National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for upland surface soil

  1. Surface Soil

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Surface Soil Surface Soil We compare local soil samples with samples collected from northern New Mexico locations that are beyond the range of potential influence from normal...

  2. Twenty-Three-Year Changes in Upland and Bottomland Forest Soils of Central Illinois

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David, Mark B.

    Twenty-Three-Year Changes in Upland and Bottomland Forest Soils of Central Illinois Jenwei Tsai, Mark B. David, and Robert G. Darmody Abstract: Soil formation is a complex process that varies

  3. Methane emissions from upland forest soils and vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Megonigal, ABB

    2008-01-01

    Crill. 2006. A source of methane from upland forests in thecontrolling atmospheric methane con- sumption by temperateand T.B. Parkin. 2001. Methane oxidation and produc- tion

  4. Soil protozoa--An intensive study of population dynamics and community structure in an upland grassland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soil protozoa--An intensive study of population dynamics and community structure in an upland intensive investigation of soil protozoan diversity sponsored by the Natural Environment Research Council within the context of the fractal character of the soil. We developed methods for estimating

  5. Surface Soil

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired Solar Fuel Production 1: TotalofSupplySurface Soil Surface Soil We

  6. Major Nitrogen Loss Pathways in Upland Blueberry Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vano, Imre

    2009-01-01

    1), SC- Soil + sawdust sewage sludge compost (1:1) with 5 gN contents derived from sewage sludge, which resulted in

  7. EVALUATION OF ENHANCED VOC REMOVAL WITH SOIL FRACTURING IN THE SRS UPLAND UNIT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riha, B

    2005-10-31

    The Environmental Restoration Technology Section (ERTS) of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) conducted pilot scale testing to evaluate the effectiveness of using hydraulic fracturing as a means to improve soil vapor extraction (SVE) system performance. Laboratory and field research has shown that significant amounts of solvents can be entrapped in low permeability zones by capillary forces and removal by SVE can be severely limited due to low flow rates, mass transfer resistance of the hydrophobic compounds by trapped interparticle water, and diffusion resistance. Introducing sand-filled fractures into these tight zones improves the performance of SVE by (1) increasing the overall permeability of the formation and thereby increasing SVE flow rates, (2) shortening diffusion pathways, and (3) increasing air permeability by improving pore water removal. The synergistic effect of the fracture well completion methods, fracture and flow geometry, and pore water removal appears to increase the rate of solvent mass removal over that of increasing flow rate alone. A field test was conducted where a conventional well in the SRS Upland Unit was tested before and after hydraulic fracturing. ERTS teamed with Clemson University through the South Carolina University and Education Foundation (SCUREF) program utilizing their expertise in fracturing and fracture modeling. The goals of the fracturing pilot testing were to evaluate the following: (1) The effect of hydraulic fractures on the performance of a conventional well. This was the most reliable way to remove the effects of spatial variations in permeability and contaminant distribution on relative well performance. It also provided data on the option of improving the performance of existing wells using hydraulic fractures. (2) The relative performance of a conventional SVE well and isolated hydraulic fractures. This was the most reliable indicator of the performance of hydraulic fractures that could be created in a full-scale implementation. The SVE well, monitoring point arrays and four fracturing wells were installed and the well testing has been completed. Four fractures were successfully created the week of July 25, 2005. The fractures were created in an open area at the bottom of steel well casing by using a water jet to create a notch in the soil and then injecting a guar-sand slurry into the formation. The sand-filled fractures increase the effective air permeability of the subsurface formation diffusion path lengths for contaminant removal. The primary metrics for evaluation were an increase in SVE flow rates in the zone of contamination and an increase in the zone of influence. Sufficient testing has been performed to show that fracturing in the Upland Unit accelerates SVE solvent remediation and fracturing can increase flow rates in the Upland Unit by at least one order of magnitude.

  8. Farmers' knowledge of soils in relation to cropping practices: A case study of farmers in upland rice based slash-and-burn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Kessel, Chris

    Farmers' knowledge of soils in relation to cropping practices: A case study of farmers in upland Understanding indigenous knowledge of soils has come to be seen as essential in understanding the local in relation to soil quality and cropping practices. Most farmers interviewed distinguished two or more soils

  9. Paleoenvironmental reconstruction of the Brady Soil in the Nebraska loess uplands using biosilicate and bioturbation analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woodburn, Terri Lee

    2014-12-31

    This dissertation takes a multiple-proxy approach to a paleoenvironmental reconstruction of the Holocene--Pleistocene Transition represented by the Brady Soil in the central Great Plains. To better understand this dynamic time of climate change...

  10. Artificial Soiling of Photovoltaic Module Surfaces using Traceable Soil Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Artificial Soiling of Photovoltaic Module Surfaces using Traceable Soil Components Patrick D@sandia.gov Abstract--Effective evaluation and prediction of photovoltaic performance loss due to soiling requires types. I. INTRODUCTION Soiling is a significant source of energy loss in photovoltaic (PV) systems [1

  11. The Soils of Bowie, Denton, Freestone, and Red River Counties. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1928-01-01

    in the next column. This is 18 to 24 bushels the first crop. The yields fall off rapidly in succeeding crops, shom- ing the importance of nitrogen. Classification of Soils of Bowie County Upland soils of the forested area: Non-calcareous, gray to brownish...-calcareous, gray to brownish-gray surface soil, ycl upper subsoil, red lower subsoil. Crowley silt loam.-Upland soil of the original forested area n calcareous with dark gray to brown surface soil and heavy mottled g and brown subsoil. Leaf very fine sandy...

  12. The effect of soil hydraulic properties vs. soil texture in land surface models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Small, Eric

    The effect of soil hydraulic properties vs. soil texture in land surface models E. D. Gutmann and E and difficulties in scaling existing data. In particular, the spatial distribution of Soil Hydraulic Properties to determine SHPs. Citation: Gutmann, E. D., and E. E. Small (2005), The effect of soil hydraulic properties vs

  13. Reorganization of vegetation, hydrology and soil carbon after permafrost degradation across heterogeneous boreal landscapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuang, Qianlai

    of Land Resources and Environmental Sciences, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717, USA 7 on thick ice-rich peat deposits over reworked lowland loess. In rocky uplands, after fire permafrost thawed thermokarst bogs and flooding of soils, and surface soils accumulated new bog peat. We were not able to detect

  14. Sensitivity of Mesoscale Surface Dynamics to Surface Soil and Vegetation Contrasts over the Carolina Sandhills

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raman, Sethu

    Sensitivity of Mesoscale Surface Dynamics to Surface Soil and Vegetation Contrasts over in mesoscale summertime precipitation over this region. Numerical simulations are analyzed to investigate the relationships between mesoscale surface dynamics and the transition from clay to sandy soils over this region

  15. Soil CO2 production and surface flux at four climate observatories in eastern Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beltrami, Hugo

    Soil CO2 production and surface flux at four climate observatories in eastern Canada David Risk December 2002. [1] Soils constitute the largest terrestrial source of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere the climatic controls on soil respiration. We use subsurface CO2 concentrations, surface CO2 flux and detailed

  16. Time Domain Reflectometry Surface Reflections for Dielectric Constant in Highly Conductive Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowack, Robert L.

    Time Domain Reflectometry Surface Reflections for Dielectric Constant in Highly Conductive Soils reflectometry TDR mea- surement in highly conductive soils. It makes use of information contained in the TDR signal from the reflection at the surface of the soil rather than the reflection from the end

  17. Soil and Water Science Department University of Florida Background concentrations of trace metals in Florida surface soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    locations, will be analyzed using a SAS statistical program (SAS, 1987). GIS softwares Arc/Info and Arc View surface soils is critical for evaluating land application of non-hazardous waste materials. Concentrations

  18. Impact of Hillslope-Scale Organization of Topography, Soil Moisture, Soil Temperature, and Vegetation on Modeling Surface Microwave Radiation Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flores, Alejandro N.

    Microwave radiometry will emerge as an important tool for global remote sensing of near-surface soil moisture in the coming decade. In this modeling study, we find that hillslope-scale topography (tens of meters) influences ...

  19. Soil surface properties in Mediterranean mountain ecosystems: Effects of environmental factors and implications of management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrera, Carlos M.

    Soil surface properties in Mediterranean mountain ecosystems: Effects of environmental factors and implications of management C. Oyonarte a,*, V. Aranda b , P. Durante a a Department of Soil Science, CITE II; received in revised form 23 July 2007; accepted 31 July 2007 Abstract Understanding soil processes

  20. Effects of PV Module Soiling on Glass Surface Resistance and Potential-Induced Degradation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hacke, Peter; Button, Patrick; Hendrickson, Alex; Spataru, Sergiu; Glick, Stephen

    2015-06-14

    The goals of the project were: Determine applicability of transmission line method (TLM) to evaluate sheet resistance of soils on module glass;
    Evaluate various soils on glass for changes in surface resistance and their ability to promote potential-induced degradation with humidity (PID);
    Evaluate PID characteristics, rate, and leakage current increases on full-size mc-Si modules associated with a conductive soil on the surface.

  1. COMPARISON OF LEAD CONCENTRATION IN SURFACE SOIL BY INDUCTED COUPLED PLASMA/OPTICAL EMISSION SPECTROMETRY AND X-RAY FLUORESCENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    COMPARISON OF LEAD CONCENTRATION IN SURFACE SOIL BY INDUCTED COUPLED PLASMA/OPTICAL EMISSION-en-Halatte, France roseline.bonnard@ineris.fr) Keywords : soil lead concentration, soil samples, in situ measurements, X-ray fluorescence, ICP/OES ABSTRACT The lead concentration in the surface soil of a French village

  2. Bench terracing in the Kerinci uplands of Sumatra, Indonesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belsky, Jill M.

    Bench terracing in the Kerinci uplands of Sumatra, Indonesia ABSTRACF: Bench terracing's effect farmers views and use of bench terraces were evaluated in the Kerinci uplands of Sumatra , Indonesia

  3. Accumulation of surface-applied agricultural limestone in acid soils of east Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Earl Raymond

    1987-01-01

    limestone sample, the lime dealer who supplied the sample, and its source is found in Appendix A. Analyses of Agricultural t, imestone Analyses performed on each sample of agricultural limestone includea: total dissolution analysis, x-ray diffraction... in the surface of limed soils than in the surface of unlimed soils, and a greater proportion of exchange sites were occupied by Ca2+ in the surface of limed soils than in the subsurface. Aluminum saturation was high enough in the subsoil of some sites...

  4. Relation of soil-, surface-, and ground-water distributions of inorganic nitrogen with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macdonald, Ellen

    Relation of soil-, surface-, and ground-water distributions of inorganic nitrogen with topographic position in harvested and unharvested portions of an aspen-dominated catchment in the Boreal Plain M.L. Macrae, K.J. Devito, I.F. Creed, and S.E. Macdonald Abstract: Spatial distributions of soil extractable

  5. Vegetation, soils, and surface hydrology of playa landforms in the Rio Grande Plains, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farley, Andrea Lee

    2000-01-01

    Playas in the Rio Grande Plains of southern Texas were compared with respect to their: 1) size, shape, soil properties, and microtopography, 2) vegetation composition and structure, 3) surface water accumulation potential, and 4) disturbance history...

  6. Field measurements of ammonia volatilization from surface applications of nitrogen fertilizers to a calcareous soil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hargrove, W. L

    1977-01-01

    , according to Mortland (1958), ". . . the conflicting nature of the data on losses of ammonia from soils. . . does not necessarily represent in- consistency but arises from the multitude of variables affecting ammonia sorption. Variations in techniques...FIELD MEASUREMENTS OF AMMONIA VOLATILIZATION FROM SURFACE APPLICATIONS OF NITROGEN FERTILIZERS TO A CALCAREOUS SOIL A Thesis by WILLIAM LEONARD HARGROVE, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in Partial fulfillment...

  7. Ammonia volatilization from soils with surface rice straw residue 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barghassa, Peyam

    1995-01-01

    rice straw vs. no straw, (NH4)2SO4 VS-urea, surface broadcast vs. deep placement of N, immediate flooding vs. delayed flooding. The treatments in the field consisted of all possible combinations of the following variables: surface rice straw vs...

  8. Topology of Roscoe's- and Hvorslev's- Surfaces in the Phase Space of Soil Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Evesque

    2005-06-14

    In general, the evolution of soil submitted to simple stress-strain paths is characterized using the 3d phase space (v,p',q) i.e. (specific volume, mean intergranular pressure, deviatoric stress); one finds that all trajectories end up at a line of attracting point called the critical-state line. The surface of Roscoe (Hvorslev) is defined as the surface made of the last part of the set of trajectories ending to a given critical point and coming from all states of normally consolidated soils (from all states of over consolidated soils). It is demonstrated that these two sets are part of the same surface, which is confirmed by experimental data.

  9. The jamming surface of granular matter determined from soil mechanics results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Evesque

    2005-06-17

    Classical soil mechanics results are used to propose the equation of the jamming transition surface in the (stress, specific volume) space. Taking axis-ymmetric conditions, labelling q the deviatoric stress and p' the mean pressure applied on the granular skeleton, and considering normal range of pressure (10 kPa-10MPa) the equation of the surface of jamming transition is v = vo-m ln(p'/p'o)+ md ln(1+q q/(M' M' p' p')); M' is related to the friction angle, m and md are two constants which depend on soil characteristics; p'o is a "unit" pressure.

  10. Water Infiltration and Permeability of Selected Urban Soils as Affected by Salinity and Sodicity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miyamoto, S.

    2012-10-05

    into two alluvial soils (Torrifluvents), and two upland soils (Paleorthid and Calciorthid, Aridisols) placed in greenhouse pots. For the first experiment, irrigation solutions simulating the Rio Grande water, city potable water, and two sources of reclaimed...

  11. Soil Iodine Determination in Deccan Syneclise, India: Implications for Near Surface Geochemical Hydrocarbon Prospecting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mani, Devleena; Kumar, T. Satish; Rasheed, M. A.; Patil, D. J.; Dayal, A. M.; Rao, T. Gnaneshwar; Balaram, V.

    2011-03-15

    The association of iodine with organic matter in sedimentary basins is well documented. High iodine concentration in soils overlying oil and gas fields and areas with hydrocarbon microseepage has been observed and used as a geochemical exploratory tool for hydrocarbons in a few studies. In this study, we measure iodine concentration in soil samples collected from parts of Deccan Syneclise in the west central India to investigate its potential application as a geochemical indicator for hydrocarbons. The Deccan Syneclise consists of rifted depositional sites with Gondwana-Mesozoic sediments up to 3.5 km concealed under the Deccan Traps and is considered prospective for hydrocarbons. The concentration of iodine in soil samples is determined using ICP-MS and the values range between 1.1 and 19.3 ppm. High iodine values are characteristic of the northern part of the sampled region. The total organic carbon (TOC) content of the soil samples range between 0.1 and 1.3%. The TOC correlates poorly with the soil iodine (r{sup 2} < 1), indicating a lack of association of iodine with the surficial organic matter and the possibility of interaction between the seeping hydrocarbons and soil iodine. Further, the distribution pattern of iodine compares well with two surface geochemical indicators: the adsorbed light gaseous hydrocarbons (methane through butane) and the propane-oxidizing bacterial populations in the soil. The integration of geochemical observations show the occurrence of elevated values in the northern part of the study area, which is also coincident with the presence of exposed dyke swarms that probably serve as conduits for hydrocarbon microseepage. The corroboration of iodine with existing geological, geophysical, and geochemical data suggests its efficacy as one of the potential tool in surface geochemical exploration of hydrocarbons. Our study supports Deccan Syneclise to be promising in terms of its hydrocarbon prospects.

  12. Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils (Phase II) Field Sampling Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. L. Schwendiman

    2006-07-27

    This Field Sampling Plan describes the Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils, Phase II remediation field sampling activities to be performed at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center located within the Idaho National Laboratory Site. Sampling activities described in this plan support characterization sampling of new sites, real-time soil spectroscopy during excavation, and confirmation sampling that verifies that the remedial action objectives and remediation goals presented in the Final Record of Decision for Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Operable Unit 3-13 have been met.

  13. Sorption of organic carbon compounds to the fine fraction of surface and Subsurface Soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jagadamma, Sindhu [ORNL; Mayes, Melanie [ORNL; Zinn, Yuri [Federal University of Lavras, Brazil; Gisladottir, Gudrun [University of Iceland; Ann, Russell [Iowa State University

    2014-01-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) transported from the soil surface is stabilized in deeper soil profiles by physicochemical sorption processes. However, it is unclear how different forms of organic carbon (OC) compounds common in soil organic matter interact with soil minerals in the surface (A) and subsurface (B) horizons. We added four compounds (glucose, starch, cinnamic acid and stearic acid) to the silt- and clay-sized fraction (fine fraction) of A and B horizons of eight soils from varying climates (3 temperate, 3 tropical, 1 arctic and 1 sub-arctic). Equilibriumbatch experiments were conducted using 0 to 100 mg C L 1 of 14C-labeled compounds for 8 h. Sorption parameters (maximum sorption capacity, Qmax and binding coefficient, k) calculated by fitting sorption data to the Langmuir equation showed that Qmax of A and B horizons was very similar for all compounds. Both Qmax and k values were related to sorbate properties, with Qmax being lowest for glucose (20 500 mg kg 1), highest for stearic acid (20,000 200,000 mg kg 1), and intermediate for both cinnamic acid (200 4000 mg kg 1) and starch (400 6000 mg kg 1). Simple linear regression analysis revealed that physicochemical properties of the sorbents influenced the Qmax of cinnamic acid and stearic acid, but not glucose and starch. The sorbent properties did not show predictive ability for binding coefficient k. By using the fine fraction as sorbent, we found that the mineral fractions of A horizons are equally reactive as the B horizons irrespective of soil organic carbon content.

  14. Experimental observation of signature changes in bulk soil electrical conductivity in response to engineered surface CO2 leakage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou X.; Wielopolski L.; Lakkaraju, V. R.; Apple, M.; Dobeck, L. M.; Gullickson, K.; Shaw, J. A.; Cunningham, A. B.; Spangler, L. H.

    2012-03-01

    Experimental observations of signature changes of bulk soil electrical conductivity (EC) due to CO{sub 2} leakage were carried out at a field site at Bozeman, Montana, to investigate the change of soil geophysical properties in response to possible leakage of geologically sequestered CO{sub 2}. The dynamic evolution of bulk soil EC was measured during an engineered surface leakage of CO{sub 2} through in situ continuous monitoring of bulk soil EC, soil moisture, soil temperature, rainfall rate, and soil CO{sub 2} concentration to investigate the response of soil bulk EC signature to CO{sub 2} leakage. Observations show that: (1) high soil CO{sub 2} concentration due to CO{sub 2} leakage enhances the dependence of bulk soil EC on soil moisture. The bulk soil EC is a linear multivariate function of soil moisture and soil temperature, the coefficient for soil moisture increased from 2.111 dS for the non-leaking phase to 4.589 dS for the CO{sub 2} leaking phase; and the coefficient for temperature increased from 0.003 dS/C for the non-leaking phase to 0.008 dS/C for the CO{sub 2} leaking phase. The dependence of bulk soil EC on soil temperature is generally weak, but leaked CO{sub 2} enhances the dependence, (2) after the CO{sub 2} release, the relationship between soil bulk EC and soil CO{sub 2} concentration observes three distinct CO{sub 2} decay modes. Rainfall events result in sudden changes of soil moisture and are believed to be the driving forcing for these decay modes, and (3) within each mode, increasing soil CO{sub 2} concentration results in higher bulk soil EC. Comparing the first 2 decay modes, it is found that the dependence of soil EC on soil CO{sub 2} concentration is weaker for the first decay mode than the second decay mode.

  15. Active cooling-based surface confinement system for thermal soil treatment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aines, R.D.; Newmark, R.L.

    1997-10-28

    A thermal barrier is disclosed for surface confinement with active cooling to control subsurface pressures during thermal remediation of shallow (5-20 feet) underground contaminants. If steam injection is used for underground heating, the actively cooled thermal barrier allows the steam to be injected into soil at pressures much higher (20-60 psi) than the confining strength of the soil, while preventing steam breakthrough. The rising steam is condensed to liquid water at the thermal barrier-ground surface interface. The rapid temperature drop forced by the thermal barrier drops the subsurface pressure to below atmospheric pressure. The steam and contaminant vapors are contained by the thermal blanket, which can be made of a variety of materials such as steel plates, concrete slabs, membranes, fabric bags, or rubber bladders. 1 fig.

  16. Active cooling-based surface confinement system for thermal soil treatment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aines, Roger D. (Livermore, CA); Newmark, Robin L. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1997-01-01

    A thermal barrier is disclosed for surface confinement with active cooling to control subsurface pressures during thermal remediation of shallow (5-20 feet) underground contaminants. If steam injection is used for underground heating, the actively cooled thermal barrier allows the steam to be injected into soil at pressures much higher (20-60 psi) than the confining strength of the soil, while preventing steam breakthrough. The rising steam is condensed to liquid water at the thermal barrier-ground surface interface. The rapid temperature drop forced by the thermal barrier drops the subsurface pressure to below atmospheric pressure. The steam and contaminant vapors are contained by the thermal blanket, which can be made of a variety of materials such as steel plates, concrete slabs, membranes, fabric bags, or rubber bladders.

  17. The effect of stratigraphy and soil plasticity on the settlement characteristics of reclaimed surface mined land 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rangel, Jorge Enrique

    1979-01-01

    of the manuscript I am grateful to my fellow graduate students who worked with me in this thesis: I thank Richard M. Pollard for his skillful operation of the Scanning Electron microscope whicn produced optimum microphotographs very important...THE EFFECT OF STRATIGRAPHY AND SOIL PLASTICITY ON THE SETTLEMENT CHARACTERISTICS OF FECLAIMED SURFACE MINED I~D A Thesis GORGE ENRIQUE RANGEL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the regni ement...

  18. Major Nitrogen Loss Pathways in Upland Blueberry Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vano, Imre

    2009-01-01

    sawdust sewage sludge compost (1:1) with 5 g ferrous sulfategas relations, the sawdust compost amended treatment has theprecipitation (? SC-Sawdust Compost; ? PM-Peat Moss; ?SO-

  19. Impacts of livestock in regenerating upland birch woodlands in Scotland 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollock, Meg L; Milner, J M; Waterhouse, A; Holland, J P; Legg, Colin

    2005-01-01

    Including large herbivores in wooded areas is often seen as a useful conservation tool. Browsing intensities on saplings in seven upland birch woodlands grazed by sheep, cattle and wild herbivores were studied. The aims ...

  20. Understanding Spatio-Temporal Variability and Associated Physical Controls of Near-Surface Soil Moisture in Different Hydro-Climates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, Champa

    2013-05-06

    Near-surface soil moisture is a key state variable of the hydrologic cycle and plays a significant role in the global water and energy balance by affecting several hydrological, ecological, meteorological, geomorphologic, ...

  1. Effect of soil erosion on the long-term stability of FUSRAP near-surface waste-burial sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knight, M.J.

    1983-04-01

    Decontamination of FUSRAP sites could result in the generation of large volumes (in excess of 400,000 m/sup 3/) of low-activity radioactive wastes (primarily contaminated soil and building materials) requiring subsequent disposal. It is likely that near-surface burial will be seriously considered as an option for disposal of these materials. A number of factors - including soil erosion - could adversely affect the long-term stability of a near-surface waste-burial site. The majority of FUSRAP sites are located in the humid eastern United States, where the principal cause of erosion is the action of water. This report examines the effect of soil erosion by water on burial-site stability based on analysis of four hypothetical near-surface burial sites. The Universal Soil Loss Equation was employed to estimate average annual soil loss from burial sites and the 1000-year effects of soil loss on the soil barrier (burial trench cap) placed over low-activity wastes. Results suggest that the land use of the burial site and the slope gradient of the burial trench cap significantly affect the rate of soil erosion. The development of measures limiting the potential land use of a burial site (e.g., mixing large rocks into the burial trench cap) may be required to preserve the integrity of a burial trench for long periods of time.

  2. Effects of PV Module Soiling on Glass Surface Resistance and Potential-Induced Degradation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hacke, Peter; Burton, Patrick; Hendrickson, Alex; Spartaru, Sergiu; Glick, Stephen; Terwilliger, Kent

    2015-12-03

    The sheet resistance of three soil types (Arizona road dust, soot, and sea salt) on glass were measured by the transmission line method as a function of relative humidity (RH) between 39% and 95% at 60 degrees C. Sea salt yielded a 3.5 order of magnitude decrease in resistance on the glass surface when the RH was increased over this RH range. Arizona road dust showed reduced sheet resistance at lower RH, but with less humidity sensitivity over the range tested. The soot sample did not show significant resistivity change compared to the unsoiled control. Photovoltaic modules with sea salt on their faces were step-stressed between 25% and 95% RH at 60 degrees C applying -1000 V bias to the active cell circuit. Leakage current from the cell circuit to ground ranged between two and ten times higher than that of the unsoiled controls. Degradation rate of modules with salt on the surface increased with increasing RH and time.

  3. Determination of thorium, uranium, and potassium elemental concentrations in surface soils in Cyprus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michalis Tzortzis; Haralabos Tsertos

    2004-03-15

    A comprehensive study was conducted to determine thorium, uranium and potassium elemental concentrations in surface soils throughout the accessible area of Cyprus using high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry. A total of 115 soil samples was collected from all over the bedrock surface of the island based on the different lithological units of the study area. The soil samples were sieved through a fine mesh, sealed in 1000-mL plastic Marinelli beakers, and measured in the laboratory in terms of their gamma radioactivity for a counting time of 18 hours each. From the measured gamma-ray spectra, elemental concentrations were determined for thorium (range from 2.5x10^-3 to 9.8 micro g g-1), uranium (from 8.1x10^-4 to 3.2 micro g g-1) and potassium (from 1.3x10^-4 to 1.9 %). The Arithmetic mean values (A.M. +- S.D.) calculated are (1.2 +- 1.7) micro g g-1, (0.6 +- 0.7) micro g g-1, and (0.4 +- 0.3) %, for thorium, uranium and potassium, respectively, which are by a factor of three to six lower than the world average values of 7.4 micro g g-1 (Th), 2.8 micro g g-1 (U) and 1.3 % (K) derived from all data available worldwide. The best-fitting relation between the concentrations of Th and K versus U, and also of K versus Th, is essentially of linear type with a correlation coefficient of 0.93, 0.84, and 0.90, respectively. The Th/U, K/U, and K/Th ratios (slopes) calculated are equal to 2.0, 2.8x10^3,and 1.4x10^3, respectively.

  4. Diurnal activity of soil surface arthropods in agroecosystems: design for an inexpensive time-sorting pitfall trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blumberg, A.Y.; Crossley, D.A. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The design for an inexpensive time-sorting pitfall trap is presented. The basis of the mechanism is a rotary stepping solenoid powered by lantern batteries. Traps were utilized to sample soil surface arthropods at two hour intervals for five 24 hr periods in 1983. One trap each was placed in conventional tillage (CT) and no-tillage (NT) agroecosystems. Soil arthropod surface activity was greatest in CT on 9 July during the dawn and dusk periods but the data did not indicate other dominant trends. Activity in NT was greatest during dusk on 27 June, but again no other dominant trends were evident. When CT and NT are combined over the sample dates, surface soil arthropod activity peaked during dusk, with a smaller activity peak at dawn. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  5. The effect of reducing the surface tension of water upon certain physical characteristics of soils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kadry, Louay T

    1952-01-01

    Colloid Cheet- istry", J. Alexander, Vol. 3, Chats. Cat, pp, 41. 3, Batterp L. D, 1938 Soil Partwtability as related to noncapillary porosity. Proc. S, S. S. A. 3t52-6. 4. 1949 Practical values frets physioal analysis of soils. Soil Sci ~ 8 68tl 13. 5... soil stueples. Soil Soi. ~ 58 t337-53. 12. Hardy, P. 1925 Percolation in colloidal soils, Jour. of Agri ~ soi F 8 15t434-43 ' 13. Benin, S. 1943 Inhibition of various liquids and resistance to d1spersion of soils. Gonpt, Rendus 217 t528-80. 1...

  6. Soils of Henderson, Hidalgo, Milam, Nacogdoches, Navarro, Wichita, Willacy and Victoria Counties. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1933-01-01

    cent, and with Norfolk fine sandy loam on 7.0 per cent. The upland soils of the East Texas Timber Country with friable subsoils include the Norfolk, Greenville, Portsmouth, Ruston, Kirvin, and Bowie series. The upland soils with heavy subsoils... sandy loam Ochlockonee silty clay loam Ochlockonee silty clay loam Ochlockonee very fine sandy loam ---.---...-..----. Ochlockonee very fine sandy loam .... Orangeburg fine sandy loam Orangeburg fine sandy loam Peat Peat -.......- Portsmouth...

  7. Harmonic propagation of variability in surface energy balance within a coupled soil-vegetation-atmosphere system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gentine, P.

    [1] The response of a soil-vegetation-atmosphere continuum model to incoming radiation forcing is investigated in order to gain insights into the coupling of soil and atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) states and fluxes. The ...

  8. Multiple soil nutrient competition between plants, microbes, and mineral surfaces: model development, parameterization, and example applications in several tropical forests

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhu, Q.; Riley, W. J.; Tang, J.; Koven, C. D.

    2015-03-05

    Soil is a complex system where biotic (e.g., plant roots, micro-organisms) and abiotic (e.g., mineral surfaces) consumers compete for resources necessary for life (e.g., nitrogen, phosphorus). This competition is ecologically significant, since it regulates the dynamics of soil nutrients and controls aboveground plant productivity. Here we develop, calibrate, and test a nutrient competition model that accounts for multiple soil nutrients interacting with multiple biotic and abiotic consumers. As applied here for tropical forests, the Nutrient COMpetition model (N-COM) includes three primary soil nutrients (NH4+, NO3?, and POx (representing the sum of PO43?, HPO42?, and H2PO4?)) and five potential competitors (plantmore »roots, decomposing microbes, nitrifiers, denitrifiers, and mineral surfaces). The competition is formulated with a quasi-steady-state chemical equilibrium approximation to account for substrate (multiple substrates share one consumer) and consumer (multiple consumers compete for one substrate) effects. N-COM successfully reproduced observed soil heterotrophic respiration, N2O emissions, free phosphorus, sorbed phosphorus, and free NH4+ at a tropical forest site (Tapajos). The overall model posterior uncertainty was moderately well constrained. Our sensitivity analysis revealed that soil nutrient competition was primarily regulated by consumer-substrate affinity rather than environmental factors such as soil temperature or soil moisture. Our results imply that the competitiveness (from most to least competitive) followed this order: (1) for NH4+, nitrifiers ~ decomposing microbes > plant roots, (2) for NO3?, denitrifiers ~ decomposing microbes > plant roots, (3) for POx, mineral surfaces > decomposing microbes ~ plant roots. Although smaller, plant relative competitiveness is of the same order of magnitude as microbes. We then applied the N-COM model to analyze field nitrogen and phosphorus perturbation experiments in two tropical forest sites (in Hawaii and Puerto Rico) not used in model development or calibration. Under soil inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus elevated conditions, the model accurately replicated the experimentally observed competition among different nutrient consumers. Although we used as many observations as we could obtain, more nutrient addition experiments in tropical systems would greatly benefit model testing and calibration. In summary, the N-COM model provides an ecologically consistent representation of nutrient competition appropriate for land BGC models integrated in Earth System Models.« less

  9. Project test plan for runoff and erosion on fine-soil barrier surfaces and rock-covered side slopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walters, W.H.; Hoover, K.A.; Cadwell, L.L.

    1990-06-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Westinghouse Hanford Company are working together to develop protective barriers to isolate near-surface radioactive waste. The purpose of the barriers is to protect defense wastes at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site from infiltration of precipitation, biointrusion, and surficial erosion for up to 10,000 years without the need for long-term monitoring, maintenance, or institutional control. The barriers will be constructed of layered earth and rock material designed to direct surface and groundwater pathways away from the buried waste. To address soil erosion as it applies to barrier design and long-term stability, a task designed to study this problem has been included in the Protective Barriers Program at PNL. The barrier soil-erosion task will investigate the ability of the soil cover and side slopes to resist the erosional and destabilizing processes from externally applied water. The study will include identification and field testing of the dominant processes contributing to erosion and barrier failure. The effects of rock mulches, vegetation cover on the top fine-grained soil surface, as well as the stability of rock armoring on the side slopes, will be evaluated. Some of the testing will include the effects of animal intrusion on barrier erosion, and these will be coordinated with other animal intrusion studies. 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  10. DIVISION S-2-SOIL CHEMISTRY Backtitration Technique for Proton Isotherm Modeling of Oxide Surfaces1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    to compare the accuracy and practicality of two methods to determine soil acidity: the NaCl method (cation breaks to in- dicate end points, as is usuallyexpected of weak acids. Bradfield (1923, 1924)claimed that the error was due to methodology. He obtained "definite breaks" by adding the soil (weak acid) to the alkali

  11. Spatial variations in soil and plant delta 13 C and delta 15 N values in a subtropical savanna: implications for vegetation change and nutrient dynamics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bai, E

    2009-05-15

    lower-lying portions of the landscape are dominated by closed-canopy woodlands. I used soil ?13C in conjunction with aerial photography and geostatistics to quantify landscape-scale vegetation dynamics in uplands of this savanna parkland. Spatial...

  12. Soil Carbon Stocks and Soil Carbon Quality in the Upland Portion of a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Bernard

    , Quebec David Pare´,1 * Jessica L. Banville,2,3 Michelle Garneau,2,3 and Yves Bergeron4 1 Natural. Sainte-Foy, Quebec, Quebec G1V 4C7, Canada; 2 De´partement de Ge´ographie, Universite´ du Que´bec a` Montre´al, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3P8, Canada; 3 GEOTOP UQA` M-McGill, Universite´ du Que´bec a` Montre

  13. Lead distribution in near-surface soils of two Florida cities: Gainesville and Miami

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    , arithmetic mean; GM, geometric mean; GSD, geometric standard deviation; OC, organic carbon; SCTL, soil clean, and the widespread past use of alkyl-lead compounds as antiknock addi- tives in gasoline, and Pb-based paint

  14. Modeling land surface processes of the midwestern United States : predicting soil moisture under a warmer climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winter, Jonathan (Jonathan Mark)

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation seeks to quantify the response of soil moisture to climate change in the midwestern United States. To assess this response, a dynamic global vegetation model, Integrated Biosphere Simulator, was coupled ...

  15. Heterogeneous Surface-Based Freezing of Atmospheric Aerosols Containing Ash, Soot, and Soil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fornea, Adam P.

    2010-07-14

    nucleation will occur through one of several mechanisms including the contact and immersion freezing mechanisms. Through a series of contact freezing experiments, we have characterized the ability of aerosols composed of volcanic ash, soot, and peat soil...

  16. Soil surface stabilization using an in situ plutonium coating techniuqe at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lew, J.; Snipes, R. [Environmental Management and Enrichment Facilities, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Tamura, T.

    1996-12-31

    The Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program (HAZWRAP), in collaboration with the University of Nevada at Reno (UNR), has developed and is investigating an in situ plutonium treatment for soils at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The concept, conceived by Dr. T. Tamura and refined at HAZWRAP, was developed during the Nevada Applied Ecology Program investigation. In analyzing for plutonium in soils, it was noted that the alpha emanation of plutonium was greatly attenuated if traces of iron or manganese oxides were present in the final electroplating stage. The technique would reduce resuspension of alpha particles into the air by coating the contaminants in soils in situ with an environmentally compatible, durable, and nontoxic material. The coating materials (calcium hydroxide, ferrous sulfate) reduce resuspension by providing a cementitious barrier against radiation penetration while retaining soil porosity. This technique not only stabilizes plutonium-contaminated soils, but also provides an additional protection from worker exposure to radiation during remediation activities. Additionally, the coating would decrease the water solubility of the contaminant and, thus, reduce its migration through soil and uptake by plants.

  17. Evaluation of spring flow in the uplands of Matalom, Leyte, Philippines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Evaluation of spring flow in the uplands of Matalom, Leyte, Philippines Cynthia F. Malvicini, Tammo of the springs near Matalom, Leyte, Philippines as a sustainable source of drinking water, we measured for drinking and domestic use is a basic need. In the uplands of Matalom, Leyte, Philippines, where this study

  18. Mass Transport within Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKone, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Nature and Properties of Soils 2nd Edition. Prentice Hall,Exchange of PCBS betweetl Soil and the Atmosphere in theChemicals Residing below the Soil Surface” Water Resources

  19. UNCORRECTEDPROOF 2 Requirements of a global near-surface soil moisture satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Jeff

    : accuracy, repeat time, and spatial resolution 4 Jeffrey P. Walker a,b,*, Paul R. Houser a 5 a Hydrological) remote sensing studies, using 53both thermal infrared and microwave (passive and ac- 54tive) electromagnetic radiation. Of these, passive 55microwave soil moisture measurement has been the 56most promising

  20. GPR Surveys across a Prototype Surface Barrier to Determine Temporal and Spatial Variations in Soil Moisture Content

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clement, William P.; Ward, Anderson L.

    2008-06-10

    Engineered surface barriers are expected to play a critical role in the closure of waste sites within the DOE complex and currently require monitoring to verify performance. The most comprehensive approach to assess performance is by water balance evaluation, which requires knowledge of the soil water storage. However, water storage measurements are still made mostly by point sensors and as result field-scale estimates are subject to much uncertainty. The objective of this study was to assess the viability of using ground penetrating radar (GPR) to monitor changes in soil moisture distribution, and therefore water storage, at multiple scales. Profiles were collected at four times during the year March, May, September and the following January to track the decrease in storage from the spring to the summer followed by the increase in the winter. A series of 40-m long profiles were collected using 100-Mhz antennas with a sample interval of 0.8 ns and 500 samples per trace in a 400-ns window. A common midpoint (CMP) survey was first used to determine an optimal antenna separation (3.5 m) after which data were collected using a wide-offset reflection geometry. Travel times were used to calculate the electromagnetic velocities which were then used to calculate water content using the Topp’s equation. Changes in the GPR response were easily observed over the course of the study and indicated spatial differences in moisture, which owing to the relatively uniform soil, can be attributed to differences in water removal by evapotranspiration. Water content also showed a strong seasonal strong seasonal dependence that correlate well with seasonal changes in precipitation and plant water uptake. An investigation of the effects of soil water content on the amplitude of the ground wave showed weaker amplitudes in the drier spring and summer months than in the winter suggesting a correlation between amplitude and water content. Results show that GPR can provide accurate non-invasive estimates of spatial and temporal changes in water content and therefore soil water storage.

  1. Resolving Carbon's Rainbow from Uplands to the Deep-sea | Argonne...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resolving Carbon's Rainbow from Uplands to the Deep-sea Event Sponsor: Environmental Science Division Seminar Start Date: Sep 17 2015 - 11:00am BuildingRoom: Building 240Room...

  2. Silviculture of upland native Recognition of the value of native woodlands, particularly Ancient Woodlands, has been

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of such natural habitats was emphasised at the Rio Earth Summit in 1992 and in the resolutions of the Ministerial of timber. · Traditionally, upland native woodlands were used to shelter low numbers of livestock (usually

  3. A comparison of variability of undisturbed and surface mined soils in Freestone County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bearden, Eddie Dean

    1984-01-01

    -collected on some sites during Narch, 1983. PEDON SAMPLING SCHEMES B 1 Meter x 1 Meter 2 Meters x 2 Meters Fig. 5--multiple sub-sampling schemes from pit (A) and compositing core samples (B) . 18 Laboratory Methods Bulk Sample Preparation All soil material...';:::. ";, . . ")': ( 5% (TEU) 6- ION (COMMON) 'H ~ II-20% (MANY) UNO. 2YR IOYR UND, 2YR ' IOVR ' UNO. ' 2YR IOYR UNO. = UNDISTOROEO 2 YR ? 2 YEAR OI. O MINE)OIL IO YR = IO YEAR OLD MINESOIL Fig. 11--Root percentage classes with observations (5 meters apart. ROO...

  4. Growth and fruiting responses of diverse genotypes of American Upland cotton grown in different environments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gannaway, J. R

    1971-01-01

    GROWTH AND FRUITING RESPONSES OF DIVERSE GENOTYPES OF AMERICAN UPLAND COTTON GROWN IN DIFFERENT ENVIRONMENTS A Thesis JOHN ROBERT GANNAWAY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1971 Major Subject: Plant Breeding GROWTH AND FRUITING RESPONSES OF DIVERSE GENOTYPES OF AMERICAN UPLAND COTTON GROWN IN DIFFERENT ENVIRONMENTS A Thesis by JOHN ROBERT GANNAWAY Approved as to style and content by...

  5. Turnover and storage of C and N in five density fractions from California annual grassland surface soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amundson, Ronald

    in density fractions from soils collected before and after atmospheric thermonuclear weapons testing

  6. Comparative plant uptake and microbial degradation of trichloroethylene in the rhizospheres of five plant species-- implications for bioremediation of contaminated surface soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, T.A. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)); Walton, B.T. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this study was to collect data that would provide a foundation for the concept of using vegetation to enhance in situ bioremediation of contaminated surface soils. Soil and vegetation (Lespedeza cuneata, Paspalum notatum, Pinus taeda, and Solidago sp.) samples from the Miscellaneous Chemicals Basin (MCB) at the Savannah River Site were used in tests to identify critical plant and microbiological variables affecting the fate of trichloroethylene (TCE) in the root zone. Microbiological assays including phospholipid acid analyses, and {sup 14}C-acetate incorporation were conducted to elucidate differences in rhizosphere and nonvegetated soil microbial communities from the MCB. The microbial activity, biomass, and degradation of TCE in rhizosphere soils were significantly greater than corresponding nonvegetated soils. Vegetation had a positive effect on microbial degradation of {sup 14}C-TCE in whole-plant experiments. Soils from the MCB containing Lespedeza cuneata, Pinus taeda, and Glycine max mineralized greater than 25% of the {sup 14}C- TCE added compared with less than 20% in nonvegetated soils. Collectively, these results provide evidence for the positive role of vegetation in enhancing biodegradation.

  7. Treatment of soil, vegetation and snow in land surface models: a test of the BiosphereAtmosphere Transfer Scheme with the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    surface consists of soil, vegetation, snow, glaciers, inland waters, mountains, animals, human beings to study the complicated transfer or diffusion of energy, water and trace gases within each study object of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA b Department of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizona

  8. Residence Time Effects on P Sorption/Desorption on Ferrihydrite Understanding mechanisms of P retention/release on soil mineral surfaces is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Residence Time Effects on P Sorption/Desorption on Ferrihydrite Y. Arai Understanding mechanisms of P retention/release on soil mineral surfaces is fundamental in assessing the P biogeochemistry that are high ammonium oxalate extractable P, due to long-term manure amendments. Since there is a high

  9. Surface Environmental Surveillance Project: Locations Manual Volume 1 – Air and Water Volume 2 – Farm Products, Soil & Vegetation, and Wildlife

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fritz, Brad G.; Patton, Gregory W.; Stegen, Amanda; Poston, Ted M.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes all environmental monitoring locations associated with the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project. Environmental surveillance of the Hanford site and surrounding areas is conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Sampling is conducted to evaluate levels of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants in the Hanford environs, as required in DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment. The environmental surveillance sampling design is described in the Hanford Site Environmental Monitoring Plan, United States Department of Energy, Richland Operation Office (DOE/RL-91-50). This document contains the locations of sites used to collect samples for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP). Each section includes directions, maps, and pictures of the locations. A general knowledge of roads and highways on and around the Hanford Site is necessary to successfully use this manual. Supplemental information (Maps, Gazetteer, etc.) may be necessary if user is unfamiliar with local routes. The SESP is a multimedia environmental surveillance effort to measure the concentrations of radionuclides and chemicals in environmental media to demonstrate compliance with applicable environmental quality standards and public exposure limits, and assessing environmental impacts. Project personnel annually collect selected samples of ambient air, surface water, agricultural products, fish, wildlife, and sediments. Soil and vegetation samples are collected approximately every 5 years. Analytical capabilities include the measurement of radionuclides at very low environmental concentrations and, in selected media, nonradiological chemicals including metals, anions, volatile organic compounds, and total organic carbon.

  10. Hydrocarbon anomaly in soil gas as near-surface expressions of upflows and outflows in geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ong, H.L.; Higashihara, M.; Klusman, R.W.; Voorhees, K.J.; Pudjianto, R.; Ong, J

    1996-01-24

    A variety of hydrocarbons, C1 - C12, have been found in volcanic gases (fumarolic) and in geothermal waters and gases. The hydrocarbons are thought to have come from products of pyrolysis of kerogen in sedimentary rocks or they could be fed into the geothermal system by the recharging waters which may contain dissolved hydrocarbons or hydrocarbons extracted by the waters from the rocks. In the hot geothermal zone, 300°+ C, many of these hydrocarbons are in their critical state. It is thought that they move upwards due to buoyancy and flux up with the upflowing geothermal fluids in the upflow zones together with the magmatic gases. Permeability which could be provided by faults, fissures, mini and micro fractures are thought to provide pathways for the upward flux. A sensitive technique (Petrex) utilizing passive integrative adsorption of the hydrocarbons in soil gas on activated charcoal followed by desorption and analysis of the hydrocarbons by direct introduction mass spectrometry allows mapping of the anomalous areas. Surveys for geothermal resources conducted in Japan and in Indonesia show that the hydrocarbon anomaly occur over known fields and over areas strongly suspected of geothermal potential. The hydrocarbons found and identified were n-paraffins (C7-C9) and aromatics (C7-C8). Detection of permeable, i.e. active or open faults, parts of older faults which have been reactivated, e.g. by younger intersecting faults, and the area surrounding these faulted and permeable region is possible. The mechanism leading to the appearance of the hydrocarbon in the soil gas over upflow zones of the geothermal reservoir is proposed. The paraffins seems to be better pathfinders for the location of upflows than the aromatics. However the aromatics may, under certain circumstances, give better indications of the direction of the outflow of the geothermal system. It is thought that an upflow zone can be defined when conditions exist where the recharging waters containing the hydrocarbons feed into the geothermal kitchen. The existence of open and active faults, fissures, mini and micro fractures allow sufficient permeability for the gases to flux up and express themselves at the surface as hydrocarbon anomaly in the soil gas. When any of the requirements is absent, i.e. in the absence of the recharging waters, hydrocarbons, temperature, or permeability, no anomaly can be expected. It assumes a dynamic convective system, i.e. recharging waters, upflow and outflow. The anomalies however can define to a certain extent, regions of geothermal upflow, buoyant transport of gases, and frequently down-gradient of cooling waters.

  11. Wilson Bull., 11l(l), 1999, pp. 100-104 EFFECTS OF WIND TURBINES ON UPLAND NESTING BIRDS IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson Bull., 11l(l), 1999, pp. 100-104 EFFECTS OF WIND TURBINES ON UPLAND NESTING BIRDS in southwestern Minnesota to determine the relative influence of wind turbines on overall densities of upland transects that were placed along wind turbine strings within three CRP fields and in three CRP fields

  12. Riparian and Upland Restoration at the U.S. Department of Energy Rocky Flats, Colorado, Site - 12360

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Jody K.

    2012-07-01

    Remedial investigation and cleanup at the Rocky Flats, Colorado, Site was completed in 2005. Uplands, riparian, and wetland habitat were disturbed during cleanup and closure activities and required extensive revegetation. Unavoidable disturbances to habitat of the Preble's meadow jumping mouse (a federally listed species) and wetlands required consultation with regulatory agencies and mitigation. Mitigation wetlands were constructed in two drainages, and a third developed naturally where a soil borrow area intercepted the groundwater table. During the 50-plus years of site operations, 12 ponds were constructed in three drainages to manage and retain runoff and sewage treatment plant discharges prior to release off site. A batch-release protocol has been used for the past several decades at the terminal ponds, which has affected the riparian communities downstream. To return the hydrologic regime to a more natural flow-through system similar to the pre-industrial-use conditions, seven interior dams (of 12) have been breached, and the remaining five dams are scheduled for breaching between 2011 and 2020. At the breached dams, the former open water areas have transformed to emergent wetlands, and the stream reaches have returned to a flow-through system. Riparian and wetland vegetation has established very well. The valves of the terminal ponds were opened in fall 2011 to begin flow-through operations and provide water to the downstream plant communities while allowing reestablishment of vegetation in the former pond bottoms prior to breaching. A number of challenges and issues were addressed during the revegetation effort. These included reaching an agreement on revegetation goals, addressing poor substrate quality and soil compaction problems, using soil amendments and topsoil, selecting seeds, determining the timing and location of revegetation projects relative to continuing closure activities, weed control, erosion control, revegetation project field oversight, and contractual limitations. A variety of ecological restoration techniques were conducted at the site to meet these challenges. These efforts have resulted in vegetation becoming well established in most locations. (author)

  13. Z .The Science of the Total Environment 265 2001 169 179 Manganese and land-use in upland catchments in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heal, Kate

    acidified catchment soils. After harvesting, increased soil pools of water-soluble Mn and elevated Mn March 2000 Abstract Z .Manganese Mn in surface waters is a micronutrient, but elevated concentrations are toxic to fish and impair Z y1.drinking water quality. In Scotland, undesirable Mn concentrations )0

  14. The effects of topping on yield and other agronomic characters in two varieties of Upland cotton 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bearden, Gary Dee

    1957-01-01

    LiBRARY A A M COLLESE Of TEXAS THE EFFECTS OF TOPPlNG ON YIELD AND OTHER AGRONOMIC CHARACTERS IN TM) VARIETIES OF UPLAND COTTON Gary Dse Bearden Suhmittsd to ths Graduate School of ths Agricultural and Mechanical Collage of Texas in Partial... fulfillment of the requirements for ths degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1957 Ma/or Subjects Plant Breeding THE EFFECTS OF TOPPING ON YIELD AND OTHER AGRONOMIC CHARACTERS IN TM3 VARIETIES OF UPLAND COTTON Gary Dee Beaten Approve4 as to style...

  15. Steam treatment of surface soil: how does it affect water-soluble organic matter, C mineralization, and bacterial community composition?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roux-Michollet, Dad; Dudal, Yves; Jocteur-Monrozier, Lucile; Czarnes, Sonia

    2010-01-01

    organic components Water extraction was performed by shakingresulting from hot water extraction, as measured by Sparlingboiling soil in water resulted in the extraction of both

  16. APPLICATION OF DIGITALMULTISPECTRAL IMAGERY TO LITTORAL ZONE SOIL AND ELEVATION MODELING-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrizio, Mary C.

    . The two primary landform zones found within the study area include the coastal beach zone and the dune of longitudinally oriented upland, sandy dunes dissected by very wet marshes. This coastal geomorphology, common between vegetation, soil and elevation data. Upon review, statistics suggested there was association

  17. Methane cycling in upland soils of the Peruvian Andes and Amazon 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Samuel Peter

    2015-06-30

    Significant discrepancies exist in global estimates of the atmospheric methane (CH4) budget. This is particularly true for tropical South America where bottom-up approaches, rooted in field observation, tend to under ...

  18. USING RADIO-TELEMETRY TO DETERMINE RANGE AND RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS OF UPLAND SANDPIPERS AT AN EXPERIMENTALLY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandercock, Brett K.

    USING RADIO-TELEMETRY TO DETERMINE RANGE AND RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS OF UPLAND SANDPIPERS birds with radio transmitters at the experimentally managed Konza Prairie Biological Station of radios on survival and movement, and optimizing the duration of transmitter attachment. We compared 4

  19. Long-term directional changes in upland Quercus forests throughout Oklahoma, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Michael W.

    Long-term directional changes in upland Quercus forests throughout Oklahoma, USA Ryan D. De? Location: Oklahoma, USA. Methods: We re-sampled 30 forest stands originally sampled in the 1950s across; Juniperus virginiana; mesophication; Oak; Oklahoma; Quercus marilandica; Quercus stellata; Species

  20. Introgression from Gossypium mustelinum and G. tomentosum into upland cotton, G. hirusutum 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gardunia, Brian Wayne

    2009-05-15

    To increase genetic diversity with elite upland cotton, introgression populations with wild species of cotton, Gossypium mustelinum and G. tomentosum, were created. To accomplish this objective, F1, F2, BC1F1, and BC1F2 generations were developed...

  1. Soil moisture in complex terrain: quantifying effects on atmospheric boundary layer flow and providing improved surface boundary conditions for mesoscale models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniels, Megan Hanako

    2010-01-01

    74 ii Soil Moisture Sensors: Decagon ECH2O Capacitance133 A.10 Soil types corresponding to each75 Soil Moisture and Temperature Probe

  2. Summary of Inorganic Compositional Data for Groundwater, Soil-Water, and Surface-Water Samples at the Headgate Draw Subsurface Drip Irrigation Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geboy, Nicholas J.; Engle, Mark A.; Schroeder, Karl T.; Zupanic, John W.

    2007-01-01

    As part of a 5-year project on the impact of subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) application of coalbed-methane (CBM) produced waters, water samples were collected from the Headgate Draw SDI site in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming, USA. This research is part of a larger study to understand short- and long-term impacts on both soil and water quality from the beneficial use of CBM waters to grow forage crops through use of SDI. This document provides a summary of the context, sampling methodology, and quality assurance and quality control documentation of samples collected prior to and over the first year of SDI operation at the site (May 2008-October 2009). This report contains an associated database containing inorganic compositional data, water-quality criteria parameters, and calculated geochemical parameters for samples of groundwater, soil water, surface water, treated CBM waters, and as-received CBM waters collected at the Headgate Draw SDI site.

  3. Soil and variety effects on energy use and carbon emissions associated with switchgrass-based ethanol production in Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woli, Prem; Paz, Joel O.; Baldwin, Brian S.; Lang, David J.; Kiniry, James R.

    2012-06-29

    High biomass production potential, wide adaptability, low input requirement, and low environmental risk make switchgrass an economically and ecologically viable energy crop.The inherent variablity in switchgrass productivity due to variations in soil and variety could affect the sustainability and eco-friendliness of switchgrass-based ethanol production. This study examined the soil and variety effects on these variables. Three locations in Mississippi were selected based on latitude and potential acreage. Using ALMANAC, switchgrass biomass yields were simulated for several scenarios of soils and varities. The simulated yields were fed to IBSAL to compute energy use and CO2 emissions in various operations in the biomass supply From the energy and emissions values, the sustainability and eco-friendliness of ethanol production were determined using net energy value (NEV) and carbon credit balance (CCB) as indicators, respectively. Soil and variety effects on NEV and CCB were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Results showed significant differences in NEV and CCB across soils and varieties. Both NEV and CCB increased in the direction of heavier to lighter soils and on the order of north-upland , south-upland, north-lowland, and south-lowland varieties. Only north-upland and south-lowland varieties were significantly significantly different because they were different in both cytotype and ecotype. Gaps between lowland and upland varieties were smaller in a dry year than in a wet year. The NEV and CCB increased in the direction of dry to wet year. From south to north, they decreased for lowland cytotypes but increased for upland cytotypes. Thus, the differences among varieties decreased northwards.

  4. Methane Bioattenuation and Implications for Explosion Risk Reduction along the Groundwater to Soil Surface Pathway above a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    Methane Bioattenuation and Implications for Explosion Risk Reduction along the Groundwater to Soil aquifers, which could pose an explosion risk if methane migrates into enclosed spaces where ignitable table. Despite methane concentrations within the ethanol plume reaching saturated levels (20-23 mg

  5. Effects of vegetation and soil moisture on the simulated land surface processes from the coupled WRF/Noah model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Small, Eric

    WRF/Noah model Seungbum Hong,1 Venkat Lakshmi,1 Eric E. Small,2 Fei Chen,3 Mukul Tewari,3 and Kevin W. Lakshmi, E. E. Small, F. Chen, M. Tewari, and K. W. Manning (2009), Effects of vegetation and soil

  6. Mass Transport within Soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKone, Thomas E.

    2009-03-01

    Contaminants in soil can impact human health and the environment through a complex web of interactions. Soils exist where the atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere, and biosphere converge. Soil is the thin outer zone of the earth's crust that supports rooted plants and is the product of climate and living organisms acting on rock. A true soil is a mixture of air, water, mineral, and organic components. The relative proportions of these components determine the value of the soil for agricultural and for other human uses. These proportions also determine, to a large extent, how a substance added to soil is transported and/or transformed within the soil (Spositio, 2004). In mass-balance models, soil compartments play a major role, functioning both as reservoirs and as the principal media for transport among air, vegetation, surface water, deeper soil, and ground water (Mackay, 2001). Quantifying the mass transport of chemicals within soil and between soil and atmosphere is important for understanding the role soil plays in controlling fate, transport, and exposure to multimedia pollutants. Soils are characteristically heterogeneous. A trench dug into soil typically reveals several horizontal layers having different colors and textures. As illustrated in Figure 1, these multiple layers are often divided into three major horizons: (1) the A horizon, which encompasses the root zone and contains a high concentration of organic matter; (2) the B horizon, which is unsaturated, lies below the roots of most plants, and contains a much lower organic carbon content; and (3) the C horizon, which is the unsaturated zone of weathered parent rock consisting of bedrock, alluvial material, glacial material, and/or soil of an earlier geological period. Below these three horizons lies the saturated zone - a zone that encompasses the area below ground surface in which all interconnected openings within the geologic media are completely filled with water. Similarly to the unsaturated zone with three major horizons, the saturated zone can be further divided into other zones based on hydraulic and geologic conditions. Wetland soils are a special and important class in which near-saturation conditions exist most of the time. When a contaminant is added to or formed in a soil column, there are several mechanisms by which it can be dispersed, transported out of the soil column to other parts of the environment, destroyed, or transformed into some other species. Thus, to evaluate or manage any contaminant introduced to the soil column, one must determine whether and how that substance will (1) remain or accumulate within the soil column, (2) be transported by dispersion or advection within the soil column, (3) be physically, chemically, or biologically transformed within the soil (i.e., by hydrolysis, oxidation, etc.), or (4) be transported out of the soil column to another part of the environment through a cross-media transfer (i.e., volatilization, runoff, ground water infiltration, etc.). These competing processes impact the fate of physical, chemical, or biological contaminants found in soils. In order to capture these mechanisms in mass transfer models, we must develop mass-transfer coefficients (MTCs) specific to soil layers. That is the goal of this chapter. The reader is referred to other chapters in this Handbook that address related transport processes, namely Chapter 13 on bioturbation, Chapter 15 on transport in near-surface geological formations, and Chapter 17 on soil resuspention. This chapter addresses the following issues: the nature of soil pollution, composition of soil, transport processes and transport parameters in soil, transformation processes in soil, mass-balance models, and MTCs in soils. We show that to address vertical heterogeneity in soils in is necessary to define a characteristic scaling depth and use this to establish process-based expressions for soil MTCs. The scaling depth in soil and the corresponding MTCs depend strongly on (1) the composition of the soil and physical state of the soil, (2) the chemical and physic

  7. In-situ vitrification of soil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brouns, Richard A. (Kennewick, WA); Buelt, James L. (Richland, WA); Bonner, William F. (Richland, WA)

    1983-01-01

    A method of vitrifying soil at or below a soil surface location. Two or more conductive electrodes are inserted into the soil for heating of the soil mass between them to a temperature above its melting temperature. Materials in the soil, such as buried waste, can thereby be effectively immobilized.

  8. Atmospheric and soil-gas monitoring for surface leakage at the San Juan Basin CO{sub 2} pilot test site at Pump Canyon New Mexico, using perfluorocarbon tracers, CO{sub 2} soil-gas flux and soil-gas hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, Arthur W.; Diehl, J. Rodney; Strazisar, Brian R.; Wilson, Thomas; H Stanko, Dennis C.

    2012-05-01

    Near-surface monitoring and subsurface characterization activities were undertaken in collaboration with the Southwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership on their San Juan Basin coal-bed methane pilot test site near Navajo City, New Mexico. Nearly 18,407 short tons (1.670 × 107 kg) of CO{sub 2} were injected into 3 seams of the Fruitland coal between July 2008 and April 2009. Between September 18 and October 30, 2008, two additions of approximately 20 L each of perfluorocarbon (PFC) tracers were mixed with the CO{sub 2} at the injection wellhead. PFC tracers in soil-gas and in the atmosphere were monitored over a period of 2 years using a rectangular array of permanent installations. Additional monitors were placed near existing well bores and at other locations of potential leakage identified during the pre-injection site survey. Monitoring was conducted using sorbent containing tubes to collect any released PFC tracer from soil-gas or the atmosphere. Near-surface monitoring activities also included CO{sub 2} surface flux and carbon isotopes, soil-gas hydrocarbon levels, and electrical conductivity in the soil. The value of the PFC tracers was demonstrated when a significant leakage event was detected near an offset production well. Subsurface characterization activities, including 3D seismic interpretation and attribute analysis, were conducted to evaluate reservoir integrity and the potential that leakage of injected CO{sub 2} might occur. Leakage from the injection reservoir was not detected. PFC tracers made breakthroughs at 2 of 3 offset wells which were not otherwise directly observable in produced gases containing 20–30% CO{sub 2}. These results have aided reservoir geophysical and simulation investigations to track the underground movement of CO{sub 2}. 3D seismic analysis provided a possible interpretation for the order of appearance of tracers at production wells.

  9. Multiple soil nutrient competition between plants, microbes,...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Multiple soil nutrient competition between plants, microbes, and mineral surfaces: model development, parameterization, and example applications in several...

  10. Development of Surface Complexation Models of Cr(VI) Adsorption on Soils, Sediments and Model Mixtures of Kaolinite, Montmorillonite, ?-Alumina, Hydrous Manganese and Ferric Oxides and Goethite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koretsky, Carla [Western Michigan University] [Western Michigan University

    2013-11-29

    Hexavalent chromium is a highly toxic contaminant that has been introduced into aquifers and shallow sediments and soils via many anthropogenic activities. Hexavalent chromium contamination is a problem or potential problem in the shallow subsurface at several DOE sites, including Hanford, Idaho National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Oak Ridge Reservation (DOE, 2008). To accurately quantify the fate and transport of hexavalent chromium at DOE and other contaminated sites, robust geochemical models, capable of correctly predicting changes in chromium chemical form resulting from chemical reactions occurring in subsurface environments are needed. One important chemical reaction that may greatly impact the bioavailability and mobility of hexavalent chromium in the subsurface is chemical binding to the surfaces of particulates, termed adsorption or surface complexation. Quantitative thermodynamic surface complexation models have been derived that can correctly calculate hexavalent chromium adsorption on well-characterized materials over ranges in subsurface conditions, such pH and salinity. However, models have not yet been developed for hexavalent chromium adsorption on many important constituents of natural soils and sediments, such as clay minerals. Furthermore, most of the existing thermodynamic models have been developed for relatively simple, single solid systems and have rarely been tested for the complex mixtures of solids present in real sediments and soils. In this study, the adsorption of hexavalent chromium was measured as a function of pH (3-10), salinity (0.001 to 0.1 M NaNO3), and partial pressure of carbon dioxide(0-5%) on a suite of naturally-occurring solids including goethite (FeOOH), hydrous manganese oxide (MnOOH), hydrous ferric oxide (Fe(OH)3), ?-alumina (Al2O3), kaolinite (Al2Si2O5(OH)4), and montmorillonite (Na3(Al, Mg)2Si4O10(OH)2?nH2O). The results show that all of these materials can bind substantial quantities of hexavalent chromium, especially at low pH. Unexpectedly, experiments with the clay minerals kaolinite and montmorillonite suggest that hexavalent chromium may interact with these solids over much longer periods of time than expected. Furthermore, hexavalent chromium may irreversibly bind to these solids, perhaps because of oxidation-reduction reactions occurring on the surfaces of the clay minerals. More work should be done to investigate and quantify these chemical reactions. Experiments conducted with mixtures of goethite, hydrous manganese oxide, hydrous ferric oxide, ?-alumina, montmorillonite and kaolinite demonstrate that it is possible to correctly predict hexavalent chromium binding in the presence of multiple minerals using thermodynamic models derived for the simpler systems. Further, these models suggest that of the six solid considered in this study, goethite is typically the solid to which most of the hexavalent chromium will bind. Experiments completed with organic-rich and organic-poor natural sediments demonstrate that in organic-rich substrates, organic matter is likely to control uptake of the hexavalent chromium. The models derived and tested in this study for hexavalent chromium binding to ?-alumina, hydrous manganese oxide, goethite, hydrous ferric oxide and clay minerals can be used to better predict changes in hexavalent chromium bioavailability and mobility in contaminated sediments and soils.

  11. The effects of fire on the thermal stability of permafrost in lowland and upland black spruce forests of interior Alaska in a changing climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    .1088/1748-9326/8/3/035030 The effects of fire on the thermal stability of permafrost in lowland and upland black spruce forests of the organic layer in the black spruce forest ecosystems of interior Alaska. Fire that burns the organic layer determine post-fire ground temperature dynamics in lowland and upland black spruce forests? (2) What levels

  12. Characterization of Soil Water Content Variability and Soil Texture using GPR Groundwave Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Susan

    Characterization of Soil Water Content Variability and Soil Texture using GPR Groundwave Techniques@ce.berkeley.edu ABSTRACT Accurate characterization of near-surface soil water content is vital for guiding agricultural. Characterizing the near-surface soil water content can be difficult, as this parameter is often both spatially

  13. A garden mulch is any material spread on the soil surface to modify the environment where the plant is growing. The materials used can be natural or synthetic and can be used in any number of combinations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    companies manufacture recycled paper into mulch, sold in rolls and installed much like black plastic. OtherA garden mulch is any material spread on the soil surface to modify the environment where the plant within a single garden or around a homestead. The proper selection and use of a mulch will result

  14. Tropical forest soil microbial communities couple iron and carbon biogeochemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubinsky, E.A.; Silver, W.L.; Firestone, M.K.

    2009-10-15

    We report that iron-reducing bacteria are primary mediators of anaerobic carbon oxidation in upland tropical soils spanning a rainfall gradient (3500 - 5000 mm yr-1) in northeast Puerto Rico. The abundant rainfall and high net primary productivity of these tropical forests provide optimal soil habitat for iron-reducing and iron-oxidizing bacteria. Spatially and temporally dynamic redox conditions make iron-transforming microbial communities central to the belowground carbon cycle in these wet tropical forests. The exceedingly high abundance of iron-reducing bacteria (up to 1.2 x 10{sup 9} cells per gram soil) indicated that they possess extensive metabolic capacity to catalyze the reduction of iron minerals. In soils from the higher rainfall sites, measured rates of ferric iron reduction could account for up to 44 % of organic carbon oxidation. Iron reducers appeared to compete with methanogens when labile carbon availability was limited. We found large numbers of bacteria that oxidize reduced iron at sites with high rates of iron reduction and large numbers of iron-reducers. the coexistence of large populations of ironreducing and iron-oxidizing bacteria is evidence for rapid iron cycling between its reduced and oxidized states, and suggests that mutualistic interactions among these bacteria ultimately fuel organic carbon oxidation and inhibit CH4 production in these upland tropical forests.

  15. Water Transfer from Soil to the Atmosphere as Related to Climate and Soil Properties 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wendt, C. W.

    1970-01-01

    of the soil surface is the limiting parameter. Effects of Crude Oil on Evaporation - Crude oil applied to the wet soil surfaces of the lysimeters following rains suppressed evaporation immediately following the rains. However, the value of the crude oil...

  16. Ecological Screening Values for Surface Water, Sediment, and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ecological Screening Values for Surface Water, Sediment, and Soil Friday, G. P. 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; SOILS; SURFACE WATERS; SEDIMENTS; ECOLOGICAL CONCENTRATION; ENVIRONMENTAL...

  17. A method to predict the soil susceptibility to compaction of surface layers as a function of water content and bulk density

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    of water content and bulk density K. Saffih-Hdadi1 , P. Défossez2 , G. Richard3 , Y-J. Cui4 , A-M. Tang4 physical properties. Because the soil compaction depends on its water content, bulk density and texture between soil mechanical properties and easily measurable soil properties as well as water content and bulk

  18. EFFECT OF FLOOD REGIME ON TREE GROWTH IN THE FLOODPLAIN AND SURROUNDING UPLANDS OF THE WISCONSIN RIVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Monica G.

    EFFECT OF FLOOD REGIME ON TREE GROWTH IN THE FLOODPLAIN AND SURROUNDING UPLANDS OF THE WISCONSIN, BC, V6T 1Z4 Canada ABSTRACT Flood regime and vegetation flood tolerance interact to influence tree. The levee restricts some floodplain area from overbank flood events, but leaves a portion of active

  19. Artificial Soiling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    pigments found in soils throughout the United States roughly following the USDA soil taxonomy 11. Ensuring a repeatable test formulation was straightforward when using...

  20. Rainwater Harvesting: Soil Storage and Infiltration System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechell, Justin; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-08-11

    A soil storage and infiltration system collects rainfall runoff from the roofs of buildings and directs it underground where it infiltrates the soil. Such a system conserves water and protects it from surface pollution. This publication describes...

  1. Summary of Soil and Water Conservation Research from the Blackland Experiment Station, Temple, Texas, 1942-53. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tippit, O. J. (Olin J.); Henderson, R. C.; Smith, Richard M.

    1954-01-01

    -season clovers on closely grazed or poor upland soils. Sweetclover with Johnson- ; also has wide usefulness. Mixed native tall grasses, managed for permanence of stand, give -- /man results. Sudangrass for hot summer grazing is outstanding among cultivated... and sweetclover, or grass with clover. Improved residue manage- ; ment may permit a higher percentage of row crops. - i , Class I1 land, with present farming methods, profits from the improvement of 1 year of small grain ~ith sweetclover, or equivalent...

  2. Soils Soil Series

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541 *ImpactScience of SignaturesSoft0 Soils Soil Series and

  3. Modeling the effects of fire severity and climate warming on active layer thickness and soil carbon storage of black spruce forests across the landscape in interior Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Genet, Helene [Institute of Arctic Biology (IAB), University of Alaska, Fairbanks (UAF)] [Institute of Arctic Biology (IAB), University of Alaska, Fairbanks (UAF); McGuire, A. David [University of Alaska] [University of Alaska; Barrett, K. [USGS Alaska Science Center] [USGS Alaska Science Center; Breen, Amy [International Arctic Research Center, SNAP, University of Alaska, Fairbanks (UAF)] [International Arctic Research Center, SNAP, University of Alaska, Fairbanks (UAF); Euskirchen, Eugenie S [University of Alaska] [University of Alaska; Johnstone, J. F. [University of Saskatchewan] [University of Saskatchewan; Kasischke, Eric S. [University of Maryland, College Park] [University of Maryland, College Park; Melvin, A. M. [University of Florida, Gainesville] [University of Florida, Gainesville; Bennett, A. [International Arctic Research Center, SNAP, University of Alaska, Fairbanks (UAF)] [International Arctic Research Center, SNAP, University of Alaska, Fairbanks (UAF); Mack, M. C. [University of Florida, Gainesville] [University of Florida, Gainesville; Rupp, Scott T. [International Arctic Research Center, SNAP, University of Alaska, Fairbanks (UAF)] [International Arctic Research Center, SNAP, University of Alaska, Fairbanks (UAF); Schuur, Edward [University of Florida] [University of Florida; Turetsky, M. R. [University of Guelph, Canada] [University of Guelph, Canada; Yuan, Fengming [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    There is a substantial amount of carbon stored in the permafrost soils of boreal forest ecosystems, where it is currently protected from decomposition. The surface organic horizons insulate the deeper soil from variations in atmospheric temperature. The removal of these insulating horizons through consumption by fire increases the vulnerability of permafrost to thaw, and the carbon stored in permafrost to decomposition. In this study we ask how warming and fire regime may influence spatial and temporal changes in active layer and carbon dynamics across a boreal forest landscape in interior Alaska. To address this question, we (1) developed and tested a predictive model of the effect of fire severity on soil organic horizons that depends on landscape-level conditions and (2) used this model to evaluate the long-term consequences of warming and changes in fire regime on active layer and soil carbon dynamics of black spruce forests across interior Alaska. The predictive model of fire severity, designed from the analysis of field observations, reproduces the effect of local topography (landform category, the slope angle and aspect and flow accumulation), weather conditions (drought index, soil moisture) and fire characteristics (day of year and size of the fire) on the reduction of the organic layercaused by fire. The integration of the fire severity model into an ecosystem process-based model allowed us to document the relative importance and interactions among local topography, fire regime and climate warming on active layer and soil carbon dynamics. Lowlands were more resistant to severe fires and climate warming, showing smaller increases in active layer thickness and soil carbon loss compared to drier flat uplands and slopes. In simulations that included the effects of both warming and fire at the regional scale, fire was primarily responsible for a reduction in organic layer thickness of 0.06 m on average by 2100 that led to an increase in active layer thickness of 1.1 m on average by 2100. The combination of warming and fire led to a simulated cumulative loss of 9.6 kgC m 2 on average by 2100. Our analysis suggests that ecosystem carbon storage in boreal forests in interior Alaska is particularly vulnerable, primarily due to the combustion of organic layer thickness in fire and the related increase in active layer thickness that exposes previously protected permafrost soil carbon to decomposition.

  4. ARM - Measurement - Soil surface temperature

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska Outreach Homepolarization ARMtotal downwelling

  5. --SOILS SUSTAIN LIFE --SOIL SCIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, John F.

    -- SOILS SUSTAIN LIFE -- SOIL SCIENCE SOCIETY OF AMERICA 677 South Segoe Road · Madison WI 53711 a PDF file only for $100. TOTAL: $ Invoice no. Shipping (to be added) $ * If you have a subscription;-- SOILS SUSTAIN LIFE -- SOIL SCIENCE SOCIETY OF AMERICA 677 South Segoe Road · Madison WI 53711 · (608

  6. Arsenic chemistry in soils and sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fendorf, S.

    2010-01-01

    retention mechanisms on goethite. 1. Surface structure.ion adsorbed on synthetic goethite (?-FeOOH). Soil Sci. 35:of arsenic(III) on goethite: spectroscopic evidence for

  7. Soil moisture in complex terrain: quantifying effects on atmospheric boundary layer flow and providing improved surface boundary conditions for mesoscale models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniels, Megan Hanako

    2010-01-01

    groundwater, land-surface, and mesoscale atmospheric model-and modification of mesoscale circulations. , Mon. Wea.J. Davis, The effects of mesoscale surface heterogeneity on

  8. Monitoring Soil Erosion on a Burned Site in the Mojave-Great Basin Transition Zone: Final Report for the Jacob Fire Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Julianne DRI; Etyemezian, Vic DRI; Cablk, Mary E. DRI; Shillito, Rose DRI; Shafer, David DOE Grand Junction, Colorado

    2013-06-01

    A historic return interval of 100 years for large fires in the U.S. southwestern deserts is being replaced by one where fires may reoccur as frequently as every 20 to 30 years. The shortened return interval, which translates to an increase in fires, has implications for management of Soil Corrective Action Units (CAUs) and Corrective Action Sites (CASs) for which the Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office has responsibility. A series of studies was initiated at uncontaminated analog sites to better understand the possible impacts of erosion and transport by wind and water should contaminated soil sites burn. The first of these studies was undertaken at the Jacob Fire site approximately 12 kilometers (7.5 miles) north of Hiko, Nevada. A lightning-caused fire burned approximately 200 hectares during August 6-8, 2008. The site is representative of a transition between Mojave and Great Basin desert ecoregions on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), where the largest number of Soil CAUs/CASs are located. The area that burned at the Jacob Fire site was primarily a Coleogyne ramosissima (blackbrush) and Ephedra nevadensis (Mormon tea) community, also an abundant shrub assemblage in the similar transition zone on the NNSS. This report summarizes three years of measurements after the fire. Seven measurement campaigns at the Jacob Fire site were completed. Measurements were made on burned ridge (upland) and drainage sites, and on burned and unburned sites beneath and between vegetation. A Portable In-Situ Wind Erosion Lab (PI-SWERL) was used to estimate emissions of suspended particles at different wind speeds. Context for these measurements was provided through a meteorological tower that was installed at the Jacob Fire site to obtain local, relevant environmental parameters. Filter samples, collected from the exhaust of the PI-SWERL during measurements, were analyzed for chemical composition. Runoff and water erosion were quantified through a series of rainfall/runoff simulation tests in which controlled amounts of water were delivered to the soil surface in a specified amount of time. Runoff data were collected from understory and interspace soils on burned ridge and drainage areas. Runoff volume and suspended sediment in the runoff were sampled; the particle size distribution of the sediment was determined by laboratory analysis. Several land surface and soil characteristics associated with runoff were integrated by the calculation of site-specific curve numbers. Several vegetation surveys were conducted to assess post-burn recovery. Data from plots in both burned and unburned areas included species identification, counts, and location. Characterization of fire-affected area included measures at both the landscape scale and at specific sites. Although wind erosion measurements indicate that there are seasonal influences on almost all parameters measured, several trends were observed. PI-SWERL measurements indicated the potential for PM10 windblown dust emissions was higher on areas that were burned compared to areas that were not. Among the burned areas, understory soils in drainage areas were the most emissive, and interspace soils along burned ridges were least emissive. By 34 months after the burn (MAB), at the end of the study, emissions from all burned soil sites were virtually indistinguishable from unburned levels. Like the amount of emissions, the chemical signature of the fire (indicated by the EC-Soil ratio) was elevated immediately after the fire and approached pre-burn levels by 24 MAB. Thus, the potential for wind erosion at the Jacob Fire site, as measured by the amount and type of emissions, increased significantly after the fire and returned to unburned levels by 24 MAB. The effect of fire on the potential for water erosion at the Jacob Fire site was more ambiguous. Runoff and sediment from ridge interspace soils and unburned interspace soils were similar throughout the study period. Seldom, if ever, did runoff and sediment occur in burned drainage area soils. Fo

  9. Producing - Harvesting - Marketing High Quality Upland Cotton in the El Paso Trade Territory. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Charles A. (compiler)

    1963-01-01

    . The amount of water required will depend on soil depth, water holding capacity of the soil and the amount of soil moisture in storage in the root zone. Where salinity is a problem, sufficient water should be used to leach salts to a safe level. Apply... such as nomically by many farmers in the area. If moisture stress or cold weather. machine picking in green-leaf is attempted, have an experienced picker-operator. When Desiccants picking in green-leaf, the pressure plates of the Disiccants are not recommended...

  10. Soiling of building envelope surfaces and its effect on solar reflectance - Part II: Development of an accelerate aging method for roofing materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sleiman, Mohamad; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Berdahl, Paul; Gilbert, Haley; Quelen, Sarah; Marlot, Lea; Preble, Chelsea; Chen, Sharon; Montalbano, Amadine; Rosseler, Olivier; Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen; Destaillats, Hugo

    2013-11-18

    Highly reflective roofs can decrease the energy required for building air conditioning, help mitigate the urban heat island effect, and slow global warming. However, these benefits are diminished by soiling and weathering processes that reduce the solar reflectance of most roofing materials. Soiling results from the deposition of atmospheric particulate matter and the growth of microorganisms, each of which absorb sunlight. Weathering of materials occurs with exposure to water, sunlight, and high temperatures. This study developed an accelerated aging method that incorporates features of soiling and weathering. The method sprays a calibrated aqueous soiling mixture of dust minerals, black carbon, humic acid, and salts onto preconditioned coupons of roofing materials, then subjects the soiled coupons to cycles of ultraviolet radiation, heat and water in a commercial weatherometer. Three soiling mixtures were optimized to reproduce the site-specific solar spectral reflectance features of roofing products exposed for 3 years in a hot and humid climate (Miami, Florida); a hot and dry climate (Phoenix, Arizona); and a polluted atmosphere in a temperate climate (Cleveland, Ohio). A fourth mixture was designed to reproduce the three-site average values of solar reflectance and thermal emittance attained after 3 years of natural exposure, which the Cool Roof Rating Council (CRRC) uses to rate roofing products sold in the US. This accelerated aging method was applied to 25 products?single ply membranes, factory and field applied coatings, tiles, modified bitumen cap sheets, and asphalt shingles?and reproduced in 3 days the CRRC's 3-year aged values of solar reflectance. This accelerated aging method can be used to speed the evaluation and rating of new cool roofing materials.

  11. Predicting Soil-Water Partition Coefficients for Cadmium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Predicting Soil-Water Partition Coefficients for Cadmium S U E N - Z O N E L E E Department, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 D O N A L D L . S P A R K S Department of Plant and Soil of Cd(II) on 15 New Jersey soils. The soils were characterized in terms of surface properties

  12. Protein accumulation and distribution in floodplain soils and river foam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rilli, Matthias C.

    REPORT Protein accumulation and distribution in floodplain soils and river foam Mary J. Harner,1 of particular organisms is unknown. In this study, we explore how a Bradford-reactive soil protein (BRSP in Montana, we extracted BRSP from soils and related the protein concentrations to the age of soil surfaces

  13. THE SOIL SCOOP by Clain Jones, Montana State University Extension Soil Fertility Specialist, and Kathrin Olson-Rutz, Research Associate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    THE SOIL SCOOP by Clain Jones, Montana State University Extension Soil Fertility Specialist Feeding the Vegetable Garden Knowing about garden soil can lead to healthy plants, efficient resource use, and protection of ground and surface water. Soil nutrients and organic matter are important for a healthy garden

  14. The effect of mineral surface chemistry on the biodegradation of petroleum 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan, Katherine Ann

    1997-01-01

    the biodegradation of a crude oil in soils with different characteristics including mineral surface chemistry, organic matter content, and surface area in order to determine the impact of soil chemistry on bioavailability and biodegradability of petroleum. Two soils...

  15. LAND MINE DETECTION IN BARE SOILS USING THERMAL INFRARED SENSORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borchers, Brian

    LAND MINE DETECTION IN BARE SOILS USING THERMAL INFRARED SENSORS Sung-ho Hong, Timothy W. Miller, The Netherlands. lensen@fel.tno.nl ABSTRACT Soil surface temperatures not only exhibit daily and annual cycles of soil surface temperatures, it will be difficult to determine what times of day are most suitable

  16. Soiling of building envelope surfaces and its effect on solar reflectance - Part II: Development of an accelerate aging method for roofing materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Mohamad Sleiman

    2014-01-01

    thermal comfort conditions. Solar Energy 85, 3085-3102.surfaces and its effect on solar reflectance-Part I:of roofing product databases. . Solar Energy Materials and

  17. Predicting soil erosion from Cap Rouge Plateau, Haiti 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcelin, Fritz Sauveur

    1985-01-01

    in waterways, causing more frequent flooding, higher costs for navigation, and reduced storage capacity of reservoirs. Geological (sometimes called natural or normal) erosion is the inexorable and continuous process of evolution of the earth's surface... clays and other soil grains together in quite stable forms in many strongly leached, temperate- region soils and in numerous tropical soils. These soils may be quite resistant to erosion. 27 Cro in Hi Soils just plowed from native vegetation...

  18. Soil effects on thermal signatures of buried nonmetallic landmines Remke L. van Dam*a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borchers, Brian

    Soil effects on thermal signatures of buried nonmetallic landmines Remke L. van Dam*a , Brian for temperature propagation through homogeneous and layered soils is presented to predict surface temperatures as a function of soil heat flux amplitude, soil texture, soil water content, and thermal properties and burial

  19. Effect of soil freezing on particulate resuspension

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duce, S.W.; Shaw, P.G.; Winberg, M.R.

    1988-08-01

    This report presents the results of small scale laboratory tests that were conducted to determine the effect of soil freezing on soil resuspension. Nontransuranic contaminated soil form the Radioactive Waste Management Complex was subjected to a series of test conditions to determine respirable and nonrespirable fractions of airborne dust. A separate fraction of the same soil was spiked with Pu-239 and subjected to the same test conditions. Concentrations of resuspended soil and Pu in air were determined. Test results show that: (a) the largest fraction of soil resuspended is in the nonrespirable size fraction, (b) the concentration of resuspended soil in air is highly dependent on surface air velocity, and (c) freezing is not as effective at reducing resuspension of fine dry soil as it is with coarse soil, and (d) artificially prepared Pu contaminated soil has a high proportion of the total activity distributed on ultrafine material, reacts inversely to the mass movement of soil, and does not adequately imitate Pu movement in an actual contaminated soil. 26 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. LIFE IN THE SOIL SOIL BIODIVERSITY: ITS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wall, Diana

    LIFE IN THE SOIL SOIL BIODIVERSITY: ITS IMPORTANCE TO ECOSYSTEM PROCESSES Report of a Workshop Held vision Literature cited Workshop participants EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Soils are one of the most poorly the soil physico- chemical environment and the soil's species through activities such as: inputs

  1. Detection of explosives in soils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chambers, William B. (Edgewood, NM); Rodacy, Philip J. (Albuquerque, NM); Phelan, James M. (Bosque Farms, NM); Woodfin, Ronald L. (Sandia Park, NM)

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method for detecting explosive-indicating compounds in subsurface soil. The apparatus has a probe with an adsorbent material on some portion of its surface that can be placed into soil beneath the ground surface, where the adsorbent material can adsorb at least one explosive-indicating compound. The apparatus additional has the capability to desorb the explosive-indicating compound through heating or solvent extraction. A diagnostic instrument attached to the probe detects the desorbed explosive-indicating compound. In the method for detecting explosive-indicating compounds in soil, the sampling probe with an adsorbent material on at least some portion of a surface of the sampling probe is inserted into the soil to contact the adsorbent material with the soil. The explosive-indicating compounds are then desorbed and transferred as either a liquid or gas sample to a diagnostic tool for analysis. The resulting gas or liquid sample is analyzed using at least one diagnostic tool selected from the group consisting of an ion-mobility spectrometer, a gas chromatograph, a high performance liquid chromatograph, a capillary electrophoresis chromatograph, a mass spectrometer, a Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer and a Raman spectrometer to detect the presence of explosive-indicating compounds.

  2. Soil Series

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541 *ImpactScience of SignaturesSoft CostsSoil &Soil0

  3. Analysis of volatile phase transport in soils using natural radon gas as a tracer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, C.; Thomas, D.M.

    1992-12-31

    We have conducted a field study of soil gas transport processes using radon gas as a naturally occurring tracer. The .experiment monitored soil gas radon activity, soil moisture, and soil temperature at three depths in the shallow soil column; barometric pressure, rainfall and wind speed were monitored at the soil surface. Linear and multiple regression analysis of the data sets has shown that the gas phase radon activities under natural environmental conditions are influenced by soil moisture content, barometric pressure variations, soil temperature and soil structure. The effect of wind speed on subsurface radon activities under our field conditions has not been demonstrated.

  4. Analysis of volatile phase transport in soils using natural radon gas as a tracer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, C.; Thomas, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    We have conducted a field study of soil gas transport processes using radon gas as a naturally occurring tracer. The .experiment monitored soil gas radon activity, soil moisture, and soil temperature at three depths in the shallow soil column; barometric pressure, rainfall and wind speed were monitored at the soil surface. Linear and multiple regression analysis of the data sets has shown that the gas phase radon activities under natural environmental conditions are influenced by soil moisture content, barometric pressure variations, soil temperature and soil structure. The effect of wind speed on subsurface radon activities under our field conditions has not been demonstrated.

  5. Enhancing the soil organic matter pool through biomass incorporation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felipe G. Sanchez; Emily A. Carter; John F. Klepac

    2003-01-01

    A study was installed in the upper Coastal Plains of South Carolina, USA that sought to examine the impact of incorporating downed slash materials into subsoil layers on soil chemical and physical properties as compared with the effect of slash materials left on the soil surface. Two sites were examined which differed in soil textural composition: sandy vs. clay.

  6. 100 Area soil washing: Bench scale tests on 116-F-4 pluto crib soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Field, J.G.

    1994-06-10

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a bench-scale treatability study on a pluto crib soil sample from 100 Area of the Hanford Site. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of physical separation (wet sieving), treatment processes (attrition scrubbing, and autogenous surface grinding), and chemical extraction methods as a means of separating radioactively-contaminated soil fractions from uncontaminated soil fractions. The soil washing treatability study was conducted on a soil sample from the 116-F-4 Pluto Crib that had been dug up as part of an excavation treatability study. Trace element analyses of this soil showed no elevated concentrations above typically uncontaminated soil background levels. Data on the distribution of radionuclide in various size fractions indicated that the soil-washing tests should be focused on the gravel and sand fractions of the 116-F-4 soil. The radionuclide data also showed that {sup 137}Cs was the only contaminant in this soil that exceeded the test performance goal (TPG). Therefore, the effectiveness of subsequent soil-washing tests for 116-F-4 soil was evaluated on the basis of activity attenuation of {sup 137}Cs in the gravel- and sand-size fractions.

  7. Heavy metal movement in metal-contaminated soil profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Zhenbin; Shuman, L.M.

    1996-10-01

    Heavy metal movement in soil profiles is a major environmental concern because even slow transport through the soil may eventually lead to deterioration of groundwater quality. In this study, three metal-contaminated soil (Fuquay, Dothan, and Clarendon) were selected from cropland were a high-metal flue dust had been applied annually for 6 years to raise soil pH, with application ending 4 years before sampling. One uncontaminated soil (Tifton) from the same physiographic area was also sampled as a control. Soil samples were collected in 15-cm increments from the surface to 105 cm in depth. Total contents of Zn, Cd, and Pb in the soils samples were determined. To better understand metal movement in relation to metal fractions in the soil profile, soil samples were also extracted sequentially for exchangeable (EXC), organic matter (OM), Mn oxide (MNO), amorphous Fe oxide (AFEO), crystalline Fe oxide (CFEO), and residual (RES) fractions. 35 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Vapor Transport in Dry Soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gee, Glendon W.; Ward, Anderson L.

    2001-11-16

    Water-vapor movement in soils is a complex process, controlled by both diffusion and advection and influenced by pressure and thermal gradients acting across tortuous flow paths. Wide-ranging interest in water-vapor transport includes both theoretical and practical aspects. Just how pressure and thermal gradients enhance water-vapor flow is still not completely understood and subject to ongoing research. Practical aspects include dryland farming (surface mulching), water harvesting (aerial wells), fertilizer placement, and migration of contaminants at waste-sites. The following article describes the processes and practical applications of water-vapor transport, with emphasis on unsaturated (dry) soil systems.

  9. Building Fertile Soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindsey, Ann

    2008-01-01

    A Backyard Guide to Healthy Soil and Higher Yields, by JohnInstitute. Start with the Soil, by Grace Gershuny. Emmaus,Institute. 1993. The Soul of Soil: A Guide to Ecological

  10. Thermal properties of soils and soils testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-02-17

    The thermal properties of soils are reviewed with reference to the use of soils as heat sources, heat sinks, or thermal storage. Specific heat and thermal conductivity are discussed. (ACR)

  11. An ecological and range vegetation analysis of the upland sites of the southern extension of the oak-hickory forest region in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCaleb, John Earl

    1954-01-01

    a c r e s p er animal unit y e a r ................... 99 Table Page 1 AN ECOLOGICAL AND RANGE VEGETATION ANALYSIS OF THE UPLAND SITES OF THE SOUTHERN EXTENSION OF THE OAK- HICKORY FOREST REGION IN TEXAS INTRODUCTION The oak -h ick o ry fo... the nature o f the vegetational changes which are o c cu rr in g is n e c e s sa ry fo r p roper management o f these a reas as range lands. 4 OBJECTIVES The ob je c t iv es set forth in this study are th ree - fo ld : 1. To make an e co lo g...

  12. Soil Nitrogen Mineralization Potential for Improved Fertilizer Recommendations and Decreased Nitrate Contamination of Groundwater 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franzluebbers, Alan; Haney, Richard; Hons, Frank

    1995-01-01

    In order to prevent overfertilization, which could lead to groundwater contamination, rapid and accurate soil testing procedures are needed to evaluate agricultural surface soils for their potential to mineralize C and N. Our objectives were...

  13. The Soil Moisture Active and Passive Mission (SMAP): Science and Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Entekhabi, Dara

    The soil moisture active and passive mission (SMAP) will provide global maps of soil moisture content and surface freeze/thaw state. Global measurements of these variables are critical for terrestrial water and carbon cycle ...

  14. Environmental Soil Chemistry Second Edition Environmental Soil Chemistry illustrates fundamental principles of soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Environmental Soil Chemistry Second Edition Environmental Soil Chemistry illustrates fundamental principles of soil chemistry with respect to environmental reactions between soils and other natural contemporary training in the basics of soil chemistry and applications to real-world environmental concerns

  15. Morphology of rain water channelization in systematically varied model sandy soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Wei; C. M. Cejas; R. Barrois; R. Dreyfus; D. J. Durian

    2014-03-13

    We visualize the formation of fingered flow in dry model sandy soils under different raining conditions using a quasi-2d experimental set-up, and systematically determine the impact of soil grain diameter and surface wetting property on water channelization phenomenon. The model sandy soils we use are random closely-packed glass beads with varied diameters and surface treatments. For hydrophilic sandy soils, our experiments show that rain water infiltrates into a shallow top layer of soil and creates a horizontal water wetting front that grows downward homogeneously until instabilities occur to form fingered flows. For hydrophobic sandy soils, in contrast, we observe that rain water ponds on the top of soil surface until the hydraulic pressure is strong enough to overcome the capillary repellency of soil and create narrow water channels that penetrate the soil packing. Varying the raindrop impinging speed has little influence on water channel formation. However, varying the rain rate causes significant changes in water infiltration depth, water channel width, and water channel separation. At a fixed raining condition, we combine the effects of grain diameter and surface hydrophobicity into a single parameter and determine its influence on water infiltration depth, water channel width, and water channel separation. We also demonstrate the efficiency of several soil water improvement methods that relate to rain water channelization phenomenon, including pre-wetting sandy soils at different level before rainfall, modifying soil surface flatness, and applying superabsorbent hydrogel particles as soil modifiers.

  16. Managing Soil Salinity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provin, Tony; Pitt, John L.

    2001-07-13

    oceans and lakes. Fertilizers and organic amendments also add salts to the soil. Effects of salts on plants As soils become more saline, plants become unable to draw as much water from the soil. This is because the plant roots contain varying... and die, no matter how much you water them. Routine soil testing can identify your soil?s salinity levels and suggest measures you can take to correct the specific salinity problem in your soil. Salinity and salt The terms salt and salinity are often used...

  17. Exfiltrometer apparatus and method for measuring unsaturated hydrologic properties in soil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M.; Sisson, James B.; Schafer, Annette L.

    2006-01-17

    Exfiltrometer apparatus includes a container for holding soil. A sample container for holding sample soil is positionable with respect to the container so that the sample soil contained in the sample container is in communication with soil contained in the container. A first tensiometer operatively associated with the sample container senses a surface water potential at about a surface of the sample soil contained in the sample container. A second tensiometer operatively associated with the sample container senses a first subsurface water potential below the surface of the sample soil. A water content sensor operatively associated with the sample container senses a water content in the sample soil. A water supply supplies water to the sample soil. A data logger operatively connected to the first and second tensiometers, and to the water content sensor receives and processes data provided by the first and second tensiometers and by the water content sensor.

  18. Inverse Modeling of Hydrologic Parameters Using Surface Flux...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    estimated include surface and subsurface runoff generation parameters and vadose zone soil water parameters. We find that using model parameters calibrated by the least-square...

  19. Reclaiming earthen drainage channels using organic soil amendments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carpenter, Todd A

    2000-01-01

    . The primary goal of this study was to determine the best combination of organic amendment and vegetation to stabilize and maintain these waterways. A site was selected that had surface soil textures ranging from fine sandy loam to silt loam. Soils...

  20. Effect of soiling in CPV systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vivar, M.; Herrero, R.; Anton, I.; Martinez-Moreno, F.; Moreton, R.; Sala, G.

    2010-07-15

    The effect of soiling in flat PV modules has been already studied, causing a reduction of the electrical output of 4% on average. For CPV's, as far as soiling produces light scattering at the optical collector surface, the scattered rays should be definitively lost because they cannot be focused onto the receivers again. While the theoretical study becomes difficult because soiling is variable at different sites, it becomes easier to begin the monitoring of the real field performance of concentrators and then raise the following question: how much does the soiling affect to PV concentrators in comparison with flat panels?' The answers allow to predict the PV concentrator electrical performance and to establish a pattern of cleaning frequency. Some experiments have been conducted at the IES-UPM and CSES-ANU sites, consisting in linear reflective concentration systems, a point focus refractive concentrator and a flat module. All the systems have been measured when soiled and then after cleaning, achieving different increases of I{sub SC}. In general, results show that CPV systems are more sensitive to soiling than flat panels, accumulating losses in I{sub SC} of about 14% on average in three different tests conducted at IES-UPM and CSES-ANU test sites in Madrid (Spain) and Canberra (Australia). Some concentrators can reach losses up to 26% when the system is soiled for 4 months of exposure. (author)

  1. Microbial modulators of soil carbon storage: integrating genomic and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    linkage of genomes to global phenomena is a significant chal- lenge, many connections at intermediate in the earth's soil by pumping CO2 into existing or drilled/excavated sub-surface reservoirs; and (iii) long

  2. VARIATION IN EROSION/DEPOSITION RATES OVER THE LAST FIFTTY YEARS ON ALLUVIAL FAN SURFACES OF L. PLEISTOCENE-MID HOLOCENE AGE, ESTIMATIONS USING 137CS SOIL PROFILE DATA, AMARGOSA VALLEY, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Harrington; R. Kelly; K.T. Ebert

    2005-08-26

    Variations in erosion and deposition for the last fifty years (based on estimates from 137Cs profiles) on surfaces (Late Pleistocene to Late Holocene in age) making up the Fortymile Wash alluvial fan south of Yucca Mountain, is a function of surface age and of desert pavement development or absence. For purposes of comparing erosion and deposition, the surfaces can be examined as three groups: (1) Late Pleistocene surfaces possess areas of desert pavement development with thin Av or sandy A horizons, formed by the trapping capabilities of the pavements. These zones of deposition are complemented by coppice dune formation on similar parts of the surface. Areas on the surface where no pavement development has occurred are erosional in nature with 0.0 +/- 0.0 cm to 1.5 +/- 0.5 cm of erosion occurring primarily by winds blowing across the surface. Overall these surfaces may show either a small net depositional gain or small erosional loss. (2) Early Holocene surfaces have no well-developed desert pavements, but may have residual gravel deposits in small areas on the surfaces. These surfaces show the most consistent erosional surface areas on which it ranges from 1.0 +/-.01 cm to 2.0+/- .01 cm. Fewer depositional forms are found on this age of surface so there is probably a net loss of 1.5 cm across these surfaces. (3) The Late Holocene surfaces show the greatest variability in erosion and deposition. Overbank deposition during floods cover many edges of these surfaces and coppice dune formation also creates depositional features. Erosion rates are highly variable and range from 0.0 +/- 0.0 to a maximum of 2.0+/-.01. Erosion occurs because of the lack of protection of the surface. However, the common areas of deposition probably result in the surface having a small net depositional gain across these surfaces. Thus, the interchannel surfaces of the Fortymile Wash fan show a variety of erosional styles as well as areas of deposition. The fan, therefore, is a dynamic system that primarily responds to the incising of the channels into the upper fan surface, and the development of protecting desert pavements with time.

  3. Dynamic Simulation of Unsteady Flow of Water in Unsaturated Soils and its Application to Subirrigation System Design 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiler, E. A.; Bhuiyan, S. I.

    1971-01-01

    Two computer programs were developed. One simulated vertical unsteady infiltration through the surface into a homogeneous unsaturated soil. Simulation results were obtained for three different soils--Yolo light clay, ...

  4. Combined effects of short-term rainfall patterns and soil texture on nitrogen cycling -- A Modeling Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gu, C.

    2010-01-01

    NO 3- concentrations in leachate and surface water can alsoResponse Soil nitrate leachate fluxes were very sensitive tothe 15 cm month -1 scenario, N leachate fluxes in both soils

  5. Assessing Phosphorous Loss to Protect Surface Water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia, Raul

    2005-01-01

    programs. It is an integrated approach that considers soil and landscape features in order tx H2O | pg. 10 Assessing Phosphorus Loss to Protect Surface Water to find appropriate phosphorus management practices by estimating phosphorus delivery...

  6. Experimental unsaturated soil mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delage, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    In this general report, experimental systems and procedures of investigating the hydro-mechanical behaviour of unsaturated soils are presented. The water retention properties of unsaturated soils are commented and linked to various physical parameters and properties of the soils. Techniques of controlling suction are described together with their adaptation in various laboratory testing devices. Some typical features of the mechanical behaviour of unsaturated soils are presented within an elasto-plastic framework. An attempt to describe the numerous and significant recent advances in the investigation of the behaviour of unsaturated soils, including the contributions to this Conference, is proposed.

  7. A constitutive model for unsaturated cemented soils under cyclic loading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, C; Pereira, Jean-Michel; Huang, M S

    2008-01-01

    On the basis of plastic bounding surface model, the damage theory for structured soils and unsaturated soil mechanics, an elastoplastic model for unsaturated loessic soils under cyclic loading has been elaborated. Firstly, the description of bond degradation in a damage framework is given, linking the damage of soil's structure to the accumulated strain. The Barcelona Basic Model (BBM) was considered for the suction effects. The elastoplastic model is then integrated into a bounding surface plasticity framework in order to model strain accumulation along cyclic loading, even under small stress levels. The validation of the proposed model is conducted by comparing its predictions with the experimental results from multi-level cyclic triaxial tests performed on a natural loess sampled beside the Northern French railway for high speed train and about 140 km far from Paris. The comparisons show the capabilities of the model to describe the behaviour of unsaturated cemented soils under cyclic loading.

  8. Deriving soil moisture with the combined L-band radar and radiometer measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Jiancheng

    In this study, we develop a combined active/passive technique to estimate surface soil moisture with the focus on the short vegetated surfaces. We first simulated a database for both active and passive signals under SMAP's ...

  9. CO2 CH4 flux Air temperature Soil temperature and Soil moisture, Barrow, Alaska 2013 ver. 1

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Margaret Torn

    2015-01-14

    This dataset consists of field measurements of CO2 and CH4 flux, as well as soil properties made during 2013 in Areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska. Included are i) measurements of CO2 and CH4 flux made from June to September (ii) Calculation of corresponding Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) and CH4 exchange (transparent minus opaque) between atmosphere and the ecosystem (ii) Measurements of Los Gatos Research (LGR) chamber air temperature made from June to September (ii) measurements of surface layer depth, type of surface layer, soil temperature and soil moisture from June to September.

  10. CO2 CH4 flux Air temperature Soil temperature and Soil moisture, Barrow, Alaska 2013 ver. 1

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Margaret Torn

    This dataset consists of field measurements of CO2 and CH4 flux, as well as soil properties made during 2013 in Areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska. Included are i) measurements of CO2 and CH4 flux made from June to September (ii) Calculation of corresponding Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) and CH4 exchange (transparent minus opaque) between atmosphere and the ecosystem (ii) Measurements of Los Gatos Research (LGR) chamber air temperature made from June to September (ii) measurements of surface layer depth, type of surface layer, soil temperature and soil moisture from June to September.

  11. Soil Horizons Some Noteworthy Soil Science in Wisconsin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Stephen R.

    Soil Horizons Some Noteworthy Soil Science in Wisconsin Alfred E. Hartemink The impact and benefits of soil science have only partly been documented. Here I highlight four noteworthy soil science achievements from the state of Wisconsin that took place between 1870 and the early 1980s: (i) the first soil

  12. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Soil order and management practices control soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Kessel, Chris

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Soil order and management practices control soil phosphorus fractions in managed in wetland rice soils. In this study we evaluated 71 wetland soils in the Sacramento Valley, California, consisting of different soil orders (Alfisols, Entisols, Mollisols and Verti- sols) and different management

  13. Author's personal copy Wading bird guano contributes to Hg accumulation in tree island soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    . The mean Hg concentration in surface soils of ghost tree islands was low and similar to marsh soil. For live tree islands, Hg concentrations in the surface head region were considerably greater than those Everglades typically consists of head, middle and tail re- gions (Mason and Valk, 2002). The head is the most

  14. Procedures for sampling radium-contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleischhauer, H.L.

    1985-10-01

    Two procedures for sampling the surface layer (0 to 15 centimeters) of radium-contaminated soil are recommended for use in remedial action projects. Both procedures adhere to the philosophy that soil samples should have constant geometry and constant volume in order to ensure uniformity. In the first procedure, a ''cookie cutter'' fashioned from pipe or steel plate, is driven to the desired depth by means of a slide hammer, and the sample extracted as a core or plug. The second procedure requires use of a template to outline the sampling area, from which the sample is obtained using a trowel or spoon. Sampling to the desired depth must then be performed incrementally. Selection of one procedure over the other is governed primarily by soil conditions, the cookie cutter being effective in nongravelly soils, and the template procedure appropriate for use in both gravelly and nongravelly soils. In any event, a minimum sample volume of 1000 cubic centimeters is recommended. The step-by-step procedures are accompanied by a description of the minimum requirements for sample documentation. Transport of the soil samples from the field is then addressed in a discussion of the federal regulations for shipping radioactive materials. Interpretation of those regulations, particularly in light of their application to remedial action soil-sampling programs, is provided in the form of guidance and suggested procedures. Due to the complex nature of the regulations, however, there is no guarantee that our interpretations of them are complete or entirely accurate. Preparation of soil samples for radium-226 analysis by means of gamma-ray spectroscopy is described.

  15. Department of Crop and Soil Sciences PhD Graduate Research Assistantship: Soil Science/Soil Quality/Soil Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flury, Markus

    Department of Crop and Soil Sciences PhD Graduate Research Assistantship: Soil Science/Soil Quality/Soil Physics Position Summary: Plastic mulches are used in agriculture to conserve water, suppress weeds, and increase soil temperatures. However, plastic mulches need to be disposed off at the end

  16. Disturbed core Undisturbed soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Batch Disturbed core Undisturbed soil column Pedon Field Watershed Multi-scale modeling .001-1 m3 1-10 m3 10-10,000 m3 >10,000 m3 Unraveling the influence of scale on organic C transport Soil through deep soil profiles may be the "missing" C flux in global budgets. Jardine, P.M., M.A. Mayes, J. R

  17. Plant diversity increases soil microbial activity and soil carbon storage.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    B. The vertical distribution of soil organic carbon and itsA. S. & Whitmore, A. P. Soil organic matter turnover isorganic matter in a cultivated soil. Org. Geochem. 33, 357–

  18. Building Fertile Soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindsey, Ann

    2008-01-01

    soil amendments such as compost, manure, cover crops, andare some readily available sources: j Compost is rich inorganic matter, and making compost is a great way to recycle

  19. Mass Transport within Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKone, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    large fraction of the sewage sludge produced in many regionsharmful microorganisms. Sewage sludge contains contaminantsdisposal of sewage and industrial sludge. Soil contamination

  20. This content has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text. Download details

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    of Land Resources and Environmental Sciences, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717, USA 7 on thick ice-rich peat deposits over reworked lowland loess. In rocky uplands, after fire permafrost thawed thermokarst bogs and flooding of soils, and surface soils accumulated new bog peat. We were not able to detect

  1. SOIL TEST INTERPRETATIONS RECOMMENDATIONS HANDBOOK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, James S.

    1 SOIL TEST INTERPRETATIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS HANDBOOK Originally written 1983 By Daryl D..................................................20 SOIL ACIDITY AND LIMESTONE...............................................27 EXCHANGEABLE MAGNESIUM No. Page No. I. Nitrogen rate adjustments based upon soil texture, organic matter, and time of major

  2. Technical Note Engineering Soils Maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Note Engineering Soils Maps PAUL M. SANTI Department of Geology and Geological, Suite 100, Overland Park, KS 66211 Key Terms: Engineering Properties, Soils, Hazards, Mapping INTRODUCTION For many applications, `engineering soils maps' may be preferable to comprehensive engineering

  3. X-ray Microspectroscopy and Chemical Reactions in Soil Microsites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D Hesterberg; M Duff; J Dixon; M Vepraskas

    2011-12-31

    Soils provide long-term storage of environmental contaminants, which helps to protect water and air quality and diminishes negative impacts of contaminants on human and ecosystem health. Characterizing solid-phase chemical species in highly complex matrices is essential for developing principles that can be broadly applied to the wide range of notoriously heterogeneous soils occurring at the earth's surface. In the context of historical developments in soil analytical techniques, we describe applications of bulk-sample and spatially resolved synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) for characterizing chemical species of contaminants in soils, and for determining the uniqueness of trace-element reactivity in different soil microsites. Spatially resolved X-ray techniques provide opportunities for following chemical changes within soil microsites that serve as highly localized chemical micro- (or nano-)reactors of unique composition. An example of this microreactor concept is shown for micro-X-ray absorption near edge structure analysis of metal sulfide oxidation in a contaminated soil. One research challenge is to use information and principles developed from microscale soil chemistry for predicting macroscale and field-scale behavior of soil contaminants.

  4. communications in soil scienceand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    ) IMPACT OF HIGH-VOLUME WOOD-FIRED BOILER ASH AMENDMENT ON SOIL PROPERTIES AND NUTRIENTS Tait Chirenje was conducted to determine the changes in soil properties and the availability and leachability of nutrients.13) increased water holding capacity increases supply of water to plants. However, the results from coal ash

  5. communications in soil scienceand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    ) IMPACT OF HIGH-VOLUME WOOD-FIRED BOILER ASH AMENDMENT ON SOIL PROPERTIES AND NUTRIENTS Tait Chirenje-0290 ABSTRACT Forest application of boiler ash is fast becoming a popular alternative to landfilling. Boiler ash following the application of large quantities of boiler ash in a sandy soil (with a spodic horizon). Two

  6. Free Standing Soil Sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    Free Standing Soil Sample Kiosks Clemson University Cooperative Extension Service Reportto of Richland County, Jackie Kopack Jordan has partnered with local garden centers to provide free standing soil sample collections sites. The free standing kiosks are located at three local garden centers. Woodley

  7. Chapter 14 Geology and Soils

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in bold and acronyms are defined in Chapter 32, Glossary and Acronyms. Chapter 14 Geology and Soils This chapter describes existing geological and soil conditions in the...

  8. Soil Acidity and Manganese Nutrition of Corn and Soybeans as Affected by Lime and Nitrogen Applications in an Oxisol under a No-Till System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caires, Eduardo Fávero; Garbuio, Fernando José; Joris, Hélio Antonio Wood; Pereira, Paulo Roberto da Silva Filho

    2009-01-01

    control soil acidity in NT, lime is broadcast on the surfacethat examined the effect of lime and N applications soilacid loamy soil. Dolomitic lime was surface applied and N-NH

  9. Missing links in the root-soil organic matter continuum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Brien, Sarah L.; Iversen, Colleen M

    2009-01-01

    The soil environment remains one of the most complex and poorly understood research frontiers in ecology. Soil organic matter (SOM), which spans a continuum from fresh detritus to highly processed, mineral-associated organic matter, is the foundation of sustainable terrestrial ecosystems. Heterogeneous SOM pools are fueled by inputs from living and dead plants, driven by the activity of micro- and mesofauna, and are shaped by a multitude of abiotic factors. The specialization required to measure unseen processes that occur on a wide range of spatial and temporal scales has led to the partitioning of soil ecology research across several disciplines. In the organized oral session 'Missing links in the root-soil organic matter continuum' at the annual Ecological Society of America meeting in Albuquerque, NM, USA, we joined the call for greater communication and collaboration among ecologists who work at the root-soil interface (e.g. Coleman, 2008). Our goal was to bridge the gap between scientific disciplines and to synthesize disconnected pieces of knowledge from root-centric and soil-centric studies into an integrated understanding of belowground ecosystem processes. We focused this report around three compelling themes that arose from the session: (1) the influence of the rhizosphere on SOM cycling, (2) the role of soil heterotrophs in driving the transformation of root detritus to SOM, and (3) the controlling influence of the soil environment on SOM dynamics. We conclude with a discussion of new approaches for gathering data to bridge gaps in the root-SOM continuum and to inform the next generation of ecosystem models. Although leaf litter has often been considered to be the main source of organic inputs to soil, Ann Russell synthesized a convincing body of work demonstrating that roots, rather than surface residues, control the accumulation of SOM in a variety of ecosystems. Living roots, which are chemically diverse and highly dynamic, also influence a wide range of soil processes, from the exudation of labile C compounds to the development of fungal associations. For example, Zoe Cardon demonstrated that the root-mediated redistribution of deep soil water to relatively dry shallower soil, increased soil CO{sub 2} efflux and nutrient cycling near the surface in an arid ecosystem. Andrew Kulmatiski also discussed the importance of rooting distribution throughout the soil profile for strategies of water uptake by different species in an African savanna. Later, Julie Jastrow demonstrated that living roots shape soil physical structure by promoting the formation of soil aggregates, which facilitated accrual of SOM in restored grasslands. Taken together, the evidence is compelling that living roots, and organic matter derived from root detritus, are important parts of the continuum of organic matter in the soil. Larger soil organisms (i.e. 50 {micro}m to many cm in body size) play an important role in the root-SOM continuum by grazing on roots and microbes, comminuting organic matter and aggregating soil in fecal pellets. However, litterbag and soil incubation studies necessarily exclude invertebrates, and research on faunal activity and trophic dynamics tends to be independent from research on the biogeochemistry of SOM cycling. Tim Filley used plant-derived biomarkers in invertebrate residues to bridge the gap between larger soil organisms, such as earthworms and beetle larvae, and SOM distribution. He found that larger soil organisms help to stabilize root-derived organic matter in soil aggregates. Similar coupling of biogeochemistry with food web studies could prove fruitful for describing mechanisms that underlie critical ecosystem processes. Despite considerable research efforts, the breadth of the microbial role in the root-SOM continuum remains unresolved. Using advanced pyrosequencing techniques, David Nelson demonstrated the importance of archea as nitrifiers in agricultural systems exposed to elevated [CO{sub 2}]. Rising atmospheric [CO{sub 2}] and other changing environmental factors add a layer of complexity t

  10. Extractable soil phosphorus in Blackland Prairie soils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byrd, Robert Claude

    1995-01-01

    crop P response, evaluate crop response to P fertilizer placement and rate, and compare extractable P levels from TAEX, Bray 1, Olsen, TAEX 1, TAEX 2, and TAEX 3 in selected Blackland Prairie soils. Five field locations were established with replicated...

  11. Soil bacterial and fungal community responses to nitrogen addition across soil depth and microhabitat in an arid shrubland

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mueller, Rebecca C.; Belnap, Jayne; Kuske, Cheryl R.

    2015-09-04

    Arid shrublands are stressful environments, typified by alkaline soils low in organic matter, with biologically-limiting extremes in water availability, temperature, and UV radiation. The widely-spaced plants and interspace biological soil crusts in these regions provide soil nutrients in a localized fashion, creating a mosaic pattern of plant- or crust-associated microhabitats with distinct nutrient composition. With sporadic and limited rainfall, nutrients are primarily retained in the shallow surface soil, patterning biological activity. We examined soil bacterial and fungal community responses to simulated nitrogen (N) deposition in an arid Larrea tridentata-Ambrosia dumosa field experiment in southern Nevada, USA, using high-throughput sequencing ofmore »ribosomal RNA genes. To examine potential interactions among the N application, microhabitat and soil depth, we sampled soils associated with shrub canopies and interspace biological crusts at two soil depths (0–0.5 or 0–10 cm) across the N-amendment gradient (0, 7, and 15 kg ha–1 yr–1). We hypothesized that localized compositional differences in soil microbiota would constrain the impacts of N addition to a microhabitat distribution that would reflect highly localized geochemical conditions and microbial community composition. The richness and community composition of both bacterial and fungal communities differed significantly by microhabitat and with soil depth in each microhabitat. Only bacterial communities exhibited significant responses to the N addition. Community composition correlated with microhabitat and depth differences in soil geochemical features. Provided the distinct roles of soil bacteria and fungi in major nutrient cycles, the resilience of fungi and sensitivity of bacteria to N amendments suggests that increased N input predicted for many arid ecosystems could shift nutrient cycling toward pathways driven primarily by fungal communities.« less

  12. Soil Profile Rebuilding Specification (Full Version)--1 Soil Profile Rebuilding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    for Restoration of Graded and Compacted Soils that will be Vegetated CSI Div 2 CSICode-02910-Plant Preparation or addition of topsoil, and subsequent planting with woody plants. The soil preparation portion of Soil-Soil Preparation CONTENTS 1. PURPOSE AND DESCRIPTION 2. PROCEDURE 3. DEFINITIONS 4. SUBMITTALS REFERENCES

  13. APBI 401 / SOIL 501: SOIL PROCESSES TERM 1 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    APBI 401 / SOIL 501: SOIL PROCESSES TERM 1 ­ 2014 Instructor Sandra Brown, MCML 156c Office hour: M Rationale: Soils are a fundamental component of agro-ecological, forest and other land use systems; reflecting natural processes and the influence of human activities. Soil properties and processes regulate

  14. APBI 403 / SOIL 503 SOIL SAMPLING, ANALYSES AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    APBI 403 / SOIL 503 SOIL SAMPLING, ANALYSES AND DATA INTERPRETATION TERM 1 ­ 2015/16 Instructors measurement procedures and techniques in soil science. Course Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of APBI 403 readings will be drawn from a variety of sources. Course Marks: APBI 403 ­ Soil Sampling, Analyses and Data

  15. UNCERTAINTY IN THE SPECIFICATION OF SURFACE CHARACTERISTICS, PART II: HIERARCHY OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raman, Sethu

    - transpiration, surface and air temperature, circulation and advection of scalars, and precipitation patterns heating and cooling, influencing the moisture availability in and above the soil. This feature

  16. Digital Soil Mapping: Interactions with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grunwald, Sabine

    Chapter 21 Digital Soil Mapping: Interactions with and Applications for Hydropedology J.A. Thompson,1, * S. Roecker,2 S. Grunwald3 and P.R. Owens4 ABSTRACT Spatial information on soils, particularly hydrologic and hydromorphic soil properties, is used to understand and assess soil water retention, flooding

  17. Department: SOIL Course No.: 2120

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    :George Elliott Content Area: CA3 Science and Technology Catalog Copy: SOIL 2120. Environmental Soil Science (251 products) spend a significant amount of time in soils. This, in turn, impacts water quality. The production it has on our everyday lives, and the interdependency of the various natural environments. Soil formation

  18. Automated soil gas monitoring chamber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Edwards, Nelson T.; Riggs, Jeffery S.

    2003-07-29

    A chamber for trapping soil gases as they evolve from the soil without disturbance to the soil and to the natural microclimate within the chamber has been invented. The chamber opens between measurements and therefore does not alter the metabolic processes that influence soil gas efflux rates. A multiple chamber system provides for repetitive multi-point sampling, undisturbed metabolic soil processes between sampling, and an essentially airtight sampling chamber operating at ambient pressure.

  19. Saving our soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grandy, A. Stuart; Billings, Sharon A.; Richter Dan

    2010-05-01

    Saving our soils 171 A Stuart Grandy Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI GUEST EDITORIAL GUEST EDITORIAL GUEST EDITORIAL © The Ecological Society of America www.frontiersinecology.org Although the US healthcare system is among the best... in the world at treating disease, it is frequentlycriticized for not doing enough to prevent disease. Similarly, soil management, while effectively address- ing acute problems, is less successful at preventing chronic degradation. This analogy becomes clear...

  20. Soil Biology & Biochemistry 38 (2006) 22922299 Modifications of degradation-resistant soil organic matter by soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miksik, Ivan

    2006-01-01

    Soil Biology & Biochemistry 38 (2006) 2292­2299 Modifications of degradation-resistant soil organic matter by soil saprobic microfungi Veronika R eza´ c ova´ a,b,Ã, Hana Hrs elova´ a , Hana Gryndlerova in their solutions and in sterile soil by microfungal species and two well-known HA degraders were studied

  1. Propagation of seismic waves through liquefied soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taiebat, Mahdi; Jeremic, Boris; Dafalias, Yannis; Kaynia, Amir; Cheng, Zhao

    2010-01-01

    Journal of the Soil Mechanics and Foundations Division,of critical state soil mechanics and bounding surfacewith critical state soil mechanics principles; it renders

  2. Crop and Soil Science Degree Checklist Name: ____________________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grünwald, Niklaus J.

    and Soil Science Degree Checklist Name: ____________________________ ID Intensive (SOIL 325) (3) _______ HHS 231 ­ Lifetime Fitness for Health (2. Global Issues (3) (*soil science electives meeting requirement) _______ Science

  3. Pennsylvania Soil Survey Edward J. Ciolkosz,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    dePamphilis, Claude

    Pennsylvania Soil Survey History by Edward J. Ciolkosz, Robert L. Cunningham, and Joseph J ............................................................................................... 1 CHAPTER 2 Pennsylvania Soil Characterization ......................................... 10 CHAPTER 4 Soil Survey Committee History

  4. Controls on black carbon storage in soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Czimczik, Claudia I; Masiello, Caroline A

    2007-01-01

    Physical and chemical protection of soil organic carbonin three agricultural soils with different contents ofcalcium carbonate, Aust. J. Soil Res. , 38, 1005 – 1016.

  5. A comparison of methods for determining the adsorption of pentachlorophenol on soil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Eva Lorine

    1986-01-01

    . PentacMorophenol, a widely used organic pesticide, was used for these tests. The batch tests showed that both the surface soil and subsurface soil fit a non-linear Freundlich isotherm, and distribution ccefficients of 1. 11 and 0. 76 mug were..., with the widespread use of fertilizers having the greatest effect due to the high mobility of nitrate in natural soil and groundwater systems. Although the use of organic pesticides in the United States increased significantly following World War II, pesticides...

  6. Evidence of Surface Connectivity for Texas Gulf Coast Depressional Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and a regulatory perspective, to understand the surface water pathways that connect such wetlands to each other communities surrounded by terrestrial plant communities or undrained hydric soils surrounded by hydric soils hydrologically isolated as well; however, many are in fact connected, via subsurface pathways, with nearby water

  7. Hydrated goethite (alpha-FeOOH) (100) interface structure: Ordered water and surface functional groups.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghose, S.K.

    2011-01-01

    and the (010) surface of goethite. Geochem. Trans. 9, 1–16.Con?rmation of the surface structure of goethite (a-FeOOH. ,phosphated goethite by infrared spectroscopy. Soil Sci. Soc.

  8. Surface CO2 leakage during the first shallow subsurface CO2 release experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewicki, J.L.; Oldenburg, C.; Dobeck, L.; Spangler, L.

    2008-01-01

    numbered 0-6. Plots of F CO2 measured along the surface wellin Figure 2. Figure 2. Log F CO2 maps for measurements madeof soil CO 2 flux (F CO2 ). The surface leakage onset,

  9. Land Surface Model Data Assimilation for Atmospheric Prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Jeff

    predictions from different models even when using the same parameters, inputs, and initial conditions (Houser remote sensing studies, using visible, thermal infrared (surface temperature) and microwave (passive and active) electromagnetic radiation. Of these, passive microwave soil moisture measurement has been

  10. Solar dimming and CO2 effects on soil moisture trends Alan Robock1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    Solar dimming and CO2 effects on soil moisture trends Alan Robock1 and Haibin Li1 Received 15 July solar dimming and upward CO2 trends, we conducted experiments with a sophisticated land surface model. Li (2006), Solar dimming and CO2 effects on soil moisture trends, Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L20708

  11. Impact of nitrogenous fertiliser-induced proton release on cultivated soils with contrasting carbonate contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mailhes, Corinne

    carbonate contents: A column experiment Laure Gandois, Anne-Sophie Perrin, Anne Probst Universite´ de in car- bonated soils. Undisturbed soil columns containing different carbonate content were sampled includes leaching of NO3 to surface and ground water and eutrophication (e.g. Seitzinger and Kroeze, 1998

  12. Surface science | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired Solar Fuel Production 1: TotalofSupplySurface Soil Surface Soil

  13. Permafrost carbon—climate feedback is sensitive to deep soil carbon decomposability but not deep soil nitrogen dynamics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Koven, Charles D.; Lawrence, David M.; Riley, William J.

    2015-03-09

    Permafrost soils contain enormous amounts of organic carbon whose stability is contingent on remaining frozen. With future warming, these soils may release carbon to the atmosphere and act as a positive feedback to climate change. Significant uncertainty remains on the postthaw carbon dynamics of permafrost-affected ecosystems, in particular since most of the carbon resides at depth where decomposition dynamics may differ from surface soils, and since nitrogen mineralized by decomposition may enhance plant growth. Here we show, using a carbon–nitrogen model that includes permafrost processes forced in an unmitigated warming scenario, that the future carbon balance of the permafrost regionmore »is highly sensitive to the decomposability of deeper carbon, with the net balance ranging from 21 Pg C to 164 Pg C losses by 2300. Increased soil nitrogen mineralization reduces nutrient limitations, but the impact of deep nitrogen on the carbon budget is small due to enhanced nitrogen availability from warming surface soils and seasonal asynchrony between deeper nitrogen availability and plant nitrogen demands. The future carbon balance of this region is projected to hinge more on the rate and extent of permafrost thaw and soil decomposition than on enhanced nitrogen availability for vegetation growth resulting from permafrost thaw.« less

  14. Weathering controls on mechanisms of carbon storage in grassland soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masiello, C.A.; Chadwick, O.A.; Southon, J.; Torn, M.S.; Harden, J.W.

    2004-09-01

    On a sequence of soils developed under similar vegetation, temperature, and precipitation conditions, but with variations in mineralogical properties, we use organic carbon and 14C inventories to examine mineral protection of soil organic carbon. In these soils, 14C data indicate that the creation of slow-cycling carbon can be modeled as occurring through reaction of organic ligands with Al3+ and Fe3+ cations in the upper horizons, followed by sorption to amorphous inorganic Al compounds at depth. Only one of these processes, the chelation of Al3+ and Fe3+ by organic ligands, is linked to large carbon stocks. Organic ligands stabilized by this process traverse the soil column as dissolved organic carbon (both from surface horizons and root exudates). At our moist grassland site, this chelation and transport process is very strongly correlated with the storage and long-term stabilization of soil organic carbon. Our 14C results show that the mechanisms of organic carbon transport and storage at this site follow a classic model previously believed to only be significant in a single soil order (Spodosols), and closely related to the presence of forests. The presence of this process in the grassland Alfisol, Inceptisol, and Mollisol soils of this chronosequence suggests that this process is a more significant control on organic carbon storage than previously thought.

  15. Monitoring field soil suction using a miniature tensiometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yu-Jun; Mantho, Altin Theodore; De Laure, Emmanuel

    2008-01-01

    An experimental device was developed to monitor the field soil suction using miniature tensiometer. This device consists of a double tube system that ensures a good contact between the tensiometer and the soil surface at the bottom of the testing borehole. This system also ensures the tensiometer periodical retrieving without disturbing the surrounding soil. This device was used to monitor the soil suction at the site of Boissy-le-Ch\\^atel, France. The measurement was performed at two depths (25 and 45 cm) during two months (May and June 2004). The recorded suction data are analyzed by comparing with the volumetric water content data recorded using TDR (Time Domain Reflectometer) probes as well as the meteorological data. A good agreement between these results was observed, showing a satisfactory performance of the developed device.

  16. Underground barrier construction apparatus with soil-retaining shield

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gardner, B.M.; Smith, A.M.; Hanson, R.W.; Hodges, R.T.

    1998-08-04

    An apparatus is described for building a horizontal underground barrier by cutting through soil and depositing a slurry, preferably one which cures into a hardened material. The apparatus includes a digging means for cutting and removing soil to create a void under the surface of the ground, a shield means for maintaining the void, and injection means for inserting barrier-forming material into the void. In one embodiment, the digging means is a continuous cutting chain. Mounted on the continuous cutting chain are cutter teeth for cutting through soil and discharge paddles for removing the loosened soil. This invention includes a barrier placement machine, a method for building an underground horizontal containment barrier using the barrier placement machine, and the underground containment system. Preferably the underground containment barrier goes underneath and around the site to be contained in a bathtub-type containment. 17 figs.

  17. Underground barrier construction apparatus with soil-retaining shield

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gardner, Bradley M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smith, Ann Marie (Pocatello, ID); Hanson, Richard W. (Spokane, WA); Hodges, Richard T. (Deer Park, WA)

    1998-01-01

    An apparatus for building a horizontal underground barrier by cutting through soil and depositing a slurry, preferably one which cures into a hardened material. The apparatus includes a digging means for cutting and removing soil to create a void under the surface of the ground, a shield means for maintaining the void, and injection means for inserting barrier-forming material into the void. In one embodiment, the digging means is a continuous cutting chain. Mounted on the continuous cutting chain are cutter teeth for cutting through soil and discharge paddles for removing the loosened soil. This invention includes a barrier placement machine, a method for building an underground horizontal containment barrier using the barrier placement machine, and the underground containment system. Preferably the underground containment barrier goes underneath and around the site to be contained in a bathtub-type containment.

  18. Root Water Uptake and Soil Water Dynamics in a Karst Savanna on the Edwards Plateau, TX 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tokumoto, Ieyasu

    2013-05-09

    soils by slowing upward movement of water, thereby maintaining capillary connectivity to the surface for a longer period of time. Two simulation models, van Genuchten (VG) and Durner, were compared with the data from evaporation experiments. Results...

  19. VARIATIONS IN RADON-222 IN SOIL AND GROUND WATER AT THE NEVADA TEST SITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wollenberg, H.

    2010-01-01

    1962, Final Report, on-site radon studies in surface soils,110. King, Chi-Yu, 1975, Radon emanation along an act- ive1975, In- vestigation of Radon-222 in subsurface waters as

  20. The Severity of Smouldering Peat Fires and Damage to the Forest Soil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rein, Guillermo; Cleaver, Natalie; Ashton, Clare; Pironi, Paolo; Torero, Jose L

    Smouldering wildfires propagate slowly through surface and subsurface organic layers of the forest ground and severely affect the soil, producing physical, chemical and biological changes. These effects are caused by the prolonged heating...

  1. Miamisburg Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwate...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Miamisburg Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Miamisburg Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports...

  2. Fernald Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwater...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Fernald Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Fernald Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Fernald...

  3. Intergrating Magnetotellurics, Soil Gas Geochemistry and Structural...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Intergrating Magnetotellurics, Soil Gas Geochemistry and Structural Analysis to Identify Hidden, High Enthalpy, Extensional Geothermal Systems Intergrating Magnetotellurics, Soil...

  4. LIVING SOIL Master Gardener College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    LIVING SOIL Master Gardener College George W. Bird, Professor, MSU (June 9, 2012) #12;#12;Living Soil References G. W. Bird, Professor Michigan State University birdg@msu.edu http://www.ent.msu.edu/Directory/Facultypages/bird/tabid/133/Default.aspx · Brady, N. and R. Weil. 2002. Nature and Properties of Soils (13th ed) Prentice Hall

  5. Soil Testing for Environmental Contaminates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soil Testing for Environmental Contaminates Interpreting Your Heavy Metals Test Results Olivia quantities. Soils have often been the landing spot for heavy metals, chemicals, and wastes as byproducts of industrial and agricultural pollutants. Many of these metals are present in soils natu- rally, usually

  6. LUNAR SOIL SIMULATION TRAFFICABILITY PARAMETERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    LUNAR SOIL SIMULATION and TRAFFICABILITY PARAMETERS by W. David Carrier, III Lunar Geotechnical.0 RECOMMENDED LUNAR SOIL TRAFFICABILITY PARAMETERS Table 9.14 in the Lunar Sourcebook (Carrier et al. 1991, p. 529) lists the current recommended lunar soil trafficability parameters: bc = 0.017 N/cm2 bN = 35° K

  7. SOIL INFORMATION Last Lime Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    production. Send samples, forms, and payment to Virginia Tech Soil Testing Lab, 145 Smyth Hall (MC 0465), 185 Industrial Lawns - Bermudagrass Routine (soil pH, P, K, Ca, Mg, Zn, Mn, Cu, Fe, B, and estimated CEC) $10, Virginia Tech." COST PER SAMPLE IN-STATE OUT-OF-STATE SOIL TEST DESIRED AND FEES SAMPLE IDENTIFICATION Your

  8. Trees and Structural Soils A New Stormwater Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    Trees and Structural Soils A New Stormwater Management Practice for Sustainable Urban Sites Dr. Susan D. Day Urban Forestry Departments of Forestry and Horticulture Sarah B. Dickinson Sustainable Practice for Sustainable Urban Sites #12;Stormwater Challenge Paved Surfaces · No ground water recharge

  9. The Basicity of Texas Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach); Carlyle, E. C. (Elmer Cardinal)

    1929-01-01

    mixture of nitrate of soda and sulphate of ammonia in proper proportions will not affect the acidity of the soil. THE BASICITY OF TEXAS SOILS 7 The importance of these characteristics of sulphate of ammonia and nitrate of soda depencls upon various... to the effect of fertilizer an the reaction of soils. Some fertilizer materials, such as sulphate of ammonia, have a tendency to cause the soil to become acid. Sulphate ,of ammonia reacts with the replaceable bases in the soil silicates; the ammonia replaces...

  10. The association of fiber quality parameters and lint yield components of the F3 derived F4 progeny of two upland cotton populations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basal, Huseyin

    1996-01-01

    : seed surface area (SA/S), lint percentage (LP), seeds per boll (S/13), lint weight per seed (L/S), fibers per seed (F/S), lint weight per unit seed surface area (L/SA), and fibers per unit seed surface area (F/SA). In population 1: micronaire...

  11. Permafrost soils and carbon cycling

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ping, C. L.; Jastrow, J. D.; Jorgenson, M. T.; Michaelson, G. J.; Shur, Y. L.

    2015-02-05

    Knowledge of soils in the permafrost region has advanced immensely in recent decades, despite the remoteness and inaccessibility of most of the region and the sampling limitations posed by the severe environment. These efforts significantly increased estimates of the amount of organic carbon stored in permafrost-region soils and improved understanding of how pedogenic processes unique to permafrost environments built enormous organic carbon stocks during the Quaternary. This knowledge has also called attention to the importance of permafrost-affected soils to the global carbon cycle and the potential vulnerability of the region's soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks to changing climatic conditions. Inmore »this review, we briefly introduce the permafrost characteristics, ice structures, and cryopedogenic processes that shape the development of permafrost-affected soils, and discuss their effects on soil structures and on organic matter distributions within the soil profile. We then examine the quantity of organic carbon stored in permafrost-region soils, as well as the characteristics, intrinsic decomposability, and potential vulnerability of this organic carbon to permafrost thaw under a warming climate. Overall, frozen conditions and cryopedogenic processes, such as cryoturbation, have slowed decomposition and enhanced the sequestration of organic carbon in permafrost-affected soils over millennial timescales. Due to the low temperatures, the organic matter in permafrost soils is often less humified than in more temperate soils, making some portion of this stored organic carbon relatively vulnerable to mineralization upon thawing of permafrost.« less

  12. Characterization of soil water content variability and soil texture using GPR groundwave techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grote, K.

    2010-01-01

    wave method for soil water content measurement: Hydrologicalfor estimating soil water content during irrigation andvariations of the soil water content in an agro-ecosystem

  13. Water and heat transport in boreal soils: Implications for soil response to climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    G. An integrated model of soil, hydrology, and vegetatione n v Water and heat transport in boreal soils: Implicationsfor soil response to climate change Zhaosheng Fan a, ? ,

  14. Digitally controlled simple shear apparatus for dynamic soil testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duku, Pendo M; Stewart, Jonathan P; Whang, Daniel H; Venugopal, Ravi

    2007-01-01

    Techniques in Soil Mechanics,” Soils Found. , Vol. 23, No.Experimental Unsaturated Soil Mechanics, A. Taran- tino, E.

  15. Pneumatic soil removal tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neuhaus, John E. (Newport News, VA)

    1992-01-01

    A soil removal tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and other debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder mounted on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably mounted on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator valve mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw.

  16. Pneumatic soil removal tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neuhaus, J.E.

    1992-10-13

    A soil removal tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and other debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder mounted on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably mounted on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator valve mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw. 3 figs.

  17. TEOS 02 La Selva soil and root dynamics: What happens in soil, stays in soil Team Members

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soatto, Stefano

    TEOS 02 La Selva soil and root dynamics: What happens in soil, stays in soil Team Members · Michael. This includes clay soils, high precipitation, and relatively constant warm temperatures. Another importance flux network, and a large database on ecological dynamics. Approach Soil AMR units and sensor networks

  18. FRACTURE ENHANCED SOIL VAPOR EXTRACTION TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION AT THE A-014 OUTFALL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riha, B; Warren Hyde, W; Richard Hall , R

    2008-03-12

    Data collected during this study show that the performance of hydraulically fractured wells (with respect to mass removal rates) may tend to decrease with time following precipitation events. These effects are due to temporary increases in water saturation in the formation within the vicinity of the fractures, therefore, the wells should tend to rebound during subsequent dry periods. The data available for fractured well versus conventional well performance (with respect to flow rate versus vacuum pressure) are limited in this study. However, the data that we have to draw from suggest that, with the possible exception of a few extreme examples, hydraulically fractured wells tend to perform better than conventional wells during soil vapor extraction (SVE) operation at the A-14 Outfall. The pancake like geometry associated with hydraulic fractures also leads to a significant increase in zone of influence (ZOI), as compared to conventional wells. The increase in ZOI is due to the radially extending, horizontal, high-permeability conduit nature of the hydraulic fracture, however, air-flow into the fracture is predominately vertical (occurring at right angles to the fracture plane). Flow rates from above and below the fracture will tend to be equivalent when the formation is homogeneous, however, in the case of directionally fining depositional sequences flow rates will be greater from the direction of increasing permeability. The Upland Unit is a fining upward sequence, therefore flow rates (and contaminant mass flow rates) will tend to be higher below the fracture. This suggests that emplacing the fractures slightly above the source zone is an important strategy for accelerating contaminant removal at the A-014 Outfall site and in the Upland Unit at the SRS. However, due to the multitude of previous borings at the A-014 Outfall site, the shallower fractures failed. More than 2500 lbs of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (cVOCs) were removed during approximately 6 months of fractured well SVE operation at the A-014 field site. Plotting total mass removed over this time period shows a roughly linear relationship Figure 7. This occurs because the mass removal rate remains fairly constant with time. When mass removal comes predominately from cVOCs stored in the vapor phase there is a marked decline in mass removal rate over a short period of time due to the limiting nature of diffusion. Constant mass removal rates suggest that a source zone has been directly targeted and, therefore, is providing a constant supply of cVOC that partitions into the vapor phase and is removed through the well. Directly targeting and removing source zones is the most efficient approach to remediating contaminated sites. Results of this study show that utilization of hydraulic fractures during SVE is an effective approach for increasing remediation efficiency at the A-014 Outfall field site and in the Upland Unit at the SRS. Hydraulically fractured wells tend to produce greater flow rates and create larger ZOI's than do conventional wells. These attributes allow fractured wells to effectively treat larger volumes of formation. The unique sand-emplacement geometry associated with hydraulically fractured wells also allows direct targeting of multiple zones located at similar elevations within a fairly large radius of the well. The ability to directly target source zones significantly decreases diffusion pathways, therefore, significantly decreasing the time required to reach remediation goals.

  19. Programmable surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Amy (Amy Teh-Yu)

    2012-01-01

    Robotic vehicles walk on legs, roll on wheels, are pulled by tracks, pushed by propellers, lifted by wings, and steered by rudders. All of these systems share the common character of momentum transport across their surfaces. ...

  20. Soil protection major Prof. Dani Or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giger, Christine

    1 Soil protection major Prof. Dani Or Soil and Terrestrial Environmental Physics CHN F 29.1 Universitätstrasse 16 8092 Zürich dani.or@env.ethz.ch +41 44 633 60 15 Dr. Peter Lehmann Soil and Terrestrial Environmental Physics Objectives of soil protection major · understand composition and structure of soil · study

  1. Compacted Soil Liner Interface Strength Importance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Case Study Compacted Soil Liner Interface Strength Importance Timothy D. Stark, F.ASCE1 ; Hangseok interface is not the geomembrane (GM)/compacted low-permeability soil liner (LPSL) but a soil­soil interface placing the cover soil from bottom to top. DOI: 10.1061/(ASCE)GT.1943-5606 .0000556. © 2012 American

  2. Rehabilitating Damaged Urban SoilsRehabilitating Damaged Urban Soils to OptimizeTree Establishment and Growth & Improve Soil Functionto OptimizeTree Establishment and Growth & Improve Soil Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    Rehabilitating Damaged Urban SoilsRehabilitating Damaged Urban Soils to OptimizeTree Establishment and Growth & Improve Soil Functionto OptimizeTree Establishment and Growth & Improve Soil Function Rachel of Crop and Soil Environmental Sciences This project is funded in part by theTree Research and Education

  3. Homeowner Soil Sample Information Form 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provin, Tony

    2007-04-11

    THE TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY SYSTEM Soil, Water and Forage Testing Laboratory Urban and Homeowner Soil Sample Information Form See sampling procedures and mailing instructions on the back of this form. (PLEASE DO NOT SEND CASH) SU07 E-444... (7-07) Results will be mailed to this address ONLY Address City Phone County where sampled Name Laboratory # (For Lab Use Only) State Zip Payment (DO NOT SEND CASH). Amount Paid $ SUBMITTED BY: Check Money Order Make Checks Payable to: Soil...

  4. How Does Your Soil Rate? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barton, Jack H.; Mills, J. F.

    1956-01-01

    ~SERVICE G. G. GIBSON. DIRECTOR. COLLEGE STATION. TEXAS THE C $acb . Soil and Water Conservation ! Texas Agricultural Extensio~ 8. Assistant rrotessc 1 Department of A A. & M. College Texas A. & M. College aysrey ACKNOWLEDGMENTS This bulletin has... been written with the desire to give a better understanding of the soil. It is designed as a guide toward a more uniform method of teaching land evaluation. The advice, consultations and suggestions of the agronomists and soil scientists...

  5. Organic Constituents of the Soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1922-01-01

    materials. As might be expected, those in the excrement are the most resistant to the action of the soil bacteria. Other experiments were made, but the results were similar to this one. SUGARS BY HYDROLYSIS OF SOILS The reducing sugars formed by heating... sheep excrement. The amount of reducing substance, calculated as sugars, produced by heating the soil with la per cent. sulphuric acid varied from .OO2 to .215 per cent. with the average of .058 for 7'7 soils. The nitrogen insoluble in permanganate...

  6. Soil metagenomics and carbon cycling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    stands to improve climate modeling Environmental microbiology In 2009, the Department of Energy established the Los Alamos Science Focus Area in Soil Metagenomics & Carbon Cycling...

  7. Soil Density/Moisture Gauge

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This scenario provides the planning instructions, guidance, and evaluation forms necessary to conduct an exercise involving a highway shipment of a soil moisture/density gauge (Class 7 -...

  8. Mapping Impervious Surfaces with High ResolutionMapping Impervious Surfaces with High Resolution QuickBirdQuickBird Satellite DataSatellite Data Accurate mapping of impervious surface areas is critical to stormwater management because impervious surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrissey, Leslie A.

    to stormwater management because impervious surfaces reduce infiltration of surface water into the soil, thereby's stormwater utility. To this end, the combination of high spatial resolution (0.6m panchromatic and 2.44m of these results, VT DEC and CSB adopted this approach to meet their stormwater objectives. The use of advanced

  9. Effects of Frozen Soil on Snowmelt Runoff and Soil Water Storage at a Continental Scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    Effects of Frozen Soil on Snowmelt Runoff and Soil Water Storage at a Continental Scale GUO-YUE NIU) ABSTRACT The presence of ice in soil dramatically alters soil hydrologic and thermal properties. Despite computes soil ice content and its modifications to soil hydrologic and thermal properties. However

  10. Simple yield surface expressions appropriate for soil plasticity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taiebat, Mahdi; Dafalias, Yannis

    2010-01-01

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF GEOMECHANICS © ASCE / JULY/AUGUSTNumerical Models in Geomechanics, Proc. , NUMOG VII, G. N.the International Journal of Geomechanics, Vol. 10, No. 4,

  11. Validation of Noah-simulated Soil Temperature in the North American Land Data Assimilation System Phase 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xia, Youlong; Ek, Michael; Sheffield, Justin; Livneh, Ben; Huang, Maoyi; Wei, Helin; Song, Feng; Luo, Lifeng; Meng, Jesse; Wood, Eric

    2013-02-25

    Soil temperature can exhibit considerable memory from weather and climate signals and is among the most important initial conditions in numerical weather and climate models. Consequently, a more accurate long-term land surface soil temperature dataset is needed to improve weather and climate simulation and prediction, and is also important for the simulation of agricultural crop yield and ecological processes. The North-American Land Data Assimilation (NLDAS) Phase 2 (NLDAS-2) has generated 31-years (1979-2009) of simulated hourly soil temperature data with a spatial resolution of 1/8o. This dataset has not been comprehensively evaluated to date. Thus, the ultimate purpose of the present work is to assess Noah-simulated soil temperature for different soil depths and timescales. We used long-term (1979-2001) observed monthly mean soil temperatures from 137 cooperative stations over the United States to evaluate simulated soil temperature for three soil layers (0-10 cm, 10-40 cm, 40-100 cm) for annual and monthly timescales. We used short-term (1997-1999) observed soil temperature from 72 Oklahoma Mesonet stations to validate simulated soil temperatures for three soil layers and for daily and hourly timescales. The results showed that the Noah land surface model (Noah LSM) generally matches observed soil temperature well for different soil layers and timescales. At greater depths, the simulation skill (anomaly correlation) decreased for all time scales. The monthly mean diurnal cycle difference between simulated and observed soil temperature revealed large midnight biases in the cold season due to small downward longwave radiation and issues related to model parameters.

  12. Soils | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS ReportEurope GmbH JumpSlough HeatMccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP)Soils

  13. Selective leaching of uranium from uranium-contaminated soils: Progress report 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francis, C.W.; Mattus, A.J.; Farr, L.L.; Elless, M.P.; Lee, S.Y.

    1993-02-01

    Three soils and a sediment contaminated with uranium were used to determine the effectiveness of sodium carbonate and citric acid leaching to decontaminated or remove uranium to acceptable regulatory levels. Two of the soils were surface soils from the DOE facility formerly called the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) at Fernald, Ohio. This facility is presently called the Femald Environmental Management Project (FEMP). Carbonate extractions generally removed from 70 to 90% of the uranium from the Fernald storage pad soil. Uranium was slightly more difficult to extract from the Fernald incinerator and the Y-12 landfarm soils. Very small amounts of uranium could be extracted from the storm sewer sediment. Extraction with carbonate at high solution-to-soil ratios were as effective as extractions at low solution-to-soil ratios, indicating attrition by the paddle mixer was not significantly different than that provided in a rotary extractor. Also, pretreatments such as milling or pulverizing the soil sample did not appear to increase extraction efficiency when carbonate extractions were carried out at elevated temperatures (60[degree]C) or long extraction times (23 h). Adding KMnO[sub 4] in the carbonate extraction appeared to increase extraction efficiency from the Fernald incinerator soil but not the Fernald storage pad soil. The most effective leaching rates (> 90 % from both Fernald soils) were obtained using a citrate/dithionite extraction procedure designed to remove amorphous (noncrystalline) iron/aluminum sesquioxides from surfaces of clay minerals. Citric acid also proved to be a very good extractant for uranium.

  14. Selective leaching of uranium from uranium-contaminated soils: Progress report 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francis, C.W.; Mattus, A.J.; Farr, L.L.; Elless, M.P.; Lee, S.Y.

    1993-02-01

    Three soils and a sediment contaminated with uranium were used to determine the effectiveness of sodium carbonate and citric acid leaching to decontaminated or remove uranium to acceptable regulatory levels. Two of the soils were surface soils from the DOE facility formerly called the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) at Fernald, Ohio. This facility is presently called the Femald Environmental Management Project (FEMP). Carbonate extractions generally removed from 70 to 90% of the uranium from the Fernald storage pad soil. Uranium was slightly more difficult to extract from the Fernald incinerator and the Y-12 landfarm soils. Very small amounts of uranium could be extracted from the storm sewer sediment. Extraction with carbonate at high solution-to-soil ratios were as effective as extractions at low solution-to-soil ratios, indicating attrition by the paddle mixer was not significantly different than that provided in a rotary extractor. Also, pretreatments such as milling or pulverizing the soil sample did not appear to increase extraction efficiency when carbonate extractions were carried out at elevated temperatures (60{degree}C) or long extraction times (23 h). Adding KMnO{sub 4} in the carbonate extraction appeared to increase extraction efficiency from the Fernald incinerator soil but not the Fernald storage pad soil. The most effective leaching rates (> 90 % from both Fernald soils) were obtained using a citrate/dithionite extraction procedure designed to remove amorphous (noncrystalline) iron/aluminum sesquioxides from surfaces of clay minerals. Citric acid also proved to be a very good extractant for uranium.

  15. Biochar decreases dissolved organic carbon but not nitrate leaching in relation to vinasse application in a Brazilian sugarcane soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    effects that are not included in energy assessments, such as impacts on water quality, including disposal, inputs to ground and surface water from land- applied vinasse remain a challenge. Previously with vinasse [SV], soil with vinasse and biochar [SVB], and soil with biochar [SB]) were flushed with water

  16. Asymmetric response of maximum and minimum temperatures to soil emissivity change over the Northern African Sahel in a GCM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Liming

    Asymmetric response of maximum and minimum temperatures to soil emissivity change over the Northern in the Sahel could lead to reduced land surface emissivity and thus might have an asymmetric impact on daytime balance to changes in soil emissivity over the Sahel using the recently developed Community Land Model

  17. Determination of diffusion coefficient for unsaturated soils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sood, Eeshani

    2005-08-29

    The structures constructed on unsaturated soils are damaged by the movement of the soil underneath. The movement is basically due to the flow of moisture in and out of the soil. This change in moisture also affects the ...

  18. Climatic influences on hillslope soil transport efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schurr, Naomi D. (Naomi Danika)

    2014-01-01

    The soil transport coefficient D represents the relationship between local topographical gradient and soil flux in the landscape evolution model. This work presents new estimates of the soil transport coefficient D at 9 ...

  19. Collection Policy: Crop and Soil Sciences Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    Collection Policy: Crop and Soil Sciences ___________________________________________________________________________________ Introduction: This 2007 collection policy review for the Department of Crops and Soil Sciences comes several the Department of Atmospheric and Earth Sciences. Since then, Crops and Soil Sciences has reorganized into three

  20. Sulfate induced heave in lime stabilized soil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bredenkamp, Sanet

    1994-01-01

    The addition of hydrated lime to clay soils is one of the most common methods of soil stabilization. However, when sulfates are present in the soil, the calcium in the lime reacts with the sulfates to form ettringite, an ...

  1. The Application of Cluster Analysis to Investigate Multivariate Spatial Patterns in Belizean Lowland Savanna Soils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beadle, Sarah

    2014-08-30

    . Cluster analysis was performed on a novel dataset, collated from previous Belizean land use studies. Analysis of this dataset found that Belizean lowland savanna soil is generally acidic (mean surface pH=5.45) and nutrient poor (mean surface TEB=3.4cmol...

  2. Remote sensing of soil radionuclide fluxes in a tropical ecosystem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clegg, B.; Koranda, J.; Robinson, W.; Holladay, G.

    1980-11-06

    We are using a transponding geostationary satellite to collect surface environmental data to describe the fate of soil-borne radionuclides. The remote, former atomic testing grounds at the Eniwetok and Bikini Atolls present a difficult environment in which to collect continuous field data. Our land-based, solar-powered microprocessor and environmental data systems remotely acquire measurements of net and total solar radiation, rain, humidity, temperature, and soil-water potentials. For the past year, our water flux model predicts wet season plant transpiration rates nearly equal to the 6 to 7 mm/d evaporation pan rate, which decreases to 2 to 3 mm/d for the dry season. Radioisotopic analysis confirms the microclimate-estimated 1:3 to 1:20 soil to plant /sup 137/Cs dry matter concentration ratio. This ratio exacerbates the dose to man from intake of food plants. Nephelometer measurements of airborne particulates presently indicate a minimum respiratory radiological dose.

  3. NNSS Soils Monitoring: Plutonium Valley (CAU366) FY2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Julianne J.; Mizell, Steve A.; Nikolich, George; McCurdy, Greg; Campbell, Scott

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Nevada Site Office (NSO), Environmental Restoration Soils Activity has authorized the Desert Research Institute (DRI) to conduct field assessments of potential sediment transport of contaminated soil from Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 366, Area 11 Plutonium Valley Dispersion Sites Contamination Area (CA) during precipitation runoff events. Field measurements at the T-4 Atmospheric Test Site (CAU 370) suggest that radionuclide-contaminated soils may have migrated along a shallow ephemeral drainage that traverses the site (NNSA/NSO, 2009). (It is not entirely clear how contaminated soils got into their present location at the T-4 Site, but flow to the channel has been redirected and the contamination does not appear to be migrating at present.) Aerial surveys in selected portions of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) also suggest that radionuclide-contaminated soils may be migrating along ephemeral channels in Areas 3, 8, 11, 18, and 25 (Colton, 1999). In Area 11, several low-level airborne surveys of the Plutonium Valley Dispersion Sites (CAU 366) show plumes of Americium 241 (Am-241) extending along ephemeral channels (Figure 1, marker numbers 5 and 6) below Corrective Action Site (CAS) 11-23-03 (marker number 3) and CAS 11 23-04 (marker number 4) (Colton, 1999). Plutonium Valley in Area 11 of the NNSS was selected for the study because of the aerial survey evidence suggesting downstream transport of radionuclide-contaminated soil. The aerial survey (Figure 1) shows a well defined finger of elevated radioactivity (marker number 5) extending to the southwest from the southernmost detonation site (marker number 4). This finger of contamination overlies a drainage channel mapped on the topographic base map used for presentation of the survey data suggesting surface runoff as a likely cause of the contaminated area. Additionally, instrumenting sites strongly suspected of conveying soil from areas of surface contamination offers the most efficient means to confirm that surface runoff may transport radioactive contamination as a result of ambient precipitation/runoff events. Closure plans being developed for the CAUs on the NNSS may include post-closure monitoring for possible release of radioactive contaminants. Determining the potential for transport of radionuclide-contaminated soils under ambient meteorological conditions will facilitate an appropriate closure design and post-closure monitoring program.

  4. Soil Testing Lab 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    Friction factor data are important for better prediction of leakage and rotordynamic coefficients of gas annular seals. A flat-plate test rig is used to determine friction factor of hole-pattern/honeycomb flat-plate surfaces ...

  5. In situ formation of magnetite reactive barriers in soil for waste stabilization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, Robert C. (Edgewood, NM)

    2003-01-01

    Reactive barriers containing magnetite and methods for making magnetite reactive barriers in situ in soil for sequestering soil contaminants including actinides and heavy metals, organic materials, iodine and technetium are disclosed. According to one embodiment, a two-step reagent introduction into soil takes place. In the first step, free oxygen is removed from the soil by separately injecting into the soil aqueous solutions of iron (II) salt, for example FeCl.sub.2, and base, for example NaOH or NH.sub.3 in about a 1:1 volume ratio. Then, in the second step, similar reagents are injected a second time (however, according to about a 1:2 volume ratio, iron to salt) to form magnetite. The magnetite formation is facilitated, in part, due to slow intrusion of oxygen into the soil from the surface. The invention techniques are suited to injection of reagents into soil in proximity to a contamination plume or source allowing in situ formation of the reactive barrier at the location of waste or hazardous material. Mixing of reagents to form. precipitate is mediated and enhanced through movement of reagents in soil as a result of phenomena including capillary action, movement of groundwater, soil washing and reagent injection pressure.

  6. Permafrost soils and carbon cycling

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ping, C. L.; Jastrow, J. D.; Jorgenson, M. T.; Michaelson, G. J.; Shur, Y. L.

    2014-10-30

    Knowledge of soils in the permafrost region has advanced immensely in recent decades, despite the remoteness and inaccessibility of most of the region and the sampling limitations posed by the severe environment. These efforts significantly increased estimates of the amount of organic carbon (OC) stored in permafrost-region soils and improved understanding of how pedogenic processes unique to permafrost environments built enormous OC stocks during the Quaternary. This knowledge has also called attention to the importance of permafrost-affected soils to the global C cycle and the potential vulnerability of the region's soil OC stocks to changing climatic conditions. In this review,more »we briefly introduce the permafrost characteristics, ice structures, and cryopedogenic processes that shape the development of permafrost-affected soils and discuss their effects on soil structures and on organic matter distributions within the soil profile. We then examine the quantity of OC stored in permafrost-region soils, as well as the characteristics, intrinsic decomposability, and potential vulnerability of this OC to permafrost thaw under a warming climate.« less

  7. Contrasting soil microbial community functional structures in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Contrasting soil microbial community functional structures in two major landscapes of the Tibetan alpine meadow Prev Next Title: Contrasting soil microbial community...

  8. On the spectrum of soil moisture from hourly to interannual scales Gabriel G. Katul,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , total evapotrans- poration (ET), drainage below the root zone, and lateral flow. More indirectly, soil hydraulic properties, hydraulic lift from below the main rooting system, surface heating, and other boundary

  9. A wireless soil moisture smart sensor web using physics-based optimal control: Concept and initial demonstrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moghaddam, Mahta

    This paper introduces a new concept for a smart wireless sensor web technology for optimal measurements of surface-to-depth profiles of soil moisture using in-situ sensors. The objective of the technology, supported by the ...

  10. Examining the Relationship between Antecedent Soil Moisture and Summer Precipitation in the U.S. Great Plains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng, Lei

    2010-01-14

    This dissertation focuses on examining the relationship between antecedent soil moisture and summer precipitation in the U.S. Great Plains (GP). The influence of Nino sea surface temperatures (SSTs) on summer precipitation ...

  11. On Surface Approximation using Developable Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, In-Kwon

    manufacturing, e.g. in shipbuilding. Keywords: computer aided design, computer aided manufacturing, surface ap- proximation, reverse engineering, surface of revolution, developable surface, shipbuilding. 2 #12

  12. Soil Stabilization Methods with Potential for Application at the Nevada National Security Site: A Literature Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shillito, Rose; Fenstermaker, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear testing at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) has resulted in large areas of surficial radionuclide-contaminated soils. Much of the radionuclide contamination is found at or near the soil surface, and due to the dry climate setting, and the long half-life of radioactive isotopes, soil erosion poses a long-term health risk at the NNSS. The objective of this literature review is to present a survey of current stabilization methods used for minimizing soil erosion, both by water and wind. The review focuses on in situ uses of fundamental chemical and physical mechanisms for soil stabilization. A basic overview of the physical and chemical properties of soil is also presented to provide a basis for assessing stabilization methods. Some criteria for stabilization evaluation are identified based on previous studies at the NNSS. Although no specific recommendations are presented as no stabilization method, alone or in combination, will be appropriate in all circumstances, discussions of past and current stabilization procedures and specific soil tests that may aid in current or future soil stabilization activities at the NNSS are presented. However, not all Soils Corrective Action Sites (CASs) or Corrective Action Units (CAUs) will require stabilization of surficial radionuclide-contaminated soils. Each Soils CAS or CAU should be evaluated for site-specific conditions to determine if soil stabilization is necessary or practical for a given specific site closure alternative. If stabilization is necessary, then a determination will be made as to which stabilization technique is the most appropriate for that specific site.

  13. How Soil Organic Matter Composition Controls Hexachlorobenzene-Soil-Interactions: Adsorption Isotherms and Quantum Chemical Modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed, Ashour; Kühn, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Hazardous persistent organic pollutants (POPs) interact in soil with the soil organic matter (SOM) but this interaction is insufficiently understood at the molecular level. We investigated the adsorption of hexachlorobenzene (HCB) on soil samples with systematically modified SOM. These samples included the original soil, the soil modified by adding a hot water extract (HWE) fraction (soil+3 HWE and soil+6 HWE), and the pyrolyzed soil. The SOM contents increased in the order pyrolyzed soil soil soil+3 HWE soil+6 HWE. For the latter three samples this order was also valid for the HCB adsorption. The pyrolyzed soil adsorbed more HCB than the other samples at low initial concentrations, but at higher concentrations the HCB adsorption became weaker than in the samples with HWE addition. This adsorption behaviour combined with the differences in the chemical composition between the soil samples suggested that alkylated aromatic, phenol, and lignin monomer compounds contributed most to the HC...

  14. The Composition and Properties of Some Texas Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1907-01-01

    What Constitutes Soil Fertility; Causes of Small Crops; Maintaining Soil Fertitlity; Increasing Soil Fertility; Chemical Analysis of Soils; Value of Chemical Analysis; Pot Experiments; The United States Soil Survey; General ...

  15. Non-Traditional Soil Additives: Can They Improve Crop Production? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McFarland, Mark L.; Stichler, Charles; Lemon, Robert G.

    2002-06-26

    Non-traditional soil additives include soil conditioners such as organic materials and minerals, soil activators that claim to stimulate soil microbes or inoculate soil with new beneficial organisms, and wetting agents that may be marketed...

  16. Grounding electrode and method of reducing the electrical resistance of soils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koehmstedt, Paul L. (Richland, WA)

    1980-01-01

    A first solution of an electrolyte is injected underground into a volume of soil having negative surface charges on its particles. A cationic surfactant suspended in this solution neutralizes these surface charges of the soil particles within the volume. Following the first solution, a cationic asphalt emulsion suspended in a second solution is injected into the volume. The asphalt emulsion diffuses through the volume and electrostatically bonds with additional soil surrounding the volume such that an electrically conductive water repellant shell enclosing the volume is formed. This shell prevents the leaching of electrolyte from the volume into the additional soil. The second solution also contains a dissolved deliquescent salt which draws water into the volume prior to the formation of the shell. When electrically connected to an electrical installation such as a power line tower, the volume constitutes a grounding electrode for the tower.

  17. Hardpan Formation In Coarse and Medium-textured Soils In the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerard, C. J.; Burleson, C. A.; Cowley, W. R.; Bloodworth, M. E.; Kunze, G. W.

    1964-01-01

    . Briquets, which were imbeclclecl in air-c-11-y soil to cause slow clrying, were 25 to 30 percent stronger than surface-clried briquets. Lemo5 ancl Lutz (1 0) havc reported that the rate of drying on briquet slrenqtll was important. Gill (8) postulated... also that thc action of the soil moisture films during drying was ;~n extremely important factor in effecting the in- tensity of soil strength of a clay. .-\\F indicated in Figure 4, maximum soil strength \\\\.as achievecl at 27" C. Briquets clried...

  18. Process for the solvent extraction for the radiolysis and dehalogenation of halogenated organic compounds in soils, sludges, sediments and slurries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Golden, Jeffry

    2007-02-13

    A process of extracting halogenated organic compounds, and particularly PCBs, from soil, sediment, slurry, sludge and dehalogenating the compounds contacts a contaminated soil sample with an extraction medium of a mixture of an alkane and a water miscible alcohol. The organic compounds dissolve in the extraction medium which is separated from the soil by passing water upwardly through the soil. The extraction medium floats to the surface of the water and is separated. Thereafter, the extraction medium containing the halogenated organic contaminants is subjected to ionizing radiation to radiolytically dehalogenate the compounds.

  19. Process for the solvent extraction for the radiolysis and dehalogenation of halogenated organic compounds in soils, sludges, sediments and slurries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mincher, Bruce J. (3705 Creekside Dr., Idaho Falls, ID 83404); Curry, Randy Dale (1104 Merrill Ct., Columbia, MO 65203); Clevenger, Thomas E. (2512 Bluff Blvd., Columbia, MO 65201); Golden, Jeffry (12612 Cedarbrook La., Laurel, MD 20708)

    2000-01-01

    A process of extracting halogenated organic compounds, and particularly PCBs, from soil, sediment, slurry, sludge and dehalogenating the compounds contacting a contaminated soil sample with an extraction medium of a mixture of an alkane and a water miscible alcohol. The organic compounds dissolve in the extraction medium which is separated from the soil by passing water upwardly through the soil. The extraction medium floats to the surface of the water and is separated. Thereafter, the extraction medium containing the halogenated organic contaminants is subjected to ionizing radiation to radiolytically dehalogenate the compounds.

  20. Process for the solvent extraction for the radiolysis and dehalogenation of halogenated organic compounds in soils, sludges, sediments and slurries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mincher, Bruce J.; Curry, Randy Dale; Clevenger, Thomas E.; Golden, Jeffry

    2003-05-27

    A process of extracting halogenated organic compounds, and particularly PCBs, from soil, sediment, slurry, sludge and dehalogenating the compounds contacts a contaminated soil sample with an extraction medium of a mixture of an alkane and a water miscible alcohol. The organic compounds dissolve in the extraction medium which is separated from the soil by passing water upwardly through the soil. The extraction medium floats to the surface of the water and is separated. Thereafter, the extraction medium containing the halogenated organic contaminants is subjected to ionizing radiation to radiolytically dehalogenate the compounds.

  1. Descriptions and Uses of Soils of the Texas Agricultural Experiment Stations at Dallas and Prosper. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hipp, Billy W.; Knowles, Tim C.; Simpson, Benny J.; Stringer, Billy R.; Hallmark, C. Tom

    1992-01-01

    organic matter in the surface layer. Vertisols are referred to as self mulching soils or cracking clays. Entisols show little or no evidence of horizon development. The soils of the Dallas Center developed mainly from chalk and interbedded marl under... Upper Cretaceous chalk and interbedded marl under tallgrass and mid-bunchgrass vegeta tion (U. S. Depart ment of Agriculture, 1969). The relief is nearly level to gently sloping with slopes ranging from 0 to 3 percent. Weathering of the marl...

  2. Gulf Cordgrass Production, Utilization, and Nutritional Value Following Burning. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oefinger, R.D.; Scifres, F.J.

    1977-01-01

    ). Growth characteristics of gulf cordgrass give rise to its apparent adaptability to fire. Regrowth follow ing burning progresses rapidly, thus quickly rendering succulent regrowth acceptable as forage to domestic grazing animals (6). Young regrowth... and species of Acacia) on the uplands to the west. Soil Characteristics Physical and Chemical Components The loamy sand sites, burned in fall 1974 were characterized by a near neutral soil surface, becoming more basic to 30 centimeters deep (Table 1...

  3. Uranium soils integrated demonstration: Soil characterization project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cunnane, J.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Gill, V.R. [Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States); Lee, S.Y. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Morris, D.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Nickelson, M.D. [HAZWRAP, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Perry, D.L. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Tidwell, V.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-08-01

    An Integrated Demonstration Program, hosted by the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), has been established for investigating technologies applicable to the characterization and remediation of soils contaminated with uranium. Critical to the design of relevant treatment technologies is detailed information on the chemical and physical characteristics of the uranium waste-form. To address this need a soil sampling and characterization program was initiated which makes use of a variety of standard analytical techniques coupled with state-of-the-art microscopy and spectroscopy techniques. Sample representativeness is evaluated through the development of conceptual models in an effort to identify and understand those geochemical processes governing the behavior of uranium in FEMP soils. Many of the initial results have significant implications for the design of soil treatment technologies for application at the FEMP.

  4. Comprehensive appraisal of {sup 239+240}Pu in soils around Rocky Flats, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Litaor, M.I.; Allen, L.; Ellerbroek, D.

    1995-12-01

    Plutonium contamination of soils around Rocky Flats Environmental & Technology Site, near Golden, Colorado, resulted from past outdoor storage practices and subsequent remobilization due to inadequate cleanup practices. Until now human-health risk assessment has not been performed because of a lack of sufficient information regarding the spatial extent of {sup 239+240}Pu in soils. The purpose of this work was to elucidate the extent of plutonium contamination in surface soils, and to assess the uncertainty associated with the spatial distribution of {sup 239+240}Pu around Rocky Flats Environmental & Technology Site.

  5. Soil and Water Conservation Spring 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    of agricultural soil drainage on them. Define water harvesting and give examples. #12;2 Basic Course1 SWS 4233 Soil and Water Conservation 3 Credits Spring 2014 Instructor Susan Curry scurry resources: soil and water. Topics discussed include: Soil/water resources, historical erosions and sediment

  6. Soil Moisture Constants and Physical Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Kauai, and Oahu. These soils represent 10 great soil groups commonly found in the State of HawaiiSoil Moisture Constants and Physical Properties of Selected Soils in Hawaii Teruo Yamamoto U S is a geologist with the Pacific Southwest Sta- tion's watershed management research project in Honolulu, Hawaii

  7. SOIL, WATER, AND CLIMATE MS DEFENSE SEMINAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    SOIL, WATER, AND CLIMATE MS DEFENSE SEMINAR Case study for Determining the Presence of the Moorsh- Forming Process in Drained Peat (Markey Muck) Soils, Anoka County, Minnesota, USA by Allyz Kramer Polacsek Soil Science Advisor: Jay Bell Friday, May 15, 2009 9:00 ­ 10:00 am S415 Soil Science Building ABSTRACT

  8. Integrating Soil Ecological Knowledge into Restoration Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavao-Zuckerman, Mitchell

    Integrating Soil Ecological Knowledge into Restoration Management Liam Heneghan,1,2 Susan P. Miller that lead to restoration success. The discipline of soil ecology, which emphasizes both soil organisms the outcomes of restoration despite this variability. Here, we propose that the usefulness of this soil

  9. Simulating surface and subsurface initiation of macropore flow Markus Weilera,*, Felix Naefb,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiler, Markus

    soil sections extracted from each study profile. The MDA was calculated for different sets of surface infiltration in macroporous soils. q 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Macropore flow; Micro-topography; Preferential flow; Earthworm burrows; Infiltration 1. Introduction Macropores

  10. High-Resolution Estimation of Near-Subsurface Water Content using Surface GPR Ground Wave Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Yoram

    1 High-Resolution Estimation of Near-Subsurface Water Content using Surface GPR Ground Wave, UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 1. Introduction Information about near surface soil water content the applicability of a surface geophysical method, ground penetrating radar (GPR), for use as a water content

  11. Classification of urban & industrial soils in the World Reference Base for Soil Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Classification of urban & industrial soils in the World Reference Base for Soil Resources: Working, Industrial, Traffic and Mining Areas (SUITMA) of the International Union of Soil Science (IUSS), 09­11 July . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 3 Urban and industrial soils in the current WRB 4 3.1 Natural Soils

  12. Soil Test Report The following information is being provided for farmers. For consumer soil test report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    Soil Test Report The following information is being provided for farmers. For consumer soil test fertility status of the soil in each field can invest wisely in fertilizer and lime to produce the most economical crop yields. A soil test provides the needed information about soil pH, lime need and available

  13. MICHIGAN'S SOIL NITRATE TEST FOR CORN MSU SOIL AND PLANT NUTRIENT LAB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    MICHIGAN'S SOIL NITRATE TEST FOR CORN MSU SOIL AND PLANT NUTRIENT LAB Michigan State University Extension Crop and Soil Sciences Department Michigan State University WHY TEST SOIL FOR NITRATES Nitrate testing of soil is an excellent and inexpensive way of evaluating the available nitrogen (N) status

  14. Impact of Soil Type and Compaction Conditions on Soil Water Characteristic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Sheng-Tao

    Impact of Soil Type and Compaction Conditions on Soil Water Characteristic C. J. Miller, M.ASCE1 the variation of water content and pore water suction for compacted clayey soils. The soils had varying amounts of clay fraction with plasticities ranging from low to high plasticity. The unsaturated soil behavior

  15. Soil Science Society of America Journal Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson, Kristine

    Soil Science Society of America Journal Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. doi:10.2136/sssaj2013.03.0093 Received 8 Mar. 2013. *Corresponding author (tyson.ochsner@okstate.edu). © Soil Science Society of America. State of the Art in Large-Scale Soil Moisture Monitoring Review & Analysis--Soil Physics T he science

  16. Soil Aggregate Size Affects Phosphorus Desorption from Highly Weathered Soils and Plant Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Kessel, Chris

    Soil Aggregate Size Affects Phosphorus Desorption from Highly Weathered Soils and Plant Growth X of P around soil aggregates (Gunary et al., 1964; Linquist etfrom soil, understanding P desorption from soils may improve the precision of P diagnosis and fertilization recommendations. Many al., 1997

  17. REGULAR ARTICLE Impact of biological soil crusts and desert plants on soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neher, Deborah A.

    REGULAR ARTICLE Impact of biological soil crusts and desert plants on soil microfaunal community plants and biological soil crusts on desert soil nematode and protozoan abundance and community composition. In the first experiment, biological soil crusts were removed by physical trampling. Treatments

  18. Soil Profile Rebuilding Specification (Brief Version)--1 Soil Profile Rebuilding--Abbreviated Specification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    Soil Profile Rebuilding Specification (Brief Version)--1 Soil Profile Rebuilding--Abbreviated Specification Specification for Restoration of Graded and Compacted Soils that will be Vegetated 1. PURPOSE AND DESCRIPTION Purpose Soil Profile Rebuilding is an appropriate soil restoration technique for sites where

  19. Worldwide organic soil carbon and nitrogen data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zinke, P.J.; Stangenberger, A.G.; Post, W.M.; Emanual, W.R.; Olson, J.S.

    1986-09-01

    The objective of the research presented in this package was to identify data that could be used to estimate the size of the soil organic carbon pool under relatively undisturbed soil conditions. A subset of the data can be used to estimate amounts of soil carbon storage at equilibrium with natural soil-forming factors. The magnitude of soil properties so defined is a resulting nonequilibrium values for carbon storage. Variation in these values is due to differences in local and geographic soil-forming factors. Therefore, information is included on location, soil nitrogen content, climate, and vegetation along with carbon density and variation.

  20. Coupling the high-complexity land surface model ACASA to the mesoscale model WRF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pyles, R. D.

    In this study, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is coupled with the Advanced Canopy–Atmosphere–Soil Algorithm (ACASA), a high-complexity land surface model. Although WRF is a state-of-the-art regional ...

  1. Coupling the High Complexity Land Surface Model ACASA to the Mesoscale Model WRF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, L.

    In this study, the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) is coupled with the Advanced Canopy-Atmosphere-Soil Algorithm (ACASA), a high complexity land surface model. Although WRF is a state-of-the-art regional ...

  2. Nuclear forensics: Soil content

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beebe, Merilyn Amy

    2015-08-31

    Nuclear Forensics is a growing field that is concerned with all stages of the process of creating and detonating a nuclear weapon. The main goal is to prevent nuclear attack by locating and securing nuclear material before it can be used in an aggressive manner. This stage of the process is mostly paperwork; laws, regulations, treaties, and declarations made by individual countries or by the UN Security Council. There is some preliminary leg work done in the form of field testing detection equipment and tracking down orphan materials; however, none of these have yielded any spectacular or useful results. In the event of a nuclear attack, the first step is to analyze the post detonation debris to aid in the identification of the responsible party. This aspect of the nuclear forensics process, while reactive in nature, is more scientific. A rock sample taken from the detonation site can be dissolved into liquid form and analyzed to determine its chemical composition. The chemical analysis of spent nuclear material can provide valuable information if properly processed and analyzed. In order to accurately evaluate the results, scientists require information on the natural occurring elements in the detonation zone. From this information, scientists can determine what percentage of the element originated in the bomb itself rather than the environment. To this end, element concentrations in soils from sixty-nine different cities are given, along with activity concentrations for uranium, thorium, potassium, and radium in various building materials. These data are used in the analysis program Python.

  3. Organic soil phosphorus is plant-available but is neglected by routine soil-testing methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steffens, Diedrich; Leppin, Thomas; Schubert, Sven

    2009-01-01

    microorganisms. Biol. Fertil. Soils 1988; 5: 308-312 Van derplant species and to evaluate different soil-testing methodsin measuring organic soil-P. Material and Methods This

  4. Soil Organic Matter of Natural and Restored Coastal Wetland Soils in Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elgin, Barbara K.

    2012-01-01

    of natural and created marsh soils. J. Exp. Mar. Biol. Ecol.2007. Freshwater Input Structures Soil Properties, VerticalS.S. , Hoover, K.L. 1996. Soil properties of reference

  5. The polluted surface water exerts an influence on underground water and its environmental effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weng, H.

    1995-12-31

    The relationship between the polluted surface water flowing through urban areas and adjacent ground water resources in the southeast of China was systematically studied. The polluted surface water contained elevated concentrations of heavy metals in the sediment. When this water was directly used in irrigation or as fertilizer, the harmful components and heavy metals were transported from water to soil and were adsorbed by soil and plants. The health of local people who drank the ground water was threatened.

  6. Effect of Combustion Temperature on Soil and Soil Organic Matter Properties: A Study of Soils from the Western Elevation Transect in Central Sierra Nevada, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Araya, Samuel Negusse

    2014-01-01

    during pyrolysis compared to untreated soils, Rosa et al. (soil organic matter as reflected by 13 C natural abundance, pyrolysis

  7. Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, DR

    2011-02-14

    A Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) has been installed collocated with each deployed ECOR system at the Southern Great Plains (SGP), North Slope of Alaska (NSA), Tropical Western Pacific (TWP), ARM Mobile Facility 1 (AMF1), and ARM Mobile Facility 2 (AMF2). The surface energy balance system consists of upwelling and downwelling solar and infrared radiometers within one net radiometer, a wetness sensor, and soil measurements. The SEBS measurements allow the comparison of ECOR sensible and latent heat fluxes with the energy balance determined from the SEBS and provide information on wetting of the sensors for data quality purposes.

  8. Global Soil Change: Land Use, Soil and Water SWS4231C, SWS5234

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    Global Soil Change: Land Use, Soil and Water SWS4231C, SWS5234 Course Syllabus: Fall 2014 that can be found at: https://catalog

  9. Recovery of Soil Carbon Stocks on Disturbed Coastal Plain Soils Through Secondary Forest SuccessionPlain Soils Through Secondary Forest Succession

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Post, Wilfred M.

    Recovery of Soil Carbon Stocks on Disturbed Coastal Plain Soils Through Secondary Forest SuccessionPlain Soils Through Secondary Forest Succession Recovery of soil carbon stocks in historically Contact and Environmental Research 50 µm Recovery of soil carbon stocks in historically degraded soils provides a means

  10. Interannual Variability in Global Soil Respiration on a 0.5 Degree Grid Cell Basis (1980-1994)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raich, J.W.

    2003-09-15

    We used a climate-driven regression model to develop spatially resolved estimates of soil-CO{sub 2} emissions from the terrestrial land surface for each month from January 1980 to December 1994, to evaluate the effects of interannual variations in climate on global soil-to-atmosphere CO{sub 2} fluxes. The mean annual global soil-CO{sub 2} flux over this 15-y period was estimated to be 80.4 (range 79.3-81.8) Pg C. Monthly variations in global soil-CO{sub 2} emissions followed closely the mean temperature cycle of the Northern Hemisphere. Globally, soil-CO{sub 2} emissions reached their minima in February and peaked in July and August. Tropical and subtropical evergreen broad-leaved forests contributed more soil-derived CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere than did any other vegetation type ({approx}30% of the total) and exhibited a biannual cycle in their emissions. Soil-CO{sub 2} emissions in other biomes exhibited a single annual cycle that paralleled the seasonal temperature cycle. Interannual variability in estimated global soil-CO{sub 2} production is substantially less than is variability in net carbon uptake by plants (i.e., net primary productivity). Thus, soils appear to buffer atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations against far more dramatic seasonal and interannual differences in plant growth. Within seasonally dry biomes (savannas, bushlands, and deserts), interannual variability in soil-CO{sub 2} emissions correlated significantly with interannual differences in precipitation. At the global scale, however, annual soil-CO{sub 2} fluxes correlated with mean annual temperature, with a slope of 3.3 PgCY{sup -1} per degree Celsius. Although the distribution of precipitation influences seasonal and spatial patterns of soil-CO{sub 2} emissions, global warming is likely to stimulate CO{sub 2} emissions from soils.

  11. Inverse modelling of in situ soil water dynamics: investigating the effect of different prior distributions of the soil hydraulic parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scharnagl, B.; Vrugt, J. A; Vereecken, H.; Herbst, M.

    2011-01-01

    monitor- ing soil water contents, Water Resour. Res. , 26,spatial variation of soil water content at the field scaledetermination of soil water content: measurements in coaxial

  12. Inverse modelling of in situ soil water dynamics: investigating the effect of different prior distributions of the soil hydraulic parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scharnagl, B.; Vrugt, J. A; Vereecken, H.; Herbst, M.

    2011-01-01

    data for identifying soil hydraulic parameters from outflowdistributions of the soil hydraulic parameters Carrera, J.method to determine soil hydraulic functions from multistep

  13. Treatment of radionuclide contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pettis, S.A.; Kallas, A.J.; Kochen, R.L.; McGlochlin, S.C.

    1988-06-01

    Rockwell, International, Rocky Flats Plants, is committed to remediating within the scope of RCRA/CERCLA, Solid Waste Managements Units (SWMUs) at Rocky Flats found to be contaminated with hazardous substances. SWMUs fund to have radionuclide (uranium, plutonium, and/or americium) concentrations in the soils and/or groundwater that exceed background levels or regulatory limits will also be included in this remediation effort. This paper briefly summarizes past and present efforts by Rockwell International, Rocky Flats Plant, to identify treatment technologies appropriate for remediating actinide contaminated soils. Many of the promising soil treatments evaluated in Rocky Flats' laboratories during the late 1970's and early 1980's are currently being revisited. These technologies are generally directed toward substantially reducing the volume of contaminated soils, with the subsequent intention of disposing of a small remaining concentrated fraction of contaminated soil in a facility approved to receive radioactive wastes. Treatment processes currently will be treated to remove actinides, and recycled back to the process. Past investigations have included evaluations of dry screening, wet screening, scrubbing, ultrasonics, chemical oxidation, calcination, desliming, flotation, and heavy-liquid density separation. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Surface and subsurface characterization of uranium contamination at the Fernald environmental management site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schilk, A.J.; Perkins, R.W.; Abel, K.H.; Brodzinski, R.L.

    1993-04-01

    The past operations of uranium production and support facilities at several Department of Energy (DOE) sites have occasionally resulted in the local contamination of some surface and subsurface soils, and the three-dimensional distribution of the uranium at these sites must be thoroughly characterized before any effective remedial protocols can be established. To this end, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has been tasked by the DOE`s Office of Technology Development with adapting, developing, and demonstrating technologies for the measurement of uranium in surface and subsurface soils at the Fernald Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration site. These studies are detailed in this report.

  15. Soil microbial responses to nitrogen addition in arid ecosystems

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sinsabaugh, Robert L.; Belnap, Jayne; Rudgers, Jennifer; Kuske, Cheryl R.; Martinez, Noelle; Sandquist, Darren

    2015-08-14

    The N cycle of arid ecosystems is influenced by low soil organic matter, high soil pH, and extremes in water potential and temperature that lead to open canopies and development of biological soil crusts (biocrusts). We investigated the effects of N amendment on soil microbial dynamics in a Larrea tridentata-Ambrosia dumosa shrubland site in southern Nevada USA. Sites were fertilized with a NO3-NH4 mix at 0, 7, and 15 kg N ha-1 y-1 from March 2012 to March 2013. In March 2013, biocrust (0–0.5 cm) and bulk soils (0–10 cm) were collected beneath Ambrosia canopies and in the interspaces betweenmore »plants. Biomass responses were assessed as bacterial and fungal SSU rRNA gene copy number and chlorophyll a concentration. Metabolic responses were measured by five ecoenzyme activities and rates of N transformation. With most measures, nutrient availability, microbial biomass, and process rates were greater in soils beneath the shrub canopy compared to the interspace between plants, and greater in the surface biocrust horizon compared to the deeper 10 cm soil profile. Most measures responded positively to experimental N addition. Effect sizes were generally greater for bulk soil than biocrust. Results were incorporated into a meta-analysis of arid ecosystem responses to N amendment that included data from 14 other studies. Effect sizes were calculated for biomass and metabolic responses. Regressions of effect sizes, calculated for biomass, and metabolic responses, showed similar trends in relation to N application rate and N load (rate × duration). The critical points separating positive from negative treatment effects were 88 kg ha-1 y-1 and 159 kg ha-1, respectively, for biomass, and 70 kg ha-1 y-1 and 114 kg ha-1, respectively, for metabolism. These critical values are comparable to those for microbial biomass, decomposition rates and respiration reported in broader meta-analyses of N amendment effects in mesic ecosystems. The large effect sizes at low N addition rates indicate that arid ecosystems are sensitive to modest increments in anthropogenic N deposition.« less

  16. Project plan for the background soils project for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The Background Soils Project for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (BSPP) will determine the background concentration levels of selected naturally occurring metals, other inorganics, and radionuclides in soils from uncontaminated areas in proximity to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) in Paducah, Kentucky. The data will be used for comparison with characterization and compliance data for soils, with significant differences being indicative of contamination. All data collected as part of this project will be in addition to other background databases established for the PGDP. The BSPP will address the variability of surface and near-surface concentration levels with respect to (1) soil taxonomical types (series) and (2) soil sampling depths within a specific soil profile. The BSPP will also address the variability of concentration levels in deeper geologic formations by collecting samples of geologic materials. The BSPP will establish a database, with recommendations on how to use the data for contaminated site assessment, and provide data to estimate the potential human and health and ecological risk associated with background level concentrations of potentially hazardous constituents. BSPP data will be used or applied as follows.

  17. Soil structure interaction for shrink-swell soils a new design procedure for foundation slabs on shrink-swell soils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdelmalak, Remon Melek

    2009-05-15

    ............................................................................. 34 3.3 Weather-Soil Interaction Models ................................................... 37 viii CHAPTER Page 3.4 Soil-Structure Interaction Models .................................................. 40 3.5 Comparison of Beam Depths... for Stiffened Slabs on Shrink-Swell Soils Using WRI, PTI 2004 and AS 2870...................................... 42 3.6 Influence of the 2002 Texas Section of ASCE Recommended Practice on the Beam Depths for Stiffened Slabs on Shrink-Swell Soils...

  18. Long-term soil warming and Carbon Cycle Feedbacks to the Climate System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melillo, Jerry M.

    2014-04-30

    The primary objective of the proposed research was to quantify and explain the effects of a sustained in situ 5oC soil temperature increase on net carbon (C) storage in a northeastern deciduous forest ecosystem. The research was done at an established soil warming experiment at the Harvard Forest in central Massachusetts – Barre Woods site established in 2001. In the field, a series of plant and soil measurements were made to quantify changes in C storage in the ecosystem and to provide insights into the possible relationships between C-storage changes and nitrogen (N) cycling changes in the warmed plots. Field measurements included: 1) annual woody increment; 2) litterfall; 3) carbon dioxide (CO2) efflux from the soil surface; 4) root biomass and respiration; 5) microbial biomass; and 6) net N mineralization and net nitrification rates. This research was designed to increase our understanding of how global warming will affect the capacity of temperate forest ecosystems to store C. The work explored how soil warming changes the interactions between the C and N cycles, and how these changes affect land-atmosphere feedbacks. This core research question framed the project – What are the effects of a sustained in situ 5oC soil temperature increase on net carbon (C) storage in a northeastern deciduous forest ecosystem? A second critical question was addressed in this research – What are the effects of a sustained in situ 5{degrees}C soil temperature increase on nitrogen (N) cycling in a northeastern deciduous forest ecosystem?

  19. Release of phosphorus and metals from soils and sediments during dispersion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, A.; Simsiman, G.V.; Chesters, G.

    1985-02-01

    The authors determined the P, Al, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn released from soils and river bottom sediments to the supernatant liquid during dispersion by ultrasound and end-over-end shaking techniques. The ratios of the elements in the supernatant to the total acid-digestible elements on the solid phase varied from 1.0 to 7.3% for soils and 0.3 to 2.0% for sediments, using ultrasound, and 0.05 to 2.6% for soils and 0.03 to 0.7% for sediments, using the shaking method. The ratio provides an estimate of the analytical error caused by dispersion during particle size fractionation. Furthermore, the ratio may indicate the extent of release of elements to the overlying water during resuspension or transport of sediments. Cadmium is the element most easily removed from soils and sediment surfaces.

  20. Multi-Year Lags between Forest Browning and Soil Respiration at High Northern Latitudes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Bunn, Andrew G.; Thomson, Allison M.

    2012-11-26

    High-latitude northern ecosystems are experiencing rapid climate changes, and represent a large potential climate feedback because of their high soil carbon densities and shifting disturbance regimes. A significant carbon flow from these ecosystems is soil respiration (RS, the flow of carbon dioxide, generated by plant roots and soil fauna, from the soil surface to atmosphere), and any change in the high-latitude carbon cycle might thus be reflected in RS observed in the field. This study used two variants of a machine-learning algorithm and least squares regression to examine how remotely-sensed canopy greenness (NDVI), climate, and other variables are coupled to annual RS based on 105 observations from 64 circumpolar sites in a global database. The addition of NDVI roughly doubled model performance, with the best-performing models explaining ~62% of observed RS variability

  1. Qualitative evaluation of heavy metals in soils using portable XRF instruments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCain, R.G.

    1993-10-01

    Portable isotope-source energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyzers can provide rapid on site screening for heavy metals in soils. Their use generally involves empirical calibration to a suite of representative soil samples spiked with a range of concentrations of the analytes of interest. In most cases, only a limited number of analytes can be measured with this approach, because of constraints imposed by the operational software and costs associated with preparing the calibration suite. A simple approach is described that provides a qualitative indication of anomalous concentrations of heavy metals based on numeric comparison of gross count rates to background values. This approach can rapidly identify contaminated soils and does not depend on a suite of calibration samples. Direct measurements can be made to rapidly map soil contamination without sample collection, and the method can also be applied to other surfaces such as concrete.

  2. Probabilistic Analysis of the Compressibility of Soils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jung, Byoung C.

    2010-07-14

    , to incorporate all available sources of information, and to integrate the uncertainty in an estimate of the probability. In geotechnical engineering, current soil classification charts based on CPT data may not provide an accurate prediction of soil type, even...

  3. Soil Carbon Sequestration and the Greenhouse Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Archer, Steven R.

    Soil Carbon Sequestration and the Greenhouse Effect Second edition Rattan Lal & Ronald F. Follett. Printed in the United States of America. #12;181 Soil Carbon Sequestration and the Greenhouse Effect, 2nd

  4. Beth Brockett SOIL 502 Soil Quality Analysis -Chemistry Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (see map in Appendix 1). Sustainability Street is in an urban location and the microclimate) will be useful in diagnosing management issues at this site. History of Site Urban soils can be expected as grazing land, has had an orchard planted on it, and has been developed for building. Proximity to storage

  5. Soil Moisture Initialization for Climate Prediction: Characterization of Model and Observation Errors Wenge Ni-Meister (1), Jeffrey Walker(3), and Paul R. Houser (2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Jeff

    and Observation Errors Wenge Ni-Meister (1), Jeffrey Walker(3), and Paul R. Houser (2) 1. Department of Geology of the land surface soil moisture states. Passive microwave remote sensing provides quantitative information

  6. Monday, November 5, 2007 -11:15 AM Microbe-Mineral Interactions and their Influence on ArsenicTransformations in the Soil Environment.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Monday, November 5, 2007 - 11:15 AM 91-7 Microbe-Mineral Interactions and their Influence (bacteria) and reactive mineral surfaces (manganese and iron oxides) play in As reaction pathway(s) in soils

  7. Persistence of soil organic matter as an ecosystem property

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, M.W.

    2012-01-01

    Belgium. 8 Department of Crop and Soil Science, Oregon State10 Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, Cornell Center for

  8. Relation of Soil Acidity to Cotton Root Rot. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taubenhaus, J. J. (Jacob Joseph); Ezekiel, Walter N. (Walter Naphtali); Fudge, J. F. (Joseph Franklin)

    1937-01-01

    sand, pH 6.8-7.1; 6-12 inches, brownish-yellow fine sand, pH 6.9-7.1; 12-24 inches, yellow fins sand, pH 7.0-7.1. Subsoil: 24-36 inches, red heavy clay, pH 5.7-6.2. Lufkin fine sandy loam. Surface layer: 0-12 inches, homo- geneous brownish-gray fine... 0 x N 0. 1 2 4 5 3 6 11 12 13 14 19 20 25 26 27 25 33 34 35 36 37 38 49 50 rates various soils, into which the Average pH of soil, 1929 51 38 47 39 53 45 8 6 57 56 3 3 41 6 47 43 61 47 6 35 56 69 53...

  9. Effects of Soil pH and Soil Water Content on Prosulfuron Dissipation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sims, Gerald K.

    Effects of Soil pH and Soil Water Content on Prosulfuron Dissipation RYAN P. HULTGREN,*, ROBERT J% dissipation of the herbicide (DT50) was determined for each soil and water content treatment. At equivalent water contents, prosulfuron DT50 values were positively correlated with soil pH (P

  10. Water in the Soil http://www.alison-burke.com/jpgs-large/lifesciences/soil_waterflow.jpg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowak, Robert S.

    Recap Recap Recap #12;Water in the Soil http://www.alison-burke.com/jpgs-large/lifesciences/soil_waterflow.jpg Soil water potential More negative #12;Less water requires more force As the soil water content decreases, plants need to excerpt more pressure to take water Photosynthesis and Water A decreases

  11. Recommended Academic Plan for the Environmental Resource Management -Soil Science Option (E R M/SOIL)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Omiecinski, Curtis

    of Pollutants in Soils 3 ASM 327 (fall only) Soil and Water Resource Management 3 SOILS 401 Soil Composition requirements. GWS, GHA, GQ, GN, GA, GH, and GS are codes used to identify General Education requirements. US, IL, and US;IL are codes used to designate courses that satisfy University United States

  12. Holme et al. Soil Redox Sensor Networks RADIO FREQUENCY ENABLED SOIL REDOX POTENTIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubinstein, Benjamin

    Holme et al. Soil Redox Sensor Networks RADIO FREQUENCY ENABLED SOIL REDOX POTENTIAL SENSOR technologies that may be combined into a cost effective soil redox sensor network, discuss the merits of each as a component of said network, describe a prototype soil redox sensor network and perform basic laboratory

  13. Soil Science Society of America Journal Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. 78:310

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    Soil Science Society of America Journal Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. 78:3­10 doi:10.2136/sssaj2013.07.0287dgs Received 17 July 2013. *Corresponding author (david.myrold@oregonstate.edu). © Soil Science by the publisher. The Potential of Metagenomic Approaches for Understanding Soil Microbial Processes The11th

  14. Soil Biology & Biochemistry 39 (2007) 21382149 Heterogeneity of soil nutrients and subsurface biota

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neher, Deborah A.

    2007-01-01

    Author's personal copy Soil Biology & Biochemistry 39 (2007) 2138­2149 Heterogeneity of soil Laboratory, 999-W, Aiken, SC 29808, USA f Department of Plant & Soil Science, University of Vermont, Hills to have a highly heterogeneous distribution of nutrients and soil biota, with greater concentrations

  15. Bio-Char Soil Management on Highly Weathered Soils in the Humid Tropics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehmann, Johannes

    36 Bio-Char Soil Management on Highly Weathered Soils in the Humid Tropics Johannes Lehmann1), ColombiaQ1 CONTENTS 36.1 Bio-Char Management and Soil Nutrient Availability ............................................. 518 36.2 Microbial Cycling of Nutrients in Soils with Bio-Char

  16. Role of large-scale soil structure in organic carbon turnover: Evidence from California grassland soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Role of large-scale soil structure in organic carbon turnover: Evidence from California grassland soils Stephanie A. Ewing,1 Jonathan Sanderman,1 W. Troy Baisden,2 Yang Wang,3 and Ronald Amundson1 characterized the effect of large-scale (>20 mm) soil physical structure on the age and recalcitrance of soil

  17. Abundant and Stable Char Residues in Soils: Implications for Soil Fertility and Carbon Sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehmann, Johannes

    Abundant and Stable Char Residues in Soils: Implications for Soil Fertility and Carbon Department of Chemistry, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011, United States § Department of Crop and Soil, Ames, Iowa 50011, United States *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: Large-scale soil application

  18. The effects of soil type and chemical treatment on nickel speciation in refinery enriched soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The effects of soil type and chemical treatment on nickel speciation in refinery enriched soils a Rhizosphere Science Research Group, Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, N122S Agricultural Sciences North Manure and Byproducts Laboratory, Beltsville, MD 20705, USA c Environmental Soil Chemistry Research Group

  19. Soil Science Society of America Journal Revealing Soil Structure and Functional Macroporosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildenschild, Dorthe

    how fast water, greenhouse gases, vola- tile compounds, chemicals, and pollutants can enter and move ecosystem functions. In this study, soil physical measurements (soil-water retention and air permeability soil clay content, while significantly higher air permeability was observed for the l1 to l3 soils than

  20. Soil microbial activity and N availability with elevated CO2 in Mojave Desert soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Billings, Sharon A.; Schaeffer, Sean M.

    2004-01-01

    We examined the effects of elevated CO2 on soil nitrogen (N) dynamics in the Mojave Desert by measuring plant N isotope composition (?15N), soil microbial biomass N, soil respiration, resin-available N, and C and N dynamics during soil incubations...

  1. ASSESSING AND MANAGING SOIL QUALITY FOR URBAN AGRICULTURE IN A DEGRADED VACANT LOT SOIL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (OM) amendments produced from yard wastes and the use of raised beds on soil properties and vegetable wastes can improve soil quality at previously degraded sites and increase crop yields for urban; compost; Soil Management Assessment Framework; vacant land; shrinking cities; soil compaction INTRODUCTION

  2. Arsenic chemistry in soils and sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fendorf, S.

    2010-01-01

    and selenium from landfill leachate by clay minerals. Soil1987) Using landfill leachate, (Frost and Griffin, 1977) (

  3. Light, earthworms, and soil resources as predictors of diversity of 10 soil invertebrate groups across monocultures of 14 tree species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2016-01-01

    a mesocosm study. Applied Soil Ecology 8, 61e75. Mueller,and acidity in mineral soils at a common garden experiment.of Stasi n litter traits, soil biota, and soil chemistry on

  4. SURFACE WAVE TESTING FOR CHARACTERIZATION OF BALLAST AND FOUNDATION LAYERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (ballast and subgrade) condition assessment system based on the seismic surface wave method soil in a track system are essential to schedule and predict maintenance costs and to improve safety structure. Concerns for seismic testing of track substructure include coupling between receiver and ballast

  5. Interpretation of storage field well casing surface potentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dabkowski, J.

    1987-01-01

    The shape of a well casing-to-soil potential gradient surface profile is influenced by many variables. Hence, the interpretation of such field data can be difficult. The paper illustrates how such factors as layered ground resistivity, polarization potential variations with depth, and external interference affect the profiles and, therefore, the interpretation of field data.

  6. SOIL PHYSICS, SWS 4602C I. COURSE INSTRUCTOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    tube c. Soil water content d. Measurement of soil water content e. Energy status of soil water f. Soil water velocity c. Darcy's law and Poiseuille's Law d. Saturated hydraulic conductivity, permeability Soils (Hillel pages 203-233, Lectures 10-14) a. Darcy's Law in unsaturated soils b. Hydraulic

  7. Soil and Water Conservation Spring 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    on them. Define water harvesting and give examples. #12;Basic Course Requirements: 1. Exams consistSWS 4233 Soil and Water Conservation Spring 2014 Instructor Susan Curry scurry@ufl.edu 352 most valuable and most mistreated resources: soil and water. Topics discussed include: Soil/water

  8. 9, 1443714473, 2012 Soil carbon drivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    BGD 9, 14437­14473, 2012 Soil carbon drivers and benchmarks in Earth system models K. E. O. Todd if available. Causes of variation in soil carbon predictions from CMIP5 Earth system models and comparison #12;BGD 9, 14437­14473, 2012 Soil carbon drivers and benchmarks in Earth system models K. E. O. Todd

  9. Common Questions Why should I soil test?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    Common Questions Why should I soil test? Soil testing is an important diagnostic tool to evaluate nutrient imbalances and understand plant growth. The most important reason to soil test is to have a basis for intelligent application of fertilizer and lime. Testing also allows for growers and homeowners to maintain

  10. Factors influencing swelling and shrinking in soils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidson, Steve Edwin

    1956-01-01

    in the laboratory on top of a soil sample compacted inside the Proctor mold followed by plate tests. That way, a soil modulus versus water content curve is developed which parallels the approach for the dry density versus water content. The soil modulus versus water...

  11. FieldIndicators of Hydric Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    Soils, Version 5.01, 2003 Natural Resources Conservation Service Wetland Science Institute Soil on the right has mucky peat (hemic soil material) to a depth of about 8 cm. If indicator S2 (2.5 cm mucky peat or peat) or indicator S3 (5 cm mucky peat or peat) is not a concern, morphologies below 8 cm would

  12. Soil and Water Chemistry Distance Education Section

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    ., 2nd edition Oxford University Press. 3. Soil Chemistry. Bohn, McNeal, O'Connor, and Myer. 2001 3rd, Professor, Soil and Water Science Dept Mailing address: University of Florida Everglades Research principles of soil and water chemistry. The class will cover the fundamentals principles of the properties

  13. Soil Carbon Accumulation During Temperate Forest Succession

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grogan, Paul

    K7L 3N6, Canada ABSTRACT Carbon sequestration in soils that have previously beendepletedoforganic the soil carbon sequestration potential of such lands by sampling adjacent mature forest and agricultural abandonment is more important than soil type in determining the potential magnitude of carbon sequestration

  14. Pennsylvania Soil Survey The First 100 Years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    dePamphilis, Claude

    Pennsylvania Soil Survey The First 100 Years by Joseph J. Eckenrode and Edward J. Ciolkosz Agronomy Series Number 144 July 1999 #12;Pennsylvania Soil Survey The First 100 Years by Joseph J. Eckenrode1 University Park, PA 16802 July 1999 1 Soil Scientist USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS

  15. DIVISION S-6--SOIL & WATER MANAGEMENT & CONSERVATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DIVISION S-6--SOIL & WATER MANAGEMENT & CONSERVATION Soil Organic Carbon Sequestration Rates soil column within 20 yr following culti- Carbon sequestration rates, with a change from CT to NT, can in approximately 40 to and returning to the original land cover or other peren- 60 yr. Carbon sequestration rates

  16. Soil: 24077 (subsample 24077,9)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Soil: 24077 (subsample 24077,9) D.S. McKay PI LOCATION COMMENTS: Sample collected from the Luna 24.S. scientists were given sam ples totalling 3 grams; these were divided into 6 soil samples and one rock fragment. The Moscow Institute of Geochemistry reports that the Luna 24 soil included more large grains

  17. KSInglett Page 1 MATH FOR SOIL SCIENTISTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    transport 9. Soil temperature, heat capacity and conductivity Unit 3 PROBLEM SOLVING IN SOIL BIOCHEMISTRY 10 and radioactive isotopes Unit 4 PROBLEM SOLVING IN SOIL BIOLOGY 14. Microbial growth yield and mortality 15 and nutrient availability 22. Potential Erosion 23. Waste management and bioremediation Unit 6 DATA ANALYSIS

  18. TSNo s02-staats173645-P Alum Amendment Effects on Soil Phosphorus Stabilization in Poultry Litter Amended Sandy Soils.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    bioavailable P on Arkansas loamy pasture soils. However, the effects on acidic sandy soils are not well

  19. ALTERNATIVE FIELD METHODS TO TREAT MERCURY IN SOIL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest F. Stine Jr; Steven T. Downey

    2002-08-14

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) used large quantities of mercury in the uranium separating process from the 1950s until the late 1980s in support of national defense. Some of this mercury, as well as other hazardous metals and radionuclides, found its way into, and under, several buildings, soil and subsurface soils and into some of the surface waters. Several of these areas may pose potential health or environmental risks and must be dealt with under current environmental regulations. DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) awarded a contract ''Alternative Field Methods to Treat Mercury in Soil'' to IT Group, Knoxville TN (IT) and its subcontractor NFS, Erwin, TN to identify remedial methods to clean up mercury-contaminated high-clay content soils using proven treatment chemistries. The sites of interest were the Y-12 National Security Complex located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, the David Witherspoon properties located in Knoxville, Tennessee, and at other similarly contaminated sites. The primary laboratory-scale contract objectives were (1) to safely retrieve and test samples of contaminated soil in an approved laboratory and (2) to determine an acceptable treatment method to ensure that the mercury does not leach from the soil above regulatory levels. The leaching requirements were to meet the TC (0.2 mg/l) and UTS (0.025 mg/l) TCLP criteria. In-situ treatments were preferred to control potential mercury vapors emissions and liquid mercury spills associated with ex-situ treatments. All laboratory work was conducted in IT's and NFS laboratories. Mercury contaminated nonradioactive soil from under the Alpha 2 building in the Y-12 complex was used. This soils contained insufficient levels of leachable mercury and resulted in TCLP mercury concentrations that were similar to the applicable LDR limits. The soil was spiked at multiple levels with metallic (up to 6000 mg/l) and soluble mercury compounds (up to 500 mg/kg) to simulate expected ranges of mercury contamination and to increase the TCLP mercury values. IT/NFS investigated ambient temperature amalgamation/stabilization/fixation of mercury-contaminated soils to meet these objectives. Treatment ranged in size from a few ounces to 10 pounds. The treatability study philosophy was to develop working envelops of formulations where reasonable minimum and maximum amounts of each reagent that would successfully treat the contaminated soil were determined. The dosages investigated were based on ratios of stoichiometric reactions and applications of standard sets of formulations. The approach purposely identified formulations that failed short or longer cure-time performance criteria to define the limits of the envelope. Reagent envelops successfully met the project requirements one day after treatment and after greater than 30-day cures. The use of multiple levels of spikes allowed the establishment of reagent dosages that were successful across a broad range of mercury values, e.g., 50 to 6000 mg/kg mercury. The treatment products were damp to slightly wet material. Enough drying reagent, e.g., Portland cement or lime by-product, were added to some formulations to control the leachability of uranium and other hazardous metals and to ensure the product passed the paint filter test. Cost analyzes and conceptual designs for four alternatives for full-scale treatments were prepared. The alternatives included two in-situ treatments and two ex-situ treatments. The cost estimates were based on the results from the bench-scale study. All four alternatives treatment costs were well below the baseline costs.

  20. Barrier erosion control test plan: Gravel mulch, vegetation, and soil water interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waugh, W.J.; Link, S.O. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

    1988-07-01

    Soil erosion could reduce the water storage capacity of barriers that have been proposed for the disposal of near-surface waste at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site. Gravel mixed into the top soil surface may create a self-healing veneer that greatly retards soil loss. However, gravel admixtures may also enhance infiltration of rainwater, suppress plant growth and water extraction, and lead to the leaching of underlying waste. This report describes plans for two experiments that were designed to test hypotheses concerning the interactive effects of surface gravel admixtures, revegetation, and enhanced precipitation on soil water balance and plant abundance. The first experiment is a factorial field plot set up on the site selected as a soil borrow area for the eventual construction of barriers. The treatments, arranged in a a split-split-plot design structure, include two densities of gravel admix, a mixture of native and introduced grasses, and irrigation to simulate a wetter climate. Changes in soil water storage and plant cover are monitored with neutron moisture probes and point intercept sampling, respectively. The second experiment consists of an array of 80 lysimeters containing several different barrier prototypes. Surface treatments are similar to the field-plot experiment. Drainage is collected from a valve at the base of each lysimeter tube, and evapotranspiration is estimated by subtraction. The lysimeters are also designed to be coupled to a whole-plant gas exchange system that will be used to conduct controlled experiments on evapotranspiration for modeling purposes. 56 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

  1. Soil Science Minor To earn a Soil Science minor, students must complete the following courses to total 27 credits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grünwald, Niklaus J.

    Soil Science Minor To earn a Soil Science minor, students must complete the following courses to total 27 credits: I. Soil Core A. ______SOIL 205.Soil Science (4) or ____ CSS 305. Principles of Soil Science (4) [Taught at EOU La Grande campus only

  2. Movement and treatment of water containing Escherichia coli applied to soil by subsurface drip emitters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franti, Jason M

    2001-01-01

    , the distribution of water was not uniformly dispersed spherically around the emitter. Instead, water flowed conically toward the microcosm surface when soil water (P[w]) was highest and dispersed into the bottom of the microcosm in drier samples. Some management...

  3. Modeling Zinc and Sodium Chloride Migration in Vadose Zone Soils Beneath Stormwater Infiltration Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    Modeling Zinc and Sodium Chloride Migration in Vadose Zone Soils Beneath Stormwater Infiltration in stormwater runoff and a decrease in groundwater recharge. Stormwater runoff contains pollutants (nutrients to the degradation of surface waters below stormwater pipe outfalls. Infiltrating stormwater has been shown

  4. Soil microbial biomass: an estimator of soil development in reclaimed lignite mine soil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swanson, Eric Scott

    1996-01-01

    A two-year study was conducted at the Big Brown lignite mine in Fairfield, Texas, to determine the rate and extent of recovery of the soil microbial biomass (SMB) in mixed overburden. The relationships between SMB carbon (SMBC), basal respiration...

  5. Improving snow albedo processes in WRF/SSiB regional climate model to assess impact of dust and black carbon in snow on surface energy balance and hydrology over western U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    in snow, and surface water and energy balances in of?inesnow and surface/soil water and energy balances (Figure 1).albedo can affect the water and energy balance, snowcover

  6. The Chemical Composition of Some Soils of Angelina, Brazoria, Cameron, Cherokee, Delta, Lamar, Hidalgo, Lavaca, Montgomery, Nacogdoches, Robertson, Rusk, Webb and Wilson Counties. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1909-01-01

    and texture and showing a yellowish gray color. The ~rganic matter contained in the first few inches gives the surface soil a grayish color. The topography is rolling with excellent surface drainage. The soil is f*-,;:ly retentive of moisture, and when... overflows. T11e principal timber growth is pecan and ash. This is one of the most desirable soils of the bottom, as it is very fertile. has good drainage, and is easily cultivated. ll'rost of it is under cultivation at present. Sugar cane is thc principal...

  7. The widely used Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model provides a few land surface schemes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menut, Laurent

    is com- puted from the surface energy balance using a force- restore algorithm for heat exchange within linearised surface energy balance equation representing the combined ground-vegetation sur- face. Soil (USA) and widely used in the World meteorolo- gical and air quality communities. WRF provides a choice

  8. Vitrification testing of soil fines from contaminated Hanford 100 Area and 300 Area soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ludowise, J.D.

    1994-05-01

    The suitability of Hanford soil for vitrification is well known and has been demonstrated extensively in other work. The tests reported here were carried out to confirm the applicability of vitrification to the soil fines (a subset of the Hanford soil potentially different in composition from the bulk soil) and to provide data on the performance of actual, vitrified soil fines. It was determined that the soil fines were generally similar in composition to the bulk Hanford soil, although the fraction <0.25 mm in the 100 Area soil sample appears to differ somewhat from the bulk soil composition. The soil fines are readily melted into a homogeneous glass with the simple additions of CaO and/or Na{sub 2}O. The vitrified waste (plus additives) occupies only 60% of the volume of the initial untreated waste. Leach testing has shown the glasses made from the soil fines to be very durable relative to natural and man-made glasses and has demonstrated the ability of the vitrified waste to greatly reduce the release of radionuclides to the environment. Viscosity and electrical conductivity measurements indicate that the soil fines will be readily processable, although with levels of additives slightly greater than used in the radioactive melts. These tests demonstrate the applicability of vitrification to the contaminated soil fines and the exceptional performance of the waste form resulting from the vitrification of contaminated Hanford soils.

  9. Innovative Vitrification for Soil Remediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hnat, James G.; Patten, John S.; Jetta, Norman W.

    1996-12-31

    Vortec has successfully completed Phases 1 and 2 of a technology demonstration program for an ''Innovative Fossil Fuel Fired Vitrification Technology for Soil Remediation.'' The principal objective of the program is to demonstrate the ability of a Vortec Cyclone Melting System (CMS) to remediate DOE contaminated soils and other waste forms containing TM RCRA hazardous materials, low levels of radionuclides and TSCA (PCB) containing wastes. The demonstration program will verify the ability of this vitrification process to produce a chemically stable glass final waste form which passes both TCLP and PCT quality control requirements, while meeting all federal and state emission control regulations. The demonstration system is designed to process 36 ton/day of as-received drummed or bulk wastes. The processing capacity equates to approximately 160 barrels/day of waste materials containing 30% moisture at an average weight of 450 lbs./barrel.

  10. Multi-analytical approach reveals potential microbial indicators in soil for sugarcane model systems

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Navarrete, Acacio Aparecido; Diniz, Tatiana Rosa; Braga, Lucas Palma Perez; Silva, Genivaldo Gueiros Zacarias; Franchini, Julio Cezar; Rossetto, Raffaella; Edwards, Robert Alan; Tsai, Siu Mui; Lehman, R. Michael

    2015-06-09

    This study focused on the effects of organic and inorganic amendments and straw retention on the microbial biomass (MB) and taxonomic groups of bacteria in sugarcane-cultivated soils in a greenhouse mesocosm experiment monitored for gas emissions and chemical factors. The experiment consisted of combinations of synthetic nitrogen (N), vinasse (V; a liquid waste from ethanol production), and sugarcane-straw blankets. Increases in CO2-C and N2O-N emissions were identified shortly after the addition of both N and V to the soils, thus increasing MB nitrogen (MB-N) and decreasing MB carbon (MB-C) in the N+V-amended soils and altering soil chemical factors that weremore »correlated with the MB. Across 57 soil metagenomic datasets, Actinobacteria (31.5%), Planctomycetes (12.3%), Deltaproteobacteria (12.3%), Alphaproteobacteria (12.0%) and Betaproteobacteria (11.1%) were the most dominant bacterial groups during the experiment. Differences in relative abundance of metagenomic sequences were mainly revealed for Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria and Verrucomicrobia with regard to N+V fertilization and straw retention. Differential abundances in bacterial groups were confirmed using 16S rRNA gene-targeted phylum-specific primers for real-time PCR analysis in all soil samples, whose results were in accordance with sequence data, except for Gammaproteobacteria. Actinobacteria were more responsive to straw retention with Rubrobacterales, Bifidobacteriales and Actinomycetales related to the chemical factors of N+V-amended soils. Acidobacteria subgroup 7 and Opitutae, a verrucomicrobial class, were related to the chemical factors of soils without straw retention as a surface blanket. Taken together, the results showed that MB-C and MB-N responded to changes in soil chemical factors and CO2-C and N2O-N emissions, especially for N+V-amended soils. The results also indicated that several taxonomic groups of bacteria, such as Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria and Verrucomicrobia, and their subgroups acted as early-warning indicators of N+V amendments and straw retention in sugarcane-cultivated soils, which can alter the soil chemical factors.« less

  11. Effects of litter traits, soil biota, and soil chemistry on soil carbon stocks at a common garden with 14 tree species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    Nematode density (min. soil) Bacterial-feeding nemat.C:N microb. biomass (min. soil) Ectomycorrh. sporocarp spp.R, McCartney D (2002) Soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics in

  12. Plant-soil interactions and acclimation to temperature of microbial-mediated soil respiration may affect predictions of soil CO2 efflux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curiel Yuste, J.; Ma, S.; Baldocchi, D. D.

    2010-01-01

    shifts in microbial communities due to soil warming.Soil Sci Soc Am J 61:475–481to an important portion of soil CO 2 ef?ux (Hanson et al.

  13. Effects of litter traits, soil biota, and soil chemistry on soil carbon stocks at a common garden with 14 tree species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    and acidity in mineral soils at a common garden experimentof dominant tree species on soils, but the underlyingN), and acidity in mineral soils from an experiment with

  14. Distribution of Pb-210 in Spanish Soils: Study of the Atmospheric Contribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrera, M.; Romero, M. L.; Valino, F. [CIEMAT. Avda. Complutense 22. 28040 Madrid (Spain); Cartas, H. A. [CEAC. C/Castillo de Jagua. 59350 Cienfuegos. CUBA (Cuba); Herranz, M.; Idoeta, R.; Legarda, F. [UPV-EHU. Alameda de Urquijo, s/n. 48013 Bilbao (Spain)

    2008-08-07

    The vertical distribution of activity and inventories of atmospheric Pb-210 is being studied in Spanish soils, aiming to establish the reference levels in the zone, based on the type of soil and the annual rainfall. A homogeneous distribution grid (approx. 150x150 km each cell) has been established covering the peninsular land, trying to combine the varying soil types (remaining undisturbed for the last 50 years) and the closeness to meteorological stations. Sampling has been performed by extracting undisturbed soil cylinders of 6 cm diameter and 120 cm length, with an impact penetrometer, and the soil cores have been sectioned in slices of 3 cm thick. The analysis of Pb-210 has been performed using a gamma spectrometry system with coaxial HPGe detector sensitive at low energies (46.5 keV emission). The geometry of measured samples is thin enough (approx. 2 cm) to minimize self-absorption corrections. The work presents the results obtained so far. The Pb-210 activity profiles exhibit the characteristic decreasing shape with depth, showing maximum levels at the surface, and reaching the equilibrium activity with Ra-226 at a maximum depth depending on different environmental conditions. The unsupported Pb-210 inventory values are in the usual range (1000-5000 Bq/m{sup 2}), showing a positive correlation with the averaged annual rainfall. These reference levels could be used in posterior studies of anthropogenic alteration of soils, evaluation of erosion and desertification processes.

  15. Comparison of Laboratory and Field Methods for Determining the Quasi-Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity of Soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faybishenko, Boris

    1997-08-01

    Laboratory and field ponded infiltration tests in quasi-saturated soils (containing entrapped air) exhibit the same three-stage temporal variability for the flow rate and hydraulic conductivity. However, the values for the hydraulic conductivity may differ by as much as two orders of magnitude due to differences in the geometry and physics of flow when different laboratory and field methods are applied. The purpose of this paper is to investigate this variability using a comparison of results of ponded infiltration tests conducted under laboratory conditions using confined cores, with results of field tests conducted using partially isolated cores and double-ring infiltrometers. Under laboratory conditions in confined cores, during the firs stage, the water flux decreases over time because entrapped air plugs the largest pores in the soils; during the second stage, the quasi-saturated hydraulic conductivity increases by one to two orders of magnitude, essentially reaching the saturated hydraulic conductivity, when entrapped air is discharged from the soils; during the third stage, the hydraulic conductivity decreases to minimum values due to sealing of the soil surface and the effect of biofilms sealing the pores within the wetted zone. Under field conditions, the second stage is only partially developed, and when the surface sealing process begins, the hydraulic pressure drops below the air entry value, thereby causing atmospheric air to enter the soils. As a result, the soils become unsaturated with a low hydraulic conductivity, and the infiltration rate consequently decreases. Contrary to the laboratory experiments in confined cores, the saturated hydraulic conductivity cannot be reached under field conditions. In computations of infiltration one has to take into account the variations in the quasi-saturated and unsaturated hydraulic conductivities, moisture and entrapped air content, and the hydraulic gradient in the quasi-saturated or unsaturated soils.

  16. Evaluation of cobalt mobility in soils from the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papelis, C.

    1996-09-01

    Nuclear testing at and around the Nevada Test Site (NTS) resulted in widespread contamination from transuranic and other radionuclides, as well as from other toxic inorganic and organic contaminants. The type of contamination, including spatial distribution and type of radionuclides present, depends on the type of testing performed. Remediation of the contaminated areas is currently under way. The optimum in situ or ex situ remediation technology depends on the degree of interaction between the particular radionuclide, or contaminant in general, and the soil matrix, among other factors. The objective of this project was to evaluate the sorption affinity of NTS soils for common non-transuranic radionuclides. The sorption of cobalt (Co) on soils from two different areas of the NTS, namely the Little Feller and Cabriolet event sites, was studied. Experiments were conducted as a function of pH, solid concentration, total Co concentration, ionic strength, and particle size fraction. Preliminary results indicate that both soils have a high sorption capacity for Co. The results suggest that Co uptake is controlled by sorption on either internal, permanent-charge, ion-exchange sites of clay minerals or on amphoteric, surface-hydroxyl sites of oxides. The results further indicate strong retardation of Co in these soils, under most conditions tested and expected to be found in the respective soil environments. These conclusions are applicable to transport of radionuclides which are expected to bind strongly on oxide surfaces (e.g., Co) but the results may not be representative of the behavior of weakly binding radionuclides. These studies clearly demonstrate the importance of evaluating the mobility of radionuclides and the degree of radionuclide-soil interaction before final selection of an in situ or ex situ remediation technology for a contaminated site.

  17. Soil suitability index identifies potential areas for groundwater banking on agricultural lands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    R. 1981. Range claypan soil improvement: response fromdoi:10.2134/ agronj2001.932281x Soil Survey Division Staff.1993. Soil survey manual. Soil Conservation Service. US

  18. Effects of soil solarization on yields of celery, pepper, onion, control of soil-borne pathogens, and chemical changes in the soil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avila, Francisco Antonio

    1989-01-01

    EFFECTS OF SOIL SOLARIZATION ON YIELDS OF CELERY, PEPPER, ONION, CONTROL OF SOIL-BORNE PATHOGENS, AND CHEMICAL CHANGES IN THE SOIL A Thesis by FRANCISCO ANTONIO AVILA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1989 Major Subject: Horticulture EFFECTS OF SOIL SOLARIZATION ON YIELDS OF CELERY, PEPPER, ONION, CONTROL OF SOIL-BORNE PATHOGENS, AND CHEMICAL CHANGES IN THE SOIL A...

  19. Determination of Natural Beryllium (Be) in Soil and Swipe Samples Utilizing Yttrium/Beryllium Ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-09-30

    1. Objective: A method to determine whether beryllium (Be) components in surface swipe samples are from a natural source is needed. 2. Methods: Soil samples and surface swipes from area facilities were analyzed for marker elements to identify source pathways for beryllium (Be). To be useful, the natural marker element must be present at reasonably consistent levels across the site, must correlate with the Be concentration, and not have the potential to be present from non-natural sources. 3. Results: The research on marker elements used to identify source pathways for beryllium (Be) concentrations demonstrates a clear correlation between Be and yttrium (Y) in natural soils on the Nevada National Security Site. The Y/Be ratio is proposed as a method to characterize the source of Be in soil and surface swipe samples and to aid in recommendations for follow up actions. Swipe samples are analyzed using an ICP/MS method and compared with results from soil samples. Natural soil constituent levels and the Y/Be Ratio range is determined for the occupied and historical facilities and surrounding areas. Y/Be ratios within the statistical range established indicate the Be is from a natural source. Y/Be ratios lower than this range indicate the presence of another Be source, and may then be correlated to alloy, ceramic, or other operational sources by the ratios of copper, nickel, cobalt, uranium, and/or niobium. Example case studies of evaluations of buildings with historical operational beryllium usage, current ongoing technical processes, and heavy equipment used in large building demolitions are included demonstrating the value of the ratio approach. 4. Conclusions: This differentiation is valuable as there is no known correlation between natural beryllium in soil and beryllium disease.

  20. Growing plants on atoll soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stone, E L; Migvar, L; Robison, W L

    2000-02-16

    Many years ago people living on atolls depended entirely on foods gathered from the sea and reefs and grown on land. Only a few plants, such as coconut (ni), Pandanus (bob), and arrowroot (mok-mok), could be grown on the lower rainfall atolls, although adequate groundwater conditions also allowed taro (iaraj, kotak, wot) to be cultivated. On higher rainfall atolls, breadfruit (ma) was a major food source, and banana (binana, kepran), lime (laim), and taros (iaraj, kotak, wot) could be grown. The early atoll populations were experts in growing plants that were vital to sustaining their nutrition requirements and to providing materials for thatch, basketry, cordage, canoe construction, flowers, and medicine. They knew which varieties of food plants grew well or poorly on their atolls, how to propagate them, and where on their atoll they grew best. They knew the uses of most native plants and what the various woods were well suited for. Many varieties of Pandanus (bob) and breadfruit (ma) grew well with high rainfall, but only a few produced well on drier atolls. Such information had been passed down through the generations although some of it has been lost in the last century. Today there are new plants and new varieties of existing plants that can be grown on atolls. There are also new materials and information on how to grow both the old and new plants more effectively. However, there are also introduced weeds and pests to control. Today, there is also an acute need to grow more of the useful plants adapted to atolls. Increasing numbers of people living on an atoll without an equal increase in income or food production stretches the available food supplies. Much has been written about the poor conditions for plant growth on atolls. As compared with many places in the world where crops are grown, however, atolls can provide some highly favorable conditions. For instance, the driving force for plant growth is sunlight, and on atolls light is abundant throughout the year. Except on the driest of atolls, air temperature and humidity range only within limits set by the surrounding sea. There are no cold seasons, no frosts, no cold soils, no dry winds, and no periodic plagues of insects or diseases moving from miles away. Problems of soil drainage or salinity are few and easily recognized. Nor are there problems with acid soils, soil crusting, or erosion that challenge cultivators in many other areas. On the contrary, some of the black soils at the center of wide islands rank with the best soils of Russia and the American Midwest, except for their shortage of potassium and the uncertainties of rainfall. Some of these atoll soils contain more total nitrogen than many of the world's most productive agricultural soils and, in some, the total phosphorus content is so high as to be almost unbelievable--two to five tons of the element per acre. Certainly, problems exist in growing plants on atolls. There are also some special concerns not encountered in other environments, such as the wind and salt spray near shore. The two major physical limitations, however, are inadequate rainfall in some years and in many places, and soil fertility limitations. The alkaline or ''limy'' make-up of atoll soils means that a few plant nutrients, especially iron, limit growth of many introduced plants, and this is difficult to correct. As elsewhere in the world, many--but not all--atoll soils lack enough nitrogen and/or phosphorus for high yield, and all lack sufficient potassium. There is no practical way of overcoming drought except by use of tolerant plants such as coconut (ni) and Pandanus (bob), plus collection and careful use of whatever water is available. There are opportunities to overcome nutritional limitations mentioned above, first, by intensive use of all organic debris and household wastes in small gardens and, second, by use of commercial fertilizers. Imported fertilizers are expensive, certainly, but much less so on a family basis than the equivalent costs of imported food.

  1. Cleaning of a model food soil from horizontal plates by a moving vertical water jet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, D. I.; Köhler, H.; Cai, L.; Majschak, J.-P.; Davidson, J. F.

    2014-11-20

    steel test sheets (dimensions in mm, 500 × 500 × 1, AISI 304, 2B finish) were cleaned with water and ethanol before soiling. The sheets were placed upright and the test soil was sprayed on to give a homogeneous film. Excess solution flowed down off... -1 and a surface coverage of 11 g m-2. The EE calculation employed a pump efficiency of 76% and a (lab scale) motor efficiency of 85%: pressure losses due to fittings and work or liquid used to move the jet were not considered. The effect...

  2. The Composition of the Soils of Archer, Franklin and Harrision Counties. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1919-01-01

    the Vernon fine sandy loam. It is quite probable that the use of phosphate on the Vernon fine sandy loam soils would be profitable, especially in good seasons. The total potash varies from 15,600 to 37,000 pounds per acre in the surface soil to a depth... clap loam, to 2,600 pounds per acre in the Vernon clay. This amount is sufficient for from fourteen to forty-three crops of corn of forty bushels each, if .it could all be utilized for the crop, but since there are also great losses of nitro- gen...

  3. In-Situ Contained And Of Volatile Soil Contaminants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Varvel, Mark Darrell (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2005-12-27

    The invention relates to a novel approach to containing and removing toxic waste from a subsurface environment. More specifically the present invention relates to a system for containing and removing volatile toxic chemicals from a subsurface environment using differences in surface and subsurface pressures. The present embodiment generally comprises a deep well, a horizontal tube, at least one injection well, at least one extraction well and a means for containing the waste within the waste zone (in-situ barrier). During operation the deep well air at the bottom of well (which is at a high pressure relative to the land surface as well as relative to the air in the contaminated soil) flows upward through the deep well (or deep well tube). This stream of deep well air is directed into the horizontal tube, down through the injection tube(s) (injection well(s)) and into the contaminate plume where it enhances volatization and/or removal of the contaminants.

  4. In-Situ Containment and Extraction of Volatile Soil Contaminants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Varvel, Mark Darrell

    2005-12-27

    The invention relates to a novel approach to containing and removing toxic waste from a subsurface environment. More specifically the present invention relates to a system for containing and removing volatile toxic chemicals from a subsurface environment using differences in surface and subsurface pressures. The present embodiment generally comprises a deep well, a horizontal tube, at least one injection well, at least one extraction well and a means for containing the waste within the waste zone (in-situ barrier). During operation the deep well air at the bottom of well (which is at a high pressure relative to the land surface as well as relative to the air in the contaminated soil) flows upward through the deep well (or deep well tube). This stream of deep well air is directed into the horizontal tube, down through the injection tube(s) (injection well(s)) and into the contaminate plume where it enhances volatization and/or removal of the contaminants.

  5. Water and heat transport in boreal soils: Implications for soil response to climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    upward gradients of water potential energy (mainly due towater movement could be an important factor in seasonal soil energywater movement through boreal soil is a critical factor for accurate simulations of energy (

  6. Consolidation theories for saturated-unsaturated soils and numerical simulation of residential buildings on expansive soils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Xiong

    2005-11-01

    to perform uncoupled two or three dimensional consolidation calculation for both expansive soils and collapsible soils. From the analysis, the equivalent effective stress and excessive pore water pressure can be easily calculated. At the same time...

  7. Soil phosphorus status and fertilizer use in select agricutural soils in Nicaragua 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niemeyer, Patrick G

    2001-01-01

    A survey of small, medium and large Nicaraguan producers indicated a heavy reliance on imported complete fertilizer. Analysis of soils sampled from the large-scale commercial producers found low P retention in the lowland heavy clay soils...

  8. Pedogenic Thresholds and Soil Process Domains in Basalt-Derived Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vitousek, PM; Chadwick, OA

    2013-01-01

    rejuvenation of weathering-derived nutri- ent supply in anProcess Domains in Basalt-Derived Soils Peter M. Vitousekand domains in basalt-derived soils on two rainfall

  9. Soil maps of Wisconsin Alfred E. Hartemink a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Stephen R.

    Soil maps of Wisconsin Alfred E. Hartemink a, , Birl Lowery a , Carl Wacker b a University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Soil Science, FD Hole Soils Lab, 1525 Observatory Drive, Madison, WI 53706 May 2012 Accepted 15 May 2012 Available online xxxx Keywords: Soil maps Historical maps Digital soil

  10. Soil degradation, global warming and climate impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feddema, Johannes J.; Freire, Sergio Carneiro

    2001-01-01

    stream_size 21847 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Feddema_Soil_Degradation_Global_Warming.pdf.txt stream_source_info Feddema_Soil_Degradation_Global_Warming.pdf.txt Content-Encoding UTF-8 Content-Type text.... This study will demonstrate one methodology for assessing the potential large-scale impacts of soil degradation on African climates and water resources. In addition it will compare and contrast these impacts to those expected from global warming and compare...

  11. Dynamic Soil-Structure-Soil-Interaction Analysis of Structures in Dense Urban Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Katherine Carys

    2013-01-01

    soil. International Journal of Geomechanics, 8(6), 336-346.International Journal of Geomechanics. Takewaki, I. (1998).

  12. Supplementary Information Pyrogenic carbon additions to soil counteract positive priming of soil carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehmann, Johannes

    derive the fraction of total soil CO2 emissions that are from this plant as compared to those from the C3 soil using the equation: fC4 veg T C3soil C4 veg C3soil , where fC4veg is the fraction of CO2 the contrasting metabolic pathways of C3 and C4 plants. During photosynthetic uptake of CO2, C3 plants

  13. Elevated CO2 stimulates grassland soil respiration by increasing carbon inputs rather than by enhancing soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    Elevated CO2 stimulates grassland soil respiration by increasing carbon inputs rather than by enhancing soil moisture E . C A R O L A D A I R * § , P E T E R B . R E I C H , J A R E D J . T R O It is not clear whether the consistent positive effect of elevated CO2 on soil respiration (soil carbon flux, SCF

  14. Oxidation of Organic Compounds in the Soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1915-01-01

    aerated. It is known, for example, that nitrification in a liquid culture is not the same as nitrification in the soil. Cottonseed meal will putrefy in soil in flaslcs stopperecl with cotton wool, while in glass jars, the same mixture will nitrifv. A... cnpaciiy. The nitrif-ing capac- it" the oxidatioa capacity 'and the capacit~ of the soil to convert am- monia into nitrates and ammonia are to a certain extent related, espe- . cially the t-ro latter. They are not necessarily the same in the same soils...

  15. The Chemical Composition of Some Texas Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1907-01-01

    as to be unfit for agricultural purposes, although very productive when the stones are removed. Crawford silty clay is a brown to reddish brown clay, being the principal truck soil of the area. Blanco Ioam is a heavy gray loam or silty loam occurring only... acid is low in the Houston Ioam and in the Susquehanna fine sandy loam, but other soils contain an abundance. A fair quantity of nit- rogen is present in all the soils. Potash is low in Houston clay and in the Blanco loam. These soils as a rule...

  16. Contrasting soil microbial community functional structures in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    two major landscapes of the Tibetan alpine meadow Prev Next Title: Contrasting soil microbial community functional structures in two major landscapes of the Tibetan alpine...

  17. Performance evaluation soil samples utilizing encapsulation technology

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dahlgran, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1999-01-01

    Performance evaluation soil samples and method of their preparation using encapsulation technology to encapsulate analytes which are introduced into a soil matrix for analysis and evaluation by analytical laboratories. Target analytes are mixed in an appropriate solvent at predetermined concentrations. The mixture is emulsified in a solution of polymeric film forming material. The emulsified solution is polymerized to form microcapsules. The microcapsules are recovered, quantitated and introduced into a soil matrix in a predetermined ratio to form soil samples with the desired analyte concentration.

  18. Performance evaluation soil samples utilizing encapsulation technology

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dahlgran, J.R.

    1999-08-17

    Performance evaluation soil samples and method of their preparation uses encapsulation technology to encapsulate analytes which are introduced into a soil matrix for analysis and evaluation by analytical laboratories. Target analytes are mixed in an appropriate solvent at predetermined concentrations. The mixture is emulsified in a solution of polymeric film forming material. The emulsified solution is polymerized to form microcapsules. The microcapsules are recovered, quantitated and introduced into a soil matrix in a predetermined ratio to form soil samples with the desired analyte concentration. 1 fig.

  19. Stable or unstable wetting fronts in water repellent soils effect of antecedent soil moisture content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    contents during the experiment, which caused the soil to be wettable instead of water repellent. The waterStable or unstable wetting fronts in water repellent soils ± effect of antecedent soil moisture content Coen J. Ritsemaa,* , John L. Nieberb , Louis W. Dekkera , T.S. Steenhuisc a DLO Winand Staring

  20. Nitrogen Fixation and Leaching of Biological Soil Crust Communities in Mesic Temperate Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neher, Deborah A.

    Microbial Ecology Nitrogen Fixation and Leaching of Biological Soil Crust Communities in Mesic Temperate Soils Roberta M. Veluci1,2 , Deborah A. Neher1,3 and Thomas R. Weicht1,3 (1) Department of Earth, FL 32611-0760, USA (3) Department of Plant and Soil Science, University of Vermont, 105 Carrigan Dr

  1. The production and degradation of trichloroacetic acid in soil: results from in situ soil column experiments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heal, Mathew R; Dickey, Catherine A; Heal, Kate V; Stidson, Ruth T; Matucha, Miroslav; Cape, J Neil

    2010-01-01

    experiments with radioactively-labelled TCA and with irradiated (sterilised) soil columns. Control in situ forest soil columns showed evidence of net export (i.e. in situ production) of TCA, consistent with a net soil TCA production inferred from forest...

  2. Elevated CO2 stimulates grassland soil respiration by increasing carbon inputs rather than by enhancing soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Elevated CO2 stimulates grassland soil respiration by increasing carbon inputs rather than It is not clear whether the consistent positive effect of elevated CO2 on soil respiration (soil carbon flux, SCF) results from increased plant and microbial activity due to (i) greater C availability through CO2-induced

  3. Soil organic carbon and nutrient content in aggregate-size fractions of a subtropical rice soil under variable tillage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Soil organic carbon and nutrient content in aggregate-size fractions of a subtropical rice soil The effects of tillage on soil organic carbon (SOC) and nutrient content of soil aggregates can vary spatially and temporally, and for different soil types and cropping systems. We assessed SOC and nutrient levels within

  4. EFFECTS OF COMPOST AND LIME APPLICATION ON SOIL CHEMICAL PROPERTIES, SOIL MICROBIAL COMMUNITY, AND FUSARIUM WILT IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    1 EFFECTS OF COMPOST AND LIME APPLICATION ON SOIL CHEMICAL PROPERTIES, SOIL MICROBIAL COMMUNITY compost as an antagonistic suppression approach to combat soil-borne disease effects on crop yields the effect of compost and lime on soil chemical properties, the soil microbial community (including Fusarium

  5. Soil metagenomics and carbon cycling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541 *ImpactScience of SignaturesSoft CostsSoilBioscience:

  6. Hazen, T. C., A. J. Tien, A. Worsztynowicz, D. J. Altman, K. Ulfig, and T. Manko. 2003. Biopiles for Remediation of Petroleum-Contaminated Soils: A Polish Case Study. NATO Advanced Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry

    on The Utilization of Bioremediation to Reduce Soil Contamination: Problems and Solutions. V. Sasek, J. Glaser, and P Department of Energy and the Institute for Ecology of Industrial Areas of Poland demonstrated bioremediation to destroy oil sludges [6]. By applying oil to the soil surface, adding fertilizer (P & N), water

  7. Finnish forest soils Pekka Tamminen and Erkki Tomppo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomppo, Erkki

    .9 %), Gleysols (1.4 %) and Regosols (1.2 %), had only a small proportion. International soil classifications seem properties, the use of continuous variables would be more useful for primary soil users. Keywords soil survey

  8. Biochar and Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria as Soil Amendments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hale, Lauren Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    pyrolysis temperature on biochar property and function as a heavy metal sorbent in soil.soil biological community structures and functions and that pyrolysisPyrolysis Temperature of Biochar Amendments on Transport of Escherichia coli in Saturated and Unsaturated Soil.

  9. Soil-landscape model helps predict potassium supply in vineyards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Geen, Anthony T; Pettygrove, Stuart; Southard, Randal; Minoshima, Hideomi; Verdegaal, Paul S.

    2008-01-01

    for making and inter- preting soil surveys (2nd ed. ). USDA-K S, V, K Depth inches Color* moist soil Sand Silt Clay Claymineralogy† pH CEC cmol(+)/kg soil‡ Exchangeable K K

  10. Soil Disturbance from an Integrated Mechanical Forest Fuel Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolding, M. Chad

    Soil Disturbance from an Integrated Mechanical Forest Fuel Reduction Operation in Southwest Oregon1 literature has quantified harvesting system effectiveness or soil disturbance concerns from such operations. This paper reports results of soil disturbance generated from an integrated forest harvesting

  11. In-Situ Bioremediation of Perchlorate in Groundwater and Soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Liyan

    2012-01-01

    AND SPATIAL PATTERNS OF SOIL REDOX POTENTIAL IN FLORIDAParker, Effects of common soil anions and pH on the uptakein lettuce. Plant and Soil, 2008. 302(1-2): p. 139-148.

  12. Storage and turnover of organic matter in soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torn, M.S.

    2009-01-01

    of organic carbon from peat soils. Nature 412 , 785. Fried,Plant Litter. Standard Soil Methods for Long-Term Ecological2007). Role of proteins in soil carbon and nitrogen storage:

  13. SOIL MICROBIOLOGY Resource Use of Soilborne Streptomyces Varies with Location,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    SOIL MICROBIOLOGY Resource Use of Soilborne Streptomyces Varies with Location, Phylogeny in prairie soils. Resource use patterns were highly variable among Streptomyces isolates and were soils less than 1 m apart differed significantly in their ability to use resources, indicating

  14. Soil Hydraulic Characteristics of a Small Southwest Oregon Watershed Following

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    --------------------------------------------- Soil Hydraulic Characteristics of a Small Southwest by a high-intensity burn over areas of steep topography. The areal distribution of soil hydraulic of infiltration capacity, saturated hydraulic conductivity, and soil moisture characteristics. Also, measures

  15. Dynamics of decadally cycling carbon in subsurface soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koarashi, Jun; Hockaday, William C; Masiello, Caroline A; Trumbore, Susan E

    2012-01-01

    of organic carbon in deep soil layers controlled by freshcarbon input G03033 from fresh liter to deep mineral soils,Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. , 71, 347–354, doi:

  16. Soils of Amazonia with particular reference to the RAINFOR sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quesada, C. A; Lloyd, J.; Anderson, L. O; Fyllas, N. M; Schwarz, M.; Czimczik, C. I

    2011-01-01

    in S. Paulo State, Brazil, Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. , 38, Lima,G. : Variable Charge Soils: Their Mineralogy, Chemistry andV. S. : Edaphic controls on soil organic carbon retention in

  17. Measurement and Modeling of Solute Diffusion Coefficients in Unsaturated Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chou, Hsin-Yi

    2010-01-01

    Diffusion and flow in gravel, soil, and whole rock, AppliedEds. ) (2002), Methods of Soil Analysis Part 4 PhysicalUnsaturated Volcanic Ash Soils, Vadose Zone Journal, 8(4),

  18. Vineyard nutrient needs vary with rootstocks and soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lambert, Jean-Jacques; Anderson, Michael M; Wolpert, J A

    2008-01-01

    to the interpretation of soil analysis for potassium andA (ed. ). 1986. Methods of Soil Analysis. Part 1. Physi- cal9:154–68. Nicholas P. 2004. Soil, Irrigation and Nutrition.

  19. Process and apparatus for obtaining samples of liquid and gas from soil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rossabi, J.; May, C.P.; Pemberton, B.E.; Shinn, J.; Sprague, K.

    1999-03-30

    An apparatus and process for obtaining samples of liquid and gas from subsurface soil is provided having filter zone adjacent an external expander ring. The expander ring creates a void within the soil substrate which encourages the accumulation of soil-borne fluids. The fluids migrate along a pressure gradient through a plurality of filters before entering a first chamber. A one-way valve regulates the flow of fluid into a second chamber in further communication with a collection tube through which samples are collected at the surface. A second one-way valve having a reverse flow provides additional communication between the chambers for the pressurized cleaning and back-flushing of the apparatus. 8 figs.

  20. Process and apparatus for obtaining samples of liquid and gas from soil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rossabi, Joseph (105 Michael Ct., Aiken, SC 29801); May, Christopher P. (5002 Hesperus Dr., Columbia, MD 21044); Pemberton, Bradley E. (131 Glencarin Dr., Aiken, SC 29803); Shinn, Jim (Box 65, RFD. #1, South Royalton, VT 05068); Sprague, Keith (Box 234 Rte. 14, Brookfield, VT 05036)

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus and process for obtaining samples of liquid and gas from subsurface soil is provided having filter zone adjacent an external expander ring. The expander ring creates a void within the soil substrate which encourages the accumulation of soil-borne fluids. The fluids migrate along a pressure gradient through a plurality of filters before entering a first chamber. A one-way valve regulates the flow of fluid into a second chamber in further communication with a collection tube through which samples are collected at the surface. A second one-way valve having a reverse flow provides additional communication between the chambers for the pressurized cleaning and back-flushing of the apparatus.

  1. Evaluation of the evaporative fraction for parameterization of the surface energy balance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nichols, W.E. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Cuenca, R.H. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis (United States))

    1993-11-01

    The evaporative fraction is a ratio of latent heat flux to the sum of latent and sensible heat fluxes. It has been used to characterize the energy partition over land surfaces and has potential for inferring daily energy balance information based on midday remote sensing measurements. The HAPEX-MOBILHY program SAMER system provided surface energy balance data over a range of agricultural crops and soil types. Data from this large-scale field experiment was analyzed to study the behavior and daylight stability of the evaporative fraction in both ideal and general meteorological conditions. Strong linear relations were found to exist between the midday evaporative fraction and the daylight evaporative fraction. Statistical tests, however, rejected the hypothesis that the two quantities were equal. Relations between the evaporative fraction and surface soil moisture as well as soil moisture over the complete root zone were explored, but no correlation was identified. 33 refs., 11 figs., 6 tabs.

  2. Innovative vitrification for soil remediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jetta, N.W.; Patten, J.S.; Hnat, J.G. [Vortec Corp., Collegeville, PA (United States)] [and others

    1996-03-01

    The objective of this DOE demonstration program is to validate the performance and operation of the Vortec Cyclone Melting System (CMS{trademark}) for the processing of LLW contaminated soils found at DOE sites. This DOE vitrification demonstration project has successfully progressed through the first two phases. Phase 1 consisted of pilot scale testing with surrogate wastes and the conceptual design of a process plant operating at a generic DOE site. The objective of Phase 2, which is scheduled to be completed the end of FY 95, is to develop a definitive process plant design for the treatment of wastes at a specific DOE facility. During Phase 2, a site specific design was developed for the processing of LLW soils and muds containing TSCA organics and RCRA metal contaminants. Phase 3 will consist of a full scale demonstration at the DOE gaseous diffusion plant located in Paducah, KY. Several DOE sites were evaluated for potential application of the technology. Paducah was selected for the demonstration program because of their urgent waste remediation needs as well as their strong management and cost sharing financial support for the project.

  3. Innovative vitrification for soil remediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jetta, N.W.; Patten, J.S.; Hnat, J.G. [Vortec Corp., Collegeville, PA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The objective of this DOE demonstration program is to validate the performance and operation of the Vortec Cyclone Melting System (CMS{trademark}) for the processing of LLW contaminated soils found at DOE sites. This DOE vitrification demonstration project has successfully progressed through the first two phases. Phase I consisted of pilot scale testing with surrogate wastes and the conceptual design of a process plant operating at a generic DOE site. The objective of Phase 2, which is scheduled to be completed the end of FY 95, is to develop a definitive process plant design for the treatment of wastes at a specific DOE facility. During Phase 2, a site specific design was developed for the processing of LLW soils and muds containing TSCA organics and RCRA metal contaminants. Phase 3 will consist of a full scale demonstration at the DOE gaseous diffusion plant located in Paducah, KY. Several DOE sites were evaluated for potential application of the technology. Paducah was selected for the demonstration program because of their urgent waste remediation needs as well as their strong management and cost sharing financial support for the project.

  4. T Tank Farm Interim Surface Barrier Demonstration - Vadose Zone Monitoring FY08 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z. F.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Field, Jim G.; Parker, Danny L.

    2009-02-01

    DOE’s Office of River Protection constructed a temporary surface barrier over a portion of the T Tank Farm as part of the T Farm Interim Surface Barrier Demonstration Project. The surface barrier is designed to minimize the infiltration of precipitation into the contaminated soil zone created by the Tank T-106 leak and minimize movement of the contamination. As part of the demonstration effort, vadose zone moisture is being monitored to assess the effectiveness of the barrier at reducing soil moisture. A solar-powered system was installed to continuously monitor soil water conditions at four locations (i.e., instrument Nests A, B, C, and D) beneath the barrier and outside the barrier footprint as well as site meteorological conditions. Nest A is placed in the area outside the barrier footprint and serves as a control, providing subsurface conditions outside the influence of the surface barrier. Nest B provides subsurface measurements to assess surface-barrier edge effects. Nests C and D are used to assess changes in soil-moisture conditions beneath the interim surface barrier.

  5. Numerical study on transient heat transfer under soil with plastic mulch in agriculture applications using a nonlinear finite element model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Castro, Carlos Armando

    2011-01-01

    In this paper is developed a simple mathematical model of transient heat transfer under soil with plastic mulch in order to determine with numerical studies the influence of different plastic mulches on the soil temperature and the evolutions of temperatures at different depths with time. The governing differential equations are solved by a Galerkin Finite Element Model, taking into account the nonlinearities due to radiative heat exchange between the soil surface, the plastic mulch and the atmosphere. The model was validated experimentally giving good approximation of the model to the measured data. Simulations were run with the validated model in order to determine the optimal combination of mulch optical properties to maximize the soil temperature with a Taguchi's analysis, proving that the material most used nowadays in Colombia is not the optimal and giving quantitative results of the properties the optimal mulch must possess.

  6. Cliff T. Johnston Professor of Soil Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Scott A.

    in Academic, Professional and Scholarly Societies American Chemical Society Clay Minerals Society Awarded a Fulbright Senior Specialist Grant ­ Brazil. Publications - Journal Articles and Invited Reviews developments in soil science research, L.L. Boersma (ed.), Soil Sci. Soc. of Am. Publications, Madison, WI

  7. Data management system for organic soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stinnette, P.

    1999-07-01

    A Data Management System for Organic Soil (DMSOS) has been developed that enables the acquisition, management and analysis of organic soil data as well as the presentation of results to be conducted effectively through a common interface. This development was in response to the data management needs of research investigating the engineering properties of organic soil and its extension to the stabilization of organic soil through dynamic replacement (DR). It is shown how the above functions are implemented efficiently using Windows-based software to perform comprehensive data management and analysis of data gathered from both laboratory and field tests. When the engineering properties of a given organic soil deposit are needed, a build-in Computer Advisor for Organic Soil Projects (CAOSP) predicts the properties from DMSOS based correlations. A unique and useful feature of the CAOSP is its ability to estimate the anticipated ultimate settlement of an organic soil deposit given the loading conditions and the moisture or organic content. Also incorporated in the DMSOS is a quality control system that utilizes computerized data acquisition/data management techniques in order to evaluate the degree of improvement of an organic soil layer at a given stage of treatment using DR.

  8. Analysis of large soil samples for actinides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maxwell, III; Sherrod L. (Aiken, SC)

    2009-03-24

    A method of analyzing relatively large soil samples for actinides by employing a separation process that includes cerium fluoride precipitation for removing the soil matrix and precipitates plutonium, americium, and curium with cerium and hydrofluoric acid followed by separating these actinides using chromatography cartridges.

  9. NNSS Soils Monitoring: Plutonium Valley (CAU366)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Julianne J.; Mizell, Steve A.; Nikolich, George; Campbell, Scott

    2012-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Nevada Site Office (NSO), Environmental Restoration Soils Activity has authorized the Desert Research Institute (DRI) to conduct field assessments of potential sediment transport of contaminated soil from Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 366, Area 11 Plutonium Valley Dispersion Sites Contamination Area (CA) during precipitation runoff events.

  10. Process for removing polychlorinated biphenyls from soil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hancher, C.W.; Saunders, M.B.; Googin, J.M.

    1984-11-16

    The present invention relates to a method of removing polychlorinated biphenyls from soil. The polychlorinated biphenyls are extracted from the soil by employing a liquid organic solvent dispersed in water in the ratio of about 1:3 to 3:1. The organic solvent includes such materials as short-chain hydrocarbons including kerosene or gasoline which are immiscible with water and are nonpolar. The organic solvent has a greater affinity for the PCB's than the soil so as to extract the PCB's from the soil upon contact. The organic solvent phase is separated from the suspended soil and water phase and distilled for permitting the recycle of the organic solvent phase and the concentration of the PCB's in the remaining organic phase. The present process can be satisfactorily practiced with soil containing 10 to 20% petroleum-based oils and organic fluids such as used in transformers and cutting fluids, coolants and the like which contain PCB's. The subject method provides for the removal of a sufficient concentration of PCB's from the soil to provide the soil with a level of PCB's within the guidelines of the Environmental Protection Agency.

  11. Moisture Relations of Some Texas Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1915-01-01

    . %Water Content of Houston Black Clay, 1912 The curves show clearly the effects of cultivation upon the water content of the soil. T'he cultivated soil contains a larger percentage of water in practicaJly all cases. The curves also show the decided...

  12. Using soil sensing technology to examine interactions and controls between ectomycorrhizal growth and environmental factors on soil CO2 dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasselquist, Niles J.; Vargas, Rodrigo; Allen, Michael F.

    2010-01-01

    Plant Soil (2010) 331:17–29 DOI 10.1007/s11104-y REGULAR ARTICLE Using soil sensing technology to examineand environmental factors on soil CO 2 dynamics Niles J.

  13. 19th World Congress of Soil Science, Soil solutions for a changing world, Brisbane, Australia 1-6 August 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ). The investigated ES were climate regulation through carbon sequestration in soil and biomass, soil conservation of these results are discussed. Key Words Land use change, socioeconomic drivers, carbon sequestration, soil

  14. Non-Linear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction (SSI) Method for...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Non-Linear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction (SSI) Method for Developing Non-Linear Seismic SSI Analysis Techniques Non-Linear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction (SSI) Method for...

  15. SIMULATION OF CONSOLIDATION IN PARTIALLY SATURATED SOIL MATERIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasimhan, T.N.

    2010-01-01

    T.W. and R.V. Whitman, Soil Mechanics, John Wiley, New York,in the field of soil mechanics. The now widely used concept

  16. ORNL researchers improve soil carbon cycling models | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and releases carbon into the soil. Enzymes released by microbes in the soil degrade the organic matter, releasing carbon molecules, which the microbes absorb as food. Eventually,...

  17. Plant stimulation of soil microbial community succession: how...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Plant stimulation of soil microbial community succession: how sequential expression mediates soil carbon stabilization and turnover Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Plant...

  18. Mapping Soil Carbon from Cradle to Grave: Identifying the Microbial...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Mapping Soil Carbon from Cradle to Grave: Identifying the Microbial Blueprint for Root-carbon Transformations in Soil Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Mapping...

  19. Mapping Soil Carbon from Cradle to Grave: Identifying the Microbial...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In-Document Search Title: Mapping Soil Carbon from Cradle to Grave: Identifying the Microbial Blueprint for Root-carbon Transformations in Soil Erin Nuccio, Lawrence...

  20. Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Archived Soil & Groundwater...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Rocky...

  1. LM Conducts Groundwater and Soil Investigation at Riverton, Wyoming...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Conducts Groundwater and Soil Investigation at Riverton, Wyoming, in Response to 2010 Flood LM Conducts Groundwater and Soil Investigation at Riverton, Wyoming, in Response to 2010...

  2. Soil and Groundwater Cleanup - In-Situ Grouting, Lessons Learned...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Soil and Groundwater Cleanup - In-Situ Grouting, Lessons Learned (Post CD-4), Environmental Management Cleanup, May 2011 Soil and Groundwater Cleanup - In-Situ Grouting, Lessons...

  3. After More Than 20 Years Operating, Hanford's Soil Vapor Extraction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    After More Than 20 Years Operating, Hanford's Soil Vapor Extraction Project Nears Completion After More Than 20 Years Operating, Hanford's Soil Vapor Extraction Project Nears...

  4. Soil Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Klusman...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Soil Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Klusman & Landress, 1979) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Soil Sampling At...

  5. Soil Sampling At Waunita Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Ringrose...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Soil Sampling At Waunita Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Ringrose & Pearl, 1981) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Soil Sampling At...

  6. STRUCTURE-SOIL-STRUCTURE INTERACTION AT SRS | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    INTERACTION AT SRS Structure-Soil-Structure Interaction at SRS Structural Mechanics - SRS October 25, 2011 Structure-Soil-Structure Interaction at SRS More Documents &...

  7. NYSDOT soil bioengineering and biotechnical engineering design guidance and specifications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glath, Gary; Radzyminski, Stephen; Lohse, Robert; Freehart, William

    2003-01-01

    NYSDOT SOIL BIOENGINEERING AND BIOTECHNICAL ENGINEERING15, 2002, NYSDOT issued Soil Bioengineering and BiotechnicalBenefits of bioengineering/biotechnical engineering systems

  8. Fluorinated silica microchannel surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kirby, Brian J.; Shepodd, Timothy Jon

    2005-03-15

    A method for surface modification of microchannels and capillaries. The method produces a chemically inert surface having a lowered surface free energy and improved frictional properties by attaching a fluorinated alkane group to the surface. The coating is produced by hydrolysis of a silane agent that is functionalized with either alkoxy or chloro ligands and an uncharged C.sub.3 -C.sub.10 fluorinated alkane chain. It has been found that the extent of surface coverage can be controlled by controlling the contact time from a minimum of about 2 minutes to a maximum of 120 minutes for complete surface coverage.

  9. Germination studies with upland cotton cultivars 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wickramasinghe, Palitha Jagath

    1982-01-01

    to low temperatures and germination or seedling emergence is delayed or, in extreme condi- tions, germination is prevented when exposed to chilling conditions (Crocker and Barton, 1957; Mayer and Pcljakoff-Mayber, 1963). Camp and Walker (1927), Ludwig... in surviving seedlings. If chilling occurs after germination has proceeded for 24 to 36 hours at a favorable temperature, a radicle cortex injury and long-term growth inhibition may result, causing reduced yield or, at least, delayed fruit- ing...

  10. Vegetation Dynamics in Seasonally Grazed Upland Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollock, Meg L

    This thesis addresses the effects of seasonality of grazing on vegetation dynamics. Background to the thesis is provided by the Hill Sheep and Native Woodland (HSNW) project, a system-scale experiment with the long-term ...

  11. Effect of 1-methylcyclopropene on upland cotton 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scheiner, Justin Jack

    2007-09-17

    Ethylene plays a key role in square and boll abscission in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.). When subjected to stress, cotton plants synthesize higher rates of ethylene which can result in the loss of immature fruit. The ethylene action inhibitor 1...

  12. Upland, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThin FilmUnited States: Energy

  13. Generation and mobility of radon in soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, A.W.; Jester, W.A.; Ciolkosz, E.J.

    1993-01-01

    This study has confirmed large seasonal and daily variations of Rn in soil gas, developed models for the effects of temperature and moisture on air-water Rn partition, inhibited Rn diffusion from wet soil into sparse large air-filled pores and effects of diffusion into bedrock, demonstrated that organic matter is a major host for 226Ra in soils and that organic-bound Ra largely determines the proportion of 222Rn emanated to pore space, shown that in contrast 220Rn is emanated mainly from 224Ra in Fe-oxides, detected significant disequilibrium between 226Ra and 238U in organic matter and in some recent glacial soils, demonstrated by computer models that air convection driven by temperature differences is expected in moderately permeable soils on hillsides.

  14. Measuring spatial variability in soil characteristics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoskinson, Reed L. (Rigby, ID); Svoboda, John M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sawyer, J. Wayne (Hampton, VA); Hess, John R. (Ashton, ID); Hess, J. Richard (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides systems and methods for measuring a load force associated with pulling a farm implement through soil that is used to generate a spatially variable map that represents the spatial variability of the physical characteristics of the soil. An instrumented hitch pin configured to measure a load force is provided that measures the load force generated by a farm implement when the farm implement is connected with a tractor and pulled through or across soil. Each time a load force is measured, a global positioning system identifies the location of the measurement. This data is stored and analyzed to generate a spatially variable map of the soil. This map is representative of the physical characteristics of the soil, which are inferred from the magnitude of the load force.

  15. Clean soil at Eniwetok and Johnston Atolls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bramlitt, E.T.

    1990-01-01

    The Defense Nuclear Agency has managed two large-scale soil cleanups (landmass decontaminations) of plutonium contamination. Both are at Pacific Ocean atolls formerly used for nuclear weapons tests. The Eniwetok Atoll (EA) cleanup between 1977 and 1980 evaluated 390 ha of contaminated land and cleaned 50 ha by removing 80,000 m[sup 3] of contaminated soil. The Johnston Atoll (JA) cleanup is in process. It has checked 270 ha, will clean 15 ha, and plans for removal of 80,000 m[sup 3] of soil. The cleanups are similar in other respects including carbonate-based soil, in situ radiation surveys, contamination characteristics, soil excavation methods, safety, and weather. The two cleanups are in contrast relative to planning time, agencies involved, funding, documentation, environmental considerations, cleanup workforce, site beneficiaries, waste characterization, regulatory permits, management, and project duration. The most noteworthy differences are the rationale for cleanup, the cleanup process, the definition of clean, and the cost.

  16. T Tank Farm Interim Surface Barrier Demonstration - Vadose Zone Monitoring FY09 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z. F.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Field, Jim G.; Parker, Danny L.

    2010-01-01

    DOE’s Office of River Protection constructed a temporary surface barrier over a portion of the T Tank Farm as part of the T Farm Interim Surface Barrier Demonstration Project. As part of the demonstration effort, vadose zone moisture is being monitored to assess the effectiveness of the barrier at reducing soil moisture. A solar-powered system was installed to continuously monitor soil water conditions at four locations (i.e., instrument Nests A, B, C, and D) beneath the barrier and outside the barrier footprint as well as site meteorological conditions. Nest A is placed in the area outside the barrier footprint and serves as a control, providing subsurface conditions outside the influence of the surface barrier. Nest B provides subsurface measurements to assess surface-barrier edge effects. Nests C and D are used to assess changes in soil-moisture conditions beneath the interim surface barrier. Each instrument nest is composed of a capacitance probe (CP) with multiple sensors, multiple heat-dissipation units (HDUs), and a neutron probe (NP) access tube. The monitoring results in FY09 are summarized below. The solar panels functioned normally and could provide sufficient power to the instruments. The CP in Nest C after September 20, 2009, was not functional. The CP sensors in Nest B after July 13 and the 0.9-m CP sensor in Nest D before June 10 gave noisy data. Other CPs were functional normally. All the HDUs were functional normally but some pressure-head values measured by HDUs were greater than the upper measurement-limit. The higher-than-upper-limit values might be due to the very wet soil condition and/or measurement error but do not imply the malfunction of the sensors. Similar to FY07 and FY08, in FY09, the soil under natural conditions (Nest A) was generally recharged during the winter period (October-March) and discharged during the summer period (April-September). Soil water conditions above about 1.5-m to 2-m depth from all three types of measurements (i.e., CP, NP and HDU) showed relatively large variation during the seasonal wetting-drying cycle. For the soil below 2-m depth, the seasonal variation of soil water content was relatively small. The construction of the surface barrier was completed in April 2008. In the soil below the surface barrier (Nests C and D), the CP measurements showed that water content at the soil between 0.6-m and 2.3-m depths was very stable, indicating no climatic impacts on soil water condition beneath the barrier. The NP-measured water content showed that soil water drainage seemed occurring in the soil between about 3.4 m (11 ft) and 9.1 m (30 ft) in FY09. The HDU-measured water pressure decreased consistently in the soil above 5-m depth, indicating soil water drainage at these depths of the soil. In the soil below the edge of the surface barrier (Nest B), the CP-measured water content was relatively stable through the year except at the 0.9-m depth; the NP-measured water content showed that soil water drainage was occurring in the soil between about 3.4 m (11 ft) and 9.1 m (30 ft) but at a slightly smaller magnitude than those in Nests C and D; the HDU-measurements show that the pressure head changes in FY09 in Nest B were less than those for C and D but more than those for A. The soil-water-pressure head was more sensitive to soil water regime changes under dry conditions. In the soil beneath the barrier, the theoretical steady-state values of pressure head is equal to the negative of the distance to groundwater table. Hence, it is expected that, in the future, while the water content become stable, the pressure head will keep decreasing for a long time (e.g., many years). These results indicate that the T Tank Farm surface barrier was performing as expected by intercepting the meteoric water from infiltrating into the soil and the soil was becoming drier gradually. The barrier also has some effects on the soil below the barrier edge but at a reduced magnitude.

  17. 300-FF-1 Operable Unit physical separation of soils pilot plant study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

    1994-01-15

    Alternative Remedial Technologies, Inc. (ART) was selected in a competitive selection process to conduct a pilot study for the physical separation of soils in the North Process Pond of the 300 Area at the Hanford Site. In January 1994, ART mobilized its 15 tons-per-hour pilot plant to the site. The plant was initially staged in a commercial area to allow for pretest inspections and minor modifications. The plant was specifically designed for use as a physical separations unit and consisted of a feed hopper, wet screens, hydrocyclones, as well as settling and dewatering equipment. The plant was supported in the field with prescreening equipment, mobile generators, air compressors, and water storage tanks. The plant was moved into the surface contamination area on March 24, 1994. The testing was conducted during the period March 23, 1994 through April 13, 1994. Two soil types were treated during the testing: a natural soil contaminated with low levels of uranium, cesium, cobalt, and heavy metals, and a natural soil contaminated with a uranium carbonate material that was visually recognizable by the presence of a green sludge material in the soil matrix. The ``green`` material contained significantly higher levels of the same contaminants. Both source materials were treated by the plant in a manner that fed the material, produced clean gravel and sand fractions, and concentrated the contaminants in a sludge cake. Process water was recycled during the operations. The testing was extremely successful in that for both source waste streams, it was demonstrated that volume reductions of greater than 90% could be achieved while also meeting the test performance criteria. The volume reduction for the natural soils averaged a 93.8%, while the ``green`` soils showed a 91.4% volume reduction.

  18. Errors in determination of soil water content using time-domain reflectometry caused by soil compaction around wave guides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghezzehei, T.A.

    2008-01-01

    as well as the water content and water retention propertiesvariations in soil-water content, Water Resources Research,eld soil. Subsequent to water content water measurement, the

  19. Biochar as a soil amendment: Impact on hydraulic and physical properties of an arable loamy sand soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez, Vivian Dominique

    2014-01-01

    feedstocks and pyrolysis temperatures on soil physical andpyrolysis of papermill waste on agronomic performance and soilpyrolysis of papermill waste on agronomic performance and soil

  20. Surface Tension of Seawater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nayar, Kishor Govind

    New measurements and a reference correlation for the surface tension of seawater at atmospheric pressure are presented in this paper. Surface tension of seawater was measured across a salinity range of 20 ? S ? 131 g/kg ...

  1. Teaching Organic Farming and Gardening: Resources for Instructors, 3rd Edition. Part 2 - Applied Soil Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    Provides essential information on soil ecosystem managementexports to a soil ecosystem? What information would you needInformation-rich resource on soil organisms offers a comprehensive guide to soil biology, soil ecosystem

  2. Study on the reduction of atmospheric mercury emissions from mine waste enriched soils through native grass cover in the Mt. Amiata region of Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fantozzi, L., E-mail: l.fantozzi@iia.cnr.it [CNR-Institute of Atmospheric Pollution Research, c/o: UNICAL-Polifunzionale, 87036 Rende (Italy); Ferrara, R., E-mail: romano.ferrara@pi.ibf.cnr.it [CNR-Institute of Biophysics, San Cataldo Research Area, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Dini, F., E-mail: fdiniprotisti@gmail.com [University of Pisa, Department of Biology, Via A. Volta 4, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Tamburello, L., E-mail: ltamburello@biologia.unipi.it [University of Pisa, Department of Biology, Via Derna 1, I-56126 Pisa (Italy); Pirrone, N.; Sprovieri, F. [CNR-Institute of Atmospheric Pollution Research, c/o: UNICAL-Polifunzionale, 87036 Rende (Italy)] [CNR-Institute of Atmospheric Pollution Research, c/o: UNICAL-Polifunzionale, 87036 Rende (Italy)

    2013-08-15

    Atmospheric mercury emissions from mine-waste enriched soils were measured in order to compare the mercury fluxes of bare soils with those from other soils covered by native grasses. Our research was conducted near Mt. Amiata in central Italy, an area that was one of the largest and most productive mining centers in Europe up into the 1980s. To determine in situ mercury emissions, we used a Plexiglas flux chamber connected to a portable mercury analyzer (Lumex RA-915+). This allowed us to detect, in real time, the mercury vapor in the air, and to correlate this with the meteorological parameters that we examined (solar radiation, soil temperature, and humidity). The highest mercury flux values (8000 ng m{sup ?2} h{sup ?1}) were observed on bare soils during the hours of maximum insulation, while lower values (250 ng m{sup ?2} h{sup ?1}) were observed on soils covered by native grasses. Our results indicate that two main environmental variables affect mercury emission: solar radiation intensity and soil temperature. The presence of native vegetation, which can shield soil surfaces from incident light, reduced mercury emissions, a result that we attribute to a drop in the efficiency of mercury photoreduction processes rather than to decreases in soil temperature. This finding is consistent with decreases in mercury flux values down to 3500 ng m{sup ?2} h{sup ?1}, which occurred under cloudy conditions despite high soil temperatures. Moreover, when the soil temperature was 28 °C and the vegetation was removed from the experimental site, mercury emissions increased almost four-fold. This increase occurred almost immediately after the grasses were cut, and was approximately eight-fold after 20 h. Thus, this study demonstrates that enhancing wild vegetation cover could be an inexpensive and effective approach in fostering a natural, self-renewing reduction of mercury emissions from mercury-contaminated soils. -- Highlights: ? Mercury air/surface exchange from grass covered soil is different from bare soil. ? Light enhances mercury emissions and is the main parameter driving the process. ? The presence of wild vegetation covering the soil reduces mercury emission. ? Vegetative covers could be a solution to reduce atmospheric mercury pollution.

  3. Fresnel versus Kummer surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peinke, Joachim

    Fresnel versus Kummer surfaces Alberto Favaro & Friedrich W. Hehl Outline Linear media Linear media-you. Fresnel versus Kummer surfaces: geometrical optics in dispersionless linear (meta)materials and vacuum, 19­23 November 2012 Email: favaro@thp.uni-koeln.de #12;Fresnel versus Kummer surfaces Alberto Favaro

  4. Post-Closure Groundwater Monitoring Plan for the 1324-N Surface Impoundment and 1324-NA Percolation Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, Mary J.

    2004-04-02

    The 1324-N Surface Impoundment and the 1324-NA Percolation Pond, located in the 100-N Area of the Hanford Site, are regulated under the Resource Consevation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Surface and underground features of the facilities have been removed and laboratory analyses showed that soil met the closure performance standards. These sites have been backfilled and revegetated.

  5. Solar-wind protons and heavy ions sputtering of lunar surface materials A.F. Barghouty a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solar-wind protons and heavy ions sputtering of lunar surface materials A.F. Barghouty a, , F Available online 21 December 2010 Keywords: Solar wind sputtering Lunar regolith KREEP soil Potential a c t Lunar surface materials are exposed to $1 keV/amu solar-wind protons and heavy ions on almost

  6. Global estimation of evapotranspiration using a leaf area index-based surface energy and water balance model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Timothy

    -relative-humidity-based two-source (ARTS) E model that simulates the surface energy balance, soil water balanceGlobal estimation of evapotranspiration using a leaf area index-based surface energy and water balance model H. Yan a, , S.Q. Wang b , D. Billesbach c , W. Oechel d , J.H. Zhang e , T. Meyers f , T

  7. A dual-pass variational data assimilation framework for estimating soil moisture profiles from AMSR-E microwave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    influences the partitioning of surface available energy into sensible and latent heat fluxes and henceA dual-pass variational data assimilation framework for estimating soil moisture profiles from AMSR, we have designed a dual-pass assimilation (DP-En4DVar) framework to optimize the model state

  8. A new method for in situ soil gas diffusivity measurement and applications in the monitoring of subsurface CO2 production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beltrami, Hugo

    -specific diffusivity measurements greatly improved the accuracy of CO2 production estimates. We observed a consistent and close correspondence between calculated profile CO2 production and (independently measured) soil CO2 surface flux. The subsurface CO2 production estimates acquired using in situ gas diffusivity measurements

  9. Innovative vitrification for soil remediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jetta, N.W.; Patten, J.S.; Hart, J.G.

    1995-12-01

    The objective of this DOE demonstration program is to validate the performance and operation of the Vortec Cyclone Melting System (CMS{trademark}) for the processing of LLW contaminated soils found at DOE sites. This DOE vitrification demonstration project has successfully progressed through the first two phases. Phase 1 consisted of pilot scale testing with surrogate wastes and the conceptual design of a process plant operating at a generic DOE site. The objective of Phase 2, which is scheduled to be completed the end of FY 95, is to develop a definitive process plant design for the treatment of wastes at a specific DOE facility. During Phase 2, a site specific design was developed for the processing of LLW soils and muds containing TSCA organics and RCRA metal contaminants. Phase 3 will consist of a full scale demonstration at the DOE gaseous diffusion plant located in Paducah, KY. Several DOE sites were evaluated for potential application of the technology. Paducah was selected for the demonstration program because of their urgent waste remediation needs as well as their strong management and cost sharing financial support for the project. During Phase 2, the basic nitrification process design was modified to meet the specific needs of the new waste streams available at Paducah. The system design developed for Paducah has significantly enhanced the processing capabilities of the Vortec vitrification process. The overall system design now includes the capability to shred entire drums and drum packs containing mud, concrete, plastics and PCB`s as well as bulk waste materials. This enhanced processing capability will substantially expand the total DOE waste remediation applications of the technology.

  10. Trajectories of loose sand samples in the Phase Space of Soil Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Evesque

    2005-07-05

    In general, the evolution of soil submitted to simple stress-strain paths is characterised using the 3d phase space (v,p',q) i.e. (specific volume, mean intergranular pressure, deviatoric stress q. When uniaxial compressions is performed at constant lateral pressure p' or at constant mean pressure p', one finds that all trajectories end up at a line of attracting point called the critical-state line via the surface of Roscoe or of Hvorslev depending if the initial volume is the loosest possible one (at a given p') or densest. Trajectories of weakly dense samples are not often reported in this phase space. We find here that they shall present some sigmoid shape as it can be found from soil mechanics argument. This seems to indicate that Roscoe's surface shall exhibit a singularity at the critical point.

  11. ASTM sampling methods and analytical validation for lead in paint, dust, soil, and air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, K.; Schlecht, P.C.; Song, R.; Feng, A.; DeWalt, G.; McKnight, M.E.

    1996-12-31

    ASTM Subcommittee E06.23 on Abatement/Mitigation of Lead Hazards has developed a number of standards that are concerned with the sampling of leas in environmental media, namely paint, dust, soil and airborne particulate. An ASTM practice for the collection of airborne particulate lead in the workplace has been published. New ASTM standards for the collection of dry paint film samples, surface soil samples, and surface dust wipe samples for subsequent lead analysis have also been promulgated. Other draft standards pertinent to lead sampling are under development. The ASTM standards concerned with lead sample collection are accompanied by separate sample preparation standard practices and a standard analysis method. Sample preparation and analytical methods have been evaluated by interlaboratory testing; such analyses may be used to assess the efficacy of sampling protocols.

  12. Sources for Pu in near surface air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartmann, G.; Thom, C.; Baechmann, K.

    1989-01-01

    This paper provides evidence that most of the Pu in the near surface air today is due to resuspension. Vertical and particle size distribution in near surface air over a period of three years were measured. The seasonal variations of Pu in air and the influence of meteorological parameters on these variations are shown. Samples were taken before the Chernobyl accident in an area where only Pu fallout from the atmospheric nuclear tests of the early sixties occurs. The comparison of the behavior of Pu with other trace elements, which were also measured, showed similar behavior of Pu and elements like Ca, Ti and Fe in near surface air. This confirms that most Pu is resuspended because the main source for these elements in air is the soil surface. Resuspension factors and resuspension rate are estimated for all measured elements. A resuspension factor of 0.8 X 10(-8) m-1 and a resuspension rate of 0.09 X 10(-9) s-1 is calculated for Pu.

  13. Surface cleanliness measurement procedure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schroder, Mark Stewart (Hendersonville, NC); Woodmansee, Donald Ernest (Simpsonville, SC); Beadie, Douglas Frank (Greenville, SC)

    2002-01-01

    A procedure and tools for quantifying surface cleanliness are described. Cleanliness of a target surface is quantified by wiping a prescribed area of the surface with a flexible, bright white cloth swatch, preferably mounted on a special tool. The cloth picks up a substantial amount of any particulate surface contamination. The amount of contamination is determined by measuring the reflectivity loss of the cloth before and after wiping on the contaminated system and comparing that loss to a previous calibration with similar contamination. In the alternative, a visual comparison of the contaminated cloth to a contamination key provides an indication of the surface cleanliness.

  14. Defining Niger Delta Soils – Are They Laterites?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alayaki, Funmilayo; Al-Tabbaa, Abir; Ayotamuno, Josiah

    2015-01-01

    by rainwater and groundwater caused detrimental effect on soil structure. He noted that the rigidity of the soils matrix may become deflocculated when there is leaching out of salt which makes the soil particles to lose their inter-particle attractive forces... ://www.iiste.org/conference/upcoming-conferences-call-for-paper/ IISTE Knowledge Sharing Partners EBSCO, Index Copernicus, Ulrich's Periodicals Directory, JournalTOCS, PKP Open Archives Harvester, Bielefeld Academic Search Engine, Elektronische Zeitschriftenbibliothek EZB, Open J-Gate, OCLC WorldCat, Universe...

  15. Formation of Zn-rich phyllosilicate, Zn-layered double hydroxide and hydrozincite in contaminated calcareous soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacquat, Olivier; Voegelin, Andreas; Villard, Andre; Marcus, Matthew A.; Kretzschmar, Ruben

    2007-10-15

    Recent studies demonstrated that Zn-phyllosilicate- and Zn-layered double hydroxide-type (Zn-LDH) precipitates may form in contaminated soils. However, the influence of soil properties and Zn content on the quantity and type of precipitate forming has not been studied in detail so far. In this work, we determined the speciation of Zn in six carbonate-rich surface soils (pH 6.2 to 7.5) contaminated by aqueous Zn in the runoff from galvanized power line towers (1322 to 30090 mg/kg Zn). Based on 12 bulk and 23 microfocused extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra, the number, type and proportion of Zn species were derived using principal component analysis, target testing, and linear combination fitting. Nearly pure Zn-rich phyllosilicate and Zn-LDH were identified at different locations within a single soil horizon, suggesting that the local availabilities of Al and Si controlled the type of precipitate forming. Hydrozincite was identified on the surfaces of limestone particles that were not in direct contact with the soil clay matrix. With increasing Zn loading of the soils, the percentage of precipitated Zn increased from {approx}20% to {approx}80%, while the precipitate type shifted from Zn-phyllosilicate and/or Zn-LDH at the lowest studied soil Zn contents over predominantly Zn-LDH at intermediate loadings to hydrozincite in extremely contaminated soils. These trends were in agreement with the solubility of Zn in equilibrium with these phases. Sequential extractions showed that large fractions of soil Zn ({approx}30% to {approx}80%) as well as of synthetic Zn-kerolite, Zn-LDH, and hydrozincite spiked into uncontaminated soil were readily extracted by 1 M NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} followed by 1 M NH{sub 4}-acetate at pH 6.0. Even though the formation of Zn precipitates allows for the retention of Zn in excess to the adsorption capacity of calcareous soils, the long-term immobilization potential of these precipitates is limited.

  16. Temperature-associated increases in the global soil respiration record

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Thomson, Allison M.

    2010-03-25

    Soil respiration (RS), the flux of CO2 from the soil surface to the atmosphere, comprises the second-largest terrestrial carbon flux, but its dynamics are incompletely understood, and the global flux remains poorly constrained. Ecosystem warming experiments, modelling analyses, and biokinetics all suggest that RS should change with climate. This has been difficult to confirm observationally because of the high spatial variability of RS, inaccessibility of the soil medium, and inability of remote sensing instruments to measure large-scale RS fluxes. Given these constraints, is it possible to discern climate-driven changes in regional or global RS fluxes in the extant four-decade record of RS chamber measurements? Here we use a database of worldwide RS observations, matched with high-resolution historical climate data, to show a previously unknown temporal trend in the RS record after accounting for mean annual climate, leaf area, nitrogen deposition, and changes in CO2 measurement technique. Air temperature anomaly (deviation from the 1961-1990 mean) is significantly and positively correlated with changes in RS fluxes; both temperature and precipitation anomalies exert effects in specific biomes. We estimate that the current (2008) annual global RS flux is 98±12 Pg and has increased 0.1 Pg yr-1 over the last 20 years, implying a global RS temperature response (Q10) of 1.5. An increasing global RS flux does not necessarily constitute a positive feedback loop to the atmosphere; nonetheless, the available data are consistent with an acceleration of the terrestrial carbon cycle in response to global climate change.

  17. The Role of Micro-Mechanics in Soil Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolton, Malcolm

    The Role of Micro-Mechanics in Soil Mechanics M.D.Bolton CUED/D-Soils/TR313 September 2000;1 The Role of Micro-Mechanics in Soil Mechanics Malcolm Bolton Summary It is suggested that observations of the changing microstructure of soils will permit the selection and refinement of relevant micro-mechanisms

  18. Persistence of soil organic matter as an ecosystem property

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, M.W.

    2012-01-01

    soils, probably depending on the conditions under which they were produced, which suggests that pyrolysis

  19. Identifying Street Tree Stressors in Urban Forest Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    availability · Contaminants · Particulate mader o Car exhaust · Low soil nutrients o OM removed (Craul

  20. Automated soil respiration measurements: new information, opportunities and challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vargas, R.; Carbone, M. S.

    2008-01-01

    information, opportunities, and challenges Automated Soil Respiration Workshop – a Terrestrial Ecosystem

  1. SOIL MOISTURE CHARACTERISTICS IN UPPER PART OF HINDON RIVER CATCHMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, C.P.

    1 SOIL MOISTURE CHARACTERISTICS IN UPPER PART OF HINDON RIVER CATCHMENT C. P. Kumar* Vijay Kumar** Vivekanand Singh*** ABSTRACT Knowledge of the physics of soil water movement is crucial to the solution for estimating the soil hydraulic properties are required for prediction of soil water flow. This paper presents

  2. Method for treatment of soils contaminated with organic pollutants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wickramanayake, Godage B. (Cranbury, NJ)

    1993-01-01

    A method for treating soil contaminated by organic compounds wherein an ozone containing gas is treated with acid to increase the stability of the ozone in the soil environment and the treated ozone applied to the contaminated soil to decompose the organic compounds. The soil may be treated in situ or may be removed for treatment and refilled.

  3. REGIONAL SOIL TEST LABS FOR HOME GARDENERS 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Wendell T.

    REGIONAL SOIL TEST LABS FOR HOME GARDENERS 1 HG110a Labs and links current as of 10/8/2015 A basic soil test that gives readings for soil acidity (pH), calcium (Ca), phosphorus (P), potassium (K includes lead in its basic "Home Lawn and Garden Soil Test." · Most labs offer homeowner and commercial

  4. forEnvironmentalManagementofMilitaryLands Guide to Sampling Soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    forEnvironmentalManagementofMilitaryLands Guide to Sampling Soil Compaction Using Hand-Held Soil Fort Collins, CO 80523-1490 January 2004 #12;#12;1 Guide to Sampling Soil Compaction Using Hand-Held Soil Penetrometers1 Prepared by Dave Jones and Matt Kunze Center for Environmental Management

  5. SOIL SURVEY OF PAYNE COUNTY, OKLAHOMA OSURR Section 17

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    66 26 76 26 26 26 SOIL SURVEY OF PAYNE COUNTY, OKLAHOMA OSURR Section 17 0 300 600 900 1,200150 Feet 0 100 20050 Meters Web Soil Survey 1.1 National Cooperative Soil Survey 5/7/2007 Page 1 of 3 #12;MAP INFORMATION SOIL SURVEY OF PAYNE COUNTY, OKLAHOMA OSURR Section 17 Source of Map: Natural Resources

  6. Manoj Shukla Assistant Professor of Environmental Soil Physics,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    of scales, and carbon sequestration in soils Professional Activities and Honors (last 6 years) Present

  7. Soil to plant transfer of 238 Th on a uranium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Qinhong "Max"

    Soil to plant transfer of 238 U, 226 Ra and 232 Th on a uranium mining-impacted soil from species grown in soils from southeastern China contaminated with uranium mine tailings were analyzed. Keywords: Uranium; Thorium; Radium; Tailings-contaminated soil; Soileplant transfer 1. Introduction

  8. Monday, March 23, 2009 PHOENIX: SOIL, CHEMISTRY, AND HABITABILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Monday, March 23, 2009 PHOENIX: SOIL, CHEMISTRY, AND HABITABILITY 2:30 p.m. Waterway Ballroom 1 Properties of the Icy Soil at the Phoenix Landing Site [#1671] The physical properties of the icy martian soil documented by the robotic arm camera of the Phoenix lander are discussed. The soil is friable

  9. Occurrence of positive soil water potentials during infiltration in layered soils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Dennis Wade

    1992-01-01

    OCCURRENCE OF POSITIVE SOIL WATER POTENTIALS DURING INFILTRATION IN LAYERED SOILS A Thesis by DENNIS WADE HILL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of NASTER OF SCIENCE May 1992 Major Subject: Agricultural Engineering OCCURRENCE OF POSITIVE SOZL WATER POTENTIALS DURING INFILTRATION IN LAYERED SOILS A Thesis DENNIS WADE HZLL Approved as to style and content by: Marshall J. McFarland (Chair) p...

  10. Using finished compost is a way of returning organic matter to the soil in a usable form. Soil organic matter benefits plant growth by improving the moisture and nutrient-holding capacity of sandy soils, by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Using finished compost is a way of returning organic matter to the soil in a usable form. Soil and by helping prevent soil erosion. Think of compost primarily as a soil conditioner rather than a fertilizer will be necessary for adequate plant growth. A soil test will determine if compost-amended garden soil requires

  11. Soil temperature, soil moisture and thaw depth, Barrow, Alaska, Ver. 1

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sloan, V.L.; J.A. Liebig; M.S. Hahn; J.B. Curtis; J.D. Brooks; A. Rogers; C.M. Iversen; R.J. Norby

    2014-01-10

    This dataset consists of field measurements of soil properties made during 2012 and 2013 in areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska. Included are i) weekly measurements of thaw depth, soil moisture, presence and depth of standing water, and soil temperature made during the 2012 and 2013 growing seasons (June - September) and ii) half-hourly measurements of soil temperature logged continuously during the period June 2012 to September 2013.

  12. Characterization of soil water content variability and soil texture using GPR groundwave techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grote, K.

    2010-01-01

    of soil moisture: Adv. Water Resourc. , 17, Fageria, N.K. ,SGP97) Hydrology Experiment: Water Resources Research, 35(6)variability across scales: Water Resources Research, 44,

  13. Soil temperature, soil moisture and thaw depth, Barrow, Alaska, Ver. 1

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sloan, V.L.; J.A. Liebig; M.S. Hahn; J.B. Curtis; J.D. Brooks; A. Rogers; C.M. Iversen; R.J. Norby

    This dataset consists of field measurements of soil properties made during 2012 and 2013 in areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska. Included are i) weekly measurements of thaw depth, soil moisture, presence and depth of standing water, and soil temperature made during the 2012 and 2013 growing seasons (June - September) and ii) half-hourly measurements of soil temperature logged continuously during the period June 2012 to September 2013.

  14. Stochastic analysis of soil-structure interaction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Charles Cheuk Lap

    1994-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of soil structure interaction on the response of a building subjected to an earthquake motion. Spectra consisting of the auto and cross spectral densities of three components of free-field earthquake motion at all...

  15. The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Entekhabi, Dara

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission is one of the first Earth observation satellites being developed by NASA in response to the National Research Council's Decadal Survey. SMAP will make global measurements of ...

  16. FINGERPRINTING SOILS – A PROOF OF CONCEPT 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kobylinski, Catherine

    2011-05-06

    assess Locard’s Exchange Principle. Soil samples were collected within in a thirty-mile radius of a designated “crime scene” in the Brazos River floodplain near Texas A...

  17. Bioaugmentation of TNT-contaminated soil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bokelmann, Annamarie

    1999-01-01

    test period. The soil treatments in this study included: (1) the Bacillus sp., (2) the existing indigenous microorganisms, and (3) a sterile control. The disappearance of TNT, as measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), was compared...

  18. Dynamics of digging in wet soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jung, Sunghwan

    Numerous animals live in, and locomote through, subsea soils. To move in a medium dominated by frictional interactions, many of these animals have adopted unique burrowing strategies. This paper presents a burrowing model ...

  19. Adsorption and transport of pyrithiobac in soils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matocha, Christopher John

    1996-01-01

    adsorbents (Gonzales bentonite, Georgia kaolinite, goethite, and Michigan peat) and four soils (Houston Black c, Hidalgo sl, Orelia scl, and Ships sic) having a wide range of physical and chemical properties. Adsorption isotherms were developed...

  20. Soil carbon and nitrogen cycling and storage throughout the soil profile in a sweetgum plantation after 11 years of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soil carbon and nitrogen cycling and storage throughout the soil profile in a sweetgum plantation partitioning of carbon (C) to fine roots under elevated [CO2], especially deep in the soil profile, could alter soil C and nitrogen (N) cycling in forests. After more than 11 years of free-air CO2 enrichment

  1. Soil Security: Solving the Global Soil Crisis Andrea Koch, Alex McBratney, Mark Adams, Damien Field, Robert Hill,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehmann, Johannes

    Soil Security: Solving the Global Soil Crisis Andrea Koch, Alex McBratney, Mark Adams, Damien Field England Michael Zimmermann University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna Abstract Soil degradation is a critical and growing global problem. As the world population increases, pressure on soil also

  2. Effects of Soil Organic Matter on the Kinetics and Mechanisms of Pb(II) Sorption and Desorption in Soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Effects of Soil Organic Matter on the Kinetics and Mechanisms of Pb(II) Sorption and Desorption in Soil Daniel G. Strawn* and Donald L. Sparks ABSTRACT make better predictions about the mobility and threat from Pb contami- and desorption behavior on soil be understood, as wellnated soil, it is critical

  3. Soil nematode communities are ecologically more mature beneath late-than early-successional stage biological soil crusts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neher, Deborah A.

    Soil nematode communities are ecologically more mature beneath late- than early-successional stage biological soil crusts Brian J. Darby a,*, Deborah A. Neher a , Jayne Belnap b a Department of Plant and Soil; accepted 12 April 2006 Abstract Biological soil crusts are key mediators of carbon and nitrogen inputs

  4. Leaching of BTEX from Aged Crude Oil Contaminated Model Soils: Experimental and Modeling Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huesemann, Michael H.; Hausmann, Tom S.; Fortman, Timothy J.

    2005-01-01

    It is generally assumed that soil properties such as organic matter content, porosity, and mineral surface area have a significant effect on the bioavailability and leachability of aged petroleum hydrocarbons. In order to test this hypothesis, nine model soils or sorbents (i.e., fine and coarse quartz sand, montmorillonite and kaolinite clay, peat, 60? and 150? silica gel, a loam soil, and non-porous glass beads) were spiked with a crude oil, aged for 27 months in the laboratory, and transferred to glass columns for the performance of continuous flow leaching experiments. The column effluents were periodically sampled for 43 days and analyzed for BTEX. A one-dimensional flow model for predicting the dissolution and dispersion of individual hydrocarbons from a multi-component NAPL such as crude oil was used to fit the leaching data (i.e., the BTEX concentration versus time curves) by adjusting the equilibrium oil-leachate partitioning coefficient (Kol) for each respective hydrocarbon. The Peclet number, which is a measure of dispersion and a required modeling parameter, was measured in separate chloride tracer experiments for each soil column. Results demonstrate that soil properties did not significantly affect the leaching kinetics of BTEX from the columns. Instead, BTEX leaching curves could be successfully fitted with the one-dimensional NAPL dissolution flow model for all sorbents with the exception of montmorillonite clay. The fitting parameter Kol for each hydrocarbon was found to be similar to the Kol values that were independently measured for the same crude oil by Rixey et al. (Journal of Hazardous Materials B, 65: 137-156, 1999). In addition, the fitted Kol values were very similar for BTEX leaching from aged compared to freshly spiked loam soil. These findings indicate that leaching of BTEX in the aged soils that are contaminated with crude oil at the high concentrations commonly found in the environment (i.e., >20,000 mg/kg) was not affected by soil properties or aging but rather was governed by the equilibrium dissolution of these hydrocarbons from the crude oil NAPL that is coating the soil particles.

  5. The Soils of Brazos, Camp, Ellis, and Washington Counties. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1924-01-01

    10 ............................. Plant food required by crops 12 Pot experiments .......'................................ 12 Average composition of the soil of the counties studied ....... 13 ................................... Soils of Brazos..., as well as by the pot experiments. HOW TO USE THE ANALYSES Analyses of the soils are given in connection with the de- scription of the various types of soil. The interpretation of the analyses is also given and will be discussed there also. If a soil...

  6. SOIL SURVEY OF PAYNE COUNTY, OKLAHOMA OSURR Section 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    21 76 11 25 61 49 2 11 65 25 74 25 25 25 6125 65 25 40 11 W 26 25 32 W 54 3 11 65 11 74 11 74 SOIL Soil Survey 1.1 National Cooperative Soil Survey 5/7/2007 Page 1 of 3 #12;MAP INFORMATION SOIL SURVEY OF PAYNE COUNTY, OKLAHOMA OSURR Section 5 Source of Map: Natural Resources Conservation Service Web Soil

  7. Combining multi-objective optimization and bayesian model averaging to calibrate forecast ensembles of soil hydraulic models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vrugt, Jasper A; Wohling, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Most studies in vadose zone hydrology use a single conceptual model for predictive inference and analysis. Focusing on the outcome of a single model is prone to statistical bias and underestimation of uncertainty. In this study, we combine multi-objective optimization and Bayesian Model Averaging (BMA) to generate forecast ensembles of soil hydraulic models. To illustrate our method, we use observed tensiometric pressure head data at three different depths in a layered vadose zone of volcanic origin in New Zealand. A set of seven different soil hydraulic models is calibrated using a multi-objective formulation with three different objective functions that each measure the mismatch between observed and predicted soil water pressure head at one specific depth. The Pareto solution space corresponding to these three objectives is estimated with AMALGAM, and used to generate four different model ensembles. These ensembles are post-processed with BMA and used for predictive analysis and uncertainty estimation. Our most important conclusions for the vadose zone under consideration are: (1) the mean BMA forecast exhibits similar predictive capabilities as the best individual performing soil hydraulic model, (2) the size of the BMA uncertainty ranges increase with increasing depth and dryness in the soil profile, (3) the best performing ensemble corresponds to the compromise (or balanced) solution of the three-objective Pareto surface, and (4) the combined multi-objective optimization and BMA framework proposed in this paper is very useful to generate forecast ensembles of soil hydraulic models.

  8. GAMMA DETECTOR RESPONSE/SOIL CONCENTRATION CORRELATION STUDY AT THE AAR MANUFACTURING, INC. SITE, LIVONIA, MICHIGAN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ALTIC, NICK A

    2013-03-22

    At the NRC?s request, ORAU conducted surveys of the AAR Manufacturing site during the period of September 25 through September 27, 2012. The survey activities included walkover surveys and sampling activities. Once the survey team was onsite, the NRC personnel decided to forgo survey activities in the ?New Addition? and the pickling area. Areas of the planned study boundary were inaccessible due to overgrowth/large pieces of concrete covering the soil surface; therefore, the study boundary was redefined. Gamma walkover scans of the site boundary and ?front yard? identified multiple areas of elevated gamma radiation. As a result, two judgmental samples were collected. Sample results were above thorium background levels The answer to the PSQ relating to the relationship between thorium concentration in soil and NaI instrument response is ?Yes.? NaI instrument response can be used as a predictor of Th-232 concentration in the 0 to 1 m layer. An R2 value of 0.79 was determined for the surface soil relationship, thus satisfying the DQOs. Moreover, the regression was cross-checked by comparing the predicted Th-232 soil core concentration to the average Th-232 concentration (Section 5.3.2). Based on the cross-check, the regression equation provides a reasonable estimate for the Th-232 concentration at the judgmental locations. Consideration must be given when applying this equation to other soil areas of the site. If the contamination was heterogeneously distributed, and not distributed in a discrete layer as it was in the study area, then using the regression equation to predict Th-232 concentration would not be applicable.

  9. Surface modification to waveguides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Timberlake, John R. (Allentown, NJ); Ruzic, David N. (Kendall Park, NJ); Moore, Richard L. (Princeton, NJ); Cohen, Samuel A. (Pennington, NJ); Manos, Dennis M. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

    1983-01-01

    A method of treating the interior surfaces of a waveguide to improve power transmission comprising the steps of mechanically polishing to remove surface protrusions; electropolishing to remove embedded particles; ultrasonically cleaning to remove any residue; coating the interior waveguide surfaces with an alkyd resin solution or electrophoretically depositing carbon lamp black suspended in an alkyd resin solution to form a 1.mu. to 5.mu. thick film; vacuum pyrolyzing the film to form a uniform adherent carbon coating.

  10. Surface modification to waveguides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Timberlake, J.R.; Ruzic, D.N.; Moore, R.L.; Cohen, S.A.; Manos, D.M.

    1982-06-16

    A method is described for treating the interior surfaces of a waveguide to improve power transmission comprising the steps of mechanically polishing to remove surface protrusions; electropolishing to remove embedded particles; ultrasonically cleaning to remove any residue; coating the interior waveguide surfaces with an alkyd resin solution or electrophoretically depositing carbon lamp black suspended in an alkyd resin solution to form a 1..mu.. to 5..mu.. thick film; vacuum pyrolyzing the film to form a uniform adherent carbon coating.

  11. Noncommutative Riemann Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joakim Arnlind; Martin Bordemann; Laurent Hofer; Jens Hoppe; Hidehiko Shimada

    2007-11-16

    We introduce C-Algebras of compact Riemann surfaces $\\Sigma$ as non-commutative analogues of the Poisson algebra of smooth functions on $\\Sigma$. Representations of these algebras give rise to sequences of matrix-algebras for which matrix-commutators converge to Poisson-brackets as $N\\to\\infty$. For a particular class of surfaces, nicely interpolating between spheres and tori, we completely characterize (even for the intermediate singular surface) all finite dimensional representations of the corresponding C-algebras.

  12. Soil washing: A preliminary assessment of its applicability to Hanford

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerber, M A; Freeman, H D; Baker, E G; Riemath, W F

    1991-09-01

    Soil washing is being considered for treating soils at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site. As a result of over 50 years of operations to produce plutonium for the US Department of Defense and research for DOE, soils in areas within the Site are contaminated with hazardous wastes and radionuclides. In the soil washing process, contaminated soil is mixed with a liquid and then physically and/or chemically treated to dissolve the contaminants into solution and/or concentrate them in a small fraction of the soil. The purpose of this procedure is to separate the contaminants from the bulk of the soil. The key to successful application is to match the types of contaminants and soil characteristics with physical-chemical methods that perform well under the existing conditions. The applicability of soil washing to Hanford Site contaminated soils must take into account both the characteristics of the oil and the type of contamination. Hanford soils typically contain up to 90% sand, gravel, and cobbles, which generally are favorable characteristics for soil washing. For example, in soil samples from the north pond in the 300 Area, 80% to 90% of the soil particles were larger than 250 {mu}m. The principal contaminants in the soil are radionuclides, heavy metals, and nitrate and sulfate salts. For most of the sites, organic contaminants are either not present or are found in very low concentration. 28 refs., 5 figs., 10 tabs.

  13. MINERALAVATER INTERFACE USING MOLECULAR SCALE TECHNIQUES An understanding of the kinetics and mechanisms of metal sorption on soil minerals and soils is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    and mechanisms of metal sorption on soil minerals and soils is fundamental in assessing the speciation, mobility metals (e.g., Co, Ni, Zn) residence time affects the rate of metal release from soil minerals while on soil minerals and soils and speciation of metals in contaminated soils via macroscopic and molecular

  14. Ammonia volatilization from surface application of ammonium sulfate to carbonate systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feagley, Sam Edward

    1976-01-01

    AMMONIA VOLATILIZATION FROM SURFACE APPLICATION OF AMMONIUM SULFATE TO CARBONATE SYSTEMS A Thesis by SAM EDWARD FEAGLEY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1976 Major Subject; Soil Science AMMONIA VOLATILIZATION FROM SURFACE APPLICATIONS OF AMMONIUM SULFATE TO CARBONATE SYSTEMS A Thesis SAM EDWARD FEAGLEY Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of Committee Head of Dep...

  15. T-TY Tank Farm Interim Surface Barrier Demonstration - Vadose Zone Monitoring FY10 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z. F.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Field, Jim G.; Parker, Danny L.

    2011-01-24

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection has constructed interim surface barriers over a portion of the T and TY tank farms as part of the Interim Surface Barrier Demonstration Project. The interim surface barriers (hereafter referred to as the surface barriers or barriers) are designed to minimize the infiltration of precipitation into the soil zones containing radioactive contaminants and minimize the movement of the contaminants. As part of the demonstration effort, vadose zone moisture is being monitored to assess the effectiveness of the barriers at reducing soil moisture. Solar-powered systems were installed to continuously monitor soil water conditions at four locations in the T (i.e., instrument Nests TA, TB, TC, and TD) and the TY (i.e., instrument Nests TYA and TYB) Farms beneath the barriers and outside the barrier footprint as well as site meteorological conditions. Nests TA and TYA are placed in the area outside the barrier footprint and serve as controls, providing subsurface conditions outside the influence of the surface barriers. Nest TB provides subsurface measurements to assess surface-barrier edge effects. Nests TC, TD, and TYB are used to assess changes in soil-moisture conditions beneath the interim surface barriers. Except for occasional times for TC and TD and planned dates for TYB, during FY10, the battery voltage at the TMS and instrument Nests in both T and TY tank farms remained above 12.0 V, denoting that the battery voltages were sufficient for the stations to remain functional. All the HDUs were functioning normally, but some pressure-head values were greater than the upper measurement limit. The values that exceeded the upper limit may indicate wet soil conditions and/or measurement error, but they do not imply a malfunction of the sensors. Similar to FY07 through FY09, in FY10, the soil under natural conditions in the T Farm (Nest TA) was generally recharged during the winter period (October–March), and they discharged during the summer period (April–September). Soil water conditions above about 1.5-m to 2-m depth from all three types of measurements (i.e., CP, NP, and HDU) showed relatively large variation during the seasonal wetting-drying cycle. For the soil below 2-m depth, the seasonal variation of soil water content was relatively small. The construction of the TISB was completed in April 2008. In the soil below the TISB (Nests TC and TD), the CP-measured water content showed that ? at the soil between 0.6-m and 2.3-m depths was stable, indicating no climatic impacts on soil water conditions beneath the barrier. The NP-measured water content in the soil between about 3.4 m (11 ft) and 12.2 m (40 ft) since the completion of the barrier decreased by 0.007 to 0.014 m3 m-3. The HDU-measured soil-water pressure at 1-m, 2-m, and 5-m depths decreased by 0.7 to 2.4 m, indicating soil water drainage at these depths of the soil. In the soil below the edge of the TISB (Nest TB), the CP-measured water content was relatively stable through the year; the NP-measured water content showed that soil water drainage was occurring in the soil between about 3.4 m (11 ft) and 12.2 m (40 ft) but at a slightly smaller magnitude than in Nests TC and TD; the HDU-measurements show that the pressure head changes at Nest TB since the completion of the barrier were generally less than those at TC and TD, but more than those at TA. These results indicate that the TISB is performing as expected by intercepting the meteoric water from infiltrating into the soil, and the soil is becoming drier gradually. The barrier also had some effects on the soil below the barrier edge, but at a reduced magnitude. There was no significant difference in soil-water regime between the two nests in the TY tank farm because the barrier at the TY Farm was just completed one month before the end of the FY.

  16. 2010 19th World Congress of Soil Science, Soil Solutions for a Changing World

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    of Ni include magmatic sulfide ores and lateritic silicates found in serpentine soils. Anthropogenic Ni, Brisbane, Australia. Published on DVD. 160 Nickel Speciation in Serpentine Soils using Synchrotron Sciences and Delaware Environmental Institute, Newark, DE, USA, mgs@udel.edu Abstract We examined nickel

  17. The accompanying Soil Test Report (and supplemental Soil Test Notes, when provided) will help you assess

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    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    and Abbreviations P = phosphorus K = potassium Ca = calcium Mg = magnesium Zn = zinc Mn = manganese Cu = copper Fe Specialist, Virginia Tech Steve Heckendorn, Soil Test Laboratory Manager, Virginia Tech Soil Test Note #1 www.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications and Marketing, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Virginia Polytechnic

  18. Soil Science Society of America Journal Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. 76:17071718

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    Battles, John

    a diamond-tipped cylindrical drill bit powered by a rotary engine (Ponder and Alley, 1997). This type the Suitability of Rotary Coring for Sampling in Rocky Soils Pedology F orest and wildland soils are difficult of corer can cut through large roots and rocks to a depth of 90 cm or more. Sampling by rotary coring

  19. Title: Scientist of Soil Microbiologist Address: P.O. Box 110290, Soil and Water Science Department

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    Balser, Teri C.

    degradation of methyl bromide in methane-, 2,4-D-, and #12;phenol-treated soils. Bull. Environ. Contam and Bioremediation Research Interests: Degradation and fate of pesticides and other environmentally important organic.G. Hornsby. 1997. Stimulation of microbial degradation of methyl bromide in soil during oxidation

  20. Analytical Modeling of Soil Solution Monitoring by Diffusion in Porous Cups

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    Shaw, Benjamin D.; Tuli, Atac; Wei, Jing-Bin; Hopmans, Jan W.

    2010-01-01

    I. : In situ soil water extraction: a review. J. Environ.used in situ soil water extraction methods to monitor soilmethods require soil water extraction by suction with