Sample records for upper confidence limit

  1. Sample sizes for confidence limits for reliability.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darby, John L.

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We recently performed an evaluation of the implications of a reduced stockpile of nuclear weapons for surveillance to support estimates of reliability. We found that one technique developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) under-estimates the required sample size for systems-level testing. For a large population the discrepancy is not important, but for a small population it is important. We found that another technique used by SNL provides the correct required sample size. For systems-level testing of nuclear weapons, samples are selected without replacement, and the hypergeometric probability distribution applies. Both of the SNL techniques focus on samples without defects from sampling without replacement. We generalized the second SNL technique to cases with defects in the sample. We created a computer program in Mathematica to automate the calculation of confidence for reliability. We also evaluated sampling with replacement where the binomial probability distribution applies.

  2. Extending the Upper Temperature Limit for Life

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    ) un- der N2-CO2 (80:20) in sealed culture tubes that con- tained formate (10 mM) as the electron donor that permit strain 121 to grow at such high temperatures are unknown. It is gen- erally assumed that the upperExtending the Upper Temperature Limit for Life Kazem Kashefi and Derek R. Lovley* The upper

  3. Upper limit on the primary photon fraction from the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Risse, Markus; /Karlsruhe, Forschungszentrum

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on observations of the depth of shower maximum performed with the hybrid detector of the Auger Observatory, an upper limit on the cosmic-ray photon fraction of 26% (at 95% confidence level) is derived for primary energies above 10{sup 19} eV. Additional observables recorded with the surface detector array, available for a sub-set of the data sample, support the conclusion that a photon origin of the observed events is not favoured.

  4. Upper Limits from Counting Experiments with Multiple Pipelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick J. Sutton

    2010-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In counting experiments, one can set an upper limit on the rate of a Poisson process based on a count of the number of events observed due to the process. In some experiments, one makes several counts of the number of events, using different instruments, different event detection algorithms, or observations over multiple time intervals. We demonstrate how to generalize the classical frequentist upper limit calculation to the case where multiple counts of events are made over one or more time intervals using several (not necessarily independent) procedures. We show how different choices of the rank ordering of possible outcomes in the space of counts correspond to applying different levels of significance to the various measurements. We propose an ordering that is matched to the sensitivity of the different measurement procedures and show that in typical cases it gives stronger upper limits than other choices. As an example, we show how this method can be applied to searches for gravitational-wave bursts, where multiple burst-detection algorithms analyse the same data set, and demonstrate how a single combined upper limit can be set on the gravitational-wave burst rate.

  5. Upper limits for the photoproduction cross section for the ???(1860) pentaquark state off the deuteron

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Egiyan, H.; Langheinrich, J.; Gothe, R. W.; Graham, L.; Holtrop, M.; Lu, H.; Mattione, P.; Mutchler, G.; Park, K.; Smith, E. S.; Stepanyan, S.; Zhao, Z. W.; Adhikari, K. P.; Aghasyan, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Ball, J.; Baltzell, N. A.; Battaglieri, M.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bennett, R. P.; Biselli, A. S.; Bookwalter, C.; Branford, D.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Contalbrigo, M.; D’Angelo, A.; Daniel, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Dey, B.; Dickson, R.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fradi, A.; Gabrielyan, M. Y.; Gevorgyan, N.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Guler, N.; Guo, L.; Gyurjyan, V.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Heddle, D.; Hicks, K.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Khetarpal, P.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Livingston, K.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Mao, Y.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Mokeev, V.; Munevar, E.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Ni, A.; Niculescu, G.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paolone, M.; Pappalardo, L.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Phelps, E.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Protopopescu, D.; Raue, B. A.; Ricco, G.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B. G.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Sabatié, F.; Saini, M. S.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Seraydaryan, H.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D. I.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Tang, W.; Taylor, C. E.; Tedeschi, D. J.; Ungaro, M.; Voutier, E.; Watts, D. P.; Weinstein, L. B.; Weygand, D. P.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhao, B.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We searched for the ???(1860) pentaquark in the photoproduction process off the deuteron in the ????-decay channel using CLAS. The invariant-mass spectrum of the ???? system does not indicate any statistically significant enhancement near the reported mass M=1.860 GeV. The statistical analysis of the sideband-subtracted mass spectrum yields a 90%-confidence-level upper limit of 0.7 nb for the photoproduction cross section of ???(1860) with a consecutive decay into???? in the photon-energy range 4.5GeV?<5.5GeV.

  6. Upper limits on stray force noise for LISA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Carbone; A. Cavalleri; R. Dolesi; C. D. Hoyle; M. Hueller; S. Vitale; W. J. Weber

    2003-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a torsion pendulum facility for LISA gravitational reference sensor ground testing that allows us to put significant upper limits on residual stray forces exerted by LISA-like position sensors on a representative test mass and to characterize specific sources of disturbances for LISA. We present here the details of the facility, the experimental procedures used to maximize its sensitivity, and the techniques used to characterize the pendulum itself that allowed us to reach a torque sensitivity below 20 fNm /sqrt{Hz} from 0.3 to 10 mHz. We also discuss the implications of the obtained results for LISA.

  7. Confidence Levels for CVaR Risk Measures and Minimax Limits*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Page 1 ... In practice it may not be easy to determine what value of confidence level should be .... Now we find that as ? approaches 1 the problem approaches the ...... argument of this formulation can be explained as follows: we don't know the.

  8. Upper limits for the photoproduction cross section for the Phi--(1860) pentaquark state off the deuteron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hovanes Egiyan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We searched for the {Phi}{sup --}(1860) pentaquark in the photoproduction process off the deuteron in the {Xi}{sup -} {pi}{sup -} decay channel using CLAS. The invariant mass spectrum of the {Xi}{sup -} {pi}{sup -} system does not indicate any statistically significant enhancement near the reported mass M = 1.860 GeV. The statistical analysis of the sideband-subtracted mass spectrum yields a 90% confidence level upper limit of 0.7 nb for the photoproduction cross section of {Phi}{sup --}(1860) with a consecutive decay into {Xi}{sup -} {pi}{sup -} in the photon energy range 4.5 GeV < E{sub {gamma}} < 5.5 GeV.

  9. Possible Upper limits on Lorentz Factors in High Energy Astrophysical Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Sivaram; Kenath Arun

    2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma ray bursts (GRBs) are the most luminous physical phenomena in the universe. The relativistic effect on the blast wave associated with the GRB introduces the gamma factor. Here we put an upper limit on the gamma factor via constraints on maximal power allowed by general relativity and hence set upper limits on other observable quantities such as deceleration distance. Also upper limits are set on the high energy particle radiation due to constraints set by cosmic microwave background radiation.

  10. Confidence building on the Korean Peninsula: A conceptual development for the cooperative monitoring of limited-force deployment zones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vannoni, M.; Duggan, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Cooperative Monitoring Center; Nam, M.K.; Moon, K.K.; Kim, M.J. [Korea Inst. for Defense Analyses, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Arms Control Research Center

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Confidence building measures (CBMs), particularly military ones, that address the security needs of North and South Korea could decrease the risk of conflict on the Korean Peninsula and help create an environment in which to negotiate a peace regime. The Korea Institute for Defense Analyses (KIDA) and the Cooperative Monitoring Center (CMC) of Sandia National Laboratories collaborated to identify potential CBMs and define associated monitoring. The project is a conceptual analysis of political and technical options for confidence building that might be feasible in Korea at some future time. KIDA first analyzed current security conditions and options for CBMs. Their conclusions are presented as a hypothetical agreement to strengthen the Armistice Agreement by establishing Limited Force Deployment Zones along the Military Demarcation Line. The goal of the hypothetical agreement is to increase mutual security and build confidence. The CMC then used KIDA`s scenario to develop a strategy for cooperative monitoring the agreement. Cooperative monitoring is the collecting, analyzing and sharing of agreed information among parties to an agreement and typically relies on the use of commercially available technology. A cooperative monitoring regime must be consistent with the agreement`s terms; the geographic, logistic, military, and political factors in the Korean setting; and the capabilities of monitoring technologies. This report describes the security situation on the Korean peninsula, relevant precedents from other regions, the hypothetical agreement for reducing military tensions, a monitoring strategy for the hypothetical Korean agreement, examples of implementation, and a description of applicable monitoring technologies and procedures.

  11. Statistical Confirmation of a Stellar Upper Mass Limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. S. Oey; C. J. Clarke

    2005-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the expectation value for the maximum stellar mass (m_max) in an ensemble of N stars, as a function of the IMF upper-mass cutoff (m_up) and N. We statistically demonstrate that the upper IMF of the local massive star census observed thus far in the Milky Way and Magellanic Clouds clearly exhibits a universal upper mass cutoff around 120 - 200 M_sun for a Salpeter IMF, although the result is more ambiguous for a steeper IMF.

  12. Upper limits on the solar-neutron flux at the Yangbajing neutron monitor from BATSE-detected solar flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Tsuchiya; H. Miyasaka; E. Takahashi; S. Shimoda; Y. Yamada; I. Kondo; K. Makishima; F. Zhu; Y. Tan; H. Hu; Y. Tang; J. Zhang; H. Lu; X. Meng

    2007-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work is to search the Yangbajing neutron monitor data obtained between 1998 October and 2000 June for solar neutrons associated with solar flares. Using the onset times of 166 BATSE-detected flares with the GOES peak flux (1 -- 8 \\AA) higher than $1.0 \\times 10^{-5}$ $\\mathrm{Wm^{-2}}$, we prepare for each flare a light curve of the Yangbajing neutron monitor, spanning $\\pm$ 1.5 hours from the BATSE onset time. Based on the light curves, a systematic search for solar neutrons in energies above 100 MeV from the 166 flares was performed. No statistically significant signals due to solar neutrons were found in the present work. Therefore, we put upper limits on the $>$ 100 MeV solar-neutron flux for 18 events consisting of 2 X and 16 M class flares. The calculation assumed a power-law shaped neutron energy spectrum and three types of neutron emission profiles at the Sun. Compared with the other positive neutron detections associated with X-class flares, typical 95% confidence level upper limits for the two X-class flares are found to be comparable to the lowest and second lowest neutron fluxes at the top of the atmosphere.In addition, the upper limits for M-class flares scatter in the range of $10^{-2}$ to 1 neutrons $\\mathrm{cm^{-2}s^{-1}}$. This provides the first upper limits on the solar-neutron flux from M-class solar flares, using space observatories as well as ground-based neutron monitors.

  13. A New Upper Limit on the Polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher O'Dell

    2002-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMB) is an invaluable probe of the conditions of the early universe. Recent measurements of its spatial anisotropy have allowed accurate determinations of several fundamental cosmological parameters, such as the curvature of the universe, the shape of the spectrum of primordial density fluctuations, and the contribution of baryons, dark matter, and dark energy to the overall energy density of the universe. In addition to being spatially non-uniform, the CMB is theorized to be slightly polarized. Measurements of this polarization, particularly at large angular scales, have the potential to provide information on primordial gravitational waves, theories of inflation, and the ionization history of the universe, as well as help further constrain cosmological parameters. Polarization has not yet been detected in the CMB. This thesis describes a recent search for CMB polarization at large angular scales, conducted in the spring of 2000 at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. After a general introduction on both CMB polarization and general microwave polarimetry, details of the experiment itself are given, as well as a full description of the data selection and analysis techniques. Using these techniques, our data lead to a new upper limit on CMB polarization at large angular scales of 10 $\\mu$K in both E- and B-type polarization at 95% confidence. If B-polarization is assumed to be zero, the limit for E-type polarization is lowered to 8 $\\mu$K. This experiment is the first of a new breed of highly-sensitive instruments that will one day map out this interesting property of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation.

  14. Upper limit on branching ratio the decay B. Bassalleck,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Laboratory (BNL). The decay forbidden angular momentum conservation neutrinos purely massless left## # cosmological constraints neutrino masses imply more stringent limits. branching 0 ## case massive Majorana Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New 11973, USA TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia

  15. Upper limits on electric dipole moments of tau-lepton, heavy quarks, and W-boson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. G. Grozin; I. B. Khriplovich; A. S. Rudenko

    2009-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss upper limits on the electric dipole moments (EDM) of the tau-lepton, heavy quarks, and W-boson, which follow from the precision measurements of the electron and neutron EDM.

  16. Upper limits on electric dipole moments of tau-lepton, heavy quarks, and W-boson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grozin, A G; Rudenko, A S

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss upper limits on the electric dipole moments (EDM) of the tau-lepton, heavy quarks, and W-boson, which follow from the precision measurements of the electron and neutron EDM.

  17. COMPASS: AN UPPER LIMIT ON COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND POLARIZATION AT AN ANGULAR SCALE OF 200

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timbie, Peter

    COMPASS: AN UPPER LIMIT ON COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND POLARIZATION AT AN ANGULAR SCALE OF 200, 11 and Peter T. Timbie6 Receivved 2003 Auggust 19; accepted 2004 April 12 ABSTRACT COMPASS is an on with the Cosmic Microwave Polari- zation at Small Scales (COMPASS) telescope. Although this limit is about

  18. Upper limit of the total cross section for the pn --> pn eta' reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Klaja; P. Moskal; S. D. Bass; E. Czerwinski; R. Czyzykiewicz; D. Gil; D. Grzonka; T. Johansson; B. Kamys; A. Khoukaz; P. Klaja; W. Krzemien; W. Oelert; B. Rejdych; J. Ritman; T. Sefzick; M. Siemaszko; M. Silarski; J. Smyrski; A. Taschner; M. Wolke; P. Wustner; J. Zdebik; M. Zielinski; W. Zipper

    2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The upper limit of the total cross section for the pn --> pn eta' reaction has been determined near the kinematical threshold in the excess energy range from 0 to 24 MeV. The measurement was performed using the COSY-11 detector setup, a deuteron cluster target, and the proton beam of COSY with a momentum of 3.35 GeV/c. The energy dependence of the upper limit of the cross section was extracted exploiting the Fermi momenta of nucleons inside the deuteron. Comparison of the determined upper limit of the ratio R_eta' = sigma(pn --> pn eta') / sigma(pp --> pp eta') with the corresponding ratio for eta-meson production does not favor the dominance of the N*(1535) resonance in the production process of the eta' meson and suggests nonidentical production mechanisms for eta and eta' mesons.

  19. Improved Upper Limits on the Stochastic Gravitational-Wave Background from 2009-2010 LIGO and Virgo Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; the Virgo Collaboration; J. Aasi; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. Abbott; M. R. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; K. Ackley; C. Adams; T. Adams; P. Addesso; R. X. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; N. Aggarwal; O. D. Aguiar; A. Ain; P. Ajith; A. Alemic; B. Allen; A. Allocca; D. Amariutei; M. Andersen; R. Anderson; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. C. Araya; C. Arceneaux; J. Areeda; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; L. Austin; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. T. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. W. Ballmer; J. C. Barayoga; M. Barbet; B. C. Barish; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; A. Basti; J. C. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; C. Belczynski; A. S. Bell; C. Bell; G. Bergmann; D. Bersanetti; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; S. Biscans; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; S. Bloemen; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; M. Boer; G. Bogaert; C. Bogan; C. Bond; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; Sukanta Bose; L. Bosi; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; D. D. Brown; F. Brückner; S. Buchman; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; R. Burman; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. Calderón Bustillo; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; K. C. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; A. Castiglia; S. Caudill; M. Cavaglià; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; C. Celerier; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; R. Chakraborty; T. Chalermsongsak; S. J. Chamberlin; S. Chao; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. S. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; Q. Chu; S. S. Y. Chua; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; J. A. Clark; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; A. Colla; C. Collette; M. Colombini; L. Cominsky; M. Constancio Jr.; A. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corpuz; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. W. Coughlin; S. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; S. Countryman; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; R. Coyne; K. Craig; J. D. E. Creighton; S. G. Crowder; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; K. Dahl; T. Dal Canton; M. Damjanic; S. L. Danilishin; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. S. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; S. Deléglise; W. Del Pozzo; T. Denker; T. Dent; H. Dereli; V. Dergachev; R. De Rosa; R. T. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; M. Díaz; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; A. Di Virgilio; A. Donath; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Doravari; S. Dossa; R. Douglas; T. P. Downes; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; T. Edo; M. Edwards; A. Effler; H. Eggenstein; P. Ehrens; J. Eichholz; S. S. Eikenberry; G. Endr?czi; R. Essick; T. Etzel; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Q. Fang; S. Farinon; B. Farr; W. M. Farr; M. Favata; H. Fehrmann; M. M. Fejer; D. Feldbaum; F. Feroz; I. Ferrante; F. Ferrini; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; J. -D. Fournier; S. Franco; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; P. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; L. Gammaitoni; S. Gaonkar; F. Garufi; N. Gehrels; G. Gemme; E. Genin; A. Gennai; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; R. Goetz; L. Gondan; G. González; N. Gordon; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Gossan; S. Goßler; R. Gouaty; C. Gräf; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; P. Groot; H. Grote; K. Grover; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; K. Gushwa; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; M. Hanke; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. Hart; M. T. Hartman; C. -J. Haster; K. Haughian; A. Heidmann; M. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; G. Hemming; M. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; M. Heurs; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; S. Hooper; P. Hopkins; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; Y. Hu; E. Huerta; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; M. Huynh; T. Huynh-Dinh; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; B. R. Iyer; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; H. Jang; P. Jaranowski; Y. Ji; F. Jiménez-Forteza; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; R. Jones; R. J. G. Jonker; L. Ju; Haris K; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; J. Karlen; M. Kasprzack; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kawabe; F. Kawazoe; F. Kéfélian; G. M. Keiser; D. Keitel; D. B. Kelley; W. Kells; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili

    2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Gravitational waves from a variety of sources are predicted to superpose to create a stochastic background. This background is expected to contain unique information from throughout the history of the universe that is unavailable through standard electromagnetic observations, making its study of fundamental importance to understanding the evolution of the universe. We carry out a search for the stochastic background with the latest data from LIGO and Virgo. Consistent with predictions from most stochastic gravitational-wave background models, the data display no evidence of a stochastic gravitational-wave signal. Assuming a gravitational-wave spectrum of Omega_GW(f)=Omega_alpha*(f/f_ref)^alpha, we place 95% confidence level upper limits on the energy density of the background in each of four frequency bands spanning 41.5-1726 Hz. In the frequency band of 41.5-169.25 Hz for a spectral index of alpha=0, we constrain the energy density of the stochastic background to be Omega_GW(f)<5.6x10^-6. For the 600-1000 Hz band, Omega_GW(f)<0.14*(f/900 Hz)^3, a factor of 2.5 lower than the best previously reported upper limits. We find Omega_GW(f)<1.8x10^-4 using a spectral index of zero for 170-600 Hz and Omega_GW(f)<1.0*(f/1300 Hz)^3 for 1000-1726 Hz, bands in which no previous direct limits have been placed. The limits in these four bands are the lowest direct measurements to date on the stochastic background. We discuss the implications of these results in light of the recent claim by the BICEP2 experiment of the possible evidence for inflationary gravitational waves.

  20. CDF Note 9674 Combined Upper Limit on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production for Winter 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fermilab

    CDF Note 9674 Combined Upper Limit on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production for Winter 2009 The CDF of searches for the Standard Model Higgs boson at CDF. The six major analyses combined are the WH bV/c2 in steps of 5 GeV/c2 , assuming Standard Model decay branching fractions of the Higgs boson

  1. CDF Note 9999 Combined Upper Limit on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fermilab

    CDF Note 9999 Combined Upper Limit on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production The CDF Collaboration for the Standard Model Higgs boson at CDF. The six major analyses combined are the WH b¯b channels, the WH + ZH E Model decay branching fractions of the Higgs boson and that the ratios of the rates for the WH, ZH, gg

  2. Computing flux upper-limits for non-detections F. Masci, 10/25/2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masci, Frank

    to "real" detections (e.g., in a spectrum), the quoted upper limits often lack probabilistic power. One in the first place, i.e., has flux measurement > some threshold set according to some maximum tolerable interval) that probably contains the true flux can then be assigned using the uncertainties. If a source

  3. A very reduced upper limit on the interstellar abundance of beryllium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillaume Hébrard; Martin Lemoine; Roger Ferlet; Alfred Vidal-Madjar

    1997-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of observations of the $\\lambda 3130.4$ \\AA interstellar absorption line of Be II in the direction of zeta Per. The data were obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii 3.6m Telescope using the Coud\\'e f/4 Gecko spectrograph at a resolving power $\\simeq 1.1 \\times 10^5$, and a signal-to-noise ratio S/N $\\simeq$ 2000. The Be II line is not detected, and we obtain an upper limit on the equivalent width $W_{3130.4}\\leq30$ $\\mu$\\AA. This upper limit is 7 times below the lowest upper limit ever reported hitherto. The derived interstellar abundance is ($^9$Be/H) $\\leq 7 \\times 10^{-13}$, not corrected for the depletion of Be onto interstellar grains; it corresponds to an upper limit $\\delta_{Be} \\leq -1.5$ dex on the depletion factor of Be. As such, it argues in favour of models of formation of dust grains in stellar atmospheres.

  4. Upper Limits on Electric and Weak Dipole Moments of W-Boson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. E. Blinov; A. S. Rudenko

    2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The total cross-sections of the reaction e+e- --> W+W-, as measured at LEP-II at centre-of-mass energies between 183 and 207 GeV are used to derive the upper limits on the parameters of CP-violating (P-odd and C-even) triple gauge-boson couplings WW\\gamma and WWZ. The 95% CL limits |\\widetilde{\\kappa}_Z|<0.13 and |\\widetilde{\\lambda}_Z|<0.31 are obtained assuming local SU(2)_L x U(1)_Y gauge invariance. Our results are comparable with the previous ones obtained through the analysis of the W decay products. We also discuss the upper limits on the electric dipole moment (EDM) of the W-boson, which follow from the precision measurements of the electron and neutron EDM.

  5. Upper limit on spontaneous supercurrents in Sr2RuO4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, Suk Bum

    2010-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    It is widely believed that the perovskite Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4} is an unconventional superconductor with broken time reversal symmetry. It has been predicted that superconductors with broken time reversal symmetry should have spontaneously generated supercurrents at edges and domain walls. We have done careful imaging of the magnetic fields above Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4} single crystals using scanning Hall bar and SQUID microscopies, and see no evidence for such spontaneously generated supercurrents. We use the results from our magnetic imaging to place upper limits on the spontaneously generated supercurrents at edges and domain walls as a function of domain size. For a single domain, this upper limit is below the predicted signal by two orders of magnitude. We speculate on the causes and implications of the lack of large spontaneous supercurrents in this very interesting superconducting system.

  6. Upper limits for PH3 and H2S in Titan's Atmosphere from Cassini CIRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nixon, Conor A; Irwin, Patrick G J; Horst, Sarah M; 10.1016/j.icarus.2013.02.024

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have searched for the presence of simple P and S-bearing molecules in Titan's atmosphere, by looking for the characteristic signatures of phosphine and hydrogen sulfide in infrared spectra obtained by Cassini CIRS. As a result we have placed the first upper limits on the stratospheric abundances, which are 1 ppb (PH3) and 330 ppb (H2S), at the 2-sigma significance level.

  7. D Note 6229-CONF Combined Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quigg, Chris

    D� Note 6229-CONF Combined Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production from the D�) Searches for standard model Higgs boson production in p¯p collisions at s = 1.96 TeV are carried out for Higgs boson masses (mH) in the range 100 mH 200 GeV/c2 . The contributing production processes include

  8. Improved Upper Limits on the Stochastic Gravitational-Wave Background from 2009-2010 LIGO and Virgo Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aasi, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Alemic, A; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Amariutei, D; Andersen, M; Anderson, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Austin, L; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barbet, M; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Belczynski, C; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Bergmann, G; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biscans, S; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bloemen, S; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, Sukanta; Bosi, L; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brückner, F; Buchman, S; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burman, R; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Bustillo, J Calderón; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K C; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Castiglia, A; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Celerier, C; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S S Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Collette, C; Colombini, M; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corpuz, A; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dahl, K; Canton, T Dal; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Donath, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Dossa, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edo, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Endr?czi, G; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Feldbaum, D; Feroz, F; Ferrante, I; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S; Garufi, F; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Gräf, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gushwa, K; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanke, M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hart, M; Hartman, M T; Haster, C -J; Haughian, K; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Hooper, S; Hopkins, P; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hu, Y; Huerta, E; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, H; Jaranowski, P; Ji, Y; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, Haris; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Karlen, J; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Keiser, G M; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, C; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, N G; Kim, Y -M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J; Koehlenbeck, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gravitational waves from a variety of sources are predicted to superpose to create a stochastic background. This background is expected to contain unique information from throughout the history of the universe that is unavailable through standard electromagnetic observations, making its study of fundamental importance to understanding the evolution of the universe. We carry out a search for the stochastic background with the latest data from LIGO and Virgo. Consistent with predictions from most stochastic gravitational-wave background models, the data display no evidence of a stochastic gravitational-wave signal. Assuming a gravitational-wave spectrum of Omega_GW(f)=Omega_alpha*(f/f_ref)^alpha, we place 95% confidence level upper limits on the energy density of the background in each of four frequency bands spanning 41.5-1726 Hz. In the frequency band of 41.5-169.25 Hz for a spectral index of alpha=0, we constrain the energy density of the stochastic background to be Omega_GW(f)<5.6x10^-6. For the 600-1000...

  9. Upper limits for undetected trace species in the stratosphere of Titan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nixon, Connor A.; Achterberg, Richard K.; Teanby, Nicholas A.; Irwin, Patrick G.; Flaud, Jean Marie; Kleiner, I.; Dehayem-kamadjeu, A.; Brown, Linda R.; Sams, Robert L.; Bezard, Bruno; Coustenis, Athena; Ansty, Todd M.; Mamoutkine, Andrei; Vinatier, Sandrine; Bjoraker, Gordon L.; Jennings, Donald E.; Romani, Paul N.; Flasar, F. M.

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we describe a first quantitative search for several molecules in Titans stratosphere ni Cassini CIRS infrared spectra. These are: ammonia (NH3), methanol (CH3OH), formaldehyde (H2CO), and acetonitrile (CH3CN), all of which are predicted by photochemical models but only the last of which observed, and not in the infrared,. We find non-detections in all cases, but derive upper limits on the abundances from low-noise observations at 25 degreesS and 75 degreesN. Comparing these constraints to model predictions, we conclude that CIRS is highly unlikely to see NH3 or CH3OH emissions. However, CH3CN and H2CO are closer to CIRS detectability, and we suggest ways in which the sensitivity threshold may be lowered towards this goal.

  10. Combined upper limit on Standard Model Higgs boson production at CDF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buzatu Adrian

    2012-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Higgs boson is the only elementary particle predicted by the Standard Model (SM) that has neither been confirmed nor refuted. The CDF collaboration has performed SM Higgs searches in many channels using $p\\pbar$ collisions at a centre-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s}=1.96\\tev$. We present the latest combined Higgs boson search at CDF. Since the previous year's combination, the sensitivity is increased through the addition of new channels, the improvement of existing channels and the addition of new data samples. We also use the latest parton distribution functions and $gg \\rightarrow H$ theoretical cross sections when modelling the signal event yields. Using integrated luminosities of up to 8.2 $\\invfb$, we observe a good agreement between data and the background prediction. Since we do not see a Higgs boson excess, we set 95% CL upper limits on the Higgs boson cross section in the range between 100 and 200 $\\gevcc$, with 5 $\\gevcc$ increments. The observed (expected) limits for a 115 and a 165 $\\gevcc$ Higgs boson are 1.55 (1.49) and 0.75 (0.79) $\\times$ SM, respectively. Since last year, the Higgs boson excluded range by CDF is extended to 156.5 - 173.7 and 100 - 104.5 $\\gevcc$.

  11. Combined upper limit on Standard Model Higgs boson production at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adrian, Buzatu; /McGill U.

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Higgs boson is the only elementary particle predicted by the Standard Model (SM) that has neither been confirmed nor refuted. The CDF collaboration has performed SM Higgs searches in many channels using p{bar p} collisions at a centre-of-mass energy {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. We present the latest combined Higgs boson search at CDF. Since the previous year's combination, the sensitivity is increased through the addition of new channels, the improvement of existing channels and the addition of new data samples. We also use the latest parton distribution functions and gg {yields} H theoretical cross sections when modelling the signal event yields. Using integrated luminosities of up to 8.2 fb{sup -1}, we observe a good agreement between data and the background prediction. Since we do not see a Higgs boson excess, we set 95% CL upper limits on the Higgs boson cross section in the range between 100 and 200 GeV/c{sup 2}, with 5 GeV/c{sup 2} increments. The observed (expected) limits for a 115 and a 165 GeV/c{sup 2} Higgs boson are 1.55 (1.49) and 0.75 (0.79) x SM, respectively. Since last year, the Higgs boson excluded range by CDF is extended to 156.5 - 173.7 and 100 - 104.5 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  12. Upper limit on the cross section for reactor antineutrinos changing 22Na decay rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. J. de Meijer; S. W. Steyn

    2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present results of a long-term observation of the decay of 22Na in the presence of a nuclear fission reactor. The measurements were made outside the containment wall of and underneath the Koeberg nuclear power plant near Cape Town, South Africa. Antineutrino fluxes ranged from ~5*10^11 to 1.6*10^13 cm^-2 s^-1 during this period. We show that the coincidence summing technique provides a sensitive tool to measure a change in the total decay constant as well as the branching ratio between EC and beta+ decay of 22Na to the first excited state in 22Ne. We observe a relative change in count rate between reactor-ON and reactor-OFF equal to (-0.51+/-0.11)*10^-4. After evaluating possible systematic uncertainties we conclude that the effect is either due to a hidden instrumental cause or due to an interaction between antineutrinos and the 22Na nucleus. An upper limit of ~0.03 barn has been deduced for observing any change in the decay rate of 22Na due to antineutrino interactions.

  13. GeV Gamma-ray Flux Upper Limits from Clusters of Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    al., M Ackermann et

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The detection of diffuse radio emission associated with clusters of galaxies indicates populations of relativistic leptons infusing the intracluster medium. Those electrons and positrons are either injected into and accelerated directly in the intracluster medium, or produced as secondary pairs by cosmic-ray ions scattering on ambient protons. Radiation mechanisms involving the energetic leptons together with decay of neutral pions produced by hadronic interactions have the potential to produce abundant GeV photons. Here, we report on the search for GeV emission from clusters of galaxies using data collected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) from August 2008 to February 2010. Thirty-three galaxy clusters have been selected according to their proximity and high mass, X-ray flux and temperature, and indications of non-thermal activity for this study. We report upper limits on the photon flux in the range 0.2-100 GeV towards a sample of observed clusters (typical va...

  14. Final Report - Inspection Limit Confirmation for Upper Head Penetration Nozzle Cracking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Michael T.; Rudland, David L.; Zhang, Tao; Wilkowski, Gery M.

    2008-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The ASME Code Case N-729-1 defines alternative examination requirements for the Control Rod Drive Mechanism (CRDM) upper head penetration nozzle welds. The basis for these examination requirements was developed as part of an Industry program conducted by the Materials Reliability Program (MRP) through the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The results of this program were published in MRP-95 Rev. 1 and document a set of finite element weld residual stress analyses conducted on a variety of upper head penetration nozzles. The inspection zone selected by the industry was based on the stress where it was assumed that primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) would not initiate. As explained in MRP-95 Rev. 1, it has been illustrated that PWSCC does not occur in the Alloy 600 tube when the stresses are below the yield strength of that tube. Typical yield strengths at operating conditions for Alloy 600 range from 35 ksi to 65 ksi. A stress less than 20-ksi tension was chosen as a conservative range where PWSCC would not initiate. Over the last several years, Engineering Mechanics Corporation of Columbus (Emc2) has conducted welding residual stress analyses on upper head penetration J-welds made from Alloy 182 weld metal for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff. These efforts were performed as a confirmatory evaluation of the industry’s analyses conducted as part of their MRP-95 Rev. 1 effort. To this point, the analyses conducted by Emc2 have not been compared to the MRP-95 Rev. 1 results or the examination zones defined in the Code Case. Therefore, this report summarizes the past Emc2 CRDM welding analyses and investigates the regions where the welding stresses may be sufficiently high to promote stress corrosion cracking (SCC). In all, 90 welding residual stress analyses were conducted by Emc2 and the largest distance below the weld where the stress drops below 20 ksi was 5 inches for the uphill weld of the 53-degree nozzle case. For the largest distance above the weld where stress drops below 20 ksi, the worst case was 1.5 inches above the downhill side of the 25-degree nozzle case. The inspection zones described in both MRP-95 Rev. 1 and Code Case N-729-1 were set at 1.0 inch for nozzle angles greater than 30 degrees or 1.5 inches for nozzle angles less than 30 degrees, above the highest or below the lowest point on the weld. In all cases analyzed by Emc2 in this effort, there was only one case where the stress was above 20 ksi outside of this inspection zone. For that case, the stresses were very close to 20 ksi at the inspection zone limit and were considered acceptable.

  15. Robust upper limit on the neutron single-particle energy of the $i_{13/2}$ orbit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Lei; H. Jiang

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The boundary of the neutron $i_{13/2}$ single-particle energy is investigated with exact shell-model calculations, where random two-body interactions are adopted to overcome the bias from effective interactions. Excitation energies of $3^-_1$ state in $^{134}$Te and $^{136}$Xe, as well as those of $13/2^+_1$ states in $^{135}$Te and $^{137}$Xe, are taken as touchstones of our samplings. A robust upper limit of $\\varepsilon_{i13/2}mixing of $i_{13/2}$ single-neutron configuration and $f_{7/2}\\otimes 3^-$ configuration in $13/2^+_1$ states of $N=83$ isotones.

  16. Calculating exclusion limits for Weakly Interacting Massive Particle direct detection experiments without background subtraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anne M Green

    2001-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Competitive limits on the weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) spin-independent scattering cross section are currently being produced by 76Ge detectors originally designed to search for neutrinoless double beta decay, such as the Heidelberg-Moscow and IGEX experiments. In the absence of background subtraction, limits on the WIMP interaction cross section are set by calculating the upper confidence limit on the theoretical event rate, given the observed event rate. The standard analysis technique involves calculating the 90% upper confidence limit on the number of events in each bin, and excluding any set of parameters (WIMP mass and cross-section) which produces a theoretical event rate for any bin which exceeds the 90% upper confidence limit on the event rate for that bin. We show that, if there is more than one energy bin, this produces exclusion limits that are actually at a lower degree of confidence than 90%, and are hence erroneously tight. We formulate criteria which produce true 90% confidence exclusion limits in these circumstances, including calculating the individual bin confidence limit for which the overall probability that no bins exceeds this confidence limit is 90% and calculating the 90% minimum confidence limit on the number of bins which exceed their individual bin 90% confidence limits. We then compare the limits on the WIMP cross-section produced by these criteria with those found using the standard technique, using data from the Heidelberg-Moscow and IGEX experiments.

  17. Upper limits on a stochastic gravitational-wave background using LIGO and Virgo interferometers at 600-1000 Hz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. D. Abbott; M. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; R. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; K. Agatsuma; P. Ajith; B. Allen; E. Amador Ceron; D. Amariutei; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. A. Arain; M. C. Araya; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; D. Atkinson; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. Ballmer; J. C. B. Barayoga; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; M. Bastarrika; A. Basti; J. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; D. Beck; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; A. Belletoile; I. Belopolski; M. Benacquista; J. M. Berliner; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; N. Beveridge; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; R. Biswas; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; C. Bogan; R. Bondarescu; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; S. Bose; L. Bosi; B. Bouhou; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; J. Burguet--Castell; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; J. Cannizzo; K. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; S. Caudill; M. Cavaglià; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; O. Chaibi; T. Chalermsongsak; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; S. Chelkowski; W. Chen; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; S. S. Y. Chua; C. T. Y. Chung; S. Chung; G. Ciani; D. E. Clark; J. Clark; J. H. Clayton; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; C. N. Colacino; J. Colas; A. Colla; M. Colombini; A. Conte; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; A. M. Cruise; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; R. M. Cutler; K. Dahl; S. L. Danilishin; R. Dannenberg; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; R. De Rosa; D. DeBra; G. Debreczeni; W. Del Pozzo; M. del Prete; T. Dent; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; M. Di Paolo Emilio; A. Di Virgilio; M. Díaz; A. Dietz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; J. -C. Dumas; T. Eberle; M. Edgar; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; G. Endr\\Hoczi; R. Engel; T. Etzel; K. Evans; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Y. Fan; B. F. Farr; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; F. Feroz; I. Ferrante; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; M. Flanigan; S. Foley; E. Forsi; L. A. Forte; N. Fotopoulos; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; D. Friedrich; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; M. -K. Fujimoto; P. J. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; M. Galimberti; L. Gammaitoni; J. Garcia; F. Garufi; M. E. Gáspár; G. Gemme; R. Geng; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. Á. Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; S. Gil; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; L. M. Goggin; G. González; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Goßler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; N. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Greverie; R. Grosso; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; R. Gupta; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; T. Ha; J. M. Hallam; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. -F. Hayau; J. Heefner; A. Heidmann; M. C. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; M. A. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; V. Herrera; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; M. Holtrop; T. Hong; S. Hooper; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; Y. J. Jang; P. Jaranowski; E. Jesse; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; G. Jones; R. Jones; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; R. Kasturi; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; D. Kelley; W. Kells; D. G. Keppel; Z. Keresztes; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili; E. A. Khazanov; B. Kim; C. Kim; H. Kim; K. Kim; N. Kim; Y. -M. Kim; P. J. King; D. L. Kinzel; J. S. Kissel; S. Klimenko; K. Kokeyama; V. Kondrashov; S. Koranda; W. Z. Korth; I. Kowalska; D. Kozak; O. Kranz; V. Kringel; S. Krishnamurthy; B. Krishnan; A. Królak; G. Kuehn; R. Kumar; P. Kwee; P. K. Lam

    2012-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A stochastic background of gravitational waves is expected to arise from a superposition of many incoherent sources of gravitational waves, of either cosmological or astrophysical origin. This background is a target for the current generation of ground-based detectors. In this article we present the first joint search for a stochastic background using data from the LIGO and Virgo interferometers. In a frequency band of 600-1000 Hz, we obtained a 95% upper limit on the amplitude of $\\Omega_{\\rm GW}(f) = \\Omega_3 (f/900 \\mathrm{Hz})^3$, of $\\Omega_3 < 0.33$, assuming a value of the Hubble parameter of $h_{100}=0.72$. These new limits are a factor of seven better than the previous best in this frequency band.

  18. Upper Limits on Electric and Weak Dipole Moments of Tau-Lepton and Heavy Quarks from e+e- Annihilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. E. Blinov; A. S. Rudenko

    2009-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The total cross-sections measured at LEP for e+e- annihilation into tau+tau-, c\\bar{c} and b\\bar{b} at 2E ~ 200 GeV are used to derive the upper limits 3*10^{-17}, 5*10^{-17}, 2*10^{-17} e*cm for the electric dipole moments and 4*10^{-17}, 7*10^{-17}, 2.5*10^{-17} e*cm for the weak dipole moments of the tau-lepton, c-, and b-quarks, respectively. Some of the existing limits on these moments are improved and for the b-quark the improvement is rather significant.

  19. Polarimetric Observations of the Masers in NGC 4258: An Upper Limit on the Large-Scale Magnetic Field 0.2 pc from the Central Engine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. R. Herrnstein; J. M. Moran; L. J. Greenhill; E. G. Blackman; P. J. Diamond

    1998-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We report VLA 1 sigma upper limits of 1.5% and 3% on the intrinsic circular and linear fractional polarizations, respectively, of the water vapor maser emission 0.2 pc from the central engine of NGC 4258. A corresponding 0.5% upper limit on any Zeeman-splitting-induced circular polarization translates to a 1 sigma upper limit on the parallel, or toroidal, component of the magnetic field of 300 mG. Assuming magnetic and thermal pressure balance in the disk, this magnetic field upper limit corresponds to a model-dependent estimate of the accretion rate through the molecular disk of 10^-1.9 alpha solar masses per year for the case where the magnetic field lies along the line of sight.

  20. Upper limits for the existence of long-lived isotopes of roentgenium in natural gold

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dellinger, F.; Kutschera, W.; Forstner, O.; Golser, R.; Priller, A.; Steier, P.; Wallner, A.; Winkler, G. [University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator (VERA) Laboratory, Waehringer Strasse 17, A-1090 Wien (Austria)

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensitive search for isotopes of a superheavy element (SHE) in natural gold materials has been performed with accelerator mass spectrometry at the Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator, which is based on a 3-MV tandem accelerator. Because the most likely SHE in gold is roentgenium (Rg, Z = 111), the search concentrated on Rg isotopes. Two different mass regions were explored: (i) For the neutron-deficient isotopes {sup 261}Rg and {sup 265}Rg, abundance limits in gold of 3x10{sup -16} were reached (no events observed). This is in stark contrast to the findings of Marinov et al.[Int. J. Mod. Phys. E 18, 621 (2009)], who reported positive identification of these isotopes with inductively coupled plasma sector field mass spectrometry in the (1-10)x10{sup -10} abundance range. (ii) Theoretical models of SHEs predict a region of increased stability around the proton and neutron shell closures of Z = 114 and N = 184. We therefore investigated eight heavy Rg isotopes, {sup A}Rg, A = 289, 290, 291, 292, 293, 294, 295, and 296. For six isotopes no events were observed, setting limits also in the 10{sup -16} abundance range. For {sup 291}Rg and {sup 294}Rg we observed two and nine events, respectively, which results in an abundance in the 10{sup -15} range. However, pileup of a particularly strong background in these cases makes a positive identification as Rg isotopes--even after pileup correction--unlikely.

  1. An upper limit on the ratio between the Extreme Ultraviolet and the bolometric luminosities of stars hosting habitable planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sengupta, Sujan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large number of terrestrial planets in the classical habitable zone of stars of different spectral types has already been discovered and many are expected to be discovered in near future. However, owing to the lack of knowledge on the atmospheric properties, the ambient environment of such planets are unknown. It is known that sufficient amount of Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) radiation from the star can drive hydrodynamic outflow of hydrogen that may drag heavier species from the atmosphere of the planet. If the rate of mass loss is sufficiently high then substantial amount of volatiles would escape causing the planet to become uninhabitable. Considering energy-limited hydrodynamical mass loss with an escape rate that causes oxygen to escape along with hydrogen, I present an upper limit for the ratio between the EUV and the bolometric luminosities of stars which constrains the habitability of planets around them. Application of the limit to planet-hosting stars with known EUV luminosities implies that many M-t...

  2. An upper limit to the photon fraction in cosmic rays above 10**19-eV from the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abraham, J.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allison, P.; Alvarez, C.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Anjos, J.C.; /Centro Atomico Bariloche /Buenos Aires, CONICET /La Plata U. /Pierre Auger Observ. /CNEA, San Martin /Adelaide U. /Catholic U. of Bolivia, La Paz /Bolivia U. /Sao Paulo U. /Campinas State U. /UEFS, Feira de Santana; ,

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An upper limit of 16% (at 95% c.l.) is derived for the photon fraction in cosmic rays with energies above 10{sup 19} eV, based on observations of the depth of shower maximum performed with the hybrid detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory. This is the first such limit on photons obtained by observing the fluorescence light profile of air showers. This upper limit confirms and improves on previous results from the Haverah Park and AGASA surface arrays. Additional data recorded with the Auger surface detectors for a subset of the event sample, support the conclusion that a photon origin of the observed events is not favored.

  3. Increasing the upper-limit intensity and temperature range for thermal self-focusing of a laser beam by using plasma density ramp-up

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bokaei, B.; Niknam, A. R., E-mail: a-niknam@sbu.ac.ir [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This work is devoted to improving relativistic and ponderomotive thermal self-focusing of the intense laser beam in an underdense plasma. It is shown that the ponderomotive nonlinearity induces a saturation mechanism for thermal self-focusing. Therefore, in addition to the well-known lower-limit critical intensity, there is an upper-limit intensity for thermal self-focusing above which the laser beam starts to experience ponderomotive defocusing. It is indicated that the upper-limit intensity value is dependent on plasma and laser parameters such as the plasma electron temperature, plasma density, and laser spot size. Furthermore, the effect of the upward plasma density ramp profile on the thermal self-focusing is studied. Results show that by using the plasma density ramp-up, the upper-limit intensity increases and the self-focusing temperature range expands.

  4. Upper Snake Provincial Assessment May 2004 APPENDIX 3-1--OVERVIEW OF THE MAJOR CAUSES LIMITING THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Upper Snake­Rock, Portneuf, Blackfoot, Willow, Teton, Beaver­Camas, and the Upper and Lower Henrys Fork province. (Source: ICBEMP 1997.) Major Hydrologic Unit (Watershed)a Snake Headwaters Subbasin Relative province. (Source GAP II, Scott et al. 2002) Focal Habitat Type High Low Medium Very High Very Low Riparian

  5. version 17.0 FERMILAB-PUB-10-???-E CDF Note 10101, D0 Note 6039 Combined Tevatron upper limit on gg H W +

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fermilab

    ,82 D. Brown ,22 E. Brubaker ,83 X.B. Bu ,8 D. Buchholz ,86 J. Budagov ,53 H.S. Budd ,115 S. Budd ,87. Campanelli ,68 M. Campbell ,104 F. Canelli ,82, 83 A. Canepa ,123 B. Carls ,87 D. Carlsmith ,134 R. Carosiversion 17.0 FERMILAB-PUB-10-???-E CDF Note 10101, D0 Note 6039 Combined Tevatron upper limit on gg

  6. Upper limit of the energy of the photon and the phase change of photon to material particles at the Scwartzschild radius

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Radhakrishnan Nair

    2005-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of Scwartzschild radius is extended to the photon and the upper limit imposed on the energy of a photon as a result of the three characteristics of the photon--the constancy of the velocity of light, the spin value of $1\\hslash$ and the zero rest mass of the photon--is shown. Further the phase change that occurs to the photon at the Scwartzschild radius, from energy to matter as a result of vacuum fluctuations is indicated.

  7. The Carnot efficiencybetween these temperatures is: This provides an absolute upper limit to the Rankine cycle effi-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Y. A.

    to the Rankine cycle effi- ciency. Heat Absorbed from Stream 3 Power Produced by Steam Turbine Required Power a steam cycle alongsidethe gas turbine cycle. LITERATURE CITED Christodoulou,K., Diploma Thesis, N Output of Gas Turbine For the Gas Turbine Cycle Calculated for Case 2, Upper Exhaust Temperature T6

  8. ISO/SWS observations of SN 1987A: II. A refined upper limit on the mass of Ti-44 in the ejecta of SN 1987A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Lundqvist; C. Kozma; J. Sollerman; C. Fransson

    2001-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    ISO/SWS observations of SN 1987A on day 3425 show no emission in [Fe I] 24.05 microns and [Fe II] 25.99 microns down to the limits of roughly 0.39 Jy and 0.64 Jy, respectively. Assuming a homogeneous distribution of Ti-44 inside 2000 km/s and negligible dust cooling, we have made time dependent theoretical models to estimate an upper limit on the mass of ejected Ti-44. Assessing various uncertainties of the model, and checking the late optical emission it predicts, we obtain an upper limit of 1.1EE-4 solar masses. This is lower than in our previous estimate using other ISO data, and we compare our new result with other models for the late emission, as well as with expected yields from explosion models. We also show that steady-state models for the optical emission are likely to overestimate the mass of ejected Ti-44. The low limit we find for the mass of ejected Ti-44 could be higher if dust cooling is important. A direct check on this is provided by the gamma-ray emission at 1.157 Mev as a result of the radioactive decay of Ti-44.

  9. Upper and lower limits on the Crab pulsar's astrophysical parameters set from gravitational wave observations by LIGO: braking index and energy considerations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giovanni Santostasi

    2008-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Laser Interferometer Gravitational Observatory (LIGO) has recently reached the end of its fifth science run (S5), having collected more than a year worth of data. Analysis of the data is still ongoing but a positive detection of gravitational waves, while possible, is not realistically expected for most likely sources. This is particularly true for what concerns gravitational waves from known pulsars. In fact, even under the most optimistic (and not very realistic) assumption that all the pulsar's observed spin-down is due to gravitational waves, the gravitational wave strain at earth from all the known isolated pulsars (with the only notable exception of the Crab pulsar) would not be strong enough to be detectable by existing detectors. By August 2006, LIGO had produced enough data for a coherent integration capable to extract signal from noise that was weaker than the one expected from the Crab pulsar's spin-down limit. No signal was detected, but beating the spin-down limit is a considerable achievement for the LIGO Scientific Collaboration (LSC). It is customary to translate the upper limit on strain from a pulsar into a more astrophysically significant upper limit on ellipticity. Once the spin-down limit has been beaten, it is possible to release the constraint that all the spin-down is due to gravitational wave emission. A more complete model with diverse braking mechanisms can be used to set limits on several astrophysical parameters of the pulsar. This paper shows possible values of such parameters for the Crab pulsar given the current limit on gravitational waves from this neutron star.

  10. Subjective Risk, Confidence, and Ambiguity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Traeger, Christian P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Paper 1103) Subjective Risk, Confidence, and Ambiguityby author(s). Subjective Risk, Con?dence, and Ambiguity ?567. Ellsberg, D. (1961), ‘Risk, ambiguity and the savage

  11. CO mass upper limits in the Fomalhaut ring - the importance of NLTE excitation in debris discs and future prospects with ALMA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matrà, L; Wyatt, M C; Dent, W R F

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, gas has been observed in an increasing number of debris discs, though its nature remains to be determined. Here, we analyse CO molecular excitation in optically thin debris discs, and search ALMA Cycle-0 data for CO J=3-2 emission in the Fomalhaut ring. No significant line emission is observed; we set a 3-$\\sigma$ upper limit on the integrated line flux of 0.16 Jy km s$^{-1}$. We show a significant dependency of the CO excitation on the density of collisional partners $n$, on the gas kinetic temperature $T_k$ and on the ambient radiation field $J$, suggesting that assumptions widely used for protoplanetary discs (e.g. LTE) do not necessarily apply to their low density debris counterparts. When applied to the Fomalhaut ring, we consider a primordial origin scenario where H$_2$ dominates collisional excitation of CO, and a secondary origin scenario dominated by e$^-$ and H$_2$O. In either scenario, we obtain a strict upper limit on the CO mass of 4.9 $\\times$ 10$^{-4}$ M$_{\\oplus}$. This arises...

  12. Combined CDF and D0 Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production with up to 8.6 fb-1 of Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The CDF; D0 Collaborations; the Tevatron New Phenomena; Higgs Working Group

    2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We combine results from CDF and D0 on direct searches for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) in ppbar collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV. Compared to the previous Tevatron Higgs boson search combination more data have been added, additional channels have been incorporated, and some previously used channels have been reanalyzed to gain sensitivity. We use the MSTW08 parton distribution functions and the latest theoretical cross sections when comparing our limits to the SM predictions. With up to 8.2 fb-1 of data analyzed at CDF and up to 8.6 fb-1 at D0, the 95% C.L. our upper limits on Higgs boson production are factors of 1.17, 1.71, and 0.48 times the values of the SM cross section for Higgs bosons of mass m_H=115 GeV/c^2, 140 GeV/c^2, and 165 GeV/c^2, respectively. The corresponding median upper limits expected in the absence of Higgs boson production are 1.16, 1.16, and 0.57. There is a small (approx. 1 sigma) excess of data events with respect to the background estimation in searches for the Higgs boson in the mass range 125

  13. Combined CDF and D0 Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production with up to 8.6 fb-1 of Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CDF, The; Collaborations, D0; Phenomena, the Tevatron New; Group, Higgs Working

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We combine results from CDF and D0 on direct searches for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) in p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Compared to the previous Tevatron Higgs boson search combination more data have been added, additional channels have been incorporated, and some previously used channels have been reanalyzed to gain sensitivity. We use the MSTW08 parton distribution functions and the latest theoretical cross sections when comparing our limits to the SM predictions. With up to 8.2 fb{sup -1} of data analyzed at CDF and up to 8.6 fb{sup -1} at D0, the 95% C.L. our upper limits on Higgs boson production are factors of 1.17, 1.71, and 0.48 times the values of the SM cross section for Higgs bosons of mass m{sub H} = 115 GeV/c{sup 2}, 140 GeV/c{sup 2}, and 165 GeV/c{sup 2}, respectively. The corresponding median upper limits expected in the absence of Higgs boson production are 1.16, 1.16, and 0.57. There is a small ({approx} 1{sigma}) excess of data events with respect to the background estimation in searches for the Higgs boson in the mass range 125 < m{sub H} < 155 GeV/c{sup 2}. We exclude, at the 95% C.L., a new and larger region at high mass between 156 < m{sub H} < 177 GeV/c{sup 2}, with an expected exclusion region of 148 < m{sub H} < 180 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  14. Search for quantum transducers between electromagnetic and gravitational radiation: A measurement of an upper limit on the transducer conversion efficiency of yttrium barium copper oxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Y. Chiao; W. J. Fitelson; A. D. Speliotopoulos

    2003-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A minimal coupling rule for the coupling of the electron spin to curved spacetime in general relativity suggests the possibility of a coupling between electromagnetic and gravitational radiation mediated by means of a quantum fluid. Thus quantum transducers between these two kinds of radiation fields might exist. We report here on the first attempt at a Hertz-type experiment, in which a high-$\\rm{T_c}$ superconductor (YBCO) was the sample material used as a possible quantum transducer to convert EM into GR microwaves, and a second piece of YBCO in a separate apparatus was used to back-convert GR into EM microwaves. An upper limit on the conversion efficiency of YBCO was measured to be $1.6\\times10^{-5}$ at liquid nitrogen temperature.

  15. Dynamics of Confident Voting D. Volovik1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redner, Sidney

    of Physics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA Abstract. We introduce the confident voter two substates that correspond to different confidence levels in the opinion. The basic variables

  16. Combined CDF and D0 Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production with up to 8.2 fb-1 of Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The CDF; D0 Collaborations; the TEVNPHWG Working Group

    2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We combine results from CDF and D0's direct searches for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) produced in p-pbar collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV. The results presented here include those channels which are most sensitive to Higgs bosons with mass between 130 and 200 GeV/c^2, namely searches targeted at Higgs boson decays to W+W-, although acceptance for decays into tau+tau- and gamma gamma is included. Compared to the previous Tevatron Higgs search combination, more data have been added and the analyses have been improved to gain sensitivity. We use the MSTW08 parton distribution functions and the latest gg to H theoretical cross section predictions when testing for the presence of a SM Higgs boson. With up to 7.1 fb-1 of data analyzed at CDF, and up to 8.2 fb-1 at D0, the 95% C.L. upper limits on Higgs boson production is a factor of 0.54 times the SM cross section for a Higgs boson mass of 165 GeV/c^2. We exclude at the 95% C.L. the region 158

  17. CONFIDENCE MEASURE BASED MODELADAPTATION FOR SPEAKER VERIFICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dupont, Stéphane

    Polytechnique de Mons ­ Multitel Research Center Avenue Copernic, 1, 7000 Mons Belgium Abstract Confidence

  18. Calibration Trumps Confidence as a Basis for Witness Credibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tenney, Elizabeth R.; MacCoun, Robert J.; Spellman, Barbara A.; Hastie, Reid

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Human Behavior, 4, Calibration Trumps Confidence Hatvany,Applied Psychology, 66, Calibration Trumps Confidence Wells,Calibration Trumps Confidence Calibration Trumps Confidence

  19. Confidence Measures for Evaluating Pronunciation Models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Gethin; Renals, Steve

    In this paper, we investigate the use of confidence measures for the evaluation of pronunciation models and the employment of these evaluations in an automatic baseform learning process. The confidence measures and ...

  20. HERS experiment cause for confidence.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cavallo, J. D.; Energy Systems

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At last April's Affordable Comfort conference, I conducted a small HERS (home energy ratings) experiment to examine the relative variability of ratings in new and older homes. The experiment grew out of discussions with Oak Ridge National Laboratory Senior Researcher Mark Ternes and EPA Energy Specialist Mia South about how good the HERS tools currently employed in the new homes market are at identifying cost-effective conservation measures in existing homes. Older homes present challenges for raters that may not generally exist in new construction. These include the absence of blueprints, the inability to interview the builder, the difficulty of identifying the operating efficiency of installed equipment, and different envelope characteristics within the home caused by partial remodels over the years. For precisely these reasons, the need for accurate ratings of older homes is acute. The efficacy of ratings in existing homes hinges on two questions: How accurate are the ratings in existing homes? and, How much does accuracy matter to the selection of conservation measures? A small experiment was organized to test the variability of ratings. Two homes were chosen to represent the very broad spectra that raters can find in the new-construction and existing-home housing stock. The new home in Park Ridge, Illinois, is typical in size and layout of the homes being built in the suburbs around Chicago. This four-bedroom, two-story house with finished basement measures slightly more than 4,000 ft{sup 2}, including the basement. The older home is located in Elgin, Illinois, and was built before 1940, probably sometime in the '20s or '30s. This two-bedroom house has a basement in which the furnace, water heater, clothes washer, and dryer are located. The raters disagreed as to whether the basement should be considered part of the conditioned space. Excluding the basement area, the house measurement approximately 1,000 ft{sup 2}. The rating process included a site visit to measure the homes features, inspection of the blueprints for the new home (none existed for the Elgin home), and a blower door test. After the raters completed their analysis, I examined the effect that the variability of ratings for the Elgin home had on choices for energy conservation measures. Although the sample was small, the results of this experiment are valuable. They may be summarized as follows: First, the ratings that different analysts estimated varied more widely for the older home than they did for the new home. Second, for the older home, the identification of cost-effective energy conservation measures was insensitive to the variation in ratings. Clearly, these findings need to be verified in further experiments. But it is noteworthy that the separate ratings of the new home were in such good agreement, and that cost-effective efficiency recommendations can be arrived at even when divergences exist in the absolute rating value. These findings also suggest that it is appropriate to have confidence in ratings as a tool for identifying cost-effective energy measures in older housing stock.

  1. Combined CDF and Dzero Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production at High Mass (155-200 GeV/c2) with 3 fb-1 of data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tevatron New Phenomena; Higgs working group; CDF Collaboration; D0 Collaboration

    2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We combine results from CDF and DO searches for a standard model Higgs boson in ppbar collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron, at sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV. With 3.0 fb-1 of data analyzed at CDF, and at DO, the 95% C.L. upper limits on Higgs boson production are a factor of 1.2, 1.0 and 1.3 higher than the SM cross section for a Higgs boson mass of m_{H}=$165, 170 and 175 GeV, respectively. We exclude at 95% C.L. a standard model Higgs boson of m_H=170 GeV. Based on simulation, the ratios of the corresponding median expected upper limit to the Standard Model cross section are 1.2, 1.4 and 1.7. Compared to the previous Higgs Tevatron combination, more data and refined analysis techniques have been used. These results extend significantly the individual limits of each experiment and provide new knowledge on the mass of the standard model Higgs boson beyond the LEP direct searches.

  2. Florida consumer confidence holds steady in May

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belogay, Eugene A.

    . Consumer confidence held steady at 68 in May after dropping for three months since Feb. 1 when gasoline prices began shooting up, according to a new survey. But Floridians' perceptions of their own finances.8 from a revised 66 in April on worries about jobs and inflation for groceries and gasoline. The survey

  3. Random selection as a confidence building tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macarthur, Duncan W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hauck, Danielle [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Langner, Diana [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thron, Jonathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, Morag [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Williams, Richard [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Any verification measurement performed on potentially classified nuclear material must satisfy two seemingly contradictory constraints. First and foremost, no classified information can be released. At the same time, the monitoring party must have confidence in the veracity of the measurement. The first concern can be addressed by performing the measurements within the host facility using instruments under the host's control. Because the data output in this measurement scenario is also under host control, it is difficult for the monitoring party to have confidence in that data. One technique for addressing this difficulty is random selection. The concept of random selection can be thought of as four steps: (1) The host presents several 'identical' copies of a component or system to the monitor. (2) One (or more) of these copies is randomly chosen by the monitors for use in the measurement system. (3) Similarly, one or more is randomly chosen to be validated further at a later date in a monitor-controlled facility. (4) Because the two components or systems are identical, validation of the 'validation copy' is equivalent to validation of the measurement system. This procedure sounds straightforward, but effective application may be quite difficult. Although random selection is often viewed as a panacea for confidence building, the amount of confidence generated depends on the monitor's continuity of knowledge for both validation and measurement systems. In this presentation, we will discuss the random selection technique, as well as where and how this technique might be applied to generate maximum confidence. In addition, we will discuss the role of modular measurement-system design in facilitating random selection and describe a simple modular measurement system incorporating six small {sup 3}He neutron detectors and a single high-purity germanium gamma detector.

  4. Diagnosing Anomalous Network Performance with Confidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Settlemyer, Bradley W [ORNL; Hodson, Stephen W [ORNL; Kuehn, Jeffery A [ORNL; Poole, Stephen W [ORNL

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Variability in network performance is a major obstacle in effectively analyzing the throughput of modern high performance computer systems. High performance interconnec- tion networks offer excellent best-case network latencies; how- ever, highly parallel applications running on parallel machines typically require consistently high levels of performance to adequately leverage the massive amounts of available computing power. Performance analysts have usually quantified network performance using traditional summary statistics that assume the observational data is sampled from a normal distribution. In our examinations of network performance, we have found this method of analysis often provides too little data to under- stand anomalous network performance. Our tool, Confidence, instead uses an empirically derived probability distribution to characterize network performance. In this paper we describe several instances where the Confidence toolkit allowed us to understand and diagnose network performance anomalies that we could not adequately explore with the simple summary statis- tics provided by traditional measurement tools. In particular, we examine a multi-modal performance scenario encountered with an Infiniband interconnection network and we explore the performance repeatability on the custom Cray SeaStar2 interconnection network after a set of software and driver updates.

  5. Limits to the muon flux from neutralino annihilations in the Sun with the AMANDA detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The AMANDA collaboration; M. Ackermann

    2005-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for an excess of muon-neutrinos from neutralino annihilations in the Sun has been performed with the AMANDA-II neutrino detector using data collected in 143.7 days of live-time in 2001. No excess over the expected atmospheric neutrino background has been observed. An upper limit at 90% confidence level has been obtained on the annihilation rate of captured neutralinos in the Sun, as well as the corresponding muon flux limit at the Earth, both as functions of the neutralino mass in the range 100 GeV-5000 GeV.

  6. Confidence measures for hybrid HMM/ANN speech recognition. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Gethin; Renals, Steve

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we introduce four acoustic confidence measures which are derived from the output of a hybrid HMM/ANN large vocabulary continuous speech recognition system. These confidence measures, based on local posterior probability estimates...

  7. Improved Limits on $B^{0}$ Decays to Invisible $(+gamma)$ Final States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Palano, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; /Bergen U.; Brown, David Nathan; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; So, R.Y.; /British Columbia U.; Khan, A.; /Brunel U.; Blinov, V.E.; /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U., Comp. Sci. Dept. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U.; /more authors.; ,

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We establish improved upper limits on branching fractions for B{sup 0} decays to final states where the decay products are purely invisible (i.e., no observable final state particles) and for final states where the only visible product is a photon. Within the Standard Model, these decays have branching fractions that are below the current experimental sensitivity, but various models of physics beyond the Standard Model predict significant contributions for these channels. Using 471 million B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon} (4S) resonance by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, we establish upper limits at the 90% confidence level of 2.4 x 10{sup -5} for the branching fraction of B{sup 0} {yields} invisible and 1.7 x 10{sup -5} for the branching fraction of B{sup 0} {yields} invisible + {gamma}.

  8. Limits on tau lepton flavor violating decays in three charged leptons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cervelli, Alberto

    2010-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for the neutrinoless, lepton-flavor violating decay of the {tau} lepton into three charged leptons has been performed using an integrated luminosity of 468 fb{sup -1} collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II collider. In all six decay modes considered, the numbers of events found in data are compatible with the background expectations. Upper limits on the branching fractions are set in the range (1.8-3.3) x 10{sup -8} at 90% confidence level.

  9. Informatively optimal levels of confidence for measurement uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David

    2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    expanded uncertainty of measurement as a historical artifact, and not as a strictly substantiated value. .... where ?o(?) = 1.5 is true for the most uncertain classification situation (50% confidence) about allowing or ..... as a power of exponent (n).

  10. Using Subjective Confidence to Improve Metacognitive Monitoring Accuracy and Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Tyler

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    USING SUBJECTIVE CONFIDENCE TO IMPROVE METACOGNITIVE MONITORING ACCURACY AND CONTROL A Dissertation by TYLER MICHAEL MILLER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... Michael Miller USING SUBJECTIVE CONFIDENCE TO IMPROVE METACOGNITIVE MONITORING ACCURACY AND CONTROL A Dissertation by TYLER MICHAEL MILLER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

  11. Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup The Upper Los Alamos Canyon Project involves cleaning up hazardous materials left over from some of the Laboratory's earliest activities. Contact...

  12. The effect of terrorism on public confidence : an exploratory study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, M. S.; Baldwin, T. E.; Samsa, M. E.; Ramaprasad, A.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A primary goal of terrorism is to instill a sense of fear and vulnerability in a population and to erode confidence in government and law enforcement agencies to protect citizens against future attacks. In recognition of its importance, the Department of Homeland Security includes public confidence as one of the metrics it uses to assess the consequences of terrorist attacks. Hence, several factors--including a detailed understanding of the variations in public confidence among individuals, by type of terrorist event, and as a function of time--are critical to developing this metric. In this exploratory study, a questionnaire was designed, tested, and administered to small groups of individuals to measure public confidence in the ability of federal, state, and local governments and their public safety agencies to prevent acts of terrorism. Data were collected from the groups before and after they watched mock television news broadcasts portraying a smallpox attack, a series of suicide bomber attacks, a refinery bombing, and cyber intrusions on financial institutions that resulted in identity theft and financial losses. Our findings include the following: (a) the subjects can be classified into at least three distinct groups on the basis of their baseline outlook--optimistic, pessimistic, and unaffected; (b) the subjects make discriminations in their interpretations of an event on the basis of the nature of a terrorist attack, the time horizon, and its impact; (c) the recovery of confidence after a terrorist event has an incubation period and typically does not return to its initial level in the long-term; (d) the patterns of recovery of confidence differ between the optimists and the pessimists; and (e) individuals are able to associate a monetary value with a loss or gain in confidence, and the value associated with a loss is greater than the value associated with a gain. These findings illustrate the importance the public places in their confidence in government and law enforcement and also indicate that the level of importance is clearly of a magnitude on the order of other major terrorist event consequences, such as loss of human life and impacts to the economy.

  13. Simultaneous confidence bands in curve prediction applied to load curves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Simultaneous confidence bands in curve prediction applied to load curves J.M. Aza¨is1, S. Bercu2, J, load curve. 1 Introduction In curve prediction, one is generally interested in deriving simultaneous this technique in the numerical context of load curve pre- diction: power producers like EDF, the electrical

  14. ON CONFIDENCE INTERVALS ASSOCIATED WITH THE USUAL AND ADJUSTED LIKELIHOODS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Nancy

    and Mukerjee (1994) on higher order power shed light on the power properties of the associated confidence. Highest posterior density regions, with approximate frequentist validity, are also included in the study. Keywords: Bartlett correction; expected length; highest posterior density region; likeli­ hood ratio

  15. STATISTICS OF PRECIPITATION EXTREMES: QUANTIFYING CONFIDENCE IN TRENDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katz, Richard

    this situation (e. g., "extRemes" package in open source statistical programming language R) Maximum likelihood1 STATISTICS OF PRECIPITATION EXTREMES: QUANTIFYING CONFIDENCE IN TRENDS Rick Katz Institute in Causes of Trends #12;4 (1) Introduction · Extreme value analysis under stationarity -- Statistical theory

  16. LIMITS ON PROMPT, DISPERSED RADIO PULSES FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannister, K. W.; Murphy, T.; Gaensler, B. M. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy (SIfA), School of Physics A29, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Reynolds, J. E., E-mail: keith.bannister@csiro.au [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)

    2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We have searched for prompt radio emission from nine gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with a 12 m telescope at 1.4 GHz, with a time resolution of 64 {mu}s to 1 s. We detected single dispersed radio pulses with significances >6{sigma} in the few minutes following two GRBs. The dispersion measures of both pulses are well in excess of the expected Galactic values, and the implied rate is incompatible with known sources of single dispersed pulses. The arrival times of both pulses also coincide with breaks in the GRB X-ray light curves. A null trial and statistical arguments rule out random fluctuations as the origin of these pulses with >95% and {approx}97% confidence, respectively, although a simple population argument supports a GRB origin with confidence of only 2%. We caution that we cannot rule out radio frequency interference (RFI) as the origin of these pulses. If the single pulses are not related to the GRBs, we set an upper limit on the flux density of radio pulses emitted between 200 and 1800 s after a GRB of 1.27w {sup -1/2} Jy, where 6.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} s < w < 32 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} s is the pulse width. We set a limit of less than 760 Jy for long timescale (>1 s) variations. These limits are some of the most constraining at high time resolution and GHz frequencies in the early stages of the GRB phenomenon.

  17. Upper limits on charm-changing neutral-current interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.

    1988-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    in the D -D system and/or large branching ratios for charmed-hadron decays into oppositely charged leptons. Thus far, no experimental evidence exists for D -D mixing. Previous studies of charm-changing neutral- current interactions have been made by seeking...- ence Foundation and the U.S. Department of Energy, under Contracts No. DE-AC02-76ER01428, No. De- AC02-76ER03066, No. De-AC02-76ER03064, No. DE-AC02-76ER01545, No. DE-AC02-78ER05001, and No. F605-86-ER40272. 'S. L. Glashow, J. Iliopoulos, and L. Maiani...

  18. Inter-Korean military confidence building after 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tae-woo, Kim (Korea Institute for Defense Analyses, Seoul, Republic of Korea); Littlefield, Adriane C.; Vannoni, Michael Geoffrey; Sang-beom, Kim (Korea Institute for Defense Analyses, Seoul, Republic of Korea); Koelm, Jennifer Gay; Olsen, John Norman; Myong-jin, Kim (Korea Institute for Defense Analyses, Seoul, Republic of Korea); Sung-tack, Shin (Korea Institute for Defense Analyses, Seoul, Republic of Korea)

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tensions on the Korean Peninsula remain high despite a long-term strategy by South Korea to increase inter-Korean exchanges in economics, culture, sports, and other topics. This is because the process of reconciliation has rarely extended to military and security topics and those initiatives that were negotiated have been ineffective. Bilateral interactions must include actions to reduce threats and improve confidence associated with conventional military forces (land, sea, and air) as well as nuclear, chemical, and biological activities that are applicable to developing and producing weapons of mass destruction (WMD). The purpose of this project is to develop concepts for inter-Korean confidence building measures (CBMs) for military and WMD topics that South Korea could propose to the North when conditions are right. This report describes the historical and policy context for developing security-related CBMs and presents an array of bilateral options for conventional military and WMD topics within a consistent framework. The conceptual CBMs address two scenarios: (1) improved relations where construction of a peace regime becomes a full agenda item in inter-Korean dialogue, and (2) continued tense inter-Korean relations. Some measures could be proposed in the short term under current conditions, others might be implemented in a series of steps, while some require a higher level of cooperation than currently exists. To support decision making by political leaders, this research focuses on strategies and policy options and does not include technical details.

  19. Multiply Connected Topological Economics, Confidence Relation and Political Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi-Fang Chang

    2010-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the similar formulas of the preference relation and the utility function, we propose the confidence relations and the corresponding influence functions that represent various interacting strengths of different families, cliques and systems of organization. Since they can affect products, profit and prices, etc., in an economic system, and are usually independent of economic results, therefore, the system can produce a multiply connected topological economics. If the political economy is an economy chaperoned polity, it will produce consequentially a binary economy. When the changes of the product and the influence are independent one another, they may be a node or saddle point. When the influence function large enough achieves a certain threshold value, it will form a wormhole with loss of capital. Various powers produce usually the economic wormhole and various corruptions.

  20. Constraints on Braneworld Gravity Models from a Kinematic Limit on the Age of the Black Hole XTE J1118+480

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Psaltis, Dimitrios [Departments of Physics and Astronomy, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States)

    2007-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In braneworld gravity models with a finite anti-de Sitter space (AdS) curvature in the extra dimension, the AdS/conformal field theory correspondence leads to a prediction for the lifetime of astrophysical black holes that is significantly smaller than the Hubble time, for asymptotic curvatures that are consistent with current experiments. Using the recent measurements of the position, three-dimensional spatial velocity, and mass of the black hole XTE J1118+480, I calculate a lower limit on its kinematic age of {>=}11 Myr (95% confidence). This translates into an upper limit for the asymptotic AdS curvature in the extra dimensions of <0.08 mm, which significantly improves the limit obtained by table top experiments of sub mm gravity.

  1. Draft Inventory Upper Snake Province

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Draft Inventory Upper Snake Province Submitted To The Northwest Power and Conservation Council Portland, Oregon Prepared by December 2004 #12;BOI043620012.DOC/KG ii Contents Section Page Inventory

  2. Chronological refinement of an ice core record at Upper Fremont Glacier in south central North America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuster, Paul F. [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Boulder, Colorado (United States)] [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Boulder, Colorado (United States); White, David E. [Golden Software, Golden, Colorado (United States)] [Golden Software, Golden, Colorado (United States); Naftz, David L. [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States)] [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Cecil, L. DeWayne [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Idaho Falls, Idaho (United States)] [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Idaho Falls, Idaho (United States)

    2000-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential to use ice cores from alpine glaciers in the midlatitudes to reconstruct paleoclimatic records has not been widely recognized. Although excellent paleoclimatic records exist for the polar regions, paleoclimatic ice core records are not common from midlatitude locations. An ice core removed from the Upper Fremont Glacier in Wyoming provides evidence for abrupt climate change during the mid-1800s. Volcanic events (Krakatau and Tambora) identified from electrical conductivity measurements (ECM) and isotopic and chemical data from the Upper Fremont Glacier were reexamined to confirm and refine previous chronological estimates of the ice core. At a depth of 152 m the refined age-depth profile shows good agreement (1736{+-}10 A.D.) with the {sup 14}C age date (1729{+-}95 A.D.). The {delta}{sup 18}O profile of the Upper Fremont Glacier (UFG) ice core indicates a change in climate known as the Little Ice Age (LIA). However, the sampling interval for {delta}{sup 18}O is sufficiently large (20 cm) such that it is difficult to pinpoint the LIA termination on the basis of {delta}{sup 18}O data alone. Other research has shown that changes in the {delta}{sup 18}O variance are generally coincident with changes in ECM variance. The ECM data set contains over 125,000 data points at a resolution of 1 data point per millimeter of ice core. A 999-point running average of the ECM data set and results from f tests indicates that the variance of the ECM data decreases significantly at about 108 m. At this depth, the age-depth profile predicts an age of 1845 A.D. Results indicate the termination of the LIA was abrupt with a major climatic shift to warmer temperatures around 1845 A.D. and continuing to present day. Prediction limits (error bars) calculated for the profile ages are {+-}10 years (90% confidence level). Thus a conservative estimate for the time taken to complete the LIA climatic shift to present-day climate is about 10 years, suggesting the LIA termination in alpine regions of central North America may have occurred on a relatively short (decadal) timescale. (c) 2000 American Geophysical Union.

  3. Quantum Statistics Basis, Thermodynamic Analogies and the Degree of Confidence for Maximum Entropy Restoration and Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soffer, Bernard H; Kikuchi, Ryoichi

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Confidence for Maximum Entropy Restoration and EstimationApril 3, 1992) The Maximum Entropy method, using physicalare discussed. Maximum Entropy (ME) estimation has been

  4. Acceleration of the Greenland ice sheet mass loss as observed by GRACE: Confidence and sensitivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acceleration of the Greenland ice sheet mass loss as observed by GRACE: Confidence and sensitivity: Greenland mass loss acceleration confidence intervals GRACE a b s t r a c t We examine the scale and spatial distribution of the mass change acceleration in Greenland and its statistical significance, using processed

  5. Confidence Valuation in a Public-Key Infrastructure based on Uncertain Evidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maurer, Ueli

    Confidence Valuation in a Public-Key Infrastructure based on Uncertain Evidence Reto Kohlas Ueli an uncertain piece of evidence and have proposed ad hoc methods, sometimes referred to as trust management and the valuation of confidence values in the general context of reasoning based on uncertain evidence. Second, we

  6. Confidence Valuation in a PublicKey Infrastructure based on Uncertain Evidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maurer, Ueli

    Confidence Valuation in a Public­Key Infrastructure based on Uncertain Evidence Reto Kohlas Ueli an uncertain piece of evidence and have proposed ad hoc methods, sometimes referred to as trust management and the valuation of confidence values in the general context of reasoning based on uncertain evidence. Second, we

  7. Role of IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) safeguards in confidence building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Augustson, R.H.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, I will examine some attributes of confidence building and connect them with how the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) interacts with its member states in carrying out its safeguards function. These interactions and the structure set up to define them help maintain and strengthen confidence between the IAEA and the member states and among these states. 3 refs.

  8. Multiplicative scale uncertainties in the unified approach for constructing confidence intervals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. S. Smith

    2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated how uncertainties in the estimation of the detection efficiency affect the 90% confidence intervals in the unified approach for constructing confidence intervals. The study has been conducted for experiments where the number of detected events is large and can be described by a Gaussian probability density function. We also assume the detection efficiency has a Gaussian probability density and study the range of the relative uncertainties $\\sigma_\\epsilon$ between 0 and 30%. We find that the confidence intervals provide proper coverage over a wide signal range and increase smoothly and continuously from the intervals that ignore scale uncertainties with a quadratic dependence on $\\sigma_\\epsilon$.

  9. Report of the First Confidence Building Exercise For Biomedical Sample Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alcaraz, A; Gregg, H

    2010-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We participated in the first exercise to build confidence in the analysis of biomedical samples for trace levels of CW agents and/or their degradation, reaction or metabolites.

  10. Dynamics of Confident Voting D. Volovik 1 and S. Redner 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redner, Sidney

    and Department of Physics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA Abstract. We introduce two substates that correspond to di#erent confidence levels in the opinion. The basic variables

  11. Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrinceton PlasmaAfternoon TalksDigitalRevisionof EnergyUpper Los

  12. Cooperative Monitoring Center Occasional Paper/18: Maritime Cooperation Between India and Pakistan: Building Confidence at Sea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SIDDIQA-AGHA,AYESHA

    2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses ways in which the navies of both India and Pakistan can cooperate on issues of maritime and naval significance. Although the militaries and navies of the two countries have traditionally seen each other as rivals, international economic developments make cooperation imperative. South Asia requires an approach that can alter the existing hostile images and perceptions. This can be achieved through developing an incremental approach towards confidence building that would allow consistency and help build confidence gradually. The aim is to make confidence building a sustainable activity that would help transform hostile images and build cooperative and nonhostile relationships. This paper proposes a five-step model to suggest what the two navies can do jointly to build confidence, with the ultimate goal of naval arms control. The steps include (1) the Signaling Stage to initiate communication between the two navies, (2) the Warming-Up Stage to build confidence through nonmilitary joint ventures, (3) the Handshake Stage to build confidence between the two navies through military joint ventures, (4) the Problem-Solving Stage to resolve outstanding disputes, and (5) the Final Nod Stage to initiate naval arms control. This model would employ communication, navigation, and remote sensing technologies to achieve success.

  13. The {ital COBE} Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment Search for the Cosmic Infrared Background. I. Limits and Detections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hauser, M.G. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)] [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Arendt, R.G. [Raytheon STX, Code 685, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)] [Raytheon STX, Code 685, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Kelsall, T.; Dwek, E. [Code 685, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)] [Code 685, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Odegard, N.; Weiland, J.L.; Freudenreich, H.T. [Raytheon STX, Code 685, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)] [Raytheon STX, Code 685, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Reach, W.T. [California Institute of Technology, IPAC/JPL, MS 100-22, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)] [California Institute of Technology, IPAC/JPL, MS 100-22, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Silverberg, R.F.; Moseley, S.H. [Code 685, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)] [Code 685, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Pei, Y.C. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)] [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Lubin, P. [Physics Department, University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)] [Physics Department, University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Mather, J.C.; Shafer, R.A. [Code 685, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)] [Code 685, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Smoot, G.F. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Space Sciences Laboratory, Department of Physics, UC Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)] [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Space Sciences Laboratory, Department of Physics, UC Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Weiss, R. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Room 20F-001, Department of Physics, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)] [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Room 20F-001, Department of Physics, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Wilkinson, D.T. [Princeton University, Department of Physics, Jadwin Hall, Box 708, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)] [Princeton University, Department of Physics, Jadwin Hall, Box 708, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Wright, E.L. [UCLA, Astronomy Department, Los Angeles, CA 90024-1562 (United States)] [UCLA, Astronomy Department, Los Angeles, CA 90024-1562 (United States)

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) on the Cosmic Background Explorer ({ital COBE}) spacecraft was designed primarily to conduct a systematic search for an isotropic cosmic infrared background (CIB) in 10 photometric bands from 1.25 to 240 {mu}m. The results of that search are presented here. Conservative limits on the CIB are obtained from the minimum observed brightness in all-sky maps at each wavelength, with the faintest limits in the DIRBE spectral range being at 3.5 {mu}m ({nu}{ital I}{sub {nu}} {lt} 64 nW m{sup {minus}2} sr{sup {minus}1}, 95{percent} confidence level) and at 240 {mu}m ({nu}{ital I}{sub {nu}} {lt} 28 nW m{sup {minus}2} sr{sup {minus}1}, 95{percent} confidence level). The bright foregrounds from interplanetary dust scattering and emission, stars, and interstellar dust emission are the principal impediments to the DIRBE measurements of the CIB. These foregrounds have been modeled and removed from the sky maps. Assessment of the random and systematic uncertainties in the residuals and tests for isotropy show that only the 140 and 240 {mu}m data provide candidate detections of the CIB. The residuals and their uncertainties provide CIB upper limits more restrictive than the dark sky limits at wavelengths from 1.25 to 100 {mu}m. No plausible solar system or Galactic source of the observed 140 and 240 {mu}m residuals can be identified, leading to the conclusion that the CIB has been detected at levels of {nu}{ital I}{sub {nu}} = 25 {plus_minus} 7 and 14 {plus_minus} 3 nW m{sup {minus}2} sr{sup {minus}1} at 140 and 240 {mu}m, respectively. The integrated energy from 140 to 240 {mu}m, 10.3 nW m{sup {minus}2} sr{sup {minus}1}, is about twice the integrated optical light from the galaxies in the Hubble Deep Field, suggesting that star formation might have been heavily enshrouded by dust at high redshift. The detections and upper limits reported here provide new constraints on models of the history of energy-releasing processes and dust production since the decoupling of the cosmic microwave background from matter. {copyright} {ital {copyright} 1998.} {ital The American Astronomical Society}

  14. Self field triggered superconducting fault current limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tekletsadik, Kasegn D. (Rexford, NY)

    2008-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A superconducting fault current limiter array with a plurality of superconductor elements arranged in a meanding array having an even number of supconductors parallel to each other and arranged in a plane that is parallel to an odd number of the plurality of superconductors, where the odd number of supconductors are parallel to each other and arranged in a plane that is parallel to the even number of the plurality of superconductors, when viewed from a top view. The even number of superconductors are coupled at the upper end to the upper end of the odd number of superconductors. A plurality of lower shunt coils each coupled to the lower end of each of the even number of superconductors and a plurality of upper shunt coils each coupled to the upper end of each of the odd number of superconductors so as to generate a generally orthoganal uniform magnetic field during quenching using only the magenetic field generated by the superconductors.

  15. Calculating Confidence, Uncertainty, and Numbers of Samples When Using Statistical Sampling Approaches to Characterize and Clear Contaminated Areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Matzke, Brett D.; Sego, Landon H.; Amidan, Brett G.

    2013-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the methodology, formulas, and inputs needed to make characterization and clearance decisions for Bacillus anthracis-contaminated and uncontaminated (or decontaminated) areas using a statistical sampling approach. Specifically, the report includes the methods and formulas for calculating the • number of samples required to achieve a specified confidence in characterization and clearance decisions • confidence in making characterization and clearance decisions for a specified number of samples for two common statistically based environmental sampling approaches. In particular, the report addresses an issue raised by the Government Accountability Office by providing methods and formulas to calculate the confidence that a decision area is uncontaminated (or successfully decontaminated) if all samples collected according to a statistical sampling approach have negative results. Key to addressing this topic is the probability that an individual sample result is a false negative, which is commonly referred to as the false negative rate (FNR). The two statistical sampling approaches currently discussed in this report are 1) hotspot sampling to detect small isolated contaminated locations during the characterization phase, and 2) combined judgment and random (CJR) sampling during the clearance phase. Typically if contamination is widely distributed in a decision area, it will be detectable via judgment sampling during the characterization phrase. Hotspot sampling is appropriate for characterization situations where contamination is not widely distributed and may not be detected by judgment sampling. CJR sampling is appropriate during the clearance phase when it is desired to augment judgment samples with statistical (random) samples. The hotspot and CJR statistical sampling approaches are discussed in the report for four situations: 1. qualitative data (detect and non-detect) when the FNR = 0 or when using statistical sampling methods that account for FNR > 0 2. qualitative data when the FNR > 0 but statistical sampling methods are used that assume the FNR = 0 3. quantitative data (e.g., contaminant concentrations expressed as CFU/cm2) when the FNR = 0 or when using statistical sampling methods that account for FNR > 0 4. quantitative data when the FNR > 0 but statistical sampling methods are used that assume the FNR = 0. For Situation 2, the hotspot sampling approach provides for stating with Z% confidence that a hotspot of specified shape and size with detectable contamination will be found. Also for Situation 2, the CJR approach provides for stating with X% confidence that at least Y% of the decision area does not contain detectable contamination. Forms of these statements for the other three situations are discussed in Section 2.2. Statistical methods that account for FNR > 0 currently only exist for the hotspot sampling approach with qualitative data (or quantitative data converted to qualitative data). This report documents the current status of methods and formulas for the hotspot and CJR sampling approaches. Limitations of these methods are identified. Extensions of the methods that are applicable when FNR = 0 to account for FNR > 0, or to address other limitations, will be documented in future revisions of this report if future funding supports the development of such extensions. For quantitative data, this report also presents statistical methods and formulas for 1. quantifying the uncertainty in measured sample results 2. estimating the true surface concentration corresponding to a surface sample 3. quantifying the uncertainty of the estimate of the true surface concentration. All of the methods and formulas discussed in the report were applied to example situations to illustrate application of the methods and interpretation of the results.

  16. Assessment of Charter Boat and Head Boat Angler Perception of Fishery Regulations and Stock Health in the Recreational Red Snapper (Lutjanus campechanus) Fishery in the Upper Texas Coast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norman, Sarah A.

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    quota by 1.7 million pounds. The lack of consistency between state and federal regulations and the drastic changes in management schemes have affected anglers' confidence in management, and limited the ability of the fishery to successfully adapt...

  17. CJS Profile Likelihood Confidence Intervals in The CJS Estimates in SURPH 3 provide point estimates for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    CJS Profile Likelihood Confidence Intervals in SURPH 3 The CJS Estimates in SURPH 3 provide point based on profile likelihoods provide a non-parametric alternative. In most instances there will be close that the profile likelihood confidence intervals should be used. The theory behind profile likelihood confidence

  18. Cooperative Monitoring Center Occasional Paper/13: Cooperative monitoring for confidence building: A case study of the Sino-Indian border areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SIDHU,WAHEGURU PAL SINGH; YUAN,JING-DONG; BIRINGER,KENT L.

    1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This occasional paper identifies applicable cooperative monitoring techniques and develops models for possible application in the context of the border between China and India. The 1993 and 1996 Sino-Indian agreements on maintaining peace and tranquility along the Line of Actual Control (LAC) and establishing certain confidence building measures (CBMs), including force reductions and limitation on military exercises along their common border, are used to examine the application of technically based cooperative monitoring in both strengthening the existing terms of the agreements and also enhancing trust. The paper also aims to further the understanding of how and under what conditions technology-based tools can assist in implementing existing agreements on arms control and confidence building. The authors explore how cooperative monitoring techniques can facilitate effective implementation of arms control agreements and CBMS between states and contribute to greater security and stability in bilateral, regional, and global contexts.

  19. Half-life Limit of 19Mg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Frank; T. Baumann; D. Bazin; R. R. C. Clement; M. W. Cooper; P. Heckman; W. A. Peters; A. Stolz; M. Thoennessen; M. S. Wallace

    2003-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for 19Mg was performed using projectile fragmentation of a 150 MeV/nucleon 36Ar beam. No events of 19Mg were observed. From the time-of-flight through the fragment separator an upper limit of 22 ns for the half-life of 19Mg was established.

  20. Improved limits on scalar weak couplings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adelberger, E.G. (PPE Division, CERN, CH-1211 Geneve 23 (Switzerland) Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States))

    1993-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    I point out that [beta]-delayed proton spectroscopy is a powerful probe of possible scalar contributions to nuclear [beta] decay, and use Schardt and Riisager's data on the shape of the beta-delayed proton peaks from the superallowed decays of [sup 32]Ar and [sup 33]Ar to set improved upper limits on such couplings. Implications of these limits for leptoquark masses are mentioned.

  1. Biological Survey of the Upper Purgatoire Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biological Survey of the Upper Purgatoire Watershed Las Animas County, CO John Carney Colorado ...............................................................................................................9 Management Urgency Ranks ........................................................................................................10 POTENTIAL CONSERVATION SITE PLANNING BOUNDARIES........................................12 Off

  2. Upper Cumberland EMC- Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Upper Cumberland Electric Membership Corporation (UCEMC), in collaboration with the Tennessee Valley Authority, offers incentives for its customers to purchase and install energy efficient...

  3. Method and system for assigning a confidence metric for automated determination of optic disc location

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karnowski, Thomas P. (Knoxville, TN); Tobin, Jr., Kenneth W. (Harriman, TN); Muthusamy Govindasamy, Vijaya Priya (Knoxville, TN); Chaum, Edward (Memphis, TN)

    2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for assigning a confidence metric for automated determination of optic disc location that includes analyzing a retinal image and determining at least two sets of coordinates locating an optic disc in the retinal image. The sets of coordinates can be determined using first and second image analysis techniques that are different from one another. An accuracy parameter can be calculated and compared to a primary risk cut-off value. A high confidence level can be assigned to the retinal image if the accuracy parameter is less than the primary risk cut-off value and a low confidence level can be assigned to the retinal image if the accuracy parameter is greater than the primary risk cut-off value. The primary risk cut-off value being selected to represent an acceptable risk of misdiagnosis of a disease having retinal manifestations by the automated technique.

  4. The use of latin hypercube sampling for the efficient estimation of confidence intervals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grabaskas, D.; Denning, R.; Aldemir, T. [Ohio State Univ., 201 W 19th Ave, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Nakayama, M. K. [New Jersey Inst. of Technology, 218 Central Ave, Newark, NJ 07102 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Latin hypercube sampling (LHS) has long been used as a way of assuring adequate sampling of the tails of distributions in a Monte Carlo analysis and provided the framework for the uncertainty analysis performed in the NUREG-1150 risk assessment. However, this technique has not often been used in the performance of regulatory analyses due to the inability to establish confidence levels on the quantiles of the output distribution. Recent work has demonstrated a method that makes this possible. This method is compared to the procedure of crude Monte Carlo using order statistics, which is currently used to establish confidence levels. The results of several statistical examples demonstrate that the LHS confidence interval method can provide a more accurate and precise solution, but issues remain when applying the technique generally. (authors)

  5. Approach and development strategy for an agent-based model of economic confidence.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sprigg, James A.; Pryor, Richard J.; Jorgensen, Craig Reed

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We are extending the existing features of Aspen, a powerful economic modeling tool, and introducing new features to simulate the role of confidence in economic activity. The new model is built from a collection of autonomous agents that represent households, firms, and other relevant entities like financial exchanges and governmental authorities. We simultaneously model several interrelated markets, including those for labor, products, stocks, and bonds. We also model economic tradeoffs, such as decisions of households and firms regarding spending, savings, and investment. In this paper, we review some of the basic principles and model components and describe our approach and development strategy for emulating consumer, investor, and business confidence. The model of confidence is explored within the context of economic disruptions, such as those resulting from disasters or terrorist events.

  6. The committee says that although public confidence in agriculture is at an all-time low

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    The committee says that although public confidence in agriculture is at an all-time low out that civil departments, such as the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (MAFF million research programme. Peter Rosen, head of the high energy and nuclear physics office

  7. Confidence Intervals for OD Demand Estimation Yingying Chen, Fernando Ordo~nez

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ordóñez, Fernando

    Confidence Intervals for OD Demand Estimation Yingying Chen, Fernando Ord´o~nez , and Kurt Palmer Representative origin-destination (OD) demand tables are a crucial part of making many transportation models relevant to practice. However estimating these OD tables is a challenging problem, even more so determining

  8. Using Classification to Evaluate the Output of Confidence-Based Association Rule Mining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank, Eibe

    Using Classification to Evaluate the Output of Confidence-Based Association Rule Mining Stefan, New Zealand {mhall, eibe}@cs.waikato.ac.nz Abstract. Association rule mining is a data mining concerning both running time and size of rule sets. 1 Introduction Association rule mining is a widely

  9. Using Classification to Evaluate the Output of ConfidenceBased Association Rule Mining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank, Eibe

    Using Classification to Evaluate the Output of Confidence­Based Association Rule Mining Stefan Hamilton, New Zealand {mhall, eibe}@cs.waikato.ac.nz Abstract. Association rule mining is a data mining concerning both running time and size of rule sets. 1 Introduction Association rule mining is a widely

  10. ESTIMATING BEDROCK AND SURFACE LAYER BOUNDARIES AND CONFIDENCE INTERVALS IN ICE SHEET RADAR IMAGERY USING MCMC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menczer, Filippo

    ESTIMATING BEDROCK AND SURFACE LAYER BOUNDARIES AND CONFIDENCE INTERVALS IN ICE SHEET RADAR IMAGERY and Computing Indiana University Bloomington, Indiana USA ABSTRACT Climate models that predict polar ice sheet behavior require accurate measurements of the bedrock-ice and ice-air bound- aries in ground

  11. Profile-Supported Confidence Estimation for Load-Value-Prediction Martin Burtscher and Benjamin G. Zorn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burtscher, Martin

    Profile-Supported Confidence Estimation for Load-Value-Prediction Martin Burtscher and Benjamin G}@cs.colorado.edu Abstract Due to their occasional very long latency, load instruc- tions are among the slowest instructions the execution of its dependent instructions, which can significantly affect system performance. Load value

  12. A Component-Based Approach for Constructing High-confidence Distributed Real-time and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tuceryan, Mihran

    the entire software life-cycle. 1 Introduction As the complexity of Distributed Real-Time Embedded (DRE development cost, but also facilitate high-confidence DRE system construction using different formalisms over implementations of the same functional component with different run-time features (e.g., battery consumption

  13. A Component-Based Approach for Constructing High-Confidence Distributed Real-Time and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Jeffrey G.

    the entire software life-cycle. 1 Introduction As the complexity of Distributed Real-Time Embedded (DRE development cost, but also facilitate high-confidence DRE system construction using different formalisms over with different run-time features (e.g., battery consumption versus throughput). Addition- ally, two components

  14. Process Limits on Euclid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Process Limits Process Limits Limit Hard Soft core file size (blocks) 0 unlimited data seg size (kbytes) unlimited unlimited scheduling priority 0 0 file size (blocks) unlimited...

  15. Scenario development for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: Building confidence in the assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galson, D.A. [Galson Sciences Limited, (United Kingdom); Swift, P.N. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scenario developments is part of the iterative performance assessment (PA) process for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Scenario development for the WIPP has been the subject of intense external review, and is certain to be the subject of continued scrutiny as the project proceeds toward regulatory compliance. The principal means of increasing confidence is this aspect of the PA will be through the use of a systematic and thorough procedure toward developing the scenarios and conceptual models on which the assessment is to be based. Early and ongoing interaction with project reviewers can assist with confidence building. Quality of argument and clarity of presentation in PA will be of key concern. Appropriate tools are required for documenting and tracking assumptions, through a single assessment phase, and between iterative assessment phases. Risks associated with future human actions are of particular concern to the WIPP project, and international consensus on the principles for incorporation of future human actions in assessments would be valuable.

  16. Another Look at Confidence Intervals: Proposal for a More Relevant and Transparent Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steven D. Biller; Scott M. Oser

    2015-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The behaviors of various confidence/credible interval constructions are explored, particularly in the region of low statistics where methods diverge most. We highlight a number of challenges, such as the treatment of nuisance parameters, and common misconceptions associated with such constructions. An informal survey of the literature suggests that confidence intervals are not always defined in relevant ways and are too often misinterpreted and/or misapplied. This can lead to seemingly paradoxical behaviours and flawed comparisons regarding the relevance of experimental results. We therefore conclude that there is a need for a more pragmatic strategy which recognizes that, while it is critical to objectively convey the information content of the data, there is also a strong desire to derive bounds on models and a natural instinct to interpret things this way. Accordingly, we attempt to put aside philosophical biases in favor of a practical view to propose a more transparent and self-consistent approach that better addresses these issues.

  17. PRA In Design: Increasing Confidence in Pre-operational Assessments of Risks (Results of a Joint NASA/ NRC Workshop)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Youngblood

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In late 2009, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) jointly organized a workshop to discuss technical issues associated with application of risk assessments to early phases of system design. The workshop, which was coordinated by the Idaho National Laboratory, involved invited presentations from a number of PRA experts in the aerospace and nuclear fields and subsequent discussion to address the following questions: (a) What technical issues limit decision-makers’ confidence in PRA results, especially at a preoperational phase of the system life cycle? (b) What is being done to address these issues? (c) What more can be done? The workshop resulted in participant observations and suggestions on several technical issues, including the pursuit of non-traditional approaches to risk assessment and the verification and validation of risk models. The workshop participants also identified several important non-technical issues, including risk communication with decision makers, and the integration of PRA into the overall design process.

  18. New limits for neutrinoless tau decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Darling, C.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan; Zhou, L.

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    double beta decays, neutrino oscillations, Z!l11l22 decays, and other rare pro- cesses. In particular, there are strict limits on muon neutrino- less decays: B(m!eg),4.9310211 and B(m!eee),2.4 310212 at 90% confidence level @18#. However, lepton num- ber... particles and on the new coupling constants. The most optimistic branching fraction predictions are at the level of about 1026. Constraints on lepton flavor violation come from studies of rare and forbidden K , p, and m decays, e-m conversions, neutrinoless...

  19. area upper engadine: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Niles; Adam Pease 2001-01-01 18 An Upper Bound on Overflow Probability in Transient Source Systems Engineering Websites Summary: An Upper Bound on Overflow Probability in...

  20. Upper Snake Provincial Assessment May 2004 APPENDIX 4-1--UPPER SNAKE PROVINCE PROJECT INVENTORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Upper Snake Provincial Assessment May 2004 1 APPENDIX 4-1--UPPER SNAKE PROVINCE PROJECT INVENTORY The purpose of the project inventory is to provide a generalized picture of the types of fish and wildlife team participants through the project inventory website or through direct submission. Additional

  1. Upper Mahiao Binary GEPP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, IndianaTurtleCooperativeCROSS-VALIDATION OF SWERA'sUpperUpperMahiao

  2. The Upper Atmosphere of HD17156b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. T. Koskinen; A. D. Aylward; S. Miller

    2008-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    HD17156b is a newly-found transiting extrasolar giant planet (EGP) that orbits its G-type host star in a highly eccentric orbit (e~0.67) with an orbital semi-major axis of 0.16 AU. Its period, 21.2 Earth days, is the longest among the known transiting planets. The atmosphere of the planet undergoes a 27-fold variation in stellar irradiation during each orbit, making it an interesting subject for atmospheric modelling. We have used a three-dimensional model of the upper atmosphere and ionosphere for extrasolar gas giants in order to simulate the progress of HD17156b along its eccentric orbit. Here we present the results of these simulations and discuss the stability, circulation, and composition in its upper atmosphere. Contrary to the well-known transiting planet HD209458b, we find that the atmosphere of HD17156b is unlikely to escape hydrodynamically at any point along the orbit, even if the upper atmosphere is almost entirely composed of atomic hydrogen and H+, and infrared cooling by H3+ ions is negligible. The nature of the upper atmosphere is sensitive to to the composition of the thermosphere, and in particular to the mixing ratio of H2, as the availability of H2 regulates radiative cooling. In light of different simulations we make specific predictions about the thermosphere-ionosphere system of HD17156b that can potentially be verified by observations.

  3. Upper bounds for Steklov eigenvalues on surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Girouard, Alexandre

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We give explicit isoperimetric upper bounds for all Steklov eigenvalues of a compact orientable surface with boundary, in terms of the genus, the length of the boundary, and the number of boundary components. Our estimates generalize a recent result of Fraser-Schoen, as well as the classical inequalites obtained by Hersch-Payne-Schiffer, whose approach is used in the present paper.

  4. POSTGRADUATE Upper Level, Otto Beit Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jarrett, Thomas H.

    FUNDING YOUR POSTGRADUATE STUDIES AT UCT Upper Level, Otto Beit Building University Avenue North, the Postgraduate Funding Office and Postgraduate Centre were established at the University of Cape Town to provide apply for funding from both the University and from as many other sources of support as possible

  5. Draft Management Plan Upper Snake Province

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .......................................................................................4-5 Consistency with Idaho's Water Quality Management Plan...........................4-5 303(dDraft Management Plan Upper Snake Province Submitted To The Northwest Power and Conservation Quality Anti-Degradation Policy (39-3603) ............................................4-8 ESA and CWA

  6. Free Energies of Dilute Bose gases: upper bound

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun Yin

    2010-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive a upper bound on the free energy of a Bose gas system at density $\\rho$ and temperature $T$. In combination with the lower bound derived previously by Seiringer \\cite{RS1}, our result proves that in the low density limit, i.e., when $a^3\\rho\\ll 1$, where $a$ denotes the scattering length of the pair-interaction potential, the leading term of $\\Delta f$ the free energy difference per volume between interacting and ideal Bose gases is equal to $4\\pi a (2\\rho^2-[\\rho-\\rhoc]^2_+)$. Here, $\\rhoc(T)$ denotes the critical density for Bose-Einstein condensation (for the ideal gas), and $[\\cdot ]_+$ $=$ $\\max\\{\\cdot, 0\\}$ denotes the positive part.

  7. Effects of upper-plenum steam condensation phenomena on heat transfer in a rod bundle. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chon, W.Y.; Addabbo, C.; Liao, N.S.

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    System performance and thermohydraulic response to simultaneous bottom and top water injection were investigated in a 3 x 3 rod bundle Reflood Test Facility. An extensive series of tests, encompassing both simple bottom and combined injection reflooding, were carried out. A number of phenomenological events governing the thermodynamic coupling between the bottom reflood updraft and the top deluge were identified. Due to the countercurrent motion of the upflowing steam and water injected in the upper plenum counter current flow limiting phenomena hindered the penetration of water from inventory in the upper plenum into the bundle section. Consequently, condensation phenomena in the upper plenum and in the venting pipework characterized the thermohydraulic response of the bundle to simultaneous bottom and top water injection.

  8. Earning public trust and confidence: Requisites for managing radioactive wastes. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Task Force on Radioactive Waste Management was created in April 1991 by former Secretary James D. Watkins, who asked the group to analyze the critical institutional question of how the Department of Energy (DOE) might strengthen public trust and confidence in the civilian radioactive waste management program. The panel met eight times over a period of 27 months and heard formal presentations from nearly 100 representatives of state and local governments, non-governmental organizations, and senior DOE Headquarters and Field Office managers. The group also commissioned a variety of studies from independent experts, contracted with the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Public Administration to hold workshops on designing and leading trust-evoking organizations, and carried out one survey of parties affected by the Department`s radioactive waste management activities and a second one of DOE employees and contractors.

  9. Limits on flavor changing neutral currents in D-0 meson Decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Copty, N.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Hancock, N.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the CLEO II detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring, we have searched for flavor changing neutral currents and lepton family number violations in D-0 meson decays. The upper limits on the branching fractions ...

  10. Confidence building measures at sea:opportunities for India and Pakistan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vohra, Ravi Bhushan Rear Admiral (; ); Ansari, Hasan Masood Rear Admiral (; )

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The sea presents unique possibilities for implementing confidence building measures (CBMs) between India and Pakistan that are currently not available along the contentious land borders surrounding Jammu and Kashmir. This is due to the nature of maritime issues, the common military culture of naval forces, and a less contentious history of maritime interaction between the two nations. Maritime issues of mutual concern provide a strong foundation for more far-reaching future CBMs on land, while addressing pressing security, economic, and humanitarian needs at sea in the near-term. Although Indian and Pakistani maritime forces currently have stronger opportunities to cooperate with one another than their counterparts on land, reliable mechanisms to alleviate tension or promote operational coordination remain non-existent. Therefore, possible maritime CBMs, as well as pragmatic mechanisms to initiate and sustain cooperation, require serious examination. This report reflects the unique joint research undertaking of two retired Senior Naval Officers from both India and Pakistan, sponsored by the Cooperative Monitoring Center of the International Security Center at Sandia National Laboratories. Research focuses on technology as a valuable tool to facilitate confidence building between states having a low level of initial trust. Technical CBMs not only increase transparency, but also provide standardized, scientific means of interacting on politically difficult problems. Admirals Vohra and Ansari introduce technology as a mechanism to facilitate consistent forms of cooperation and initiate discussion in the maritime realm. They present technical CBMs capable of being acted upon as well as high-level political recommendations regarding the following issues: (1) Delimitation of the maritime boundary between India and Pakistan and its relationship to the Sir Creek dispute; (2) Restoration of full shipping links and the security of ports and cargos; (3) Fishing within disputed areas and resolution of issues relating to arrest and repatriation of fishermen from both sides; and (4) Naval and maritime agency interaction and possibilities for cooperation.

  11. THE WHITE MOUNTAIN POLARIMETER TELESCOPE AND AN UPPER LIMIT ON COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND POLARIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timbie, Peter

    . 2005; O'Dwyer et al. 2005; Donzelli 2006), and uses iden- tical aluminum coated carbon fiber reflectors gear.12 This table, as described in Mei

  12. Assessment of the Upper Particle Size Limit for Quantitative Analysis of Aerosols Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hahn, David W.

    the vaporization dynamics of individual aerosol particles, such as thermophoretic forces and vapor expulsion. Since

  13. New upper limits on the tau-neutrino mass from primordial helium considerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolgov, A.D.; Rothstein, I.Z. (The Randall Laboratory of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States))

    1993-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we reconsider recently derived bounds on MeV tau neutrinos, taking into account previously unaccounted for effects. We find that, assuming that the neutrino lifetime is longer than [similar to]100 sec, the constraint [ital N][sub eff][lt]3.6 rules out [nu][sub [tau

  14. A New Upper Limit on the Large Angular Scale Polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timbie, Peter

    , dark matter, and dark energy to the overall energy density of the universe. In addition to being of a new breed of highly-sensitive instruments that will one day map out this interesting property knowledge, Brian Keat- ing, also deserves much credit. Thanks to him I have finally memorized the radiometer

  15. CLNS 01/1739 Improved Upper Limits on the FCNC Decays B ! K` + ` \\Gamma and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 7 University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 8 Southern Methodist University, Dallas, Texas 75275 9 Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York 13244 10 University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 11 University of Texas ­ Pan American, Edinburg, Texas 78539 12 Vanderbilt

  16. New Upper Limits on the Tau Neutrino Mass from Primordial Helium Considerations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. D. Dolgov; I. Z. Rothstein

    1993-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we reconsider recently derived bounds on $MeV$ tau neutrinos, taking into account previously unaccounted for effects. We find that, assuming that the neutrino life-time is longer than $O(100~sec)$, the constraint $N_{eff}Majorana neutrinos and $0.74~(MeV)neutrinos. Given that the present laboratory bound is 35 MeV, our results lower the present bound to $0.5$ and $0.74$ for Majorana and Dirac neutrinos respectively.

  17. Pattern Alteration: Upper Arm Sleeve Width

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    in the upper arm are unbecoming and may form excess vertical folds (Fig. 2). The Personal Measurement Chart (line 10) shows how much to alter. Figure 1. Tight sleeve Figure 2. Loose sleeve 2... ................................................................................................................................................................................. Figure 3. Tissue paper Figure 4. Sleeve Sleeve Figure 5. Sleeve Sleeve Figure 6. Figure 7. Sleeve Figure 8. Spread Lap Spread Lap Cut away Tissue Tissue Basic and raglan style garments 1. Trace the cutting line of the set-in sleeve cap on tissue...

  18. Articulated limiter blade for a tokamak fusion reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doll, D.W.

    1982-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A limiter blade for a large tokomak fusion reactor includes three articulated blade sections for enabling the limiter blade to be adjusted for plasmas of different sizes. Each blade section is formed of a rigid backing plate carrying graphite tiles coated with titanium carbide, and the limiter blade forms a generally elliptic contour in both the poloidal and toroidal directions to uniformly distribute the heat flow to the blade. The limiter blade includes a central blade section movable along the major radius of the vacuum vessel, and upper and lower pivotal blade sections which may be pivoted by linear actuators having rollers held to the back surface of the pivotal blade sections.

  19. Articulated limiter blade for a tokamak fusion reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doll, David W. (San Diego, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A limiter blade for a large tokomak fusion reactor includes three articulated blade sections for enabling the limiter blade to be adjusted for plasmas of different sizes. Each blade section is formed of a rigid backing plate carrying graphite tiles coated with titanium carbide, and the limiter blade forms a generally elliptic contour in both the poloidal and toroidal directions to uniformly distribute the heat flow to the blade. The limiter blade includes a central blade section movable along the major radius of the vacuum vessel, and upper and lower pivotal blade sections which may be pivoted by linear actuators having rollers held to the back surface of the pivotal blade sections.

  20. An Integrated Geophysical Analysis Of The Upper Crust Of The...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Of The Upper Crust Of The Southern Kenya Rift Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: An Integrated Geophysical Analysis Of The Upper...

  1. Upper internals arrangement for a pressurized water reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singleton, Norman R; Altman, David A; Yu, Ching; Rex, James A; Forsyth, David R

    2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In a pressurized water reactor with all of the in-core instrumentation gaining access to the core through the reactor head, each fuel assembly in which the instrumentation is introduced is aligned with an upper internals instrumentation guide-way. In the elevations above the upper internals upper support assembly, the instrumentation is protected and aligned by upper mounted instrumentation columns that are part of the instrumentation guide-way and extend from the upper support assembly towards the reactor head in hue with a corresponding head penetration. The upper mounted instrumentation columns are supported laterally at one end by an upper guide tube and at the other end by the upper support plate.

  2. On the need and use of models to explore the role of economic confidence:a survey.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sprigg, James A.; Paez, Paul J. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Hand, Michael S. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM)

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Empirical studies suggest that consumption is more sensitive to current income than suggested under the permanent income hypothesis, which raises questions regarding expectations for future income, risk aversion, and the role of economic confidence measures. This report surveys a body of fundamental economic literature as well as burgeoning computational modeling methods to support efforts to better anticipate cascading economic responses to terrorist threats and attacks. This is a three part survey to support the incorporation of models of economic confidence into agent-based microeconomic simulations. We first review broad underlying economic principles related to this topic. We then review the economic principle of confidence and related empirical studies. Finally, we provide a brief survey of efforts and publications related to agent-based economic simulation.

  3. Sedimentary parameters of upper Barataria Bay, Louisiana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegert, Rudolf B

    1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SEDIMENTARY PARAMETERS OF UPPER BARATARIA BAY, LOUISIANA A Thesis Rudolf Bernhardt Siegert Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural snd Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the reGulremente for the d. agree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1961 Ma)or Sub)ect GeologP SEDYIKNTARY PARAI'ZTEHS OF DT'PBR BARATARIA BAY, LOUISIANA A Thesis By Rudolf Bernhardt Siegert Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of C 'tice Bea of Department or Student Advisor...

  4. The effects of two situational variables on the self-confidence of males and females in achievement settings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Susan Marilyn Hartman

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - ~uivocal feedback on individuals' abilities, women do not have lower self-confidence than men. Feather and. Simon (1971) found no sex differences in conf1dence of passing a subsequent anagruns test when the subjects had been given feedback in the form oi..., 94 ) I ? 5. 28, yg . 01. A Scheffe's comparison of means revealed that subjects who were given clear feedback were significantly more conf1dent in same-sex competition (X= 4. 26) and less confident in oppos1te-sex competition (X= 2. 71), g g . 05...

  5. The effects of two situational variables on the self-confidence of males and females in achievement settings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Susan Marilyn Hartman

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - ~uivocal feedback on individuals' abilities, women do not have lower self-confidence than men. Feather and. Simon (1971) found no sex differences in conf1dence of passing a subsequent anagruns test when the subjects had been given feedback in the form oi..., 94 ) I ? 5. 28, yg . 01. A Scheffe's comparison of means revealed that subjects who were given clear feedback were significantly more conf1dent in same-sex competition (X= 4. 26) and less confident in oppos1te-sex competition (X= 2. 71), g g . 05...

  6. An Upper Bound on Neutron Star Masses from Models of Short Gamma-ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Scott; Bedaque, Paulo F; Miller, M Coleman

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The discovery of two neutron stars with gravitational masses $\\approx 2~M_\\odot$ has placed a strong lower limit on the maximum mass of a slowly rotating neutron star, and with it a strong constraint on the properties of cold matter beyond nuclear density. Current upper mass limits are much looser. Here we note that, if most short gamma-ray bursts are produced by the coalescence of two neutron stars, and if the merger remnant collapses quickly, then the upper mass limit is constrained tightly. We find that if the rotation of the merger remnant is limited only by mass-shedding (which seems plausible based on current numerical studies), then the maximum gravitational mass of a slowly rotating neutron star is between $\\approx 2~M_\\odot$ and $\\approx 2.2~M_\\odot$ if the masses of neutron stars that coalesce to produce gamma-ray bursts are in the range seen in Galactic double neutron star systems. These limits are increased by $\\sim 4$% if the rotation is slowed by $\\sim 30$%, and by $\\sim 15$% if the merger remna...

  7. Apply early! Limited enrollment.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    volcano. Experience the culture and history of Hawaii, and the impact of human activitiesApply early! Limited enrollment. Environmental Science in the Hawaiian Islands Observe, research

  8. OxfordRoadOxfordRoadOxfordRoad UpperBrookStreetUpperBrookStreet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lane Platt Lane UpperLloydStreet HartLane Claremont Road Mauldeth RoadMauldeth Road West Albert Road Coupland Chapel 43. Roby URC 44. Quadria Jilamia Islamic Centre 45. Platt Lane Methodist Church 46. Holy Trinity, Platt Church of England 47. Platt Fields Park, open space with a lake. 48. Allen Hall 49. The Islah

  9. A.Ferrand Conferencia Facultad de Ciencias Polticas y Sociologa, Madrid, Avril 2004 1 RELATIONS SOCIALE, SECRET, CONFIDENCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    SOCIALE, SECRET, CONFIDENCES Conférence présentée le Mardi 20 Avril 2004 à la Facultad de Ciencias relationnelles influencent leur capacité à ne pas transmettre de l'information, c'est-à-dire à créer du secret (Simmel, 1906 ; Petitat, 1998). 1.2 LA GENERALITE ET L'IMPORTANCE DU SECRET COMME ENJEU SOCIAL Le secret

  10. On the Eddington limit in accretion discs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Heinzeller; W. J. Duschl

    2006-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Although the Eddington limit has originally been derived for stars, recently its relevance for the evolution of accretion discs has been realized. We discuss the question whether the classical Eddington limit - which has been applied globally for almost all calculations on accretion discs - is a good approximation if applied locally in the disc. For this purpose, a critical accretion rate corresponding to this type of modified classical Eddington limit is calculated from thin alpha-disc models and slim disc models. We account for the non-spherical symmetry of the disc models by computing the local upper limits on the accretion rate from vertical and radial force equilibria separately. It is shown that the results can differ considerably from the classical (global) value: The vertical radiation force limits the maximum accretion rate in the inner disc region to much less than the classical Eddington value in thin alpha-discs, while it allows for significantly higher accretion rates in slim discs. We discuss the implications of these results for the evolution of accretion discs and their central objects.

  11. Understanding nuclei in the upper sd - shell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarkar, M. Saha; Bisoi, Abhijit; Ray, Sudatta [Nuclear Physics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata 700064 (India); Kshetri, Ritesh [Nuclear Physics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata 700064, India and Sidho-Kanho-Birsha University, Purulia - 723101 (India); Sarkar, S. [Indian Institute of Engineering Science and Technology, Shibpur, Howrah - 711103 (India)

    2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclei in the upper-sd shell usually exhibit characteristics of spherical single particle excitations. In the recent years, employment of sophisticated techniques of gamma spectroscopy has led to observation of high spin states of several nuclei near A ? 40. In a few of them multiparticle, multihole rotational states coexist with states of single particle nature. We have studied a few nuclei in this mass region experimentally, using various campaigns of the Indian National Gamma Array setup. We have compared and combined our empirical observations with the large-scale shell model results to interpret the structure of these nuclei. Indication of population of states of large deformation has been found in our data. This gives us an opportunity to investigate the interplay of single particle and collective degrees of freedom in this mass region.

  12. Optical limiting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McBranch, Duncan W. (Santa Fe, NM); Mattes, Benjamin R. (Santa Fe, NM); Koskelo, Aaron C. (Los Alamos, NM); Heeger, Alan J. (Santa Barbara, CA); Robinson, Jeanne M. (Los Alamos, NM); Smilowitz, Laura B. (Los Alamos, NM); Klimov, Victor I. (Los Alamos, NM); Cha, Myoungsik (Goleta, CA); Sariciftci, N. Serdar (Santa Barbara, CA); Hummelen, Jan C. (Groningen, NL)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical limiting materials. Methanofullerenes, fulleroids and/or other fullerenes chemically altered for enhanced solubility, in liquid solution, and in solid blends with transparent glass (SiO.sub.2) gels or polymers, or semiconducting (conjugated) polymers, are shown to be useful as optical limiters (optical surge protectors). The nonlinear absorption is tunable such that the energy transmitted through such blends saturates at high input energy per pulse over a wide range of wavelengths from 400-1100 nm by selecting the host material for its absorption wavelength and ability to transfer the absorbed energy into the optical limiting composition dissolved therein. This phenomenon should be generalizable to other compositions than substituted fullerenes.

  13. Crust and Upper Mantle P Wave Velocity Structure Beneath Valles...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Crust and Upper Mantle P Wave Velocity Structure Beneath Valles Caldera, New Mexico- Results from the Jemez Teleseismic Tomography Experiment Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

  14. Upper crustal structure of an obliquely extending orogen, central...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    eastern California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: Upper crustal structure of an obliquely extending orogen, central...

  15. Synchronization of Limit Sets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Changpin Li; Weihua Deng

    2005-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this Letter, we derive a sufficient condition of synchronizing limit sets (attractors and repellers) by using the linear feedback control technique proposed here. There examples are included. The numerical simulations and computer graphics show that our method work well.

  16. Upper Cretaceous coccoliths from Texas and Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bukry, D.

    1969-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    huxleyi (Lohmann) HAY & MOHLER, for example, is known from all oceans in the tropics, subarctic, and subantarctic. Other species, however, are more limited, and low-latitude coc- colithophore floras are more diverse than are high-latitude ones (HAsLE, 1960... huxleyi (Lohmann) HAY & MOHLER, for example, is known from all oceans in the tropics, subarctic, and subantarctic. Other species, however, are more limited, and low-latitude coc- colithophore floras are more diverse than are high-latitude ones (HAsLE, 1960...

  17. Quantum Limits of Thermometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas M. Stace

    2010-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The precision of typical thermometers consisting of $N$ particles is shot noise limited, improving as $\\sim1/\\sqrt{N}$. For high precision thermometry and thermometric standards this presents an important theoretical noise floor. Here it is demonstrated that thermometry may be mapped onto the problem of phase estimation, and using techniques from optimal phase estimation, it follows that the scaling of the precision of a thermometer may in principle be improved to $\\sim1/N$, representing a Heisenberg limit to thermometry.

  18. Toroidal midplane neutral beam armor and plasma limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kugel, Henry W. (Somerset, NJ); Hand, Jr, Samuel W. (Hopewell Township, Mercer County, NJ); Ksayian, Haig (Titusville, NJ)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For use in a tokamak fusion reactor having a midplane magnetic coil on the inner wall of an evacuated toriodal chamber within which a neutral beam heated, fusing plasma is magnetically confined, a neutral beam armor shield and plasma limiter is provided on the inner wall of the toroidal chamber to shield the midplane coil from neutral beam shine-thru and plasma deposition. The armor shield/plasma limiter forms a semicircular enclosure around the midplane coil with the outer surface of the armor shield/plasma limiter shaped to match, as closely as practical, the inner limiting magnetic flux surface of the toroidally confined, indented, bean-shaped plasma. The armor shield/plasma limiter includes a plurality of semicircular graphite plates each having a pair of coupled upper and lower sections with each plate positioned in intimate contact with an adjacent plate on each side thereof so as to form a closed, planar structure around the entire outer periphery of the circular midplane coil. The upper and lower plate sections are adapted for coupling to heat sensing thermocouples and to a circulating water conduit system for cooling the armor shield/plasma limiter.The inner center portion of each graphite plate is adapted to receive and enclose a section of a circular diagnostic magnetic flux loop so as to minimize the power from the plasma confinement chamber incident upon the flux loop.

  19. Upper bounds for multiphase composites in any dimension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luis Silvestre

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We prove a rigorous upper bound for the effective conductivity of an isotropic composite made of several isotropic components in any dimension. This upper bound coincides with the Hashin Shtrikman bound when the volume ratio of all phases but any two vanish.

  20. Limits on the neutrino magnetic moment from the MUNU experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daraktchieva, Z; Link, O; Amsler, Claude; Avenier, M; Broggini, C; Busto, J; Cerna, C; Gervasio, G; Jeanneret, J B; Jonkmans, G; Koang, D H; Lebrun, D; Ould-Saada, F; Puglierin, G; Stutz, A; Tadsen, A; Vuilleumier, J L

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MUNU experiment was carried out at the Bugey nuclear power reactor. The aim was the study of electron antineutrino-electron elastic scattering at low energy. The recoil electrons were recorded in a gas time projection chamber, immersed in a tank filled with liquid scintillator serving as veto detector, suppressing in particular Compton electrons. The measured electron recoil spectrum is presented. Upper limits on the neutrino magnetic moment were derived and are discussed.

  1. Central Limit Theorem for Branching Random Walks in Random Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nobuo Yoshida

    2007-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider branching random walks in $d$-dimensional integer lattice with time-space i.i.d. offspring distributions. When $d \\ge 3$ and the fluctuation of the environment is well moderated by the random walk, we prove a central limit theorem for the density of the population, together with upper bounds for the density of the most populated site and the replica overlap. We also discuss the phase transition of this model in connection with directed polymers in random environment.

  2. AUSTRALIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCE-IN-CONFIDENCE The closing date for nomination of a Candidate for Ordinary Election is 31 July each year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kheifets, Anatoli

    AUSTRALIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCE-IN-CONFIDENCE The closing date for nomination of a Candidate for Ordinary Election is 31 July each year Page 1 Certificate revision June 2014 AUSTRALIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCE will not be circulated by the candidate #12;AUSTRALIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCE-IN-CONFIDENCE The closing date for nomination

  3. Optical limiting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McBranch, D.W.; Mattes, B.R.; Koskelo, A.C.; Heeger, A.J.; Robinson, J.M.; Smilowitz, L.B.; Klimov, V.I.; Cha, M.; Sariciftci, N.S.; Hummelen, J.C.

    1998-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Methanofullerenes, fulleroids and/or other fullerenes chemically altered for enhanced solubility, in liquid solution, and in solid blends with transparent glass (SiO{sub 2}) gels or polymers, or semiconducting (conjugated) polymers, are shown to be useful as optical limiters (optical surge protectors). The nonlinear absorption is tunable such that the energy transmitted through such blends saturates at high input energy per pulse over a wide range of wavelengths from 400--1,100 nm by selecting the host material for its absorption wavelength and ability to transfer the absorbed energy into the optical limiting composition dissolved therein. This phenomenon should be generalizable to other compositions than substituted fullerenes. 5 figs.

  4. Ideal Quantum Gases with Planck Scale Limitations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rainer Collier

    2015-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermodynamic system of non-interacting quantum particles changes its statistical distribution formulas if there is a universal limitation for the size of energetic quantum leaps (magnitude of quantum leaps smaller than Planck energy). By means of a restriction of the a priori equiprobability postulate one can reach a thermodynamic foundation of these corrected distribution formulas. The number of microstates is determined by means of a suitable counting method and combined with thermodynamics via the Boltzmann principle. The result is that, for particle energies that come close to the Planck energy, the thermodynamic difference between fermion and boson distribution vanishes. Both distributions then approximate a Boltzmann distribution. The wave and particle character of the quantum particles, too, can be influenced by choosing the size of the temperature and particle energy parameters relative to the Planck energy, as you can see from the associated fluctuation formulas. In the case of non-relativistic degeneration, the critical parameters Fermi momentum (fermions) and Einstein temperature (bosons) vanish as soon as the rest energy of the quantum particles reaches the Planck energy. For the Bose-Einstein condensation there exists, in the condensation range, a finite upper limit for the number of particles in the ground state, which is determined by the ratio of Planck mass to the rest mass of the quantum particles. In the relativistic high-temperature range, the energy densities of photon and neutrino radiation have finite limit values, which is of interest with regard to the start of cosmic expansion.

  5. Radionuclide limits for vault disposal at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, J.R.

    1992-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site is developing a facility called the E-Area Vaults which will serve as the new radioactive waste disposal facility beginning early in 1992. The facility will employ engineered below-grade concrete vaults for disposal and above-grade storage for certain long-lived mobile radionuclides. This report documents the determination of interim upper limits for radionuclide inventories and concentrations which should be allowed in the disposal structures. The work presented here will aid in the development of both waste acceptance criteria and operating limits for the E-Area Vaults. Disposal limits for forty isotopes which comprise the SRS waste streams were determined. The limits are based on total facility and vault inventories for those radionuclides which impact groundwater, and or waste package concentrations for those radionuclides which could affect intruders.

  6. EFFECT OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON WATERSHED RUNOFF FLOW - UPPER COOSA RIVER BASIN UPSTREAM FROM PLANT HAMMOND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, K.

    2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability of water managers to maintain adequate supplies in the coming decades depends on future weather conditions, as climate change has the potential to reduce stream flows from their current values due to potentially less precipitation and higher temperatures, and possibly rendering them unable to meet demand. The upper Coosa River basin, located in northwest Georgia, plays an important role in supplying water for industry and domestic use in northern Georgia, and has been involved in water disputes in recent times. The seven-day ten-year low flow (7Q10 flow) is the lowest average flow for seven consecutive days that has an average recurrence interval of 10 years. The 7Q10 flow is statistically derived from the observed historical flow data, and represents the low flow (drought) condition for a basin. The upper Coosa River basin also supplies cooling water for the 935MW coal-fired Hammond plant, which draws about 65% of the 7Q10 flow of the upper Coosa River to dissipate waste heat. The water is drawn through once and returned to the river directly from the generator (i.e., no cooling tower is used). Record low flows in 2007 led to use of portable cooling towers to meet temperature limits. Disruption of the Plant Hammond operation may trigger closure of area industrial facilities (e.g. paper mill). The population in Georgia is expected to double from 9 million to 18 million residents in the next 25 years, mostly in the metropolitan Atlanta area. Therefore, there will be an even greater demand for potable water and for waste assimilation. Climate change in the form of persistent droughts (causing low flows) and high ambient temperatures create regulatory compliance challenges for Plant Hammond operating with a once-through cooling system. Therefore, the Upper Coosa River basin was selected to study the effect of potential future weather change on the watershed runoff flow.

  7. Upper bounds on minimum distance of nonbinary quantum stabilizer codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Santosh

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The most popular class of quantum error correcting codes is stabilizer codes. Binary quantum stabilizer codes have been well studied, and Calderbank, Rains, Shor and Sloane (July 1998) have constructed a table of upper bounds on the minimum distance...

  8. Characterization of Sea Turtle Nesting on the Upper Texas Coast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Christi Lynn

    2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Nearly annual record Kemp’s ridley sea turtle (Lepidochelys kempii) nesting activity on the upper Texas coast (UTC; defined as beaches from Sabine Pass to Matagorda Peninsula), where scientifically verifiable nesting commenced in 2002, has occurred...

  9. Improvable upper bounds to the piezoelectric polaron ground state energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Soldatov

    2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    It was shown that an infinite sequence of improving non-increasing upper bounds to the ground state energy (GSE) of a slow-moving piezoeletric polaron can be devised.

  10. Hydrology and Glaciers in the Upper Indus Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Winston

    Examines the state of the science associated with the snow and ice hydrology in the Upper Indus Basin (IUB), reviewing the literature and data available on the present and projected role of glaciers, snow fields, and stream ...

  11. Floristic study of the Upper Frio River, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swihart, Theresa Irene

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Vascular plant collections and field data compiled during a one and a half year period for the upper Frio River, Texas, produced a flora that comprises 78 families, 223 genera and 319 species. Vascular plants were collected ...

  12. Fault current limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Darmann, Francis Anthony

    2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A fault current limiter (FCL) includes a series of high permeability posts for collectively define a core for the FCL. A DC coil, for the purposes of saturating a portion of the high permeability posts, surrounds the complete structure outside of an enclosure in the form of a vessel. The vessel contains a dielectric insulation medium. AC coils, for transporting AC current, are wound on insulating formers and electrically interconnected to each other in a manner such that the senses of the magnetic field produced by each AC coil in the corresponding high permeability core are opposing. There are insulation barriers between phases to improve dielectric withstand properties of the dielectric medium.

  13. Geology, volcanology and geochemistry Drainage pattern and regional morphostructure at Melka Kunture (Upper Awash, Ethiopia) ........................83

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    at Melka Kunture (Upper Awash, Ethiopia) ........................83 Guillaume Bardin, Jean-Paul Raynal, Guy Kieffer Volcanic markers in coarse alluvium at Melka Kunture (Upper Awash, Ethiopia (Upper Awash, Ethiopia) ....................................................103 Gérard Poupeau, Guy

  14. (Limiting the greenhouse effect)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayner, S.

    1991-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Traveler attended the Dahlem Research Conference organized by the Freien Universitat, Berlin. The subject of the conference was Limiting the Greenhouse Effect: Options for Controlling Atmospheric CO{sub 2} Accumulation. Like all Dahlem workshops, this was a meeting of scientific experts, although the disciplines represented were broader than usual, ranging across anthropology, economics, international relations, forestry, engineering, and atmospheric chemistry. Participation by scientists from developing countries was limited. The conference was divided into four multidisciplinary working groups. Traveler acted as moderator for Group 3 which examined the question What knowledge is required to tackle the principal social and institutional barriers to reducing CO{sub 2} emissions'' The working rapporteur was Jesse Ausubel of Rockefeller University. Other working groups examined the economic costs, benefits, and technical feasibility of options to reduce emissions per unit of energy service; the options for reducing energy use per unit of GNP; and the significant of linkage between strategies to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions and other goals. Draft reports of the working groups are appended. Overall, the conference identified a number of important research needs in all four areas. It may prove particularly important in bringing the social and institutional research needs relevant to climate change closer to the forefront of the scientific and policy communities than hitherto.

  15. A Comparison of Education, Business, and Engineering Undergraduate Students’ Internet Use and their Experience, Confidence, and Competence in Using New Literacies of the Internet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Su Yeon

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This study explored beginning and advanced pre-service teachers’ Internet use and their experience, confidence, and competence in using new literacies of the Internet. In addition, this study compared the pre-service teachers to same-aged business...

  16. acute non-variceal upper: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    upper layer model Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary: Evaluation 65 Chapter 4 OSI Upper Layer Architecture and Model: Evaluation In this chapter the...

  17. The Limits of Quintessence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caldwell, R.R.; Linder, Eric V.

    2005-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We present evidence that the simplest particle-physics scalar-field models of dynamical dark energy can be separated into distinct behaviors based on the acceleration or deceleration of the field as it evolves down its potential towards a zero minimum. We show that these models occupy narrow regions in the phase-plane of w and w', the dark energy equation-of-state and its time-derivative in units of the Hubble time. Restricting an energy scale of the dark energy microphysics limits how closely a scalar field can resemble a cosmological constant. These results, indicating a desired measurement resolution of order \\sigma(w')\\approx (1+w), define firm targets for observational tests of the physics of dark energy.

  18. The Weak-Coupling Limit of Simplicial Quantum Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Thorleifsson; P. Bialas; B. Petersson

    1998-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In the weak-coupling limit, kappa_0 going to infinity, the partition function of simplicial quantum gravity is dominated by an ensemble of triangulations with the ratio N_0/N_D close to the upper kinematic limit. For a combinatorial triangulation of the D--sphere this limit is 1/D. Defining an ensemble of maximal triangulations, i.e. triangulations that have the maximal possible number of vertices for a given volume, we investigate the properties of this ensemble in three dimensions using both Monte Carlo simulations and a strong-coupling expansion of the partition function, both for pure simplicial gravity and a with a suitable modified measure. For the latter we observe a continuous phase transition to a crinkled phase and we investigate the fractal properties of this phase.

  19. Beating the spin-down limit on gravitational wave emission from the Crab pulsar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; B. Abbott; R. Abbott; R. Adhikari; P. Ajith; B. Allen; G. Allen; R. Amin; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; M. A. Arain; M. Araya; H. Armandula; P. Armor; Y. Aso; S. Aston; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; S. Babak; S. Ballmer; H. Bantilan; B. C. Barish; C. Barker; D. Barker; B. Barr; P. Barriga; M. A. Barton; M. Bastarrika; K. Bayer; J. Betzwieser; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; R. Biswas; E. Black; K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; T. P. Bodiya; L. Bogue; R. Bork; V. Boschi; S. Bose; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; J. E. Brau; M. Brinkmann; A. Brooks; D. A. Brown; G. Brunet; A. Bullington; A. Buonanno; O. Burmeister; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. B. Camp; J. Cannizzo; K. Cannon; J. Cao; L. Cardenas; T. Casebolt; G. Castaldi; C. Cepeda; E. Chalkley; P. Charlton; S. Chatterji; S. Chelkowski; Y. Chen; N. Christensen; D. Clark; J. Clark; T. Cokelaer; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. Corbitt; D. Coyne; J. D. E. Creighton; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; R. M. Cutler; J. Dalrymple; K. Danzmann; G. Davies; D. DeBra; J. Degallaix; M. Degree; V. Dergachev; S. Desai; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; M. Díaz; J. Dickson; A. Dietz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; E. E. Doomes; R. W. P. Drever; I. Duke; J. -C. Dumas; R. J. Dupuis; J. G. Dwyer; C. Echols; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; E. Espinoza; T. Etzel; T. Evans; S. Fairhurst; Y. Fan; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; M. M. Fejer; L. S. Finn; K. Flasch; N. Fotopoulos; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. Fricke; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; M. Fyffe; J. Garofoli; I. Gholami; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; K. Goda; E. Goetz; L. Goggin; G. González; S. Gossler; R. Gouaty; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; M. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; F. Grimaldi; R. Grosso; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; M. Guenther; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; B. Hage; J. M. Hallam; D. Hammer; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. Harry; E. Harstad; K. Hayama; T. Hayler; J. Heefner; I. S. Heng; M. Hennessy; A. Heptonstall; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; E. Hirose; D. Hoak; D. Hosken; J. Hough; S. H. Huttner; D. Ingram; M. Ito; A. Ivanov; B. Johnson; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; G. Jones; R. Jones; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kamat; J. Kanner; D. Kasprzyk; E. Katsavounidis; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; W. Kells; D. G. Keppel; F. Ya. Khalili; R. Khan; E. Khazanov; C. Kim; P. King; J. S. Kissel; S. Klimenko; K. Kokeyama; V. Kondrashov; R. K. Kopparapu; D. Kozak; I. Kozhevatov; B. Krishnan; P. Kwee; P. K. Lam; M. Landry; M. M. Lang; B. Lantz; A. Lazzarini; M. Lei; N. Leindecker; V. Leonhardt; I. Leonor; K. Libbrecht; H. Lin; P. Lindquist; N. A. Lockerbie; D. Lodhia; M. Lormand; P. Lu; M. Lubinski; A. Lucianetti; H. Lück; B. Machenschalk; M. MacInnis; M. Mageswaran; K. Mailand; V. Mandic; S. Márka; Z. Márka; A. Markosyan; J. Markowitz; E. Maros; I. Martin; R. M. Martin; J. N. Marx; K. Mason; F. Matichard; L. Matone; R. Matzner; N. Mavalvala; R. McCarthy; D. E. McClelland; S. C. McGuire; M. McHugh; G. McIntyre; G. McIvor; D. McKechan; K. McKenzie; T. Meier; A. Melissinos; G. Mendell; R. A. Mercer; S. Meshkov; C. J. Messenger; D. Meyers; J. Miller; J. Minelli; S. Mitra; V. P. Mitrofanov; G. Mitselmakher; R. Mittleman; O. Miyakawa; B. Moe; S. Mohanty; G. Moreno; K. Mossavi; C. MowLowry; G. Mueller; S. Mukherjee; H. Mukhopadhyay; H. Müller-Ebhardt; J. Munch; P. Murray; E. Myers; J. Myers; T. Nash; J. Nelson; G. Newton; A. Nishizawa; K. Numata; J. O'Dell; G. Ogin; B. O'Reilly; R. O'Shaughnessy; D. J. Ottaway; R. S. Ottens; H. Overmier; B. J. Owen; Y. Pan; C. Pankow; M. A. Papa; V. Parameshwaraiah; P. Patel; M. Pedraza; S. Penn; A. Perreca; T. Petrie; I. M. Pinto; M. Pitkin; H. J. Pletsch; M. V. Plissi; F. Postiglione; M. Principe; R. Prix; V. Quetschke; F. Raab; D. S. Rabeling; H. Radkins; N. Rainer; M. Rakhmanov; M. Ramsunder; H. Rehbein; S. Reid; D. H. Reitze; R. Riesen; K. Riles; B. Rivera; N. A. Robertson; C. Robinson; E. L. Robinson; S. Roddy; A. Rodriguez; A. M. Rogan; J. Rollins; J. D. Romano; J. Romie; R. Route; S. Rowan; A. Rüdiger; L. Ruet; P. Russell; K. Ryan; S. Sakata; M. Samidi; L. Sancho de la Jordana; V. Sandberg; V. Sannibale; S. Saraf; P. Sarin; B. S. Sathyaprakash; S. Sato; P. R. Saulson; R. Savage; P. Savov; S. W. Schediwy; R. Schilling; R. Schnabel; R. Schofield; B. F. Schutz; P. Schwinberg; S. M. Scott; A. C. Searle; B. Sears; F. Seifert; D. Sellers; A. S. Sengupta; P. Shawhan; D. H. Shoemaker; A. Sibley; X. Siemens; D. Sigg; S. Sinha; A. M. Sintes; B. J. J. Slagmolen; J. Slutsky; J. R. Smith; M. R. Smith; N. D. Smith; K. Somiya; B. Sorazu; L. C. Stein; A. Stochino; R. Stone; K. A. Strain; D. M. Strom; A. Stuver; T. Z. Summerscales; K. -X. Sun; M. Sung; P. J. Sutton; H. Takahashi; D. B. Tanner; R. Taylor; R. Taylor; J. Thacker; K. A. Thorne; K. S. Thorne; A. Thüring; K. V. Tokmakov; C. Torres; C. Torrie; G. Traylor; M. Trias; W. Tyler

    2008-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We present direct upper limits on gravitational wave emission from the Crab pulsar using data from the first nine months of the fifth science run of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO). These limits are based on two searches. In the first we assume that the gravitational wave emission follows the observed radio timing, giving an upper limit on gravitational wave emission that beats indirect limits inferred from the spin-down and braking index of the pulsar and the energetics of the nebula. In the second we allow for a small mismatch between the gravitational and radio signal frequencies and interpret our results in the context of two possible gravitational wave emission mechanisms.

  20. Power and efficiency limits for internal combustion engines via methods of finite-time thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berry, R. Stephen

    Power and efficiency limits for internal combustion engines via methods of finite publication 17 June 1993) Analytical expressionsfor the upper bounds of power and efficiency of an internal and expensiveto compute and analyze.2If we are interestedin maximum power output or in maximum effi- ciency

  1. Far-Infrared ISO Limits on Dust Disks around Millisecond Pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. J. W. Lazio; J. Fischer; R. S. Foster

    2001-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We report 60 and 90 micron observations of 7 millisecond pulsars with the ISOPHOT instrument and describe our analysis procedures. No pulsars were detected, and typical (3\\sigma) upper limits are 150 mJy. We combine our results with others in the literature and use them to place constraints on the existence of protoplanetary or dust disks around millisecond pulsars.

  2. Fundamental Limits for Light Absorption and Scattering Induced by Cooperative Electromagnetic Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hugonin, Jean-Paul; Ben-Abdallah, Philippe

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Absorption and scattering of electromagnetic waves by dielectric media are of fundamental importance in many branches of physics. In this Letter we analytically derived the ultimate upper limits for the absorbed and scattered powers by any system of optical resonators in mutual interaction. We show that these bounds depend only on the geometric configuration given an incident field. We give the conditions to fullfill to reach these limits paving so a way for a rational design of optimal metamaterials.

  3. Investor Confidence Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Actionable Data ESL-KT-13-12-38 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 Near-Term: Not Enough Deal-Flow • High Transaction Costs • Lack of Viable Origination Channels • Highly Variable Performance • Complex... Custom Projects ESL-KT-13-12-38 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 Long-Term: High Cost of Capital • More equity than debt • Not enough volume to securitize • Insufficient actuarial data...

  4. Waste Confidence Discussion

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian Nuclear Warheads|of Energy Washington SuccessWhen Life GivesLong-Term

  5. Toroidal midplane neutral beam armor and plasma limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kugel, H.W.; Hand, S.W. Jr.; Ksayian, H.

    1985-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention contemplates an armor shield/plasma limiter positioned upon the inner wall of a toroidal vacuum chamber within which is magnetically confined an energetic plasma in a tokamak nuclear fusion reactor. The armor shield/plasma limiter is thus of a general semi-toroidal shape and is comprised of a plurality of adjacent graphite plates positioned immediately adjacent to each other so as to form a continuous ring upon and around the toroidal chamber's inner wall and the reactor's midplane coil. Each plate has a generally semi-circular outer circumference and a recessed inner portion and is comprised of upper and lower half sections positioned immediately adjacent to one another along the midplane of the plate. With the upper and lower half sections thus joined, a channel or duct is provided within the midplane of the plate in which a magnetic flux loop is positioned. The magnetic flux loop is thus positioned immediately adjacent to the fusing toroidal plasma and serves as a diagnostic sensor with the armor shield/plasma limiter minimizing the amount of power from the energetic plasma as well as from the neutral particle beams heating the plasma incident upon the flux loop.

  6. COMMENTARY:Limits to adaptation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preston, Benjamin L [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An actor-centered, risk-based approach to defining limits to social adaptation provides a useful analytic framing for identifying and anticipating these limits and informing debates over society s responses to climate change.

  7. Upper tropospheric jet streams over North America during summer 1988

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landers, David Edward

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    UPPER TROPOSPHERIC JET STREAMS OVER NORTH AMERICA DURING SUMMER 1988 A Thesis by DAVID EDWARD LANDERS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfuillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1991 Ma j or Sub j ect: Meteorology UPPER TROPOSPHERIC JET STREAMS OVER NORTH AMERICA SUMMER 1988 A Thesis by DAVID EDWARD LANDERS Approved as to style and Content by: Dusan Djuric (Co-Chairman) James P. McGuirk (Co...

  8. Szlenk Index, Upper Estimates, and Embedding in Banach Spaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Causey, Ryan Michael

    2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    and the topology of the space. But Enflo's famous example of a Banach space failing the approximation property [8] is also a Banach space failing to have either a Schauder basis or a finite dimensional decomposition. For this reason, one often wishes to determine... subsequential U upper tree estimates, then X embeds into Y . 8 (ii) If U, V are as in Theorem 1.2, then there exists a reflexive Banach space Z with FDD F satisfying subsequential V lower and subsequential U upper block estimates in Z such that if X ? REFL...

  9. Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, IndianaTurtleCooperativeCROSS-VALIDATION OF SWERA'sUpperUpper Hot

  10. Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, IndianaTurtleCooperativeCROSS-VALIDATION OF SWERA'sUpperUpper

  11. MODELING THE FATE AND TRANSPORT OF ATRAZINE IN THE UPPER CHESAPEAKE BAY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frei, Allan

    for agrochemicals in the Upper Chesapeake Bay. Keywords: Chesapeake Bay, hydrodynamic model, atrazine, photolysis

  12. Upper Oceanic Energy Response to Tropical Cyclone Passage JOHN A. KNAFF AND MARK DEMARIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schubert, Wayne H.

    Upper Oceanic Energy Response to Tropical Cyclone Passage JOHN A. KNAFF AND MARK DEMARIA NOAA is investigated using a 6-yr daily record of data-driven analyses of two measures of upper ocean energy content information and the upper ocean response. Upper oceanic energy decreases in these metrics are shown to persist

  13. An upper limit to the photon fraction in cosmic rays above 1019 from the Pierre Auger Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbosa, Henrique

    .S. Gold bx , F. Gomez Albarracin e , M. Go´mez Berisso a , R. Go´mez Herrero bd , M. Gonc¸alves do Amaral

  14. Improved Upper Limits on the Stochastic Gravitational-Wave Background from 2009–2010 LIGO and Virgo Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aasi, J.

    Gravitational waves from a variety of sources are predicted to superpose to create a stochastic background. This background is expected to contain unique information from throughout the history of the Universe that is ...

  15. Fermi-LAT Upper Limit for NGC 4151 and its Implications for Physics of Hot Accretion Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wojaczynski, Rafal; Xie, Fu-Guo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present preliminary results of our analysis of the {\\it Fermi}-LAT data from the direction of NGC 4151. We find a new gamma-ray source with a statistical significance sigma > 5, shifted by 0.5degr from the position of NGC 4151. Apparently, the source was bright only during a 1.5-year period between December 2011 and June 2013 and it strongly contaminated the signal from NGC 4151. Therefore, we neglect this period in our analysis. We find two additional, persistent gamma-ray sources with high sigma, shifted from NGC 4151 by ~1.5degr and 5degr, whose presence has been recently confirmed in the Third Fermi Catalog. After subtracting the above sources, we still see a weak residual, with sigma ~processes in hot flows as well as the...

  16. Upper limits on a stochastic gravitational-wave background using LIGO and Virgo interferometers at 600–1000 Hz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barsotti, Lisa

    A stochastic background of gravitational waves is expected to arise from a superposition of many incoherent sources of gravitational waves, of either cosmological or astrophysical origin. This background is a target for ...

  17. Upper Snake Provincial Assessment May 2004 6. Participants and Affiliations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the Upper Snake Provincial Assessment Idaho Department of Fish and Game: Gregg Servheen Jon Beals Lance Chad Colter Shoshone-Bannock Tribes Larry Dickerson US Fish and Wildlife Service John Fred Shoshone-Bannock Tribes Jim Fredericks Idaho Fish and Game Dan Garren Idaho Fish and Game Lauri Hanauska-Brown Idaho Fish

  18. Transdichotomous algorithms without multiplication some upper and lower bounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brodnik, Andrej "Andy"

    Trans­dichotomous algorithms without multiplication ­ some upper and lower bounds Andrej Brodnik 1 that on a RAM with addition, subtraction, bitwise Boolean operations and shifts, but no multiplication; 1g w of w­bit bit strings (or numbers between 0 and 2 w \\Gamma 1). An increasingly popular

  19. Upper Midwest Food, Fuel and Fiber Network Tour

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2nd Annual Upper Midwest Food, Fuel and Fiber Network Tour Aug. 31 ­ Sept. 2, 2010 #12;Tuesday Dept. of Ag & Biological Engineering 9:30 a.m. Horizon Wind Energy Farm ­ (Construction vs. Finished Phases) http://www.horizonwind.com/home/ Gary Freymiller, WISER & Peter Park, Horizon Wind Energy 11:00 a

  20. Tracking and Modifying Upper-body Human Motion Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zordan, Victor

    of humanlike characters affect the believability, aesthetic, and impact of an animation or virtual environment the dynamics of the animated character. Figure 1 shows a human actor and two animated characters tracking hisTracking and Modifying Upper-body Human Motion Data with Dynamic Simulation Victor B. Zordan

  1. Detection of upper mantle flow associated with the African Superplume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conrad, Clint

    with warm, less dense material, the African seismic anomaly has been ascribed to a long-lived thermal upwelling from the lower mantle. Such a large-scale upwelling should also affect the regional horizontal flow field in the upper mantle. To test this model, we compare seismic anisotropy inferred from shear-wave

  2. Architecture of the upper Sego Sandstone, Book Cliffs, Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birkhead, Stanley Scott

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    ................................................................................................................... 22 SEDIMENTOLOGY.................................................................................................... 26 Marine Shale with Wavy Sandstones............................................................... 26 Highly... surfaces. The cross-section defines an 8.5 kilometer section that begins in Sego Canyon outside of Thompson Springs, Figure 12-Bedding diagram of major facies transitions with sedimentary logs overlain. SEDIMENTOLOGY Upper Sego Sandstone deposits can...

  3. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Acupuncture for Upper-Extremity Rehabilitation in Chronic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaechter, Judith D.

    , and improvement trends in UE motor function (P .09) and digit ROM (P .06). Conclusions: Based on ITT analyses, we Sham-Controlled Study Peter M. Wayne, PhD, David E. Krebs, PhD, Eric A. Macklin, PhD, Rosa Schnyer, Lic. Acupuncture for upper- extremity rehabilitation in chronic stroke: a randomized sham- controlled study. Arch

  4. Simulating Sustainability: Conjunctive Land and Water Management in the Upper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    a series of micro-basins that function similarly to a multi-reservoir river system for water management arrangements for water management, and integration of geospatial information into "sustainability scenariosSimulating Sustainability: Conjunctive Land and Water Management in the Upper Santa Cruz River

  5. Upper mantle flow beneath the Hangay dome, central Mongolia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Déverchère, Jacques

    Upper mantle flow beneath the Hangay dome, central Mongolia Acknowledgements This work, A., Amarjargal, S. and Déverchère, J., 2003. GPS measurements of crustal deformation in the Baikal-Mongolia., 2002. Mantle structure and rifting processes in the Baikal-Mongolia region: geophysical data

  6. LARGE ABUNDANCES OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN TITAN'S UPPER ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez-Puertas, M.; Funke, B.; Garcia-Comas, M. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (CSIC), E-18080 Granada (Spain); Dinelli, B. M. [ISAC-CNR, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Adriani, A.; D'Aversa, E. [IAPS-INAF, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Moriconi, M. L. [ISAC-CNR, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Boersma, C.; Allamandola, L. J., E-mail: puertas@iaa.es [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035-1000 (United States)

    2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we analyze the strong unidentified emission near 3.28 {mu}m in Titan's upper daytime atmosphere recently discovered by Dinelli et al. We have studied it by using the NASA Ames PAH IR Spectroscopic Database. The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), after absorbing UV solar radiation, are able to emit strongly near 3.3 {mu}m. By using current models for the redistribution of the absorbed UV energy, we have explained the observed spectral feature and have derived the vertical distribution of PAH abundances in Titan's upper atmosphere. PAHs have been found to be present in large concentrations, about (2-3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} particles cm{sup -3}. The identified PAHs have 9-96 carbons, with a concentration-weighted average of 34 carbons. The mean mass is {approx}430 u; the mean area is about 0.53 nm{sup 2}; they are formed by 10-11 rings on average, and about one-third of them contain nitrogen atoms. Recently, benzene together with light aromatic species as well as small concentrations of heavy positive and negative ions have been detected in Titan's upper atmosphere. We suggest that the large concentrations of PAHs found here are the neutral counterpart of those positive and negative ions, which hence supports the theory that the origin of Titan main haze layer is located in the upper atmosphere.

  7. Floristic study of the Upper Frio River, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swihart, Theresa Irene

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    of the floras of North Central Texas, Madison County, Robertson County and the La Copita Research Area. A total of 9 species endemic to Texas were collected along the upper Frio River. Throughout the northern portion of the study area there is exposed bedrock...

  8. Petroleum geology of Carter sandstone (upper Mississippian), Black Warrior Basin, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bearden, B.L.; Mancini, E.A.

    1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of combination petroleum traps makes the Black Warrior basin of northwestern Alabama an attractive area for continued hydrocarbon exploration. More than 1,500 wells have been drilled, and more than 90 separate petroleum pools have been discovered. The primary hydrocarbon reservoirs are Upper Mississippian sandstones. The Carter sandstone is the most productive petroleum reservoir in the basin. Productivity of the Carter sandstone is directly related to its environment of deposition. The Carter accumulated within a high constructive elongate to lobate delta, which prograded into the basin from the northwest to the southeast. Carter bar-finger and distal-bar lithofacies constitute the primary hydrocarbon reservoirs. Primary porosity in the Carter sandstone has been reduced by quartz overgrowths and calcite cementation. Petroleum traps in the Carter sandstone in central Fayette and Lamar Counties, Alabama, are primarily stratigraphic and combination (structural-stratigraphic) traps. The potential is excellent for future development of hydrocarbon reservoirs in the Upper Mississippian Carter sandstone. Frontier regions south and east of the known productive limits of the Black Warrior basin are ideal areas for continued exploration.

  9. Cooperative Monitoring Center Occasional Paper/12: ENTNEA: A Concept for Enhancing Nuclear Transparency for Confidence Building in Northeast Asia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nam, Man-Kwon; Shin, Sung-Tack

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear energy continues to be a strong and growing component of economic development in Northeast Asia. A broad range of nuclear energy systems already exists across the region and vigorous growth is projected. Associated with these capabilities and plans are various concerns about operational safety, environmental protection, and accumulation of spent fuel and other nuclear materials. We consider cooperative measures that might address these concerns. The confidence building measures suggested here center on the sharing of information to lessen concerns about nuclear activities or to solve technical problems. These activities are encompassed by an Enhanced Nuclear Transparency in Northeast Asia (ENTNEA) concept that would be composed of near-term, information-sharing activities and an eventual regional institution. The near-term activities would address specific concerns and build a tradition of cooperation; examples include radiation measurements for public safety and emergency response, demonstration of safe operations at facilities and in transportation, and material security in the back end of the fuel cycle. Linkages to existing efforts and organizations would be sought to maximize the benefits of cooperation. In the longer term, the new cooperative tradition might evolve into an ENTNEA institution. In institutional form, ENTNEA could combine the near-term activities and new cooperative activities, which might require an institutional basis, for the mutual benefit and security of regional parties.

  10. An insoluble residue study of the upper Walnut Formation, Comanche Peak Limestone, and Edwards Limestone, Bosque and western McLennan counties, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simpson, Jimmie Darrell

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    R' ERECERICKSBURG CROUP I &AHKH&HHwAT VVVVVV VvVV LINE AA' NORTHERN LIMIT OF CHERT LINE BBI SOUTHERN LIMIT OF KIAMICHI LINE CC' SOUTHERN LIMIT OF BIOHERMS SCALE WI IAIISOR' 25 50 . . : ~ :. ;: 0 GEORGETONN C ~ , ', 'T CI MILES Fig. 2... x Main Street Pawpaw Weno Denton Fort Worth Duck Creek Kiamichi 0-15& Edwards 15'-125' Comanche Peak 70'-125' Upper Marl Member Walnut 125'-175' Paluxy 0-25' g 5 Glen Rose Fig. 3. Columnar section of Early Cretaceous formation...

  11. Detection of $^{133}$Xe from the Fukushima nuclear power plant in the upper troposphere above Germany

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simgen, Hardy; Aufmhoff, Heinfried; Baumann, Robert; Kaether, Florian; Lindemann, Sebastian; Rauch, Ludwig; Schlager, Hans; Schlosser, Clemens; Schumann, Ulrich

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After the accident in the Japanese Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in March 2011 large amounts of radioactivity were released and distributed in the atmosphere. Among them were also radioactive noble gas isotopes which can be used as tracers to probe global atmospheric circulation models. This work presents unique measurements of the radionuclide $^{133}$Xe from Fukushima in the upper troposphere above Germany. The measurements involve air sampling in a research jet aircraft followed by chromatographic xenon extraction and ultra-low background gas counting with miniaturized proportional counters. With this technique a detection limit of the order of 100 $^{133}$Xe atoms in liter-scale air samples (corresponding to about 100 mBq/m$^3$) is achievable. Our results proof that the $^{133}$Xe-rich ground level air layer from Fukushima was lifted up to the tropopause and distributed hemispherically. Moreover, comparisons with ground level air measurements indicate that the arrival of the radioactive plume in ...

  12. The Transition to Experiencing: I. Limited Learning and Limited Experiencing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indiana University

    The Transition to Experiencing: I. Limited Learning and Limited Experiencing Simona Ginsburg route for the transition from sensory processing to unlimited experiencing, or basic consciousness. We the transition. We believe that the raw mate- rial from which feelings were molded by natural selection

  13. Limit theory for overfit models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calhoun, Grayson Ford

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    theory. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.2 Asymptotic Theory and Main Results . . . . . . . . .Chapter 2 Limit theory for comparing over?t models out-of-

  14. Limits to the power density of very large wind farms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nishino, Takafumi

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple analysis is presented concerning an upper limit of the power density (power per unit land area) of a very large wind farm located at the bottom of a fully developed boundary layer. The analysis suggests that the limit of the power density is about 0.38 times $\\tau_{w0}U_{F0}$, where $\\tau_{w0}$ is the natural shear stress on the ground (that is observed before constructing the wind farm) and $U_{F0}$ is the natural or undisturbed wind speed averaged across the height of the farm to be constructed. Importantly, this implies that the maximum extractable power from such a very large wind farm will not be proportional to the cubic of the wind speed at the farm height, or even the farm height itself, but be proportional to $U_{F0}$.

  15. New limits on extragalactic magnetic fields from rotation measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pshirkov, Maxim S; Urban, Federico R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We take advantage of the wealth of rotation measures data contained in the NVSS catalogue to derive new, statistically robust, upper limits on the strength of extragalactic magnetic fields. We simulate the extragalactic contribution to the rotation measures for a given field strength and correlation length, by assuming that the electron density follows the distribution of Lyman-$\\alpha$ clouds. Based on the observation that rotation measures from low-luminosity distant radio sources do not exhibit any trend with redshift, while the extragalactic contribution instead grows with distance, we constrain fields with Mpc coherence length to be below 1.2 nG at the $2\\sigma$ level, and fields coherent across the entire observable Universe below 0.5 nG. These limits do not depend on the particular origin of these cosmological fields.

  16. Limits on iron-dominated fallback disk in SN 1987A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Werner; T. Nagel; T. Rauch

    2007-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The non-detection of a point source in SN1987A imposes an upper limit for the optical luminosity of L=2L_sun. This limits the size of a possible fallback disk around the stellar remnant. Assuming a steady-state thin disk with blackbody emission requires a disk smaller than 100,000 km if the accretion rate is at 30% of the Eddington rate (Graves et al. 2005). We have performed detailed non-LTE radiation transfer calculations to model the disk spectrum more realistically. It turns out that the observational limit on the disk extension becomes even tighter, namely 70,000 km.

  17. Upper Bound on Fidelity of Classical Sagnac Gyroscope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas B. Bahder

    2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerous quantum mechanical schemes have been proposed that are intended to improve the sensitivity to rotation provided by the classical Sagnac effect in gyroscopes. A general metric is needed that can compare the performance of the new quantum systems with the classical systems. The fidelity (Shannon mutual information between the measurement and the rotation rate) is proposed as a metric that is capable of this comparison. A theoretical upper bound is derived for the fidelity of an ideal classical Sagnac gyroscope. This upper bound for the classical Sagnac gyroscope should be used as a benchmark to compare the performance of proposed enhanced classical and quantum rotation sensors. In fact, the fidelity is general enough to compare the quality of two different apparatuses (two different experiments) that attempt to measure the same quantity.

  18. FUEL CASK IMPACT LIMITER VULNERABILITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leduc, D; Jeffery England, J; Roy Rothermel, R

    2009-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Cylindrical fuel casks often have impact limiters surrounding just the ends of the cask shaft in a typical 'dumbbell' arrangement. The primary purpose of these impact limiters is to absorb energy to reduce loads on the cask structure during impacts associated with a severe accident. Impact limiters are also credited in many packages with protecting closure seals and maintaining lower peak temperatures during fire events. For this credit to be taken in safety analyses, the impact limiter attachment system must be shown to retain the impact limiter following Normal Conditions of Transport (NCT) and Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC) impacts. Large casks are often certified by analysis only because of the costs associated with testing. Therefore, some cask impact limiter attachment systems have not been tested in real impacts. A recent structural analysis of the T-3 Spent Fuel Containment Cask found problems with the design of the impact limiter attachment system. Assumptions in the original Safety Analysis for Packaging (SARP) concerning the loading in the attachment bolts were found to be inaccurate in certain drop orientations. This paper documents the lessons learned and their applicability to impact limiter attachment system designs.

  19. Performance Limits for Cherenkov Instruments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Hofmann

    2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of Cherenkov instruments for the detection of very high energy gamma rays is ultimately limited by the fluctuations in the development of air showers. With particular emphasis on the angular resolution, the ultimate performance limits are investigated on the basis of simulations.

  20. Congressional Request Limiting the Magnitude

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as goals? Target: limit U.S. GHG emissions (e.g., national emission budget, or percent reduction) What is a reasonable share of U.S. emission reductions relative to the global targets? What is the implied emissions on atmospheric GHG concentrations? Target: limit atmospheric GHG concentrations (e.g., 450, 550 ppm CO2,eq) How

  1. Diversity in the upper management of leading Texas contractors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Anne Nicole

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commission the power to go to the courts for implementation of the laws. The 1972 act extended an individual's right to sue in private actions to the right to sue against state and local governments as well. Previously, in 1963, the Equal Pay Act of 1963..., prejudice plus power, and discrimination (2000). It is upper management's responsibility to ensure that their company is diversified. "CEOs must be proactive [in] initiating and taking on the challenges inherent in managing a diverse workforce" (Work...

  2. EIS-0408: Upper Great Plains Wind Energy Programmatic EIS

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS, being prepared jointly by DOE's Western Area Power Administration and the Department of the Interior’s Fish and Wildlife Service, will evaluate the environmental impacts of wind energy development in Iowa, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota – Western’s Upper Great Plains customer service region. Western will use the EIS to implement a comprehensive regional program to manage interconnection requests for wind energy projects.

  3. High upper critical field in disordered niobium nitride superconductor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baskaran, R., E-mail: baskaran@igcar.gov.in; Thanikai Arasu, A. V.; Amaladass, E. P.; Janawadkar, M. P. [Materials Science Group, IGCAR, Kalpakkam-603102 (India)

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Superconducting Niobium Nitride thin films have been deposited on glass, aluminum nitride buffered glass, and oxidized silicon substrates by reactive DC magnetron sputtering at ambient substrate temperatures. The crystal structure of these thin films has been determined to be cubic fcc B1 structure by Glancing Incidence X-Ray Diffraction analysis. The superconducting transition temperatures of the thin films were measured to be greater than 11.6?K with a maximum of 13.4?K. The negative temperature coefficient of resistance observed in these thin films indicates the presence of disorder. Magneto-resistance measurements have been carried out on these thin films patterned into standard four probe geometry upto a maximum magnetic field of 12?T for two films and upto 15?T for the other two films. The dependence of transition temperature on the applied field is analyzed to estimate the upper critical field. The upper critical field for most of the films was estimated to exceed 35?T, while one of the most disordered films had an estimated upper critical field greater than 70?T.

  4. Upper critical fields and two-band superconductivity in Sr1-xEux(Fe0.89Co0.11)?As? (x=0.20 and 0.46)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hu, Rongwei; Mun, Eun Deok; Altarawneh, M. M.; Mielke, C. H.; Zapf, V. S.; Bud'ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The upper critical fields Hc2(T) of single crystals of Sr1-xEux(Fe?.??Co?.??)?As? (x=0.20 and 0.46) were determined by radio-frequency penetration depth measurements in pulsed magnetic fields. Hc2(T) approaches the Pauli limiting field but shows an upward curvature with an enhancement from the orbital limited field, as inferred from the Werthamer-Helfand-Hohenberg theory. We discuss the temperature dependence of the upper critical fields and the decreasing anisotropy using a two-band BCS model.

  5. Cognitive Issues in Upper-Division Electricity & Magnetism Steven J. Pollock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    interventions ­at the upper division. Keywords: physics education research, course reform, electricityCognitive Issues in Upper-Division Electricity & Magnetism Steven J. Pollock and Stephanie V. Chasteen* * Science Education Initiative, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, USA Department

  6. Upper Adjoints for Fast Interprocedural Variable Markus MullerOlm 1 and Helmut Seidl 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller-Olm, Markus

    Upper Adjoints for Fast Inter­procedural Variable Equalities Markus MË?uller­Olm 1 and Helmut Seidl

  7. SECTION 34 Table of Contents 34 Upper Columbia Management Plan..............................................................2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and formation of the Subbasin Work Teams and the process used to develop and adopt the management plan can34-1 SECTION 34 ­ Table of Contents 34 Upper Columbia Management Plan .........................................................................25 #12;34-2 34 Upper Columbia Management Plan The Upper Columbia Subbasin Management Plan

  8. Upper Digestive Disorders Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee 02/2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yener, Aylin

    Upper Digestive Disorders Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee 02/2012 Revised 02/08/12 Page 1 of 2 Upper Digestive Tract Anatomy Esophagus: A long muscular tube in the chest area occurs in the duodenum. Upper Digestive Disorders Reflux with Esophagitis: The flowing back (or reflux

  9. CHEMICAL AND HYDROLOGIC DATA FROM THE CEMENT CREEK AND UPPER ANIMAS RIVER CONFLUENCE AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHEMICAL AND HYDROLOGIC DATA FROM THE CEMENT CREEK AND UPPER ANIMAS RIVER CONFLUENCE AND MIXING.S. Geological Survey #12;CHEMICAL AND HYDROLOGIC DATA FROM THE CEMENT CREEK AND UPPER ANIMAS RIVER CONFLUENCE.H., Schemel, L.E., 2007, Chemical and hydrologic data form the Cement Creek and upper Animas River confluence

  10. Penetration of solar radiation in the upper ocean: A numerical model for oceanic and coastal waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Zhongping

    Penetration of solar radiation in the upper ocean: A numerical model for oceanic and coastal waters in the upper ocean, the vertical distribution of solar radiation (ESR) in the shortwave domain plays (2005), Penetration of solar radiation in the upper ocean: A numerical model for oceanic and coastal

  11. New code upper bounds from the Terwilliger algebra and semidefinite programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrijver, Alexander

    1 New code upper bounds from the Terwilliger algebra and semidefinite programming Alexander n and minimum distance at least d. It is based on block­diagonalising the Terwilliger alge­ bra, Terwilliger algebra, upper bounds. I. DESCRIPTION OF THE METHOD We present a new upper bound on A(n, d

  12. New code upper bounds from the Terwilliger algebra and semidefinite programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrijver, Alexander

    1 New code upper bounds from the Terwilliger algebra and semidefinite programming Alexander and minimum distance at least d. It is based on block-diagonalising the Terwilliger alge- bra of the Hamming, Terwilliger algebra, upper bounds. I. DESCRIPTION OF THE METHOD We present a new upper bound on A(n, d

  13. Testing upper motor neuron function in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: the most difficult

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooper, Robin L.

    Testing upper motor neuron function in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: the most difficult task of neurophysiology Clinical signs of upper motor neuron involvement are an essential observation to support the diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral scler- osis. However, clinical signs of upper motor neuron can be difficult

  14. Passive fault current limiting device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Daniel J. (Wheeling, IL); Cha, Yung S. (Darien, IL)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A passive current limiting device and isolator is particularly adapted for use at high power levels for limiting excessive currents in a circuit in a fault condition such as an electrical short. The current limiting device comprises a magnetic core wound with two magnetically opposed, parallel connected coils of copper, a high temperature superconductor or other electrically conducting material, and a fault element connected in series with one of the coils. Under normal operating conditions, the magnetic flux density produced by the two coils cancel each other. Under a fault condition, the fault element is triggered to cause an imbalance in the magnetic flux density between the two coils which results in an increase in the impedance in the coils. While the fault element may be a separate current limiter, switch, fuse, bimetal strip or the like, it preferably is a superconductor current limiter conducting one-half of the current load compared to the same limiter wired to carry the total current of the circuit. The major voltage during a fault condition is in the coils wound on the common core in a preferred embodiment.

  15. Passive fault current limiting device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, D.J.; Cha, Y.S.

    1999-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A passive current limiting device and isolator is particularly adapted for use at high power levels for limiting excessive currents in a circuit in a fault condition such as an electrical short. The current limiting device comprises a magnetic core wound with two magnetically opposed, parallel connected coils of copper, a high temperature superconductor or other electrically conducting material, and a fault element connected in series with one of the coils. Under normal operating conditions, the magnetic flux density produced by the two coils cancel each other. Under a fault condition, the fault element is triggered to cause an imbalance in the magnetic flux density between the two coils which results in an increase in the impedance in the coils. While the fault element may be a separate current limiter, switch, fuse, bimetal strip or the like, it preferably is a superconductor current limiter conducting one-half of the current load compared to the same limiter wired to carry the total current of the circuit. The major voltage during a fault condition is in the coils wound on the common core in a preferred embodiment. 6 figs.

  16. Mima mound grasslands of the upper coastal prairie of Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butler, Arlene Camille

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    21 28 31 34 44 47 49 52 55 57 71 74 76 79 87 94 LlST OF TABLES Table Physical and chemical soil characteristics for topographic variations within 3 soil complexes of the upper Coastal Prairie, Texas Page 27 Average absolute... ~ ' ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ O O 8 z z O V) CO iU CC LU O D IZ 31 The landscape had less slope than on Aris-like stands. Intermounds on Crowley/Edna-like soils appear nearly level. Results of physical and chemical analysis were very similar to Aris-like soils...

  17. Biostratigraphy of the upper cretaceous Austin Group, Travis County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, William Maurice

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Formation is on the San Gabriel River at the Jonah-Hutto roadcrossing in Williamson County. At the type locality, the upper 35 feet of the Jonah is exposed; the lower 50 feet is exposed two-thirds of a mile upstream. 1he Jonah Formation ranges fr om 120... Forma- tion at Vinson Creek is 25 feet thick and the limestone beds are skeletal packstones. The thinning of the Jonah Formation is caused by the positive influence of the San Marcos Arch during deposition. 20 The contact between the Jonah Formation...

  18. Sandia Energy - Upper Rio Grande Simulation Model (URGSiM)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol Home DistributionTransportation Safety Home StationaryUpper Rio Grande

  19. Upper Arlington, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, IndianaTurtleCooperativeCROSS-VALIDATION OF SWERA'sUpper Arlington,

  20. Upper Division Hot Spring Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, IndianaTurtleCooperativeCROSS-VALIDATION OF SWERA'sUpper

  1. Simple general limiting law for the overall decay of organic compounds with global pollution potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller-Herold, U. [Swiss Federal Inst. of Technology, Zuerich (Switzerland)] [Swiss Federal Inst. of Technology, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is rigorously shown that the effective decay rate in the environment of a chemical is between the minimum decay rate in one of its possible compartments and an upper value, which is the weighted-average decay rates in all compartments. The weights are the compartments` volumes and the equilibrium concentrations that would have occurred in the compartment due to transport alone, with no degradation. This upper value is approached, in the sense of a general limiting law, if degradation is much slower than transport. This limiting law, together with an estimate for the spatial range of a persistent chemical, could serve as a minimal base for exposure-based assessment of environmental risk. As a first illustration, the result is applied to DDT and hexachloroethane. A broader group of chemicals will be discussed elsewhere. 20 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Tank 241-AX-104 upper vadose zone cone penetrometer demonstration sampling and analysis plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FIELD, J.G.

    1999-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) is the primary document describing field and laboratory activities and requirements for the tank 241-AX-104 upper vadose zone cone penetrometer (CP) demonstration. It is written in accordance with Hanford Tank Initiative Tank 241-AX-104 Upper Vadose Zone Demonstration Data Quality Objective (Banning 1999). This technology demonstration, to be conducted at tank 241-AX-104, is being performed by the Hanford Tanks Initiative (HTI) Project as a part of Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Retrieval Program (EM-30) and the Office of Science and Technology (EM-50) Tanks Focus Area. Sample results obtained as part of this demonstration will provide additional information for subsequent revisions to the Retrieval Performance Evaluation (RPE) report (Jacobs 1998). The RPE Report is the result of an evaluation of a single tank farm (AX Tank Farm) used as the basis for demonstrating a methodology for developing the data and analyses necessary to support making tank waste retrieval decisions within the context of tank farm closure requirements. The RPE includes a study of vadose zone contaminant transport mechanisms, including analysis of projected tank leak characteristics, hydrogeologic characteristics of tank farm soils, and the observed distribution of contaminants in the vadose zone in the tank farms. With limited characterization information available, large uncertainties exist as to the nature and extent of contaminants that may exist in the upper vadose zone in the AX Tank Farm. Traditionally, data has been collected from soils in the vadose zone through the installation of boreholes and wells. Soil samples are collected as the bore hole is advanced and samples are screened on site and/or sent to a laboratory for analysis. Some in-situ geophysical methods of contaminant analysis can be used to evaluate radionuclide levels in the soils adjacent to an existing borehole. However, geophysical methods require compensation for well casing interference and soil moisture content and may not be successful in some conditions. In some cases the level of interference must be estimated due to uncertainties regarding the materials used in well construction and soil conditions, Well casing deployment used for many in-situ geophysical methods is relatively expensive and geophysical methods do not generally provide real time values for contaminants. In addition, some of these methods are not practical within the boundaries of the tank farm due to physical constraints, such as underground piping and other hardware. The CP technologies could facilitate future characterization of vadose zone soils by providing vadose zone data in near real-time, reducing the number of soil samples and boreholes required, and reducing characterization costs.

  3. Page 1 of 14 UNSW Foundation Limited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New South Wales, University of

    , Coca-Cola Amatil Limited and Ingeus Limited. David is Chairman of the National E-Health Transition

  4. Upper bound on the cutoff in the Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veselov, A I

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of this presentation is to point out that the Upper bound on the cutoff in lattice Electroweak theory is still unknown. The consideration of the continuum theory is based on the perturbation expansion around trivial vacuum. The internal structure of the lattice Weinberg - Salam model may appear to be more complicated especially in the region of the phase diagram close to the phase transition between the physical Higgs phase and the unphysical symmetric phase of the lattice model, where the continuum physics is to be approached. We represent the results of our numerical investigation of the quenched model at infinite bare scalar self coupling $\\lambda$. These results demonstrate that at $\\lambda = \\infty$ the upper bound on the cutoff is around $\\frac{\\pi}{a} = 1.4$ Tev. The preliminary results for finite $\\lambda$ are also presented. Basing on these results we cannot yet make a definite conclusion on the maximal value of the cutoff admitted in the lattice model, although we have found that ...

  5. Analytically derived limits on short-range fifth forces from quantum states of neutrons in the Earth's gravitational field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Westphal; Hartmut Abele; Stefan Baessler

    2007-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, quantum states of ultra-cold neutrons in the Earth's gravitational field have been observed for the first time. From the fact that they are consistent with Newtonian gravity on the 10 %-level, analytical limits on alpha and lambda of short-range Yukawa-like additional interactions are derived between lambda = 1 micrometer and 1 mm. We arrive for lambda > 10 micrometer at alpha < 2 \\cdot 10^11 at 90 % confidence level. This translates into a limit g_s g_p / (\\hbar c) < 2 \\cdot 10^{-15} on the pseudo-scalar coupling of axions in the previously experimentally unaccessible astrophysical axion window.

  6. Scattering resonances as viscosity limits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maciej Zworski

    2015-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the method of complex scaling we show that scattering resonances of $ - \\Delta + V $, $ V \\in L^\\infty_{\\rm{c}} ( \\mathbb R^n ) $, are limits of eigenvalues of $ - \\Delta + V - i \\epsilon x^2 $ as $ \\epsilon \\to 0+ $. That justifies a method proposed in computational chemistry and reflects a general principle for resonances in other settings.

  7. A new limit on the rate-density of evaporating black holes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data taken with the CYGNUS detector between 1989 and 1993 have been used to search for 1 second bursts of ultra-high energy (UHE) gamma rays from any point in the northern sky. There is no evidence for such bursts. Therefore the theory-dependent upper limit on the rate-density of evaporating black holes is 6.1 [times] 10[sup 5]pc[sup [minus]3]yr[sup [minus]1] at the 99% C.L.. After renormalizing previous direct searches to the same theory, this limit is the most restrictive by more than 2 orders of magnitude.

  8. A new limit on the rate-density of evaporating black holes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    The CYGNUS Collaboration

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data taken with the CYGNUS detector between 1989 and 1993 have been used to search for 1 second bursts of ultra-high energy (UHE) gamma rays from any point in the northern sky. There is no evidence for such bursts. Therefore the theory-dependent upper limit on the rate-density of evaporating black holes is 6.1 {times} 10{sup 5}pc{sup {minus}3}yr{sup {minus}1} at the 99% C.L.. After renormalizing previous direct searches to the same theory, this limit is the most restrictive by more than 2 orders of magnitude.

  9. Modification and final alignment of the TFTR bumper limiter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McSmith, M.D. [McDonnell Douglas Aerospace, St. Louis, MO (United States); Loesser, G.D.; Owens, D.K. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States)

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the past three Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) vacuum vessel machine openings, an extensive effort was undertaken to optimize the distribution of heating of the bumper limiter tiles. The optimization was achieved by locating the limiter tiles relative to the toroidal magnetic field and adjusting their position relative to the magnetic field rather than to fixed points in the vacuum vessel walls. This paper will discuss the results of these alignments as measured during operation with the limiter thermocouple system and subsequent visual inspection during this past TFTR vacuum vessel opening. During the most recent in-vessel inspection (January 1993), damage to the top and bottom rows of the bumper limiter tiles was noted. More tiles were damaged on the lower row than the upper row. Tiles on the right side of the bottom row and to a lesser extent tiles on the left side of the top row were damaged. The location of the damage corresponds to the plasma power flux direction. Theories explaining the asymmetric damage (bottom versus top) are summarized. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPL) began a program to replace 223 of the originally installed tiles made from POCO AFX-5Q graphite. Of these 223 tiles, 151 were replaced with tiles made from carbon-fiber-composite (CFC) and 158 of these tiles were re-designed for installation on the top or bottom rows. The re-designed tiles have a tapered edge that reduces the angle of incidence of the power flux on the edge surface that was over-heating. This paper will review the in-vessel work and discuss the final modification of the TFTR bumper limiter to alleviate further damage at these locations prior to DT operation of TFTR.

  10. Depositional environments of Pennsylvanian Upper Strawn Group in McCulloch and San Saba Counties, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamieson, W.H. Jr.

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Upper Strawn Group (Desmoinesean) represents a transition to fluvial facies from progradational deltaic facies. The lower part of the upper Strawn is composed mostly of horizontally bedded, fine-grained sandstones and shales of a distal delta-front origin. These sandstones and shales exhibit foreset bed dips of up to 15/sup 0/. In addition to the dipping foreset beds, the delta-front facies on occasion contain small listric normal faults, resulting from periodic higher rates of sedimentation. The middle parts of the upper Strawn consist predominantly of massive, fine to medium-grained, mature sandstones which represent distributary-mouth-bar deposits, as well as other proximal delta-front deposits such as distributary channels. The upper part of the upper Strawn consists of fluvial trough cross-bedded sandstones and chert-pebble conglomerates. These overlie the deltaic facies and indicate the final stages of upper Strawn deposition. The upper Strawn is overlain by the Adams Branch limestone and shales which represent marine transgression and subsequent shallow-marine deposition. The upper Strawn Group in McCulloch and San Saba Counties, Texas, represents continued filling of the Fort Worth basin during Desmoinesean time. The upper Strawn overlies the lower Strawn, an older, deeper water facies, in most parts of the study area. The upper Strawn overlies the Atokan age Marble Falls Limestone in an isolated section of the study area due to its position there on the Concho arch.

  11. Thermodynamic Limits of Solar Cells with Non-ideal Optical Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, M Ryyan; Alam, Muhammad A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Shockley-Queisser (S-Q) theory defines the thermodynamic upper limits for Jsc, Voc, FF, and efficiency of a solar cell. The classical calculation assumes an abrupt onset of absorption at the band-edge, perfect absorption for all energies above the bandgap, and absence of non-radiative recombination. These assumptions are never satisfied for any practical solar cell. In this paper, we explain how the S-Q limits are redefined in the presence of the non-ideal optical effects, and we provide closed-form analytical expressions for the new limits for Jsc, Voc, and FF. Remarkably, these new limits can be achieved to a very high degree, even with significantly imperfect materials.

  12. Thermodynamic Limits of Solar Cells with Non-ideal Optical Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Ryyan Khan; Peter Bermel; Muhammad A. Alam

    2013-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Shockley-Queisser (S-Q) theory defines the thermodynamic upper limits for Jsc, Voc, FF, and efficiency of a solar cell. The classical calculation assumes an abrupt onset of absorption at the band-edge, perfect absorption for all energies above the bandgap, and absence of non-radiative recombination. These assumptions are never satisfied for any practical solar cell. In this paper, we explain how the S-Q limits are redefined in the presence of the non-ideal optical effects, and we provide closed-form analytical expressions for the new limits for Jsc, Voc, and FF. Remarkably, these new limits can be achieved to a very high degree, even with significantly imperfect materials.

  13. Summary of Dissolved Concentration Limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yueting Chen

    2001-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    According to the Technical Work Plan titled Technical Work Plan for Waste Form Degradation Process Model Report for SR (CRWMS M&O 2000a), the purpose of this study is to perform abstractions on solubility limits of radioactive elements based on the process-level information and thermodynamic databases provided by Natural Environment Program Operations (NEPO) and Waste Package Operations (WPO). The scope of this analysis is to produce solubility limits as functions, distributions, or constants for all transported radioactive elements identified by the Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) radioisotope screening. Results from an expert elicitation for solubility limits of most radioactive elements were used in the previous Total System Performance Assessments (TSPAs). However, the elicitation conducted in 1993 does not meet the criteria set forth by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) due to lack of documentation and traceability (Kotra et al. 1996, Section 3). Therefore, at the Waste Form Abstraction Workshop held on February 2-4, 1999, at Albuquerque, New Mexico, the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) decided to develop geochemical models to study solubility for the proposed Monitored Geologic Repository. WPO/NEPO is to develop process-level solubility models, including review and compilation of relevant thermodynamic data. PAO's responsibility is to perform abstractions based on the process models and chemical conditions and to produce solubility distributions or response surfaces applicable to the proposed repository. The results of this analysis and conceptual model will feed the performance assessment for Total System Performance Assessment--Site Recommendation (TSPA-SR) and Total System Performance Assessment--License Application (TSPA-LA), and to the Waste Form Degradation Process Model Report section on concentration limits.

  14. Fundamental Limits to Cellular Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pieter Rein ten Wolde; Nils B. Becker; Thomas E. Ouldridge; A. Mugler

    2015-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years experiments have demonstrated that living cells can measure low chemical concentrations with high precision, and much progress has been made in understanding what sets the fundamental limit to the precision of chemical sensing. Chemical concentration measurements start with the binding of ligand molecules to receptor proteins, which is an inherently noisy process, especially at low concentrations. The signaling networks that transmit the information on the ligand concentration from the receptors into the cell have to filter this noise extrinsic to the cell as much as possible. These networks, however, are also stochastic in nature, which means that they will also add noise to the transmitted signal. In this review, we will first discuss how the diffusive transport and binding of ligand to the receptor sets the receptor correlation time, and then how downstream signaling pathways integrate the noise in the receptor state; we will discuss how the number of receptors, the receptor correlation time, and the effective integration time together set a fundamental limit on the precision of sensing. We then discuss how cells can remove the receptor noise while simultaneously suppressing the intrinsic noise in the signaling network. We describe why this mechanism of time integration requires three classes of resources---receptors and their integration time, readout molecules, energy---and how each resource class sets a fundamental sensing limit. We also briefly discuss the scheme of maximum-likelihood estimation, the role of receptor cooperativity, and how cellular copy protocols differ from canonical copy protocols typically considered in the computational literature, explaining why cellular sensing systems can never reach the Landauer limit on the optimal trade-off between accuracy and energetic cost.

  15. Waste tank characterization sampling limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tusler, L.A.

    1994-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a result of the Plant Implementation Team Investigation into delayed reporting of the exotherm in Tank 241-T-111 waste samples. The corrective actions identified are to have immediate notification of appropriate Tank Farm Operations Shift Management if analyses with potential safety impact exceed established levels. A procedure, WHC-IP-0842 Section 12.18, ``TWRS Approved Sampling and Data Analysis by Designated Laboratories`` (WHC 1994), has been established to require all tank waste sampling (including core, auger and supernate) and tank vapor samples be performed using this document. This document establishes levels for specified analysis that require notification of the appropriate shift manager. The following categories provide numerical values for analysis that may indicate that a tank is either outside the operating specification or should be evaluated for inclusion on a Watch List. The information given is intended to translate an operating limit such as heat load, expressed in Btu/hour, to an analysis related limit, in this case cesium-137 and strontium-90 concentrations. By using the values provided as safety flags, the analytical laboratory personnel can notify a shift manager that a tank is in potential violation of an operating limit or that a tank should be considered for inclusion on a Watch List. The shift manager can then take appropriate interim measures until a final determination is made by engineering personnel.

  16. Detection of $^{133}$Xe from the Fukushima nuclear power plant in the upper troposphere above Germany

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardy Simgen; Frank Arnold; Heinfried Aufmhoff; Robert Baumann; Florian Kaether; Sebastian Lindemann; Ludwig Rauch; Hans Schlager; Clemens Schlosser; Ulrich Schumann

    2014-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    After the accident in the Japanese Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in March 2011 large amounts of radioactivity were released and distributed in the atmosphere. Among them were also radioactive noble gas isotopes which can be used as tracers to test global atmospheric circulation models. This work presents unique measurements of the radionuclide $^{133}$Xe from Fukushima in the upper troposphere above Germany. The measurements involve air sampling in a research jet aircraft followed by chromatographic xenon extraction and ultra-low background gas counting with miniaturized proportional counters. With this technique a detection limit of the order of 100 $^{133}$Xe atoms in litre-scale air samples (corresponding to about 100 mBq/m$^3$) is achievable. Our results provide proof that the $^{133}$Xe-rich ground level air layer from Fukushima was lifted up to the tropopause and distributed hemispherically. Moreover, comparisons with ground level air measurements indicate that the arrival of the radioactive plume at high altitude over Germany occurred several days before the ground level plume.

  17. Evaluation of the upper shelf energy for ferritic steels from miniaturized Charpy specimen data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurishita, Hiroaki; Narui, Minoru; Kayano, Hideo [Tohoku Univ., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. for Materials Research; Shibahara, Itaru; Mizuta, Syunji [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The small specimen technology is required in mechanical testing of irradiated materials because of very limited irradiation volume in currently available high flux reactors and future accelerator-based high energy neutron sources. In order to develop the methodology to evaluate the upper shelf energy (USE) for full size Charpy specimens of ferritic steels from miniaturized specimen data, the effects of specimen size and notch dimensions (notch root radius and notch depth) on the USE were studied for high strength ferritic steels with relatively low USE values of 135 and 107 J. The USE for miniaturized specimens, normalized by Bb{sup 2} or (Bb){sup 3/2} (B is the specimen thickness, b is the ligament size), was essentially independent of specimen size and tended to decrease with increasing the elastic stress concentration factor, K{sub t}, but the K{sub t} dependence was not significant. The normalized USE for full size specimens was considerably lower than that for miniaturized specimens. A general relationship was found that allows to determine the USE of full size specimens of ferritic steels directly from miniaturized specimen data.

  18. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Lorazepam to Reduce Liver Motion in Patients Receiving Upper Abdominal Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsang, Derek S.; Voncken, Francine E.M.; Tse, Regina V. [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Sykes, Jenna [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Wong, Rebecca K.S.; Dinniwell, Rob E.; Kim, John; Ringash, Jolie; Brierley, James D.; Cummings, Bernard J.; Brade, Anthony [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Dawson, Laura A., E-mail: laura.dawson@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Reduction of respiratory motion is desirable to reduce the volume of normal tissues irradiated, to improve concordance of planned and delivered doses, and to improve image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). We hypothesized that pretreatment lorazepam would lead to a measurable reduction of liver motion. Methods and Materials: Thirty-three patients receiving upper abdominal IGRT were recruited to a double-blinded randomized controlled crossover trial. Patients were randomized to 1 of 2 study arms: arm 1 received lorazepam 2 mg by mouth on day 1, followed by placebo 4 to 8 days later; arm 2 received placebo on day 1, followed by lorazepam 4 to 8 days later. After tablet ingestion and daily radiation therapy, amplitude of liver motion was measured on both study days. The primary outcomes were reduction in craniocaudal (CC) liver motion using 4-dimensional kV cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and the proportion of patients with liver motion ?5 mm. Secondary endpoints included motion measured with cine magnetic resonance imaging and kV fluoroscopy. Results: Mean relative and absolute reduction in CC amplitude with lorazepam was 21% and 2.5 mm respectively (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1-3.9, P=.001), as assessed with CBCT. Reduction in CC amplitude to ?5 mm residual liver motion was seen in 13% (95% CI 1%-25%) of patients receiving lorazepam (vs 10% receiving placebo, P=NS); 65% (95% CI 48%-81%) had reduction in residual CC liver motion to ?10 mm (vs 52% with placebo, P=NS). Patients with large respiratory movement and patients who took lorazepam ?60 minutes before imaging had greater reductions in liver CC motion. Mean reductions in liver CC amplitude on magnetic resonance imaging and fluoroscopy were nonsignificant. Conclusions: Lorazepam reduces liver motion in the CC direction; however, average magnitude of reduction is small, and most patients have residual motion >5 mm.

  19. Klee-Minty's LP and Upper Bounds for Dantzig's Simplex Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomonari Kitahara

    2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Jan 4, 2011 ... Klee-Minty's LP and Upper Bounds for Dantzig's Simplex Method. Tomonari ... Citation: This article will appear in Operations Research Letters.

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - anisotropic upper critical Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    30 A two-dimensional hybrid method for modeling seismic wave propagation in anisotropic media Summary: upper mantle. We calculated the synthetics for a series of laterally...

  1. Gradient limits and SCRF performance.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norem, J.; Pellin, M.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Superconducting rf gradients are limited by a number of mechanisms, among them are field emission, multipactor, Lorentz detuning, global and local heating, quench fields, Q-Slope, assembly defects, and overall power use. We describe how each of these mechanisms interacts with the cavity fields and show how significant improvements may be possible assuming improvements in control over the cavity surface. New techniques such as Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), the use of layered composites, Gas Cluster Ion Beam (GCIB) smoothing and Dry Ice Cleaning (DIC) have been proposed as ways to control the surface.

  2. Dose Limits | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,Office of Policy,Policy ActDetroit7471 FederalDonna Friend Donna FriendLimits

  3. Ablamp Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDIT REPORT Americium/Curium Vitrification4th DayANVAblamp Limited Jump

  4. Novacem Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpenNorth AmericaNorthwest Rural PubNova AlincaNovacem Limited

  5. Bioethanol Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher HomesLyons Biomass FacilityBioethanol Limited

  6. Lysanda Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu an Group Jump to: navigation,LushuiLyme, NewLyonLysanda Limited

  7. Stratigraphic cyclicity and reservoir heterogeneity within upper San Andres and Grayburg strata (upper Permian-Guadalupian), Maljamar field, Se New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modica, Christopher James

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of upper San Andres strata. Cavernous porosity was later plugged with massive anhydrite, resulting in the degradation of reservoir quality. In the overlying Grayburg Formation, cycles consist of mixed sandstone and shallowwater carbonate facies...

  8. Seismic Tomography Of Pg And Sg/lg And Its Use For Average Upper Crust Structure In Eurasia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steck, Lee K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Phillips, W Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rowe, C A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stead, R J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Begnaud, M L [MSU

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tomographic inversion oftravel times from first arriving compressional and shear waves for velocity structure has been applied with great success at all length scales, ranging from the laboratory bench-top to the entire Earth. Inversion of later arriving phases has seen a much more limited application. In this paper we present inversion results for regional Pg and Sg for the Eurasian continent to explore its use for understanding average upper crustal velocity structure. Inversion is performed using a damped, smoothed LSQR implementation that solves for site and event terms as well as for velocity along great circle paths between the source and receiver. Results are broadly consistent with published upper crustal velocities for the region. A spotcomparison of Vp/Vs from local and regional studies also compares well with the ratio of observed Pg to Sg velocities from our study where resolution is high. Resolution is determined through the use of checkerboard tests, and these suggest that in regions where data density is high we can resolve features down to at least 2 deg, with 4 deg possible over broader areas. RMS residual reductions are on the order of25% for Sg and 30% for Pg.

  9. Thermionic converters for an Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, W.G.; Horner-Richardson, K. [Thermacore, Inc., Lancaster, PA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS) is a solar bimodal system which combines thermal propulsion and electric power generation in a single integrated system. A thermionic converter was designed and fabricated for the ISUS system. The ISUS thermionic energy converters differ from previous designs, due to the significant changes in operating temperature prior to and during an eclipse, with the emitter temperature increasing from 1,900 K to 2,200 K, and then back again. A complete thermal and electrical model was developed for a planar diode to determine optimum operating dimensions and parameters. The model includes an overall energy balance for the diode, and changes the interelectrode gap spacing due to thermal expansion of the parts as the emitter and/or collector temperatures change. Cesium pressure can be chosen from an external liquid reservoir, an integral reservoir using cesium intercalated into graphite attached to the collector heat pipe, or optimum cesium pressure. With optimum cesium pressure, the maximum efficiency increases from 14% to 16% as the emitter temperature increases from 1,900 K to 2,200 K. The improvement in efficiency is only 2% as the emitter temperature is increased. Optimum efficiency requires an external, actively controlled liquid reservoir.

  10. Bitumen accumulation in Grosmont platform complex, Upper Devonian, Alberta, Canada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffmann, C.F.; Strausz, O.P.

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Upper Devonian Grosmont Formation, a broad carbonate platform complex in Alberta, Canada, contains an estimated 300 billion bbl of bitumen. It has been suggested that these vast reserves are related to Lower Cretaceous Athabasca oil sands. Detailed gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric studies of a wide range of biologic marker compounds confirm this suggestion. The Grosmont Formation contains bitumen of similar maturity and source to the Athabasca deposit, but it has been subjected to a greater degree of biodegradation and water washing, possibly as a result of its reservoir rock characteristics. The difference in the degree of biodegradation is manifested by the absence of bicyclic terpanes and by the reduced concentrations of the C/sub 30/ and the 22R epimers of the extended hopanes in the Grosmont bitumen. Also, the greater degree of water washing of the Grosmont bitumen is inferred from the observed distribution of the bicyclic, tricyclic, and tetracyclic terpenoid sulfides, which shows a characteristic loss of the lower molecular weight members in the carbonate bitumen. The correlation established here between the two deposits suggests that if the precursor oil has indeed undergone long-distance migration, the Paleozoic carbonates could have acted as a path for migration. Finally, the observed distribution of steranes in the Grosmont bitumen corresponds to the suggestion that the Mannville Group shales were not the major source rocks of the oil-sand and carbonate bitumen accumulations of northern Alberta. 11 figures, 6 tables.

  11. Upper Jurassic depositional systems and hydrocarbon potential of southeast Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meendsen, F.C.; Moore, C.H.; Heydari, E.; Sassen, R.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Upper Jurassic sedimentation in southeast Mississippi was controlled by eustatic sea level fluctuations and locally modified by salt tectonism and basement structure. This study, using conventional core data and geophysical logs, indicates that a stable carbonate platform developed along the updip margin of the Mississippi interior salt basin. The basin was partially barred from the main Gulf of Mexico water mass by the Wiggins uplift, and became evaporitic during the Late Jurassic. Moldic, intercrystalline, and vuggy dolomite porosity is developed on the crests of intermediate and high-amplitude salt highs and on the Wiggins uplift. Jurassic source rocks are lower Smackover laminated lime mudstones. Migration into adjacent reservoirs postdated formation of porosity and the growth of salt anticlines, the most common trap type. A large potential Norphlet-Smackover gas play extends along the southern flank of the Wiggins uplift. Salt anticlines within the interior basin remain viable targets. Small oil discoveries should continue in stratigraphic traps, subtle salt structures, and basement blocks on the platform.

  12. Measurement of the pp-bar?W?+X cross section at s?=1.96 TeV and WW? anomalous coupling limits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Coppage, Don; Gardner, J.; Hensel, Carsten; Christofek, L.|J|abeen, S.; Wilson, Graham Wallace; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.

    2005-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    . The cross section times branching fraction for pp-bar?W(?)+X????+X with E(?)(T)>8 GeV and ?R(??)> 0.7 is 14.8±1.6(stat)±1.0(syst)±1.0(lum)??pb. The one-dimensional 95% confidence level limits on anomalous couplings are ?0.88

  13. Physics of the Shannon Limits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merhav, Neri

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide a simple physical interpretation, in the context of the second law of thermodynamics, to the information inequality (a.k.a. the Gibbs' inequality, which is also equivalent to the log-sum inequality), asserting that the relative entropy between two probability distributions cannot be negative. Since this inequality stands at the basis of the data processing theorem (DPT), and the DPT in turn is at the heart of most, if not all, proofs of converse theorems in Shannon theory, it is observed that conceptually, the roots of fundamental limits of Information Theory can actually be attributed to the laws of physics, in particular, to the second law of thermodynamics, and at least indirectly, also to the law of energy conservation. By the same token, in the other direction: one can view the second law as stemming from information-theoretic principles.

  14. Limited-life cartridge primers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; Rosen, Robert S.

    2005-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A cartridge primer which utilizes an explosive that can be designed to become inactive in a predetermined period of time: a limited-life primer. The explosive or combustible material of the primer is an inorganic reactive multilayer (RML). The reaction products of the RML are sub-micron grains of non-corrosive inorganic compounds that would have no harmful effects on firearms or cartridge cases. Unlike use of primers containing lead components, primers utilizing RML's would not present a hazard to the environment. The sensitivity of an RML is determined by the physical structure and the stored interfacial energy. The sensitivity lowers with time due to a decrease in interfacial energy resulting from interdiffusion of the elemental layers. Time-dependent interdiffusion is predictable, thereby enabling the functional lifetime of an RML primer to be predetermined by the initial thickness and materials selection of the reacting layers.

  15. Limited-life cartridge primers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, D.M.; Rosen, R.S.

    1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A cartridge primer is described which utilizes an explosive that can be designed to become inactive in a predetermined period of time: a limited-life primer. The explosive or combustible material of the primer is an inorganic reactive multilayer (RML). The reaction products of the RML are sub-micron grains of non-corrosive inorganic compounds that would have no harmful effects on firearms or cartridge cases. Unlike use of primers containing lead components, primers utilizing RML`s would not present a hazard to the environment. The sensitivity of an RML is determined by the physical structure and the stored interfacial energy. The sensitivity lowers with time due to a decrease in interfacial energy resulting from interdiffusion of the elemental layers. Time-dependent interdiffusion is predictable, thereby enabling the functional lifetime of an RML primer to be predetermined by the initial thickness and materials selection of the reacting layers. 10 figs.

  16. Limits to the lunar atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, T.H. (National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, D.C. (USA)); Shemansky, D.E. (Univ. of Arizona, Tucson (USA))

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of sodium and potassium on the Moon implies that other more abundant species should be present. Volatile molecules like H{sub 2}O are significantly more abundant than sodium in any of the proposed external atmospheric sources. Source mechanisms which derive atoms from the surface should favor abundant elements in the regolith. It is therefore puzzling that the Apollo ultraviolet spectrometer experiment set limits on the density of oxygen of N{sub O} < 5 {times} 10{sup 2} cm{sup {minus}3}, and that the Apollo Lunar Atmospheric Composition Experiment data imply N{sub O} < 50 cm{sup {minus}3} above the subsolar point. These limits are surprisingly small relative to the measured value for sodium. A simple consideration of sources and sinks predicts significantly greater densities of oxygen. It is possible but doubtful that the Apollo measurements occur ed during an epoch in which source rates were small. A preferential loss process for oxygen on the darkside of the Moon is considered in which ionization by electron capture in surface collisions leads to escape through acceleration in the local electric field. Cold trapping in permanently shadowed regions as a net sink is considered and discounted, but the episodic nature of cometary insertion may allow formation of ice layers which act as a stablized source of OH. On the basis of an assumed meteoroid impact source, the authors predict a possible emission brightness of {approximately} 50 R in the OH(A {minus} X)(0,0) band above the lunar bright limb. A very uncertain small comet source of H{sub 2}O could raise this value by more than two orders of magnitude.

  17. Opportunistic Routing in Wireless Ad Hoc Networks: Upper Bounds for the Packet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mans, Bernard

    routing, in a realistic network model where link conditions are variable. We analyze the performance1 Opportunistic Routing in Wireless Ad Hoc Networks: Upper Bounds for the Packet Propagation Speed to the destination. In this paper, we provide upper bounds on the packet propaga- tion speed for opportunistic

  18. Effects of ozone cooling in the tropical lower stratosphere and upper troposphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Effects of ozone cooling in the tropical lower stratosphere and upper troposphere Piers M. Forster lower stratosphere and upper troposphere and elucidate the key role of ozone changes in driving of tropical ozone decreases at 70 hPa and lower pressures can lead to significant cooling not only

  19. Global empirical wind model for the upper mesosphere/lower thermosphere. I. Prevailing wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Global empirical wind model for the upper mesosphere/lower thermosphere. I. Prevailing wind Y. I. An updated empirical climatic zonally aver- aged prevailing wind model for the upper mesosphere/ lower of monthly mean winds from meteor radar and MF radar measurements at more than 40 stations, well distributed

  20. Mechanisms of summertime upper Arctic Ocean warming and the effect on sea ice melt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    but occurs over a much broader area of the ice pack. Citation: Steele, M., J. Zhang, and W. Ermold (2010Mechanisms of summertime upper Arctic Ocean warming and the effect on sea ice melt Michael Steele,1 summertime upper ocean warming and sea ice melt during the 21st century in the Arctic Ocean. Our first

  1. Observations on student difficulties with mathematics in upper-division electricity and magnetism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    Observations on student difficulties with mathematics in upper-division electricity and magnetism Rachel E. Pepper, Stephanie V. Chasteen, Steven J. Pollock, and Katherine K. Perkins Science Education 2011; published 27 March 2012) We discuss common difficulties in upper-division electricity

  2. Earth Planets Space, 64, 113120, 2012 Upper ionosphere of Mars is not axially symmetrical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gurnett, Donald A.

    Earth Planets Space, 64, 113­120, 2012 Upper ionosphere of Mars is not axially symmetrical E to the ionosphere providing momentum and energy transfer to the upper layers of the ionospheric plasma. While dependence rather closely follow the Chapman model (Gurnett et al., 2008; Morgan et al., 2008; Withers, 2009

  3. Variation of the Thermohaline Structure in the Western Equatorial Pacific Upper Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luther, Douglas S.

    Variation of the Thermohaline Structure in the Western Equatorial Pacific Upper Ocean;Abstract Processes which control the upper ocean thermohaline structure in the western equa- torial Pacific forcing data have indicated that the thick isothermal layer in the western equatorial Pacific is found

  4. Reduced Order Modeling of the Upper Tropical Pacific Ocean Model Using Proper Orthogonal Decomposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aluffi, Paolo

    Reduced Order Modeling of the Upper Tropical Pacific Ocean Model Using Proper Orthogonal of a large-scale upper ocean circulation in the tropic Pacific domain. We construct different POD models-scale seasonal variability of the tropic Pacific obtained by the original model is well captured by a low

  5. Studio optics: Adapting interactive engagement pedagogy to upper-division physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zollman, Dean

    Studio optics: Adapting interactive engagement pedagogy to upper-division physics Christopher M describe the development and implementation of a Studio Optics course for upper-division physics majors course in optics at the junior-senior and first year graduate student level that incorporates the methods

  6. Impacts of Land Management on Agroecosystem Carbon Fluxes in the Upper Midwest, United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Impacts of Land Management on Agroecosystem Carbon Fluxes in the Upper Midwest, United States Investigators: T.J. Griffis and J.M. Baker Funding Source: United States Department of Energy, Office-soybean rotation systems located in the Upper Midwest. The management strategies will include: 1) Conventional corn

  7. Upper mantle structure beneath the Caribbean-South American plate boundary from surface wave tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niu, Fenglin

    Upper mantle structure beneath the Caribbean-South American plate boundary from surface wave velocity structure of the crust and upper mantle of the Caribbean-South American boundary region American continental lithosphere, the Venezuelan archipelago, and the Caribbean oceanic lithosphere

  8. Simulations of water isotope abundances in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere and implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gettelman, Andrew

    fractionation processes. The results indicate that water substance in the upper troposphere does not follow a Rayleigh distillation model due to the presence of condensed phase water. Stratospheric abundances and climate of the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS). It is broadly known that most of the air

  9. Cooperator Report: Habitat Requirements of Steelhead in the Upper Salinas River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Lisa C.

    Cooperator Report: Habitat Requirements of Steelhead in the Upper Salinas River Watershed Jenna L the abundance, distribution, and habitat requirements of steelhead in the upper Salinas River watershed. We, and reproduce (Thompson & Larsen 2004). The Salinas River and its tributaries have been designated

  10. PID Admittance Control for an Upper Limb Exoskeleton Wen Yu, Jacob Rosen, Xiaoou Li

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Jacob

    PID Admittance Control for an Upper Limb Exoskeleton Wen Yu, Jacob Rosen, Xiaoou Li Abstract PID control. Three force sensors in the upper-level send desired trajectories to the lower, a model-free PID type admittance control is applied, whose parameters can be designed by human impedance

  11. FLUCTUATION IN TRAP-NET CATCHES IN THE UPPER MISSISSIPPI RIVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FLUCTUATION IN TRAP-NET CATCHES IN THE UPPER MISSISSIPPI RIVER if; Marine Biological LabofdiuryKay, Secretary Fish and Wildlife Service, Albert M. Day, Director FLUCTUATION IN TRAP NET CATCHES IN THE UPPER Gear used 3 Methods 5 Statistical considerations 5 Season trends in catch of trap nets 6 Black crappie

  12. viscosity in the upper mantle, the result of an ancient, failed rift in the region.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, David A.

    penetration in the upper ocean, and can be related to phy- toplankton abundance. Along with measure- ments biomass is a crucial measure of the health of ocean ecosystems. An impressive synthesis of the relevant of the upper-ocean concentration of chlorophyll, which is found in all phytoplank- ton, Secchi-disk depths

  13. Upper mantle flow beneath and around the Hangay dome, Central Mongolia Guilhem Barruol a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Déverchère, Jacques

    Upper mantle flow beneath and around the Hangay dome, Central Mongolia Guilhem Barruol a, , Anne Academy of Sciences (RCAG), P.O. Box 51, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia a b s t r a c ta r t i c l e i n f o-wave splitting upper mantle Mongolia Hangay dome Siberian craton Bogd fault Mongolia represents the northernmost

  14. MODELLING GROUNDWATER FLOW ON THE REGIONAL SCALE IN THE UPPER DANUBE CATCHMENT (GERMANY)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    MODELLING GROUNDWATER FLOW ON THE REGIONAL SCALE IN THE UPPER DANUBE CATCHMENT (GERMANY) Roland.barthel@iws.uni-stuttgart.de Abstract. A groundwater flow model for the Upper Danube catchment (A=77,000km2 at gauge Passau, Germany coupled models. Modelling of groundwater flow, using coupled deterministic and hydrological approaches

  15. GAISUS-1 thermionic converter for the integrated solar upper stage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Begg, L.L.; Heffernan, T.F.; Horner, M.H. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS) system is a compact orbital transfer vehicle which generates thrust to boost payloads from LEO to higher orbits. It does this by collecting and concentrating solar flux into a sensible thermal storage, graphite receiver which is used to heat hydrogen propellant to temperatures of up to 2500 K. The ISUS receiver also radiates heat into an array of thermionic converters which produce electrical power. The GAISUS-1 thermionic converter is a first generation planar converter designed to produce electrical power when coupled with the ISUS receiver. GAISUS-1 will deliver over 31 W{sub e} at 1900 K. A wrought Re hotshoe accepts radiant heat from the receiver. The back side of the hotshoe forms the emitting surface of the converter. Special attention was paid to optimize the electrical and thermal losses experienced through the sleeve. Triple and single sleeve geometries were thermally modeled and evaluated, resulting in the selection of a single sleeve design. A high temperature metal/ceramic seal isolates the emitter sleeve from the collector. A Nb collector is used and is an integral part of a Nb/Na heat pipe. The heat pipe transports reject heat from the collector surface to a thermal radiator (condenser) portion of the heat pipe. The converter utilizes an integral graphite Cs reservoir. This type of reservoir automatically produces a rise in Cs pressure in response to a rise in emitter/collector temperatures. This Cs pressure feedback mechanism insures adequate Cs coverage of the emitter over a broad range of operating conditions (temperatures).

  16. Evaluating Radiative Closure in the Middle-to-Upper Troposhere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tobin, David C; Turner, David D; Knuteson, Robert O

    2013-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This project had two general objectives. The first is the characterization and improvement of the radiative transfer parameterization in strongly absorbing water vapor bands, as these strongly absorbing bands dictate the clear sky radiative heating rate. The second is the characterization and improvement of the radiative transfer in cirrus clouds, with emphasis on ensuring that the parameterization of the radiative transfer is consistent and accurate across the spectrum. Both of these objectives are important for understanding the radiative processes in the mid-to-upper troposphere. The research on this project primarily involved analysis of data from the First and Second Radiative Heating in Underexplored Bands Campaigns, RHUBC-I and II. This included a climate model sensitivity study using results from RHUBC-I. The RHUBC experiments are ARM-funded activities that directly address the objectives of this research project. A secondary effort was also conducted that investigated the trends in the long-term (~14 year) dataset collected by the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) at the ARM Southern Great Plains site. This work, which was primarily done by a post-doc at the University of Wisconsin �������¢���������������� Madison under Dr. Turner�������¢����������������s direction, uses the only NIST-traceable instrument at the ARM site that has a well-documented calibration and uncertainty performance to investigate long-term trends in the downwelling longwave radiance above this site.

  17. Stratigraphy of Smackover formation (Upper Jurassic), Southwest Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrett, M.L.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The modeled eustatic sea level rise during Smackover deposition is recorded in rocks along the Wiggins Arch--Conecuh Ridge areas of the Manila embayment as a ''large-scale'' transgressive-regressive carbonate package. Transgression of Smackover carbonates in the Conecuh Ridge area was associated with the end of pronounced fault-block movement characteristic of earlier Norphlet deposits. Underlying Louann and Norphlet strata created a ramplike surface of transgression in the Wiggins arch area, whereas the Louann pinch-out and confinement or Norphlet coarse clastics between basement blocks in the far eastern Manila embayment resulted in a rapidly changing paleotopographic surface. The subdued paleotopographic (ramp) setting was dominated by lateral progradation of sedimentary environments; in contrast, carbonates to the east over basement features responded to the same eustatic changes by vertical upbuilding (aggradation) of facies-a ''tectonic dictator'' existed that controlled depositional relief and localized environments through time. Direct evidence for meter-scale relative sea level oscillations is from multiple exposure surfaces within upper Smackover grainstones. These diagenetic caps (up to four zones recognized in the Chunchula field area) at the top of coarsening-upward sequences are characterized by chemically coated grains, gravitational vadose cements, multiple dissolution-reprecipitation features, and localized radial-fibrous cements. Stacked sedimentary packages indicate that repeated relative sea level rises again initiated carbonate deposition after exposure. Correlation of exposure caps in four wells in Chunchula field reflect internal time lines generally parallel with the Norphlet-Smackover contact, and indicate lateral equivalence of grainstones with updip anhydrite.

  18. Photon and graviton mass limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nieto, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Goldhaber Scharff, Alfred [SUNY

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review past and current studies of possible long-distance, low-frequency deviations from Maxwell electrodynamics and Einstein gravity. Both have passed through three phases: (1) Testing the inverse-square laws of Newton and Coulomb, (2) Seeking a nonzero value for the rest mass of photon or graviton, and (3) Considering more degrees of freedom, allowing mass while preserving gauge or general-coordinate invariance. For electrodynamics there continues to be no sign of any deviation. Since our previous review the lower limit on the photon Compton wavelength (associated with weakening of electromagnetic fields in vacuum over large distance scale) has improved by four orders of magnitude, to about one astronomical unit. Rapid current progress in astronomical observations makes it likely that there will be further advances. These ultimately could yield a bound exceeding galactic dimensions, as has long been contemplated. Meanwhile, for gravity there have been strong arguments about even the concept of a graviton rest mass. At the same time there are striking observations, commonly labeled 'dark matter' and 'dark energy' that some argue imply modified gravity. This makes the questions for gravity much more interesting. For dark matter, which involves increased attraction at large distances, any explanation by modified gravity would be qualitatively different from graviton mass. Because dark energy is associated with reduced attraction at large distances, it might be explained by a graviton-mass-like effect.

  19. Kinetic limits of dynamical systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jens Marklof

    2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the pioneering work of Maxwell and Boltzmann in the 1860s and 1870s, a major challenge in mathematical physics has been the derivation of macroscopic evolution equations from the fundamental microscopic laws of classical or quantum mechanics. Macroscopic transport equations lie at the heart of many important physical theories, including fluid dynamics, condensed matter theory and nuclear physics. The rigorous derivation of macroscopic transport equations is thus not only a conceptual exercise that establishes their consistency with the fundamental laws of physics: the possibility of finding deviations and corrections to classical evolution equations makes this subject both intellectually exciting and relevant in practical applications. The plan of these lectures is to develop a renormalisation technique that will allow us to derive transport equations for the kinetic limits of two classes of simple dynamical systems, the Lorentz gas and kicked Hamiltonians (or linked twist maps). The technique uses the ergodic theory of flows on homogeneous spaces (homogeneous flows for short), and is based on joint work with Andreas Str\\"ombergsson.

  20. New primordial-magnetic-field limit from the latest LIGO S5 data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, S. [Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China) and Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100080 (China)

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the energy momentum tensor of a magnetic field always contains a spin-2 component in its anisotropic stress, stochastic primordial magnetic field (PMF) in the early universe must generate stochastic gravitational-wave (GW) background. This process will greatly affect the relic gravitational wave (RGW), which is one of the major scientific goals of the laser interferometer GW detections. Recently, the fifth science (S5) run of laser interferometer gravitational-wave observatory (LIGO) gave a latest upper limit {Omega}{sub GW}<6.9x10{sup -6} on the RGW background. Utilizing this upper limit, we derive new PMF limits: for a scale of galactic cluster {lambda}=1 Mpc, the amplitude of PMF, that produced by the electroweak phase transition, has to be weaker than B{sub {lambda}{<=}4}x10{sup -7} G; for a scale of supercluster {lambda}=100 Mpc, the amplitude of PMF has to be weaker than B{sub {lambda}{<=}9}x10{sup -11} G. In this manner, GW observation has potential to make interesting contributions to the study of primordial magnetic field.

  1. New Primordial-Magnetic-Field Limit from The Latest LIGO S5 data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shuang Wang

    2009-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the energy momentum tensor of a magnetic field always contains a spin-2 component in its anisotropic stress, stochastic primordial magnetic field (PMF) in the early universe must generate stochastic gravitational wave (GW) background. This process will greatly affect the relic gravitational wave (RGW), which is one of major scientific goals of the laser interferometer GW detections. Recently, the fifth science (S5) run of laser interferometer gravitational-wave observatory (LIGO) gave a latest upper limit $\\Omega_{GW}<6.9\\times10^{-6}$ on the RGW background. Utilizing this upper limit, we derive new PMF Limits: for a scale of galactic cluster $\\lambda=1$ Mpc, the amplitude of PMF, that produced by the electroweak phase transition (EPT), has to be weaker than $B_{\\lambda} \\leq 4\\times 10^{-7}$ Gauss; for a scale of supercluster $\\lambda=100$ Mpc, the amplitude of PMF has to be weaker than $B_{\\lambda} \\leq 9\\times 10^{-11}$ Gauss. In this manner, GW observation has potential to make interesting contributions to the study of primordial magnetic field.

  2. Infrared limit in external field scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrzej Herdegen

    2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Scattering of electrons/positrons by external classical electromagnetic wave packet is considered in infrared limit. In this limit the scattering operator exists and produces physical effects, although the scattering cross-section is trivial.

  3. Fractal Graphics Proprietary Limited 39 Fairway, Nedlands,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boschetti, Fabio

    1 Fractal Graphics Proprietary Limited 39 Fairway, Nedlands, Western Australia, Australia 6009 djh@fractalgraphics.com.au 2 Fractal Graphics Proprietary Limited 39 Fairway, Nedlands, Western Australia, Australia 6009 nja

  4. FUNDAMENTAL PERFORMANCE LIMITS OF WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Baochun

    FUNDAMENTAL PERFORMANCE LIMITS OF WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORKS ZHIHUA HU, BAOCHUN LI Abstract. Understanding the fundamental performance limits of wireless sensor networks is critical towards. Key words. Wireless sensor networks, network capacity, network lifetime. 1. Introduction. When

  5. Neural substrates of cognitive capacity limitations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buschman, Tim

    Cognition has a severely limited capacity: Adult humans can retain only about four items “in mind”. This limitation is fundamental to human brain function: Individual capacity is highly correlated with intelligence measures ...

  6. Implementing Risk-Limiting Audits in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cast09.pdf. Philip B. Stark. Risk-limiting post-electionthe N.J. law the ?rst “risk-based statistical audit law. ”Holt bill does not limit risk. The Holt bill has a clause

  7. Upper Higgs boson mass bounds from a chirally invariant lattice Higgs-Yukawa model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Gerhold; K. Jansen

    2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We establish the cutoff-dependent upper Higgs boson mass bound by means of direct lattice computations in the framework of a chirally invariant lattice Higgs-Yukawa model emulating the same chiral Yukawa coupling structure as in the Higgs-fermion sector of the Standard Model. As expected from the triviality picture of the Higgs sector, we observe the upper mass bound to decrease with rising cutoff parameter $\\Lambda$. Moreover, the strength of the fermionic contribution to the upper mass bound is explored by comparing to the corresponding analysis in the pure $\\Phi^4$-theory.

  8. High temperature superconducting fault current limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, J.R.

    1997-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A fault current limiter for an electrical circuit is disclosed. The fault current limiter includes a high temperature superconductor in the electrical circuit. The high temperature superconductor is cooled below its critical temperature to maintain the superconducting electrical properties during operation as the fault current limiter. 15 figs.

  9. High temperature superconducting fault current limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fault current limiter (10) for an electrical circuit (14). The fault current limiter (10) includes a high temperature superconductor (12) in the electrical circuit (14). The high temperature superconductor (12) is cooled below its critical temperature to maintain the superconducting electrical properties during operation as the fault current limiter (10).

  10. Confidence Intervals Laboratory Project #5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kofman, Ilya

    concerning the amount of soda in some soda bottles. The Pepsi Bottling Plant in Astoria Queens produces a huge number of half gallon, plastic Diet Pepsi bottles. The company claims that, due to manufacturing we had ALL the data on Pepsi's Astoria soda bottles. This is the same as assuming we know everything

  11. Cold dilute neutron matter on the lattice II: Results in the unitary limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean Lee; Thomas Schaefer

    2005-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the second of two papers which investigate cold dilute neutron matter on the lattice using pionless effective field theory. In the unitary limit, where the effective range is zero and scattering length is infinite, simple scaling relations relate thermodynamic functions at different temperatures. When the second virial coefficient is properly tuned, we find that the lattice results obey these scaling relations. We compute the energy per particle, pressure, spin susceptibility, dineutron correlation function, and an upper bound for the superfluid critical temperature.

  12. The edited version has been published in 2004 in N. Hopkins & R. Saad (eds), Upper Egypt, Identity and Change, Cairo,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The edited version has been published in 2004 in N. Hopkins & R. Saad (eds), Upper Egypt, Identity tendency, at least since the early 20th c., to describe Upper Egypt (hereafter as-Sa'îd) as a specific these questions and were always stressing "How unknown and unfamiliar and neglected Upper Egypt was for the State

  13. Improving simulations of the upper ocean by inclusion of surface waves in the MellorYamada turbulence scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ezer,Tal

    mixing. Surface waves can enhance turbulence kinetic energy and mixing of the upper ocean via wave interaction on the MellorYamada scheme and upper ocean thermal structure are examined and compared with each scheme. The behaviors of the MellorYamada scheme, as well as the simulated upper ocean thermal structure

  14. Limits on Primordial Black Hole evaporation with the H.E.S.S. array of Cherenkov telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glicenstein, J-F; Vivier, M; Herr, T

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data collected by the H.E.S.S. array between 2004 and 2012 have been used to search for photon bursts from primordial black hole explosions. Bursts were searched for in a 30 second time-window. The duration of the search window has been optimized to increase the burst signal while keeping the statistical background low. No evidence for a burst signal was found. Preliminary upper limits on the local rate of PBH explosions of $1.4\\times 10^{4} {pc}^{-3} {yr}^{-1}$ have been obtained, which improve previously published limits by almost an order of magnitude

  15. Implementation Study of Energy Conservation Recommendations in the Upper Midwest Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heisinger, K. P.; Bassett, K.; Twedt, M. P.

    The South Dakota State University (SDSU) Industrial Energy Optimization Program (IEOP) and Energy Analysis and Diagnostic Center (EADC) program perform energy audits for industrial companies in the Upper Midwest region of the United States. Each...

  16. Improved age control on early Homo fossils from the upper Burgi Member at Koobi Fora, Kenya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Improved age control on early Homo fossils from the upper Burgi Member at Koobi Fora, Kenya in Areas 105 and 131 on the Karari Ridge in the eastern Turkana Basin (Kenya). We identify the base

  17. Improved age control on early Homo fossils from the upper Burgi Member at Koobi Fora, Kenya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Improved age control on early Homo fossils from the upper Burgi Member at Koobi Fora, Kenya in Areas 105 and 131 on the Karari Ridge in the eastern Turkana Basin (Kenya). We identify the base

  18. INDIANA UNIVERSITY COMPUTER SCIENCE DEPARTMENT PROFESSIONAL MASTER'S DEGREE: UPPER LEVEL GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS WORKSHEET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indiana University

    INDIANA UNIVERSITY COMPUTER SCIENCE DEPARTMENT PROFESSIONAL MASTER'S DEGREE: UPPER LEVEL GRADUATION790) Q: (Qualifying exam + 2 approved graduate-level courses (1, 2 above)) Qualifying exam: _______________________ Date:_____ Grade:____ R, S, TH: (Master's research project, Master's software project, University

  19. A Survey of Biological Underwater Noises Off the Coast of California and in Upper Puget Sound

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Martin W

    1943-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF CALIFORNIA AND IN UPPER PUGET SOUND by Martin W Johnson iin noise conditions in the Puget Sound area. ii CONFIDENTIALin background noises in the Puget Sound area which had been

  20. Demonstration Sites of Best Management Practices: A Manual for the Upper Etowah River Alliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosemond, Amy Daum

    Demonstration Sites of Best Management Practices: A Manual for the Upper Etowah River Alliance and the Institute of Ecology #12;UERA BMPs Demonstation Sites Manual 2 of 2 Demonstration Sites of Best Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 iii. Best Management Practices

  1. Planktonic Foraminifera Record of the Mid Albian Sea Level Rise, Upper Magdalena Valley, Colombia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sukop, Mike

    Planktonic Foraminifera Record of the Mid Albian Sea Level Rise, Upper Magdalena Valley, Colombia Cretaceous unit in southern Colombia named "Tetuán Limestone", have allowed the comparison between planktic foraminifera interval zones in Colombia: Ticinella primula and Biticinella breggiensis, with late

  2. The oceanic and cratonic upper mantle: Clues from joint interpretation of global velocity and attenuation models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asthenosphere Seismic attenuation Seismic velocity Anelasticity Partial melt Combined interpretation of seismicThe oceanic and cratonic upper mantle: Clues from joint interpretation of global velocity anelastic dispersion (Karato and Jung, 1998; Karato, 2003). A unique interpretation of seismological models

  3. Microsoft Word - Upper Jocko River Final Draft CX 7-15-2013.docx

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Upper Jocko River Property funding Fish and Wildlife Project No. and Contract No.: 2002-003-00, BPA-007168 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021):...

  4. Development of a Robotic Device for the Physical Training of Human Upper Extremity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramos, Jorge Adrian

    2013-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis focuses on the development of a robotic device to be used in parallel with observational learning techniques for facilitating the recovery of the upper limb in post-stroke patients. It has been shown in the existing observational...

  5. Enhanced Doppler Effect in the Upper Hybrid Resonance Microwave Backscattering Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Enhanced Doppler Effect in the Upper Hybrid Resonance Microwave Backscattering Experiment A, Politekhnicheskaya 26, 194021 St.Petersburg, Russia Observations of enhanced Doppler frequency shift effect based on this effect is proposed. 1. INTRODUCTION Investigation of tokamak plasma poloidal rotation

  6. Pressure solution and microfracturing in primary oil migration, upper cretaceous Austin Chalk, Texas Gulf Coast 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chanchani, Jitesh

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Upper Cretaceous Austin Chalk is a well known source rock and fractured reservoir. Production is mainly from fractures, and the mechanism by which oil migrates from the matrix into the fractures is not well understood. Microfracturing due...

  7. Concurrent tectonic and climatic changes recorded in upper Tortonian sediments from the Eastern Mediterranean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    evolution in the eastern Mediterranean region. Concurrent tectonic and climatic changes in the MetochiaConcurrent tectonic and climatic changes recorded in upper Tortonian sediments from the Eastern climatic reconstructions reveal substantial changes, especially on the North African continent which

  8. Geochemical and rheological constraints on the dynamics of the oceanic upper mantle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren, Jessica Mendelsohn

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I provide constraints on mantle convection through observations of the rheology and composition of the oceanic upper mantle. Convection cannot be directly observed, yet is a fundamental part of the plate tectonic cycle. ...

  9. Mineralogical analysis and uranium distribution of the sediments from the upper Jackson formation, Karnes County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fishman, Paul Harold

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the reouirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1978 Major Subject: Geology MINERALOGICAL ANALYSIS AND URANIUM DISTRIBUTION OF THE SEDIMENTS FROM THE UPPER JACKSON FORMATION KARNES COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by PAUL HAROLD FISHMAN Approved... as to style and content by: Chairman o Commrttee ea o Department lf (/ ~ s Member Member December 1978 ABSTRACT Mineralogical Analysis and Uranium Distribution of the Sediments from the Upper Jackson Formation Karnes County, Texas (December 1978...

  10. Terry sandstone member of the Pierre Shale, Upper Cretaceous, Spindle field, Denver Basin, Colorado 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helsley, Robert James

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TERRY SANDSTONE MEMBER OF THE PIERRE SHALE, UPPER CRETACEOUS, SPINDLE FIELD, DENVER BASIN, COLORADO A Thesis by ROBERT JAMES HELSLEY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1985 Major Subject: Geology TERRY SANDSTONE MEMBER OF THE PIERRE SHALE, UPPER CRETACEOUS, SPINDLE FIELD, DENVER BASIN, COLORADO A Thesis by ROBERT JAMES HELSLEY Approved as to style and content by: R. R. Berg...

  11. Depositional environment and reservoir characteristics of the upper Frio sandstones, Willamar field, Willacy County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caram, Hector Luis

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DEEGSITICNAL ENVIRONMENT AND ~IR CHABACZERISIICS OF THE UPPER FRIO SANDBKNES, WILIAMAR FIEID, WILZACY COUNTY, TEXAS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial ~fillment of the reguirements for the degree of MASZER... OF SCIENCE December 1988 Major Subject: Geology DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRCINNENZ AND RESERVOIR CHARACIKRISTICS OF THE UPPER FRIO SANDSTONES, WI~ FIEID WILIACY ~, TEXAS A Thesis HECIOR IIJIS CARAM Approved as to style and content by: ~ R. Berg (Chair...

  12. Depositional environment of Upper Devonian gas producing sandstones, Westmoreland County, southwestern Pennsylvania 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Work, Rebecca Miller

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENT OF UPPER DEVONIAN GAS PRODUCING SANDSTONES, WESTMORELAND COUNTY, SOUTHWESTERN PENNSYLVANIA A Thesis by REBECCA MILLER WORK Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1988 Major Subject: Geology DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENT OF UPPER DEVONIAN GAS PRODUCING SANDSTONES, WESTMORELAND COUNTY, SOUTHWESTERN PENNSYLVANIA A Thesis REBECCA MILLER WORK Approved as to style...

  13. Depositional environment of upper Wilcox sandstones, Northeast Thompsonville field, Jim Hogg and Webb Counties, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tedford, Fredrick John

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENT OF UPPER WILCOX SANDSTONES, NORTHEAST THOMPSONVILLE FIELD, JIM HOGG AND WEBB COUNTIES, TEXAS A Thesis by FREDERICK JOHN TEDFORD Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1977 Major Subject: Geology DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENT OF UPPER WILCOX SANDSTONES, NORTHEAST THOMPSONVILLE FIELD, JIM HOGG AND WEBB COUNTIES, TEXAS A Thesis by FREDERICK JOHN TEDFORD Approved...

  14. Upper bound on the secret key rate distillable from effective quantum correlations with imperfect detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moroder, Tobias; Curty, Marcos; Luetkenhaus, Norbert [Quantum Information Theory Group, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik I, and Max-Planck Research Group, Institute of Optics, Information and Photonics, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Staudtstrasse 7/B2, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide a simple method to obtain an upper bound on the secret key rate that is particularly suited to analyze practical realizations of quantum key distribution protocols with imperfect devices. We consider the so-called trusted device scenario where Eve cannot modify the actual detection devices employed by Alice and Bob. The upper bound obtained is based on the available measurements results, but it includes the effect of the noise and losses present in the detectors of the legitimate users.

  15. The Impact of Tenure Arrangements and Crop Rotations on Upper Gulf Coast Rice Farms.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perry, Gregory M.; Rister, M. Edward; Richardson, James W.; Grant, Warren R.; Sij, John W. Jr

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I ____J - TDOC Z TA245 .7 8873 N0.1530 The Impact Of Tenure Arrangements And Crop Rotations On Upper Gulf Coast Rice Farms The Texas Agricultural Experiment Station/ Neville P. Clarke, Director/ The Texas A&M University System/ College... .. . .. . . .................. . . . . . .. . ... .. .... ... 88 PREFACE This bulletin reports economic analyses of the effects of important variables affecting the viability of rice-soybean farming operations in the Texas Upper Gulf Coast region. The study attempts to recognize many factors that affect...

  16. Trace fossils of Fort Hays Limestone Member of Niobrara Chalk (Upper Cretaceous), west-central Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, R. W.

    1970-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS PALEONTOLOGICAL CONTRIBUTIONS ARTICLE 53 (CRETACEOUS 2) TRACE FOSSILS OF FORT HAYS LIMESTONE MEMBER OF NIOBRARA CHALK (UPPER CRETACEOUS), WEST-CENTRAL KANSAS ROBERT W. FREY University of Georgia Marine Institute, Sapelo... Figures, 10 Plates, 4 Tables TRACE FOSSILS OF FORT HAYS LIMESTONE MEMBER OF NIOBRARA CHALK (UPPER CRETACEOUS), WEST-CENTRAL KANSAS' ROBERT W. FREY University of Georgia Marine Institute, Sapelo Island, Georgia CONTENTS PAGE PAGE ABSTRACT 5 Thalassinoides...

  17. Upper arun hydroelectric project feasibility study (phase 1). Volume 2. Appendix. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report was prepared for Nepal Electricity Authority (NEA). The primary objective of the study was to compare several alternative development schemes to drive an optimum development plan for exploiting the hydroelectric potential of the Upper Arun River, to be further investigated in phase 2 of the feasibility study. The report presents the result of the phase I studies investigations recommends the alternatives to be pursued to develop the Upper Arun River. Volume 2 contains tables, figures and other supporting materials.

  18. The corona and upper transition region of epsilon Eridani

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. -U. Ness; C. Jordan

    2007-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We present analyses of observations of epsilon Eridani (K2 V) made with the Low Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer on Chandra and the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer, supplemented by observations made with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph, the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer and the Reflection Grating Spectrometer on XMM-Newton. The observed emission lines are used to find relative element abundances, to place limits on the electron densities and pressures and to determine the mean apparent emission measure distribution. As in the previous paper by Sim & Jordan (2003a), the mean emitting area as a function of the electron temperature is derived by comparisons with a theoretical emission measure distribution found from energy balance arguments. The final model has a coronal temperature of 3.4 x 10^6 K, an electron pressure of 1.3 x 10^16 cm^-3 K at T_e = 2 x 10^5 K and an area filling factor of 0.14 at 3.2 x 10^5 K. We discuss a number of issues concerning the atomic data currently available. Our analyses are based mainly on the latest version of CHIANTI (v5.2). We conclude that the Ne/O relative abundance is 0.30, larger than that recommended from solar studies, and that there is no convincing evidence for enhanced coronal abundances of elements with low first ionization potentials.

  19. Impact limiter retention using a tape joint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzales, A.; Eakes, R.G.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Beneficial Uses Shipping System (BUSS) Cask employs polyurethane foam impact limiters that fit onto the ends of the cask. A foam impact limiter takes energy out of a system during a hypothetical accident condition by allowing foam crush and large deformations to occur. This, in turn, precludes high stresses or deformations from occurring to the cask. Because of the need to transmit significant amounts of heat to the environment, the BUSS cask impact limiters were designed to shield a minimum amount of the cask surface area. With this design impact limiter retention after the initial impact resulting from the 9 meter regulatory drops becomes a concern. Retention is essential to ensure the cask does not experience higher stresses during any secondary or rebound effects without impact limiters than it does during the 9 meter regulatory drop with impact limiters in place.

  20. New Limits on the Ultra-high Energy Cosmic Neutrino Flux from the ANITA Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANITA collaboration; P. Gorham; P. Allison; S. Barwick; J. Beatty; D. Besson; W. Binns; C. Chen; P. Chen; J. Clem; A. Connolly; P. Dowkontt; M. DuVernois; R. Field; D. Goldstein; A. Goodhue; C. Hast; C. Hebert; S. Hoover; M. Israel; J. Kowalski; J. Learned; K. Liewer; J. Link; E. Lusczek; S. Matsuno; B. Mercurio; C. Miki; P. Miocinovic; J. Nam; C. Naudet; R. Nichol; K. Palladino; K. Reil; A. Romero-Wolf; M. Rosen; L. Ruckman; D. Saltzberg; D. Seckel; G. Varner; D. Walz; Y. Wang; F. Wu

    2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report initial results of the first flight of the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA-1) 2006-2007 Long Duration Balloon flight, which searched for evidence of a diffuse flux of cosmic neutrinos above energies of 3 EeV. ANITA-1 flew for 35 days looking for radio impulses due to the Askaryan effect in neutrino-induced electromagnetic showers within the Antarctic ice sheets. We report here on our initial analysis, which was performed as a blind search of the data. No neutrino candidates are seen, with no detected physics background. We set model-independent limits based on this result. Upper limits derived from our analysis rule out the highest cosmogenic neutrino models. In a background horizontal-polarization channel, we also detect six events consistent with radio impulses from ultra-high energy extensive air showers.

  1. New Limits on the Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Neutrino Flux from the ANITA Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorham, P.W.; Allison, P.; /Hawaii U.; Barwick, S.W.; /UC, Irvine; Beatty, J.J.; /Ohio State U.; Besson, D.Z.; /Kansas U.; Binns, W.R.; /Washington U., St. Louis; Chen, C.; /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U.; Chen, P.; /SLAC; Clem, J.M.; /Delaware U.; Connolly, A.; /University Coll. London; Dowkontt, P.F.; /Washington U., St. Louis; DuVernois, M.A.; /Minnesota U.; Field, R.C.; /SLAC; Goldstein, D.; /UC, Irvine; Goodhue, A.; /UCLA; Hast, C.; /SLAC; Hebert, C.L.; /Hawaii U.; Hoover, S.; /UCLA; Israel, M.H.; /Washington U., St. Louis; Kowalski, J.; Learned, J.G.; /Hawaii U. /Caltech, JPL /Hawaii U. /Minnesota U. /Hawaii U. /Ohio State U. /Hawaii U. /UC, Irvine /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /Caltech, JPL /SLAC /University Coll. London /Ohio State U. /SLAC /Hawaii U. /UCLA /Delaware U. /Hawaii U. /SLAC /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report initial results of the first flight of the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA-1) 2006-2007 Long Duration Balloon flight, which searched for evidence of a diffuse flux of cosmic neutrinos above energies of E{sub v} = 3 x 10{sup 18} eV. ANITA-1 flew for 35 days looking for radio impulses due to the Askaryan effect in neutrino-induced electromagnetic showers within the Antarctic ice sheets. We report here on our initial analysis, which was performed as a blind search of the data. No neutrino candidates are seen, with no detected physics background. We set model-independent limits based on this result. Upper limits derived from our analysis rule out the highest cosmogenic neutrino models. In a background horizontal-polarization channel, we also detect six events consistent with radio impulses from ultrahigh energy extensive air showers.

  2. Search for a High-Mass Diphoton State and Limits on Randall-Sundrum Gravitons at CDF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P H; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bölla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, Yu; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carrillo, S; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Cilijak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Cuenca-Almenar, C; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Da Ronco, S; Datta, M; D'Auria, S; Davies, T; Dagenhart, D; De Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Delli Paoli, F; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Dorr, C; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernández, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Forrester, S; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; García, J E; Garberson, F; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Golossanov, A; Gómez, G; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grundler, U; Guimarães da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Höcker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kraan, A C; Kraus, J; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lu, R S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Mäki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martinez-Ballarin, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtälä, P; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla-Fernández, P A; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Müller, T; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have performed a search for new particles which decay to two photons using 1.2/fb of integrated luminosity from p-pbar collisions at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV collected using the CDF II Detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. We find the diphoton mass spectrum to be in agreement with the standard model expectation, and set limits on the cross section times branching ratio for the Randall-Sundrum graviton, as a function of diphoton mass. We subsequently derive lower limits for the graviton mass of 230 GeV/c2 and 850 GeV/c2, at the 95% confidence level, for coupling parameters (k/M_Pl) of 0.01 and 0.1 respectively.

  3. Improved Limits on Sterile Neutrino Dark Matter using Full-Sky Fermi-GBM Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Kenny C Y; Gaskins, Jennifer M; Smith, Miles; Preece, Robert

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sterile neutrino of ~keV mass is a well motivated dark matter candidate. Its decay generates a X-ray line which offers a unique target for X-ray telescopes. For the first time, we use the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) onboard the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope to search for sterile neutrino decay lines; our analysis covers the energy range 10-25 keV (sterile neutrino mass 20-50 keV), which is inaccessible to X-ray and gamma-ray satellites such as Chandra, Suzaku, XMM-Newton, and INTEGRAL. The extremely wide field of view of the GBM enables a large fraction of the Milky Way dark matter halo to be probed. After implementing careful data cuts, we obtain ~53 days of full sky observational data. We search for sterile neutrino decay lines in the energy spectrum, and find no significant signal. From this, we obtain upper limits on the sterile neutrino mixing angle as a function of mass. In the sterile neutrino mass range 25-40 keV, we improve upon previous upper limits by approximately an order of magnitude. Bett...

  4. Estimating the upper limit of gas production from Class 2 hydrate accumulations in the permafrost: 2. Alternative well designs and sensitivity analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moridis, G.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ocean through the annular gravel pack (kg) P = pressure (Pa)through the annular gravel pack (kg/s) Q R = rate of CH 4through the annular gravel pack (ST m 3 ) V R = cumulative

  5. Improved upper limits on the flavor-changing neutral current decays B -> Kl(+)l(-) and B -> K*(892)l(+)l(-)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Zhao, X.

    2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have searched a sample of 9.6 x 10(6) B(B) over bar events for the flavor-changing neutral current decays B --> Kl(+)l(-) and B --> K*(892)l(+)l(-). We subject the latter decay to the requirement that the dilepton mass ...

  6. Combined upper limit on standard model higgs boson production at D0 in $p \\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernhard, Ralf; /Freiburg U.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The latest searches for the Standard Model Higgs boson at a centre-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV with the D0 and the CDF detectors at the Fermilab Tevatron collider are presented. For the first time since the LEP experiments the sensitivity for a Standard Model Higgs boson has been reached at a Higgs boson mass of 170 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  7. Estimating the upper limit of gas production from Class 2 hydrate accumulations in the permafrost: 2. Alternative well designs and sensitivity analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moridis, G.; Reagan, M.T.

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the second paper of this series, we evaluate two additional well designs for production from permafrost-associated (PA) hydrate deposits. Both designs are within the capabilities of conventional technology. We determine that large volumes of gas can be produced at high rates (several MMSCFD) for long times using either well design. The production approach involves initial fluid withdrawal from the water zone underneath the hydrate-bearing layer (HBL). The production process follows a cyclical pattern, with each cycle composed of two stages: a long stage (months to years) of increasing gas production and decreasing water production, and a short stage (days to weeks) that involves destruction of the secondary hydrate (mainly through warm water injection) that evolves during the first stage, and is followed by a reduction in the fluid withdrawal rate. A well configuration with completion throughout the HBL leads to high production rates, but also the creation of a secondary hydrate barrier around the well that needs to be destroyed regularly by water injection. However, a configuration that initially involves heating of the outer surface of the wellbore and later continuous injection of warm water at low rates (Case C) appears to deliver optimum performance over the period it takes for the exhaustion of the hydrate deposit. Using Case C as the standard, we determine that gas production from PA hydrate deposits increases with the fluid withdrawal rate, the initial hydrate saturation and temperature, and with the formation permeability.

  8. Combined Tevatron upper limit on gg --> H --> W[superscript +]W[superscript -] and constraints on the Higgs boson mass in fourth-generation fermion models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paus, Christoph M. E.

    We combine results from searches by the CDF and D0 collaborations for a standard model Higgs boson (H) in the process gg-->H-->W+W- in pp? collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at [sqrt]s=1.96??TeV. With 4.8??fb-1 ...

  9. Estimating the upper limit of gas production from Class 2 hydrate accumulations in the permafrost: 2. Alternative well designs and sensitivity analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moridis, G.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    m). As in all cases of gas hydrates (Moridis et al. , 2007;by destroying the secondary gas hydrate barrier (if such aInduced Gas Production From Class 1 Hydrate Deposits,” SPE

  10. The Chandrasekhar limit for quark stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shibaji Banerjee; Sanjay K. Ghosh; Sibaji Raha

    2000-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Chandrasekhar limit for quark stars is evaluated from simple energy balance relations, as proposed by Landau for white dwarfs or neutron stars. It has been found that the limit for quark stars depends on, in addition to the fundamental constants, the Bag constant.

  11. Self-triggering superconducting fault current limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yuan, Xing (Albany, NY); Tekletsadik, Kasegn (Rexford, NY)

    2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A modular and scaleable Matrix Fault Current Limiter (MFCL) that functions as a "variable impedance" device in an electric power network, using components made of superconducting and non-superconducting electrically conductive materials. The matrix fault current limiter comprises a fault current limiter module that includes a superconductor which is electrically coupled in parallel with a trigger coil, wherein the trigger coil is magnetically coupled to the superconductor. The current surge doing a fault within the electrical power network will cause the superconductor to transition to its resistive state and also generate a uniform magnetic field in the trigger coil and simultaneously limit the voltage developed across the superconductor. This results in fast and uniform quenching of the superconductors, significantly reduces the burnout risk associated with non-uniformity often existing within the volume of superconductor materials. The fault current limiter modules may be electrically coupled together to form various "n" (rows).times."m" (columns) matrix configurations.

  12. Metals in fish from the Upper Benue River and lakes Geriyo and Njuwa in northeastern Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eromosele, C.O.; Eromosele, I.C.; Muktar, S.L.M.; Birdling, S.A. [Federal Univ. of Technology, Yola (Nigeria)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lakes Geriyo and Njuwa occupy natural depressions near the upper Benue River in northeastern Nigeria. The lakes are flooded by the river during the rainy season spanning the months of May to September. Fishing activities on the lakes and river provide fish for consumption by the local communities. Industrial activity around the upper Benue River and the lakes is low and there is no information on other activities with the potential for polluting the Benue River as it flows from neighboring Cameroon. However, an unconfirmed report indicated high levels of lead in the upper Benue River, generally speculated as arising from biogeometrical factors. Trace elements, some of which are toxic, may accumulate in edible marine organisms to levels which may be deleterious to human health. For the upper Benue River and its associate lakes, Geriyo and Njuwa, there is yet no report of a systematic study to assess the levels of metals in fish found in these waters. This paper presents the results of a study on metal levels in fish collected from Lakes Geriyo and Njuwa and upper Benue River in northeastern Nigeria. 7 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  13. Hydrochemistry and hydrogeologic conditions within the Hanford Site upper basalt confined aquifer system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spane, F.A. Jr.; Webber, W.D.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Hanford Site Ground-Water Surveillance Project, Flow System Characterization Task. Pacific Northwest Laboratory examines the potential for offsite migration of contamination within the upper basalt confined aquifer system for the US Department of Energy (DOE). As part of this activity, groundwater samples were collected over the past 2 years from selected wells completed in the upper Saddle Mountains Basalt. The hydrochemical and isotopic information obtained from these groundwater samples provides hydrologic information concerning the aquifer-flow system. Ideally, when combined with other hydrologic property information, hydrochemical and isotopic data can be used to evaluate the origin and source of groundwater, areal groundwater-flow patterns, residence and groundwater travel time, rock/groundwater reactions, and aquifer intercommunication for the upper basalt confined aquifer system. This report presents the first comprehensive Hanford Site-wide summary of hydrochemical properties for the upper basalt confined aquifer system. This report provides the hydrogeologic characteristics (Section 2.0) and hydrochemical properties (Section 3.0) for groundwater within this system. A detailed description of the range of the identified hydrochemical parameter subgroups for groundwater in the upper basalt confined aquifer system is also presented in Section 3.0. Evidence that is indicative of aquifer contamination/aquifer intercommunication and an assessment of the potential for offsite migration of contaminants in groundwater within the upper basalt aquifer is provided in Section 4.0. The references cited throughout the report are given in Section 5.0. Tables that summarize groundwater sample analysis results for individual test interval/well sites are included in the Appendix.

  14. Long-time limit of correlation functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Franosch

    2014-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Auto-correlation functions in an equilibrium stochastic process are well-characterized by Bochner's theorem as Fourier transforms of a finite symmetric Borel measure. The existence of a long-time limit of these correlation functions depends on the spectral properties of the measure. Here we provide conditions applicable to a wide-class of dynamical theories guaranteeing the existence of the long-time limit. We discuss the implications in the context of the mode-coupling theory of the glass transition where a non-trivial long-time limit signals an idealized glass state.

  15. Limit of light coupling into solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naqavi, A; Ballif, C; Scharf, T; Herzig, H P

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a limit for the strength of coupling light into the modes of solar cells. This limit depends on both a cell's thickness and its modal properties. For a cell with refractive index n and thickness d, we obtain a maximal coupling rate of 2c*sqrt(n^2-1)/d where c is speed of light. Our method can be used in the design of solar cells and in calculating their efficiency limits; besides, it can be applied to a broad variety of resonant phenomena and devices.

  16. Upper Devonian and Lower Mississippian conodont zones in Montana, Wyoming, and South Dakota

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klapper, G.

    1966-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Cheiloceras-Stufe in New York are the same as HASS ' lower Gassaway faunal zone in its New York occurrence, with the exception of the South Wales Member of the Perrysburg Formation. The upper Gassaway fau- nal zone of the Chattanooga Shale (51, p. 22... of the Cheiloceras-Stufe in New York are the same as HASS ' lower Gassaway faunal zone in its New York occurrence, with the exception of the South Wales Member of the Perrysburg Formation. The upper Gassaway fau- nal zone of the Chattanooga Shale (51, p. 22...

  17. A preliminary study of the distribution of some copepods in upper Laguna Madre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, John C

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LIBRARY a a at cniiEr~ nF TExas A PRELIMINARY STUDY OF THE DISTRIBUTION OF SOME COPEPODS IN UPPER LAGUNA MADRE John C. Henderson A Thesis Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Mlny, io(R Ma/or Sub)ect: Oceanography A PRELIMINARY STUDY OF THE DISTRIBUTION OF SOME COPEPODS IN UPPER LAGUNA MADRE A Thesis John C. Henderson Approved as to style and content by: C...

  18. Mechanical characteristics of folds in Upper Cretaceous strata in the Disturbed Belt of northwestern Montana 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Pat Kader

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -shape. The trough in S3 (see unit 23, Plate 2) is hi. ghly fractured in the sandstone and shows considerable flowage in the shale. From the air, it is readily apparent that these folds of the upper Two Medicine are much smaller in lateral extent along strike than... Formation (mostly shale), the Virgelle Sandstone, and the Two Medi. cine Formation (mostly shale), Montana Group, Upper Cretaceous. The Virgelle Sand- stone, about 54 meters thick, lies between the shales and behaved as the most competent member...

  19. Insect community structure and function in Upper Three Runs, Savannah River Site, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morse, J.C.; English, W.R. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States). Dept. of Entomology; Looney, B.B. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1993-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A project to document the insect species in the upper reaches of Upper Three Runs at the Savannah River site was recently completed. This research was supported by the US Department of Energy under the National Environmental Research Park Program. The work was performed by the Department of Entomology at Clemson University in clemson, SC, by John C. Morse (principal investigator), William R. English and their colleagues. The major output from this study was the dissertation of Dr. William R. English entitled ``Ecosystem Dynamics of a South Carolina Sandhills Stream.`` He investigated selected environmental resources and determined their dynamics and the dynamics of the aquatic invertebrate community structure in response to them.

  20. Raman shifted third harmonic generation of upper hybrid radiation in a plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magesh Kumar, K.K.; Singh, Ranjeet; Tripathi, V. K. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi-110016 (India)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Raman shifted third harmonic generation of upper hybrid radiation is proposed and studied. In the presence of ambient magnetic field, the plasma wave present in the system produces electron density ripple (perturbation) which couples with the velocity imparted by the nonlinear ponderomotive force at twice the laser frequency producing the Raman shifted third harmonic field. The wave vector of the plasma wave provides the uncompensated momentum necessary for phase matching condition. The applied magnetic field can be adjusted to have the phase matching for the given plasma frequency. The energy conversion ratio from pump to the Raman shifted third harmonic generation of upper hybrid radiation is analyzed.

  1. A search for fast optical transients in the Pan-STARRS1 medium-deep survey: M-dwarf flares, asteroids, limits on extragalactic rates, and implications for LSST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berger, E.; Leibler, C. N.; Chornock, R.; Foley, R. J.; Soderberg, A. M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Rest, A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Price, P. A. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H.; Huber, M. E.; Magnier, E. A.; Tonry, J. L. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Metcalfe, N. [Department of Physics, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Stubbs, C. W. [Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for fast optical transients (? ? 0.5 hr-1 day) using repeated observations of the Pan-STARRS1 Medium-Deep Survey (PS1/MDS) fields. Our search takes advantage of the consecutive g {sub P1} r {sub P1} observations (16.5 minutes in each filter), by requiring detections in both bands, with non-detections on preceding and subsequent nights. We identify 19 transients brighter than 22.5 AB mag (S/N ? 10). Of these, 11 events exhibit quiescent counterparts in the deep PS1/MDS templates that we identify as M4-M9 dwarfs at d ? 0.2-1.2 kpc. The remaining eight transients lack quiescent counterparts, exhibit mild but significant astrometric shifts between the g {sub P1} and r {sub P1} images, colors of (g – r){sub P1} ? 0.5-0.8 mag, non-varying light curves, and locations near the ecliptic plane with solar elongations of about 130°, which are all indicative of main-belt asteroids near the stationary point of their orbits. With identifications for all 19 transients, we place an upper limit of R {sub FOT}(? ? 0.5 hr) ? 0.12 deg{sup –2} day{sup –1} (95% confidence level) on the sky-projected rate of extragalactic fast transients at ? 22.5 mag, a factor of 30-50 times lower than previous limits; the limit for a timescale of ?1 day is R {sub FOT} ? 2.4 × 10{sup –3} deg{sup –2} day{sup –1}. To convert these sky-projected rates to volumetric rates, we explore the expected peak luminosities of fast optical transients powered by various mechanisms, and find that non-relativistic events are limited to M ? –10 to ? – 14 mag for a timescale of ?0.5 hr to ?1 day, while relativistic sources (e.g., gamma-ray bursts, magnetar-powered transients) can reach much larger luminosities. The resulting volumetric rates are ? 13 Mpc{sup –3} yr{sup –1} (M ? –10 mag), ? 0.05 Mpc{sup –3} yr{sup –1} (M ? –14 mag), and ? 10{sup –6} Mpc{sup –3} yr{sup –1} (M ? –24 mag), significantly above the nova, supernova, and gamma-ray burst rates, respectively, indicating that much larger surveys are required to provide meaningful constraints. Motivated by the results of our search, we discuss strategies for identifying fast optical transients in the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope main survey, and reach the optimistic conclusion that the veil of foreground contaminants can be lifted with the survey data, without the need for expensive follow-up observations.

  2. Quantum Cryptography Approaching the Classical Limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weedbrook, Christian

    We consider the security of continuous-variable quantum cryptography as we approach the classical limit, i.e., when the unknown preparation noise at the sender’s station becomes significantly noisy or thermal (even by as ...

  3. Infinite volume limit for the dipole gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Dimock

    2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a classical dipole gas in with low activity and show that the pressure has a limit as the volume goes to infinity. The result is obtained by a renormalization group analysis of the model.

  4. Heisenberg-limited metrology with information recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon A. Haine; Stuart S. Szigeti; Matthias D. Lang; Carlton M. Caves

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information recycling has been shown to improve the sensitivity of atom interferometers by exploiting atom-light entanglement. In this paper, we apply information recycling to an interferometer where the input quantum state has been partially transferred from some donor system. We demonstrate that when the quantum state of this donor system is from a particular class of number-correlated Heisenberg-limited states, information recycling yields a Heisenberg-limited phase measurement. Crucially, this result holds irrespective of the fraction of the quantum state transferred to the interferometer input and also for a general class of number-conserving quantum-state-transfer processes, including ones that destroy the first-order phase coherence between the branches of the interferometer. This result could have significant applications in Heisenberg-limited atom interferometry, where the quantum state is transferred from a Heisenberg-limited photon source, and in optical interferometry where the loss can be monitored.

  5. Can Eutrophication Influence Nitrogen vs. Phosphorus Limitation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    Can Eutrophication Influence Nitrogen vs. Phosphorus Limitation? George Gregory Bates College, originating largely from septic systems and fertilizers, have caused significant eutrophication in freshwater nitrogen and phosphorus grew the highest concentration of phytoplankton, but eutrophic ponds grew a mean

  6. Some Fundamental Limitations for Cognitive Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahai, Anant

    ' & $ % Some Fundamental Limitations for Cognitive Radio Anant Sahai Wireless Foundations, UCB EECS program November 1 at BWRC Cognitive Radio Workshop #12;' & $ % Outline 1. Why cognitive radios? 2 November 1 at BWRC Cognitive Radio Workshop #12;' & $ % Apparent spectrum allocations · Traditional

  7. Diffusion-Limited Aggregation on Curved Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, J.

    We develop a general theory of transport-limited aggregation phenomena occurring on curved surfaces, based on stochastic iterated conformal maps and conformal projections to the complex plane. To illustrate the theory, we ...

  8. Climate Prediction: The Limits of Ocean Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stone, Peter H.

    We identify three major areas of ignorance which limit predictability in current ocean GCMs. One is the very crude representation of subgrid-scale mixing processes. These processes are parameterized with coefficients whose ...

  9. Performance limits of axial turbomachine stages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, David Kenneth

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis assesses the limits of stage efficiency for axial compressor and turbine stages. A stage model is developed, consisting of a specified geometry and a surface velocity distribution with turbulent boundary layers. ...

  10. Representation of Limited Rights Data and Restricted Computer...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Representation of Limited Rights Data and Restricted Computer Software Representation of Limited Rights Data and Restricted Computer Software Representation of Limited Rights Data...

  11. Limits of Equivalence: Thinking Gay Male Subjectivity Outside Feminist Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galloway, Samuel R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Limits of Equivalence: Thinking Gay Male Subjectivityor this limit of equivalence? The problem, of course, ispaper, the limits of equivalence emerge: while all subjects

  12. Inequality design limits in optimal aerodynamic shapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seaman, Charles Knight

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I would like to thank Mr. Stan Lowy for his assistance. ABSTRACT The investigation is concerned with ways of including design con- straints in the problem of optimum aerodynamic shapes. Inequality constraints are examined in the report as one... means of describing design limits in the optimization problem. The use of inequality con- straints to consider design limits in a variational solution is illustrated with an example problem. In the example problem, the admissable profiles for a...

  13. Limits on a Composite Higgs Boson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Sekhar Chivukula; Nick Evans; Christian Hoelbling

    2000-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Precision electroweak data are generally believed to constrain the Higgs boson mass to lie below approximately 190 GeV at 95% confidence level. The standard Higgs model is, however, trivial and can only be an effective field theory valid below some high energy scale characteristic of the underlying non-trivial physics. Corrections to the custodial isospin violating parameter T arising from interactions at this higher energy scale dramatically enlarge the allowed range of Higgs mass. We perform a fit to precision electroweak data and determine the region in the (m_H, Delta T) plane that is consistent with experimental results. Overlaying the estimated size of corrections to T arising from the underlying dynamics, we find that a Higgs mass up to 500 GeV is allowed. We review two composite Higgs models which can realize the possibility of a phenomenologically acceptable heavy Higgs boson. We comment on the potential of improvements in the measurements of m_t and M_W to improve constraints on composite Higgs models.

  14. DWPF COAL CARBON WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA LIMIT EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambert, D.; Choi, A.

    2010-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A paper study was completed to assess the impact on the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF)'s Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) acid addition and melter off-gas flammability control strategy in processing Sludge Batch 10 (SB10) to SB13 with an added Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) stream and two Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) products (Strip Effluent and Actinide Removal Stream). In all of the cases that were modeled, an acid mix using formic acid and nitric acid could be achieved that would produce a predicted Reducing/Oxidizing (REDOX) Ratio of 0.20 Fe{sup +2}/{Sigma}Fe. There was sufficient formic acid in these combinations to reduce both the manganese and mercury present. Reduction of manganese and mercury are both necessary during Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) processing, however, other reducing agents such as coal and oxalate are not effective in this reduction. The next phase in this study will be experimental testing with SB10, FBSR, and both SWPF simulants to validate the assumptions in this paper study and determine whether there are any issues in processing these streams simultaneously. The paper study also evaluated a series of abnormal processing conditions to determine whether potential abnormal conditions in FBSR, SWPF or DWPF would produce melter feed that was too oxidizing or too reducing. In most of the cases that were modeled with one parameter at its extreme, an acid mix using formic acid and nitric acid could be achieved that would produce a predicted REDOX of 0.09-0.30 (target 0.20). However, when a run was completed with both high coal and oxalate, with minimum formic acid to reduce mercury and manganese, the final REDOX was predicted to be 0.49 with sludge and FBSR product and 0.47 with sludge, FBSR product and both SWPF products which exceeds the upper REDOX limit.

  15. Characteristics of the upper crust and magma chambers along the spreading centers of the Lau back-arc basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dingler, Allison Maria Jacobs

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    G. , 1990. Origin of petrology and geochemistry of submarinerate, morphology, and petrology. Upper crustal refractione.g. , morphology, petrology, seismicity, and hydrothermal

  16. Maximal boost and energy of elementary particles as a manifestation of the limit of localizability of elementary quantum systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Japaridze, George

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I discuss an upper bound on the boost and the energy of elementary particles. The limit is derived utilizing the core principle of relativistic quantum mechanics stating that there is a lower limit for localization of an elementary quantum system and the suggestion that when the localization scale reaches the Planck length, elementary particles are removed from observables. The limit for the boost and energy, $M_{Planck}/m$ and $M_{Planck}c^{2}\\approx\\,8.6* 10^{27}$ eV, is defined in terms of fundamental constants and the mass of elementary particle and does not involve any dynamic scale. These bounds imply that the cosmic ray flux of any flavor may stretch up to energies of order $10^{18}$ GeV and will cut off at this value.

  17. Stochastic Models Applied to Operation of Reservoirs in the Upper Colorado River Basin in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, R. A.; O'Connor, G. E.; Curry, G. L.; Helm, J. C.

    TR-47 1973 Stochastic Models Applied to Operation of Reservoirs in the Upper Colorado River Basin in Texas R.A. Clark G.E. O?Connor G.L. Curry J.C. Helm Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A...

  18. FINANCE MAJOR UPPER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS FOR 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009 & 2010 CATALOG YEARS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponce, V. Miguel

    FINANCE MAJOR UPPER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS FOR 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009 & 2010 CATALOG YEARS Course of Finance Minimum grade of C required for Finance majors IDS 302: Intro to Operations Management MGT 350 Financial Accounting FIN 321: Managerial Economics FIN 325: Intermediate Finance FIN 323 with a C FIN 327

  19. FINANCE MAJOR UPPER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS FOR 2011/12 CATALOG YEAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponce, V. Miguel

    FINANCE MAJOR UPPER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS FOR 2011/12 CATALOG YEAR Course Grade Prerequisites/Notes BA 300 Ethical Decision Making in Business (1 unit) FIN 323: Fundamentals of Finance Minimum grade of C required for Finance majors MIS 302: Intro to Operations Management MGT 350: Management

  20. NOAA Technical Memorandum NWS HYDRO 39 PROBABLE MAXIMUM PRECIPITATION FOR THE UPPER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Memorandum NWS HYDRO 39 PROBABLE MAXIMUM PRECIPITATION FOR THE UPPER DEERFIELD RIVER The Office of Hydrology (HYDRO) of the National Weather Service (NWS) develops procedures for making river agencies, and conducts pertinent research and development. NOAA Technical Memorandums in the NWS HYDRO

  1. Investigating Upper Bounds on Network Lifetime Extension for Cell-Based Energy Conservation Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santi, Paolo

    Investigating Upper Bounds on Network Lifetime Extension for Cell-Based Energy Conservation either for a base network (one without any energy conservation technique) or for one using cooperative energy conservation strategies. In this paper, we investigate the lifetime/density tradeoff under

  2. Multi-fractal thermal characteristics of the southwestern GIN sea upper layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Peter C.

    Multi-fractal thermal characteristics of the southwestern GIN sea upper layer Peter C. Chu Naval describes a multi-fractal analysis on a high-resolution temperature dataset to obtain the nonstationarity matter Published by Elsevier Ltd. doi:10.1016/S0960-0779(03)00041-9 Chaos, Solitons and Fractals 19 (2004

  3. Use of SF6 to estimate anthropogenic CO2 in the upper ocean Toste Tanhua,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waugh, Darryn W.

    Use of SF6 to estimate anthropogenic CO2 in the upper ocean Toste Tanhua,1 Darryn W. Waugh,2s. Here we apply SF6, a tracer that continues to increase in the atmosphere, as a basis for the Cant water mass transit time distributions (TTDs) calculated with SF6 are compared to those based on CFC-12

  4. But Does It Last? Sustaining a Research-Based Curriculum in Upper-Division Electricity & Magnetism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    But Does It Last? Sustaining a Research-Based Curriculum in Upper-Division Electricity & Magnetism Stephanie V. Chasteen, Rachel E. Pepper, Steven J. Pollock, Katherine K. Perkins Science Education course approach in junior-level electricity and magnetism (E&M). Almost all developed materials (i

  5. The Upper Bound of Capacity for A Concurrent-transmission-based Ad-hoc Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tseng, Yu-Chee

    1 The Upper Bound of Capacity for A Concurrent-transmission-based Ad-hoc Network with Single National Chiao-Tung University, Hsin-Chu, 30010 Taiwan Department of Communication Engineering National Chiao-Tung University, Hsin-Chu, 30010 Taiwan Department of Information and Computer Engineering Chung

  6. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING (EE)/COMPUTER ENGINEERING (CMPE) UPPER DIVISION HONORS PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Shengli

    ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING (EE)/COMPUTER ENGINEERING (CMPE) UPPER DIVISION HONORS PROGRAM Deadlines the website at http://www.honors.uconn.edu. EE/CMPE Honors Program The Electrical/Computer Engineering 4950 Electrical and Computer Engineering Design I (2 credits; Fall, Senior Year) and ECE 4099

  7. Natural Arsenic in Groundwater and Alkaline Lakes at the upper Paraguay basin, Pantanal, Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Natural Arsenic in Groundwater and Alkaline Lakes at the upper Paraguay basin, Pantanal, Brazil L, Brazil d Université de Provence, Aix Marseille 1, France e Departamento de Geografia, Universidade Federal do Mato Grosso do Sul, Três Lagoas, Brazil f Laboratoire de Géomophologie Appliquée, Université de

  8. Safe Upper-bounds Inference of Energy Consumption for Java Bytecode Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Politécnica de Madrid, Universidad

    Safe Upper-bounds Inference of Energy Consumption for Java Bytecode Applications (Extended Abstract relying on autonomous on-board data analysis. Intermediate Representation Resource Usage Analysis Energy- mize energy consumption. Several approaches have been developed for estimating the en- ergy consumption

  9. Upper Permian vertebrates and their sedimentological context in the South Urals, Russia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benton, Michael

    and Kutulukskaya svitas, of equivalent age). This succession documents major climatic changes, with increasing aridity through the Late Permian. The climate changes are manifested in changing sedimentationUpper Permian vertebrates and their sedimentological context in the South Urals, Russia Valentin P

  10. Stream Restoration in the Upper Midwest, U.S.A. Gretchen G. Alexander1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan, David

    Stream Restoration in the Upper Midwest, U.S.A. Gretchen G. Alexander1 and J. David Allan1,2 Abstract Restoration activities intended to improve the condition of streams and rivers are widespread types of activities and their effectiveness. We developed a database of 1,345 stream restoration

  11. PENMAN Upper Model Building a LargeScale Knowledge Base for Machine Translation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knight, Kevin

    f g et al. Abstract PENMAN Upper Model Building a Large­Scale Knowledge Base for Machine­ gineer to build up an index to a KB in a second language, such as Spanish or Japanese. USC is a three­site collabora­ tive effort to build a large­scale knowledge­based ma­ chine translation system

  12. E.2. Electronic Appendix -Food Web Elements of the Fraser River Upper River (above rkm 210)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 E.2. Electronic Appendix - Food Web Elements of the Fraser River Basin Upper River (above rkm 210) Food webs: Microbenthic algae (periphyton), detritus from riparian vegetation and littoral insects tributaries. Collector-gatherers (invertebrates feeding on fine particulate organic material) are the most

  13. Helium Isotopic Textures in Earth's Upper Mantle David W. Graham a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, David W.

    Helium Isotopic Textures in Earth's Upper Mantle David W. Graham a , Barry B. Hanan b , Christophe of variability represent a description of helium isotopic texture. We utilize four complementary methods (~100 km) mantle flow, and by sampling during the partial melting process (~30 km). Keywords: helium

  14. Coupling between upper-hybrid waves and electron holes in Earth's magnetotail

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jovanovic, D.; Shukla, P.K.; Morfill, G. [Institute of Physics, P. O. Box 57, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik IV, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum, Germany and Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, D-85740 Garching (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, D-85740 Garching (Germany)

    2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An analytic theory of the nonlinear interaction between electrostatic high-frequency upper-hybrid waves and the low-frequency electron holes in a magnetized plasma is presented. It provides an explanation for the simultaneous occurrence of upper-hybrid bursts and electron holes, observed recently by the WIND and CLUSTER spacecrafts in the vicinity of the X point during the collisionless reconnection in Earth's deep magnetotail. Using a fluid description for the high-frequency mode and a drift-kinetic description for the low-frequency mode, a Zakharov-type system of equations is obtained that describes the interaction between the upper-hybrid and lower-hybrid waves in the presence of an oblique Buneman instability and resonant electrons. The saturation of the linear and explosive parametric instabilities is shown to result from the electron trapping in the combined low-frequency and ponderomotive potentials, yielding an oblique lower-hybrid hole. The presence of an electron hole produces the localization of the upper-hybrid waves, yielding either a bright nonlinear Schroedinger soliton trapped inside the hole or a dark soliton driven by the defocusing nonlinear Schroedinger nonlinearity, which is trapped outside of the hole.

  15. Plant biodiversity and ethnobotany inside the projected impact area of the Upper Seti Hydropower Project,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asselin, Hugo

    Plant biodiversity and ethnobotany inside the projected impact area of the Upper Seti Hydropower hydropower project, currently under feasibility study. The objective of the study was to document plant the construction of major hydropower infrastructure (Pokharel 2001; Bartle 2002). However, potential impacts

  16. Evolution of the Upper Rhone River discharge and suspended sediment load during the last 80 years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Versoix, Switzerland Key words: Sediment rating curve, sediment load, dam, deep water lake. ABSTRACTEvolution of the Upper Rhone River discharge and suspended sediment load during the last 80 years in amplitude and frequency. From the available literature data, sediment rating curves have been calculated

  17. Evaluation of shrub encroachment and brush control on water availability in the Upper Guadalupe River watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Afinowicz, Jason David

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    ............................................................................................... 99 VITA ........................................................................................................... 102 x LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE Page 2-1 A comparison of the same area as viewed from (a) a 30-m spatial resolution..., and light brush in the Upper Guadalupe River watershed as determined by remote sensing shown by dark regions?.. ................................................................................... 21 3-1 The location and stream network...

  18. New upper bounds for nonbinary codes Dion Gijswijt , Alexander Schrijver y , Hajime Tanaka z

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrijver, Alexander

    - diagonalizing the Terwilliger algebra of the nonbinary Hamming scheme, the bound can be calculated in time bounds for binary codes. Keywords: codes, nonbinary codes, upper bounds, Delsarte bound, Terwilliger alge with the Terwilliger algebra [7] of H(n; q). In section 3 it is shown how the algebra A q;n can be used to obtain a new

  19. Model simulation of Greenland Sea upper-ocean variability S. Hakkinen,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    Model simulation of Greenland Sea upper-ocean variability S. Ha¨kkinen,1 F. Dupont,2 M. Karcher,3-ocean water masses coincides with periods of intense deep-water formation in the Greenland Sea. This paper-ocean properties observed in the Greenland Sea, including very dense, saline water masses in the 1950s, 1960s

  20. Upper-air temperatures around Greenland: 19642005 Jason E. Box1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    Upper-air temperatures around Greenland: 1964­2005 Jason E. Box1,2 and Ariel E. Cohen2 Received 15 of 12h balloon soundings from six sites surrounding Greenland reveal distinct patterns of tropospheric-air temperatures around Greenland: 1964­ 2005, Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L12706, doi:10.1029/ 2006GL025723. 1

  1. Upper ocean T-S variations in the Greenland Sea and their association to climatic conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Upper ocean T-S variations in the Greenland Sea and their association to climatic conditions Sirpa that the salinity variability in the central Greenland Gyre follows closely the sea level pressure (SLP) fluctuations found along the Greenland Coast, e.g., at Angmagssalik. Corresponding large-scale SLP field

  2. Experimental Results on Upper Bounds for Vertex Pi-Lights Victoria Brumberg1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramaswami, Suneeta

    Experimental Results on Upper Bounds for Vertex Pi-Lights Victoria Brumberg1 Suneeta Ramaswami2 Diane Souvaine3 Abstract The problem of illuminating a simple n-gon with cn, c lights is open, whereas a lower bound of 3 5 n is known. We provide an algorithm for placing -lights, and experimental

  3. Neural PID Control of Robot Manipulators with Application to an Upper Limb Exoskeleton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Jacob

    1 Neural PID Control of Robot Manipulators with Application to an Upper Limb Exoskeleton Wen Yu to uncertainties in robot control, PID control needs a big integral gain, or a neural compensator is added of the robot control. In this paper, we extend the popular neural PD control into neural PID control

  4. A Novel Linear PID Controller for an Upper Limb Exoskeleton Wen Yu and Jacob Rosen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Jacob

    A Novel Linear PID Controller for an Upper Limb Exoskeleton Wen Yu and Jacob Rosen Abstract. The stability of such a system is critical given the proximity of its human operator. A new PID controller [25]. Given the complexity of the of the exoskeleton as 7 DOF system a PID controller may

  5. TP53 gene mutations of lung cancer patients in upper northern Thailand and environmental risk factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TP53 gene mutations of lung cancer patients in upper northern Thailand and environmental risk mutations are observed in about 40e70% of lung cancer tissues, and the hot spot codon mu- tations factors that influence TP53 gene mutation in lung cancer patients residing areas with high lung cancer

  6. ORIGINAL PAPER Mapping the phases of Glacial Lake Algonquin in the upper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaetzl, Randall

    . M. Shortridge Á R. J. Schaetzl Department of Geography, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI of ice was removed (Gilbert 1898; Clark et al. 1994; Lewis et al. 2005). Locations in northern Michigan the Main and two ``Upper Group'' phases in northern Michigan and nearby Ontario, reports their spatial

  7. Thin, pedoturbated, and locally sourced loess in the western Upper Peninsula of Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaetzl, Randall

    Thin, pedoturbated, and locally sourced loess in the western Upper Peninsula of Michigan Michael D. Luehmann , Randall J. Schaetzl, Bradley A. Miller, Michael E. Bigsby Department of Geography, Michigan November 2012 Available online 1 February 2013 Keywords: Loess Michigan Particle size filtering Bimodal

  8. RURAL POVERTY AND DIVERSIFICATION OF FARMING SYSTEMS IN UPPER NORTHEAST THAILAND.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    RURAL POVERTY AND DIVERSIFICATION OF FARMING SYSTEMS IN UPPER NORTHEAST THAILAND. C. BARNAUD 1 , G and government support to help them catch-up is still needed. INTRODUCTION Unacceptable levels of poverty the seriousness of the situation. But a fundamental question remains: How can we reduce poverty, particularly

  9. Evaluating the effect of interannual variations of surface chlorophyll on upper ocean temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of interactions between ocean biology, ocean dynamics, and irradiance penetration. The bulk of the essential]. The biota, in turn, modulate the penetration of solar radia- tion in the upper ocean and control, to some that the SST differences are not the result of the direct effect of ocean biota on light penetration. Rather

  10. Thermal maturity of the Upper Triassic-Middle Jurassic Shemshak Group (Alborz Range, Northern Iran)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Iran) based on organic petrography, geochemistry and basin modelling: implications for source rock1 Thermal maturity of the Upper Triassic-Middle Jurassic Shemshak Group (Alborz Range, Northern Iran. Organic matter (OM) has been investigated using Rock-Eval pyrolysis, elemental analysis

  11. Lake Level Controlled Sedimentological I Heterogenity of Oil Shale, Upper Green River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gani, M. Royhan

    Chapter 3 Lake Level Controlled Sedimentological 1:'_i 'I I Heterogenity of Oil Shale, Upper Green email: mgani@uno.edu t",. The Green River Formation comprises the world's largest deposit of oil-shale characterization of these lacustrine oil-shale deposits in the subsurface is lacking. This study analyzed ~300 m

  12. Towards a Wireless Building Management System Requiring no Change to Upper-layer Protocols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Dan

    communications to support transmission, design protocols for sensor networking and conduct application that converts existing wired sensor network into wireless without changing upper layer protocols decent understanding on the design within a wireless sensor network, e.g., OS, programming languages

  13. The role of pressure solution creep in the ductility of the Earth's upper crust

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    theoretical creep laws. Laboratory experiments are implemented in order to test the models and to measure1 The role of pressure solution creep in the ductility of the Earth's upper crust Jean, France The aim of this review is to characterize the role of pressure solution creep in the ductility

  14. Bio-Climatic Analysis and Thermal Performance of Upper Egypt A Case Study Kharga Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khalil, M. H.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Upper Egypt. In the recent century the most attentions of the government is the creation of new wadi parallel to Nile wadi in the west desert. Kharga Oasis is 25 degrees 26'56?North latitude and 30 degrees 32'24?East longitude. This oasis, is the largest...

  15. FY 2007 Progress Report for Upper Columbia United Tribes' Regional Coordination.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michel, D.R.

    2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a summary of activities conducted over the fiscal year 2007 contract period to fulfill requirements to coordinate Upper Columbia United Tribes (UCUT) interests within the Columbia River Basin. This coordination was specific to the implementation of portions of the Integrated Fish and Wildlife Program within the purview of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council and Bonneville Power Administration.

  16. A New Technique To Determine The Upper Threshold for Finite Length Turbo Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaturvedi, A K

    A New Technique To Determine The Upper Threshold for Finite Length Turbo Codes A.Rajeshand A in finite frame length turbo codes. These thresholds depend on the component encoder as well as the frame to indecisive and unequivocal fixed points respectively, for finiteframe length turbo codes. Concurrently, Gamal

  17. A Cavity-backed Slot Antenna with High Upper Hemisphere Efficiency for Sewer Sensor Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tentzeris, Manos

    the sensor network, an antenna needs to be robust, low-cost, low-profile, and easy to be integrated, a woven fiberglass composite was designed and fabricated as a RF transparent material for a manhole cover can be advantageous to improve the antenna efficiency toward upper hemisphere since it reflects

  18. Sequence stratigraphy of middle and upper Jurassic strata of Southwestern Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wade, W.J.; Moore, C.H. Jr. (Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States))

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Middle and Upper Jurassic systems tracts of southwestern Alabama differ from those of the western Gulf rim, showing: (1) profound influence of antecedent topography; (2) low early subsidence rates; and (3) greater clastic influx from adjacent uplands. Werner Anhydrite and Louann Salt represent the earliest marine incursion onto the Gulf rim following initial rifting; they onlap upper Paleozoic basement and garben-filling Eagle Mills red beds. Because basin-wide evaporative drawdowns overprint even higher order eustatic sea level changes, transgressive systems tracts (TST) and highstand systems tracts (HST) are indistinguishable. Anhydrite and shale caps accumulated via interstratal halite dissolution. Oxfordian Norphlet siliciclastics form a continental lowstand systems tract as illustrated by abrupt contact with underlying marine evaporites without intervening progradational marginal marine facies. Marine-reworked uppermost Norphlet sandstone marks the base of a subsequent TST, which includes overstepping lower Smackover lithofacies (laminated mudstone, algal-laminated mudstone, and pellet wackestone). The upper Smackover HST is characterized by formation of rimmed shelves upon which algal mounds and aggrading ooid grainstone parasequences accumulated. Shallow lagoonal carbonate and evaporite saltern deposition occurred behind ooid shoals; fine-grained siliciclastics accumulated in updip areas. Equivalents of Smackover A, Smackover B, Bossier, and Gilmer sequences are largely masked by influx of Haynesville and Cotton Valley continental clastics. Lack of biostratigraphic data, a consequence of restricted fauna, precludes useful age assignments for these sequences in Alabama. Middle and Upper Jurassic systems tracts of southwestern Alabama are regionally atypical and cannot serve as a model for Gulf-wide sequences.

  19. Developing a Successful Riparian-Wetland Grazing Management Plan for the Upper Ruby River Cattle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . In 1990 the Beaverhead National Forest started to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the allotment. The draft EIS became a focal point for the various groups. The major concern with the Upper Ruby Statement (EIS) for the Allotment. The draft EIS became a focal point for the various groups. All sides

  20. A Groundwater Dynamic Simulation Model: Application to the Upper San Pedro Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    A Groundwater Dynamic Simulation Model: Application to the Upper San Pedro Basin Report Prepared by using tools such as tracers to determine groundwater travel times and this dynamic simulation modeling Initiative Fund, Water Sustainability Graduate Fellowship Program 2004/2005 #12;2 Introduction Located

  1. Upper Middle Mainstem Columbia River Subbasin Focal Species Information, Red-winged Blackbird

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix C Upper Middle Mainstem Columbia River Subbasin Focal Species Information, Red-winged Blackbird Introduction The red-winged black bird is one of the most abundant birds in North America (Marshall et al. 2003). Red-winged Blackbirds are extremely adaptable; successfully colonizing many small

  2. About the Upper Bound of the Chiral Index of Multivariate Distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petitjean, Michel [DSV/iBiTec-S/SB2SM (CNRS URA 2096), CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2008-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A family of distributions in R{sup d} having a chiral index greater or equal to a constant arbitrarily close to 1/2 is exhibited. It is deduced that the upper bound of the chiral index lies in the interval [1/2; 1], for any dimension d.

  3. Biologically-Inspired Control Architecture for an Upper Limb, Intelligent Robotic Orthosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to activate the human muscles. The humanoid robot's muscles, actuated by pressure control, are controlled human motion and will facilitate a more human-friendly human-robot interaction. This leads to our illustration of applying the architecture to a proposed upper limb, robotic orthosis. Such an orthosis

  4. THE LIMIT OF MAGNETIC-SHEAR ENERGY IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, David A.; Sterling, Alphonse C., E-mail: ron.moore@nasa.gov [Heliophysics and Planetary Science Office, ZP13, Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States)

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been found previously, by measuring from active-region magnetograms a proxy of the free energy in the active region's magnetic field, (1) that there is a sharp upper limit to the free energy the field can hold that increases with the amount of magnetic field in the active region, the active region's magnetic flux content, and (2) that most active regions are near this limit when their field explodes in a coronal mass ejection/flare eruption. That is, explosive active regions are concentrated in a main-sequence path bordering the free-energy-limit line in (flux content, free-energy proxy) phase space. Here, we present evidence that specifies the underlying magnetic condition that gives rise to the free-energy limit and the accompanying main sequence of explosive active regions. Using a suitable free-energy proxy measured from vector magnetograms of 44 active regions, we find evidence that (1) in active regions at and near their free-energy limit, the ratio of magnetic-shear free energy to the non-free magnetic energy the potential field would have is of the order of one in the core field, the field rooted along the neutral line, and (2) this ratio is progressively less in active regions progressively farther below their free-energy limit. Evidently, most active regions in which this core-field energy ratio is much less than one cannot be triggered to explode; as this ratio approaches one, most active regions become capable of exploding; and when this ratio is one, most active regions are compelled to explode.

  5. Constructing Amplitudes from Their Soft Limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boucher-Veronneau, Camille; Larkoski, Andrew J.; /SLAC

    2011-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The existence of universal soft limits for gauge-theory and gravity amplitudes has been known for a long time. The properties of the soft limits have been exploited in numerous ways; in particular for relating an n-point amplitude to an (n-1)-point amplitude by removing a soft particle. Recently, a procedure called inverse soft was developed by which 'soft' particles can be systematically added to an amplitude to construct a higher-point amplitude for generic kinematics. We review this procedure and relate it to Britto-Cachazo-Feng-Witten recursion. We show that all tree-level amplitudes in gauge theory and gravity up through seven points can be constructed in this way, as well as certain classes of NMHV gauge-theory amplitudes with any number of external legs. This provides us with a systematic procedure for constructing amplitudes solely from their soft limits.

  6. Abstract--This paper presents the preliminary design of a new dexterous upper-limb prosthesis provided with a novel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arleo, Angelo

    Abstract-- This paper presents the preliminary design of a new dexterous upper-limb prosthesis replaced a missing limb with a prosthesis for cosmetic, vocational, or personal autonomy reasons. The upper) of the hand are crucial [2]. The objective of this work is to develop a bio-inspired dexterous hand prosthesis

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF A 3D GRID, FRACTURE AND PROPERTY MODELS FOR THE UPPER FREEPORT COAL AND OVERBURDEN USING 3D

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Thomas H.

    in unminable coal seams. The pilot test is being conducted by CONSOL Energy Inc. Several site characterization of the Upper Freeport coal seam in southeastern Marshall Co. The site lies within a1km2 area that is outlined dimension. Grid cell thickness in the Pittsburgh and Upper Freeport coal seams was set at 8 feet and 5 feet

  8. Shear wave splitting in SE Brazil: an eect of active or fossil upper mantle ow, or both?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barruol, Guilhem

    Shear wave splitting in SE Brazil: an e¡ect of active or fossil upper mantle £ow, or both?§ Maggy, Brazil c Universidade de SaBrazil Received 26 the structure of the upper mantle beneath southeastern Brazil using teleseismic shear wave splitting

  9. Computer simulations for direct conversion of the HF electromagnetic wave into the upper hybrid wave in ionospheric heating experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Computer simulations for direct conversion of the HF electromagnetic wave into the upper hybrid emissions (SEE). A direct conversion process is proposed as an excitation mech- anism of the upper hybrid, 1996) The electrostatic waves at the UH resonance were assumed to be excited via ``direct conversion

  10. Analyses and simulations of the upper ocean's response to Hurricane Felix at the Bermuda Testbed Mooring site: 1323 August 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, Sara Irina

    Analyses and simulations of the upper ocean's response to Hurricane Felix at the Bermuda Testbed; 31°440 N, 64°100 W) site on 15 August 1995. Data collected in the upper ocean from the BTM during. The MY2 model predicted more sea surface cooling and greater depth penetration of kinetic energy than

  11. The upper Lyapunov exponent of S1(2,R) cocycles: Discontinuity and the problem of positivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knill, Oliver

    The upper Lyapunov exponent of S1(2,R) cocycles: Discontinuity and the problem of positivity Oliver of a standard probability space (X,m). Let V be the subset ofA= L°°(X% 5/(2, R)) where the upper Lyapunov points inAwhere the Lyapunov exponents are discontinuous. We show further that the decision whether

  12. 1348 IEEE COMMUNICATIONS LETTERS, VOL. 17, NO. 7, JULY 2013 An Upper Bound on the Capacity Loss Due to Imprecise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Candan, Cagatay

    1348 IEEE COMMUNICATIONS LETTERS, VOL. 17, NO. 7, JULY 2013 An Upper Bound on the Capacity Loss Due, IEEE Abstract--A remarkably simple upper bound on the capacity loss due to imprecise channel state, (Capacity Loss) log(1 + var(h - h)SNR) where var(h - h) represents the variance of channel estimation error

  13. The limited validity of the Kubo formula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen

    The limited validity of the Kubo formula for thermal conduction J. Gemmer, UniversitË?at Osnabr; Transport phenomena and Kubo formula Normal transport phenomena: ``field driven'' j = L F F electric current (#) F = -#V Kubo formula (KF): L F (#) = 1 V # # 0 dt e -i#t # # 0 d# Tr{â??# 0 â?? j(0) â?? j(t + i

  14. DISSOLVED CONCENTRATION LIMITS OF RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NA

    2004-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate dissolved concentration limits (also referred to as solubility limits) of elements with radioactive isotopes under probable repository conditions, based on geochemical modeling calculations using geochemical modeling tools, thermodynamic databases, field measurements, and laboratory experiments. The scope of this modeling activity is to predict dissolved concentrations or solubility limits for 14 elements with radioactive isotopes (actinium, americium, carbon, cesium, iodine, lead, neptunium, plutonium, protactinium, radium, strontium, technetium, thorium, and uranium) important to calculated dose. Model outputs for uranium, plutonium, neptunium, thorium, americium, and protactinium are in the form of tabulated functions with pH and log (line integral) CO{sub 2} as independent variables, plus one or more uncertainty terms. The solubility limits for the remaining elements are either in the form of distributions or single values. The output data from this report are fundamental inputs for Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA) to determine the estimated release of these elements from waste packages and the engineered barrier system. Consistent modeling approaches and environmental conditions were used to develop solubility models for all of the actinides. These models cover broad ranges of environmental conditions so that they are applicable to both waste packages and the invert. Uncertainties from thermodynamic data, water chemistry, temperature variation, and activity coefficients have been quantified or otherwise addressed.

  15. Flexible moldable conductive current-limiting materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shea, John Joseph (Pittsburgh, PA); Djordjevic, Miomir B. (Milwaukee, WI); Hanna, William Kingston (Pittsburgh, PA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A current limiting PTC device (10) has two electrodes (14) with a thin film of electric conducting polymer material (20) disposed between the electrodes, the polymer material (20) having superior flexibility and short circuit performance, where the polymer material contains short chain aliphatic diepoxide, conductive filler particles, curing agent, and, preferably, a minor amount of bisphenol A epoxy resin.

  16. IRS Contribution Limits and OSU Retirement Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    Impact: OTRS requires contributions on total compensation (salary plus benefits) without regardIRS Contribution Limits and OSU Retirement Programs The OSU Defined Contribution Plan (DCP), (for Revenue Code 401(a). The Internal Revenue Code restrictions on employer-paid contributions make

  17. Physical limits of Communication Madhu Sudan1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudan, Madhu

    Physical limits of Communication Madhu Sudan1 1 Microsoft Research New England, One Memorial Drive by a particle may flip during transmission, and delay, where the particle's arrival time at a © Madhu Sudan, Germany #12;Madhu Sudan 5 destination may not correspond exactly to its departure time. In particular we

  18. Physical Limitations on Mining Natural Earth Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    Physical Limitations on Mining Natural Earth Systems A view of the Himalayas from Lhasa Tad Patzek of fossil fuels ("resources") left all over the Earth The resource size (current balance of a banking flow-based solutions (wind turbines, photovoltaics, and biofuels) will require most radical changes

  19. Economic Growth, Physical Limits and Liveability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on criteria air contaminants, water use, land use, greenhouse gas emissions and solid waste disposal and population growth, impose the physical limits and then simulate household and firm responses to policy and assess the resulting implications for liveability in the region. I measure liveability using 24

  20. Expanded solar-system limits on violations of the equivalence principle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James Overduin; Jack Mitcham; Zoey Warecki

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most attempts to unify general relativity with the standard model of particle physics predict violations of the equivalence principle associated in some way with the composition of the test masses. We test this idea by using observational uncertainties in the positions and motions of solar-system bodies to set upper limits on possible differences $\\Delta$ between the gravitational and inertial mass of each body. For suitable pairs of objects, it is possible to constrain three different linear combinations of $\\Delta$ using Kepler's third law, the migration of stable Lagrange points, and orbital polarization (the Nordtvedt effect). Limits of order $10^{-10}-10^{-6}$ on $\\Delta$ for individual bodies can then be derived from planetary and lunar ephemerides, Cassini observations of the Saturn system, and observations of Jupiter's Trojan asteroids as well as recently discovered Trojan companions around the Earth, Mars, Neptune, and Saturnian moons. These results can be combined with models for elemental abundances in each body to test for composition-dependent violations of the universality of free fall in the solar system. The resulting limits are weaker than those from laboratory experiments, but span a larger volume in composition space.

  1. Effects of a potential fourth fermion generation on the upper and lower Higgs boson mass bounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philipp Gerhold; Karl Jansen; Jim Kallarackal

    2010-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the effect of a potential fourth fermion generation on the upper and lower Higgs boson mass bounds. This investigation is based on the numerical evaluation of a chirally invariant lattice Higgs-Yukawa model emulating the same Higgs-fermion coupling structure as in the Higgs sector of the electroweak Standard Model. In particular, the considered model obeys a Ginsparg-Wilson version of the underlying ${SU}(2)_L\\times {U}(1)_Y$ symmetry, being a global symmetry here due to the neglection of gauge fields in this model. We present our results on the modification of the upper and lower Higgs boson mass bounds induced by the presence of a hypothetical very heavy fourth quark doublet. Finally, we compare these findings to the standard scenario of three fermion generations.

  2. Beta-dependent upper bound on ion temperature anisotropy in a laboratory plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keiter, Paul A. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States)] [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Scime, Earl E. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States)] [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Balkey, Matthew M. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States)] [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Boivin, Robert [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States)] [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Kline, John L. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States)] [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Gary, S. Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

    2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser induced fluorescence measurements of ion temperatures, parallel and perpendicular to the local magnetic field, in the Large Experiment on Instabilities and Anisotropies space simulation chamber (a steady-state, high beta, argon plasma) display an inverse correlation between the upper bound on the ion temperature anisotropy and the parallel ion beta ({beta}=8{pi}nkT/B{sup 2}). These observations are consistent with in situ spacecraft measurements in the Earth's magnetosheath and with a theoretical/computational model that predicts that such an upper bound is imposed by scattering from enhanced fluctuations due to growth of the ion cyclotron anisotropy instability (the Alfven ion cyclotron instability). (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  3. Biological monitoring of Upper Three Runs Creek, Savannah River Plant, Aiken County, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Specht, W.L.

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In anticipation of the fall 1988 start up of effluent discharges into Upper Three Creek by the F/H Area Effluent Treatment Facility of the Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC, a two and one half year biological study was initiated in June 1987. Upper Three Runs Creek is an intensively studied fourth order stream known for its high species richness. Designed to assess the potential impact of F H area effluent on the creek, the study includes qualitative and quantitative macroinvertebrate stream surveys at five sites, chronic toxicity testing of the effluent, water chemistry and bioaccumulation analysis. This final report presents the results of both pre-operational and post-operational qualitative and quantitative (artificial substrate) macroinvertebrate studies. Six quantitative and three qualitative studies were conducted prior to the initial release of the F/H ETF effluent and five quantitative and two qualitative studies were conducted post-operationally.

  4. One-way quantum key distribution: Simple upper bound on the secret key rate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moroder, Tobias; Luetkenhaus, Norbert [Institute of Theoretical Physics I and Max-Planck Research Group, Institute of Optics, Information and Photonics, University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Staudtstrasse 7, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Institute for Quantum Computing, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Curty, Marcos [Institute of Theoretical Physics I and Max-Planck Research Group, Institute of Optics, Information and Photonics, University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Staudtstrasse 7, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a simple method to obtain an upper bound on the achievable secret key rate in quantum key distribution (QKD) protocols that use only unidirectional classical communication during the public-discussion phase. This method is based on a necessary precondition for one-way secret key distillation; the legitimate users need to prove that there exists no quantum state having a symmetric extension that is compatible with the available measurements results. The main advantage of the obtained upper bound is that it can be formulated as a semidefinite program, which can be efficiently solved. We illustrate our results by analyzing two well-known qubit-based QKD protocols: the four-state protocol and the six-state protocol.

  5. A Review of Student Difficulties in Upper-Level Quantum Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Chandralekha

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Learning advanced physics, in general, is challenging not only due to the increased mathematical sophistication but also because one must continue to build on all of the prior knowledge acquired at the introductory and intermediate levels. In addition, learning quantum mechanics can be especially challenging because the paradigms of classical mechanics and quantum mechanics are very different. Here, we review research on student reasoning difficulties in learning upper-level quantum mechanics and research on students' problem-solving and metacognitive skills in these courses. Some of these studies were multi-university investigations. The investigations suggest that there is large diversity in student performance in upper-level quantum mechanics regardless of the university, textbook, or instructor and many students in these courses have not acquired a functional understanding of the fundamental concepts. The nature of reasoning difficulties in learning quantum mechanics is analogous to reasoning difficulties...

  6. Depositional environment and reservoir morphology of the Upper Wilcox sandstones, Katy gas field, Waller County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DePaul, Gilbert John

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and structural characteristics of the field. The Upper Wilcox is divided into the following units, in ascending order, "First Lower Massive" sandstones and "D", "C", "B", "A", "Second Wilcox" and "First Wilcox" interbedded sandstones and shales. The reservoir... and are generally abruptly overla1n by sandstones with sharp or erosional bases. The sandstones change laterally to thin sandstones interlaminated with thick shales. The thick sandstones are submarine, constructional- channel deposits with associated thin...

  7. Faunal studies of the type Chesteran, Upper Mississippian of southwestern Illinois

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furnish, W. M.; Saunders, W. B.; Burdick, D. W.; Strimple, H. L.

    1971-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS PALEONTOLOGICAL CONTRIBUTIONS January 8, 1971 Paper 51 FAUNAL STUDIES OF THE TYPE CHESTERAN, UPPER MISSISSIPPIAN OF SOUTHWESTERN ILLINOIS W. M. FURNISH, W. BRUCE SAUNDERS, D. W. BURDICK, and H. L. STRIMPLE The University... of Iowa, Iowa City Present address of W. BRUCE SAUNDERS, Department of Geology, Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania PART 1 AMMONOIDS FROM THE MIDDLE CHESTER BEECH CREEK LIMESTONE, ST. CLAIR COUNTY W. M. FURNISH and W. BRUCE SAUNDERS ABSTRACT...

  8. An analysis of industrial composition and growth in the Upper Rio Grande State Planning Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeghidi, Khaled

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Jones The purpose of this study was to describe in detail the indus- trial composition and past growth of a six-county area of the Upper Rio Grande State Planning Region, and identify the industries in which each county had a comparative advantage.... Knowledge of the historical changes, the composition of in- dustries and industries for which an area has comparative advantages is important in regional economic development efforts. The measure- ment of industrial mix and competitive-share of a given...

  9. Depositional environment of upper cretaceous Lewis sandstones, Sand Wash Basin, Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reinarts, Mary Susan

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the three types of turbidite channels. After Berg (1978) 44 47 49 50 LIST OF FIGURES - Continued Figure Page lg Idealized depositional model for turbi dite constructional channels. After Berg (1978) 51 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 Regional... (1962) from turbidity current deposits . Bouma 's complete turbi di te is defined as follows: pelitic shale upper unit of parallel laminae D current ripple unit lower unit of parallel laminae 8 massive graded unit In terms of flow regime...

  10. Confirmatory Survey Results for the Reactor Building Dome Upper Surfaces, Rancho Saco Nuclear Generating Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wade C. Adams

    2006-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Results from a confirmatory survey of the upper structural surfaces of the Reactor Building Dome at the Rancho Seco Nuclear Generating Station (RSNGS) performed by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education for the NRC. Also includes results of interlaboratory comparison analyses on several archived soil samples that would be provided by RSNGS personnel. The confirmatory surveys were performed on June 7 and 8, 2006.

  11. Depositional environment and reservoir morphology of the Upper Wilcox sandstones, Katy gas field, Waller County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DePaul, Gilbert John

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    overbank sandstones. Sandstones become thinner and less frequent upward in the section. Thin sand- stones 1n the predominantly shale section are widespread and exhibit sedimentary structures commonly observed in turbidity-current deposits (ABCDE, ABDE... feet of depth. Production in the Upper Wilcox section is from multiple sandstone units within a shale section on a local structural closure (Fig. 2). The properties of these sandstone units and the local stratigraphic variation determine...

  12. Mechanical characteristics of folds in Upper Cretaceous strata in the Disturbed Belt of northwestern Montana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Pat Kader

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    controlled cross section through a wave trai. n of these folds, The citations on these pages follow the style of the U. S. Geological Survey Bulletin. other field observations, laboratory analysis of collected samples, and theoretical considerations...MECHANICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF FOLDS IN UPPER CRETACEOUS STRATA IN THE DISTURBED BELT OF NORTHWESTERN MONTANA A Thesis by PAT KADER GILBERT Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  13. Depositional environment of upper cretaceous Lewis sandstones, Sand Wash Basin, Colorado 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reinarts, Mary Susan

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    areas, Moffat County, Colorado. Structure contours are top of Mesaverde. Contour interval is 1, 000 ft ( 305 m). Modified from Whi tley (1962) Generalized subsurface section of the Upper Cretaceous formations in the Sand Wash basin depicting gross... Correlation section parallel to depositional dip, North Craig field area, showing inclined time- stratigraphic units in the Lewis shale which con- tain thick sandstone intervals. Location of section shown in Fig. 23 Strike correlation section, North Craig...

  14. Depositional environment of Upper Devonian sandstones in Westmoreland County, southwestern Pennsylvania 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGee, Patricia Ann

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    into interbedded shales and siltstones not far to the west of Westmoreland County. To the east, they pass into continental red beds near the southeastern border of Westmoreland County which also coincides with the Laurel Hill anticline. In the cross sections... for natural gas was completed in 1821. It was located in Chautauqua County, New York and produced from Devonian black shales. In 1859, the first oil well, the famous Drake discovery well, was drilled in Titusville, Pennsylvania and produced from the Upper...

  15. Beam driven upper-hybrid-wave instability in quantized semiconductor plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamil, M. [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan)] [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Rasheed, A. [Department of Physics, Government College University, Faisalabad 38000 (Pakistan)] [Department of Physics, Government College University, Faisalabad 38000 (Pakistan); Rozina, Ch. [Department of Physics, Government M.A.O. College, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan)] [Department of Physics, Government M.A.O. College, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Moslem, W. M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Port Said University, Port Said 42521 (Egypt) [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Port Said University, Port Said 42521 (Egypt); Centre for Theoretical Physics, The British University in Egypt (BUE), El-Shorouk City, Cairo (Egypt); Salimullah, M. [Department of Physics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka 1342 (Bangladesh)] [Department of Physics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka 1342 (Bangladesh)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The excitation of Upper-Hybrid waves (UHWs) induced by electron beam in semiconductor plasma is examined using quantum hydrodynamic model. Various quantum effects are taken into account including recoil effect, Fermi degenerate pressure, and exchange-correlation potential. The bandwidth of the UHWs spectrum shows that the system supports purely growing unstable mode. The latter has been studied for diversified parameters of nano-sized GaAs semiconductor.

  16. Victims of child abuse and predicted abusive disciplinary styles in a middle to upper class population

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brannon, Anna Margaret

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    lenhard (Chairperson of Committee) dida . Lutes (Member) lannes H. Hope (Member) MAY 1%5 Stephen H rebel (Head of Department) Victims of Child Abuse and Predicted Abusive Disciplinary Styles in a Middle to Upper Class Population (May 1985) Anna... siblings. 18. 5X of the participants were classified as victims of child abuse; 14. 2X were raised in families where husband-wife abuse existed; and 69. 5X experienced abusive interactions with their siblings. Path analyses performed indicated a strong...

  17. An examination of Plesiosauria (Diapsida: Sauropterygia) from the Niobrara Formation (Upper Cretaceous) of central North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Storrs, G. W.

    1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS PALEONTOLOGICAL CONTRIBUTIONS August 1999 Number 11 AN EXAMINATION OF PLESIOSAURIA (DIAPSIDA: SAUROPTERYGIA) FROM THE NIOBRARA CHALK (UPPER CRETACEOUS) OF CENTRAL NORTH AMERICA Glenn W. Storrs Cincinnati Museum... Center, Geier Collections and Research Center, 1720 Gilbert Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45202, storrsgwatemail.tic.edu Abstract.—Detailed examination of the holotypes of all described plesiosaurs from the Niobrara Chalk reveals that only three of the nine...

  18. Upper arun hydroelectric project feasibility study (phase 1). Volume 1. Report. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report was prepared for Nepal Electricity Authority (NEA). The primary objective of the study was to compare several alternative development schemes to drive an optimum development plan for exploiting the hydroelectric potential of the Upper Arun River, to be further investigated in phase 2 of the feasibility study. The scope of work included reviewing the original project concepts establishing development alternatives investigations in the following fields: Toposurvey Mapping; Geology Geotechnics; Hydrology; Power Market; and Plan formulations.

  19. The environment of deposition of the Dalton Coal (Upper Pennsylvanian), Palo Pinto Co., TX.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lowenstein, Glenn Robert

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Alkane analysis for coal, overburden and underburden shales, and oil. 56 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION Previous workers have classified coals by deter- mining whether they are al 1ochthnous (transported) or autochthonous (in situ) accumul ations (Oe...THE ENVIRONMENT OF DEPOSITION OF THE DALTON COAL (UPPER PENNSYI. VANIAN), PALO PINTO CO. , TX. A Thesis by GLENN ROBERT LOWENSTEIN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for tne...

  20. Presumed Pulmonary Embolism Following Power-Pulse Spray Thrombectomy of Upper Extremity Venous Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsai, Jason; Georgiades, Christos S.; Hong, Kelvin; Kim, Hyun S. [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science (United States)], E-mail: sikhkim@jhmi.edu

    2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To achieve more effective thrombolysis in a shorter treatment time, percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy has been increasingly used in the treatment of deep venous thrombosis (DVT). The power-pulse spray is a new technique to combine chemical and rheolytic effects on clots. We present a case of presumed pulmonary embolism following power-pulse spray treatment for upper extremity DVT which necessitated resuscitation and intubation. The power-pulse spray technique should be used with caution when treating DVT.

  1. Anadronous Fish Habitat Enhancement for the Middle Fork and Upper Salmon River, 1988 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, John ( US Forest Service, Intermountain Region, Boise, ID)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The wild and natural salmon and steelhead populations in the Middle Fork and Upper Salmon River are at a critical low. Habitat enhancement through decreasing sediment loads, increasing vegetative cover, removing passage barriers, and providing habitat diversity is imperative to the survival of these specially adapted fish, until passage problems over the Columbia River dams are solved. Personnel from the Boise and Sawtooth National Forests completed all construction work planned for 1988. In Bear Valley, 1573 feet of juniper revetment was constructed at eleven sites, cattle were excluded from 1291 feet of streambanks to prevent bank breakdown, and a small ephemeral gully was filled with juniper trees. Work in the Upper Salmon Drainage consisted of constructing nine rock sills/weirs, two rock deflectors, placing riprap along forty feet of streambank, construction of 2.1 miles of fence on private lands, and opening up the original Valley Creek channel to provide spring chinook passage to the upper watershed. A detailed stream survey of anadromous fish habitat covering 72.0 miles of streams in the Middle Fork Sub-basin was completed.

  2. Mode conversion and electron heating near the upper hybrid resonance frequency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, B.L.; Okuda, H.; Abe, H.

    1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mode conversion near the upper hybrid resonance frequency and electron heating are studied using a one-dimensional electromagnetic relativistic particle code. It is found that for a sufficiently small pump field E/sub 0/, E/sub 0//sup 2//4..pi..nT/sub e/ less than or equal to 0.01, electron heating is localized in a region near the electron cyclotron layer where the pump frequency is equal to the local electron gyrofrequency. For stronger pump fields, electron heating takes place more or less uniformly across a region between the upper hybrid resonance layer and the cyclotron layer. In addition, a significant fraction of electromagnetic energy associated with the pump is found to be reflected back into the vacuum from a region in the plasma near the upper hybrid resonance layer for both strong (E/sub 0//sup 2//4..pi..nT/sub e/ approx. = 1) and weak pumps (E/sub 0//sup 2//4..pi..nT/sub e/ << 1).

  3. How energy conservation limits our measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miguel Navascues; Sandu Popescu

    2014-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations in Quantum Mechanics are subject to complex restrictions arising from the principle of energy conservation. Determining such restrictions, however, has been so far an elusive task, and only partial results are known. In this paper we discuss how constraints on the energy spectrum of a measurement device translate into limitations on the measurements which we can effect on a target system with non-trivial energy operator. We provide efficient algorithms to characterize such limitations and we quantify them exactly when the target is a two-level quantum system. Our work thus identifies the boundaries between what is possible or impossible to measure, i.e., between what we can see or not, when energy conservation is at stake.

  4. Flow reversal power limit for the HFBR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Lap Y.; Tichler, P.R.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) undergoes a buoyancy-driven reversal of flow in the reactor core following certain postulated accidents. Uncertainties about the afterheat removal capability during the flow reversal has limited the reactor operating power to 30 MW. An experimental and analytical program to address these uncertainties is described in this report. The experiments were single channel flow reversal tests under a range of conditions. The analytical phase involved simulations of the tests to benchmark the physical models and development of a criterion for dryout. The criterion is then used in simulations of reactor accidents to determine a safe operating power level. It is concluded that the limit on the HFBR operating power with respect to the issue of flow reversal is in excess of 60 MW.

  5. Polymer Quantum Mechanics and its Continuum Limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alejandro Corichi; Tatjana Vukasinac; Jose A. Zapata

    2007-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A rather non-standard quantum representation of the canonical commutation relations of quantum mechanics systems, known as the polymer representation has gained some attention in recent years, due to its possible relation with Planck scale physics. In particular, this approach has been followed in a symmetric sector of loop quantum gravity known as loop quantum cosmology. Here we explore different aspects of the relation between the ordinary Schroedinger theory and the polymer description. The paper has two parts. In the first one, we derive the polymer quantum mechanics starting from the ordinary Schroedinger theory and show that the polymer description arises as an appropriate limit. In the second part we consider the continuum limit of this theory, namely, the reverse process in which one starts from the discrete theory and tries to recover back the ordinary Schroedinger quantum mechanics. We consider several examples of interest, including the harmonic oscillator, the free particle and a simple cosmological model.

  6. Diffusion limited reactions in confined environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeremy D. Schmit; Ercan Kamber; Jané Kondev

    2007-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the effect of confinement on diffusion limited bimolecular reactions within a lattice model where a small number of reactants diffuse amongst a much larger number of inert particles. When the number of inert particles is held constant the rate of the reaction is slow for small reaction volumes due to limited mobility from crowding, and for large reaction volumes due to the reduced concentration of the reactants. The reaction rate proceeds fastest at an intermediate confinement corresponding to volume fraction near 1/2 and 1/3 in two and three dimensions, respectively. We generalize the model to off-lattice systems with hydrodynamic coupling and predict that the optimal reaction rate for monodisperse colloidal systems occurs when the volume fraction is ~0.18. Finally, we discuss the application of our model to bimolecular reactions inside cells as well as the dynamics of confined polymers.

  7. Mass and temperature limits for blackbody radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alessandro Pesci

    2006-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A spherically symmetric distribution of classical blackbody radiation is considered, at conditions in which gravitational self-interaction effects become not negligible. Static solutions to Einstein field equations are searched for, for each choice of the assumed central energy density. Spherical cavities at thermodynamic equilibrium, i.e. filled with blackbody radiation, are then studied, in particular for what concerns the relation among the mass M of the ball of radiation contained in them and their temperature at center and at the boundary. For these cavities it is shown, in particular, that: i) there is no absolute limit to M as well to their central and boundary temperatures; ii) when radius R is fixed, however, limits exist both for mass and for boundary energy density rho_B: M temperature) of the ball of radiation.

  8. Application of the ELOHA Framework to Regulated Rivers in the Upper Tennessee River Basin: A Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McManamay, Ryan A [ORNL; Orth, Dr. Donald J [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Dolloff, Dr. Charles A [USDA Forest Service, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences, Virginia Tech; Mathews, David C [Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order for habitat restoration in regulated rivers to be effective at large scales, broadly applicable frameworks are needed that provide measurable objectives and contexts for management. The Ecological Limits of Hydrologic Alteration (ELOHA) framework was created as a template to assess hydrologic alterations, develop relationships between altered streamflow and ecology, and establish environmental flow standards. We tested the utility of ELOHA in informing flow restoration applications for fish and riparian communities in regulated rivers in the Upper Tennessee River Basin (UTRB). We followed the steps of ELOHA to generate flow alteration-ecological response relationships and then determined whether those relationships could predict fish and riparian responses to flow restoration in the Cheoah River, a regulated system within the UTRB. Although ELOHA provided a robust template to construct hydrologic information and predict hydrology for ungaged locations, our results do not support the assertion that over-generalized univariate relationships between flow and ecology can produce results sufficient to guide management in regulated rivers. After constructing multivariate models, we successfully developed predictive relationships between flow alterations and fish/riparian responses. In accordance with model predictions, riparian encroachment displayed consistent decreases with increases in flow magnitude in the Cheoah River; however, fish richness did not increase as predicted four years post- restoration. Our results suggest that altered temperature and substrate and the current disturbance regime may have reduced opportunities for fish species colonization. Our case study highlights the need for interdisciplinary science in defining environmental flows for regulated rivers and the need for adaptive management approaches once flows are restored.

  9. Toxicity Data to Determine Refrigerant Concentration Limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calm, James M.

    2000-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report reviews toxicity data, identifies sources for them, and presents resulting exposure limits for refrigerants for consideration by qualified parties in developing safety guides, standards, codes, and regulations. It outlines a method to calculate an acute toxicity exposure limit (ATEL) and from it a recommended refrigerant concentration limit (RCL) for emergency exposures. The report focuses on acute toxicity with particular attention to lethality, cardiac sensitization, anesthetic and central nervous system effects, and other escape-impairing effects. It addresses R-11, R-12, R-22, R-23, R-113, R-114, R-116, R-123, R-124, R-125, R-134, R-134a, R-E134, R-141b, R-142b, R-143a, R-152a, R-218, R-227ea, R-236fa, R-245ca, R-245fa, R-290, R-500, R-502, R-600a, R-717, and R-744. It summarizes additional data for R-14, R-115, R-170 (ethane), R-C318, R-600 (n-butane), and R-1270 (propylene) to enable calculation of limits for blends incorporating them. The report summarizes the data a nd related safety information, including classifications and flammability data. It also presents a series of tables with proposed ATEL and RCL concentrations-in dimensionless form and the latter also in both metric (SI) and inch-pound (IP) units of measure-for both the cited refrigerants and 66 zerotropic and azeotropic blends. They include common refrigerants, such as R-404A, R-407C, R-410A, and R-507A, as well as others in commercial or developmental status. Appendices provide profiles for the cited single-compound refrigerants and for R-500 and R-502 as well as narrative toxicity summaries for common refrigerants. The report includes an extensive set of references.

  10. DISSOLVED CONCENTRATION LIMITS OF RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. Bernot

    2005-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate dissolved concentration limits (also referred to as solubility limits) of elements with radioactive isotopes under probable repository conditions, based on geochemical modeling calculations using geochemical modeling tools, thermodynamic databases, field measurements, and laboratory experiments. The scope of this activity is to predict dissolved concentrations or solubility limits for elements with radioactive isotopes (actinium, americium, carbon, cesium, iodine, lead, neptunium, plutonium, protactinium, radium, strontium, technetium, thorium, and uranium) relevant to calculated dose. Model outputs for uranium, plutonium, neptunium, thorium, americium, and protactinium are provided in the form of tabulated functions with pH and log fCO{sub 2} as independent variables, plus one or more uncertainty terms. The solubility limits for the remaining elements are either in the form of distributions or single values. Even though selection of an appropriate set of radionuclides documented in Radionuclide Screening (BSC 2002 [DIRS 160059]) includes actinium, transport of Ac is not modeled in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) model because of its extremely short half-life. Actinium dose is calculated in the TSPA-LA by assuming secular equilibrium with {sup 231}Pa (Section 6.10); therefore, Ac is not analyzed in this report. The output data from this report are fundamental inputs for TSPA-LA used to determine the estimated release of these elements from waste packages and the engineered barrier system. Consistent modeling approaches and environmental conditions were used to develop solubility models for the actinides discussed in this report. These models cover broad ranges of environmental conditions so they are applicable to both waste packages and the invert. Uncertainties from thermodynamic data, water chemistry, temperature variation, and activity coefficients have been quantified or otherwise addressed.

  11. Probabilistic Turing Machine and Landauer Limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Frasca

    2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We show the equivalence between a probabilistic Turing machine and the time evolution of a one-dimensional Ising model, the Glauber model in one dimension, equilibrium positions representing the results of computations of the Turing machine. This equivalence permits to map a physical system on a computational system providing in this way an evaluation of the entropy at the end of computation. The result agrees with Landauer limit.

  12. Probabilistic Turing Machine and Landauer Limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frasca, Marco

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show the equivalence between a probabilistic Turing machine and the time evolution of a one-dimensional Ising model, the Glauber model in one dimension, equilibrium positions representing the results of computations of the Turing machine. This equivalence permits to map a physical system on a computational system providing in this way an evaluation of the entropy at the end of computation. The result agrees with Landauer limit.

  13. Assessing Possibilities & Limits for Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nayak, Pabitra K; Cahen, David

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    What are the solar cell efficiencies that we can strive towards? We show here that several simple criteria, based on cell and module performance data, serve to evaluate and compare all types of today's solar cells. Analyzing these data allows to gauge in how far significant progress can be expected for the various cell types and, most importantly from both the science and technology points of view, if basic bounds, beyond those known today, may exist, that can limit such progress. This is important, because half a century after Shockley and Queisser (SQ) presented limits, based on detailed balance calculations for single absorber solar cells, those are still held to be the only ones, we need to consider; most efforts to go beyond SQ are directed towards attempts to circumvent them, primarily via smart optics, or optoelectronics. After formulating the criteria and analyzing known loss mechanisms, use of such criteria suggests - additional limits for newer types of cells, Organic and Dye-Sensitized ones, and th...

  14. Means for limiting and ameliorating electrode shorting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Van Konynenburg, Richard A. (Livermore, CA); Farmer, Joseph C. (Tracy, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fuse and filter arrangement for limiting and ameliorating electrode shorting in capacitive deionization water purification systems utilizing carbon aerogel, for example. This arrangement limits and ameliorates the effects of conducting particles or debonded carbon aerogel in shorting the electrodes of a system such as a capacitive deionization water purification system. This is important because of the small interelectrode spacing and the finite possibility of debonding or fragmentation of carbon aerogel in a large system. The fuse and filter arrangement electrically protect the entire system from shutting down if a single pair of electrodes is shorted and mechanically prevents a conducting particle from migrating through the electrode stack, shorting a series of electrode pairs in sequence. It also limits the amount of energy released in a shorting event. The arrangement consists of a set of circuit breakers or fuses with one fuse or breaker in the power line connected to one electrode of each electrode pair and a set of screens of filters in the water flow channels between each set of electrode pairs.

  15. Means for limiting and ameliorating electrode shorting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konynenburg, R.A. van; Farmer, J.C.

    1999-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A fuse and filter arrangement is described for limiting and ameliorating electrode shorting in capacitive deionization water purification systems utilizing carbon aerogel, for example. This arrangement limits and ameliorates the effects of conducting particles or debonded carbon aerogel in shorting the electrodes of a system such as a capacitive deionization water purification system. This is important because of the small interelectrode spacing and the finite possibility of debonding or fragmentation of carbon aerogel in a large system. The fuse and filter arrangement electrically protect the entire system from shutting down if a single pair of electrodes is shorted and mechanically prevents a conducting particle from migrating through the electrode stack, shorting a series of electrode pairs in sequence. It also limits the amount of energy released in a shorting event. The arrangement consists of a set of circuit breakers or fuses with one fuse or breaker in the power line connected to one electrode of each electrode pair and a set of screens of filters in the water flow channels between each set of electrode pairs.

  16. Limitations and improvements for harmonic generation measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Best, Steven; Croxford, Anthony; Neild, Simon [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Queens Building, University Walk, Bristol BS8 1TR (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A typical acoustic harmonic generation measurement comes with certain limitations. Firstly, the use of the plane wave-based analysis used to extract the nonlinear parameter, ?, ignores the effects of diffraction, attenuation and receiver averaging which are common to most experiments, and may therefore limit the accuracy of a measurement. Secondly, the method usually requires data obtained from a through-transmission type setup, which may not be practical in a field measurement scenario where access to the component is limited. Thirdly, the technique lacks a means of pinpointing areas of damage in a component, as the measured nonlinearity represents an average over the length of signal propagation. Here we describe a three-dimensional model of harmonic generation in a sound beam, which is intended to provide a more realistic representation of a typical experiment. The presence of a reflecting boundary is then incorporated into the model to assess the feasibility of performing single-sided measurements. Experimental validation is provided where possible. Finally, a focusing acoustic source is modelled to provide a theoretical indication of the afforded advantages when the nonlinearity is localized.

  17. New PVLAS model independent limit for the axion coupling to $??$ for axion masses above 1meV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Della Valle; A. Ejlli; U. Gastaldi; G. Messineo; E. Milotti; R. Pengo; L. Piemontese; G. Ruoso; G. Zavattini

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    During 2014 the PVLAS experiment has started data taking with a new apparatus installed at the INFN Section of Ferrara, Italy. The main target of the experiment is the observation of magnetic birefringence of vacuum. According to QED, the ellipticity generated by the magnetic birefringence of vacuum in the experimental apparatus is expected to be $\\psi^{\\rm(QED)} \\approx 5\\times10^{-11}$. No ellipticity signal is present so far with a noise floor $\\psi^{\\rm(noise)} \\approx 2.5\\times10^{-9}$ after 210 hours of data taking. The resulting ellipticity limit provides the best model independent upper limit on the coupling of axions to $\\gamma\\gamma$ for axion masses above $10^{-3}$eV.

  18. Karnataka Power Corporation Limited and National Thermal Power...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Limited and National Thermal Power Corporation JV Jump to: navigation, search Name: Karnataka Power Corporation Limited and National Thermal Power Corporation JV Place: India...

  19. Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell Lifetime Limitations: The Role...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electrolyte Fuel Cell Lifetime Limitations: The Role of Electrocatalyst Degradation Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell Lifetime Limitations: The Role of Electrocatalyst Degradation...

  20. (Expired) Nationwide Limited Public Interest Waiver for LED Lighting...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    (Expired) Nationwide Limited Public Interest Waiver for LED Lighting and HVAC Units: February 11, 2010 (Expired) Nationwide Limited Public Interest Waiver for LED Lighting and HVAC...

  1. Thickness dependent self limiting 1-D tin oxide nanowire arrays...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    dependent self limiting 1-D tin oxide nanowire arrays by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation. Thickness dependent self limiting 1-D tin oxide nanowire arrays by nanosecond pulsed...

  2. Limiter H-mode experiments on TFTR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bush, C.E. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Bretz, N.L.; Fredrickson, E.D.; McGuire, K.M.; Nazikian, R.; Park, H.K.; Schivell, J.; Taylor, G.; Bitter, M.; Budny, R.; Cohen, S.A.; Kilpatrick, S.J.; LeBlanc, B.; Manos, D.M.; Meade, D.; Paul, S.F.; Scott, S.D.; Stratton, B.C.; Synakowski, E.J.; Towner, H.H.; Wieland, R.M.; Arunasalam, V.; Bateman, G.; Bell, M.G.; Bell, R.; Boivin, R.; Cavallo, A.; Cheng, C.Z.; Chu, T.K.; Co

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Limiter H-modes with centrally peaked density profiles have been obtained in TFTR using a highly conditioned graphite limiter. The transition to these centrally peaked H-modes takes place from the supershot to the H-mode rather than the usual L- to H-mode transition observed on other tokamaks. Bidirectional beam heating is required to induce the transition. Density peaking factors, n{sub e}(0)/, greater than 2.3 are obtained and at the same time the H-mode characteristics are similar to those of limiter H-modes on other tokamaks, while the global confinement, {tau}{sub E}, can be >2.5 times L-mode scaling. The transport analysis of the data shows that transport in these H-modes is similar to that of supershots within the inner 0.6 m core of the plasma, but the stored electron energy (calculated using measured values of T{sub e} and n{sub e}) is higher for the H-mode at the plasma edge. Microwave scattering data for the edge plasma shows broad spectra at k = 5.5 cm{sup {minus}1} which begin at the drop in D{sub {alpha}} radiation and are strongly shifted in the electron diamagnetic drift direction. At the same time, beam emission spectroscopy (BES) shows a coherent mode near the boundary which propagates in the ion direction with m = 15--20 at 20--30 kHz. During the ELM event these apparent rotations cease and Mirnov fluctuations in the frequency range of 50--500 kHz increase in intensity. 16 refs., 8 figs.

  3. New Limits for the Violation of the Equivalence Principle in the Solar-Reactor Neutrino Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valdiviesso, G do A; De Holanda, P C

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A model for the violation of the equivalence principle (VEP) on solar and reactor neutrinos is investigated. New limits for the VEP are obtained considering the mass-flavor mixing hypothesis and the VEP model. Our analysis shows two solutions were the VEP effects practically don't change the solar sector. In a first case, the mass scale of the reactor sector remains the same and in a second situation this scale falls slightly, becoming closer to the solar solution without VEP. The combined solution points to the following set of parameters: a ``higher VEP'' $|\\phi\\Delta\\gamma|=9,12^{+0,97}_{-0,78}\\times10^{-21}$, $\\tan^2\\theta=0,478^{+0,040}_{-0,038}$ and $\\Delta m^2=6,63\\pm0,31\\times10^{-5} eV^2$ ($77,7%$ C.L.) and a ``lower VEP'' $|\\phi\\Delta\\gamma|=1,91^{+0,84}_{-0,61}\\times10^{-21}$, $\\tan^2\\theta=0,478^{+0,040}_{-0,038}$ e $\\Delta m^2=7,73^{+0,17}_{-0,20}\\times10^{-5} eV^2$ ($77,7%$ C.L.). Both solutions have increased confidence level when compared with the MSW solution ($\\tan^2\\theta=0,462^{+0,043}_{-0...

  4. The application of cooperative monitoring techniques to a conceptual limited deployment zone in the Korean peninsula

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vannoni, M.; Duggan, R.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Korean peninsula is the site of a tense military confrontation. Relations between North and South Korea improved during the early 1990`s but the process is now frozen. Confidence building measures, particularly military ones, that address the security needs of both countries would decrease the danger of conflict and help create an environment for direct negotiations. The Korean Institute for Defense Analysis (KIDA) analyzed current security conditions and options. Their scenario includes a conceptual agreement to establish Limited Force Deployment Zones (LDZ) along the current demilitarized zone (DMZ) to increase mutual security. The Cooperative Monitoring Center (CMC) of Sandia National Laboratories, in collaboration with KIDA, developed a strategy, with examples, for cooperatively monitoring the agreement. A cooperative monitoring regime requires consideration of the agreement`s terms, the geographic, logistic, military, and political factors of the Korean environment, and the capability of technology to monitor the terms. This paper assesses the applicability of cooperative monitoring to Korea, describes the monitoring strategy for the Korean enhanced DMZ scenario, and describes the applicable technologies and procedures.

  5. Improving simulations of the upper-ocean by inclusion of4 surface waves in the Mellor-Yamada turbulence scheme5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ezer,Tal

    kinetic energy and mixing of the upper ocean33 via wave breaking and non-breaking wave35 upper-ocean thermal structure are examined and compared with each other using36 one. The behaviors of the Mellor-Yamada39 scheme, as well as the simulated upper-ocean thermal structure

  6. Unitary limit in cross Andreev transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. A. Sadovskyy; G. B. Lesovik; V. M. Vinokur

    2014-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Crossed Andreev reflection (CAR) in which Cooper pair splits into two spin- and energy entangled electrons that leave a superconductor through respective spatially separated leads is one of the most promising approaches to generating pairs of entangled electrons. However, while the conventional (local) Andreev reflection occurs with the probability of unity, the probability of CAR is significantly suppressed. Here we propose a hybrid normal metal-superconductor setup that enables achieving a unitary limit of cross Andreev transport, i.e. CAR with the probability of unity thus offering the outcome of the entangled electrons with the 100% efficiency.

  7. Torque limited drive for manual valves

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elliott, Philip G. (Metropolis, IL); Underwood, Daniel E. (Paducah, KY)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a torque-limiting handwheel device for preventing manual valves from being damaged due to the application of excessive torque during the opening or closing operation of the valves. Torque can only be applied when ridges in the handwheel assembly engage in channels machined in the face of the baseplate. The amount of torque required for disengagement of the ridges from the channels is determined by the force exerted by various Bellville springs and the inclination of the side faces of the channels.

  8. Radiation from charges in the continuum limit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ianconescu, Reuven [Shenkar College of Engineering and Design, Ramat Gan 52526 (Israel)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    It is known that an accelerating charge radiates according to Larmor formula. On the other hand, any DC current following a curvilinear path, consists of accelerating charges, but in such case the radiated power is 0. The scope of this paper is to analyze and quantify how a system of charges goes from a radiating state to a non radiating state when the charges distribution goes to the continuum limit. Understanding this is important from the theoretical point of view and the results of this work are applicable to particle accelerator, cyclotron and other high energy devices.

  9. Transcending the Limits of Turing Computability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vadim A. Adamyan; Cristian S. Calude; Boris S. Pavlov

    2003-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Hypercomputation or super-Turing computation is a ``computation'' that transcends the limit imposed by Turing's model of computability. The field still faces some basic questions, technical (can we mathematically and/or physically build a hypercomputer?), cognitive (can hypercomputers realize the AI dream?), philosophical (is thinking more than computing?). The aim of this paper is to address the question: can we mathematically build a hypercomputer? We will discuss the solutions of the Infinite Merchant Problem, a decision problem equivalent to the Halting Problem, based on results obtained in \\cite{Coins,acp}. The accent will be on the new computational technique and results rather than formal proofs.

  10. Caldyne Automatics Limited | Open Energy Information

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  11. Eskom Holdings Limited | Open Energy Information

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  12. QuantaSol Limited | Open Energy Information

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  13. Defining engine efficiency limits | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197 This workDayton:| Department ofengine efficiency limits

  14. Perfectenergy International Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroupPerfectenergy International Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name:

  15. Nufcor International Limited Nufcor | Open Energy Information

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  16. United Biofuels Private Limited | Open Energy Information

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  17. Greenrock Energy Services Limited | Open Energy Information

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  18. IT Power Limited | Open Energy Information

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  19. ITI Energy Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  20. Reservoir characterization of the upper Merecure and lower Oficina Formations sands in the Leona Este Field, Eastern Venezuela Basin 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flores Millan, Maria Carolina

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The "S5", "T" and "U1" sands, traditionally described as part of the lower section of the "Oficina" Formation, and the "U2" sand, as part of the upper interval of the "Merecure" Formation, contain the largest oil remaining ...