experiments in NDCX-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bieniosek, F.M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Drift Compression Magnet Chamber Ion Beam Background Plasmaand reheating of the ion source, the target chamber can betarget chamber ports are reserved for ion beam diagnostics

  18. area upper engadine: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Niles; Adam Pease 2001-01-01 18 An Upper Bound on Overflow Probability in Transient Source Systems Engineering Websites Summary: An Upper Bound on Overflow Probability in...

  19. Crash resistant container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pierce, Jim D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A container for hazardous materials capable of protecting the enclosed materials from high speed impact. Energy absorption is provided by a multiplicity of crushable layers of either wire mesh or perforated metal sheets which thin and flow together under impact loading. Layers of a higher tensile strength material are interspersed within the crushable layers to confine them and increase performance.

  20. Crash resistant container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pierce, J.D.

    1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A container for hazardous materials capable of protecting the enclosed materials from high speed impact is disclosed. Energy absorption is provided by a multiplicity of crushable layers of either wire mesh or perforated metal sheets which thin and flow together under impact loading. Layers of a higher tensile strength material are interspersed within the crushable layers to confine them and increase performance. 1 fig.

  1. Dual chamber system providing simultaneous etch and deposition on opposing substrate sides for growing low defect density epitaxial layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kulkarni, Nagraj S. (Knoxville, TN); Kasica, Richard J. (Ashburn, VA) ,

    2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A dual-chamber reactor can include a housing enclosing a volume having a divider therein, where the divider defines a first chamber and a second chamber. The divider can include a substrate holder that supports at least one substrate and exposes a first side of the substrate to the first chamber and a second side of the substrate to the second chamber. The first chamber can include an inlet for delivering at least one reagent to the first chamber for forming a film on the first side of the substrate, and the second chamber can include a removal device for removing material from the second side of the substrate.

  2. Melt containment member

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rieken, Joel R.; Heidloff, Andrew J.

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A tubular melt containment member for transient containment of molten metals and alloys, especially reactive metals and alloys, includes a melt-contacting layer or region that comprises an oxygen-deficient rare earth oxide material that is less reactive as compared to the counterpart stoichiometric rare earth oxide. The oxygen-deficient (sub-stoichiometric) rare earth oxide can comprise oxygen-deficient yttria represented by Y.sub.2O.sub.3-x wherein x is from 0.01 to 0.1. Use of the oxygen-deficient rare earth oxide as the melt-contacting layer or region material reduces reaction with the melt for a given melt temperature and melt contact time.

  3. BWR steel containment corrosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tan, C.P.; Bagchi, G.

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report describes regulatory actions taken after corrosion was discovered in the drywell at the Oyster Creek Plant and in the torus at the Nine Mile Point 1 Plant. The report describes the causes of corrosion, requirements for monitoring corrosion, and measures to mitigate the corrosive environment for the two plants. The report describes the issuances of generic letters and information notices either to collect information to determine whether the problem is generic or to alert the licensees of similar plants about the existence of such a problem. Implementation of measures to enhance the containment performance under severe accident conditions is discussed. A study by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) of the performance of a degraded containment under severe accident conditions is summarized. The details of the BNL study are in the appendix to the report.

  4. Plastic container bagless transfer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tibrea, Steven L.; D'Amelio, Joseph A.; Daugherty, Brent A.

    2003-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A process and apparatus are provided for transferring material from an isolated environment into a storage carrier through a conduit that can be sealed with a plug. The plug and conduit can then be severed to provide a hermetically sealed storage carrier containing the material which may be transported for storage or disposal and to maintain a seal between the isolated environment and the ambient environment.

  5. Vegetable Gardening in Containers.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cotner, Sam

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are indicated in Table 1. * Growing Media Synthetic "soils" are best suited for vegetable container gardening. These mixes may be composed of sawdust, wood chips, peat moss, perlite, ver miculite or almost any other type of media. Regardless of what... "soils" are available from gar den centers, or one can be pre pared by mixing horticultu ral grade vermiculite, peat moss, limestone, superphosphate, and garden fertilizer. To 1 bushel each of vermiculite and peat moss, add 10 tablespoons...

  6. Vegetable Gardening in Containers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masabni, Joseph; Cotner, Sam

    2009-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    physical support in order to grow healthy plants. A good growing media must also drain well. Synthetic or soilless mixes are well suited for vegetable container gardening and may be composed of sawdust, wood chips, peat moss, perlite, or vermiculite... by mixing horticultural grade vermiculite, peat moss, limestone, superphosphate and garden fertilizer. To 1 bushel each of vermiculite and peat moss, add 10 tablespoons of limestone, 5 tablespoons of 0-20-0 (superphosphate) and 1 cup of garden fertil- izer...

  7. Upper Snake Provincial Assessment May 2004 APPENDIX 4-1--UPPER SNAKE PROVINCE PROJECT INVENTORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Upper Snake Provincial Assessment May 2004 1 APPENDIX 4-1--UPPER SNAKE PROVINCE PROJECT INVENTORY The purpose of the project inventory is to provide a generalized picture of the types of fish and wildlife team participants through the project inventory website or through direct submission. Additional

  8. Performance parameters of a liquid filled ionization chamber array

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poppe, B.; Stelljes, T. S.; Looe, H. K.; Chofor, N. [Clinic for Radiation Therapy, Pius-Hospital, Oldenburg 26121, Germany and WG Medical Radiation Physics, Carl von Ossietzky University, Oldenburg 26121 (Germany)] [Clinic for Radiation Therapy, Pius-Hospital, Oldenburg 26121, Germany and WG Medical Radiation Physics, Carl von Ossietzky University, Oldenburg 26121 (Germany); Harder, D. [Prof. em., Medical Physics and Biophysics, Georg August University, Göttingen 37073 (Germany)] [Prof. em., Medical Physics and Biophysics, Georg August University, Göttingen 37073 (Germany); Willborn, K. [Clinic for Radiation Therapy, Pius-Hospital, Oldenburg 26121 (Germany)] [Clinic for Radiation Therapy, Pius-Hospital, Oldenburg 26121 (Germany)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: In this work, the properties of the two-dimensional liquid filled ionization chamber array Octavius 1000SRS (PTW-Freiburg, Germany) for use in clinical photon-beam dosimetry are investigated.Methods: Measurements were carried out at an Elekta Synergy and Siemens Primus accelerator. For measurements of stability, linearity, and saturation effects of the 1000SRS array a Semiflex 31013 ionization chamber (PTW-Freiburg, Germany) was used as a reference. The effective point of measurement was determined by TPR measurements of the array in comparison with a Roos chamber (type 31004, PTW-Freiburg, Germany). The response of the array with varying field size and depth of measurement was evaluated using a Semiflex 31010 ionization chamber as a reference. Output factor measurements were carried out with a Semiflex 31010 ionization chamber, a diode (type 60012, PTW-Freiburg, Germany), and the detector array under investigation. The dose response function for a single detector of the array was determined by measuring 1 cm wide slit-beam dose profiles and comparing them against diode-measured profiles. Theoretical aspects of the low pass properties and of the sampling frequency of the detector array were evaluated. Dose profiles measured with the array and the diode detector were compared, and an intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) field was verified using the Gamma-Index method and the visualization of line dose profiles.Results: The array showed a short and long term stability better than 0.1% and 0.2%, respectively. Fluctuations in linearity were found to be within ±0.2% for the vendor specified dose range. Saturation effects were found to be similar to those reported in other studies for liquid-filled ionization chambers. The detector's relative response varied with field size and depth of measurement, showing a small energy dependence accounting for maximum signal deviations of ±2.6% from the reference condition for the setup used. The ?-values of the Gaussian dose response function for a single detector of the array were found to be (0.72 ± 0.25) mm at 6 MV and (0.74 ± 0.25) mm at 15 MV and the corresponding low pass cutoff frequencies are 0.22 and 0.21 mm{sup ?1}, respectively. For the inner 5 × 5 cm{sup 2} region and the outer 11 × 11 cm{sup 2} region of the array the Nyquist theorem is fulfilled for maximum sampling frequencies of 0.2 and 0.1 mm{sup ?1}, respectively. An IMRT field verification with a Gamma-Index analysis yielded a passing rate of 95.2% for a 3 mm/3% criterion with a TPS calculation as reference.Conclusions: This study shows the applicability of the Octavius 1000SRS in modern dosimetry. Output factor and dose profile measurements illustrated the applicability of the array in small field and stereotactic dosimetry. The high spatial resolution ensures adequate measurements of dose profiles in regular and intensity modulated photon-beam fields.

  9. Nov 13-14, 2001 A. R. Raffray, et al., Progress Report on Chamber Clearing Code Effort 1 Progress Report on Chamber Clearing Code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    Nov 13-14, 2001 A. R. Raffray, et al., Progress Report on Chamber Clearing Code Effort 1 Progress Livermore November 13-14, 2001 #12;Nov 13-14, 2001 A. R. Raffray, et al., Progress Report on Chamber.g. - CFDRC - HEIGHTS - RECON · Code implementation and integration of packages #12;Nov 13-14, 2001 A. R

  10. Bursts detected and NOT detected by EGRET imaging spark chambers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dingus, Brenda L. [University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States); Catelli, Jennifer R. [University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); NASA/GSFC, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Schneid, E. J. [Northrop-Grummann, MS A01-26, Bethpage, New York 11714 (United States)

    1998-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    EGRET has detected the highest energy emission from gamma-ray bursts. Only a few bursts have been detected either coincident or just following the BATSE detected emission. These bursts are among the brightest bursts detected by BATSE. The EGRET fluxes, including upper limits, are consistent with extrapolations for all the burst spectra measured with Comptel.

  11. Data Reduction Processes Using FPGA for MicroBooNE Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Jinyuan

    2010-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    MicroBooNE is a liquid Argon time projection chamber to be built at Fermilab for an accelerator-based neutrino physics experiment and as part of the R&D strategy for a large liquid argon detector at DUSEL. The waveforms of the {approx}9000 sense wires in the chamber are continuously digitized at 2 M samples/s - which results in a large volume of data coming off the TPC. We have developed a lossless data reduction scheme based on Huffman Coding and have tested the scheme on cosmic ray data taken from a small liquid Argon time projection chamber, the BO detector. For sense wire waveforms produced by cosmic ray tracks, the Huffman Coding scheme compresses the data by a factor of approximately 10. The compressed data can be fully recovered back to the original data since the compression is lossless. In addition to accelerator neutrino data, which comes with small duty cycle in sync with the accelerator beam spill, continuous digitized waveforms are to be temporarily stored in the MicroBooNE data-acquisition system for about an hour, long enough for an external alert from possible supernova events. Another scheme, Dynamic Decimation, has been developed to compress further the potential supernova data so that the storage can be implemented within a reasonable budget. In the Dynamic Decimation scheme, data are sampled at the full sampling rate in the regions-of-interest (ROI) containing waveforms of track-hits and are decimated down to lower sampling rate outside the ROI. Note that unlike in typical zerosuppression schemes, in Dynamic Decimation, the data in the pedestal region are not thrown away but kept at a lower sampling rate. An additional factor of 10 compression ratio is achieved using the Dynamic Decimation scheme on the BO detector data, making a total compression rate of approximate 100 when the Dynamic Decimation and the Huffman Coding functional blocks are cascaded. Both of the blocks are compiled in low-cost FPGA and their silicon resource usages are low.

  12. Upper Mahiao Binary GEPP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, IndianaTurtleCooperativeCROSS-VALIDATION OF SWERA'sUpperUpperMahiao

  13. Statistics of the electromagnetic response of a chaotic reverberation chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. -B. Gros; U. Kuhl; O. Legrand; F. Mortessagne; O. Picon; E. Richalot

    2014-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This article presents a study of the electromagnetic response of a chaotic reverberation chamber (RC) in the presence of losses. By means of simulations and of experiments, the fluctuations in the maxima of the field obtained in a conventional mode-stirred RC are compared with those in a chaotic RC in the neighborhood of the Lowest Useable Frequency (LUF). The present work illustrates that the universal spectral and spatial statistical properties of chaotic RCs allow to meet more adequately the criteria required by the Standard IEC 61000-4-21 to perform tests of electromagnetic compatibility.

  14. Long ion chamber systems for the SLC (Stanford Linear Collider)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rolfe, J.; Gearhart, R.; Jacobsen, R.; Jenkins, T.; McComick, D.; Nelson, R.; Reagan, D.; Ross, M.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Panofsky Long Ion Chamber (PLIC) is essentially a gas-filled coaxial cable, and has been used to protect the Stanford Linear Accelerator from damage caused by its electron beam, and as a sensitive diagnostic tool. This old technology has been updated and has found renewed use in the SLC. PLIC systems have been installed as beam steering aids in most parts of the SLC and are a part of the system that protects the SLC from damage by errant beams in several places. 5 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Development of the Captive Aerosol Growth and Evolution Chamber System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonietti, Carlos G

    2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    that are alternated between the two using 3-way valves. There are two Teflon ports for gases and a stainless steel port for aerosol injection and withdrawal. The walls of the room are covered with UV-reflective aluminum panels. A 54 kW air conditioning system... W black lights. The walls of the room are covered with reflective aluminum panels. During operation the inlet and outlet flow rates are matched. The University of California at Riverside environmental chamber consists of two ~90 m3 Teflon bags...

  16. Continuous Flow Diffusion Chamber Measurements of IN Concentration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution And Bylaws |ContactFlow Diffusion Chamber (CFDC)

  17. Santa Fe Chamber of Commerce Business Awards Gala

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementingnpitcheResearch Briefs TheSanket A. Deshmukh ArgonneSanta Fe Chamber

  18. Algorithm for Computation of Electromagnetic Fields of An Accelerated Short Bunch Inside a Rectangular Chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Novokhatski, Alexander; /SLAC; Sullivan, Michael; /SLAC; ,

    2010-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the feasibility of an application of an implicit finite-difference approximation to calculate the fields of a relativistic bunch moving with no restriction inside a vacuum chamber. We assume that a bunch trajectory is not straight but is inside a vacuum chamber or its branch. The bunch can be deflected by the fields of bending magnets. The bunch can be short enough to produce coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR). Accelerator physicists believe that electromagnetic phenomena of charged beams are governed by Maxwell's equations together with Newton's equations for particle dynamics. To understand the behavior of the beams and radiated fields we just need to find a solution to these equations for the case, which can fully describe the real accelerator environment. So, at first we make a model, which contains all the necessary components, but at the same time can be easily 'inserts' into the equations. Sometimes, it is possible to find analytical solutions, but usually they are only work for one-dimensional cases and rarer for two-dimension cases. To find a solution in general we may transform the equations into a equivalent finite-difference form and solve them using computers. We can find a lot of finite-difference schemes, which approximate Maxwell's equations since the first one that was published in 1966. Most of them are so called explicit schemes. That means that the value of the field at the new time step is calculated only by the field values at the previous time step. Stability conditions for these schemes do not allow a time step to be greater than or equal to a space (mesh) step. This limitation brings an additional troublesome effect for short wavelengths compared a mesh step. We state that this effect works like a frequency dispersion media, which is 'hidden' in the finite-difference equation.

  19. Beam quality conversion factors for parallel-plate ionization chambers in MV photon beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muir, B. R.; McEwen, M. R.; Rogers, D. W. O. [Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Physics Department, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada); Institute for National Measurement Standards, National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Physics Department, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada)

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate the behavior of plane-parallel ion chambers in high-energy photon beams through measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: Ten plane-parallel ion chamber types were obtained from the major ion chamber manufacturers. Absorbed dose-to-water calibration coefficients are measured for these chambers and k{sub Q} factors are determined. In the process, the behaviors of the chambers are characterized through measurements of leakage currents, chamber settling in cobalt-60, polarity and ion recombination behavior, and long-term stability. Monte Carlo calculations of the absorbed dose to the air in the ion chamber and absorbed dose to water are obtained to calculate k{sub Q} factors. Systematic uncertainties in Monte Carlo calculated k{sub Q} factors are investigated by varying material properties and chamber dimensions. Results: Chamber behavior was variable in MV photon beams, especially with regard to chamber leakage and ion recombination. The plane-parallel chambers did not perform as well as cylindrical chambers. Significant differences up to 1.5% were observed in calibration coefficients after a period of eight months although k{sub Q} factors were consistent on average within 0.17%. Chamber-to-chamber variations in k{sub Q} factors for chambers of the same type were at the 0.2% level. Systematic uncertainties in Monte Carlo calculated k{sub Q} factors ranged between 0.34% and 0.50% depending on the chamber type. Average percent differences between measured and calculated k{sub Q} factors were - 0.02%, 0.18%, and - 0.16% for 6, 10, and 25 MV beams, respectively. Conclusions: Excellent agreement is observed on average at the 0.2% level between measured and Monte Carlo calculated k{sub Q} factors. Measurements indicate that the behavior of these chambers is not adequate for their use for reference dosimetry of high-energy photon beams without a more extensive QA program than currently used for cylindrical reference-class ion chambers.

  20. Confinement Contains Condensates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Roberts, Craig D.; Shrock, Robert; Tandy, Peter C.

    2012-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Dynamical chiral symmetry breaking and its connection to the generation of hadron masses has historically been viewed as a vacuum phenomenon. We argue that confinement makes such a position untenable. If quark-hadron duality is a reality in QCD, then condensates, those quantities that have commonly been viewed as constant empirical mass-scales that fill all spacetime, are instead wholly contained within hadrons; i.e., they are a property of hadrons themselves and expressed, e.g., in their Bethe-Salpeter or light-front wave functions. We explain that this paradigm is consistent with empirical evidence, and incidentally expose misconceptions in a recent Comment.

  1. Containment System Michael F

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution And Bylaws |Contact UsContacts forContainedSecondary

  2. Slag monitoring system for combustion chambers of steam boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taler, J.; Taler, D. [Cracow University of Technology, Krakow (Poland)

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The computer-based boiler performance system presented in this article has been developed to provide a direct and quantitative assessment of furnace and convective surface cleanliness. Temperature, pressure, and flow measurements and gas analysis data are used to perform heat transfer analysis in the boiler furnace and evaporator. Power boiler efficiency is calculated using an indirect method. The on-line calculation of the exit flue gas temperature in a combustion chamber allows for an on-line heat flow rate determination, which is transferred to the boiler evaporator. Based on the energy balance for the boiler evaporator, the superheated steam mass flow rate is calculated taking into the account water flow rate in attemperators. Comparing the calculated and the measured superheated steam mass flow rate, the effectiveness of the combustion chamber water walls is determined in an on-line mode. Soot-blower sequencing can be optimized based on actual cleaning requirements rather than on fixed time cycles contributing to lowering of the medium usage in soot blowers and increasing of the water-wall lifetime.

  3. The Upper Atmosphere of HD17156b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. T. Koskinen; A. D. Aylward; S. Miller

    2008-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    HD17156b is a newly-found transiting extrasolar giant planet (EGP) that orbits its G-type host star in a highly eccentric orbit (e~0.67) with an orbital semi-major axis of 0.16 AU. Its period, 21.2 Earth days, is the longest among the known transiting planets. The atmosphere of the planet undergoes a 27-fold variation in stellar irradiation during each orbit, making it an interesting subject for atmospheric modelling. We have used a three-dimensional model of the upper atmosphere and ionosphere for extrasolar gas giants in order to simulate the progress of HD17156b along its eccentric orbit. Here we present the results of these simulations and discuss the stability, circulation, and composition in its upper atmosphere. Contrary to the well-known transiting planet HD209458b, we find that the atmosphere of HD17156b is unlikely to escape hydrodynamically at any point along the orbit, even if the upper atmosphere is almost entirely composed of atomic hydrogen and H+, and infrared cooling by H3+ ions is negligible. The nature of the upper atmosphere is sensitive to to the composition of the thermosphere, and in particular to the mixing ratio of H2, as the availability of H2 regulates radiative cooling. In light of different simulations we make specific predictions about the thermosphere-ionosphere system of HD17156b that can potentially be verified by observations.

  4. Upper bounds for Steklov eigenvalues on surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Girouard, Alexandre

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We give explicit isoperimetric upper bounds for all Steklov eigenvalues of a compact orientable surface with boundary, in terms of the genus, the length of the boundary, and the number of boundary components. Our estimates generalize a recent result of Fraser-Schoen, as well as the classical inequalites obtained by Hersch-Payne-Schiffer, whose approach is used in the present paper.

  5. POSTGRADUATE Upper Level, Otto Beit Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jarrett, Thomas H.

    FUNDING YOUR POSTGRADUATE STUDIES AT UCT Upper Level, Otto Beit Building University Avenue North, the Postgraduate Funding Office and Postgraduate Centre were established at the University of Cape Town to provide apply for funding from both the University and from as many other sources of support as possible

  6. Draft Management Plan Upper Snake Province

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .......................................................................................4-5 Consistency with Idaho's Water Quality Management Plan...........................4-5 303(dDraft Management Plan Upper Snake Province Submitted To The Northwest Power and Conservation Quality Anti-Degradation Policy (39-3603) ............................................4-8 ESA and CWA

  7. Finite element solution of Laplace's equation for ion-atom chambers Jacob Golde, Janine Shertzer, and Paul Oxley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxley, Paul

    Finite element solution of Laplace's equation for ion-atom chambers Jacob Golde, Janine Shertzer for ion-atom chambers. We first consider a simplified model chamber for which an analytical solution can is carried out in an ion-atom chamber. The atomic beam first passes through a region of the cham- ber where

  8. Dose response of selected ion chambers in applied homogeneous transverse and longitudinal magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, M. [Department of Oncology, Medical Physics Division, University of Alberta, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Fallone, B. G. [Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Departments of Oncology and Physics, University of Alberta, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Rathee, S. [Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Department of Oncology, Medical Physics Division, University of Alberta, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The magnetic fields of an integrated MR-Linac system will alter the paths of electrons that produce ions in the ionization chambers. The dose response of selected ion chambers is evaluated in the presence of varying transverse and longitudinal magnetic fields. The investigation is useful in calibration of therapeutic x-ray beams associated with MR-Linac systems. Methods: The Monte Carlo code PENELOPE was used to model the irradiation of NE2571, and PR06C ionization chambers in the presence of a transverse and longitudinal (with respect to the photon beam) magnetic fields of varying magnitude. The long axis of each chamber was simulated both parallel and perpendicular to the incident photon beam for each magnetic field case. The dose deposited in each chamber for each case was compared to the case with zero magnetic field by means of a ratio. The PR06C chamber's response was measured in the presence of a transverse magnetic field with field strengths ranging from 0.0 to 0.2 T to compare to simulated results. Results: The simulations and measured data show that in the presence of a transverse magnetic field there is a considerable dose response (maximum of 11% near 1.0 T in the ion chambers investigated, which depends on the magnitude of magnetic field, and relative orientation of the magnetic field, radiation beam, and ion chamber. Measurements made with the PR06C chamber verify these results in the region of measurement. In contrast, a longitudinal magnetic field produces only a slight increase in dose response (2% at 1.5 T) that rises slowly with increasing magnetic field and is seemingly independent of chamber orientation. Response trends were similar for the two ion chambers and relative orientations considered, but slight variations are present from chamber to chamber. Conclusions: Care must be taken when making ion chamber measurements in a transverse magnetic field. Ion chamber responses vary not only with transverse field strength, but with chamber orientation and type, and can be considerable. Longitudinal magnetic fields influence ion chamber responses relatively little (2% at 1.5 T), and only at field strengths in excess of 1.0 T.

  9. BRIE containment data report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hudson, B.; Stubbs, T.; Heinle, R.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The third in a series of experiments in close proximity, BRIE was located in hole U10cc in area 10 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The first experiment (JARLSBERG) was conducted about four years earlier while the second experiment (NORMANNA) was detonated about three years earlier. The diameter of the emplacement hole was 2.18 m and the depth-of-burial of 203 m placed the working point in alluvium about 100 m above the Paleozoic contact and nearly 300 m above the static water level. BRIE was detonated on June 18, 1987, at 08:20 PDT. All phenomena appeared normal with a chimney collapse broaching the ground surface about 17 minutes later. The mean radius of the resulting crater was 54.1 m and its maximum depth was 10.3 m. No radiation arrivals were detected above ground and containment was satisfactory.

  10. SALUT: Containment data report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stubbs, T.; Heinle, R.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The SALUT event was detonated in hole U20ak of the Nevada Test Site as indicated in Fig. 1.1. The device had a depth-of-burial of 607 m in the Scrugham Peak rhyolite of Area 20, about 15 m above the standing water level (SWL), as shown in Figures 1.2 and 1.3. Stemming of the 2.44 m diameter emplacement hole followed the plan shown in Fig. 1.4. A log of the stemming operations was maintained by Holmes & Narver. Detonation time was 08:15 PDT on June 12, 1985 and about 10 hours, 17 minutes later a sub-surface collapse progressed upwards to a depth between 200 and 270 m. No radiation arrivals were detected in the emplacement hole and the SALUT containment was considered successful.

  11. Additives That Prevent Or Reverse Cathode Aging In Drift Chambers With Helium-Isobutane Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adam Boyarski

    2001-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Noise and Malter breakdown have been studied at high rates in a test chamber having the same cell structure and gas as in the BaBar drift chamber. The chamber was first damaged by exposing it to a high source level at an elevated high voltage, until its operating current at normal voltages was below 0.5nA/cm. Additives such as water or alcohol allowed the damaged chamber to operate at 25 nA/cm, but when the additive was removed the operating point reverted to the original low value. However with 0.02% to 0.05% oxygen or 5% carbon dioxide the chamber could operate at more than 25 nA/cm, and continued to operate at this level even after the additive was removed. This shows for the first time that running with an O2 or CO2 additive at high ionisation levels can cure a damaged chamber from breakdown problems.

  12. Liquid fuel vaporizer and combustion chamber having an adjustable thermal conductor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Powell, Michael R; Whyatt, Greg A; Howe, Daniel T; Fountain, Matthew S

    2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The efficiency and effectiveness of apparatuses for vaporizing and combusting liquid fuel can be improved using thermal conductors. For example, an apparatus having a liquid fuel vaporizer and a combustion chamber can be characterized by a thermal conductor that conducts heat from the combustion chamber to the vaporizer. The thermal conductor can be a movable member positioned at an insertion depth within the combustion chamber that corresponds to a rate of heat conduction from the combustion chamber to the vaporizer. The rate of heat conduction can, therefore, be adjusted by positioning the movable member at a different insertion depth.

  13. TEST OF A LIQUID ARGON CHAMBER WITH 20-u m RMS RESOLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Derenzo, S.E.; Kirschbaum, A.R.; Eberhard, P.H.; Ross, R.R.; Sclmitz, F.T.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    electronics to build chambers with spacings of , "'rJ about 40 fJ-m to increase the signal to noise and hence reliability

  14. Charge-Focusing Readout of Time Projection Chambers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. J. Ross; M. T. Hedges; I. Jaegle; M. D. Rosen; I. S. Seong; T. N. Thorpe; S. E. Vahsen; J. Yamaoka

    2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Time projection chambers (TPCs) have found a wide range of applications in particle physics, nuclear physics, and homeland security. For TPCs with high-resolution readout, the readout electronics often dominate the price of the final detector. We have developed a novel method which could be used to build large-scale detectors while limiting the necessary readout area. By focusing the drift charge with static electric fields, we would allow a small area of electronics to be sensitive to particle detection for a much larger detector volume. The resulting cost reduction could be important in areas of research which demand large-scale detectors, including dark matter searches and detection of special nuclear material. We present simulations made using the software package Garfield of a focusing structure to be used with a prototype TPC with pixel readout. This design should enable significant focusing while retaining directional sensitivity to incoming particles. We also present first experimental results and compare them with simulation.

  15. Conceptual Design Report for the Extreme Ecosystems Test Chambers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Barnes; J. Beller; K. Caldwell; K. Croft; R. Cherry; W. Landman

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This conceptual design supports the creation of Extreme Ecosystems Test Chambers, which will replicate deep subsurface and subocean environments characterized by high pressure (2,000 psi) and subfreezing to high temperature (-4 to 300 degrees F) with differing chemical and saturation conditions. The design provides a system to support research and development that includes heat transfer, phase change issues in porous media, microbiology in extreme environments, and carbon sequestration and extraction. The initial system design is based on the research needs to support the commercial production of methane hydrates from subsurface sediments. The design provides for three pressure vessels: a Down Hole Test Vessel, a Vertical Multi-phase Test Vessel, and a Horizontal Multi-phase Test Vessel.

  16. Beam Measurements of a CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirkby, Jasper

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A striking correlation has recently been observed between global cloud cover and the flux of incident cosmic rays. The effect of natural variations in the cosmic ray flux is large, causing estimated changes in the Earth's energy radiation balance that are comparable to those attributed to greenhouse gases from the burning of fossil fuels since the Industrial Revolution. However a direct link between cosmic rays and cloud formation has not been unambiguously established. We therefore propose to experimentally measure cloud (water droplet) formation under controlled conditions in a test beam at CERN with a CLOUD chamber, duplicating the conditions prevailing in the troposphere. These data, which have never been previously obtained, will allow a detailed understanding of the possible effects of cosmic rays on clouds and confirm, or otherwise, a direct link between cosmic rays, global cloud cover and the Earth's climate. The measurements will, in turn, allow more reliable calculations to be made of the residual e...

  17. Simulation of Enhanced-Explosive Devices in Chambers and Tunnels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, J B; Kuhl, A L; Beckner, V E

    2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Introduction: Shock-dispersed fuel (SDF) explosives use a small chemical charge to disperse a combustible fuel that burns in the post-detonation environment. The energy released in the combustion process has the potential for generating higher pressures and temperatures than conventional explosives. However, the development of these types of novel explosive systems requires a detailed understanding of all of the modes of energy release. Objective: The objective of this project is develop a simulation capability for predicting explosion and combustion phase of SDF charges and apply that capability to quantifying the behavior of these types of explosives. Methodology: We approximate the dynamics of an SDF charge using high Reynolds number, fast chemistry model that effectively captures the thermodynamic behavior of SDF charges and accurately models the key modes of energy release. The overall computational model is combined with Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) , implemented in a parallel adaptive framework suited to the massively parallel computer systems. Results: We have developed a multiphase version of the model and used it to simulate an SDF charge in which the dispersed fuel is aluminum flakes. Flow visualizations show that the combustion field is turbulent for the chamber and tunnel cases studied. During the 3 milli-seconds of simulation, over 90% of the Al fuel was consumed for the chamber case, while about 40% was consumed in the tunnel case in agreement with Al-SDF experiments. Significance to DoD: DoD has a requirement to develop enhanced energetic materials to support future military systems. The SDF charges described here utilize the combustion mechanism to increase energy per gram of fuel by a factor of 7 to 10 over conventional (detonating) charges, and increase the temperature of the explosion cloud to 2,000-4,000 K (depending on the SDF fuel). Accurate numerical simulation of such SDF explosions allows one to understand the energy release mechanism, and thereby design full-scale systems with greatly improved explosive efficiency.

  18. Pattern Alteration: Upper Arm Sleeve Width

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    in the upper arm are unbecoming and may form excess vertical folds (Fig. 2). The Personal Measurement Chart (line 10) shows how much to alter. Figure 1. Tight sleeve Figure 2. Loose sleeve 2... ................................................................................................................................................................................. Figure 3. Tissue paper Figure 4. Sleeve Sleeve Figure 5. Sleeve Sleeve Figure 6. Figure 7. Sleeve Figure 8. Spread Lap Spread Lap Cut away Tissue Tissue Basic and raglan style garments 1. Trace the cutting line of the set-in sleeve cap on tissue...

  19. Bitumen accumulation in Grosmont platform complex, Upper Devonian, Alberta, Canada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffmann, C.F.; Strausz, O.P.

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Upper Devonian Grosmont Formation, a broad carbonate platform complex in Alberta, Canada, contains an estimated 300 billion bbl of bitumen. It has been suggested that these vast reserves are related to Lower Cretaceous Athabasca oil sands. Detailed gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric studies of a wide range of biologic marker compounds confirm this suggestion. The Grosmont Formation contains bitumen of similar maturity and source to the Athabasca deposit, but it has been subjected to a greater degree of biodegradation and water washing, possibly as a result of its reservoir rock characteristics. The difference in the degree of biodegradation is manifested by the absence of bicyclic terpanes and by the reduced concentrations of the C/sub 30/ and the 22R epimers of the extended hopanes in the Grosmont bitumen. Also, the greater degree of water washing of the Grosmont bitumen is inferred from the observed distribution of the bicyclic, tricyclic, and tetracyclic terpenoid sulfides, which shows a characteristic loss of the lower molecular weight members in the carbonate bitumen. The correlation established here between the two deposits suggests that if the precursor oil has indeed undergone long-distance migration, the Paleozoic carbonates could have acted as a path for migration. Finally, the observed distribution of steranes in the Grosmont bitumen corresponds to the suggestion that the Mannville Group shales were not the major source rocks of the oil-sand and carbonate bitumen accumulations of northern Alberta. 11 figures, 6 tables.

  20. Method and apparatus for active control of combustion rate through modulation of heat transfer from the combustion chamber wall

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roberts, Jr., Charles E.; Chadwell, Christopher J.

    2004-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The flame propagation rate resulting from a combustion event in the combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine is controlled by modulation of the heat transfer from the combustion flame to the combustion chamber walls. In one embodiment, heat transfer from the combustion flame to the combustion chamber walls is mechanically modulated by a movable member that is inserted into, or withdrawn from, the combustion chamber thereby changing the shape of the combustion chamber and the combustion chamber wall surface area. In another embodiment, heat transfer from the combustion flame to the combustion chamber walls is modulated by cooling the surface of a portion of the combustion chamber wall that is in close proximity to the area of the combustion chamber where flame speed control is desired.

  1. An Integrated Geophysical Analysis Of The Upper Crust Of The...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Of The Upper Crust Of The Southern Kenya Rift Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: An Integrated Geophysical Analysis Of The Upper...

  2. Upper internals arrangement for a pressurized water reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singleton, Norman R; Altman, David A; Yu, Ching; Rex, James A; Forsyth, David R

    2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In a pressurized water reactor with all of the in-core instrumentation gaining access to the core through the reactor head, each fuel assembly in which the instrumentation is introduced is aligned with an upper internals instrumentation guide-way. In the elevations above the upper internals upper support assembly, the instrumentation is protected and aligned by upper mounted instrumentation columns that are part of the instrumentation guide-way and extend from the upper support assembly towards the reactor head in hue with a corresponding head penetration. The upper mounted instrumentation columns are supported laterally at one end by an upper guide tube and at the other end by the upper support plate.

  3. CONTAINER MATERIALS, FABRICATION AND ROBUSTNESS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, K.; Louthan, M.; Rawls, G.; Sindelar, R.; Zapp, P.; Mcclard, J.

    2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The multi-barrier 3013 container used to package plutonium-bearing materials is robust and thereby highly resistant to identified degradation modes that might cause failure. The only viable degradation mechanisms identified by a panel of technical experts were pressurization within and corrosion of the containers. Evaluations of the container materials and the fabrication processes and resulting residual stresses suggest that the multi-layered containers will mitigate the potential for degradation of the outer container and prevent the release of the container contents to the environment. Additionally, the ongoing surveillance programs and laboratory studies should detect any incipient degradation of containers in the 3013 storage inventory before an outer container is compromised.

  4. Direct containment heating models in the CONTAIN code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington, K.E.; Williams, D.C.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential exists in a nuclear reactor core melt severe accident for molten core debris to be dispersed under high pressure into the containment building. If this occurs, the set of phenomena that result in the transfer of energy to the containment atmosphere and its surroundings is referred to as direct containment heating (DCH). Because of the potential for DCH to lead to early containment failure, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) has sponsored an extensive research program consisting of experimental, analytical, and risk integration components. An important element of the analytical research has been the development and assessment of direct containment heating models in the CONTAIN code. This report documents the DCH models in the CONTAIN code. DCH models in CONTAIN for representing debris transport, trapping, chemical reactions, and heat transfer from debris to the containment atmosphere and surroundings are described. The descriptions include the governing equations and input instructions in CONTAIN unique to performing DCH calculations. Modifications made to the combustion models in CONTAIN for representing the combustion of DCH-produced and pre-existing hydrogen under DCH conditions are also described. Input table options for representing the discharge of debris from the RPV and the entrainment phase of the DCH process are also described. A sample calculation is presented to demonstrate the functionality of the models. The results show that reasonable behavior is obtained when the models are used to predict the sixth Zion geometry integral effects test at 1/10th scale.

  5. IFE CHAMBER TECHNOLOGY STATUS AND FUTURE CHALLENGES W.R. Meier1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    1 IFE CHAMBER TECHNOLOGY ­ STATUS AND FUTURE CHALLENGES W.R. Meier1 , A.R. Raffrary2 , S.I. Abdel.gov (925) 422-8536 2. University of California, San Diego, CA 3. Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta-ion, laser and Z-pinch drivers. A variety of chamber concepts are being investigated including dry- wall

  6. IFE CHAMBER TECHNOLOGY STATUS AND FUTURE CHALLENGES W.R. Meier1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najmabadi, Farrokh

    IFE CHAMBER TECHNOLOGY ­ STATUS AND FUTURE CHALLENGES W.R. Meier1 , A.R. Raffray2 , S.I. Abdel.gov (925) 422-8536 2. University of California, San Diego, CA 3. Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta-ion, laser and Z-pinch drivers. A variety of chamber concepts are being investigated including dry- wall

  7. The development and application of advanced analytical methods to commercial ICF reactor chambers. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cousseau, P.; Engelstad, R.; Henderson, D.L. [and others

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress is summarized in this report for each of the following tasks: (1) multi-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics computer code development; (2) 2D radiation-hydrodynamic code development; (3) ALARA: analytic and Laplacian adaptive radioactivity analysis -- a complete package for analysis of induced activation; (4) structural dynamics modeling of ICF reactor chambers; and (5) analysis of self-consistent target chamber clearing.

  8. Plasma Chamber and APEX Budget Plans for FY 2000 (and FY 2001)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    Plasma Chamber and APEX Budget Plans for FY 2000 (and FY 2001) Spokesperson: Mohamed Abdou OFES: Plasma Chamber Spokesperson: M. Abdou Part I: VLT Director's Proposed Budget: $2200K Task Description Plans and Budgets Technology Area: APEX Spokesperson: M. Abdou Part I: VLT Director's Proposed Budget

  9. In situ reduction and evaluation of anode supported single chamber solid oxide fuel cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    In situ reduction and evaluation of anode supported single chamber solid oxide fuel cells D.05.118 #12;Abstract Single chamber anode-supported fuel cells are investigated under several methane under methane-to-oxygen ratio (Rmix) of 2. Anode-supported fuel cells are investigated regarding

  10. Combustion in Meso-scale Vortex Chambers Ming-hsun Wu*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Vigor

    1 Combustion in Meso-scale Vortex Chambers Ming-hsun Wu* , Yanxing Wang, Vigor Yang and Richard A) #12;2 COMBUSTION IN MESO-SCALE VORTEX CHAMBERS Ming-hsun Wu, Yanxing Wang, Vigor Yang and Richard A with the chemical energy varying from 25 to 174W. For the largest combustion volume, hydrogen and hydrocarbons

  11. A simple analytical model to study and control azimuthal instabilities in annular combustion chambers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A simple analytical model to study and control azimuthal instabilities in annular combustion analytical method to compute the azimuthal modes appearing in annular combustion chambers and help analyzing exper- imental, acoustic and LES (Large Eddy Simulation) data obtained in these combustion chambers

  12. Analytical and numerical studies of heavy ion beam transport in the fusion chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaganovich, Igor

    Analytical and numerical studies of heavy ion beam transport in the fusion chamber IGOR D to acceptable levels. During ion beam propagation in the chamber, electrons are drawn into the beam, Princeton, New Jersey 08543, USA Abstract The propagation of a high-current finite-length ion charge bunch

  13. Simulation of Gas Dynamic Behavior in Dry-Wall Inertial Fusion Energy Chambers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tillack, Mark

    . In this work, the code TSUNAMI [2] was used to model chamber gas dynamics for different shapes, sizes of size scaling. Previous- ly, TSUNAMI was used primarily for studying liquid protec- ted chambers which the basic response charac- teristics (with emphasis on the evolution towards a quiescent state

  14. Vapor chambers with jumping-drop liquid return from superhydrophobic condensers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chuan-Hua

    Vapor chambers with jumping-drop liquid return from superhydrophobic condensers Jonathan B. Boreyko January 2013 Accepted 28 January 2013 Keywords: Jumping drops Vapor chamber Superhydrophobicity Wick-propelled jumping drops on a superhydrophobic condenser offer a new mechanism to return the working fluid

  15. Reservoir characterization of the upper Merecure and lower Oficina Formations sands in the Leona Este Field, Eastern Venezuela Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flores Millan, Maria Carolina

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The "S5", "T" and "U1" sands, traditionally described as part of the lower section of the "Oficina" Formation, and the "U2" sand, as part of the upper interval of the "Merecure" Formation, contain the largest oil remaining reserves of the Leona Este...

  16. Pressure sensor for sealed containers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hodges, Franklin R. (Loudon, TN)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A magnetic pressure sensor for sensing a pressure change inside a sealed container. The sensor includes a sealed deformable vessel having a first end attachable to an interior surface of the sealed container, and a second end. A magnet mounted to the vessel second end defining a distance away from the container surface provides an externally detectable magnetic field. A pressure change inside the sealed container causes deformation of the vessel changing the distance of the magnet away from the container surface, and thus the detectable intensity of the magnetic field.

  17. Sedimentary parameters of upper Barataria Bay, Louisiana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegert, Rudolf B

    1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SEDIMENTARY PARAMETERS OF UPPER BARATARIA BAY, LOUISIANA A Thesis Rudolf Bernhardt Siegert Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural snd Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the reGulremente for the d. agree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1961 Ma)or Sub)ect GeologP SEDYIKNTARY PARAI'ZTEHS OF DT'PBR BARATARIA BAY, LOUISIANA A Thesis By Rudolf Bernhardt Siegert Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of C 'tice Bea of Department or Student Advisor...

  18. Beam Measurements of a CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jasper Kirkby

    2001-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A striking correlation has recently been observed between global cloud cover and the flux of incident cosmic rays. The effect of natural variations in the cosmic ray flux is large, causing estimated changes in the Earth's energy radiation balance that are comparable to those attributed to greenhouse gases from the burning of fossil fuels since the Industrial Revolution. However a direct link between cosmic rays and cloud formation has not been unambiguously established. We therefore propose to experimentally measure cloud (water droplet) formation under controlled conditions in a test beam at CERN with a CLOUD chamber, duplicating the conditions prevailing in the troposphere. These data, which have never been previously obtained, will allow a detailed understanding of the possible effects of cosmic rays on clouds and confirm, or otherwise, a direct link between cosmic rays, global cloud cover and the Earth's climate. The measurements will, in turn, allow more reliable calculations to be made of the residual effect on global temperatures of the burning of fossil fuels, an issue of profound importance to society. Furthermore, light radio-isotope records indicate a correlation has existed between global climate and the cosmic ray flux extending back over the present inter-glacial and perhaps earlier. This suggests it may eventually become possible to make long-term (10-1,000 year) predictions of changes in the Earth's climate, provided a deeper understanding can be achieved of the ``geomagnetic climate'' of the Sun and Earth that modulates the cosmic-ray flux.

  19. OxfordRoadOxfordRoadOxfordRoad UpperBrookStreetUpperBrookStreet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lane Platt Lane UpperLloydStreet HartLane Claremont Road Mauldeth RoadMauldeth Road West Albert Road Coupland Chapel 43. Roby URC 44. Quadria Jilamia Islamic Centre 45. Platt Lane Methodist Church 46. Holy Trinity, Platt Church of England 47. Platt Fields Park, open space with a lake. 48. Allen Hall 49. The Islah

  20. Harvesting Energy from Wastewater in a 2-Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The microorganisms oxidize the organic food matter, and transfer the electrons to the anode. The electrons travel wastewater treatment plants utilize aerobic bacteria. Organic material in wastewater contains energy that can a microbial fuel cell (MFC), it takes a source of bacteria, food, no oxygen, and two electrodes

  1. IFE chamber dry wall materials response to pulsed X-rays and ions at power-plant level fluences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    IFE chamber dry wall materials response to pulsed X-rays and ions at power-plant level fluences T initiated to test IFE chamber wall materials response to X-rays on the Z facility, and to ions on RHEPP-1 a collaborative investigation of the response of candidate first-wall inertial fusion energy (IFE) reactor chamber

  2. Understanding nuclei in the upper sd - shell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarkar, M. Saha; Bisoi, Abhijit; Ray, Sudatta [Nuclear Physics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata 700064 (India); Kshetri, Ritesh [Nuclear Physics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata 700064, India and Sidho-Kanho-Birsha University, Purulia - 723101 (India); Sarkar, S. [Indian Institute of Engineering Science and Technology, Shibpur, Howrah - 711103 (India)

    2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclei in the upper-sd shell usually exhibit characteristics of spherical single particle excitations. In the recent years, employment of sophisticated techniques of gamma spectroscopy has led to observation of high spin states of several nuclei near A ? 40. In a few of them multiparticle, multihole rotational states coexist with states of single particle nature. We have studied a few nuclei in this mass region experimentally, using various campaigns of the Indian National Gamma Array setup. We have compared and combined our empirical observations with the large-scale shell model results to interpret the structure of these nuclei. Indication of population of states of large deformation has been found in our data. This gives us an opportunity to investigate the interplay of single particle and collective degrees of freedom in this mass region.

  3. MEAT, POULTRY, Still contains ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    MEAT, POULTRY, SEAFOOD Still contains ice crystals and feels as cold, and ground meats Refreeze Discard Poultry and ground poultry Refreeze Discard Variety meats may safely re-freeze foods that s:ll contain ice crystals or that have been

  4. Study of surface kinetics in PECVD chamber cleaning using remote plasma source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An, Ju Jin

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The scope of this research work is to characterize the Transformer Coupled Toroidal Plasma (TCTP); to understand gas phase reactions and surface reactions of neutrals in the cleaning chamber by analyzing the concentration ...

  5. in the APS Storage Ring Vacuum Chamber Y. Chung Abstract LS-148

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Compensation for the Eddy Current Effect in the APS Storage Ring Vacuum Chamber Y. Chung Abstract LS-148 Y. Chung 053090 The amplitude attenuation and the phase shift of the...

  6. Potential applications of the natural design of internal explosion chambers in the bombardier beetle (Carabidae, Brachinus)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lai, Changquan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bombardier Beetle (Carabidae, Brachinus) has a unique form of defense mechanism which involves the explosive mixing of hydroquinones and hydrogen peroxide in its internal explosion chambers and using the resultant high ...

  7. Monte Carlo calculations of electron beam quality conversion factors for several ion chamber types

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muir, B. R., E-mail: Bryan.Muir@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [Measurement Science and Standards, National Research Council Canada, 1200 Montreal Road, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Rogers, D. W. O., E-mail: drogers@physics.carleton.ca [Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Physics Department, Carleton University, 1125 ColonelBy Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To provide a comprehensive investigation of electron beam reference dosimetry using Monte Carlo simulations of the response of 10 plane-parallel and 18 cylindrical ion chamber types. Specific emphasis is placed on the determination of the optimal shift of the chambers’ effective point of measurement (EPOM) and beam quality conversion factors. Methods: The EGSnrc system is used for calculations of the absorbed dose to gas in ion chamber models and the absorbed dose to water as a function of depth in a water phantom on which cobalt-60 and several electron beam source models are incident. The optimal EPOM shifts of the ion chambers are determined by comparing calculations of R{sub 50} converted from I{sub 50} (calculated using ion chamber simulations in phantom) to R{sub 50} calculated using simulations of the absorbed dose to water vs depth in water. Beam quality conversion factors are determined as the calculated ratio of the absorbed dose to water to the absorbed dose to air in the ion chamber at the reference depth in a cobalt-60 beam to that in electron beams. Results: For most plane-parallel chambers, the optimal EPOM shift is inside of the active cavity but different from the shift determined with water-equivalent scaling of the front window of the chamber. These optimal shifts for plane-parallel chambers also reduce the scatter of beam quality conversion factors, k{sub Q}, as a function of R{sub 50}. The optimal shift of cylindrical chambers is found to be less than the 0.5 r{sub cav} recommended by current dosimetry protocols. In most cases, the values of the optimal shift are close to 0.3 r{sub cav}. Values of k{sub ecal} are calculated and compared to those from the TG-51 protocol and differences are explained using accurate individual correction factors for a subset of ion chambers investigated. High-precision fits to beam quality conversion factors normalized to unity in a beam with R{sub 50} = 7.5 cm (k{sub Q}{sup ?}) are provided. These factors avoid the use of gradient correction factors as used in the TG-51 protocol although a chamber dependent optimal shift in the EPOM is required when using plane-parallel chambers while no shift is needed with cylindrical chambers. The sensitivity of these results to parameters used to model the ion chambers is discussed and the uncertainty related to the practical use of these results is evaluated. Conclusions: These results will prove useful as electron beam reference dosimetry protocols are being updated. The analysis of this work indicates that cylindrical ion chambers may be appropriate for use in low-energy electron beams but measurements are required to characterize their use in these beams.

  8. Towards energy resolution at the statistical limit from a negative ion time projection chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Sorensen; Mike Heffner; Adam Bernstein; Josh Renner; Melinda Sweany

    2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We make a proof-of-principle demonstration that improved energy resolution can be obtained in a negative-ion time projection chamber, by individually counting each electron produced by ionizing radiation.

  9. A sun-tracking environmental chamber for the outdoor quantification of CPV modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faiman, David, E-mail: faiman@bgu.ac.il; Melnichak, Vladimir, E-mail: faiman@bgu.ac.il; Bokobza, Dov, E-mail: faiman@bgu.ac.il; Kabalo, Shlomo, E-mail: faiman@bgu.ac.il [Department of Solar Energy and Environmental Physics, Blaustein Institutes for Desert Research, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Sede Boqer Campus, 8499000 (Israel)

    2014-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper describes a sun-tracking environmental chamber and its associated fast electronics, devised for the accurate outdoor characterization of CPV cells, receivers, mono-modules, and modules. Some typical measurement results are presented.

  10. Impact of beam transport method on chamber and driver design for heavy ion inertial fusion energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, D.V.; Welch, D.R.; Olson, C.L.; Yu, S.S.; Neff, S.; Sharp, W.M.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A. Moses, “Inertial fusion energy target output and chamberA. J. Schmitt, et al. , “Fusion energy research with lasers,o?s for inertial fusion energy power plants,” presented at

  11. Resistive Wall Heating Due to Image Current on the Beam Chamber

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    32012 Resistive Wall Heating Due to Image Current on the Beam Chamber For a Superconducting Undulator S.H. Kim, ASD MD Group 1. Introduction The image-current heating on the...

  12. COUPP - a search for dark matter with a continuously sensitive bubble chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collar, Juan,; Crum, Keith; Mishra, Smriti; Nakazawa, Dante; Odom, Brian; Rasmussen, Julia; Riley, Nathan; Szydagis, Matthew; /Chicago U.; Behnke, Ed; Levine, Ilan; Vander Werf, Nate; /Indiana U., South Bend; Cooper, Peter; Crisler, Mike; Hu, Martin; Ramberg, Erik; Sonnenschein, Andrew; Tschirhart, Robert; /Fermilab

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose to construct and operate a 60-kg room temperature CF{sub 3}I bubble chamber as a prototype dark matter (WIMP) detector. Operating in weakly-superheated mode, the chamber will be sensitive to WIMP induced nuclear recoils above 10 keV, while rejecting background electron recoils at a level approaching 10{sup 10}. We would first commission and operate this chamber in the MINOS near detector hall with the goal to demonstrate stable operation and measure internal contamination and any other backgrounds. This chamber, or an improved version, would then be relocated to an appropriate deep underground site such as the Soudan Mine. This detector will have unique sensitivity to spin-dependent WIMP-nucleon couplings, and even in this early stage of development will attain competitive sensitivity to spin-independent couplings.

  13. Pressemeddelelse: JCI (Junior Chamber International) Danmark uddelte 3 TOYP-priser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andersen, Anja C.

    Pressemeddelelse: JCI (Junior Chamber International) Danmark uddelte 3 TOYP-priser lørdag den 7 forståelse og integration mellem forskellige kulturer og folkeslag i Danmark. Outlandish er ydermere gode

  14. Method of correcting eddy current magnetic fields in particle accelerator vacuum chambers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Danby, Gordon T. (Wading River, NY); Jackson, John W. (Shoreham, NY)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for correcting magnetic field aberrations produced by eddy currents induced in a particle accelerator vacuum chamber housing is provided wherein correction windings are attached to selected positions on the housing and the windings are energized by transformer action from secondary coils, which coils are inductively coupled to the poles of electro-magnets that are powered to confine the charged particle beam within a desired orbit as the charged particles are accelerated through the vacuum chamber by a particle-driving rf field. The power inductively coupled to the secondary coils varies as a function of variations in the power supplied by the particle-accelerating rf field to a beam of particles accelerated through the vacuum chamber, so the current in the energized correction coils is effective to cancel eddy current flux fields that would otherwise be induced in the vacuum chamber by power variations in the particle beam.

  15. Method of correcting eddy current magnetic fields in particle accelerator vacuum chambers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Danby, G.T.; Jackson, J.W.

    1990-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for correcting magnetic field aberrations produced by eddy currents induced in a particle accelerator vacuum chamber housing is provided wherein correction windings are attached to selected positions on the housing and the windings are energized by transformer action from secondary coils, which coils are inductively coupled to the poles of electro-magnets that are powered to confine the charged particle beam within a desired orbit as the charged particles are accelerated through the vacuum chamber by a particle-driving rf field. The power inductively coupled to the secondary coils varies as a function of variations in the power supplied by the particle-accelerating rf field to a beam of particles accelerated through the vacuum chamber, so the current in the energized correction coils is effective to cancel eddy current flux fields that would otherwise be induced in the vacuum chamber by power variations (dB/dt) in the particle beam.

  16. The design, fabrication, and implications of a solvothermal vapor annealing chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Porter, Nathaniel R., Jr

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis documents the design, fabrication, use, and benefits of a prototype aluminum solvothermal vapor annealing chamber which facilitates the self-assembly of block copolymers (BCPs) on silicon wafers which are then ...

  17. Conceptual Study of Integrated Chamber Core for Laser Fusion with Magnetic Intervention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    pumping, tritium extraction, and chamber coolant coupling to a heat exchanger (to drive the final product plasma cloud. The j x B force on the electrons is thus transferred to the ions which appear to push

  18. Performance of the beam chamber vacuum system of K = 500 cyclotron at Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre Kolkata

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pal, Gautam, E-mail: gautam.pal@vecc.gov.in; DuttaGupta, Anjan; Chakrabarti, Alok [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, I/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The beam chamber of Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata's K = 500 superconducting cyclotron is pumped by liquid helium cooled cryopanel with liquid nitrogen cooled radiation shield. Performance of the vacuum system was evaluated by cooling the cryopanel assembly with liquid nitrogen and liquid helium. Direct measurement of beam chamber pressure is quite difficult because of space restrictions and the presence of high magnetic field. Pressure gauges were placed away from the beam chamber. The beam chamber pressure was evaluated using a Monte Carlo simulation software for vacuum system and compared with measurements. The details of the vacuum system, measurements, and estimation of pressure of the beam chamber are described in this paper.

  19. Control Dewar Secondary Vacuum Container

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rucinski, R.; /Fermilab

    1993-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This engineering note provides background information regarding the control dewar secondary vacuum container. The secondary vacuum container has it's origin with the CDP control dewar design. The name secondary vacuum container replaced the CDP term 'Watt can' which was named after Bob Watt (SLAC), a PAC/DOE review committee member who participated in a review of CDP and recommended a secondary vacuum enclosure. One of the most fragile parts of the control dewar design is the ceramic electrical feed throughs located in the secondary vacuum container. The secondary vacuum container is provided to guard against potential leaks in these ceramic insulating feed throughs. The secondary vacuum container has a pumping line separate from the main solenoid/control dewar insulating vacuum. This pumping line is connected to the inlet of the turbo pump for initial pumpdown. Under normal operation the container is isolated. Should a feedthrough develop a small leak, alternate pumping arrangements for the secondary vacuum container could be arranged. The pressure in the secondary vacuum container should be kept in a range that the breakdown voltage is kept at a maximum. The breakdown voltage is known to be a function of pressure and is described by a Paschen curve. I cannot find a copy of the curve at this time, but from what I remember, the breakdown voltage is a minimum somewhere around 10-3 torr. Ideally the pressure in the secondary vacuum can should be kept very low, around 10 E-6 or 10 E-7 torr for maximum breakdown voltage. If however a leak developed and this was not possible, then one could operate at a pressure higher than the minima point.

  20. The Effect of Heat Treatments and Coatings on the Outgassing Rate of Stainless Steel Chambers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mamum, Md Abdullah A. [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Elmustafa, Abdelmageed A, [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Stutzman, Marcy L. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Adderley, Philip A. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Poelker, Matthew [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The outgassing rates of four nominally identical 304L stainless steel vacuum chambers were measured to determine the effect of chamber coatings and heat treatments. One chamber was coated with titanium nitride (TiN) and one with amorphous silicon (a-Si) immediately following fabrication. One chamber remained uncoated throughout, and the last chamber was first tested without any coating, and then coated with a-Si following a series of heat treatments. The outgassing rate of each chamber was measured at room temperatures between 15 and 30 deg C following bakes at temperatures between 90 and 400 deg C. Measurements for bare steel showed a significant reduction in the outgassing rate by more than a factor of 20 after a 400 deg C heat treatment (3.5 x 10{sup 12} TorrL s{sup -1}cm{sup -2} prior to heat treatment, reduced to 1.7 x 10{ sup -13} TorrL s{sup -1}cm{sup -2} following heat treatment). The chambers that were coated with a-Si showed minimal change in outgassing rates with heat treatment, though an outgassing rate reduced by heat treatments prior to a-Si coating was successfully preserved throughout a series of bakes. The TiN coated chamber exhibited remarkably low outgassing rates, up to four orders of magnitude lower than the uncoated stainless steel. An evaluation of coating composition suggests the presence of elemental titanium which could provide pumping and lead to an artificially low outgassing rate. The outgassing results are discussed in terms of diffusion-limited versus recombination-limited processes.

  1. Invention and History of the Bubble Chamber (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Glaser, Don

    2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Summer Lecture Series 2006: Don Glaser won the 1960 Nobel Prize for Physics for his 1952 invention of the bubble chamber at Berkeley Lab, a type of particle detector that became the mainstay of high-energy physics research throughout the 1960s and 1970s. He discusses how, inspired by bubbles in a glass of beer, he invented the bubble chamber and detected cosmic-ray muons.

  2. Crust and Upper Mantle P Wave Velocity Structure Beneath Valles...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Crust and Upper Mantle P Wave Velocity Structure Beneath Valles Caldera, New Mexico- Results from the Jemez Teleseismic Tomography Experiment Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

  3. Upper crustal structure of an obliquely extending orogen, central...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    eastern California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: Upper crustal structure of an obliquely extending orogen, central...

  4. NOVEL CHAMBER DESIGN FOR AN IN-VACUUM CRYO-COOLED MINI-GAP UNDULATOR.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HU, J.-P.; FOERSTER, C.L.; SKARITKA, J.R.; WATERMAN, D.

    2006-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A stainless steel, Ultra-High Vacuum (UHV) chamber, featuring a large vertical rectangular port (53''W by 16''H), has been fabricated to house the one-meter magnet assembly of a newly installed undulator insertion device for beamline X-25 at the National Synchrotron Light Source. To achieve UHV, the new chamber is equipped with a differential ion pump, NEG pump, nude ion gauge, residual gas analyzer, and an all metal roughing valve. Temperature of the magnet assembly is maintained below 90 C during vacuum bake. The large rectangular port cover is sealed to the main flange of the chamber using a one-piece flat aluminum gasket and special sealing surfaces developed exclusively by Nor-Cal Products, Inc. The large flange provides easy access to the gap of the installed magnet girders for in situ magnetic measurements and shimming. Special window ports were designed into the cover and chamber for manipulation of optical micrometers external to the chamber to provide precise measurements of the in-vacuum magnet gap. The vacuum chamber assembly features independently vacuum-isolated feedthroughs that can be used for either water-or-cryogenic refrigeration-cooling of the monolithic magnet girders. This would allow for cryogenic-cooled permanent magnet operation and has been successfully tested within temperature range of +100 C to -150 C. Details of the undulator assembly for beamline X-25 is described in the paper.

  5. The STAPL Parallel Container Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanase, Ilie Gabriel

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Standard Template Adaptive Parallel Library (STAPL) is a parallel programming infrastructure that extends C with support for parallelism. STAPL provides a run-time system, a collection of distributed data structures (pContainers) and parallel...

  6. Seal device for ferromagnetic containers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meyer, Ross E. (Los Alamos, NM); Jason, Andrew J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A temporary seal or patch assembly prevents the escape of contents, e.g., fluids and the like, from within a container having a breach therethrough until the contents can be removed and/or a repair effected. A frame that supports a sealing bladder can be positioned over the breach and the frame is then attached to the container surface, which must be of a ferromagnet material, by using switchable permanent magnets. The permanent magnets are designed to have a first condition that is not attracted to the ferromagnetic surface and a second conditions whereby the magnets are attracted to the surface with sufficient force to support the seal assembly on the surface. Latching devices may be attached to the frame and engage the container surface with hardened pins to prevent the lateral movement of the seal assembly along the container surface from external forces such as fluid drag or gravity.

  7. Seal device for ferromagnetic containers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meyer, R.E.; Jason, A.J.

    1994-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A temporary seal or patch assembly prevents the escape of contents, e.g., fluids and the like, from within a container having a breach there through until the contents can be removed and/or a repair effected. A frame that supports a sealing bladder can be positioned over the breach and the frame is then attached to the container surface, which must be of a ferromagnet material, by using switchable permanent magnets. The permanent magnets are designed to have a first condition that is not attracted to the ferromagnetic surface and a second conditions whereby the magnets are attracted to the surface with sufficient force to support the seal assembly on the surface. Latching devices may be attached to the frame and engage the container surface with hardened pins to prevent the lateral movement of the seal assembly along the container surface from external forces such as fluid drag or gravity. 10 figs.

  8. Phase mixing of upper hybrid oscillations in a cold inhomogeneous plasma placed in an inhomogeneous magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarkar, Anwesa; Maity, Chandan; Chakrabarti, Nikhil [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India)] [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study phase mixing/wave breaking phenomena of upper hybrid modes in a cold inhomogeneous plasma placed in an inhomogeneous magnetic field. Inhomogeneities both in the background ion density and magnetic field profile are treated as periodic in space but independent in time. The Lagrangian fluid description is employed to obtain an exact solution of this fully nonlinear problem. It is demonstrated that the upper hybrid modes, excited by an initial local charge imbalance, break via phase mixing, induced by the inhomogeneities. It is also shown that it is possible to avoid phase mixing in excited upper hybrid oscillations in an inhomogeneous plasma containing a finite amplitude ion density fluctuation. The choice of external magnetic field is shown to have a key role in avoiding phase mixing in such oscillations. The relevance of our investigation regarding the particle acceleration in an inhomogeneous plasma has also been discussed.

  9. Upper bounds for multiphase composites in any dimension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luis Silvestre

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We prove a rigorous upper bound for the effective conductivity of an isotropic composite made of several isotropic components in any dimension. This upper bound coincides with the Hashin Shtrikman bound when the volume ratio of all phases but any two vanish.

  10. Shipping container for fissile material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crowder, H.E.

    1984-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a shipping container for the interstate transportation of enriched uranium materials. The shipping container is comprised of a rigid, high-strength, cylindrical-shaped outer vessel lined with thermal insulation. Disposed inside the thermal insulation and spaced apart from the inner walls of the outer vessel is a rigid, high-strength, cylindrical inner vessel impervious to liquid and gaseous substances and having the inner surfaces coated with a layer of cadmium to prevent nuclear criticality. The cadmium is, in turn, lined with a protective shield of high-density urethane for corrosion and wear protection. 2 figs.

  11. Mimicking Mars: A vacuum simulation chamber for testing environmental instrumentation for Mars exploration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sobrado, J. M., E-mail: sobradovj@inta.es; Martín-Soler, J. [Centro de Astrobiología (CAB), INTA-CSIC, Torrejón de Ardoz, 28850 Madrid (Spain)] [Centro de Astrobiología (CAB), INTA-CSIC, Torrejón de Ardoz, 28850 Madrid (Spain); Martín-Gago, J. A. [Centro de Astrobiología (CAB), INTA-CSIC, Torrejón de Ardoz, 28850 Madrid (Spain) [Centro de Astrobiología (CAB), INTA-CSIC, Torrejón de Ardoz, 28850 Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Ciencias de Materiales de Madrid (ICMM-CSIC), Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have built a Mars environmental simulation chamber, designed to test new electromechanical devices and instruments that could be used in space missions. We have developed this environmental system aiming at validating the meteorological station Rover Environment Monitoring Station of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission currently installed on Curiosity rover. The vacuum chamber has been built following a modular configuration and operates at pressures ranging from 1000 to 10{sup ?6} mbars, and it is possible to control the gas composition (the atmosphere) within this pressure range. The device (or sample) under study can be irradiated by an ultraviolet source and its temperature can be controlled in the range from 108 to 423 K. As an important improvement with respect to other simulation chambers, the atmospheric gas into the experimental chamber is cooled at the walls by the use of liquid-nitrogen heat exchangers. This chamber incorporates a dust generation mechanism designed to study Martian-dust deposition while modifying the conditions of temperature, and UV irradiated.

  12. Liquid crystalline composites containing phyllosilicates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaiko, David J.

    2004-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides phyllosilicate-polymer compositions which are useful as liquid crystalline composites. Phyllosilicate-polymer liquid crystalline compositions of the present invention can contain a high percentage of phyllosilicate while at the same time be transparent. Because of the ordering of the particles liquid crystalline composite, liquid crystalline composites are particularly useful as barriers to gas transport.

  13. Oxygen sensor for monitoring gas mixtures containing hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruka, R.J.; Basel, R.A.

    1996-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas sensor measures O{sub 2} content of a reformable monitored gas containing hydrocarbons, H{sub 2}O and/or CO{sub 2}, preferably in association with an electrochemical power generation system. The gas sensor has a housing communicating with the monitored gas environment and carries the monitored gas through an integral catalytic hydrocarbon reforming chamber containing a reforming catalyst, and over a solid electrolyte electrochemical cell used for sensing purposes. The electrochemical cell includes a solid electrolyte between a sensor electrode that is exposed to the monitored gas, and a reference electrode that is isolated in the housing from the monitored gas and is exposed to a reference gas environment. A heating element is also provided in heat transfer communication with the gas sensor. A circuit that can include controls operable to adjust operations via valves or the like is connected between the sensor electrode and the reference electrode to process the electrical signal developed by the electrochemical cell. The electrical signal varies as a measure of the equilibrium oxygen partial pressure of the monitored gas. Signal noise is effectively reduced by maintaining a constant temperature in the area of the electrochemical cell and providing a monitored gas at chemical equilibria when contacting the electrochemical cell. The output gas from the electrochemical cell of the sensor is fed back into the conduits of the power generating system. 4 figs.

  14. Oxygen sensor for monitoring gas mixtures containing hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruka, Roswell J. (Pittsburgh, PA); Basel, Richard A. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas sensor measures O.sub.2 content of a reformable monitored gas containing hydrocarbons H.sub.2 O and/or CO.sub.2, preferably in association with an electrochemical power generation system. The gas sensor has a housing communicating with the monitored gas environment and carries the monitored gas through an integral catalytic hydrocarbon reforming chamber containing a reforming catalyst, and over a solid electrolyte electrochemical cell used for sensing purposes. The electrochemical cell includes a solid electrolyte between a sensor electrode that is exposed to the monitored gas, and a reference electrode that is isolated in the housing from the monitored gas and is exposed to a reference gas environment. A heating element is also provided in heat transfer communication with the gas sensor. A circuit that can include controls operable to adjust operations via valves or the like is connected between the sensor electrode and the reference electrode to process the electrical signal developed by the electrochemical cell. The electrical signal varies as a measure of the equilibrium oxygen partial pressure of the monitored gas. Signal noise is effectively reduced by maintaining a constant temperature in the area of the electrochemical cell and providing a monitored gas at chemical equilibria when contacting the electrochemical cell. The output gas from the electrochemical cell of the sensor is fed back into the conduits of the power generating system.

  15. Statistical Confirmation of a Stellar Upper Mass Limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. S. Oey; C. J. Clarke

    2005-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the expectation value for the maximum stellar mass (m_max) in an ensemble of N stars, as a function of the IMF upper-mass cutoff (m_up) and N. We statistically demonstrate that the upper IMF of the local massive star census observed thus far in the Milky Way and Magellanic Clouds clearly exhibits a universal upper mass cutoff around 120 - 200 M_sun for a Salpeter IMF, although the result is more ambiguous for a steeper IMF.

  16. Effects of outgassing of loader chamber walls on hydriding of thin films for commercial applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Provo, James L., E-mail: jlprovo@verizon.net [Consultant, J.L. Provo Consulting, Trinity, Florida 34655-7179 (United States)

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An important aspect of understanding industrial processing is to know the characteristics of the materials used in such processes. A study was performed to determine the effects of hydriding chamber material on the degree of hydriding for the commercial production of thin film hydride targets for various research universities, commercial companies, and government national laboratories. The goal was to increase the degree of hydriding of various thin film hydrides and to study the vacuum environment during air-exposure hydriding. For this purpose, dynamic residual gas analysis during deuterium gas hydride processing was utilized with erbium thin films, employing a special set-up for direct dynamic hydride gas sampling during processing at elevated temperature and full loading gas pressure. Complete process data for (1) a copper–(1.83?wt.?%)beryllium wet hydrogen fired passivated (600?°C–1?h) externally heated pipe hydriding chamber are reported. Dynamic residual gas analysis comparisons during hydriding are presented for hydriding chambers made from (2) alumina (99.8 wt.?%), (3) copper (with an interior aluminum coating ?10 k Å thick, and (4) for a stainless-steel air-fired passivated (900?°C–1?h) chamber. Dynamic data with deuterium gas in the chamber at the hydriding temperature (450?°C) showed the presence and growth of water vapor (D{sub 2}O) and related mixed ion species(H{sub 2}O{sup +}, HDO{sup +}, D{sub 2}O{sup +}, and OD{sup +}) from hydrogen isotope exchange reactions during the 1?h process time. Peaks at mass-to-charge ratios (i.e., m/e) of 12(C{sup +}), 16(CD{sub 2}{sup +}), 17(CHD{sub 2}{sup +}), and 18(CD{sub 3}{sup +}, OD{sup +}) increased for approximately the first half hour of a 1?h hydriding process and then approach steady state. Mass-to-charge peaks at 19(HDO{sup +}) and 20(D{sub 2}O{sup +}) continue to increase throughout the process cycle. Using the m/e?=?20 (D{sub 2}O{sup +}) peak intensity from chamber (1)–Cu(1.83 wt.?%)Be as a standard, the peak intensity from chamber (4)—stainless-steel (air-fired) was 7.1× higher, indicating that the surface of stainless-steel had a larger concentration of reactive oxygen and/or water than hydrogen. The (D{sub 2}O{sup +}) peak intensity from chamber (3)—Cu (interior Al coating) was 1.55× larger and chamber (2)—alumina(99.8%) was 1.33× higher than Cu(1.83 wt.?%)Be. Thus copper–(1.83 wt.?%)beryllium was the best hydriding chamber material studied followed closely by the alumina (99.8 wt.?%) chamber. Gas take-up by Er occluder targets processed in Cu(1.83?wt.?%)Be hydriding chambers (i.e., gas/metal atomic ratios) correlate with the dynamic RGA data.

  17. Front-end Electronics Test for the LHCb Muon Wire Chambers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nobrega, R; Carboni, G; Massafferri, A; Santovetti, E

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the apparatus and procedures implemented to test Multi Wire Proportional Chambers (MWPC) after front-end assembly for the LHCb Muon Detector. Results of measurements of key noise parameters are also described. Given a fully equipped chamber, this system is able to diagnose every channel performing an analysis of front-end output drivers’ response and noise rate versus threshold. Besides, it allows to assess if the noise rate at the experiment threshold region is within appropriate limits. Aiming at an automatic, fast and user-friendly system for mass production tests of MWPC, the project has foreseen as well electronic identification of every chamber and front-end board, and data archiving in such a way to make it available to the Experiment Control System (ECS) while in operation.

  18. Test Facility for Full-Equipped Chambers for the LHCb Muon Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nóbrega, Rafael

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The LHCb Muon System is made up by more than 1300 chambers of 20 different types, resulting in more than 120k readout channels. In order to guarantee high-quality performance during the experiment it is of crucial importance to get a complete knowledge of the fully equipped detector functionalities.A complete test system was built and a C++ ROOT software was developed to allow carring out a variety of studies on the many LHCb Muon chambers. Such system provides full control of the frontend, the high-voltage and the acquisition electronics and makes available a number of procedures to study the chambersâ?? performance. It was used for studies and a quality control on the chambers before and during the final positioning on the detector. In this note an overview of the hardware setup and of the software will be given. Results of measurements related to front-end channels characteristics will be presented.

  19. The High Momentum Spectrometer Drift Chambers in Hall C at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vulcan, William; Kross, Brian; Beaufait, Joseph; Baker, O.; Carlini, Roger; Majewski, Stanislaw; Johnson, A.; McCauley, A.; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; Cha, Jinseok; Shin, Taeksu; Naing, Win; Danagoulian, Samuel

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mutiwire drift chambers to be used in the High Momentum Spectrometer (HMS) at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) have been designed and constructed, and recently employed in initial data-taking runs.These chambers are used to reconstruct scattered charged particle momenta in the HMS using 12C and BeO2 targets for incident electron energies up to 2.2 GeV.Offline analysis of the data indicate that these drift chambers have spatial resolution (per plane) of about 115 mu-m (sigma) in rates approaching a KHz/wire/mm.It is expected that this performance will improve at higher momenta where multiple scattering contributions are smaller.

  20. UCRL-JC-138507 Overview of IFE Chamber and Target Technologies R&D in the U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tillack, Mark

    ]) with heavy ion driven, indirect-drive targets, and the other is the gas-protected, dry-wall chamber (e with heavy-ion driven, indirect-drive targets are: a) Chamber Clearing: Can the liquid pocket and beam portUCRL-JC-138507 1 Overview of IFE Chamber and Target Technologies R&D in the U.S. W.R. Meier 1), M

  1. March 8, 2001 A. R. Raffray, et al., Assessment of Carbon and Tungsten Dry Chamber Walls under IFE Energy Depositions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    Chamber Walls under IFE Energy Depositions Ion Energy Deposition Calculations Electronic stopping power., Assessment of Carbon and Tungsten Dry Chamber Walls under IFE Energy Depositions Photon and Ion Attenuation for Ions Based on Given Spectrum and 6.5 m Chamber 0.0E+00 1.0E+13 2.0E+13 3.0E+13 4.0E+13 5.0E+13 6.0E+13

  2. Construction and test of high precision drift-tube (sMDT) chambers for the ATLAS muon spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sebastian Nowak; Oliver Korner; Hubert Kroha; Philipp Schwegler; Federico Sforza

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the upgrade of the ATLAS muon spectrometer in March 2014 new muon tracking chambers (sMDT) with drift-tubes of 15 mm diameter, half of the value of the standard ATLAS Monitored Drift-Tubes (MDT) chambers, and 10~$\\mu$m positioning accuracy of the sense wires have been constructed. The new chambers are designed to be fully compatible with the present ATLAS services but, with respect to the previously installed ATLAS MDT chambers, they are assembled in a more compact geometry and they deploy two additional tube layers that provide redundant rack information. The chambers are composed of 8 layers of in total 624 aluminium drift-tubes. The assembly of a chamber is completed within a week. A semi-automatized production line is used for the assembly of the drift-tubes prior to the chamber assembly. The production procedures and the quality control tests of the single components and of the complete chambers will be discussed. The wire position in the completed chambers have been measured by using a coordinate measuring machine.

  3. Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chambers as a Time-of-Flight System for the PHENIX Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Velkovska, Julia [Vanderbilt University] [Vanderbilt University

    2013-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In this project a Time-of-Flight detector based on multi-gap resistive plate chambers was built and installed for the PHENIX experiment at RHIC.

  4. AN X-RAY ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY STUDY OF MANGANESE CONTAINING COMPOUNDS AND PHOTOSYNTHETIC SPINACH CHLOROPLASTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, Jon Allan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    dictate the usage of ion chambers for the measurement of rmonitoring front r 0 ion chamber is necessary to correct thebe substituted for the rear ion chamber. How- ever, under

  5. Selection of dimensions for the accelerating chamber of a betatron with extraction of an electron beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakhlov, V.L.; Kashovskii, V.V.; Pushin, V.S.

    1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors discuss the results of refinement of the dynamics of particles of a beam extracted from a betatron, a refinement which has made it possible to select the main dimensions of the accelerating chamber. Expressions are obtained which make it possible to determine the chamber dimensions and the profile of the extraction window from the distribution of the magnetic field of the betatron. It is shown that proper selection of the dimensions will increase the dose rate at the exit from the magnetic core of the accelerator.

  6. Wafer chamber having a gas curtain for extreme-UV lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kanouff, Michael P. (Livermore, CA); Ray-Chaudhuri, Avijit K. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An EUVL device includes a wafer chamber that is separated from the upstream optics by a barrier having an aperture that is permeable to the inert gas. Maintaining an inert gas curtain in the proximity of a wafer positioned in a chamber of an extreme ultraviolet lithography device can effectively prevent contaminants from reaching the optics in an extreme ultraviolet photolithography device even though solid window filters are not employed between the source of reflected radiation, e.g., the camera, and the wafer. The inert gas removes the contaminants by entrainment.

  7. Calibration and performance of a secondary emission chamber as a beam intensity monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sivertz, M.; Chiang, I-H,; Rusek, A.

    2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a study of the behavior of a secondary emission chamber (SEC). We show the dependence of the SEC signal on the charge and velocity of the primary beam for beams of protons, and heavy ions including Helium, Neon, Chlorine and Iron. We fill the SEC with a selection of different gases including Hydrogen, Helium, Nitrogen, Argon, and air, studying the SEC response when it is acting as an ion chamber. We also investigate the behavior of the SEC at intermediate pressures between 10{sup -8} torr and atmospheric pressure. The SEC uses thin conducting foils as the source and collector of electrons in a vacuum chamber. When charged particles traverse the vacuum chamber, they pass through a series of thin conducting foils, alternating anode and cathode. Ionization produced in the cathode foils travels across the intervening gap due to an applied high voltage and is collected on the anode foils. Electron production is very inefficient because most of the ionization in the foils remains trapped within the foil due to the short range of most delta-rays and the work function of the foil. It is this inefficiency that allows the SEC to operate at high dose rates and short pulse duration where the standard ion chambers cannot function reliably. The SEC was placed in the NSRL ion beam to receive a variety of heavy ion beams under different beam conditions. We used these ion beams to study the response of the SEC to different species of heavy ion, comparing with proton beams. We studied the response to beam of different energies, and as a function of different counting rate. We compared the behaviour of the SEC when operating under positive and negative high voltage. The SEC can operate as an ion chamber if it is filled with gas. We measured the response of the SEC when filled with a variety of gases, from Hydrogen to Helium, Nitrogen, Argon and air. The performance of the SEC as an ion chamber is compared with the standard NSRL ion chamber, QC3. By evacuating the SEC and filling it with Nitrogen through an adjustable leak valve, we were able to measure the response of the SEC to beam as a function of gas pressure. Many interesting features of the SEC were revealed in these tests.

  8. A study of the response of a gas ionization chamber to different sources of ionizing radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zamble?-Die?guez, Filiberto Edmundo

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ; is the effective average energy to produce one pair (for values, see Table I). Charged particles produced by ionization lose their energy rather quickly in multiple collisions with the gas molecules and assume the thermal energy distribution of the gas. When... of aluminum extrusion ionization chambers to this kind of radiation was investigated. Also, since the TAMU counter is a prototype (1 in x 7in x 7in) of the chambers installed at CDF (1 in x 84in x 84in), the pad-to-wire signal ratio had to be measured...

  9. Design and performance testing of the read-out boards for the CMS-DT chambers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernández, C; Marin, J; Oller, J C; Willmott, C

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Read-out boards (ROB) are one of the key elements of readout system for CMS barrel muon drift chambers. To insure proper and reliable operation under all detector environmental conditions an exhaustive set of tests have been developed and performed on the 30 pre-series ROB's before production starts. These tests include operation under CMS radiation conditions to detect and estimate SEU rates, validation with real chamber signals and trigger rates, studies of time resolution and linearity, crosstalk analysis, track pattern generation for calibration and on-line tests, and temperature cycling to uncover marginal conditions. We present the status of the ROB and tests results. (5 refs).

  10. IFE thick liquid wall chamber dynamics: Governing mechanisms andmodeling and experimental capabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raffray, A.R.; Meier, W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.; Bonazza, R.; Calderoni, P.; Debonnel, C.S.; Dragojlovic, Z.; El-Guebaly, L.; Haynes,D.; Latkowski, J.; Olson, C.; Peterson, P.F.; Reyes, S.; Sharpe, P.; Tillack, M.S.; Zaghloul, M.

    2005-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    For thick liquid wall concepts, it is important to understand the different mechanisms affecting the chamber dynamics and the state of the chamber prior to each shot a compared with requirements from the driver and target. These include ablation mechanisms, vapor transport and control, possible aerosol formation, as well as protective jet behavior. This paper was motivated by a town meeting on this subject which helped identify the major issues, assess the latest results, review the capabilities of existing modeling and experimental facilities with respect to addressing remaining issues, and helping guide future analysis and R&D efforts; the paper covers these exact points.

  11. Liquid crystalline composites containing phyllosilicates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaiko; David J. (Naperville, IL)

    2007-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides barrier films having reduced gas permeability for use in packaging and coating applications. The barrier films comprise an anisotropic liquid crystalline composite layer formed from phyllosilicate-polymer compositions. Phyllosilicate-polymer liquid crystalline compositions of the present invention can contain a high percentage of phyllosilicate while remaining transparent. Because of the ordering of the particles in the liquid crystalline composite, barrier films comprising liquid crystalline composites are particularly useful as barriers to gas transport.

  12. Spacetimes containing slowly evolving horizons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Kavanagh; I. Booth

    2006-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Slowly evolving horizons are trapping horizons that are "almost" isolated horizons. This paper reviews their definition and discusses several spacetimes containing such structures. These include certain Vaidya and Tolman-Bondi solutions as well as (perturbatively) tidally distorted black holes. Taking into account the associated mass scales, they also suggest that slowly evolving horizons are the norm rather than the exception in astrophysical processes that involve stellar-scale black holes.

  13. Copper-containing zeolite catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Price, G.L.; Kanazirev, V.

    1996-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A catalyst useful in the conversion of nitrogen oxides or in the synthesis of nitriles or imines from amines, is formed by preparing an intimate mechanical mixture of a copper (II)-containing species, such as CuO or CuCl{sub 2}, or elemental copper, with a zeolite having a pore mouth comprising 10 oxygen atoms, such as ZSM-5, converting the elemental copper or copper (II) to copper (I), and driving the copper (I) into the zeolite.

  14. Copper-containing zeolite catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Price, Geoffrey L. (Baton Rouge, LA); Kanazirev, Vladislav (Sofia, BG)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A catalyst useful in the conversion of nitrogen oxides or in the synthesis of nitriles or imines from amines, formed by preparing an intimate mechanical mixture of a copper (II)-containing species, such as CuO or CuCl.sub.2, or elemental copper, with a zeolite having a pore mouth comprising 10 oxygen atoms, such as ZSM-5, converting the elemental copper or copper (II) to copper (I), and driving the copper (I) into the zeolite.

  15. Upper bounds on minimum distance of nonbinary quantum stabilizer codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Santosh

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The most popular class of quantum error correcting codes is stabilizer codes. Binary quantum stabilizer codes have been well studied, and Calderbank, Rains, Shor and Sloane (July 1998) have constructed a table of upper bounds on the minimum distance...

  16. Characterization of Sea Turtle Nesting on the Upper Texas Coast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Christi Lynn

    2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Nearly annual record Kemp’s ridley sea turtle (Lepidochelys kempii) nesting activity on the upper Texas coast (UTC; defined as beaches from Sabine Pass to Matagorda Peninsula), where scientifically verifiable nesting commenced in 2002, has occurred...

  17. Improvable upper bounds to the piezoelectric polaron ground state energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Soldatov

    2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    It was shown that an infinite sequence of improving non-increasing upper bounds to the ground state energy (GSE) of a slow-moving piezoeletric polaron can be devised.

  18. Hydrology and Glaciers in the Upper Indus Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Winston

    Examines the state of the science associated with the snow and ice hydrology in the Upper Indus Basin (IUB), reviewing the literature and data available on the present and projected role of glaciers, snow fields, and stream ...

  19. Floristic study of the Upper Frio River, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swihart, Theresa Irene

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Vascular plant collections and field data compiled during a one and a half year period for the upper Frio River, Texas, produced a flora that comprises 78 families, 223 genera and 319 species. Vascular plants were collected ...

  20. Dye laser amplifier including a dye cell contained within a support vessel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davin, J.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large (high flow rate) dye laser amplifier in which a continuous replenished supply of dye is excited by a first light beam, specifically a copper vapor laser beam, in order to amplify the intensity of a second different light beam, specifically a dye beam, passing through the dye is disclosed herein. This amplifier includes a dye cell defining a dye chamber through which a continuous stream of dye is caused to pass at a flow rate of greater than 30 gallons/minute at a static pressure greater than 150 pounds/square inch and a specifically designed support vessel for containing the dye cell. 6 figs.

  1. Development of weld closure stations for plutonium long-term storage containers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernandez, R.; Martinez, D.A.; Martinez, H.E.; Nelson, T.O.; Ortega, R.E.; Rofer, C.K.; Romero, W.; Stewart, J.; Trujillo, V.L.

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Weld closure stations for plutonium long-term storage containers have been designed, fabricated, and tested for the Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES) at the TA-55 Plutonium Facility of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. ARIES is a processing system used for the dismantlement of the plutonium pits from nuclear weapons. ARIES prepares the extracted-plutonium in a form which is compatible with long-term storage and disposition options and meets international inspection requirements. The processed plutonium is delivered to the canning module of the ARIES line, where it is packaged in a stainless steel container. This container is then packaged in a secondary container for long-term storage. Each of the containers is hermetically sealed with a full penetration weld closure that meets the requirements of the ASME Section IX Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. Welding is performed with a gas tungsten arc process in an inert atmosphere of helium. The encapsulated helium in the nested containers allows for leak testing the weld closure and container. The storage package was designed to meet packaging requirements of DOE Standard 3013-96 for long-term storage of plutonium metal and oxides. Development of the process parameters, weld fixture, weld qualification, and the welding chambers is discussed in this paper.

  2. Geology, volcanology and geochemistry Drainage pattern and regional morphostructure at Melka Kunture (Upper Awash, Ethiopia) ........................83

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    at Melka Kunture (Upper Awash, Ethiopia) ........................83 Guillaume Bardin, Jean-Paul Raynal, Guy Kieffer Volcanic markers in coarse alluvium at Melka Kunture (Upper Awash, Ethiopia (Upper Awash, Ethiopia) ....................................................103 Gérard Poupeau, Guy

  3. MicroBooNE, A Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) Neutrino Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katori, Teppei

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid Argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) is a promising detector technology for future neutrino experiments. MicroBooNE is a upcoming LArTPC neutrino experiment which will be located on-axis of Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB) at Fermilab, USA. The R&D efforts on this detection method and related neutrino interaction measurements are discussed.

  4. OPERATIONAL WINDOWS FOR DRY-WALL AND WETTED-WALL IFE CHAMBERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    subsystems was performed parametrically to uncover key physics/technology uncertainties and to iden- tify be necessary that may preclude propagation of the laser driver and require assisted pinch transport issue for wetted-wall concepts. KEYWORDS: inertial fusion, fusion technology, IFE chambers *E

  5. Effect of nitrate on the performance of single chamber air cathode microbial fuel cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Effect of nitrate on the performance of single chamber air cathode microbial fuel cells Chontisa Accepted 26 August 2008 Published online 11 September 2008 Keywords: Microbial fuel cell Denitrification microbial fuel cells (MFCs) has drawn much attention recently as a new approach of waste- water treatment

  6. Tungsten as first wall material in the main chamber of ASDEX Upgrade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tungsten as first wall material in the main chamber of ASDEX Upgrade V. Rohde, R. Neu, A. Geier, R material is tungsten, which has a high melting point, low erosion rate in cold scrape off layer plasma, where the present ITER-FEAT design uses tungsten. No negative influence on the plasma performance, even

  7. A UNIFIED MODEL FOR ION DEPOSITION AND THERMOMECHANICAL RESPONSE IN DRY WALL LASER IFE CHAMBERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    . INTRODUCTION In order to permit the design of an economically viable IFE power plant, we require a chamber wall reach the wall. These threats, consisting of x- rays, ions, and neutrons, can lead to wall failure associated with the IFE threats. In some cases, these inertial effects lead to stress waves that can lead

  8. Hydrogen production using single-chamber membrane-free microbial electrolysis cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Hydrogen production using single-chamber membrane-free microbial electrolysis cells Hongqiang Hu Received in revised form 13 June 2008 Accepted 17 June 2008 Published online - Keywords: Hydrogen Microbial electrohydrogenesis provides a new approach for hydrogen generation from renewable biomass. Membranes were used in all

  9. Hydrogen production in single-chamber tubular microbial electrolysis cells using non-precious-metal catalysts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Hydrogen production in single-chamber tubular microbial electrolysis cells using non August 2009 Keywords: Hydrogen production Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) NiMo NiW Cathode catalystMo cathode accomplished a hydrogen production rate of 2.0 m3 /day/m3 at current density of 270 A/m3 (12 A/m2

  10. A high-resolution drift chamber for Alpha-particle position measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Jon Patrick

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A drift chamber module with 5 anode wires covering an active region of 9 cm x 76 cm has been built to locate the vertical position of a-particle trajectories to within 295 mm full-width-half-maximum (FWEM) in isobutane at a pressure of 0.25 atm...

  11. Report on Fission Time Projection Chamber M3FT-12IN0210052

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James K. Jewell

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Time Projection Chamber is a collaborative effort to implement an innovative approach and deliver unprecedented fission measurements to DOE programs. This 4?-detector system will provide unrivaled 3-D data about the fission process. Shown here is a half populated TPC (2?) at the LLNL TPC laboratory as it undergoes testing before being shipped to LANSCE for beam experiments.

  12. Assessment of the high temperature fission chamber technology for the French fast reactor program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jammes, C.; Filliatre, P.; Geslot, B.; Domenech, T.; Normand, S. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, CEA (France)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High temperature fission chambers are key instruments for the control and protection of the sodium-cooled fast reactor. First, the developments of those neutron detectors, which are carried out either in France or abroad are reviewed. Second, the French realizations are assessed with the use of the technology readiness levels in order to identify tracks of improvement. (authors)

  13. Increased performance of single-chamber microbial fuel cells using an improved cathode structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Increased performance of single-chamber microbial fuel cells using an improved cathode structure Maximum power densities by air-driven microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are considerably influenced by cathode reserved. Keywords: Microbial fuel cell; Air cathode; Diffusion layer; PTFE coating; Coulombic efficiency 1

  14. Neutronics Assessment of Blanket Options for the HAPL Laser Inertial Fusion Energy Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    -cooled lithium blanket, a helium-cooled solid breeder blanket, and a dual-coolant lithium lead blanket of the reference blanket. Keywords-Laser fusion; lithium blanket; solid breeder; lithium lead; tritium breedingNeutronics Assessment of Blanket Options for the HAPL Laser Inertial Fusion Energy Chamber M

  15. Development of fast heating electron beam annealing setup for ultra high vacuum chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Sadhan Chandra [UGC-DAE Consortium For Scientific Research, University Campus, Khandwa Road, Indore 452 001, MP (India) [UGC-DAE Consortium For Scientific Research, University Campus, Khandwa Road, Indore 452 001, MP (India); School of Electronics, Devi Ahilya University, Indore 452001, MP (India); Institute of Physics, University of Greifswald, Felix Hausdroff Str. 6 (Germany); Majumdar, Abhijit, E-mail: majuabhijit@gmail.com, E-mail: majumdar@uni-greifswald.de; Hippler, R. [Institute of Physics, University of Greifswald, Felix Hausdroff Str. 6 (Germany)] [Institute of Physics, University of Greifswald, Felix Hausdroff Str. 6 (Germany); Katiyal, Sumant [School of Electronics, Devi Ahilya University, Indore 452001, MP (India)] [School of Electronics, Devi Ahilya University, Indore 452001, MP (India); Shripathi, T. [UGC-DAE Consortium For Scientific Research, University Campus, Khandwa Road, Indore 452 001, MP (India)] [UGC-DAE Consortium For Scientific Research, University Campus, Khandwa Road, Indore 452 001, MP (India)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the design and development of a simple, electrically low powered and fast heating versatile electron beam annealing setup (up to 1000?°C) working with ultra high vacuum (UHV) chamber for annealing thin films and multilayer structures. The important features of the system are constant temperature control in UHV conditions for the temperature range from room temperature to 1000?ºC with sufficient power of 330 W, at constant vacuum during annealing treatment. It takes approximately 6 min to reach 1000?°C from room temperature (?10{sup ?6} mbar) and 45 min to cool down without any extra cooling. The annealing setup consists of a UHV chamber, sample holder, heating arrangement mounted on suitable UHV electrical feed-through and electronic control and feedback systems to control the temperature within ±1?ºC of set value. The outside of the vacuum chamber is cooled by cold air of 20?°C of air conditioning machine used for the laboratory, so that chamber temperature does not go beyond 50?°C when target temperature is maximum. The probability of surface oxidation or surface contamination during annealing is examined by means of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of virgin Cu sample annealed at 1000?°C.

  16. Transient blocking in multi-chamber natural ventilation M. R. Flynn and C. P. Caulfield

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flynn, Morris R.

    , the system must evolve towards a ventilated terminal state in which there is outflow of buoyant fluid (inflowTransient blocking in multi-chamber natural ventilation M. R. Flynn and C. P. Caulfield Dept-energy `natural' ventilation offers an environmental benefit over building ventilation by high

  17. Chamber Technology Goals Used in APEX to Calibrate New Ideas and Measure Progress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    Chamber Technology Goals Used in APEX to Calibrate New Ideas and Measure Progress 1. High Power a subset will be remarkable progress for fusion #12;Innovative concepts proposed by APEX can extend Alloys evaluated: W-alloy selected ·Helium cooling and Li boiling evaluated ·SiC/SiC-LiPb limits

  18. Numerical Analysis of a one dimensional Diffusion Equation for a single chamber Microbial Fuel Cell using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    dimensional Diffusion Equation to model oxygen in a single chamber MFC. A rigorous verification of the effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 5 Model Application 13 #12;Advanced Numerical Methods Zielke iii 5.1 System Configuration May 5, 2006 #12;Abstract Renewable energy (RE) applications are becoming a popular means of power

  19. Multi-property characterization chamber for geophysical-hydrological investigations of hydrate bearing sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seol, Yongkoo, E-mail: Yongkoo.Seol@netl.doe.gov; Choi, Jeong-Hoon; Dai, Sheng [National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy, Morgantown, West Virginia 26507 (United States)

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the increase in the interest of producing natural gas from methane hydrates as well as potential risks of massive hydrate dissociation in the context of global warming, studies have recently shifted from pure hydrate crystals to hydrates in sediments. Such a research focus shift requires a series of innovative laboratory devices that are capable of investigating various properties of hydrate-bearing sediments (HBS). This study introduces a newly developed high pressure testing chamber, i.e., multi-property characterization chamber (MPCC), that allows simultaneous investigation of a series of fundamental properties of HBS, including small-strain stiffness (i.e., P- and S-waves), shear strength, large-strain deformation, stress-volume responses, and permeability. The peripheral coolant circulation system of the MPCC permits stable and accurate temperature control, while the core holder body, made of aluminum, enables X-ray computer tomography scanning to be easily employed for structural and morphological characterization of specimens. Samples of hydrate-bearing sediments are held within a rubber sleeve inside the chamber. The thick sleeve is more durable and versatile than thin membranes while also being much softer than oedometer-type chambers that are incapable of enabling flow tests. Bias introduced by the rubber sleeve during large deformation tests are also calibrated both theoretically and experimentally. This system provides insight into full characterization of hydrate-bearing sediments in the laboratory, as well as pressure core technology in the field.

  20. Four-Button BPM Coefficients in Cylindrical and Elliptic Beam Chambers February 17, 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    Four-Button BPM Coefficients in Cylindrical and Elliptic Beam Chambers S. H. Kim February 17, 1999 Beam position monitor (BPM) coefficients are calculated from induced charges on four-button BPMs ring is different from an exact elliptic geometry, numerical values of the BPM coefficients

  1. ForPeerReview A climate-controlled whole-tree chamber system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    to impose combinations of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentra- tion, [CO2], and air temperature treatments in the ambient [CO2] chambers was too low to be maintained during winter because of tree dormancy and the high natural increase in [CO2] over winter at high latitudes such as the Flakaliden site. Accurate control over

  2. Geothermally heated Chamber of Commerce offices at Marlin, Texas. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of an existing, low temperature, geothermal resource to heat the Chamber of Commerce offices in Marlin, Texas is described. A secondary purpose of the project is to attract new industries and businesses to Marlin via this alternate energy show-piece demonstration of a simple and practical application of Texas' low temperature geothermal resource.

  3. THERMO FLUID DYNAMICS AND CHAMBER AEROSOL BEHAVIOR FOR THIN LIQUID WALL UNDER IFE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    control. In determining the con- ditions of the chamber gas and0or vapor prior to each shot, and condensation to the wall. These issues were analyzed in detail as part of the ARIES-IFE study3 for different formation are discussed. A scoping analysis

  4. Rigid zeolite containing polyurethane foams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frost, C.B.

    1984-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A closed cell rigid polyurethane foam has been prepared which contains up to about 60% by weight of molecular sieves capable of sorbing molecules with effective critical diameters of up to about 10 A. The molecular sieve component of the foam can be preloaded with catalysts or with reactive compounds that can be released upon activation of the foam to control and complete crosslinking after the foam is formed. The foam can also be loaded with water or other flame-retarding agents, after completion. Up to about 50% of the weight of the isocyanate component of the foam can be replaced by polyimide resin precursors for incorporation into the final polymeric network.

  5. Treatment of mercury containing waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kalb, Paul D. (Wading River, NY); Melamed, Dan (Gaithersburg, MD); Patel, Bhavesh R (Elmhurst, NY); Fuhrmann, Mark (Babylon, NY)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is provided for the treatment of mercury containing waste in a single reaction vessel which includes a) stabilizing the waste with sulfur polymer cement under an inert atmosphere to form a resulting mixture and b) encapsulating the resulting mixture by heating the mixture to form a molten product and casting the molten product as a monolithic final waste form. Additional sulfur polymer cement can be added in the encapsulation step if needed, and a stabilizing additive can be added in the process to improve the leaching properties of the waste form.

  6. Split ring containment attachment device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sammel, Alfred G. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A containment attachment device 10 for operatively connecting a glovebag 200 to plastic sheeting 100 covering hazardous material. The device 10 includes an inner split ring member 20 connected on one end 22 to a middle ring member 30 wherein the free end 21 of the split ring member 20 is inserted through a slit 101 in the plastic sheeting 100 to captively engage a generally circular portion of the plastic sheeting 100. A collar potion 41 having an outer ring portion 42 is provided with fastening means 51 for securing the device 10 together wherein the glovebag 200 is operatively connected to the collar portion 41.

  7. Rigid zeolite containing polyurethane foams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frost, Charles B. (Livermore, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A closed cell rigid polyurethane foam has been prepared which contains up to about 60% by weight of molecular sieves capable of sorbing molecules with effective critical diameters of up to about 10 .ANG.. The molecular sieve component of the foam can be preloaded with catalysts or with reactive compounds that can be released upon activation of the foam to control and complete crosslinking after the foam is formed. The foam can also be loaded with water or other flame-retarding agents, after completion. Up to about 50% of the weight of the isocyanate component of the foam can be replaced by polyimide resin precursors for incorporation into the final polymeric network.

  8. Contained Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew| OpenCongress,ConsolidatedContained Energy Jump to:

  9. Molecular Characterization of Nitrogen Containing Organic Compounds...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nitrogen Containing Organic Compounds in Biomass Burning Aerosols Using High Resolution Mass Molecular Characterization of Nitrogen Containing Organic Compounds in Biomass Burning...

  10. A SEMIDEFINITE HIERARCHY FOR CONTAINMENT OF ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    problems to decide the containment question. Our point of departure is to formulate the containment problem in terms of polynomial matrix inequalities (

  11. acute non-variceal upper: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    upper layer model Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary: Evaluation 65 Chapter 4 OSI Upper Layer Architecture and Model: Evaluation In this chapter the...

  12. Processing of solid mixed waste containing radioactive and hazardous materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gotovchikov, V.T.; Ivanov, A.V.; Filippov, E.A.

    1998-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for the continuous heating and melting of a solid mixed waste bearing radioactive and hazardous materials to form separate metallic, slag and gaseous phases for producing compact forms of the waste material to facilitate disposal includes a copper split water-cooled (cold) crucible as a reaction vessel for receiving the waste material. The waste material is heated by means of the combination of a plasma torch directed into the open upper portion of the cold crucible and an electromagnetic flux produced by induction coils disposed about the crucible which is transparent to electromagnetic fields. A metallic phase of the waste material is formed in a lower portion of the crucible and is removed in the form of a compact ingot suitable for recycling and further processing. A glass-like, non-metallic slag phase containing radioactive elements is also formed in the crucible and flows out of the open upper portion of the crucible into a slag ingot mold for disposal. The decomposition products of the organic and toxic materials are incinerated and converted to environmentally safe gases in the melter. 6 figs.

  13. Processing of solid mixed waste containing radioactive and hazardous materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gotovchikov, Vitaly T. (Moscow, RU); Ivanov, Alexander V. (Moscow, RU); Filippov, Eugene A. (Moscow, RU)

    1998-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for the continuous heating and melting of a solid mixed waste bearing radioactive and hazardous materials to form separate metallic, slag and gaseous phases for producing compact forms of the waste material to facilitate disposal includes a copper split water-cooled (cold) crucible as a reaction vessel for receiving the waste material. The waste material is heated by means of the combination of a plasma torch directed into the open upper portion of the cold crucible and an electromagnetic flux produced by induction coils disposed about the crucible which is transparent to electromagnetic fields. A metallic phase of the waste material is formed in a lower portion of the crucible and is removed in the form of a compact ingot suitable for recycling and further processing. A glass-like, non-metallic slag phase containing radioactive elements is also formed in the crucible and flows out of the open upper portion of the crucible into a slag ingot mold for disposal. The decomposition products of the organic and toxic materials are incinerated and converted to environmentally safe gases in the melter.

  14. Probabilistic Analysis of a Monod-type equation by use of a single chamber Microbial Fuel Cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Probabilistic Analysis of a Monod-type equation by use of a single chamber Microbial Fuel Cell Eric for our society. Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) represent a new form of renewable energy by converting of a single chamber Microbial Fuel Cell affect the power density produced in the Microbial Fuel Cell

  15. Anode-supported thin-film fuel cells operated in a single chamber configuration 2T-I-12

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haile, Sossina M.

    on the anode, producing a complex response in fuel cell power output. Under optimized gas compositions and flowAnode-supported thin-film fuel cells operated in a single chamber configuration 2T-I-12 Zongping of anode-supported, thin-film, single chamber fuel cells (SCFCs) have been investigated. Cells, in which Ni

  16. LIFE Chamber Chemical Equilibrium Simulations with Additive Hydrogen, Oxygen, and Nitrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeMuth, J A; Simon, A J

    2009-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to enable continuous operation of a Laser Inertial confinement Fusion Energy (LIFE) engine, the material (fill-gas and debris) in the fusion chamber must be carefully managed. The chamber chemical equilibrium compositions for post-shot mixtures are evaluated to determine what compounds will be formed at temperatures 300-5000K. It is desired to know if carbon and or lead will deposit on the walls of the chamber, and if so: at what temperature, and what elements can be added to prevent this from happening. The simulation was conducted using the chemical equilibrium solver Cantera with a Matlab front-end. Solutions were obtained by running equilibrations at constant temperature and constant specific volume over the specified range of temperatures. It was found that if nothing is done, carbon will deposit on the walls once it cools to below 2138K, and lead below 838K. Three solutions to capture the carbon were found: adding pure oxygen, hydrogen/nitrogen combo, and adding pure nitrogen. The best of these was the addition of oxygen which would readily form CO at around 4000K. To determine the temperature at which carbon would deposit on the walls, temperature solutions to evaporation rate equations needed to be found. To determine how much carbon or any species was in the chamber at a given time, chamber flushing equations needed to be developed. Major concerns are deposition of carbon and/or oxygen on the tungsten walls forming tungsten oxides or tungsten carbide which could cause embrittlement and cause failure of the first wall. Further research is needed.

  17. Large panel design for containment air baffle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Richard S. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The movable air baffle shield means in accordance with the present invention provides an efficient method of cooling the space surrounding the containment vessel while also providing the capability of being moved away from the containment vessel during inspection. The containment apparatus comprises a generally cylindrical sealed containment vessel for containing at least a portion of a nuclear power generation plant, a disparate shield building surrounding and housing the containment vessel therein and spaced outwardly thereof so as to form an air annulus in the space between the shield building and the containment vessel, a shield baffle means positioned in the air annulus around at least a portion of the sides of the containment vessel providing a coolant path between the baffle means and the containment vessel to permit cooling of the containment vessel by air, the shield baffle means being movable to afford access to the containment vessel.

  18. Large panel design for containment air baffle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, R.S.

    1992-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The movable air baffle shield means in accordance with the present invention provides an efficient method of cooling the space surrounding the containment vessel while also providing the capability of being moved away from the containment vessel during inspection. The containment apparatus comprises a generally cylindrical sealed containment vessel for containing at least a portion of a nuclear power generation plant, a disparate shield building surrounding and housing the containment vessel therein and spaced outwardly thereof so as to form an air annulus in the space between the shield building and the containment vessel, a shield baffle means positioned in the air annulus around at least a portion of the sides of the containment vessel providing a coolant path between the baffle means and the containment vessel to permit cooling of the containment vessel by air, the shield baffle means being movable to afford access to the containment vessel. 9 figs.

  19. Atmospheric cloud water contains a diverse bacterial community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kourtev, P. S.; Hill, Kimberly A.; Shepson, Paul B.; Konopka, Allan

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric cloud water contains an active microbial community which can impact climate, human health and ecosystem processes in terrestrial and aquatic systems. Most studies on the composition of microbial communities in clouds have been performed with orographic clouds that are typically in direct contact with the ground. We collected water samples from cumulus clouds above the upper U.S. Midwest. The cloud water was analyzed for the diversity of bacterial phylotypes by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. DGGE analyses of bacterial communities detected 17e21 bands per sample. Sequencing confirmed the presence of a diverse bacterial community; sequences from seven bacterial phyla were retrieved. Cloud water bacterial communities appeared to be dominated by members of the cyanobacteria, proteobacteria, actinobacteria and firmicutes.

  20. Monte Carlo calculations for reference dosimetry of electron beams with the PTW Roos and NE2571 ion chambers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muir, B. R., E-mail: bmuir@physics.carleton.ca; Rogers, D. W. O., E-mail: drogers@physics.carleton.ca [Physics Department, Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada)] [Physics Department, Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate recommendations for reference dosimetry of electron beams and gradient effects for the NE2571 chamber and to provide beam quality conversion factors using Monte Carlo simulations of the PTW Roos and NE2571 ion chambers. Methods: The EGSnrc code system is used to calculate the absorbed dose-to-water and the dose to the gas in fully modeled ion chambers as a function of depth in water. Electron beams are modeled using realistic accelerator simulations as well as beams modeled as collimated point sources from realistic electron beam spectra or monoenergetic electrons. Beam quality conversion factors are calculated with ratios of the doses to water and to the air in the ion chamber in electron beams and a cobalt-60 reference field. The overall ion chamber correction factor is studied using calculations of water-to-air stopping power ratios. Results: The use of an effective point of measurement shift of 1.55 mm from the front face of the PTW Roos chamber, which places the point of measurement inside the chamber cavity, minimizes the difference betweenR{sub 50}, the beam quality specifier, calculated from chamber simulations compared to that obtained using depth-dose calculations in water. A similar shift minimizes the variation of the overall ion chamber correction factor with depth to the practical range and reduces the root-mean-square deviation of a fit to calculated beam quality conversion factors at the reference depth as a function of R{sub 50}. Similarly, an upstream shift of 0.34 r{sub cav} allows a more accurate determination of R{sub 50} from NE2571 chamber calculations and reduces the variation of the overall ion chamber correction factor with depth. The determination of the gradient correction using a shift of 0.22 r{sub cav} optimizes the root-mean-square deviation of a fit to calculated beam quality conversion factors if all beams investigated are considered. However, if only clinical beams are considered, a good fit to results for beam quality conversion factors is obtained without explicitly correcting for gradient effects. The inadequacy of R{sub 50} to uniquely specify beam quality for the accurate selection of k{sub Q} factors is discussed. Systematic uncertainties in beam quality conversion factors are analyzed for the NE2571 chamber and amount to between 0.4% and 1.2% depending on assumptions used. Conclusions: The calculated beam quality conversion factors for the PTW Roos chamber obtained here are in good agreement with literature data. These results characterize the use of an NE2571 ion chamber for reference dosimetry of electron beams even in low-energy beams.

  1. Radiative Heating of the ISCCP Upper Level Cloud Regimes and its Impact on the Large-scale Tropical Circulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Wei; Schumacher, Courtney; McFarlane, Sally A.

    2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiative heating profiles of the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) cloud regimes (or weather states) were estimated by matching ISCCP observations with radiative properties derived from cloud radar and lidar measurements from the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) sites at Manus, Papua New Guinea, and Darwin, Australia. Focus was placed on the ISCCP cloud regimes containing the majority of upper level clouds in the tropics, i.e., mesoscale convective systems (MCSs), deep cumulonimbus with cirrus, mixed shallow and deep convection, and thin cirrus. At upper levels, these regimes have average maximum cloud occurrences ranging from 30% to 55% near 12 km with variations depending on the location and cloud regime. The resulting radiative heating profiles have maxima of approximately 1 K/day near 12 km, with equal heating contributions from the longwave and shortwave components. Upper level minima occur near 15 km, with the MCS regime showing the strongest cooling of 0.2 K/day and the thin cirrus showing no cooling. The gradient of upper level heating ranges from 0.2 to 0.4 K/(day?km), with the most convectively active regimes (i.e., MCSs and deep cumulonimbus with cirrus) having the largest gradient. When the above heating profiles were applied to the 25-year ISCCP data set, the tropics-wide average profile has a radiative heating maximum of 0.45Kday-1 near 250 hPa. Column-integrated radiative heating of upper level cloud accounts for about 20% of the latent heating estimated by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (PR). The ISCCP radiative heating of tropical upper level cloud only slightly modifies the response of an idealized primitive equation model forced with the tropics-wide TRMM PR latent heating, which suggests that the impact of upper level cloud is more important to large-scale tropical circulation variations because of convective feedbacks rather than direct forcing by the cloud radiative heating profiles. However, the height of the radiative heating maxima and gradient of the heating profiles are important to determine the sign and patterns of the horizontal circulation anomaly driven by radiative heating at upper levels.

  2. SIMULATION AND FORECASTING IN INTERMODAL CONTAINER TERMINAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gambardella, Luca Maria

    SIMULATION AND FORECASTING IN INTERMODAL CONTAINER TERMINAL Luca Maria Gambardella1 , Gianluca@idsia.ch 2 LCST, La Spezia Container Terminal, La Spezia (IT) 3 DSP, Data System & Planning sa, Manno (CH working in intermodal container terminals. INTRODUCTION The amount of work a container terminal deals

  3. Contained rocket motor burn demonstrations in X-tunnel: Final report for the DoD/DOE Joint Demilitarization Technology Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. W. Allendorf; B. W. Bellow; R. f. Boehm

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three low-pressure rocket motor propellant burn tests were performed in a large, sealed test chamber located at the X-tunnel complex on the Department of Energy's Nevada Test Site in the period May--June 1997. NIKE rocket motors containing double base propellant were used in two tests (two and four motors, respectively), and the third test used two improved HAWK rocket motors containing composite propellant. The preliminary containment safety calculations, the crack and burn procedures used in each test, and the results of various measurements made during and after each test are all summarized and collected in this document.

  4. DCH-1: The first direct containment heating experiment in the SURTSEY Test Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarbell, W.W.; Brockmann, J.E.; Pilch, M.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The DCH-1 test was the first experiment performed in the SURTSEY Direct Heating Test Facility. It was designed to provide the experimental data required to understand the phenomena associated with pressurized melt ejection and direct containment heating. The results will be to develop phenomenological models for large containment response codes. The test involved 20 kg of molten core debris simulant ejected into a 1:10 scale mockup of the Zion reactor cavity. The melt was produced by a metallothermitic reaction of iron oxide and aluminum powders to yield molten iron and alumina. The cavity model was placed so that the emerging debris would propagate directly upwards along the vertical centerline of the chamber. Results from the experiment showed that the dispersed debris caused a rapid pressurization of the chamber atmosphere. Peak pressure from the six transducers ranged from 0.9 to 0.13 MPa (13.4 to 19.4 psig). The time interval from the start of debris ejection to pressure peak was two to three seconds. Post-test debris collection yielded 11.6 kg of material outside the cavity, of which approximately 1.6 kg was attributed to the uptake of oxygen by the iron particles. Mechanical sieving of the recovered debris showed a log-normal size distribution with a mass mean size of 0.55 mm. Aerosol measurements indicated a substantial portion (approx. 5 to 29%) of the displaced mass was in the size range less than 10 ..mu..m.

  5. Improved HEPA Filter Technology for Flexible and Rigid Containment Barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinson, Paul Arthur

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Safety and reliability in glovebox operations can be significantly improved and waste packaging efficiencies can be increased by inserting flexible, lightweight, high capacity HEPA filters into the walls of plastic sheet barriers. This HEPA filter/barrier technology can be adapted to a wide variety of applications: disposable waste bags, protective environmental barriers for electronic equipment, single or multiple use glovebag assemblies, flexible glovebox wall elements, and room partitions. These reliable and inexpensive filtered barriers have many uses in fields such as radioactive waste processing, HVAC filter changeout, vapor or grit blasting, asbestos cleanup, pharmaceutical, medical, biological, and electronic equipment containment. The applications can result in significant cost savings, improved operational reliability and safety, and total waste volume reduction. This technology was developed at the Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) in 1993 and has been used at ANL-W since then at the TRU Waste Characterization Chamber Gloveboxes. Another 1998 AGS Conference paper titled "TRU Waste Characterization Gloveboxes", presented by Mr. David Duncan of ANL-W, describes these boxes.

  6. Upper tropospheric jet streams over North America during summer 1988

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landers, David Edward

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    UPPER TROPOSPHERIC JET STREAMS OVER NORTH AMERICA DURING SUMMER 1988 A Thesis by DAVID EDWARD LANDERS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfuillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1991 Ma j or Sub j ect: Meteorology UPPER TROPOSPHERIC JET STREAMS OVER NORTH AMERICA SUMMER 1988 A Thesis by DAVID EDWARD LANDERS Approved as to style and Content by: Dusan Djuric (Co-Chairman) James P. McGuirk (Co...

  7. Szlenk Index, Upper Estimates, and Embedding in Banach Spaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Causey, Ryan Michael

    2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    and the topology of the space. But Enflo's famous example of a Banach space failing the approximation property [8] is also a Banach space failing to have either a Schauder basis or a finite dimensional decomposition. For this reason, one often wishes to determine... subsequential U upper tree estimates, then X embeds into Y . 8 (ii) If U, V are as in Theorem 1.2, then there exists a reflexive Banach space Z with FDD F satisfying subsequential V lower and subsequential U upper block estimates in Z such that if X ? REFL...

  8. Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, IndianaTurtleCooperativeCROSS-VALIDATION OF SWERA'sUpperUpper Hot

  9. Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, IndianaTurtleCooperativeCROSS-VALIDATION OF SWERA'sUpperUpper

  10. Response of breeding seaside sparrows to fire on the upper Texas Coast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitbeck, Matthew W

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ), Error bars represent standard deviations. Histogram represents precipitation recorded in 2000 and 2001 on Anahuac National Wildlife Refuge, Chambers County, Texas (USFWS, unpubl. data) 23 Mean number of Seaside Sparrows/survey for four years post..., Chambers County, Texas 1986 - 2001 (J. Neaville, unpubl. data). Error bars represent standard deviations. Histogram represents precipitation recorded in 2000 and 2001 on Anahuac National Wildlife Refuge, Chambers County, Texas (USFWS, unpubh data). 24...

  11. MODELING THE FATE AND TRANSPORT OF ATRAZINE IN THE UPPER CHESAPEAKE BAY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frei, Allan

    for agrochemicals in the Upper Chesapeake Bay. Keywords: Chesapeake Bay, hydrodynamic model, atrazine, photolysis

  12. Upper Oceanic Energy Response to Tropical Cyclone Passage JOHN A. KNAFF AND MARK DEMARIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schubert, Wayne H.

    Upper Oceanic Energy Response to Tropical Cyclone Passage JOHN A. KNAFF AND MARK DEMARIA NOAA is investigated using a 6-yr daily record of data-driven analyses of two measures of upper ocean energy content information and the upper ocean response. Upper oceanic energy decreases in these metrics are shown to persist

  13. Nickel based anodes for single chamber solid oxide fuel cells : a catalytic study Geoffroy Gadacz, Sorina Udroiu, Jean-Paul Viricelle, Christophe Pijolat, Michle Pijolat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Nickel based anodes for single chamber solid oxide fuel cells : a catalytic study Geoffroy Gadacz Single chamber solid oxide fuel cells (SCFC) are an alternative concept to traditional SOFC

  14. To do list for laser maintenance 8.28-8.30 1. Clean the turning box and compressor chamber, remove all broken glass piece on bread board

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shvets, Gennady

    and compressor chamber, remove all broken glass piece on bread board and mirror mount all optics in turning box and compressor chamber, replace all optics with damage spots on it, measure the reflectivity of compressor. 4. Check focal spot

  15. Contained radiological analytical chemistry module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barney, David M. (Scotia, NY)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system which provides analytical determination of a plurality of water chemistry parameters with respect to water samples subject to radiological contamination. The system includes a water sample analyzer disposed within a containment and comprising a sampling section for providing predetermined volumes of samples for analysis; a flow control section for controlling the flow through the system; and a gas analysis section for analyzing samples provided by the sampling system. The sampling section includes a controllable multiple port valve for, in one position, metering out sample of a predetermined volume and for, in a second position, delivering the material sample for analysis. The flow control section includes a regulator valve for reducing the pressure in a portion of the system to provide a low pressure region, and measurement devices located in the low pressure region for measuring sample parameters such as pH and conductivity, at low pressure. The gas analysis section which is of independent utility provides for isolating a small water sample and extracting the dissolved gases therefrom into a small expansion volume wherein the gas pressure and thermoconductivity of the extracted gas are measured.

  16. Contained radiological analytical chemistry module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barney, David M. (Scotia, NY)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system which provides analytical determination of a plurality of water chemistry parameters with respect to water samples subject to radiological contamination. The system includes a water sample analyzer disposed within a containment and comprising a sampling section for providing predetermined volumes of samples for analysis; a flow control section for controlling the flow through the system; and a gas analysis section for analyzing samples provided by the sampling system. The sampling section includes a controllable multiple port valve for, in one position, metering out sample of a predetermined volume and for, in a second position, delivering the material sample for analysis. The flow control section includes a regulator valve for reducing the pressure in a portion of the system to provide a low pressure region, and measurement devices located in the low pressure region for measuring sample parameters such as pH and conductivity, at low pressure. The gas analysis section which is of independent utility provides for isolating a small water sample and extracting the dissolved gases therefrom into a small expansion volume wherein the gas pressure and thermoconductivity of the extracted gas are measured.

  17. A Time Projection Chamber for High Accuracy and Precision Fission Cross-Section Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. Hill; K. Jewell; M. Heffner; D. Carter; M. Cunningham; V. Riot; J. Ruz; S. Sangiorgio; B. Seilhan; L. Snyder; D. M. Asner; S. Stave; G. Tatishvili; L. Wood; R. G. Baker; J. L. Klay; R. Kudo; S. Barrett; J. King; M. Leonard; W. Loveland; L. Yao; C. Brune; S. Grimes; N. Kornilov; T. N. Massey; J. Bundgaard; D. L. Duke; U. Greife; U. Hager; E. Burgett; J. Deaven; V. Kleinrath; C. McGrath; B. Wendt; N. Hertel; D. Isenhower; N. Pickle; H. Qu; S. Sharma; R. T. Thornton; D. Tovwell; R. S. Towell; S.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fission Time Projection Chamber (fissionTPC) is a compact (15 cm diameter) two-chamber MICROMEGAS TPC designed to make precision cross-section measurements of neutron-induced fission. The actinide targets are placed on the central cathode and irradiated with a neutron beam that passes axially through the TPC inducing fission in the target. The 4p acceptance for fission fragments and complete charged particle track reconstruction are powerful features of the fissionTPC which will be used to measure fission cross-sections and examine the associated systematic errors. This paper provides a detailed description of the design requirements, the design solutions, and the initial performance of the fissionTPC.

  18. IFE Final Optics and Chamber Dynamics Modeling and Experiments Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F. Najmabadi; M. S. Tillack

    2006-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Our OFES-sponsored research on IFE technology originally focused on studies of grazing-incidence metal mirrors (GIMM's). After the addition of GIMM research to the High Average Power Laser (HAPL) program, our OFES-sponsored research evolved to include laser propagation studies, surface material evolution in IFE wetted-wall chambers, and magnetic intervention. In 2003, the OFES IFE Technology program was terminated. We continued to expend resources on a no-cost extension in order to complete student research projects in an orderly way and to help us explore new research directions. Those explorations led to funding in the field of extreme ultraviolet lithography, which shares many issues in common with inertial fusion chambers, and the field of radiative properties of laser-produced plasma.

  19. Overview of IFE chamber and target technologies R&D in the U.S.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, W R; Abdou, M A; Kulcinski, G L; Moir, R W; Nobile, A; Peterson, P F; Petti, D A; Schultz, K R; Tillack, M S; Yoda, M

    2000-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy Science (OFES) formed the Virtual Laboratory for Technology (VLT) to develop the technologies needed to support near term fusion experiments and to provide the basis for future magnetic and inertial fusion energy power plants. The scope of the inertial fusion energy (IFE) element of the VLT includes the fusion chamber, driver/chamber interface, target fabrication and injection, and safety and environmental assessment for IFE. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, in conjunction with other laboratories, universities and industry, has written an R&D plan to address the critical issues in these areas over the next 5 years in a coordinated manner. This paper provides an overview of the US. research activities addressing these critical issues.

  20. Acoustic studies for alpha background rejection in dark matter bubble chamber detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bou-Cabo, M.; Felis, I.; Ardid, M.; Collaboration: COUPP Collaboration

    2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    COUPP (Chicagoland Observatory for Underground Particle Physics) is an experiment with bubble chambers able to detect dark matter directly either with Spin-Dependent or with Spin-Independent interactions. The target material is a superheated liquid (usually CF3I) that can be bubble nucleated due to nuclear recoils produced by elastic collisions of dark matter particles. The bubble growth inside the chamber is accompanied with an acoustic signature. The acoustic technique has been successfully used to have a good alpha discrimination (about 99%). In this paper, we present different studies and results related with the characterization of the acoustic properties of the detector and the different phenomena involved in the acoustic measurements of the bubble growth, such as sound generation, sound transmission and optimization of piezoelectric transducers.

  1. Ion Chambers for Monitoring the NuMI Neutrino Beam at FNAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Indurthy; R. Keisler; S. Kopp; S. Mendoza; M. Proga; Z. Pavlovich; R. Zwaska; D. Harris; A. Marchionni; J. Morfin; A. Erwin; H. Ping; C. Velissaris; D. Naples; D. Northacker; J. McDonald; M. Diwan; B. Viren

    2004-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) beamline will deliver an intense muon neutrino beam by focusing a beam of mesons into a long evacuated decay volume. The beam must be steered with 1 mRad angular accuracy toward the Soudan Underground Laboratory in northern Minnesota. We have built 4 arrays of ionization chambers to monitor the neutrino beam direction and quality. The arrays are located at 4 stations downstream of the decay volume, and measure the remnant hadron beam and tertiary muons produced along with neutrinos in meson decays. We review how the monitors will be used to make beam quality measurements, and as well we review chamber construction details, radiation damage testing, calibration, and test beam results.

  2. Addendum to the Technical Design Report for the Upgrade of the ALICE Time Projection Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The ALICE Collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the addendum to the TDR of the upgrade of the ALICE Time Projection Chamber (CERN-LHCC-2013-020 ; ALICE-TDR-016). The key objective of the upgrade is the replacement of the present MWPC-based readout chambers by detectors that allow continuous operation without active ion gating. In the TDR, we propose a solution that employs stacks of four Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs) and demonstrate that it fulfills the design specifications, in particular in terms of intrinsic position resolution, energy resolution, and ion backflow. In this document we demonstrate with additional results from both detector R&D and simulations that the technological solution chosen in the TDR has sufficient safety margin for a successful campaign with the upgraded detector in RUN 3 and beyond.

  3. Neutron and gamma detector using an ionization chamber with an integrated body and moderator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ianakiev, Kiril D.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Lestone, John Paul

    2006-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A detector for detecting neutrons and gamma radiation includes a cathode that defines an interior surface and an interior volume. A conductive neutron-capturing layer is disposed on the interior surface of the cathode and a plastic housing surrounds the cathode. A plastic lid is attached to the housing and encloses the interior volume of the cathode forming an ionization chamber, into the center of which an anode extends from the plastic lid. A working gas is disposed within the ionization chamber and a high biasing voltage is connected to the cathode. Processing electronics are coupled to the anode and process current pulses which are converted into Gaussian pulses, which are either counted as neutrons or integrated as gammas, in response to whether pulse amplitude crosses a neutron threshold. The detector according to the invention may be readily fabricated into single or multilayer detector arrays.

  4. Direct Measurement of the Bubble Nucleation Energy Threshold in a CF3I Bubble Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behnke, E; Brice, S J; Broemmelsiek, D; Collar, J I; Cooper, P S; Crisler, M; Dahl, C E; Fustin, D; Hall, J; Harnish, C; Levine, I; Lippincott, W H; Moan, T; Nania, T; Neilson, R; Ramberg, E; Robinson, A E; Sonnenschein, A; Vázquez-Jáuregui, E; Rivera, R A; Uplegger, L

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have directly measured the energy threshold and efficiency for bubble nucleation from iodine recoils in a CF3I bubble chamber in the energy range of interest for a dark matter search. These interactions cannot be probed by standard neutron calibration methods, so we develop a new technique by observing the elastic scattering of 12 GeV/c negative pions. The pions are tracked with a silicon pixel telescope and the reconstructed scattering angle provides a measure of the nuclear recoil kinetic energy. The bubble chamber was operated with a nominal threshold of (13.6+-0.6) keV. Interpretation of the results depends on the response to fluorine and carbon recoils, but in general we find agreement with the predictions of the classical bubble nucleation theory. This measurement confirms the applicability of CF3I as a target for spin-independent dark matter interactions and represents a novel technique for calibration of superheated fluid detectors.

  5. MIMAC: MIcro-tpc MAtrix of Chambers for dark matter directional detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, D; Bouly, J L; Bourrion, O; Fourel, Ch; Guillaudin, O; Lamblin, J; Mayet, F; Muraz, J F; Richer, J P; Riffard, Q; Lebreton, L; Maire, D; Busto, J; Brunner, J; Fouchez, D

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Directional detection of non-baryonic Dark Matter is a promising search strategy for discriminating WIMP events from neutrons, the ultimate background for dark matter direct detection. This strategy requires both a precise measurement of the energy down to a few keV and 3D reconstruction of tracks down to a few mm. The MIMAC (MIcro-tpc MAtrix of Chambers) collaboration has developed in the last years an original prototype detector based on the direct coupling of large pixelized micromegas with a special developed fast self-triggered electronics showing the feasibility of a new generation of directional detectors. The first bi-chamber prototype has been installed at Modane, underground laboratory in June 2012. The first undergournd background events, the gain stability and calibration are shown. The first spectrum of nuclear recoils showing 3D tracks coming from the radon progeny is presented.

  6. Apparatus for monitoring tritium in tritium-contaminating environments using a modified Kanne chamber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, D.F.

    1981-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A conventional Kanne tritium monitor has been redesigned to reduce its sensitivity to such contaminants as tritiated water vapor and tritiated oil. The high voltage electrode has been replaced by a wire cylinder and the collector electrode has been reduced in diameter. The area sensitive to contamination has thereby been reduced by about a factor of forty while the overall apparatus sensitivity and operation has not been affected. The design allows for in situ decontamination of the chambers, if necessary.

  7. Apparatus for monitoring tritium in tritium contaminating environments using a modified Kanne chamber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, David F. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A conventional Kanne tritium monitor has been redesigned to reduce its sensitivity to such contaminants as tritiated water vapor and tritiated oil. The high voltage electrode has been replaced by a wire cylinder and the collector electrode has been reduced in diameter. The area sensitive to contamination has thereby been reduced by about a factor of forty while the overall apparatus sensitivity and operation has not been affected. The design allows for in situ decontamination of the chambers, if necessary.

  8. A Multiwire Proportional Chamber for Precision Studies of Neutron Beta Decay Angular Correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ito, T M; Filippone, B W; Martin, J W; Plaster, B; Rybka, G; Yuan, J; 10.1016/j.nima.2006.11.026

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new multiwire proportional chamber (MWPC) was designed and constructed for precision studies of neutron beta decay angular correlations. Its design has several novel features, including the use of low pressure neopentane as the MWPC gas and an entrance window made of thin Mylar sheet reinforced with Kevlar fibers. In the initial off-line performance tests, the gas gain of neopentane and the position resolution were studied.

  9. A Multiwire Proportional Chamber for Precision Studies of Neutron Beta Decay Angular Correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. M. Ito; R. Carr; B. W. Filippone; J. W. Martin; B. Plaster; G. Rybka; J. Yuan

    2007-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A new multiwire proportional chamber (MWPC) was designed and constructed for precision studies of neutron beta decay angular correlations. Its design has several novel features, including the use of low pressure neopentane as the MWPC gas and an entrance window made of thin Mylar sheet reinforced with Kevlar fibers. In the initial off-line performance tests, the gas gain of neopentane and the position resolution were studied.

  10. Efficiency determination of resistive plate chambers for fast quasi-monoenergetic neutrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Röder; Z. Elekes; T. Aumann; D. Bemmerer; K. Boretzky; C. Caesar; T. E. Cowan; J. Hehner; M. Heil; M. Kempe; V. Maroussov; O. Nusair; A. V. Prokofiev; R. Reifarth; M. Sobiella; D. Stach; A. Wagner; D. Yakorev; A. Zilges; K. Zuber

    2014-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Composite detectors made of stainless steel converters and multigap resistive plate chambers have been irradiated with quasi-monoenergetic neutrons with a peak energy of 175MeV. The neutron detection efficiency has been determined using two different methods. The data are in agreement with the output of Monte Carlo simulations. The simulations are then extended to study the response of a hypothetical array made of these detectors to energetic neutrons from a radioactive ion beam experiment.

  11. Polymer Growth Rate in a Wire Chamber with Oxygen,Water, or Alcohol Gas Additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyarski, Adam; /SLAC

    2008-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The rate of polymer growth on wires was measured in a wire chamber while the chamber was aged initially with helium-isobutane (80:20) gas, and then with either oxygen, water, or alcohol added to the gas. At the completion of the aging process for each gas mixture, the carbon content on the wires was measured in a SEM/EDX instrument. The same physical wires were used in all the gas mixtures, allowing measurement of polymer build up or polymer depletion by each gas additive. It is found that the rate of polymer growth is not changed by the presence of oxygen, water or alcohol. Conjecture that oxygen reduces breakdown by removing polymer deposits on field wires is negated by these measurements. Instead, it appears that the reduced breakdown is due to lower resistance in the polymer from oxygen ions being transported into the polymer. It is also observed that field wires bombarded by the electrons in the SEM and then placed back into the chamber show an abundance of single electrons being emitted, indicating that electron charge is stored in the polymer layer and that a high electric field is necessary to remove the charge.

  12. Microwave remote plasma enhanced-atomic layer deposition system with multicusp confinement chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dechana, A. [Program of Physics and General Science, Faculty of Science and Technology, Songkhla Rajabhat University, Songkhla 90000 (Thailand); Thamboon, P. [Science and Technology Research Institute, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Boonyawan, D., E-mail: dheerawan.b@cmu.ac.th [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A microwave remote Plasma Enhanced-Atomic Layer Deposition system with multicusp confinement chamber is established at the Plasma and Beam Physics research facilities, Chiang Mai, Thailand. The system produces highly-reactive plasma species in order to enhance the deposition process of thin films. The addition of the multicusp magnetic fields further improves the plasma density and uniformity in the reaction chamber. Thus, the system is more favorable to temperature-sensitive substrates when heating becomes unwanted. Furthermore, the remote-plasma feature, which is generated via microwave power source, offers tunability of the plasma properties separately from the process. As a result, the system provides high flexibility in choice of materials and design experiments, particularly for low-temperature applications. Performance evaluations of the system were carried on coating experiments of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers onto a silicon wafer. The plasma characteristics in the chamber will be described. The resulted Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films—analyzed by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry in channeling mode and by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy techniques—will be discussed.

  13. Interpretation of Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation from Diesel Exhaust Photooxidation in an Environmental Chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakao, Shunsuke; Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Nguyen, Anh; Jung, Hee-Jung; Cocker, David R.

    2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from diesel exhaust in a smog chamber was investigated. Particle volume measurement based on mobility diameter is shown to underestimate SOA formation from diesel exhaust due to the external void space of agglomerate particles, in which case mass-based measurement technique is necessary. Rapid determination of particle effective density as a function of particle mass was performed by an Aerosol Particle Mass analyzer – Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (APM-SMPS) to obtain particle mass concentration and fractal dimension. Continuous aging of aerosol was observed in terms of atomic ratio (O/C), from 0.05 to 0.25 in 12 hours, underscoring the importance of multi-generational oxidation of low-volatile organic vapors emitted from diesel engine as the significant source of oxygenated SOA. Experimental conditions possibly have strong impacts on physical evolution of diesel particulates in a smog chamber. Higher particle effective densities were observed when raw exhaust was injected into a full bag as opposed to filling a bag with diluted exhaust using an ejector diluter. When longer transfer line was used for injecting diesel exhaust into the smog chamber, rapid particle coagulation was observed, leading to increasing particle volume concentration in dark while its mass concentration is decreasing.

  14. Small-Chamber Measurements of Chemical-Specific Emission Factors for Drywall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maddalena, Randy; Russell, Marion; Apte, Michael G.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Imported drywall installed in U.S. homes is suspected of being a source of odorous and potentially corrosive indoor pollutants. To support an investigation of those building materials by the Consumer Products Safety Commission (CPSC), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) measured chemical-specific emission factors for 30 samples of drywall materials. Emission factors are reported for 75 chemicals and 30 different drywall samples encompassing both domestic and imported stock and incorporating natural, synthetic, or mixed gypsum core material. CPSC supplied all drywall materials. First the drywall samples were isolated and conditioned in dedicated chambers, then they were transferred to small chambers where emission testing was performed. Four sampling and analysis methods were utilized to assess (1) volatile organic compounds, (2) low molecular weight carbonyls, (3) volatile sulfur compounds, and (4) reactive sulfur gases. LBNL developed a new method that combines the use of solid phase microextraction (SPME) with small emission chambers to measure the reactive sulfur gases, then extended that technique to measure the full suite of volatile sulfur compounds. The testing procedure and analysis methods are described in detail herein. Emission factors were measured under a single set of controlled environmental conditions. The results are compared graphically for each method and in detailed tables for use in estimating indoor exposure concentrations.

  15. Comparative study of ionization chamber detectors vis-a-vis a CCD detector for dispersive XAS measurement in transmission geometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poswal, A. K.; Agrawal, A.; Bhattachryya, D.; Jha, S. N.; Sahoo, N. K. [Applied Spectroscopy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai -400 085 (India)

    2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We have designed and fabricated parallel plate ionization chamber detectors and voltage vs. current characteristics (V-I curve) of the detectors were recorded with synchrotron radiation to qualify for use in X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) measurements. After qualifying the ionization chambers, the detectors were used in the dispersive EXAFS beamline (BL-08) at INDUS-2 SRS in Turbo-XAS geometry. Using the same setup and under the same setting, XAS spectra were also recorded with a CCD detector and the observation on relative performance of the ionization chamber vis-a-vis the CCD detector is presented in this paper.

  16. Fig. 1. On the right is the Cloud Chamber, on the left is a laptop running the Cloud Catcher software ( Alexis Kirke.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miranda, Eduardo Reck

    in real time. A glass cloud chamber was used onstage to make radioactivity visible in bright white tracksFig. 1. On the right is the Cloud Chamber, on the left is a laptop running the Cloud Catcher software (© Alexis Kirke.) CLOUD CHAMBER: A PERFORMANCE WITH REAL TIME TWO-WAY INTERACTION BETWEEN

  17. Syracuse Univesity Test Report On Uptake Factor Resulting From A Dropped Storage Container - Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Zhi; Zhang, Jianshun S.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under certain circumstances, powder from an accidently dropped container can become airborne and inhaled by people nearby such as those who are moving the containers. The inhaled fine particles can deposit on respiratory tracts and lungs, causing asthma, lung cancer, and other acute respiratory illnesses and chronic symptoms. The objective of this study was to develop a standard procedure to measure the airborne concentrations of different size particles within the vicinity of a dropped container where a significant portion of the contained powder is ejected. Tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}) was selected in this study to represent relatively heavy powders (7.16 g/cm3 specific gravity for WO{sub 3}). A typical can with the outer dimensions of 4.25” diameter and 4.875” tall was used as the container. The powder was dropped in two different configurations: 1) contained within a can covered by a lid that has a 0.25” diameter hole, and 2) contained within a can without a lid. The packing volume of the powder was 51.4 in3 (842.7 cm{sup 3}) and the target mass was 1936 g. The tests were carried out in a full-scale stainless steel environmental chamber with an interior volume of 852 ft3 (24.1 m3). The chamber system includes an internal recirculation loop with a rectangular air diffuser and 10 variable frequency drive fans to provide a typical room air recirculation flow pattern. Two air filters were installed in the chamber air supply duct and return duct to achieve the required low background particle concentration. The initial chamber air conditions were set at 70°F (± 5°F) and 50% (± 10%) RH. A supporting frame and releasing device were designed and built to trigger consistently the dropping of the can. The particle sampling inlet was placed 5 ft above the floor and 6 inches laterally away from the can’s falling path. Concentrations of particles between 0.5 ?m and 20 ?m were recorded in units of mass and number of particles per unit volume. The data acquisition rate was once every 2 seconds during the first 2 hours. A test procedure was developed and verified. A total of thirty two drop tests were performed, eight in Phase I and twenty four in Phase II, covering variations in dropping height (8 ft or 4 ft from the floor), room air movement (0.25-0.30 m/s or 0.10-0.15 m/s near the ceiling), landing scenario (on a flat plate or a block), and lid condition (¼” lid hole or no lid). There were ten tests with flat plate and ¼” lid hole, ten tests with flat plate no lid and twelve tests with block no lid.

  18. Upper Snake Provincial Assessment May 2004 6. Participants and Affiliations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the Upper Snake Provincial Assessment Idaho Department of Fish and Game: Gregg Servheen Jon Beals Lance Chad Colter Shoshone-Bannock Tribes Larry Dickerson US Fish and Wildlife Service John Fred Shoshone-Bannock Tribes Jim Fredericks Idaho Fish and Game Dan Garren Idaho Fish and Game Lauri Hanauska-Brown Idaho Fish

  19. Transdichotomous algorithms without multiplication some upper and lower bounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brodnik, Andrej "Andy"

    Trans­dichotomous algorithms without multiplication ­ some upper and lower bounds Andrej Brodnik 1 that on a RAM with addition, subtraction, bitwise Boolean operations and shifts, but no multiplication; 1g w of w­bit bit strings (or numbers between 0 and 2 w \\Gamma 1). An increasingly popular

  20. Upper Midwest Food, Fuel and Fiber Network Tour

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2nd Annual Upper Midwest Food, Fuel and Fiber Network Tour Aug. 31 ­ Sept. 2, 2010 #12;Tuesday Dept. of Ag & Biological Engineering 9:30 a.m. Horizon Wind Energy Farm ­ (Construction vs. Finished Phases) http://www.horizonwind.com/home/ Gary Freymiller, WISER & Peter Park, Horizon Wind Energy 11:00 a

  1. Tracking and Modifying Upper-body Human Motion Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zordan, Victor

    of humanlike characters affect the believability, aesthetic, and impact of an animation or virtual environment the dynamics of the animated character. Figure 1 shows a human actor and two animated characters tracking hisTracking and Modifying Upper-body Human Motion Data with Dynamic Simulation Victor B. Zordan

  2. Upper Limits from Counting Experiments with Multiple Pipelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick J. Sutton

    2010-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In counting experiments, one can set an upper limit on the rate of a Poisson process based on a count of the number of events observed due to the process. In some experiments, one makes several counts of the number of events, using different instruments, different event detection algorithms, or observations over multiple time intervals. We demonstrate how to generalize the classical frequentist upper limit calculation to the case where multiple counts of events are made over one or more time intervals using several (not necessarily independent) procedures. We show how different choices of the rank ordering of possible outcomes in the space of counts correspond to applying different levels of significance to the various measurements. We propose an ordering that is matched to the sensitivity of the different measurement procedures and show that in typical cases it gives stronger upper limits than other choices. As an example, we show how this method can be applied to searches for gravitational-wave bursts, where multiple burst-detection algorithms analyse the same data set, and demonstrate how a single combined upper limit can be set on the gravitational-wave burst rate.

  3. Detection of upper mantle flow associated with the African Superplume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conrad, Clint

    with warm, less dense material, the African seismic anomaly has been ascribed to a long-lived thermal upwelling from the lower mantle. Such a large-scale upwelling should also affect the regional horizontal flow field in the upper mantle. To test this model, we compare seismic anisotropy inferred from shear-wave

  4. Architecture of the upper Sego Sandstone, Book Cliffs, Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birkhead, Stanley Scott

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    ................................................................................................................... 22 SEDIMENTOLOGY.................................................................................................... 26 Marine Shale with Wavy Sandstones............................................................... 26 Highly... surfaces. The cross-section defines an 8.5 kilometer section that begins in Sego Canyon outside of Thompson Springs, Figure 12-Bedding diagram of major facies transitions with sedimentary logs overlain. SEDIMENTOLOGY Upper Sego Sandstone deposits can...

  5. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Acupuncture for Upper-Extremity Rehabilitation in Chronic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaechter, Judith D.

    , and improvement trends in UE motor function (P .09) and digit ROM (P .06). Conclusions: Based on ITT analyses, we Sham-Controlled Study Peter M. Wayne, PhD, David E. Krebs, PhD, Eric A. Macklin, PhD, Rosa Schnyer, Lic. Acupuncture for upper- extremity rehabilitation in chronic stroke: a randomized sham- controlled study. Arch

  6. Simulating Sustainability: Conjunctive Land and Water Management in the Upper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    a series of micro-basins that function similarly to a multi-reservoir river system for water management arrangements for water management, and integration of geospatial information into "sustainability scenariosSimulating Sustainability: Conjunctive Land and Water Management in the Upper Santa Cruz River

  7. Upper mantle flow beneath the Hangay dome, central Mongolia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Déverchère, Jacques

    Upper mantle flow beneath the Hangay dome, central Mongolia Acknowledgements This work, A., Amarjargal, S. and Déverchère, J., 2003. GPS measurements of crustal deformation in the Baikal-Mongolia., 2002. Mantle structure and rifting processes in the Baikal-Mongolia region: geophysical data

  8. Floristic study of the Upper Frio River, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swihart, Theresa Irene

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    of the floras of North Central Texas, Madison County, Robertson County and the La Copita Research Area. A total of 9 species endemic to Texas were collected along the upper Frio River. Throughout the northern portion of the study area there is exposed bedrock...

  9. Wide-field functional imaging of blood flow and hemoglobin oxygen saturation in the rodent dorsal window chamber.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    et al. , editors. Anesthesia and Analgesia in LaboratoryPlace the animal in a gas anesthesia chamber filled with 5%much longer than with gas anesthesia. Conversely, using gas

  10. Dependence with air density of the response of the PTW SourceCheck ionization chamber for low energy brachytherapy sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tornero-López, Ana M.; Guirado, Damián; Ruiz-Arrebola, Samuel [Servicio de Radiofísica y Protección Radiológica, Hospital Universitario San Cecilio, E-18012 Granada (Spain)] [Servicio de Radiofísica y Protección Radiológica, Hospital Universitario San Cecilio, E-18012 Granada (Spain); Perez-Calatayud, Jose [Servicio de Radioterapia, Unidad de Radiofísica, Hospital Universitario y Politécnico La Fe, E-46026 Valencia (Spain)] [Servicio de Radioterapia, Unidad de Radiofísica, Hospital Universitario y Politécnico La Fe, E-46026 Valencia (Spain); Simancas, Fernando; Lallena, Antonio M. [Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain)] [Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain); Gazdic-Santic, Maja [Department of Medical Physics and Radiation Safety, Clinical Centre of Sarajevo University, 71000 Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegovina)] [Department of Medical Physics and Radiation Safety, Clinical Centre of Sarajevo University, 71000 Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegovina)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Air-communicating well ionization chambers are commonly used to assess air kerma strength of sources used in brachytherapy. The signal produced is supposed to be proportional to the air density within the chamber and, therefore, a density-independent air kerma strength is obtained when the measurement is corrected to standard atmospheric conditions using the usual temperature and pressure correction factor. Nevertheless, when assessing low energy sources, the ionization chambers may not fulfill that condition and a residual density dependence still remains after correction. In this work, the authors examined the behavior of the PTW 34051 SourceCheck ionization chamber when measuring the air kerma strength of {sup 125}I seeds.Methods: Four different SourceCheck chambers were analyzed. With each one of them, two series of measurements of the air kerma strength for {sup 125}I selectSeed{sup TM} brachytherapy sources were performed inside a pressure chamber and varying the pressure in a range from 747 to 1040 hPa (560 to 780 mm Hg). The temperature and relative humidity were kept basically constant. An analogous experiment was performed by taking measurements at different altitudes above sea level.Results: Contrary to other well-known ionization chambers, like the HDR1000 PLUS, in which the temperature-pressure correction factor overcorrects the measurements, in the SourceCheck ionization chamber they are undercorrected. At a typical atmospheric situation of 933 hPa (700 mm Hg) and 20 °C, this undercorrection turns out to be 1.5%. Corrected measurements show a residual linear dependence on the density and, as a consequence, an additional density dependent correction must be applied. The slope of this residual linear density dependence is different for each SourceCheck chamber investigated. The results obtained by taking measurements at different altitudes are compatible with those obtained with the pressure chamber.Conclusions: Variations of the altitude and changes in the weather conditions may produce significant density corrections, and that effect should be taken into account. This effect is chamber-dependent, indicating that a specific calibration is necessary for each particular chamber. To our knowledge, this correction has not been considered so far for SourceCheck ionization chambers, but its magnitude cannot be neglected in clinical practice. The atmospheric pressure and temperature at which the chamber was calibrated need to be taken into account, and they should be reported in the calibration certificate. In addition, each institution should analyze the particular response of its SourceCheck ionization chamber and compute the adequate correction factors. In the absence of a suitable pressure chamber, a possibility for this assessment is to take measurements at different altitudes, spanning a wide enough air density range.

  11. Validation of the Read Out Electronics for the CMS Muon Drift Chambers at Tests Beam in CERN/GIF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernández, C; Fouz-Iglesias, M C; Marin, J; Oller, J C; Willmott, C

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Part of the readout system for the CMS muon drift chambers has been tested in test beams at CERN/GIF. Read Out Board (ROB) and HPTD have been validated with signals from a real muon beam, with an structure and flux similar to LHC operating conditions and using one of the chambers produced in CIEMAT already located in the test beam area under normal gas and voltage conditions. (Author) 5 refs.

  12. Self-adjustable supplemental support system for a cylindrical container in a housing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blaushild, Ronald M. (Wilkinsburg, PA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A self-adjustable supplementary support system for a cylindrical container coaxially disposed in a cylindrical housing by upper flanged supports has a plurality of outwardly extending bracket units on the external surface of the container which coact with inwardly extending resiliently outwardly extending bracket units on the inner wall of the cylindrical housing. The bracket units have flanges which form a concave surface that seats on support bars, attached by links to torsion bars that are secured to ring segments annularly spaced about the inner wall of the cylindrical housing and the bracket units and support bars coact with each other to radially position and support the container in the housing during movement of the two components from a vertical to a horizontal position, and during transportation of the same.

  13. Self-adjustable supplemental support system for a cylindrical container in a housing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blaushild, R.M.

    1987-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A self-adjustable supplementary support system for a cylindrical container coaxially disposed in a cylindrical housing by upper flanged supports has a plurality of outwardly extending bracket units on the external surface of the container which coact with inwardly extending resiliently outwardly extending bracket units on the inner wall of the cylindrical housing. The bracket units have flanges which form a concave surface that seats on support bars, attached by links to torsion bars that are secured to ring segments annularly spaced about the inner wall of the cylindrical housing and the bracket units and support bars coact with each other to radially position and support the container in the housing during movement of the two components from a vertical to a horizontal position, and during transportation of the same. 14 figs.

  14. Upper Bound on Fidelity of Classical Sagnac Gyroscope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas B. Bahder

    2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerous quantum mechanical schemes have been proposed that are intended to improve the sensitivity to rotation provided by the classical Sagnac effect in gyroscopes. A general metric is needed that can compare the performance of the new quantum systems with the classical systems. The fidelity (Shannon mutual information between the measurement and the rotation rate) is proposed as a metric that is capable of this comparison. A theoretical upper bound is derived for the fidelity of an ideal classical Sagnac gyroscope. This upper bound for the classical Sagnac gyroscope should be used as a benchmark to compare the performance of proposed enhanced classical and quantum rotation sensors. In fact, the fidelity is general enough to compare the quality of two different apparatuses (two different experiments) that attempt to measure the same quantity.

  15. Diversity in the upper management of leading Texas contractors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Anne Nicole

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commission the power to go to the courts for implementation of the laws. The 1972 act extended an individual's right to sue in private actions to the right to sue against state and local governments as well. Previously, in 1963, the Equal Pay Act of 1963..., prejudice plus power, and discrimination (2000). It is upper management's responsibility to ensure that their company is diversified. "CEOs must be proactive [in] initiating and taking on the challenges inherent in managing a diverse workforce" (Work...

  16. EIS-0408: Upper Great Plains Wind Energy Programmatic EIS

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS, being prepared jointly by DOE's Western Area Power Administration and the Department of the Interior’s Fish and Wildlife Service, will evaluate the environmental impacts of wind energy development in Iowa, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota – Western’s Upper Great Plains customer service region. Western will use the EIS to implement a comprehensive regional program to manage interconnection requests for wind energy projects.

  17. Overview of the CONTAIN LMR code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, D.E.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of containments in proposed US Liquid Metal Reactors (LMR) will require that a computational tool be available for safety analysis. As a result of an international cooperative effort, such a tool has been produced in the CONTAIN-LMR computer code. This is a version of the CONTAIN code that has been enhanced with extra capabilities for LMR applications. CONTAIN is the NRC's best-estimate code for the evaluation of the conditions that may exist inside a reactor containment building during a severe accident. Included in the phenomena modeled are thermal-hydraulics, radiant and convective heat transfer, aerosol loading and transient response, fission product transport and heating effects, and interactions of sodium and corium with the containment atmosphere and structures. CONTAIN-LMR includes models for sodium-concrete interactions, debris bed phenomena and other LMR-specific models in an integrated manner. This paper summarizes the current state of CONTAIN-LMR. A brief description of the physical models is presented. As an example of model integration in CONTAIN-LMR, recent work on the debris bed models will be discussed. Recent applications of CONTAIN-LMR are discussed. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Method for the production of {sup 99m}Tc compositions from {sup 99}Mo-containing materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, R.G.; Christian, J.D.; Grover, S.B.; Petti, D.A.; Terry, W.K.; Yoon, W.Y.

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method is described for producing {sup 99m}Tc compositions from {sup 99}Mo compounds. {sup 100}Mo metal or {sup 100}MoO{sub 3} is irradiated with photons in a particle (electron) accelerator to ultimately produce {sup 99}MoO{sub 3}. This composition is then heated in a reaction chamber to form a pool of molten {sup 99}MoO{sub 3} with an optimum depth of 0.5--5 mm. A gaseous mixture thereafter evolves from the molten {sup 99}MoO{sub 3} which contains vaporized {sup 99}MoO{sub 3}, vaporized {sup 99m}TcO{sub 3}, and vaporized {sup 99m}TcO{sub 2}. This mixture is then combined with an oxidizing gas (O{sub 2(g)}) to generate a gaseous stream containing vaporized {sup 99m}Tc{sub 2}O{sub 7} and vaporized {sup 99}MoO{sub 3}. Next, the gaseous stream is cooled in a primary condensation stage in the reaction chamber to remove vaporized {sup 99}MoO{sub 3}. Cooling is undertaken at a specially-controlled rate to achieve maximum separation efficiency. The gaseous stream is then cooled in a sequential secondary condensation stage to convert vaporized {sup 99m}Tc{sub 2}O{sub 7} into a condensed {sup 99m}Tc-containing reaction product which is collected. 1 fig.

  19. Method for the production of .sup.99m Tc compositions from .sup.99 Mo-containing materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, Ralph G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Christian, Jerry D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Grover, S. Blaine (Idaho Falls, ID); Petti, David A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Terry, William K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Yoon, Woo Y. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method for producing .sup.99m Tc compositions from .sup.99 Mo compounds. .sup.100 Mo metal or .sup.100 MoO.sub.3 is irradiated with photons in a particle (electron) accelerator to ultimately produce .sup.99 MoO.sub.3. This composition is then heated in a reaction chamber to form a pool of molten .sup.99 MoO.sub.3 with an optimum depth of 0.5-5 mm. A gaseous mixture thereafter evolves from the molten .sup.99 MoO.sub.3 which contains vaporized .sup.99 MoO.sub.3, vaporized .sup.99m TcO.sub.3, and vaporized .sup.99m TcO.sub.2. This mixture is then combined with an oxidizing gas (O.sub.2(g)) to generate a gaseous stream containing vaporized .sup.99m Tc.sub.2 O.sub.7 and vaporized .sup.99 MoO.sub.3. Next, the gaseous stream is cooled in a primary condensation stage in the reaction chamber to remove vaporized .sup.99 MoO.sub.3. Cooling is undertaken at a specially-controlled rate to achieve maximum separation efficiency. The gaseous stream is then cooled in a sequential secondary condensation stage to convert vaporized .sup.99m Tc.sub.2 O.sub.7 into a condensed .sup.99m Tc-containing reaction product which is collected.

  20. Measurement of changes in linear accelerator photon energy through flatness variation using an ion chamber array

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao Song; Balter, Peter A. [Department of Radiation Physics, Unit 94, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Rose, Mark; Simon, William E. [Sun Nuclear Corporation, 425-A Pineda Court, Melbourne, Florida 32940 (United States)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To compare the use of flatness versus percent depth dose (PDD) for determining changes in photon beam energy for a megavoltage linear accelerator. Methods: Energy changes were accomplished by adjusting the bending magnet current by up to {+-}15% in 5% increments away from the value used clinically. Two metrics for flatness, relative flatness in the central 80% of the field (Flat) and average maximum dose along the diagonals normalized by central axis dose (F{sub DN}), were measured using a commercially available planner ionization chamber array. PDD was measured in water at depths of 5 and 10 cm in 3 Multiplication-Sign 3 cm{sup 2} and 10 Multiplication-Sign 10 cm{sup 2} fields using a cylindrical chamber. Results: PDD was more sensitive to changes in energy when the beam energy was increased than when it was decreased. For the 18-MV beam in particular, PDD was not sensitive to energy reductions below the nominal energy. The value of Flat was found to be more sensitive to decreases in energy than to increases, with little sensitivity to energy increases above the nominal energy for 18-MV beams. F{sub DN} was the only metric that was found to be sensitive to both increases and reductions of energy for both the 6- and 18-MV beams. Conclusions: Flatness based metrics were found to be more sensitive to energy changes than PDD, In particular, F{sub DN} was found to be the most sensitive metric to energy changes for photon beams of 6 and 18 MV. The ionization chamber array allows this metric to be conveniently measured as part of routine accelerator quality assurance.

  1. High upper critical field in disordered niobium nitride superconductor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baskaran, R., E-mail: baskaran@igcar.gov.in; Thanikai Arasu, A. V.; Amaladass, E. P.; Janawadkar, M. P. [Materials Science Group, IGCAR, Kalpakkam-603102 (India)

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Superconducting Niobium Nitride thin films have been deposited on glass, aluminum nitride buffered glass, and oxidized silicon substrates by reactive DC magnetron sputtering at ambient substrate temperatures. The crystal structure of these thin films has been determined to be cubic fcc B1 structure by Glancing Incidence X-Ray Diffraction analysis. The superconducting transition temperatures of the thin films were measured to be greater than 11.6?K with a maximum of 13.4?K. The negative temperature coefficient of resistance observed in these thin films indicates the presence of disorder. Magneto-resistance measurements have been carried out on these thin films patterned into standard four probe geometry upto a maximum magnetic field of 12?T for two films and upto 15?T for the other two films. The dependence of transition temperature on the applied field is analyzed to estimate the upper critical field. The upper critical field for most of the films was estimated to exceed 35?T, while one of the most disordered films had an estimated upper critical field greater than 70?T.

  2. High-Rate Glass Resistive Plate Chambers For LHC Muon Detectors Upgrade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laktineh, I; Cauwenbergh, S; Combret, C; Crotty, I; Haddad, Y; Grenier, G; Guida, R; Kieffer, R; Lumb, N; Mirabito, L; Schirra, F; Seguin, N; Tytgat, M; Van der Donckt, M; Wang, Y; Zaganidis, N

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The limitation of the detection rate of standard bakelite resistive plate chambers (RPC) used as muon detector in LHC experiments is behind the absence of such detectors in the high TJ regions in both CMS and ATLAS detectors. RPCs made with low resistivity glass plates (10ID O.cm) could be an adequate solution to equip the high TJ regions extending thus both the trigger efficiency and the physics performance. Different beam tests with single and multi-gap configurations using the new glass have shown that such detectors can operate at few thousands Hzlcm2 with high efficiency( > 90%).

  3. Low-NO{sub x} combustion chamber for a power generation gas-turbine unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gutnik, M.N.; Tumanovsky, A.G.; Soudarev, A.V.; Vinogradov, E.D.; Zakharov, Y.I.; Lobanov, D.V.; Akulov, V.A.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The findings of the experimental studies over major operating characteristics of a full-scale combustion chamber (CC) for a new power generation 25 MW gas turbine unit of the AO ``Turbomotorny Zavod'' (Ekaterinburg) production are presented. A technique of the pre-mixed lean combustion with the excess air coefficient being approximately equal to 1.9--2.2 underlies the low NO{sub x} combustor design. Interrelations between the major combustor characteristics and design and duty parameters in parallel with the optimum algorithm of the combustor loading ensuring the minimum toxic exhausts into atmosphere are also shown in the paper.

  4. Development of time projection chamber for precise neutron lifetime measurement using pulsed cold neutron beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arimoto, Y; Igarashi, Y; Iwashita, Y; Ino, T; Katayama, R; Kitahara, R; Kitaguchi, M; Matsumura, H; Mishima, K; Oide, H; Otono, H; Sakakibara, R; Shima, T; Shimizu, H M; Sugino, T; Sumi, N; Sumino, H; Taketani, K; Tanaka, G; Tanaka, M; Tauchi, K; Toyoda, A; Yamada, T; Yamashita, S; Yokoyama, H; Yoshioka, T

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new time projection chamber (TPC) was developed for neutron lifetime measurement using a pulsed cold neutron spallation source at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC). Managing considerable background events from natural sources and the beam radioactivity is a challenging aspect of this measurement. To overcome this problem, the developed TPC has unprecedented features such as the use of polyether-ether-ketone plates in the support structure and internal surfaces covered with $^6$Li-enriched tiles to absorb outlier neutrons. In this paper, the design and performance of the new TPC are reported in detail.

  5. High-voltage crowbar protection for the large CDF axial drift chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Binkley, M.; Mukherjee, A.; Stuermer, W.; Wagner, R.L.; /Fermilab

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Central Outer Tracker (COT) is a big cylindrical drift chamber that provides charged particle tracking for the Collider Detector at Fermilab experiment. To protect the COT, the large stored energy in the high voltage system needs to be removed quickly when a problem is sensed. For the high voltage switch, a special-order silicon-controlled-rectifier was chosen over more readily available integrated gate bipolar transistors because of layout and reliability questions. The considerations concerning the high voltage switch, the prototype performance, and the experience of more than two years of running are described.

  6. Direct measurement of the impulse in a magnetic thrust chamber system for laser fusion rocket

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maeno, Akihiro; Yamamoto, Naoji; Nakashima, Hideki [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Science, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-kouen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Fujioka, Shinsuke; Johzaki, Tomoyuki [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-087 (Japan); Mori, Yoshitaka [Graduate School for the Creation of New Photonics Industries, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka 431-1202 (Japan); Sunahara, Atsushi [Institute for Laser Technology, Suita, Osaka 565-087 (Japan)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An experiment is conducted to measure an impulse for demonstrating a magnetic thrust chamber system for laser fusion rocket. The impulse is produced by the interaction between plasma and magnetic field. In the experiment, the system consists of plasma and neodymium permanent magnets. The plasma is created by a single-beam laser aiming at a polystyrene spherical target. The impulse is 1.5 to 2.2 {mu}Ns by means of a pendulum thrust stand, when the laser energy is 0.7 J. Without magnetic field, the measured impulse is found to be zero. These results indicate that the system for generating impulse is working.

  7. Development of time projection chamber for precise neutron lifetime measurement using pulsed cold neutron beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Arimoto; N. Higashi; Y. Igarashi; Y. Iwashita; T. Ino; R. Katayama; R. Kitahara; M. Kitaguchi; H. Matsumura; K. Mishima; H. Oide; H. Otono; R. Sakakibara; T. Shima; H. M. Shimizu; T. Sugino; N. Sumi; H. Sumino; K. Taketani; G. Tanaka; M. Tanaka; K. Tauchi; A. Toyoda; T. Yamada; S. Yamashita; H. Yokoyama; T. Yoshioka

    2015-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A new time projection chamber (TPC) was developed for neutron lifetime measurement using a pulsed cold neutron spallation source at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC). Managing considerable background events from natural sources and the beam radioactivity is a challenging aspect of this measurement. To overcome this problem, the developed TPC has unprecedented features such as the use of polyether-ether-ketone plates in the support structure and internal surfaces covered with $^6$Li-enriched tiles to absorb outlier neutrons. In this paper, the design and performance of the new TPC are reported in detail.

  8. System for inspection of stacked cargo containers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Derenzo, Stephen (Pinole, CA)

    2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a system for inspection of stacked cargo containers. One embodiment of the invention generally comprises a plurality of stacked cargo containers arranged in rows or tiers, each container having a top, a bottom a first side, a second side, a front end, and a back end; a plurality of spacers arranged in rows or tiers; one or more mobile inspection devices for inspecting the cargo containers, wherein the one or more inspection devices are removeably disposed within the spacers, the inspection means configured to move through the spacers to detect radiation within the containers. The invented system can also be configured to inspect the cargo containers for a variety of other potentially hazardous materials including but not limited to explosive and chemical threats.

  9. Filtered-vented containment systems. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benjamin, A.S.; Walling, H.C.; Cybulskis, P.; DiSalvo, R.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential benefits of filtered-vented containment systems as a means for mitigating the effects of severe accidents are analyzed. Studies so far have focused upon two operating reactor plants in the United States, a large-containment pressurized water reactor and a Mark I containment boiling water reactor. Design options that could be retrofitted to these plants are described including single-component once-through venting systems, multiple-component systems with vent and recirculation capabilities, and totally contained venting systems. A variety of venting strategies are also described which include simple low-volume containment pressure relief strategies and more complicated, high-volume venting strategies that require anticipatory actions. The latter type of strategy is intended for accidents that produce containment-threatening pressure spikes.

  10. Treating nahcolite containing formations and saline zones

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J

    2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for treating a nahcolite containing subsurface formation includes removing water from a saline zone in or near the formation. The removed water is heated using a steam and electricity cogeneration facility. The heated water is provided to the nahcolite containing formation. A fluid is produced from the nahcolite containing formation. The fluid includes at least some dissolved nahcolite. At least some of the fluid is provided to the saline zone.

  11. Monthly energy review, December 1992. [Contains Glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review contains summary data on energy consumption, petroleum, natural gas, oil and gas resource development, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, energy prices, and international energy.

  12. Monthly energy review, January 1993. [Contains Glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review contains summary data on energy consumption, petroleum, natural gas, oil and gas resource development, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, energy prices, and international energy.

  13. Radiation Characteristics of Glass Containing Gas Bubbles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilon, Laurent; Viskanta, Raymond

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    B. L. Drolen, “Thermal radiation in particulate media withRadiation Characteristics of Glass Containing Gas Bubblesthermophysical properties and radiation characteristics of

  14. Chemically stabilized ionomers containing inorganic fillers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roelofs, Mark Gerrit

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Ionomeric polymers that are chemically stabilized and contain inorganic fillers are prepared, and show reduced degradation. The ionomers care useful in membranes and electrochemical cells.

  15. Heat Transfer Fluids Containing Nanoparticles | Argonne National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Containing Nanoparticles Technology available for licensing: A stable, nonreactive nanofluid that exhibits enhanced heat transfer properties with only a minimal increase in...

  16. Cognitive Issues in Upper-Division Electricity & Magnetism Steven J. Pollock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    interventions ­at the upper division. Keywords: physics education research, course reform, electricityCognitive Issues in Upper-Division Electricity & Magnetism Steven J. Pollock and Stephanie V. Chasteen* * Science Education Initiative, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, USA Department

  17. Effects of discharge chamber length on the negative ion generation in volume-produced negative hydrogen ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, Kyoung-Jae [Center for Advance Research in Fusion Reactor Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of)] [Center for Advance Research in Fusion Reactor Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Bong-Ki; An, YoungHwa; Dang, Jeong-Jeung [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Y. S., E-mail: yhwang@snu.ac.kr [Center for Advance Research in Fusion Reactor Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In a volume-produced negative hydrogen ion source, control of electron temperature is essential due to its close correlation with the generation of highly vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules in the heating region as well as the generation of negative hydrogen ions by dissociative attachment in the extraction region. In this study, geometric effects of the cylindrical discharge chamber on negative ion generation via electron temperature changes are investigated in two discharge chambers with different lengths of 7.5 cm and 11 cm. Measurements with a radio-frequency-compensated Langmuir probe show that the electron temperature in the heating region is significantly increased by reducing the length of the discharge chamber due to the reduced effective plasma size. A particle balance model which is modified to consider the effects of discharge chamber configuration on the plasma parameters explains the variation of the electron temperature with the chamber geometry and gas pressure quite well. Accordingly, H{sup ?} ion density measurement with laser photo-detachment in the short chamber shows a few times increase compared to the longer one at the same heating power depending on gas pressure. However, the increase drops significantly as operating gas pressure decreases, indicating increased electron temperatures in the extraction region degrade dissociative attachment significantly especially in the low pressure regime. It is concluded that the increase of electron temperature by adjusting the discharge chamber geometry is efficient to increase H{sup ?} ion production as long as low electron temperatures are maintained in the extraction region in volume-produced negative hydrogen ion sources.

  18. Upper Adjoints for Fast Interprocedural Variable Markus MullerOlm 1 and Helmut Seidl 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller-Olm, Markus

    Upper Adjoints for Fast Inter­procedural Variable Equalities Markus MË?uller­Olm 1 and Helmut Seidl

  19. SU-D-19A-01: Can Farmer-Type Ionization Chambers Be Used to Improve the Accuracy of Low-Energy Electron Beam Reference Dosimetry?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muir, B R; McEwen, M R [Measurement Science and Standards, National Research Council, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate the use of cylindrical Farmer-type ionization chambers to improve the accuracy of low-energy electron beam calibration. Historically, these chamber types have not been used in beams with incident energies less than 10 MeV (R{sub 5} {sub 0} < 4.3 cm) because early investigations suggested large (up to 5 %) fluence perturbation factors in these beams, implying that a significant component of uncertainty would be introduced if used for calibration. More recently, the assumptions used to determine perturbation corrections for cylindrical chambers have been questioned. Methods: Measurements are made with cylindrical chambers in Elekta Precise 4, 8 and 18 MeV electron beams. Several chamber types are investigated that employ graphite walls and aluminum electrodes with very similar specifications (NE2571, NE2505/3, FC65-G). Depth-ionization scans are measured in water in the 8 and 18 MeV beams. To reduce uncertainty from chamber positioning, measurements in the 4 MeV beam are made at the reference depth in Virtual Water™. The variability of perturbation factors is quantified by comparing normalized response of various chambers. Results: Normalized ion chamber response varies by less than 0.7 % for similar chambers at average electron energies corresponding to that at the reference depth from 4 or 6 MeV beams. Similarly, normalized measurements made with similar chambers at the reference depth in the 4 MeV beam vary by less than 0.4 %. Absorbed dose calibration coefficients derived from these results are stable within 0.1 % on average over a period of 6 years. Conclusion: These results indicate that the uncertainty associated with differences in fluence perturbations for cylindrical chambers with similar specifications is only 0.2 %. The excellent long-term stability of these chambers in both photon and electron beams suggests that these chambers might offer the best performance for all reference dosimetry applications.

  20. Progress on an integrated multi-physics simulation predictive capability for plasma chamber nuclear components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Ying; M. Abdou; H. Zhang; R. Munipalli; M. Ulrickson; M. Sawan; B. Merrill

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the behavior of a plasma chamber component in the fusion environment requires a simulation technique that is capable of integrating multi-disciplinary computational codes while appropriately treating geometric heterogeneity and complexity. Such a tool should be able to interpret phenomena from mutually dependent scientific disciplines and predict performance with sufficient accuracy and consistency. Integrated multi-physics simulation predictive capability (ISPC) relies upon advanced numerical simulation techniques and is being applied to ITER first wall/shield and Test Blanket Module (TBM) designs. In this paper, progress in ISPC development is described through the presentation of a number of integrated simulations. The simulations cover key physical phenomena encountered in a fusion plasma chamber system, including tritium permeation, fluid dynamics, and structure mechanics. Interface engines were developed in order to pass field data, such as surface deformation or nuclear heating rate, from the structural analysis to the thermo-fluid MHD analysis code for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) velocity profile assessments, or from the neutronics analysis to the thermo-fluid analysis for temperature calculations, respectively. Near-term effort toward further ISPC development is discussed.

  1. Photoelectron track length distributions measured in a negative ion time projection chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prieskorn, Z R; Kaaret, P E; Black, J K

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report photoelectron track length distributions between 3 and 8 keV in gas mixtures of Ne+CO2+CH3NO2 (260:80:10 Torr) and CO2+CH3NO2 (197.5: 15 Torr). The measurements were made using a negative ion time projection chamber (NITPC) at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). We report the first quantitative analysis of photoelectron track length distributions in a gas. The distribution of track lengths at a given energy is best fit by a lognormal distribution. A powerlaw distribution of the form, f(E)=a(E/Eo)n, is found to fit the relationship between mean track length and energy. We find n=1.29 +/- 0.07 for Ne+CO2+CH3NO2 and n=1.20 +/- 0.09 for CO2+CH3NO2. Understanding the distribution of photoelectron track lengths in proportional counter gases is important for optimizing the pixel size and the dimensions of the active region in electron-drift time projection chambers (TPCs) and NITPC X-ray polarimeters.

  2. Improvement of a portable pressurized ionization chamber with the addition of a microprocessor datalogger

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Etten, D.; Olsen, B.

    1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A measurement system was necessary to monitor low-level external radiation levels along a boundary section of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. High pressure ionization chambers were selected to monitor the radiation levels caused by a plume of air activation products generated by a linear proton accelerator. The data are used for evaluation of an atmospheric dispersion model and for boundary dose calculations. The model compares the pressure ionization chamber (PIC) data with the predicted values based on meteorological wind data measured by two meteorological towers and source term data from the discharge stack. The PIC monitoring system required continuous remote (no ac power) battery-only operation, reliability, and data processing capability. The data processing capability simplified calibration and provided fine time resolution for comparison with other logged data. The sensor head of a Reuter-Stokes RSS-111 was used as the detector and an improved electronic control package was developed to operate the detector and to process and log the data.

  3. Multinuclear and multidimensional solid-state NMR investigations of combustion chamber deposits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, J.C. [Texaco Research Center, Beacon, NY (United States)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multinuclear solid-state NMR has been used to study the carbonaceous backbone of combustion chamber deposits (CCDs) generated in both gasoline and diesel engines. The combination of {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C cross-polarization, and dipolar dephasing techniques have been used to {open_quotes}average molecule{close_quotes} parameters for a large number of CCDs. These parameters were correlated with gasoline composition and cylinder cleanliness. Discussion will be presented on deposits from different areas of the chamber - piston top, cylinder head, squish, non-squish, end-gas, non-end gas regions. Deposits from various cylinders in a number of dynamometer engines, fleet car engines will be compared. The use of NMR to observe the effects of bench-test engine modifications on CCD structure will be demonstrated. The macromolecular structure of the deposits was studied by {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C spin-exchange experiments which allow one to observe internuclear dipolar interactions between the various carbon functionalities in the deposit. The spatial information on fuel additive - CCD interactions that these experiments provide will be discussed.

  4. Tidal channel deposits in Upper Cretaceous of northern Kaiparowits Plateau, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez, J.D.; McCabe, P.J.

    1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seven coarsening-upward sequences have been recognized in the 300 to 400-m thick John Henry Member of the Straight Cliffs Formation. These sequences have abundant hummocky cross-stratification and are interpreted as having formed by the progradation of wave-dominated shorelines. A detailed study of these sequences showed that in many cases channel deposits are incised into upper shoreface deposits. These channels are up t 15 m deep. Mudclasts, Ostrea and Inoceramus fragments, and pebbles are present at the base of many channels. Some channel lag deposits also contain logs with Teredolites borings. Thin units of flaser, wavy and lenticular bedding may be present at any position within the channel deposits but are most common higher in the sequences. The channels are, however, infilled predominantly with trough cross-bedded, fine to medium-grained sandstones. Some cross-beds show multiple reactivation surfaces and the bimodal nature of the paleocurrents suggests that the cross-beds were deposited by tidal currents. The presence of tidal bundles with double mud drapes in a few cross-beds confirms the interpretation of the sandstones as tidal channel deposits. At least 22 tidal bundles are present in one tidal bundle sequence, suggesting a semi-diurnal tidal cycle. Although, there is convincing evidence of tides within the channel deposits, the shoreface deposits show little evidence of reworking by tidal currents. Possible beach or intertidal mudflat deposits have a maximum thickness of 1.5 m. The Kaiparowits region during the Upper Cretaceous probably experienced, therefore, a microtidal regime with significant tidal currents being restricted to tidal inlets or estuaries.

  5. Tidal channel deposits in Upper Cretaceous of northern Kaiparowits Plateau, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez, J.D.; McCabe, P.J.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seven coarsening-upward sequences have been recognized in the 300 to 400-m thick John Henry Member of the Straight Cliffs Formation. These sequences have abundant hummocky cross-stratification and are interpreted as having formed by the progradation of wave-dominated shorelines. A detailed study of these sequences showed that in many cases channel deposits are incised into upper shoreface deposits. These channels are up to 15 m deep. Mudclasts, Ostrea and Inoceramus fragments, and pebbles are present at the base of many channels. Some channel lag deposits also contain logs with Teredolites borings. Thin units of flaser, wavy and lenticular bedding may be present at any position within the channel deposits but are most common higher in the sequences. The channels are, however, infilled predominantly with trough cross-bedded, fine to medium-grained sandstones. Some crossbeds show multiple reactivation surfaces and the bimodal nature of the paleocurrents suggests that the cross-beds were deposited by tidal currents. The presence of tidal bundles with double mud drapes in a few cross-beds confirms the interpretation of the sandstones as tidal channel deposits. At least 22 tidal bundles are present in one tidal bundle sequence, suggesting a semi-diurnal tidal cycle. Although there is convincing evidence of tides within the channel deposits, the shoreface deposits show little evidence of reworking by tidal currents. Possible beach or intertidal mudflat deposits have a maximum thickness of 1.5 m. The Kaiparowits region during the Upper Cretaceous probably experience, therefore, a microtidal regime with significant tidal currents being restricted to tidal inlets or estuaries.

  6. A Proposal for a Ton Scale Bubble Chamber for Dark Matter Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collar, Juan; Dahl, C.Eric; Fustin, Drew; Robinson, Alan; /Chicago U.; Behnke, Ed; Behnke, Joshua; Breznau, William; Connor, Austin; Kuehnemund, Emily Grace; Levine, Ilan; Moan, Timothy; /Indiana U., South Bend /Fermilab

    2010-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The nature of non-baryonic dark matter is one of the most intriguing questions for particle physics at the start of the 21st century. There is ample evidence for its existence, but almost nothing is known of its properties. WIMPs are a very appealing candidate particle and several experimental campaigns are underway around the world to search for these particles via the nuclear recoils that they should induce. The COUPP series of bubble chambers has played a significant role in the WIMP search. Through a sequence of detectors of increasing size, a number of R&D issues have arisen and been solved, and the technology has now been advanced to the point where the construction of large chambers requires a modest research effort, some development, but mostly just engineering. It is within this context that we propose to build the next COUPP detector - COUPP-500, a ton scale device to be built over the next three years at Fermilab and then deployed deep underground at SNOLAB. The primary advantages of the COUPP approach over other technologies are: (1) The ability to reject electron and gamma backgrounds by arranging the chamber thermodynamics such that these particles do not even trigger the detector. (2) The ability to suppress neutron backgrounds by having the radioactively impure detection elements far from the active volume and by using the self-shielding of a large device and the high granularity to identify multiple bubbles. (3) The ability to build large chambers cheaply and with a choice of target fluids. (4) The ability to increase the size of the chambers without changing the size or complexity of the data acquisition. (5) Sensitivity to spin-dependent and spin-independent WIMP couplings. These key advantages should enable the goal of one background event in a ton-year of exposure to be achieved. The conceptual design of COUPP-500 is scaled from the preceding devices. In many cases all that is needed is a simple scaling up of components previously used. Calibration and R&D are still needed on some aspects of the system. We know we have the ability to distinguish alpha-induced events from nuclear recoils, but we do not yet know whether the combination of material purity and rejection are good enough to run for a year with no alpha background. We also need to have more detailed measurements of the detector threshold and a better understanding of its high gamma rejection. In addition, there are important checks to make on the longevity of the detector components in the hydraulic fluid and on the chemistry of the active fluid. The 2009 PASAG report explicitly supported the construction of the COUPP-500 device in all funding scenarios. The NSF has shown similar enthusiasm. It awarded one of its DUSEL S4 grants to assist in the engineering needed to build COUPP-500. The currently estimated cost of COUPP-500 is $8M, about half the $15M-$20M price tag expected by the PASAG report for a next generation dark matter search experiment. The COUPP-500 device will have a spin independent WIMP-nucleus cross-section sensitivity of 6 x 10{sup -47} cm{sup 2} after a background-free year of running. This device should then provide the benchmark against which all other WIMP searches are measured.

  7. SECTION 34 Table of Contents 34 Upper Columbia Management Plan..............................................................2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and formation of the Subbasin Work Teams and the process used to develop and adopt the management plan can34-1 SECTION 34 ­ Table of Contents 34 Upper Columbia Management Plan .........................................................................25 #12;34-2 34 Upper Columbia Management Plan The Upper Columbia Subbasin Management Plan

  8. Upper Digestive Disorders Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee 02/2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yener, Aylin

    Upper Digestive Disorders Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee 02/2012 Revised 02/08/12 Page 1 of 2 Upper Digestive Tract Anatomy Esophagus: A long muscular tube in the chest area occurs in the duodenum. Upper Digestive Disorders Reflux with Esophagitis: The flowing back (or reflux

  9. CHEMICAL AND HYDROLOGIC DATA FROM THE CEMENT CREEK AND UPPER ANIMAS RIVER CONFLUENCE AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHEMICAL AND HYDROLOGIC DATA FROM THE CEMENT CREEK AND UPPER ANIMAS RIVER CONFLUENCE AND MIXING.S. Geological Survey #12;CHEMICAL AND HYDROLOGIC DATA FROM THE CEMENT CREEK AND UPPER ANIMAS RIVER CONFLUENCE.H., Schemel, L.E., 2007, Chemical and hydrologic data form the Cement Creek and upper Animas River confluence

  10. Penetration of solar radiation in the upper ocean: A numerical model for oceanic and coastal waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Zhongping

    Penetration of solar radiation in the upper ocean: A numerical model for oceanic and coastal waters in the upper ocean, the vertical distribution of solar radiation (ESR) in the shortwave domain plays (2005), Penetration of solar radiation in the upper ocean: A numerical model for oceanic and coastal

  11. New code upper bounds from the Terwilliger algebra and semidefinite programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrijver, Alexander

    1 New code upper bounds from the Terwilliger algebra and semidefinite programming Alexander n and minimum distance at least d. It is based on block­diagonalising the Terwilliger alge­ bra, Terwilliger algebra, upper bounds. I. DESCRIPTION OF THE METHOD We present a new upper bound on A(n, d

  12. New code upper bounds from the Terwilliger algebra and semidefinite programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrijver, Alexander

    1 New code upper bounds from the Terwilliger algebra and semidefinite programming Alexander and minimum distance at least d. It is based on block-diagonalising the Terwilliger alge- bra of the Hamming, Terwilliger algebra, upper bounds. I. DESCRIPTION OF THE METHOD We present a new upper bound on A(n, d

  13. Testing upper motor neuron function in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: the most difficult

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooper, Robin L.

    Testing upper motor neuron function in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: the most difficult task of neurophysiology Clinical signs of upper motor neuron involvement are an essential observation to support the diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral scler- osis. However, clinical signs of upper motor neuron can be difficult

  14. Chronological refinement of an ice core record at Upper Fremont Glacier in south central North America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuster, Paul F. [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Boulder, Colorado (United States)] [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Boulder, Colorado (United States); White, David E. [Golden Software, Golden, Colorado (United States)] [Golden Software, Golden, Colorado (United States); Naftz, David L. [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States)] [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Cecil, L. DeWayne [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Idaho Falls, Idaho (United States)] [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Idaho Falls, Idaho (United States)

    2000-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential to use ice cores from alpine glaciers in the midlatitudes to reconstruct paleoclimatic records has not been widely recognized. Although excellent paleoclimatic records exist for the polar regions, paleoclimatic ice core records are not common from midlatitude locations. An ice core removed from the Upper Fremont Glacier in Wyoming provides evidence for abrupt climate change during the mid-1800s. Volcanic events (Krakatau and Tambora) identified from electrical conductivity measurements (ECM) and isotopic and chemical data from the Upper Fremont Glacier were reexamined to confirm and refine previous chronological estimates of the ice core. At a depth of 152 m the refined age-depth profile shows good agreement (1736{+-}10 A.D.) with the {sup 14}C age date (1729{+-}95 A.D.). The {delta}{sup 18}O profile of the Upper Fremont Glacier (UFG) ice core indicates a change in climate known as the Little Ice Age (LIA). However, the sampling interval for {delta}{sup 18}O is sufficiently large (20 cm) such that it is difficult to pinpoint the LIA termination on the basis of {delta}{sup 18}O data alone. Other research has shown that changes in the {delta}{sup 18}O variance are generally coincident with changes in ECM variance. The ECM data set contains over 125,000 data points at a resolution of 1 data point per millimeter of ice core. A 999-point running average of the ECM data set and results from f tests indicates that the variance of the ECM data decreases significantly at about 108 m. At this depth, the age-depth profile predicts an age of 1845 A.D. Results indicate the termination of the LIA was abrupt with a major climatic shift to warmer temperatures around 1845 A.D. and continuing to present day. Prediction limits (error bars) calculated for the profile ages are {+-}10 years (90% confidence level). Thus a conservative estimate for the time taken to complete the LIA climatic shift to present-day climate is about 10 years, suggesting the LIA termination in alpine regions of central North America may have occurred on a relatively short (decadal) timescale. (c) 2000 American Geophysical Union.

  15. SU-E-T-17: A Mathematical Model for PinPoint Chamber Correction in Measuring Small Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, T; Zhang, Y; Li, X; Heron, D.E.; Huq, M.Saiful [University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: For small field dosimetry, such as measuring the cone output factor for stereotactic radiosurgery, ion chambers often result in underestimation of the dose, due to both the volume averaging effect and the lack of electron equilibrium. The purpose of this work is to develop a mathematical model, specifically for the pinpoint chamber, to calculate the correction factors corresponding to different type of small fields, including single cone-based circular field and non-standard composite fields. Methods: A PTW 0.015cc PinPoint chamber was used in the study. Its response in a certain field was modeled as the total contribution of many small beamlets, each with different response factor depending on the relative strength, radial distance to the chamber axis, and the beam angle. To get these factors, 12 cone-shaped circular fields (5mm,7.5mm, 10mm, 12.5mm, 15mm, 20mm, 25mm, 30mm, 35mm, 40mm, 50mm, 60mm) were irradiated and measured with the PinPoint chamber. For each field size, hundreds of readings were recorded for every 2mm chamber shift in the horizontal plane. These readings were then compared with the theoretical doses as obtained with Monte Carlo calculation. A penalized-least-square optimization algorithm was developed to find out the beamlet response factors. After the parameter fitting, the established mathematical model was validated with the same MC code for other non-circular fields. Results: The optimization algorithm used for parameter fitting was stable and the resulted response factors were smooth in spatial domain. After correction with the mathematical model, the chamber reading matched with the Monte Carlo calculation for all the tested fields to within 2%. Conclusion: A novel mathematical model has been developed for the PinPoint chamber for dosimetric measurement of small fields. The current model is applicable only when the beam axis is perpendicular to the chamber axis. It can be applied to non-standard composite fields. Further validation with other type of detectors is being conducted.

  16. Nuclear Power Plant Containment Pressure Boundary Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cherry, J.L.; Chokshi, N.C.; Costello, J.F.; Ellingwood, B.R.; Naus, D.J.

    1999-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Research to address aging of the containment pressure boundary in light-water reactor plants is summarized. This research is aimed at understanding the significant factors relating occurrence of corrosion, efficacy of inspection, and structural capacity reduction of steel containment and liners of concrete containment. This understanding will lead to improvements in risk-informed regulatory decision making. Containment pressure boundary components are described and potential aging factors identified. Quantitative tools for condition assessments of aging structures to maintain an acceptable level of reliability over the service life of the plant are discussed. Finally, the impact of aging (i.e., loss of shell thickness due to corrosion) on steel containment fragility for a pressurized water reactor ice-condenser plant is presented.

  17. Selection of 3013 Containers for Field Surveillance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry Peppers, Elizabeth Kelly, James McClard, Gary Friday, Theodore Venetz, and Jerry Stakebade

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report revises and combines three earlier reports dealing with the binning, statistical sampling, and sample selection of 3013 containers for field surveillance. It includes changes to the binning specification resulting from completion of the Savannah River Site packaging campaign and new information from the shelf-life program and field surveillance activities. The revised bin assignments result in changes to the random sample specification. These changes are necessary to meet the statistical requirements of the surveillance program. This report will be reviewed regularly and revised as needed. Section 1 of this report summarizes the results of an extensive effort to assign all of the current and projected 3013 containers in the Department of Energy (DOE) inventory to one of three bins (Innocuous, Pressure and Corrosion, or Pressure) based on potential failure mechanisms. Grouping containers into bins provides a framework to make a statistical selection of individual containers from the entire population for destructive and nondestructive field surveillance. The binning process consisted of three main steps. First, the packaged containers were binned using information in the Integrated Surveillance Program database and a decision tree. The second task was to assign those containers that could not be binned using the decision tree to a specific bin using container-by-container engineering review. The final task was to evaluate containers not yet packaged and assign them to bins using process knowledge. The technical basis for the decisions made during the binning process is included in Section 1. A composite decision tree and a summary table show all of the containers projected to be in the DOE inventory at the conclusion of packaging at all sites. Decision trees that provide an overview of the binning process and logic are included for each site. Section 2 of this report describes the approach to the statistical selection of containers for surveillance and consists of a revision of the earlier statistical sampling report. The requirement of 99.9% probability of observing at least one of the worst 5% (99.9/5%) of the containers with a potential for degradation is used to determine the number of containers in the random sample for the Pressure and Corrosion and the Pressure bins. Sampling requirements for the Innocuous bin are not based on the 99.9/5% requirement; rather, they are based on evaluating the assumption of no significant degradation of, or variability between, containers relative to corrosion or pressure generation within the Innocuous bin population as valid. Section 3 of this report focuses on the actual selection of 3013 containers for surveillance. Surveillance containers are identified by the year that the surveillance should be performed. In addition to the randomly selected containers, containers were selected from the entire population, based on engineering judgment for each of these years. The judgmental sampling targets containers with the greatest potential for gas generation and/or corrosion. The factors used for judgmental sample selection are documented in this section. A more detailed discussion of the FY 2005 sample selection process is contained in the previous FY 2005 sample selection report.

  18. Mima mound grasslands of the upper coastal prairie of Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butler, Arlene Camille

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    21 28 31 34 44 47 49 52 55 57 71 74 76 79 87 94 LlST OF TABLES Table Physical and chemical soil characteristics for topographic variations within 3 soil complexes of the upper Coastal Prairie, Texas Page 27 Average absolute... ~ ' ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ O O 8 z z O V) CO iU CC LU O D IZ 31 The landscape had less slope than on Aris-like stands. Intermounds on Crowley/Edna-like soils appear nearly level. Results of physical and chemical analysis were very similar to Aris-like soils...

  19. Biostratigraphy of the upper cretaceous Austin Group, Travis County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, William Maurice

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Formation is on the San Gabriel River at the Jonah-Hutto roadcrossing in Williamson County. At the type locality, the upper 35 feet of the Jonah is exposed; the lower 50 feet is exposed two-thirds of a mile upstream. 1he Jonah Formation ranges fr om 120... Forma- tion at Vinson Creek is 25 feet thick and the limestone beds are skeletal packstones. The thinning of the Jonah Formation is caused by the positive influence of the San Marcos Arch during deposition. 20 The contact between the Jonah Formation...

  20. Upper limits on stray force noise for LISA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Carbone; A. Cavalleri; R. Dolesi; C. D. Hoyle; M. Hueller; S. Vitale; W. J. Weber

    2003-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a torsion pendulum facility for LISA gravitational reference sensor ground testing that allows us to put significant upper limits on residual stray forces exerted by LISA-like position sensors on a representative test mass and to characterize specific sources of disturbances for LISA. We present here the details of the facility, the experimental procedures used to maximize its sensitivity, and the techniques used to characterize the pendulum itself that allowed us to reach a torque sensitivity below 20 fNm /sqrt{Hz} from 0.3 to 10 mHz. We also discuss the implications of the obtained results for LISA.

  1. Sandia Energy - Upper Rio Grande Simulation Model (URGSiM)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol Home DistributionTransportation Safety Home StationaryUpper Rio Grande

  2. Upper Arlington, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, IndianaTurtleCooperativeCROSS-VALIDATION OF SWERA'sUpper Arlington,

  3. Upper Division Hot Spring Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, IndianaTurtleCooperativeCROSS-VALIDATION OF SWERA'sUpper

  4. DISPOSAL OF EMPTY CHEMICAL CONTAINERS Empty chemical containers can contain residual amounts of chemicals. In an effort to ensure that this residue is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maroncelli, Mark

    containers or any plastic containers, plastic tubing, or plastic beakers that do not meet the recyclingDISPOSAL OF EMPTY CHEMICAL CONTAINERS Empty chemical containers can contain residual amounts or properly dispose of these containers, the following procedure has been developed by EHS in conjunction

  5. CLOSURE WELD DEVELOPMENT FOR 3013 OUTER CONTAINERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daugherty, W.; Howard, S.; Peterson, K.; Stokes, M.

    2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Excess plutonium materials in the DOE complex are packaged and stored in accordance with DOE-STD-3013. This standard specifies requirements for the stabilization of such materials and subsequent packaging in dual nested seal-welded containers. Austenitic stainless steels have been selected for container fabrication. The inner 3013 container provides contamination control while the outer 3013 container is the primary containment vessel and is the focus of this paper. Each packaging site chose a process for seal welding the outer 3013 containers in accordance with its needs and expertise. The two processes chosen for weld closure were laser beam welding (LBW) and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). Following development efforts, each system was qualified in accordance with DOE-STD-3013 prior to production use. The 3013 outer container closure weld joint was designed to accommodate the characteristics of a laser weld. This aspect of the joint design necessitated some innovative process and equipment considerations in the application of the GTAW process. Details of the weld requirements and the development processes are presented and several potential enhancements for the GTAW system are described.

  6. Construction of a scattering chamber for ion-beam analysis of environmental materials in undergraduate physics research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaBrake, Scott M.; Vineyard, Michael F.; Turley, Colin F.; Moore, Robert D.; Johnson, Christopher [Department of Physics and Astronomy Union College, Schenectady, NY 12308 (United States)

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a new scattering chamber for ion-beam analysis of environmental materials with the 1.1-MV Pelletron accelerator at the Union College Ion-Beam Analysis Laboratory. The chamber was constructed from a ten-inch, Conflat, multi-port cross and includes a three-axis target manipulator and target ladder assembly, an eight-inch turbo pump, an Amptek X-ray detector, and multiple charged particle detectors. Recent projects performed by our undergraduate research team include proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and Rutherford backscattering (RBS) analyses of atmospheric aerosols collected with a nine-stage cascade impactor in Upstate New York. We will describe the construction of the chamber and discuss the results of some commissioning experiments.

  7. June7-8, 2001 A. R. Raffray, et al., Completion of Assessment of Dry Chamber Wall Option Without Protective Gas,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    Wall Option 3 Changing Chamber Radius Affects Photon and Ion Times of Flight and Energy Deposition for Ions Based on Direct Drive Spectra and 6.5 m Chamber Debris Ions Time 10ns 0.2µs 1µs 2.5µs Fast IonsJune7-8, 2001 A. R. Raffray, et al., Completion of Assessment of Dry Chamber Wall Option Without

  8. Resolution of the direct containment heating issue for all Westinghouse plants with large dry containments or subatmospheric containments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pilch, M.M.; Allen, M.D.; Klamerus, E.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report uses the scenarios described in NUREG/CR-6075 and NUREG/CR-6075, Supplement 1, to address the direct containment heating (DCH) issue for all Westinghouse plants with large dry or subatmospheric containments. DCH is considered resolved if the conditional containment failure probability (CCFP) is less than 0.1. Loads versus strength evaluations of the CCFP were performed for each plant using plant-specific information. The DCH issue is considered resolved for a plant if a screening phase results in a CCFP less than 0.01, which is more stringent than the overall success criterion. If the screening phase CCFP for a plant is greater than 0.01, then refined containment loads evaluations must be performed and/or the probability of high pressure at vessel breach must be analyzed. These analyses could be used separately or could be integrated together to recalculate the CCFP for an individual plant to reduce the CCFP to meet the overall success criterion of less than 0.1. The CCFPs for all of the Westinghouse plants with dry containments were less than 0.01 at the screening phase, and thus, the DCH issue is resolved for these plants based on containment loads alone. No additional analyses are required.

  9. Radon free storage container and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Langner, Jr., G. Harold (Mack, CO); Rangel, Mark J. (Austin, CO)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A radon free containment environment for either short or long term storage of radon gas detectors can be provided as active, passive, or combined active and passive embodiments. A passive embodiment includes a resealable vessel containing a basket capable of holding and storing detectors and an activated charcoal adsorbing liner between the basket and the containment vessel wall. An active embodiment includes the resealable vessel of the passive embodiment, and also includes an external activated charcoal filter that circulates the gas inside the vessel through the activated charcoal filter. An embodiment combining the active and passive embodiments is also provided.

  10. Corrosion resistant storage container for radioactive material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schweitzer, Donald G. (Bayport, NY); Davis, Mary S. (Wading River, NY)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A corrosion resistant long-term storage container for isolating radioactive waste material in a repository. The container is formed of a plurality of sealed corrosion resistant canisters of different relative sizes, with the smaller canisters housed within the larger canisters, and with spacer means disposed between judxtaposed pairs of canisters to maintain a predetermined spacing between each of the canisters. The combination of the plural surfaces of the canisters and the associated spacer means is effective to make the container capable of resisting corrosion, and thereby of preventing waste material from leaking from the innermost canister into the ambient atmosphere.

  11. Passive containment cooling water distribution device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Conway, Lawrence E. (Hookstown, PA); Fanto, Susan V. (Plum Borough, PA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A passive containment cooling system for a nuclear reactor containment vessel. Disclosed is a cooling water distribution system for introducing cooling water by gravity uniformly over the outer surface of a steel containment vessel using a series of radial guide elements and cascading weir boxes to collect and then distribute the cooling water into a series of distribution areas through a plurality of cascading weirs. The cooling water is then uniformly distributed over the curved surface by a plurality of weir notches in the face plate of the weir box.

  12. Super-hydrophobic fluorine containing aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coronado, Paul R. (Livermore, CA); Poco, John F. (Livermore, CA); Hrubesh, Lawrence W. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An aerogel material with surfaces containing fluorine atoms which exhibits exceptional hydrophobicity, or the ability to repel liquid water. Hydrophobic aerogels are efficient absorbers of solvents from water. Solvents miscible with water are separated from it because the solvents are more volatile than water and they enter the porous aerogel as a vapor across the liquid water/solid interface. Solvents that are immisicble with water are separated from it by selectively wetting the aerogel. The hydrophobic property is achieved by formulating the aerogel using fluorine containing molecules either directly by addition in the sol-gel process, or by treating a standard dried aerogel using the vapor of fluorine containing molecules.

  13. Corrosion resistant storage container for radioactive material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schweitzer, D.G.; Davis, M.S.

    1984-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A corrosion resistant long-term storage container for isolating high-level radioactive waste material in a repository is claimed. The container is formed of a plurality of sealed corrosion resistant canisters of different relative sizes, with the smaller canisters housed within the larger canisters, and with spacer means disposed between juxtaposed pairs of canisters to maintain a predetermined spacing between each of the canisters. The combination of the plural surfaces of the canisters and the associated spacer means is effective to make the container capable of resisting corrosion, and thereby of preventing waste material from leaking from the innermost canister into the ambient atmosphere.

  14. Upper bound on the cutoff in the Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veselov, A I

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of this presentation is to point out that the Upper bound on the cutoff in lattice Electroweak theory is still unknown. The consideration of the continuum theory is based on the perturbation expansion around trivial vacuum. The internal structure of the lattice Weinberg - Salam model may appear to be more complicated especially in the region of the phase diagram close to the phase transition between the physical Higgs phase and the unphysical symmetric phase of the lattice model, where the continuum physics is to be approached. We represent the results of our numerical investigation of the quenched model at infinite bare scalar self coupling $\\lambda$. These results demonstrate that at $\\lambda = \\infty$ the upper bound on the cutoff is around $\\frac{\\pi}{a} = 1.4$ Tev. The preliminary results for finite $\\lambda$ are also presented. Basing on these results we cannot yet make a definite conclusion on the maximal value of the cutoff admitted in the lattice model, although we have found that ...

  15. Usiing NovoCOS cleaning equipment in repairing the furnace-chamber lining in coke batteries 4 & 5 at OAO Koks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.G. Protasov; R. Linden; A. Gross [OAO Koks, Kemerovo (Russian Federation)

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Experience with a new surface-preparation technology for the ceramic resurfacing of the refractory furnace-chamber lining in coke batteries is described.

  16. Environmental chamber measurements of mercury flux from coal utilization by-products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pekney, N.J.; Martello, D.V.; Schroeder, K.T.; Granite, E.J.

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An environmental chamber was constructed to measure the mercury flux from coal utilization by-product (CUB) samples. Samples of fly ash, FGD gypsum, and wallboard made from FGD gypsum were tested under both dark and illuminated conditions with or without the addition of water to the sample. Mercury releases varied widely, with 7-day experiment averages ranging from -6.8 to 73 ng/m2 h for the fly ash samples and -5.2 to 335 ng/m2 h for the FGD/wallboard samples. Initial mercury content, fly ash type, and light exposure had no observable consistent effects on the mercury flux. For the fly ash samples, the effect of a mercury control technology was to decrease the emission. For three of the four pairs of FGD gypsum and wallboard samples, the wallboard sample released less (or absorbed more) mercury than the gypsum.

  17. Microbial Community Analysis of a Single Chamber Microbial Fuel Cell Using Potato Wastewater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhen Li; Rishika Haynes; Eugene Sato; Malcolm Shields; Yoshiko Fujita; Chikashi Sato

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) convert chemical energy to electrical energy via bioelectrochemical reactions mediated by microorganisms. We investigated the diversity of the microbial community in an air cathode single chamber MFC that utilized potato-process wastewater as substrate. Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) results indicated that the bacterial communities on the anode, cathode, control electrode, and MFC bulk fluid were similar, but differed dramatically from that of the anaerobic domestic sludge and potato wastewater inoculum. The 16S rDNA sequencing results showed that microbial species detected on the anode were predominantly within the phyla of Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Bacteroidetes. Fluorescent microscopy results indicated that there was a clear enhancement of biofilm formation on the anode. Results of this study could help improve understanding of the complexity of microbial communities and optimize the microbial composition for generating electricity by MFCs that utilize potato wastewater.

  18. Shielding analysis for a heavy ion beam chamber with plasma channels for ion transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sawan, M.E.; Peterson, R.R.; Yu, S.

    2000-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutronics analysis has been performed to assess the shielding requirements for the insulators and final focusing magnets in a modified HYLIFE-II target chamber that utilizes pre-formed plasma channels for heavy ion beam transport. Using 65 cm thick Flibe jet assemblies provides adequate shielding for the electrical insulator units. Additional shielding is needed in front of the final focusing superconducting quadrupole magnets. A shield with a thickness varying between 45 and 90 cm needs to be provided in front of the quadrupole unit. The final laser mirrors located along the channel axis are in the direct line-of-sight of source neutrons. Neutronics calculations were performed to determine the constraints on the placement of these mirrors to be lifetime components.

  19. The Bonus Detector: A Radial Time Projection Chamber for tracking Spectator Protons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard Fenker

    2004-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A GEM-based Radial Time Projection Chamber is being developed as a spectator-proton tracker for an experiment at Jefferson Lab. The purpose of the experiment is the study of the structure of nearly free neutrons. Interactions on such neutrons can be identified by the presence of a backward-moving proton in the final state of a beam-deuterium collision. The detector must be of very low mass in order to provide sensitivity to the slowest possible protons. The ionization electron trail left by the protons will drift radially outward to an amplification structure composed of curved GEMs, and the resulting charge will be collected on pads on the outer layer of the detector. Unique design challenges are imposed by the cylindrical geometry and the low mass requirement. The status of the project and results of prototype tests are presented.

  20. Photostructured coating on a voltage degrader for a Time Projection Chamber (TPC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manaranche, C; Loquet, J L; Serdiouk, V; Scandurra, M; Zucchelli, P

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fibreglass-reinforced epoxy (Stesalit) tubes and rods were coated with a photostructured metal layer system of copper, nickel and gold for a voltage degrader built in a particle detector at CERN, Geneva. The metal layers were applied with galvanotechnical processes involving an original photolithographic exposure in three dimensions to produce a complex electrical circuit design able to provide the correct potential to 420 different conductors. The Stesalit substrate material, even after a first layer of electroless copper, is electrically quite resistive, creating problems for the electrodeposition of the subsequent nickel layer. A mathematical simulation of the plating thickness distribution showed that the electrolytic nickel deposition was suitable for short rods but electroless nickel was needed for the long rods. The functional properties of the metallized Stesalit components are satisfactory: no degradation of the gas quality within the Time Projection Chamber is observed; the potential distribution al...

  1. Radiation shielding materials and containers incorporating same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mirsky, Steven M. (Greenbelt, MD); Krill, Stephen J. (Arlington, VA); Murray, Alexander P. (Gaithersburg, MD)

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved radiation shielding material and storage systems for radioactive materials incorporating the same. The PYRolytic Uranium Compound ("PYRUC") shielding material is preferably formed by heat and/or pressure treatment of a precursor material comprising microspheres of a uranium compound, such as uranium dioxide or uranium carbide, and a suitable binder. The PYRUC shielding material provides improved radiation shielding, thermal characteristic, cost and ease of use in comparison with other shielding materials. The shielding material can be used to form containment systems, container vessels, shielding structures, and containment storage areas, all of which can be used to house radioactive waste. The preferred shielding system is in the form of a container for storage, transportation, and disposal of radioactive waste. In addition, improved methods for preparing uranium dioxide and uranium carbide microspheres for use in the radiation shielding materials are also provided.

  2. Monthly energy review, March 1993. [Contains Glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Contains summary data on petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy relative to consumption, distribution, end-use, generation, imports, supply and demand, production, prices, global aspects, and international energy.

  3. Monthly energy review, February 1993. [Contains Glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Contains summary data on petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy relative to consumption, distribution, end-use, generation, imports, supply and demand, production, prices, global aspects, and international markets.

  4. Monthly energy review, November 1992. [Contains Glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Contains summary data on petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy relative to consumption, distribution, end-use, generation, imports, supply and demand, production, prices, global aspects, and international markets.

  5. Monthly energy review, January 1992. [Contains Glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Monthly Energy Review contains statistical information on energy sources including petroleum, natural gas, coal and nuclear energy. Information on energy consumption, oil and gas resource development, electricity, energy prices and international energy is provided. (VC)

  6. Radiation Shielding Materials and Containers Incorporating Same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mirsky, Steven M.; Krill, Stephen J.; and Murray, Alexander P.

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved radiation shielding material and storage systems for radioactive materials incorporating the same. The PYRolytic Uranium Compound (''PYRUC'') shielding material is preferably formed by heat and/or pressure treatment of a precursor material comprising microspheres of a uranium compound, such as uranium dioxide or uranium carbide, and a suitable binder. The PYRUC shielding material provides improved radiation shielding, thermal characteristic, cost and ease of use in comparison with other shielding materials. The shielding material can be used to form containment systems, container vessels, shielding structures, and containment storage areas, all of which can be used to house radioactive waste. The preferred shielding system is in the form of a container for storage, transportation, and disposal of radioactive waste. In addition, improved methods for preparing uranium dioxide and uranium carbide microspheres for use in the radiation shielding materials are also provided.

  7. SHIELDED CONTAINER COMPLETENESS COMMENTS July 13, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the possible dose rate changes at the surface of the package for the intended payloads to be shipped. The same concerns as outlined above apply here. Reference WTS 2008. Shielded Container Type A Evaluation Report, ECO

  8. Process for the elimination of waste water produced upon the desulfurization of coking oven gas by means of wash solution containing organic oxygen-carrier, with simultaneous recovery of elemental sulfur

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diemer, P.; Brake, W.; Dittmer, R.

    1985-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is disclosed for the elimination of waste water falling out with the desulfurization of coking oven gas by means of an organic oxygen carrier-containing washing solution with simultaneous recovery of elemental sulfur. The waste water is decomposed in a combustion chamber in a reducing atmosphere at temperatures between about 1000/sup 0/ and 1100/sup 0/ C. under such conditions that the mole ratio of H/sub 2/S:SO/sub 2/ in the exhaust gas of the combustion chamber amounts to at least 2:1. Sulfur falling out is separated and the sensible heat of the exhaust gas is utilized for steam generation. The cooled and desulfurized exhaust gas is added to the coking oven gas before the pre-cooling. Sulfur falling out from the washing solution in the oxidizer is separated out and lead into the combustion chamber together with the part of the washing solution discharged as waste water from the washing solution circulation. Preferred embodiments include that the sulfur loading of the waste water can amount to up to about 370 kg sulfur per m/sup 3/ waste water; having the cooling of sulfur-containing exhaust gas leaving the combustion chamber follow in a waste heat boiler and a sulfur condenser heated by pre-heated boiler feed water, from which condenser sulfur is discharged in liquid state.

  9. DO HOT HALOS AROUND GALAXIES CONTAIN THE MISSING BARYONS?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Michael E.; Bregman, Joel N., E-mail: michevan@umich.ed, E-mail: jbregman@umich.ed [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Galaxies are missing most of their baryons, and many models predict these baryons lie in a hot halo around galaxies. We establish observationally motivated constraints on the mass and radii of these halos using a variety of independent arguments. First, the observed dispersion measure of pulsars in the Large Magellanic Cloud allows us to constrain the hot halo around the Milky Way: if it obeys the standard Navarro, Frenk, and White (NFW) profile, it must contain less than 4%-5% of the missing baryons from the Galaxy. This is similar to other upper limits on the Galactic hot halo, such as the soft X-ray background and the pressure around high-velocity clouds. Second, we note that the X-ray surface brightness of hot halos with NFW profiles around large isolated galaxies is high enough that such emission should be observed, unless their halos contain less than 10%-25% of their missing baryons. Third, we place constraints on the column density of hot halos using nondetections of O VII absorption along active galactic nucleus (AGN) sightlines: in general they must contain less than 70% of the missing baryons or extend to no more than 40 kpc. Flattening the density profile of galactic hot halos weakens the surface brightness constraint so that a typical L{sub *} galaxy may hold half its missing baryons in its halo, but the O VII constraint remains unchanged, and around the Milky Way a flattened profile may only hold 6%-13% of the missing baryons from the Galaxy ((2-4) x 10{sup 10} M{sub sun}). We also show that AGN and supernovae at low to moderate redshift-the theoretical sources of winds responsible for driving out the missing baryons-do not produce the expected correlations with the baryonic Tully-Fisher relationship and, therefore, are insufficient to explain the missing baryons from galaxies. We conclude that most of missing baryons from galaxies do not lie in hot halos around the galaxies, and that the missing baryons never fell into the potential wells of protogalaxies in the first place. They may have been expelled from the galaxies as part of the process of galaxy formation.

  10. Composite construction for nuclear fuel containers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cheng, B. C.; Rosenbaum, H. S.; Armijo, J. S.

    1987-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is an improved method for producing nuclear fuel containers of a composite construction having components providing therein a barrier system for resisting destructive action by volatile fission products or impurities and also interdiffusion of metal constituents, and the product thereof. The composite nuclear fuel containers of the method comprise a casing of zirconium or alloy thereof with a layer of copper overlying an oxidized surface portion of the zirconium or alloy thereof. 1 fig.

  11. Composite construction for nuclear fuel containers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cheng, Bo-Ching (Fremont, CA); Rosenbaum, Herman S. (Fremont, CA); Armijo, Joseph S. (Saratoga, CA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method for producing nuclear fuel containers of a composite construction having components providing therein a barrier system for resisting destructive action by volatile fission products or impurities and also interdiffusion of metal constituents, and the product thereof. The composite nuclear fuel containers of the method comprise a casing of zirconium or alloy thereof with a layer of copper overlying an oxidized surface portion of the zirconium or alloy thereof.

  12. Subsurface materials management and containment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nickelson, Reva A.; Richardson, John G.; Kostelnik, Kevin M.; Sloan, Paul A.

    2006-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems, components, and methods relating to subterranean containment barriers. Laterally adjacent tubular casings having male interlock structures and multiple female interlock structures defining recesses for receiving a male interlock structure are used to create subterranean barriers for containing and treating buried waste and its effluents. The multiple female interlock structures enable the barriers to be varied around subsurface objects and to form barrier sidewalls. The barrier may be used for treating and monitoring a zone of interest.

  13. System and method for liquid silicon containment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cliber, James A; Clark, Roger F; Stoddard, Nathan G; Von Dollen, Paul

    2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a system and a method for liquid silicon containment, such as during the casting of high purity silicon used in solar cells or solar modules. The containment apparatus includes a shielding ember adapted to prevent breaching molten silicon from contacting structural elements or cooling elements of a casting device, and a volume adapted to hold a quantity of breaching molten silicon with the volume formed by a bottom and one or more sides.

  14. System and method for liquid silicon containment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cliber, James A; Clark, Roger F; Stoddard, Nathan G; Von Dollen, Paul

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a system and a method for liquid silicon containment, such as during the casting of high purity silicon used in solar cells or solar modules. The containment apparatus includes a shielding member adapted to prevent breaching molten silicon from contacting structural elements or cooling elements of a casting device, and a volume adapted to hold a quantity of breaching molten silicon with the volume formed by a bottom and one or more sides.

  15. 1994 Solid waste forecast container volume summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Templeton, K.J.; Clary, J.L.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a 30-year forecast of the solid waste volumes by container type. The volumes described are low-level mixed waste (LLMW) and transuranic/transuranic mixed (TRU/TRUM) waste. These volumes and their associated container types will be generated or received at the US Department of Energy Hanford Site for storage, treatment, and disposal at Westinghouse Hanford Company`s Solid Waste Operations Complex (SWOC) during a 30-year period from FY 1994 through FY 2023. The forecast data for the 30-year period indicates that approximately 307,150 m{sup 3} of LLMW and TRU/TRUM waste will be managed by the SWOC. The main container type for this waste is 55-gallon drums, which will be used to ship 36% of the LLMW and TRU/TRUM waste. The main waste generator forecasting the use of 55-gallon drums is Past Practice Remediation. This waste will be generated by the Environmental Restoration Program during remediation of Hanford`s past practice sites. Although Past Practice Remediation is the primary generator of 55-gallon drums, most waste generators are planning to ship some percentage of their waste in 55-gallon drums. Long-length equipment containers (LECs) are forecasted to contain 32% of the LLMW and TRU/TRUM waste. The main waste generator forecasting the use of LECs is the Long-Length Equipment waste generator, which is responsible for retrieving contaminated long-length equipment from the tank farms. Boxes are forecasted to contain 21% of the waste. These containers are primarily forecasted for use by the Environmental Restoration Operations--D&D of Surplus Facilities waste generator. This waste generator is responsible for the solid waste generated during decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the facilities currently on the Surplus Facilities Program Plan. The remaining LLMW and TRU/TRUM waste volume is planned to be shipped in casks and other miscellaneous containers.

  16. Subsurface materials management and containment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nickelson, Reva A.; Richardson, John G.; Kosteinik, Kevin M.; Sloan, Paul A.

    2004-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems, components, and methods relating to subterranean containment barriers. Laterally adjacent tubular casings having male interlock structures and multiple female interlock structures defining recesses for receiving a male interlock structure are used to create subterranean barriers for containing and treating buried waste and its effluents. The multiple female interlock structures enable the barriers to be varied around subsurface objects and to form barrier sidewalls. The barrier may be used for treating and monitoring a zone of interest.

  17. Handling Strategies for Import Containers at Marine Terminals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Castilho, Bernardo; Daganzo, Carlos F.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Containers at Marine Terminals Bemardo De Castilho Carlos F.Import Containers at Marine Terminals Bernardo De CastilhoFOR IMPORT AT MARINE TERMINALS CONTAINERS BERNARDO DE

  18. Thermoelectric cooling container for medical applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aivazov, A.A.; Shtern, Y.I.; Budaguan, B.G.; Makhrachev, K.B.; Pastor, M.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work the thermoelectric cooling container for storing and transportation of the medicine, particularly for insulin, is discussed. In the working volume the temperature is supported on the level of +4 C. The container can work in two operating conditions: with the power supply and without the power supply. Two removable blocks are used for this purpose. One block (thermoelectric) is used for the work with the power supply and another (passive)-for the work without power supply. The thermoelectric block has a 12V power supply, which is used in the automobiles, yachts and other kinds of transport. The temperature in the working volume is supported by the use of the Peltier effect. An electronic device is used in this block and stabilizes temperature on the level of +4 C and indicates information about working conditions. The thermoelectric container has a power supply block for work at 220(110)V. The working temperature in the container can be maintained in the absence of the power supply. In this case the necessary temperature conditions are supported by melting of the crystallized salt. For this purpose the container has a hermetic volume containing this salt and contacting with the working volume.

  19. Upper and lower Higgs boson mass bounds from a chirally invariant lattice Higgs-Yukawa model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Gerhold

    2010-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Motivated by the advent of the Large Hadron Collider the aim of the present work is the non-perturbative determination of the cutoff-dependent upper and lower mass bounds of the Standard Model Higgs boson based on first principle calculations, in particular not relying on additional information such as the triviality property of the Higgs-Yukawa sector or indirect arguments like vacuum stability considerations. For that purpose the lattice approach is employed to allow for a non-perturbative investigation of a chirally invariant lattice Higgs-Yukawa model, serving here as a reasonable simplification of the full Standard Model, containing only those fields and interactions which are most essential for the intended Higgs boson mass determination. These are the complex Higgs doublet as well as the top and bottom quark fields and their mutual interactions. To maintain the chiral character of the Standard Model Higgs-fermion coupling also on the lattice, the latter model is constructed on the basis of the Neuberger overlap operator, obeying then an exact global lattice chiral symmetry.

  20. Upper limit on the cross section for reactor antineutrinos changing 22Na decay rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. J. de Meijer; S. W. Steyn

    2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present results of a long-term observation of the decay of 22Na in the presence of a nuclear fission reactor. The measurements were made outside the containment wall of and underneath the Koeberg nuclear power plant near Cape Town, South Africa. Antineutrino fluxes ranged from ~5*10^11 to 1.6*10^13 cm^-2 s^-1 during this period. We show that the coincidence summing technique provides a sensitive tool to measure a change in the total decay constant as well as the branching ratio between EC and beta+ decay of 22Na to the first excited state in 22Ne. We observe a relative change in count rate between reactor-ON and reactor-OFF equal to (-0.51+/-0.11)*10^-4. After evaluating possible systematic uncertainties we conclude that the effect is either due to a hidden instrumental cause or due to an interaction between antineutrinos and the 22Na nucleus. An upper limit of ~0.03 barn has been deduced for observing any change in the decay rate of 22Na due to antineutrino interactions.

  1. Influence of anticlinal growth on upper Miocene turbidite deposits, Elk Hills field, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, S.A. (Bechtel Petroleum Operations, Inc., Tupman, CA (United States)); McJannet, G.S. (Dept. of Energy, Tupman, CA (United States))

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Growth of subsea anticlines during deposition of the upper Miocene 24Z and 26R sandstones at Elk Hills caused the development of several sinuous, lenticular sand bodies. later structural growth enhanced the trap characteristics of these sandstones. Both sandstones are in the uppermost portion of the Elk Hills Shale Member of the Monterey Formation and contain channel-fill and overbank deposits of sand-rich turbidite systems. At the onset of turbidite deposition, low relief subsea anticlines separated broad basins which progressively deepened to the northeast. Channel-fill deposits of coarse-grained sand generally followed the axes of these northwest-southeast-trending basins. At several sites, channel-fill deposits also spilled north across anticlinal axes into the next lower basins. Wide bands of overbank sand and mud were deposited at sand body edges on the flat basin floors. Midway through turbidite deposition, a period of anticlinal growth substantially raised subsea relief. Channel-fill deposits continued in narrower basins but passed north into deeper basin only around well-defined sites at the anticlines' downplunge termini. Narrow basin shapes and higher anticline relief prevented significant overbank deposition. With Pliocene to Holocene uplift of the late Miocene structural trends, stratigraphic mounding of the north-directed channel-fill deposits helped create structural domes at 24Z, 2B and Northwest Stevens pools. In sand bodies lacking significant overbank deposits prevented oil entrapment in sand bodies deposited at times of low anticlinal relief.

  2. Free Energies of Dilute Bose gases: upper bound

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun Yin

    2010-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive a upper bound on the free energy of a Bose gas system at density $\\rho$ and temperature $T$. In combination with the lower bound derived previously by Seiringer \\cite{RS1}, our result proves that in the low density limit, i.e., when $a^3\\rho\\ll 1$, where $a$ denotes the scattering length of the pair-interaction potential, the leading term of $\\Delta f$ the free energy difference per volume between interacting and ideal Bose gases is equal to $4\\pi a (2\\rho^2-[\\rho-\\rhoc]^2_+)$. Here, $\\rhoc(T)$ denotes the critical density for Bose-Einstein condensation (for the ideal gas), and $[\\cdot ]_+$ $=$ $\\max\\{\\cdot, 0\\}$ denotes the positive part.

  3. Cycles in the chamber homology for GL(3) Anne-Marie Aubert, Samir Hasan and Roger Plymen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubert, Anne-Marie

    . This chamber is a polysimplex, the product of an n-simplex by a 1-simplex: C = n × 1. To this datum we will attach a homological coefficient system, see [13, p.11]. To each simplex in n we attach by Bushnell-Kutzko. We now specialize to GL(3). In this article, we will explicitly construct representative

  4. ARIES Inertial Fusion Chamber Assessment M. S. Tillack*, F. Najmabadi, L. A. El-Guebaly, D. Goodin, W. R. Meier,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    -coupled indirect drive and fast ignition. Arguably, inertial fusion looks significantly more credible and more components (i.e., final optics, final focus magnets), chamber physics (particle and radiation transport, gas al., "Inertial Fusion Energy Reactor Design Studies: Prometheus Final Report," MDC 92E0008 (DOE

  5. Analyses of Adsorption Kinetics Using a Stirred-Flow Chamber: II. Potassium-Calcium Exchange on Clay Minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Analyses of Adsorption Kinetics Using a Stirred-Flow Chamber: II. Potassium-Calcium Exchange to be measuredwith the stirred-flowtech- nique, while exchange rates on vermiculite could be ascertained. Adsorption and comparing different ki- netic methods have not been solved. Kinetics of K adsorption on clay minerals have

  6. Time-course correlation of biofilm properties and electrochemical performance in single-chamber microbial fuel cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mench, Matthew M.

    -chamber microbial fuel cells Zhiyong Ren a,c , Ramaraja P. Ramasamy b,1 , Susan Red Cloud-Owen b , Hengjing Yan 2010 Keywords: Microbial fuel cell Electricity Biofilm Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy a b s t r in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) was analyzed by time-course sampling of parallel single-bottle MFCs operated

  7. Volcano-tectonic modelling of magma chambers, ring-faults, unrest, and eruptions in the Tianchi Volcano, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheldon, Nathan D.

    this range to AD938-946), produced between 96 and 172 km3 of deposits, or around 30 km3 of dense magma, and is one of the largest eruptions on Earth during the past 1100 years. A 5-km-diameter collapse caldera, indicating that the shallow magma chamber and/or an associated geothermal system beneath the volcano

  8. Nov 5-9, 2006 IAEA meeting, Vienna, Austria Target and Chamber Technologies for Direct-Drive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    , Austria 2 Electricity Generator Target factory Modular Laser Array · Modular, separable parts: lowers cost costly chambers, better armor survival and lower cost of electricity also will be investigated. c on significant progress in US Inertial Confinement Fusion Program Proposed Work Within Context of High Average

  9. Methane efflux from boreal wetlands: Theory and testing of the ecosystem model Ecosys with chamber and tower flux measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roulet, Nigel T.

    and tower flux measurements R. F. Grant Department of Renewable Resources, University of Alberta, Edmonton tower at a beaver pond in the BOREAS Northern Study Area. Spatial and temporal variation of CH4 effluxes in the model encompassed that measured by surface chambers and the flux tower. Both modeled and measured CH4

  10. 2014 National Small Business Contracting Summit- US Women’s Chamber of Commerce & National Association of Small Business Contractors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Association of Small Business Contractors and the U.S. Women's Chamber of Commerce present the 2014 National Small Business Federal Contracting Summit. The event will include sessions on securing a fair share of federal contracting, legal issues, trends and opportunities.

  11. Corium droplet size in direct containment heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For those light water reactor severe accident sequences in which molten corium is postulated to melt through the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) lower head at elevated primary system pressure and enter the cavity region beneath the vessel, the flow of corium from the RPV will be followed by a sustained high-pressure blowdown of steam and hydrogen through the breach remaining in the vessel. The gases flowing from the breached vessel constitute a source of driving forces capable of dispersing corium from the cavity as droplets into other parts of the containment. An important issue is the fraction of the dispersed corium thermal and chemical energy which may be transferred directly to the containment atmosphere. An important determinant of the extent of direct containment heating is the size of the corium droplets which are dispersed into the containment atmosphere. An analysis is presented here of the mass median droplet sizes in the Argonne National Laboratory CWTI-13 and CWTI-14 reactor material-direct containment heating experiments as well as the Sandia National Laboratory SPIT-19 thermite test. The observed median droplet diameters are shown to be in good agreement with a correlation for the drop size in ordinary annular flow, and a droplet size prediction is carried out for the reactor system.

  12. Recent advances in the CONTAIN code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergeron, K.D.; Carroll, D.E.; Gelbard, F.; Murata, K.K.; Valdez, G.D.; Washington, K.E.

    1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An update is given on very recent developments involving CONTAIN, the USNRC's principal mechanistic code for severe accident containment analysis. First, the features are outlined in two major new releases of CONTAIN. Revision 1.06 was released in February; the major improvements include full integration of the CORCON and VANESA models for debris concrete interactions and concomitant aerosol generation, more detailed and more flexible radiation heat transfer options, and a number of minor improvements. The most recent new version of the code is CONTAIN 1.1, which was released in October. The principal new features relate to the Boiling Water Reactor. In particular, working models are included for Pressure Suppression Pools and Safety Relief Valves. In addition, this version of the code has a much-improved treatment of fision product hosting, user-defined material property options, and a number of other improvements. A second major area of progress involves the aerosol models. Previously, numerical diffusion limited the accuracy of the calculation of the concentration of the smallest particles and, there was no accounting for the effects of soluble salts or surface tension on the equilibrium water vapor pressure. All of these problems have now been solved with a stand-alone aerosol modeling code which uses a suite of new numerical approaches. The new methods have been incorporated into CONTAIN. Example calculations are presented. 7 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  13. A Concept for a Low Pressure Noble Gas Fill Intervention in the IFE Fusion Test Facility (FTF) Target Chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.A. Gentile, W.R. Blanchard, T.A. Kozub, M. Aristova, C. McGahan, S. Natta, K. Pagdon, J. Zelenty

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An engineering evaluation has been initiated to investigate conceptual engineering methods for implementing a viable gas shield strategy in the Fusion Test Facility (FTF) target chamber. The employment of a low pressure noble gas in the target chamber to thermalize energetic helium ions prior to interaction with the wall could dramatically increase the useful life of the first wall in the FTF reactor1. For the purpose of providing flexibility, two target chamber configurations are addressed: a five meter radius sphere and a ten meter radius sphere. Experimental studies at Nike have indicated that a low pressure, ambient gas resident in the target chamber during laser pulsing does not appear to impair the ability of laser light from illuminating targets2. In addition, current investigations into delivering, maintaining, and processing low pressure gas appear to be viable with slight modification to current pumping and plasma exhaust processing technologies3,4. Employment of a gas fill solution for protecting the dry wall target chamber in the FTF may reduce, or possibly eliminate the need for other attenuating technologies designed for keeping He ions from implanting in first wall structures and components. The gas fill concept appears to provide an effective means of extending the life of the first wall while employing mostly commercial off the shelf (COTS) technologies. Although a gas fill configuration may provide a methodology for attenuating damage inflicted on chamber surfaces, issues associated with target injection need to be further analyzed to ensure that the gas fill concept is viable in the integrated FTF design5. In the proposed system, the ambient noble gas is heated via the energetic helium ions produced by target detonation. The gas is subsequently cooled by the chamber wall to approximately 800oC, removed from the chamber, and processed by the chamber gas processing system (CGPS). In an optimized scenario of the above stated concept, the chamber wall acts as the primary heat exchanger. During removal, gas is pumped through the laser ports by turbo molecular-drag pumps (TM-DP). For the purpose of reducing organic based lubricants and seals, a magnetically levitated TM-DP is being investigated with pump manufacturers. Currently, magnetically levitated turbo molecular pumps are commercially available. The pumps will be exposed to thermal loads and ionizing radiation (tritium, Ar-41, post detonation neutrons). Although the TM-DP's will be subjected to these various radiations, current designs for similar pumping devices have been hardened and have the ability of locating control electronics in remote radiation shielded enclosures4. The radiation hardened TM-DP's will be 5 required to operate with minimal maintenance for periods of up to 18 continuous months. As part of this initial investigation for developing a conceptual engineering strategy for a gas fill solution, commercial suppliers of low pressure gas pumping systems have been contacted and engaged in this evaluation. Current technology in the area of mechanical pumping systems indicates that the development of a robust pumping system to meet the requirements of the FTF gas fill concept is within the limits of COTS equipment3,4.

  14. Reliability Estimation for Double Containment Piping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. Cadwallader; T. Pinna

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Double walled or double containment piping is considered for use in the ITER international project and other next-generation fusion device designs to provide an extra barrier for tritium gas and other radioactive materials. The extra barrier improves confinement of these materials and enhances safety of the facility. This paper describes some of the design challenges in designing double containment piping systems. There is also a brief review of a few operating experiences of double walled piping used with hazardous chemicals in different industries. This paper recommends approaches for the reliability analyst to use to quantify leakage from a double containment piping system in conceptual and more advanced designs. The paper also cites quantitative data that can be used to support such reliability analyses.

  15. Conversion method for gas streams containing hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mallinson, Richard G. (Norman, OK); Lobban, Lance (Norman, OK); Liu, Chang-jun (Tianjin, CN)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and a method of using the apparatus are provided for converting a gas stream containing hydrocarbons to a reaction product containing effluent molecules having at least one carbon atom, having at least one interior surface and at least one exterior surface, a first electrode and a second electrode with the first and second electrodes being selectively movable in relation to each other and positioned within the housing so as to be spatially disposed a predetermined distance from each other, a plasma discharge generator between the first and second electrodes, gas stream introducer and a collector for collecting the reaction product effluent produced by the reaction of the gas stream containing hydrocarbons with the plasma discharge between the first and second electrodes.

  16. Development of a Whole Container Seal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhn, Michael J [ORNL] [ORNL; Pickett, Chris A [ORNL] [ORNL; Stinson, Brad J [ORNL] [ORNL; Rowe, Nathan C [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper outlines a technique for utilizing electrically conductive textiles as a whole container seal. This method has the potential to provide more robustness for ensuring that the container has not been breached versus conventional sealing methods that only provide tamper indication at the area used for normal access. The conductive textile is used as a distributed sensor for detecting and localizing container tamper or breach. For sealing purposes, the conductive fabric represents a bounded, near-infinite grid of resistors. The well-known infinite resistance grid problem was used to model and confirm the expected accuracy and validity of this approach. An experimental setup was built that uses a multiplexed Wheatstone bridge measurement to determine the resistances of a coarse electrode grid across the conductive fabric. Non-uniform resistance values of the grid infer the presence of damage or tears in the fabric. Results suggest accuracy proportional to the electrode spacing in determining the presence and location of disturbances in conductive fabric samples. Current work is focused on constructing experimental prototypes for field and environmental testing to gauge the performance of these whole container seals in real world conditions. We are also developing software and hardware to interface with the whole container seals. The latest prototypes are expected to provide more accuracy in detecting and localizing events, although detection of a penetration should be adequate for most sealing applications. We are also developing smart sensing nodes that integrate digital hardware and additional sensors (e.g., motion, humidity) into the electrode nodes within the whole container seal.

  17. Quick-sealing design for radiological containment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rampolla, Donald S. (Pittsburgh, PA); Speer, Elmer (Ruffsdale, PA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A quick-sealing assembly and method for forming an adhesive seal on opposite sides of a mechanical seal for a flexible containment bag of the type used for working with radioactively contaminated objects. The assembly includes an elongated mechanical fastener having opposing engaging members affixed at a predetermined distance from each of the elongated edges, with an adhesive layer formed between the mechanical fastener and the elongated edge such that upon engagement of the mechanical fastener and adhesive layers to opposing containment fabric, a neat triple hermetic seal is formed.

  18. Quick-sealing design for radiological containment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rampolia, Donald S. (Pittsburgh, PA); Speer, Elmer (Ruffsdale, PA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A quick-sealing assembly and method for forming an adhesive seal on opposite sides of a mechanical seal for a flexible containment bag of the type used for working with radioactively contaminated objects. The assembly includes an elongated mechanical fastener having opposing engaging members affixed at a predetermined distance from each of the elongated edges, with an adhesive layer formed between the mechanical fastener and the elongated edge such that upon engagement of the mechanical fastener and adhesive layers to opposing containment fabric, a neat triple hermetic seal is formed.

  19. Quick-sealing design for radiological containment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rampdla, D.S.; Speer, E.

    1991-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a quick-sealing assembly and method for forming an adhesive seal on opposite sides of a mechanical seal for a flexible containment bag of the type used for working with radioactively contaminated objects. The assembly includes an elongated mechanical fastener having opposing engaging members affixed at a predetermined distance from each of the elongated edges, with an adhesive layer formed between the mechanical fastener and the elongated edge such that upon engagement of the mechanical fastener and adhesive layers to opposing containment fabric, a neat triple hermetic seal is formed.

  20. Quick-sealing design for radiological containment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rampolia, D.S.; Speer, E.

    1990-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a quick-sealing assembly and method for forming an adhesive seal on opposite sides of a mechanical seal for a flexible containment bag of the type used for working with radioactively contaminated objects. The assembly includes an elongated mechanical fastener having opposing engaging members affixed at a predetermined distance from each of the elongated edges, with an adhesive layer formed between the mechanical fastener and the elongated edge such that upon engagement of the mechanical fastener and adhesive layers to opposing containment fabric, a neat triple hermetic seal is formed.