Sample records for unseasonably warm temperatures

  1. Warm Springs Water District District Heating Low Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water District District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Warm Springs Water District District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

  2. Warm Springs State Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    State Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Warm Springs State Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

  3. Warm inflation dynamics in the low temperature regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bastero-Gil, Mar [Departamento de Fisica Teorica y del Cosmos, Universidad de Granada, Granada-18071 (Spain); Berera, Arjun [School of Physics, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom)

    2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Warm inflation scenarios are studied with the dissipative coefficient computed in the equilibrium approximation. Use is made of the analytical expressions available in the low temperature regime with focus on the possibility of achieving strong dissipation within this approximation. Two different types of models are examined: monomial or equivalently chaotic type potentials, and hybrid like models where the energy density during inflation is dominated by the false vacuum. In both cases dissipation is shown to typically increase during inflation and bring the system into the strong dissipative regime. Observational consequences are explored for the amplitude of the primordial spectrum and the spectral index, which translate into constraints on the number of fields mediating the dissipative mechanism, and the number of light degrees of freedom produced during inflation. This paper furthers the foundational development of warm inflation dynamics from first principles quantum field theory by calculating conservative lower bound estimates on dissipative effects during inflation using the well established thermal equilibrium approximation. This approximation does not completely represent the actual physical system and earlier work has shown relaxing both the equilibrium and low temperature constraints can substantially enlarge the warm inflation regime, but these improvements still need further theoretical development.

  4. Role of global warming on the statistics of record-breaking temperatures S. Redner1,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redner, Sidney

    Role of global warming on the statistics of record-breaking temperatures S. Redner1, * and Mark R in Philadelphia, as a function of the number of years of observation. We then consider the case of global warming question arises: is global warming the cause of such heat waves or are they merely statistical fluctuations

  5. Constructing warm inflationary model in finite temperature BIon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. R. Setare; A. Sepehri

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We study warm inflationary universe model on the BIon in thermal background. The BIon is a configuration in flat space of a D-brane and a parallel anti-D-brane connected by a wormhole with F-string charge. When the branes and antibranes are well separated and the brane's spike is far from the antibrane's spike, wormhole isn't formed however when two branes are close to each other, they can be connected by a wormhole. In this condition, there exists many channels for flowing energy from extra dimensions into our universe and inflation may naturally occur in a warm region. We present a model that allows all cosmological parameters like the scale factor $a$, the Hubble parameter $H$ and universe energy density depend on the shape function and temperature of wormhole in transverse dimension between two branes. In our model, the expansion of 4D universe is controlled by the thermal wormhole between branes and ends up in Big-Rip singularity. We show that at this singularity, universe would be destroyed and one black F-string formed. Finally, we test our model against WMAP, Planck and BICEP2 data and obtain the ripping time. According to experimental data, $N\\simeq 50$ case leads to $n_{s}\\simeq 0.96$, where \\emph{N} and $n_{s}$ are the number e-folds and the spectral index respectively. This standard case may be found in $0.01 data and $t_{rip}=27.5(Gyr)$ for BICEP2 data. Comparing this time with the time of Big Rip in brane-antibrane, we find that the wormhole in BIonic system accelerates the destruction of the universe.

  6. Role of global warming on the statistics of recordbreaking temperatures S. Redner 1, * and Mark R. Petersen 2,+

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redner, Sidney

    Role of global warming on the statistics of record颅breaking temperatures S. Redner 1, * and Mark R of global warming, where the mean temperature systematically in颅 creases with time. Over the 126颅year time question arises: is global warming the cause of such heat waves or are they merely statistical fluctuations

  7. What Global Warming Looks Like The July 2010 global map of surface temperature anomalies (Figure 1), relative to the average

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    What Global Warming Looks Like The July 2010 global map of surface temperature anomalies (Figure 1 anomalies an example of what we can expect global warming to look like? Maps of temperature anomalies, such as Figure 1, are useful for helping people understand the role of global warming in extreme events

  8. Roosevelt Warm Springs Institute for Rehab. Pool & Spa Low Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    syntax: * Display map Temperature No Data Listed Flow No Data Listed Capacity 1.00x106 Btuhr 0.300 MWt Annual Generation 7.00x109 Btuyr 2.10 GWhyr Load Factor 0.80 Contact...

  9. The Spacing of Ceiling Fans for Human Comfort in Warm Temperature Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spain, S.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE SPACING OF CEILING FANS FOR HUMAN COMFORT IN WARM TEMPERATURE CONDITIONS Syd Spain, Ph.D. Research Specialist CRS Sirrine, Inc. Houston, Tx ABSTRACT Airspeed tests of a commerci a1 1 y popular 52 in. ceiling fan operating at a low speed...

  10. Reduced diurnal temperature range does not change warming impacts on ecosystem carbon balance of Mediterranean grassland mesocosms

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Phillips, Claire L.; Gregg, Jillian W. [Terrestrial Ecosystems Research Associates; 200 SW 35th St.; Corvallis; OR; 97333; USA; Wilson, John K. [Terrestrial Ecosystems Research Associates; 200 SW 35th St.; Corvallis; OR; 97333; USA

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Daily minimum temperature (Tmin) has increased faster than daily maximum temperature (Tmax) in many parts of the world, leading to decreases in diurnal temperature range (DTR). Projections suggest these trends are likely to continue in many regions, particularly northern latitudes and in arid regions. Despite wide speculation that asymmetric warming has different impacts on plant and ecosystem production than equal-night-and-day warming, there has been little direct comparison of these scenarios. Reduced DTR has also been widely misinterpreted as a result of night-only warming, when in fact Tmin occurs near dawn, indicating higher morning as well as night temperatures. We report on the first experiment to examine ecosystem-scale impacts of faster increases in Tmin than Tmax, using precise temperature controls to create realistic diurnal temperature profiles with gradual day-night temperature transitions and elevated early morning as well as night temperatures. Studying a constructed grassland ecosystem containing species native to Oregon, USA, we found the ecosystem lost more carbon at elevated than ambient temperatures, but was unaffected by the 3篊 difference in DTR between symmetric warming (constantly ambient +3.5篊) and asymmetric warming (dawn Tmin=ambient +5篊, afternoon Tmax= ambient +2篊). Reducing DTR had no apparent effect on photosynthesis, likely because temperatures were most different in the morning and late afternoon when light was low. Respiration was also similar in both warming treatments, because respiration temperature sensitivity was not sufficient to respond to the limited temperature differences between asymmetric and symmetric warming. We concluded that changes in daily mean temperatures, rather than changes in Tmin/Tmax, were sufficient for predicting ecosystem carbon fluxes in this reconstructed Mediterranean grassland system.

  11. Reduced diurnal temperature range does not change warming impacts on ecosystem carbon balance of Mediterranean grassland mesocosms

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Phillips, Claire L.; Gregg, Jillian W.; Wilson, John K.

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Daily minimum temperature (Tmin) has increased faster than daily maximum temperature (Tmax) in many parts of the world, leading to decreases in diurnal temperature range (DTR). Projections suggest these trends are likely to continue in many regions, particularly northern latitudes and in arid regions. Despite wide speculation that asymmetric warming has different impacts on plant and ecosystem production than equal-night-and-day warming, there has been little direct comparison of these scenarios. Reduced DTR has also been widely misinterpreted as a result of night-only warming, when in fact Tmin occurs near dawn, indicating higher morning as well as night temperatures. We reportmore牷on the first experiment to examine ecosystem-scale impacts of faster increases in Tmin than Tmax, using precise temperature controls to create realistic diurnal temperature profiles with gradual day-night temperature transitions and elevated early morning as well as night temperatures. Studying a constructed grassland ecosystem containing species native to Oregon, USA, we found the ecosystem lost more carbon at elevated than ambient temperatures, but was unaffected by the 3篊 difference in DTR between symmetric warming (constantly ambient +3.5篊) and asymmetric warming (dawn Tmin=ambient +5篊, afternoon Tmax= ambient +2篊). Reducing DTR had no apparent effect on photosynthesis, likely because temperatures were most different in the morning and late afternoon when light was low. Respiration was also similar in both warming treatments, because respiration temperature sensitivity was not sufficient to respond to the limited temperature differences between asymmetric and symmetric warming. We concluded that changes in daily mean temperatures, rather than changes in Tmin/Tmax, were sufficient for predicting ecosystem carbon fluxes in this reconstructed Mediterranean grassland system.珷less

  12. WARM AND FUZZY: TEMPERATURE AND DENSITY ANALYSIS OF AN Fe XV EUV IMAGING SPECTROMETER LOOP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmelz, J. T.; Rightmire, L. A.; Kimble, J. A.; Worley, B. T.; Pathak, S. [Physics Department, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN 38152 (United States); Saar, S. H., E-mail: jschmelz@memphis.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2011-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and X-Ray Telescope (XRT) were designed in part to work together. They have the same spatial resolution and cover different but overlapping coronal temperature ranges. These properties make a combined data set ideal for multithermal analysis, where EIS provides the best information on the cooler corona (log T < 6.5) and XRT provides the best information on the hotter corona (log T > 6.5). Here, we analyze a warm non-flaring loop detected in images made in a strong EIS Fe XV emission line with a wavelength of 284.16 A and peak formation temperature of log T = 6.3. We perform differential emission measure (DEM) analysis in three pixels at different heights above the footpoint and find multithermal results with the bulk of the emission measure in the range 6.0 < log T < 6.6. Analysis with the EIS lines alone gave a DEM with huge amounts of emission measure at very high temperatures (log T >7.2); analysis with XRT data alone resulted in a DEM that was missing most of the cooler emission measure required to produce many of the EIS lines. Thus, both results were misleading and unphysical. It was only by combining the EIS and XRT data that we were able to produce a reasonable result, one without ad hoc assumptions on the shape and range of the DEM itself.

  13. Long-Term Instrumental and Reconstructed Temperature Records Contradict Anthropogenic Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horst-Joachim L黡ecke

    2011-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Monthly instrumental temperature records from 5 stations in the northern hemisphere are analyzed, each of which is local and over 200 years in length, as well as two reconstructed long-range yearly records - from a stalagmite and from tree rings that are about 2000 years long. In the instrumental records, the steepest 100-year temperature fall happened in the 19th century and the steepest rise in the 20th century, both events being of about the same magnitude. Evaluation by the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) yields Hurst exponents that are in good agreement with the literature. DFA, Monte Carlo simulations, and synthetic records reveal that both 100-year events were caused by external trends. In contrast to this, the reconstructed records show stronger 100-year rises and falls as quite common during the last 2000 years. These results contradict the hypothesis of an unusual (anthropogenic) global warming during the 20th century. As a hypothesis, the sun's magnetic field, which is correlated with sunspot numbers, is put forward as an explanation. The long-term low-frequency fluctuations in sunspot numbers are not detectable by the DFA in the monthly instrumental records, resulting in the common low Hurst exponents. The same does not hold true for the 2000-year-long reconstructed records, which explains both their higher Hurst exponents and the higher probabilities of strong 100-year temperature fluctuations. A long-term synthetic record that embodies the reconstructed sunspot number fluctuations includes the different Hurst exponents of both the instrumental and the reconstructed records and, therefore, corroborates the conjecture.

  14. Two-temperature pair potentials and phonon spectra for simple metals in the warm dense matter regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harbour, Louis; Klug, Dennis D; Lewis, Laurent J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop ion-ion pair potentials for Al, Na and K for densities and temperatures relevant to the warm-dense-matter (WDM) regime. Furthermore, we emphasize non-equilibrium states where the ion temperature $T_i$ differs from the electron temperature $T_e$. This work focuses mainly on ultra-fast laser-metal interactions where the energy of the laser is almost exclusively transferred to the electron sub-system over femtosecond time scales. This results in a two-temperature system with $T_e>T_i$ and with the ions still at the initial room temperature $T_i=T_r$. First-principles calculations, such as density functional theory (DFT) or quantum Monte Carlo, are as yet not fully feasible for WDM conditions due to lack of finite-$T$ features, e.g. pseudopotentials, and extensive CPU time requirements. Simpler methods are needed to study these highly complex systems. We propose to use two-temperature pair potentials $U_{ii}(r, T_i,T_e)$ constructed from linear-response theory using the non-linear electron density $n(\\...

  15. Global Warming Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schofield, Jeremy

    Global Warming Observations: 1. Global temperature has been gradually rising in recent years #15 in range 8000 12000 nm { CFC's, methane and N 2 O important for global warming even though concentra- tions in concentration of \\greenhouse gases" like CO 2 What determines global temperature? Energy budget of earth: 1

  16. On the maintenance of weak meridional temperature gradients during warm climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korty, Robert Lindsay

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis examines the dynamics of equable climates. The underlying physics of two mechanisms by which weak meridional temperature gradients might be maintained are studied. First, I examine the evolution of stratospheric ...

  17. Proving anthropogenic global warming and disproving natural warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovejoy, Shaun

    1 Proving anthropogenic global warming and disproving natural warming in global temperatures between 5 and 6o C. Although he was aware that his, these were negligible: global fossil fuel consumption was less than a twentieth

  18. QUESTIONS ABOUT GLOBAL WARMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    QUESTIONS ABOUT GLOBAL WARMING S IT REAL? S IT IMPORTANT? HAT IS IT DUE TO? OW MUCH MORE in the atmosphere, giving Earth its temperate climate. Global Atmosphere, Global Warming GLOBAL TEMPERATURE TREND IS THIS CARBON DIOXIDE COMING FROM? Other sources are home heating and electric power production. WE ARE ALL

  19. Global Warming: Is There Still Time to Avoid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    Global Warming: Is There Still Time to Avoid Disastrous Human -Made Climate Change? i.e. Have We simulations. (B) Simulated and observed surface temperature change. #12;21st Century Global Warming Climate) Simulated Global Warming Warming

  20. Does the problem of global warming exist at all? Insight from the temperature drift induced by inevitable colored noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rusov, V D; Eingorn, M V; Zelentsova, T N; Linnik, E P; Beglaryan, M E; Vachev, B

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present paper we state a problem of the colored noise nonremovability on the climatic 30-year time scale, which essentially changes the angle of view on the known problem of global warming.

  1. A KNOWLEDGE DISCOVERY STRATEGY FOR RELATING SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURES TO FREQUENCIES OF TROPICAL STORMS AND GENERATING PREDICTIONS OF HURRICANES UNDER 21ST-CENTURY GLOBAL WARMING SCENARIOS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Race, Caitlin [University of Minnesota; Steinbach, Michael [University of Minnesota; Ganguly, Auroop R [ORNL; Semazzi, Fred [North Carolina State University; Kumar, Vipin [University of Minnesota

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The connections among greenhouse-gas emissions scenarios, global warming, and frequencies of hurricanes or tropical cyclones are among the least understood in climate science but among the most fiercely debated in the context of adaptation decisions or mitigation policies. Here we show that a knowledge discovery strategy, which leverages observations and climate model simulations, offers the promise of developing credible projections of tropical cyclones based on sea surface temperatures (SST) in a warming environment. While this study motivates the development of new methodologies in statistics and data mining, the ability to solve challenging climate science problems with innovative combinations of traditional and state-of-the-art methods is demonstrated. Here we develop new insights, albeit in a proof-of-concept sense, on the relationship between sea surface temperatures and hurricane frequencies, and generate the most likely projections with uncertainty bounds for storm counts in the 21st-century warming environment based in turn on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Special Report on Emissions Scenarios. Our preliminary insights point to the benefits that can be achieved for climate science and impacts analysis, as well as adaptation and mitigation policies, by a solution strategy that remains tailored to the climate domain and complements physics-based climate model simulations with a combination of existing and new computational and data science approaches.

  2. Roosevelt Warm Springs Institute for Rehab. Space Heating Low...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name Roosevelt Warm Springs Institute for Rehab. Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Roosevelt Warm Springs Institute for...

  3. Long range global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rolle, K.C.; Pulkrabek, W.W.; Fiedler, R.A. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Platteville, WI (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper explores one of the causes of global warming that is often overlooked, the direct heating of the environment by engineering systems. Most research and studies of global warming concentrate on the modification that is occurring to atmospheric air as a result of pollution gases being added by various systems; i.e., refrigerants, nitrogen oxides, ozone, hydrocarbons, halon, and others. This modification affects the thermal radiation balance between earth, sun and space, resulting in a decrease of radiation outflow and a slow rise in the earth`s steady state temperature. For this reason the solution to the problem is perceived as one of cleaning up the processes and effluents that are discharged into the environment. In this paper arguments are presented that suggest, that there is a far more serious cause for global warming that will manifest itself in the next two or three centuries; direct heating from the exponential growth of energy usage by humankind. Because this is a minor contributor to the global warming problem at present, it is overlooked or ignored. Energy use from the combustion of fuels and from the output of nuclear reactions eventually is manifest as warming of the surroundings. Thus, as energy is used at an ever increasing rate the consequent global warming also increases at an ever increasing rate. Eventually this rate will become equal to a few percent of solar radiation. When this happens the earth`s temperature will have risen by several degrees with catastrophic results. The trends in world energy use are reviewed and some mathematical models are presented to suggest future scenarios. These models can be used to predict when the global warming problem will become undeniably apparent, when it will become critical, and when it will become catastrophic.

  4. global warming's six indias

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Gary L.

    global warming's six indias: An Audience Segmentation Analysis #12;Global Warming's Six Indias 1............................................................................................................................................20 2. Global Warming Beliefs and Attitudes................................................................................ 21 Knowledge about global warming varies widely by group

  5. Minimization of steam requirements and enhancement of water-gas shift reaction with warm gas temperature CO2 removal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V; Fisher, II, James C

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure utilizes a hydroxide sorbent for humidification and CO.sub.2 removal from a gaseous stream comprised of CO and CO.sub.2 prior to entry into a water-gas-shift reactor, in order to decrease CO.sub.2 concentration and increase H.sub.2O concentration and shift the water-gas shift reaction toward the forward reaction products CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2. The hydroxide sorbent may be utilized for absorbtion of CO.sub.2 exiting the water-gas shift reactor, producing an enriched H.sub.2 stream. The disclosure further provides for regeneration of the hydroxide sorbent at temperature approximating water-gas shift conditions, and for utilizing H.sub.2O product liberated as a result of the CO.sub.2 absorption.

  6. Interpolation of scattered temperature data measurements onto a worldwide regular grid using radial basis functions with applications to global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kansa, E.J.; Axelrod, M.C.; Kercher, J.R.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our current research into the response of natural ecosystems to a hypothesized climatic change requires that we have estimates of various meteorological variables on a regularly spaced grid of points on the surface of the earth. Unfortunately, the bulk of the world`s meteorological measurement stations is located at airports that tend to be concentrated on the coastlines of the world or near populated areas. We can also see that the spatial density of the station locations is extremely non-uniform with the greatest density in the USA, followed by Western Europe. Furthermore, the density of airports is rather sparse in desert regions such as the Sahara, the Arabian, Gobi, and Australian deserts; likewise the density is quite sparse in cold regions such as Antarctica Northern Canada, and interior northern Russia. The Amazon Basin in Brazil has few airports. The frequency of airports is obviously related to the population centers and the degree of industrial development of the country. We address the following problem here. Given values of meteorological variables, such as maximum monthly temperature, measured at the more than 5,500 airport stations, interpolate these values onto a regular grid of terrestrial points spaced by one degree in both latitude and longitude. This is known as the scattered data problem.

  7. Is the basinwide warming in the North Atlantic Ocean related to atmospheric carbon dioxide and global warming?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chunzai

    to atmospheric carbon dioxide and global warming? Chunzai Wang1 and Shenfu Dong1,2 Received 31 January 2010 is controversial. Some studies argued that the warming is due to global warming in association with the secular sea surface temperature. Here we show that both global warming and AMO variability make a contribution

  8. Global warming and hurricane intensity and frequency: The debate continues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kareem, Ahsan

    Global warming and hurricane intensity and frequency: The debate continues Megan Mc of these changes. Some scientists believe that global warming and increased sea surface temperatures are to blame, global warming and increased sea surface temperatures do appear to have influenced hurricane frequency

  9. The Science of Global Warming Energy Balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blais, Brian

    The Science of Global Warming 路Energy Balance 路Feedback Loops Global Warming can be understood complexities 路Introduce a Simple Model of Energy Balance 路Understand the Vocabulary 路Point out some units of energy input from the Sun = Temperature: 5.3 oC Greenhouse Effect 101: A Balance is Achieved

  10. Global warming and United States landfalling hurricanes Chunzai Wang1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chunzai

    Global warming and United States landfalling hurricanes Chunzai Wang1 and Sang-Ki Lee2 Received 18] A secular warming of sea surface temperature occurs almost everywhere over the global ocean. Here we use observational data to show that global warming of the sea surface is associated with a secular increase

  11. Discriminating robust and non-robust atmospheric circulation responses to global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Discriminating robust and non-robust atmospheric circulation responses to global warming Michael response to global warming in a set of atmospheric general circulation models (AGCMs) is investigated. The global-warmed climate is forced by a global pattern of warmed ocean surface temperatures

  12. Predicting the fate of a living fossil: how will global warming affect sex determination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Predicting the fate of a living fossil: how will global warming affect sex determination, an unlikely response to global warming, as many oviparous species are nesting earlier as the climate warms. Keywords: climate change; global warming; temperature-dependent sex determination; reptile; Sphenodon 1

  13. global warming's six americas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Gary L.

    Energy Sources 17 Subsidies for Fossil Fuel and Renewable Energy Industries 18 Support for a Carbon Tax and Costs of Reducing Fossil Fuel Use and Global Warming 8 The Alarmed 9 The Concerned 10 The Cautious 11 the spring and fall of 2012. Perceived Benefits and Costs of Reducing Fossil Fuel Use and Global Warming

  14. Cows Causing Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi

    2008-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Broadcast Transcript: Remember when President Reagan blamed trees for air pollution? Well now the Japanese are blaming cows for global warming. Apparently, the methane emissions from burping cows account for 5% of all global greenhouse gases. Simple...

  15. Global warming elucidated

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, S. [Global Warming International Center, Woodridge, IL (United States)

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The meaning of global warming and its relevance to everyday life is explained. Simple thermodynamics is used to predict an oscillatory nature of the change in climate due to global warming. Global warming causes extreme events and bad weather in the near term. In the long term it may cause the earth to transition to another equilibrium state through many oscillation in climatic patterns. The magnitudes of these oscillations could easily exceed the difference between the end points. The author further explains why many no longer fully understands the nature and magnitudes of common phenomena such as storms and wind speeds because of these oscillations, and the absorptive properties of clouds. The author links the increase in duration of the El Nino to global warming, and further predicts public health risks as the earth transitions to another equilibrium state in its young history.

  16. Warm-VM Reboot Warm-VM Reboot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kourai, Kenichi

    Tos Warm-VM Reboot VMM OS Warm-VM Reboot VMM OS OS 1 Tvmm > Tos Tvmm Tos Warm-VM Reboot Tvmm Dw(n) Warm-VM Reboot VM n Dos OS OS rejuvenation VMM rejuvenation time (a) Tvmm > Tos VMM rejuvenation OS rejuvenation time (b) Tvmm Tos 1 Warm-VM Reboot Nw Tvmm OS Nw Tvmm-Dw(n) Tos Dw(n) + NwDos Aw = 1 - Dw(n) + Nw

  17. Original article Predicted global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Original article Predicted global warming and Douglas-fir chilling requirements DD McCreary1 DP to predicted global warming. Douglas-fir / chilling / global warming / bud burst / reforestation R茅sum茅 offer evidence that mean global warming of 3-4 掳C could occur within the next century, particularly

  18. Warming caused by cumulative carbon emissions towards the trillionth tonne

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    to avoid poten- tially dangerous levels of global warming48 . Similar problems apply to the carbon cycle . But the eventual equilibrium global mean temperature associated with a given stabilization level of atmo- spheric atmospheric composition approaches a stabilization level consistent with a desired equilibrium warming

  19. St. Augustinegrass Warm-season turfgrass. Prefers full sun, but

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    St. Augustinegrass Warm-season turfgrass. Prefers full sun, but has a high tolerance for shade-season grass. It does best in full sun and high temperatures. Goes dormant and turns brown in winter. Very

  20. The Climate Policy Narrative for a Dangerously Warming World

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanford, Todd [Union of Concerned Scientists] [Union of Concerned Scientists; Frumhoff, Peter [Union of Concerned Scientists] [Union of Concerned Scientists; Luers, Amy [Skoll Global Threats Fund] [Skoll Global Threats Fund; Gulledge, Jay [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is time to acknowledge that global average temperatures will likely rise above the 2 C policy target and consider how that deeply troubling prospect should affect priorities for communicating and managing the risks of a dangerously warming climate.

  1. Estimated solar contribution to the global surface warming using the ACRIM TSI satellite composite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scafetta, Nicola

    Estimated solar contribution to the global surface warming using the ACRIM TSI satellite composite minimally contributed $10颅30% of the global surface temperature warming over the period 1980颅2002. Citation: Scafetta, N., and B. J. West (2005), Estimated solar contribution to the global surface warming using

  2. LETTER doi:10.1038/nature12156 Signature of ocean warming in global fisheries catch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pauly, Daniel

    LETTER doi:10.1038/nature12156 Signature of ocean warming in global fisheries catch William W. L changes in sea surface temperature5 . This study shows that ocean warming has already affected global. Cheung1 , Reg Watson2 & Daniel Pauly3 Marine fishes and invertebrates respond to ocean warming through

  3. Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlson, Ann E.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation Ann E. Carlson*2008]HEAT WAVES, GLOBAL WARMING, AND MITIGATION 175 stroke2001). 2008]HEAT WAVES, GLOBAL WARMING, AND MITIGATION 177

  4. Global Warming, endogenous risk and irreversibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Anthony C.; Narain, Urvashi

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The economics of global warming, Institute for InternationalEconomic Models of Global Warming, Cambridge, Mass. MITstochastic losses from global warming, Risk Analysis 16(2):

  5. Global Warming: Connecting the Dots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    Global Warming: Connecting the Dots from Causes to Solutions* Jim Hansen 26 February 2007 National://www.columbia.edu/~jeh1/worldwatch_nov2006.pdf) 5. Communicating dangers and opportunities in global warming, Amer-16, 2006. (http://pubs.giss.nasa.gov/docs/2006/2006_Hansen.pdf) 8. Global warming: Connecting the dots from

  6. 4, 10591092, 2007 Global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

    BGD 4, 1059颅1092, 2007 Global warming potential of agro-ecosystems S. Lehuger et al. Title Page Predicting the global warming potential of agro-ecosystems S. Lehuger, B. Gabrielle, E. Larmanou, P. Laville Correspondence to: S. Lehuger (simon.lehuger@grignon.inra.fr) 1059 #12;BGD 4, 1059颅1092, 2007 Global warming

  7. Global Warming and Caspian Sea Level Fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ardakanian, Reza

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coastal regions have a high social, economical and environmental importance. Due to this importance the sea level fluctuations can have many bad consequences. In this research the correlation between the increasing trend of temperature in coastal stations due to Global Warming and the Caspian Sea level has been established. The Caspian Sea level data has been received from the Jason-1 satellite. It was resulted that the monthly correlation between the temperature and sea level is high and also positive and almost the same for all the stations. But the yearly correlation was negative. It means that the sea level has decreased by the increase in temperature.

  8. Natural warm inflation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Visinelli, Luca, E-mail: u0583682@utah.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, 115 South 1400 East 201, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112-0830 (United States)

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the requirements that a generic axion-like field has to satisfy in order to play the role of the inflaton field in the warm inflation scenario. Compared to the parameter space in ordinary Natural Inflation models, we find that the parameter space in our model is enlarged. In particular, we avoid the problem of having an axion decay constant f that relates to the Planck scale, which is instead present in the ordinary Natural Inflation models; in fact, our model can easily accommodate values of the axion decay constant that lie well below the Planck scale.

  9. ARM - Global Warming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, FeatureListGeneral Changes in DailyWarming

  10. Changes in microclimate induced by experimental warming and clipping in tallgrass prairie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the diurnal air-temperature range. Keywords: climate warming, clipping, infrared heater, soil moisture, solar as the secondary factor. Infrared heater was used in order to simulate climatic warming and clipping to mimic in reduced diurnal air-temperature range. Infrared heaters substantially increased daily maximum (2.5 and 3

  11. The warm inflationary universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arjun Berera

    2008-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past decade, the importance of dissipation and fluctuation to inflationary dynamics has been realized and has led to a new picture of inflation called warm inflation. Although these phenomena are common to condensed matter systems, for inflation models their importance has only recently started to be appreciated. The article describes the motivation for these phenomenon during inflation and then examines their origins from first principles quantum field theory treatments of inflation models. Cosmology today is a data intensive field and this is driving theory to greater precision and predictability. This opens the possibility to consider tests for detecting observational signatures of dissipative processes, which will be discussed. In addition it will be discussed how particle physics and cosmology are now working in tandem to push the boundaries of our knowledge about fundamental physics.

  12. Climate Science and Drought

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Texas Climate Change and Drought Wendy Gordon, Ph.D. The University of Texas ? Austin Environmental Science Institute Texas Wildfires 2011 From the beginning of the fire season on November 15, 2010 to October 31, 2011 nearly 28,000 fires had... have been particularly severe due to the ongoing 2011 Southern US drought, and exacerbating the problem is land management practices, the unusual convergence of strong winds, unseasonably warm temperatures, and low humidity. Climate...

  13. Computer modeling of the global warming effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington, W.M. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The state of knowledge of global warming will be presented and two aspects examined: observational evidence and a review of the state of computer modeling of climate change due to anthropogenic increases in greenhouse gases. Observational evidence, indeed, shows global warming, but it is difficult to prove that the changes are unequivocally due to the greenhouse-gas effect. Although observational measurements of global warming are subject to ``correction,`` researchers are showing consistent patterns in their interpretation of the data. Since the 1960s, climate scientists have been making their computer models of the climate system more realistic. Models started as atmospheric models and, through the addition of oceans, surface hydrology, and sea-ice components, they then became climate-system models. Because of computer limitations and the limited understanding of the degree of interaction of the various components, present models require substantial simplification. Nevertheless, in their present state of development climate models can reproduce most of the observed large-scale features of the real system, such as wind, temperature, precipitation, ocean current, and sea-ice distribution. The use of supercomputers to advance the spatial resolution and realism of earth-system models will also be discussed.

  14. The Great Season Climatic Oscillation and the Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boucenna, Ahmed

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present earth warming up is often explained by the atmosphere gas greenhouse effect. This explanation is in contradiction with the thermodynamics second law. The warming up by greenhouse effect is quite improbable. It is cloud reflection that gives to the earth s ground its 15 degres C mean temperature. Since the reflection of the radiation by gases is negligible, the role of the atmosphere greenhouse gases in the earth warming up by earth radiation reflection loses its importance. We think that natural climatic oscillations contribute more to earth climatic disturbances. The oscillation that we hypothesize to exist has a long period (800 to 1000 years). The glacier melting and regeneration cycles lead to variations in the cold region ocean water density and thermal conductibility according to their salinity. These variations lead one to think about a macro climate oscillating between maximum hot and minimum cold temperatures. This oscillation is materialized by the passages of the planet through hot, mil...

  15. Case Study #1 "The Global Warming Debate"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Christopher A.

    CHEM 001A Case Study #1 "The Global Warming Debate" Global warming is one of the most contentious issues of our time. There is an ongoing debate about whether global warming is caused by human activity.S., and because the scientific evidence used to determine if global warming is man-made is so difficult

  16. PRINT ONLY: GLOBAL WARMING Alexeev V. A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    PRINT ONLY: GLOBAL WARMING Alexeev V. A. Global Warming: 0.6掳C or Less? [#1035] The peculiarities of global warming on the Earth during the last century are discussed. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXVIII (2007) full818.pdf #12;GLOBAL WARMING: 0.6 OR LESS? V.A.Alexeev; Vernadsky Institute of Geochemistry

  17. A Vast Machine Computer Models, Climate Data, and the Politics of Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Vast Machine Computer Models, Climate Data, and the Politics of Global Warming Paul N. Edwards models, climate data, and the politics of global warming / Paul N. Edwards. p. cm. Includes. Climatology--History. 3. Meteorology--History. 4. Climatology--Technological innovation. 5. Global temperature

  18. What Geology Has To Say About Global Warming William Menke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menke, William

    insights about earth's climate that can be applied to the present-day global warming debate. The geological record of ancient climate is excellent. Ancient temperatures can be determined very precisely, because the composition of the shells of corals and other marine organisms varies measurably with it. Furthermore

  19. The multimillennial sea-level commitment of global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marzeion, Ben

    The multimillennial sea-level commitment of global warming Anders Levermanna,b,1 , Peter U. Clarkc Board June 13, 2013 (received for review November 7, 2012) Global mean sea level has been steadily for different levels of global mean temperature increase above preindustrial levels. Although sea- level rise

  20. On the consistency of tachyon warm inflation with viscous pressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cid, Antonella

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We obtain conditions for the existence of an attractor in the system of equations describing a tachyon warm inflationary model with bulk viscosity taken into account. When these conditions are met the evolution approaches slow-roll regime. We present the primordial power spectrum for the tachyon field by considering a dissipation coefficient depending on the scalar field and temperature.

  1. Global warming and Arctic climate. Raymond S. Bradley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    Global warming and Arctic climate. Raymond S. Bradley Climate System Research Center University of Massachusetts Amherst #12;How have global temperatures changed & why? 1. Average instrumental records from around the world; express all as anomalies from 1961-90 average #12;#12;Overall trend is upward ("global

  2. Cosmic Rays and Global Warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sloan, T. [Physics Department, University of Lancaster, Lancaster, UK (United Kingdom); Wolfendale, A. W. [Physics Department, Durham University, Durham (United Kingdom)

    2008-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Some workers have claimed that the observed temporal correlations of (low level) terrestrial cloud cover with the cosmic ray intensity changes, due to solar modulation, are causal. The possibility arises, therefore, of a connection between cosmic rays and Global Warming. If true, the implications would be very great. We have examined this claim in some detail. So far, we have not found any evidence in support and so our conclusions are to doubt it. From the absence of corroborative evidence we estimate that less than 15% at the 95% confidence level, of the 11-year cycle warming variations are due to cosmic rays and less than 2% of the warming over the last 43 years is due to this cause. The origin of the correlation itself is probably the cycle of solar irradiance although there is, as yet, no certainty.

  3. Cosmic Rays and Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Sloan; A W Wolfendale

    2007-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been claimed by others that observed temporal correlations of terrestrial cloud cover with `the cosmic ray intensity' are causal. The possibility arises, therefore, of a connection between cosmic rays and Global Warming. If true, the implications would be very great. We have examined this claim to look for evidence to corroborate it. So far we have not found any and so our tentative conclusions are to doubt it. Such correlations as appear are more likely to be due to the small variations in solar irradiance, which, of course, correlate with cosmic rays. We estimate that less than 15% of the 11-year cycle warming variations are due to cosmic rays and less than 2% of the warming over the last 35 years is due to this cause.

  4. Geographic variation in vulnerability to climate warming in a tropical Caribbean lizard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leal, Manuel S.

    Geographic variation in vulnerability to climate warming in a tropical Caribbean lizard Alex R temperatures (Tb) of the tropical Caribbean lizard Anolis cristatellus at nine sites representing two habitat

  5. abiotic-stress resistant warm: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Zeolite on the Decomposition Resistance of Organic Matter in Tropical Soils under Global Warming CiteSeer Summary: AbstractGlobal temperature had increased by about 0.5 o...

  6. "Hot" for Warm Water Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coles, Henry

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Format Locations sorted by Dry Bulb Temperature Locationssorted by Wet Bulb Temperature 11. APPENDIX C: DIRECT LIQUIDis constrained by outdoor wet bulb temperature) or dry

  7. GLOBAL WARMING THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    GLOBAL WARMING THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT AND YOUR FAMILY'S CONTRIBUTION TO IT Stephen E. Schwartz September 22, 2004 http://www.ecd.bnl.gov/steve/schwartz.html #12;#12;THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT #12;GLOBAL does anything about it. Mark Twain Mark Twain Now with the greenhouse effect, we ARE doing something

  8. GLOBAL WARMING THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    GLOBAL WARMING THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT AND YOUR FAMILY'S CONTRIBUTION TO IT Stephen E. Schwartz GREENHOUSE EFFECT #12;GLOBAL ENERGY BALANCE Global and annual average energy fluxes in watts per square meter about it.But nobody does anything about it. Mark Twain Mark Twain Now with the greenhouse effect, we

  9. An Explanation of Global Warming without Supercomputing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An Explanation of Global Warming without Supercomputing (revised version) K. Miyazaki E that the anthropogenic global warming is severely limited because the Earth is a water planet. 1 Introduction Now,2,3] on this anthropogenic global warming (AGW) is essentially based on the results of elaborate and enormous computer

  10. Global Warming: The Threat to the Planet*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    Global Warming: The Threat to the Planet* Jim Hansen 17 April 2007 2007 Leo Szilard Lecture. Graham Red Squirrel #12;Survival of Species 1. "Business-as-Usual" Scenario - Global Warming ~ 3潞C - Likely Extinctions ~ 50 percent 2. "Alternative" Scenario - Global Warming ~ 1潞C - Likely Extinctions

  11. An Explanation of Global Warming without Supercomputing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An Explanation of Global Warming without Supercomputing K. Miyazaki E-mail: miyazakiro that the climate sensitivity never exceeds 6 C. Consequently, the anthropogenic global warming is severely limited be calculated in simple terms. Global warming is like that." However, there will be not a few physicists who do

  12. The Global Warming Debate: A July Hottest Month on Record in U.S.--Warming and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Christopher A.

    The Global Warming Debate: A Case Study July Hottest Month on Record in U.S.--Warming and Drought was the hottest month on record in the United States, perhaps due to a combination of global warming the fact that there is more than just natural variability playing a role: Global warming from human

  13. Global warming and global dioxide emission: An empirical study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linyan Sun [Xian Jiaotong Univ., Shaanxi (China); Wang, M. [Saint Mary`s Univ., Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada)

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the dynamic relationship between global surface temperature (global warming) and global carbon dioxide emission (CO{sub 2}) is modelled and analyzed by causality and spectral analysis in the time domain and frequency domain, respectively. Historical data of global CO{sub 2} emission and global surface temperature anomalies over 129 years from 1860-1988 are used in this study. The causal relationship between the two phenomena is first examined using the Sim and Granger causality test in the time domain after the data series are filtered by ARIMA models. The Granger causal relationship is further scrutinized and confirmed by cross-spectral and multichannel spectral analysis in the frequency domain. The evidence found from both analyses proves that there is a positive causal relationship between the two variables. The time domain analysis suggests that Granger causality exists between global surface temperature and global CO{sub 2} emission. Further, CO{sub 2} emission causes the change in temperature. The conclusions are further confirmed by the frequency domain analysis, which indicates that the increase in CO{sub 2} emission causes climate warming because a high coherence exists between the two variables. Furthermore, it is proved that climate changes happen after an increase in CO{sub 2} emission, which confirms that the increase in CO{sub 2} emission does cause global warming. 27 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. A possible relationship between Global Warming and Lightning Activity in India during the period 1998-2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felix Pereira B.; Priyadarsini G.; T. E. Girish

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Lightning activity on a global scale has been studied season wise using satellite data for the period from 1998 to 2009. Lightning activity shows an increasing trend during the period of study which is highly correlated with atmospheric warming. A similar increasing trend of lightning activity is observed in the Indian region during the pre-monsoon season which is correlated with global lightning trends and warming trends of surface temperature in India. Key words: Global warming, lightning activity, Solar cycle changes

  15. Hydrological consequences of global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Norman L.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2007 Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change indicates there is strong evidence that the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide far exceeds the natural range over the last 650,000 years, and this recent warming of the climate system is unequivocal, resulting in more frequent extreme precipitation events, earlier snowmelt runoff, increased winter flood likelihoods, increased and widespread melting of snow and ice, longer and more widespread droughts, and rising sea level. The effects of recent warming has been well documented and climate model projections indicate a range of hydrological impacts with likely to very likely probabilities (67 to 99 percent) of occurring with significant to severe consequences in response to a warmer lower atmosphere with an accelerating hydrologic cycle.

  16. "Hot" for Warm Water Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coles, Henry

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    points for maximum cooling liquid supply temperatures thatLiquid cooling guidelines may include: Supply temperatureliquid supply temperature for liquid cooling guidelines. Due

  17. Nuclear stopping power in warm and hot dense matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faussurier, Gerald; Blancard, Christophe [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91 297 Arpajon (France); Gauthier, Maxence [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91 297 Arpajon (France); LULI, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, Route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a method to estimate the nuclear component of the stopping power of ions propagating in dense matter. Three kinds of effective pair potentials are proposed. Results from the warm dense matter regime and the domain of high energy density physics are presented and discussed for proton and helium. The role of ionic temperature is examined. The nuclear stopping power can play a noticeable role in hot dense matter.

  18. Metrics to assess the mitigation of global warming by carbon capture and storage in the ocean and in geological reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fortunat, Joos

    Metrics to assess the mitigation of global warming by carbon capture and storage in the ocean to assess mitigation of global warming by carbon capture and storage are discussed. The climatic impact penalty for carbon capture. For an annual leakage rate of 0.01, surface air temperature becomes higher

  19. The instrumental record goes back to about 1850. A few areas of the globe have not warmed in recent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan, Richard P.

    the historical rise in temperatures. #12;Are there other indicators of the warming? Global sea level has risen of land and other factors. Global sea levels have risen about 20cm over the past 100 years a rateThe instrumental record goes back to about 1850. A few areas of the globe have not warmed in recent

  20. Mechanisms of Remote Tropical Surface Warming during El Nio JOHN C. H. CHIANG AND BENJAMIN R. LINTNER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lintner, Benjamin Richard

    temperature) for the remote tropical surface warming. Over the remote oceans, latent heat flux acting throughMechanisms of Remote Tropical Surface Warming during El Ni帽o JOHN C. H. CHIANG AND BENJAMIN R.10) simulations of the 1997/98 El Ni帽o that the observed "remote" (i.e., outside the Pacific) tropical land

  1. From the warm magnetized atomic medium to molecular clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Hennebelle; R. Banerjee; E. Vazquez-Semadeni; R. Klessen; E. Audit

    2008-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    {It has recently been proposed that giant molecular complexes form at the sites where streams of diffuse warm atomic gas collide at transonic velocities.} {We study the global statistics of molecular clouds formed by large scale colliding flows of warm neutral atomic interstellar gas under ideal MHD conditions. The flows deliver material as well as kinetic energy and trigger thermal instability leading eventually to gravitational collapse.} {We perform adaptive mesh refinement MHD simulations which, for the first time in this context, treat self-consistently cooling and self-gravity.} {The clouds formed in the simulations develop a highly inhomogeneous density and temperature structure, with cold dense filaments and clumps condensing from converging flows of warm atomic gas. In the clouds, the column density probability density distribution (PDF) peaks at $\\sim 2 \\times 10^{21} \\psc$ and decays rapidly at higher values; the magnetic intensity correlates weakly with density from $n \\sim 0.1$ to $10^4 \\pcc$, and then varies roughly as $n^{1/2}$ for higher densities.} {The global statistical properties of such molecular clouds are reasonably consistent with observational determinations. Our numerical simulations suggest that molecular clouds formed by the moderately supersonic collision of warm atomic gas streams.}

  2. Statistical factors to qualify the superconducting magnets for the SSC based on warm/cold correlations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, K.; Devred, A.; Coles, M.; Tompkins, J.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    All of the SSC production magnets will be measured at room temperature (warm), but only a fraction of these will be measured at liquid helium temperature (cold). The fractional information will then be analyzed to determine warm acceptance criteria for the field quality of the SSC magnets. Regarding predictors of the field quality based on partial information, there are several observations and studies based on the warm/cold correlation. A different facet of the acceptance test is production control, which interprets the warm/cold correlation to adjust the process parameters. For these applications, we are evaluating statistical techniques relying on asymptotic estimators of the systematic errors and random errors, and their respective confidence intervals. The estimators are useful to qualify the population magnets based on a subset of sample magnets. We present the status of our work, including: (i) a recapitulation of analytic formulas, (ii) a justification based on HERA magnet experience, and (iii) a practical interpretation of these estimators.

  3. Tachyon warm inflationary universe models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Herrera; S. del Campo; C. Campuzano

    2006-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Warm inflationary universe models in a tachyon field theory are studied. General conditions required for these models to be realizable are derived and discussed. We describe scalar perturbations (in the longitudinal gauge) and tensor perturbations for these scenarios. We develop our models for a constant dissipation parameter $\\Gamma$ in one case and one dependent on $\\phi$ in the other case. We have been successful in describing such of inflationary universe models. We use recent astronomical observations for constraining the parameters appearing in our model. Also, our results are compared with their analogous found in the cool inflationary case.

  4. Global Warming and Human Health

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental AssessmentsGeoffrey(SC) GettingGit GitGlobal Warming and Human

  5. Soil degradation, global warming and climate impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feddema, Johannes J.; Freire, Sergio Carneiro

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    will demonstrate one methodology for assessing the potential large-scale impacts of soil degradation on African climates and water resources. In addition it will compare and contrast these impacts to those expected from global warming and compare impacts for differ...- ent watershed regions on the continent. 2. METHODS In order to make a similar comparison between pro- jected climate change scenarios due to global warming Inter-Research 2001 *E-mail: feddema@ku.edu Soil degradation, global warming and climate...

  6. Global Warming Systemically Caused Hurricane Sandy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lakoff, George

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Warming Systemically Caused Hurricane Sandy by George Lakoffsystemically caused Hurricane Sandy -- and the Midwestenormous energy and size of Hurricane Sandy, as well as the

  7. Nuclear energy output slows as climate warms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramer, David

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New reports from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and the US government say the window is closing for actions to avert the worst effects of warming.

  8. Background: Global Warming, 2009 1. Unequivocally, the climate is warming. Natural systems are affected.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    ." #12;Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Transportation Sources in Minnesota A Study gas (GHG) emissions from Minnesota's transportation sector. #12;Research Study Team UniversityBackground: Global Warming, 2009 1. Unequivocally, the climate is warming. Natural systems

  9. Role of anomalous warm gulf waters in the intensification of Hurricane Menas Kafatos,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Donglian

    coincident with the distribution of warm waters or high sea surface temperature (SST). High SST values Donglian Sun,1 Ritesh Gautam,1 Zafer Boybeyi,1 Ruixin Yang,1 and Guido Cervone1 Received 18 April 2006 the Gulf States, especially Hurricane Katrina. Remarkable similarities between sea surface temperature

  10. THE EFFECT OF SNOWPACK WARMING ON THE STRESS BULB BELOW A SKIER Thomas Exner *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jamieson, Bruce

    THE EFFECT OF SNOWPACK WARMING ON THE STRESS BULB BELOW A SKIER Thomas Exner * Dept. of Geoscience exist to quantify or validate the temperature effect on the stress bulb below a skier. In this study we periods. Increasing temperatures of the near-surface layers altered the shape of the stress bulb, but so

  11. Vegetation responses in Alaskan arctic tundra after 8 years of a summer warming and winter snow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    by insulating vegetation from winter wind and temperature extremes, modifying winter soil temperaturesVegetation responses in Alaskan arctic tundra after 8 years of a summer warming and winter snow ) open-topped fiberglass chambers (OTCs) to study the effects of changes in winter snow cover and summer

  12. Warming and Intensified Summer Drought Influence Leaf Dark Respiration and Related Plant Traits in Three Dominant Species of the Southern Oak Savanna

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindgren, Kourtnee Marr

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The short-term temperature-response of dark respiration may be altered by climate warming through temperature acclimation; however the role of drought in influencing thermal acclimation is not known. We hypothesized that leaf dark respiration...

  13. ambient temperature rise: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    July 10, 2013 Research National Laboratory-University of New Mexico studies. 3:20 Global warming accelerates drought 4 Computational analysis of temperature rise phenomena...

  14. Warm Anisotropic Inflationary Universe Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharif, M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is devoted to study the warm inflation using vector fields in the background of locally rotationally symmetric Bianchi type I universe model. We formulate the field equations, slow-roll and perturbation parameters (scalar and tensor power spectra as well as their spectral indices) under slow-roll approximation. We evaluate all these parameters in terms of directional Hubble parameter during intermediate and logamediate inflationary regimes by taking the dissipation factor as a function of scalar field as well as a constant. In each case, we calculate the observational parameter of interest, i.e., tensor-scalar ratio in terms of inflation. The graphical behavior of these parameters shows that the anisotropic model is also compatible with WMAP7 and Planck observational data.

  15. Warm Anisotropic Inflationary Universe Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Sharif; Rabia Saleem

    2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is devoted to study the warm inflation using vector fields in the background of locally rotationally symmetric Bianchi type I universe model. We formulate the field equations, slow-roll and perturbation parameters (scalar and tensor power spectra as well as their spectral indices) under slow-roll approximation. We evaluate all these parameters in terms of directional Hubble parameter during intermediate and logamediate inflationary regimes by taking the dissipation factor as a function of scalar field as well as a constant. In each case, we calculate the observational parameter of interest, i.e., tensor-scalar ratio in terms of inflation. The graphical behavior of these parameters shows that the anisotropic model is also compatible with WMAP7 and Planck observational data.

  16. Language Models Introduction to Natural Language Processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, David A.

    takes place in harrisburg , pa in 1988 during an unseasonably warm winter . ... 9 #12;Movie Reviews i ' m in the minority here but let me explain . the film takes place in harrisburg , pa in 1988

  17. Global warming, insurance losses and financial industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Low, N.C. [UOB Life Assurance Limited, Singapore (Singapore)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Global warming causes extremely bad weather in the near term. They have already caught the attention of the insurance industry, as they suffered massive losses in the last decade. Twenty-one out of the 25 largest catastrophes in the US, mainly in the form of hurricanes have occurred in the last decade. The insurance industry has reacted by taking the risk of global warming in decisions as to pricing and underwriting decisions. But they have yet to take a more active role in regulating the factors that contributes to global warming. How global warming can impact the financial industry and the modern economy is explored. Insurance and modern financial derivatives are key to the efficient functioning of the modern economy, without which the global economy can still function but will take a giant step backward. Any risk as global warming that causes economic surprises will hamper the efficient working of the financial market and the modern economy.

  18. "Hot" for Warm Water Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coles, Henry

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    defining liquid cooling guidelines for future use. The goalis key to reducing cooling energy consumption for futureliquid-cooling temperatures to guide future supercomputer

  19. The Impact of Global Warming and Air Pollution on Patient Visits in the Emergency Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Derlet, Robert W

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review The Impact sf Global Warming and 1 Air pollution onair pollution problems and global warming will effect thesites in the human body. Global Warming Global warming goes

  20. Infrared absorption spectra, radiative efficiencies, and global warming potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Infrared absorption spectra, radiative efficiencies, and global warming potentials absorption spectra, radiative efficiencies, and global warming potentials of perfluorocarbons: Comparison. (1995) and combined with atmospheric lifetimes from the literature to determine global warming

  1. Electronic Structure of Warm Dense Matter via Multicenter Green...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electronic Structure of Warm Dense Matter via Multicenter Green's Function Technique Research Personnel Modeling The proposed research addresses the Warm Dense Matter area...

  2. Secretary Moniz Warms Up For Earth Day Pitch | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Warms Up For Earth Day Pitch Secretary Moniz Warms Up For Earth Day Pitch Addthis Speakers Secretary Ernest Moniz Duration :32...

  3. Cloudy Skies: Assessing Public Understanding of Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sterman, John

    2002-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Surveys show most Americans believe global warming is real. But many advocate delaying action until there is more evidence that warming is harmful. The stock and ...

  4. Cloudy Skies: Assessing Public Understanding of Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sterman, John

    2003-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Surveys show most Americans believe global warming is real. But many advocate delaying action until there is more evidence that warming is harmful. The stock and ...

  5. air warming system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from negative biases in total cloud amounts and biases in the location 2 Background: Global Warming, 2009 1. Unequivocally, the climate is warming. Natural systems are...

  6. Wildfires may contribute more to global warming than previously...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wildfires may contribute more to global warming Wildfires may contribute more to global warming than previously predicted They suggest that fire emissions could contribute a lot...

  7. Potential Effect of Pollutantn Emissions on Global Warming: First...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Potential Effect of Pollutantn Emissions on Global Warming: First Comparisong Using External Costs on Urban Buses Potential Effect of Pollutantn Emissions on Global Warming: First...

  8. aarhus warm ebis: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    including variations in solar output and cosmic ray intensity. Agw Anthropogenic; Global Warming 138 Global Warming: Connecting the Dots Multidisciplinary Databases and...

  9. Thermodynamic Evaluation of Low-Global Warming Potential Refrigerants...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Thermodynamic Evaluation of Low-Global Warming Potential Refrigerants - 2013 Peer Review Thermodynamic Evaluation of Low-Global Warming Potential Refrigerants - 2013 Peer Review...

  10. Working Fluids Low Global Warming Potential Refrigerants - 2013...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Working Fluids Low Global Warming Potential Refrigerants - 2013 Peer Review Working Fluids Low Global Warming Potential Refrigerants - 2013 Peer Review Emerging Technologies...

  11. Brooks Warm Springs Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomassSustainable and InnovativeBrookmont, Maryland: Energy Resources

  12. Warm Springs Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwide Permit webpageWalthall County,WanxiangWardellWarehamWarehouseOpen

  13. Warm Springs State Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwide Permit webpageWalthallFacility | Open Energy Information State

  14. Warm Springs Water District District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwide Permit webpageWalthallFacility | Open Energy Information

  15. Roosevelt Warm Springs Institute for Rehab. Space Heating Low Temperature

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to:

  16. Microclimatic Performance of a Free-Air Warming and CO2 Enrichment Experiment in Windy Wyoming, USA

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    LeCain, Daniel; Smith, David; Morgan, Jack; Kimball, Bruce A.; Pendall, Elise; Miglietta, Franco; Liang, Wenju

    2015-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to plan for global changing climate experiments are being conducted in many countries, but few have monitored the effects of the climate change treatments (warming, elevated CO2) on the experimental plot microclimate. During three years of an eight year study with year-round feedback-controlled infra-red heater warming (1.5/3.0癈 day/night) and growing season free-air CO2 enrichment (600 ppm) in the mixed-grass prairie of Wyoming, USA, we monitored soil, leaf, canopy-air, above-canopy-air temperatures and relative humidity of control and treated experimental plots and evaluated ecologically important temperature differentials. Leaves were warmed somewhat less than the target settings (1.1 & 1.5癈 day/night)more牷but soil was warmed more creating an average that matched the target settings extremely well both during the day and night plus the summer and winter. The site typically has about 50% bare or litter covered soil, therefore soil heat transfer is more critical than in dense canopy ecosystems. The Wyoming site commonly has strong winds (5 ms-1 average) and significant daily and seasonal temperature fluctuations (as much as 30癈 daily) but the warming system was nearly always able to maintain the set temperatures regardless of abiotic variation. The within canopy-air was only slightly warmed and above canopy-air was not warmed by the system, therefore convective warming was minor. Elevated CO2 had no direct effect nor interaction with the warming treatment on microclimate. Relative humidity within the plant canopy was only slightly reduced by warming. Soil water content was reduced by warming but increased by elevated CO2. This study demonstrates the importance of monitoring the microclimate in manipulative field global change experiments so that critical physiological and ecological conclusions can be determined. Highly variable energy demand fluctuations showed that passive IR heater warming systems will not maintain desired warming for much of the time.珷less

  17. Managing Warm-season Improved Pastures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stichler, Charles; Prostko, Eric P.; Livingston, Stephen

    1998-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    M anaging Warm-season Improved Pastures Charles Stichler, Eric Prostko, Steve Livingston* he quality and quantity of forage in pastures can vary greatly and are constantly changing throughout the year. The goal of forage management is to provide...

  18. Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Warm Dense Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a plasma. Therefore, to probe a warm dense state undergoing a nonreversible process, an ultrafast technique faster than the ALS pulse duration (70 ps) and a single-shot...

  19. Global Warming Effects on Us Hurricane Damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emanuel, Kerry Andrew

    While many studies of the effects of global warming on hurricanes predict an increase in various metrics of Atlantic basin-wide activity, it is less clear that this signal will emerge from background noise in measures of ...

  20. FIELD PERFORMANCE AND LABORATORY EVALUATION OF WARM MIX ASPHALT PRODUCED WITH RUBBERIZED BITUMEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    FIELD PERFORMANCE AND LABORATORY EVALUATION OF WARM MIX ASPHALT PRODUCED WITH RUBBERIZED BITUMEN of rubberized bitumen has been spread out mainly due to environmental aspects, but high mixing and compaction temperatures are necessary due to the higher viscosity of this bitumen. A WMA mixture (using a surfactant

  1. Shifts in ENSO coupling processes under global warming Sjoukje Philip1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    state of the Pacific Ocean between the current climate and a high CO2 climate. Next, shifts in ENSO warming may shift the properties and dynamics of El Nin~o. We study the shifts in ENSO couplings in IPCC couplings between sea surface temperature (SST), thermocline depth and wind stress are discussed. Although

  2. Earth's Energy Out of Balance: The Smoking Gun for Global Warming April, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    evaluated the energy imbalance using precise measurements of ocean temperature obtained by ocean floatsEarth's Energy Out of Balance: The Smoking Gun for Global Warming April, 2005 Scientists at Columbia University, NASA, and the Department of Energy have found that the Earth is out of energy balance

  3. Why hasn't earth warmed as much as expected?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, S.E.; Charlson, R.; Kahn, R.; Ogren, J.; Rodhe, H.

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The observed increase in global mean surface temperature (GMST) over the industrial era is less than 40% of that expected from observed increases in long-lived greenhouse gases together with the best-estimate equilibrium climate sensitivity given by the 2007 Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Possible reasons for this warming discrepancy are systematically examined here. The warming discrepancy is found to be due mainly to some combination of two factors: the IPCC best estimate of climate sensitivity being too high and/or the greenhouse gas forcing being partially offset by forcing by increased concentrations of atmospheric aerosols; the increase in global heat content due to thermal disequilibrium accounts for less than 25% of the discrepancy, and cooling by natural temperature variation can account for only about 15%. Current uncertainty in climate sensitivity is shown to preclude determining the amount of future fossil fuel CO2 emissions that would be compatible with any chosen maximum allowable increase in GMST; even the sign of such allowable future emissions is unconstrained. Resolving this situation by empirical determination of Earth抯 climate sensitivity from the historical record over the industrial period or through use of climate models whose accuracy is evaluated by their performance over this period is shown to require substantial reduction in the uncertainty of aerosol forcing over this period.

  4. CO2 Concentration Global warming is a hot topic these days. One of the factors that may explain increases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carriquiry, Alicia

    CO2 Concentration Global warming is a hot topic these days. One of the factors that may explain increases in global temperatures is the amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere. Is there a relationship between the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and global temperatures? Data Collection

  5. Long-term soil warming and Carbon Cycle Feedbacks to the Climate System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melillo, Jerry M.

    2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of the proposed research was to quantify and explain the effects of a sustained in situ 5oC soil temperature increase on net carbon (C) storage in a northeastern deciduous forest ecosystem. The research was done at an established soil warming experiment at the Harvard Forest in central Massachusetts Barre Woods site established in 2001. In the field, a series of plant and soil measurements were made to quantify changes in C storage in the ecosystem and to provide insights into the possible relationships between C-storage changes and nitrogen (N) cycling changes in the warmed plots. Field measurements included: 1) annual woody increment; 2) litterfall; 3) carbon dioxide (CO2) efflux from the soil surface; 4) root biomass and respiration; 5) microbial biomass; and 6) net N mineralization and net nitrification rates. This research was designed to increase our understanding of how global warming will affect the capacity of temperate forest ecosystems to store C. The work explored how soil warming changes the interactions between the C and N cycles, and how these changes affect land-atmosphere feedbacks. This core research question framed the project What are the effects of a sustained in situ 5oC soil temperature increase on net carbon (C) storage in a northeastern deciduous forest ecosystem? A second critical question was addressed in this research What are the effects of a sustained in situ 5{degrees}C soil temperature increase on nitrogen (N) cycling in a northeastern deciduous forest ecosystem?

  6. A WARM MODE OF GAS ACCRETION ON FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murante, Giuseppe [Osservatorio di Torino, Strada Osservatorio 20, I-10025, Pino Torinese (Tonga) (Italy); Calabrese, Matteo [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale 'Amedeo Avogadro', Universita degli Studi di Torino, Via P. Giuria 1, I-10125, Torino (Italy); De Lucia, Gabriella [I.N.A.F, Osservatorio di Trieste, Via Tiepolo 11, I- 34131, Trieste (Italy); Monaco, Pierluigi; Borgani, Stefano [Dipartimento di Fisica - Sezione di Astronomia, Universita di Trieste, via Tiepolo 11, I-34131 Trieste (Italy); Dolag, Klaus, E-mail: murante@oato.inaf.it, E-mail: monaco@oats.inaf.it, E-mail: borgani@oats.inaf.it, E-mail: calabrese@oato.inaf.it, E-mail: delucia@oats.inaf.it, E-mail: kdolag@mpa-garching.mpg.de [University Observatory Muenchen, Scheinerstr. 1, 81679, Muenchen (Germany)

    2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results from high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of a Milky-Way-sized halo, aimed at studying the effect of feedback on the nature of gas accretion. Simulations include a model of interstellar medium and star formation, in which supernova (SN) explosions provide effective thermal feedback. We distinguish between gas accretion onto the halo, which occurs when gas particles cross the halo virial radius, and gas accretion onto the central galaxy, which takes place when gas particles cross the inner one-tenth of the virial radius. Gas particles can be accreted through three different channels, depending on the maximum temperature value, T{sub max}, reached during the particles' past evolution: a cold channel for T{sub max} < 2.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} K, a hot one for T > 10{sup 6} K, and a warm one for intermediate values of T{sub max}. We find that the warm channel is at least as important as the cold one for gas accretion onto the central galaxy. This result is at variance with previous findings that the cold mode dominates gas accretion at high redshift. We ascribe this difference to the different SN feedback scheme implemented in our simulations. While results presented so far in the literature are based on uneffective SN thermal feedback schemes and/or the presence of a kinetic feedback, our simulations include only effective thermal feedback. We argue that observational detections of a warm accretion mode in the high-redshift circumgalactic medium would provide useful constraints on the nature of the feedback that regulates star formation in galaxies.

  7. Measure Guideline: Supplemental Dehumidification in Warm-Humid Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudd, A.

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document covers a description of the need and applied solutions for supplemental dehumidification in warm-humid climates, especially for energy efficient homes where the sensible cooling load has been dramatically reduced. In older homes in warm-humid climates, cooling loads are typically high and cooling equipment runs a lot to cool the air. The cooling process also removes indoor moisture, reducing indoor relative humidity. However, at current residential code levels, and especially for above-code programs, sensible cooling loads have been so dramatically reduced that the cooling system does not run a lot to cool the air, resulting in much less moisture being removed. In these new homes, cooling equipment is off for much longer periods of time especially during spring/fall seasons, summer shoulder months, rainy periods, some summer nights, and some winter days. In warm-humid climates, those long off periods allow indoor humidity to become elevated due to internally generated moisture and ventilation air change. Elevated indoor relative humidity impacts comfort, indoor air quality, and building material durability. Industry is responding with supplemental dehumidification options, but that effort is really in its infancy regarding year-round humidity control in low-energy homes. Available supplemental humidity control options are discussed. Some options are less expensive but may not control indoor humidity as well as more expensive and comprehensive options. The best performing option is one that avoids overcooling and avoids adding unnecessary heat to the space by using waste heat from the cooling system to reheat the cooled and dehumidified air to room-neutral temperature.

  8. "Hot" for Warm Water Cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    IBM Corporation; Energy Efficient HPC Working Group; Hewlett Packard Corporation; SGI; Cray Inc.; Intel Corporation; U.S. Army Engineer Research Development Center; Coles, Henry; Ellsworth, Michael; Martinez, David J.; Bailey, Anna-Maria; Banisadr, Farhad; Bates, Natalie; Coghlan, Susan; Cowley, David E.; Dube, Nicholas; Fields, Parks; Greenberg, Steve; Iyengar, Madhusudan; Kulesza, Peter R.; Loncaric, Josip; McCann, Tim; Pautsch, Greg; Patterson, Michael K.; Rivera, Richard G.; Rottman, Greg K.; Sartor, Dale; Tschudi, William; Vinson, Wade; Wescott, Ralph

    2011-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid cooling is key to reducing energy consumption for this generation of supercomputers and remains on the roadmap for the foreseeable future. This is because the heat capacity of liquids is orders of magnitude larger than that of air and once heat has been transferred to a liquid, it can be removed from the datacenter efficiently. The transition from air to liquid cooling is an inflection point providing an opportunity to work collectively to set guidelines for facilitating the energy efficiency of liquid-cooled High Performance Computing (HPC) facilities and systems. The vision is to use non-compressor-based cooling, to facilitate heat re-use, and thereby build solutions that are more energy-efficient, less carbon intensive and more cost effective than their air-cooled predecessors. The Energy Efficient HPC Working Group is developing guidelines for warmer liquid-cooling temperatures in order to standardize facility and HPC equipment, and provide more opportunity for reuse of waste heat. This report describes the development of those guidelines.

  9. Warm-Chaplygin inflationary universe model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergio del Campo; Ramon Herrera

    2008-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Warm inflationary universe models in the context of a Chaplygin gas equation are studied. General conditions required for these models to be realizable are derived and discussed. By using a chaotic potential we develop models for a dissipation coefficient of the form $\\Gamma\\propto \\phi^n$, with $n=0$ or $n\

  10. Warm-Logamediate inflationary universe model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrera, Ramon

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Warm inflationary universe models in the context of logamediate expansion are studied. General conditions required for these models to be realizable and discussed. This study is done in the weak and strong dissipative regimes. The parameters of our models are constrained from the observational data.

  11. Warm-Logamediate inflationary universe model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramon Herrera; Marco Olivares

    2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Warm inflationary universe models in the context of logamediate expansion are studied. General conditions required for these models to be realizable and discussed. This study is done in the weak and strong dissipative regimes. The parameters of our models are constrained from the observational data.

  12. Warm inflationary model in loop quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrera, Ramon [Instituto de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Avenida Brasil 2950, Casilla 4059, Valparaiso (Chile)

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A warm inflationary universe model in loop quantum cosmology is studied. In general we discuss the condition of inflation in this framework. By using a chaotic potential, V({phi}){proportional_to}{phi}{sup 2}, we develop a model where the dissipation coefficient {Gamma}={Gamma}{sub 0}=constant. We use recent astronomical observations for constraining the parameters appearing in our model.

  13. Persisting cold extremes under 21st-century warming scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kodra, Evan A [ORNL; Steinhaeuser, Karsten J K [ORNL; Ganguly, Auroop R [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analyses of climate model simulations and observations reveal that extreme cold events are likely to persist across each land-continent even under 21st-century warming scenarios. The grid-based intensity, duration and frequency of cold extreme events are calculated annually through three indices: the coldest annual consecutive three-day average of daily maximum temperature, the annual maximum of consecutive frost days, and the total number of frost days. Nine global climate models forced with a moderate greenhouse-gas emissions scenario compares the indices over 2091 2100 versus 1991 2000. The credibility of model-simulated cold extremes is evaluated through both bias scores relative to reanalysis data in the past and multi-model agreement in the future. The number of times the value of each annual index in 2091 2100 exceeds the decadal average of the corresponding index in 1991 2000 is counted. The results indicate that intensity and duration of grid-based cold extremes, when viewed as a global total, will often be as severe as current typical conditions in many regions, but the corresponding frequency does not show this persistence. While the models agree on the projected persistence of cold extremes in terms of global counts, regionally, inter-model variability and disparity in model performance tends to dominate. Our findings suggest that, despite a general warming trend, regional preparedness for extreme cold events cannot be compromised even towards the end of the century.

  14. Review: Air Pollution and Global Warming: History, Science, and Solutions, 2nd ed.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laberge, Yves

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review: Air Pollution and Global Warming: History, Science,Jacobson, Mark Z. Air Pollution and Global Warming: History,His timely book, Air Pollution and Global Warming: History,

  15. Review: Air Pollution and Global Warming: History, Science, and Solutions, 2nd ed.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laberge, Yves

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Air Pollution and Global Warming: History, Science, andZ. Air Pollution and Global Warming: History, Science, andAir Pollution and Global Warming: History, Science, and

  16. Is the Ozone Depletion Regime a Model for an Emerging Regime on Global Warming?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lang, Winfried

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the for- mation of a global warming regime produces a highlydepletion and the global warming regimes was recognized byan Emerging Regime on Global Warming? by Winfried Lang I.

  17. Editorial The Global Warming Fight is 揃ringing Sexy Back, Are You Ready?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jankowska, Marta Maja

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2006, September 25). Is global warming raising a tempest?or her behavior towards global warming in 2007. *Timberlake,Editorial: The Global Warming Fight is 揃ringing Sexy

  18. Rising Sea Levels Due to Global Warming Are Unstoppable

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rising Sea Levels Due to Global Warming Are Unstoppable Rising Sea Levels Due to Global Warming Are Unstoppable Mitigation can slow down but not prevent sea level rise for...

  19. Comparing the effects of greenhouse gas emissions on global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eckaus, Richard S.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Policies dealing with global warming require a measure of the effects of the emissions of greenhouse gases that create different magnitudes of instantaneous radiative forcing and have different lifetimes. The Global Warming ...

  20. Optimization of High-Volume Warm Forming for Lightweight Sheet...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-Volume Warm Forming for Lightweight Sheet Alloys Optimization of High-Volume Warm Forming for Lightweight Sheet Alloys 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle...

  1. The Once and Future Warm Earth: A Paleoceanographic View

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sukop, Mike

    The Once and Future Warm Earth: A Paleoceanographic View Dr. Ted C. Moore, Jr., University of Michigan Predictions of climatic warming in the near future, if true, will approximate the very warm--and ended. In the early and mid Eocene the Arctic Ocean was ice-free and subtropical flora and fauna were

  2. California Policy Should Distinguish Biofuels by Differential Global Warming Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    California Policy Should Distinguish Biofuels by Differential Global Warming Effects by Richard J: _______________________________________ Date #12;California Policy Should Distinguish Biofuels by Differential Global Warming Effects Richard J, 2006 #12;#12;ABSTRACT California Policy Should Distinguish Biofuels by Differential Global Warming

  3. Genetic shift in photoperiodic response correlated with global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cochran-Stafira, D. Liane

    Genetic shift in photoperiodic response correlated with global warming William E. Bradshaw observed in insects, birds, amphibians, and plants associated with global warm- ing during the latter half- tent with an adaptive evolutionary response to recent global warming. The latter half of the 20th

  4. Global Warming Time Bomb:* Actions Needed to Avert Disaster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    Global Warming Time Bomb:* Actions Needed to Avert Disaster James Hansen 26 October 2009 Club statements relating to policy are personal opinion Global Warming Status 1. Knowledge Gap Between - What Benefits of Solution Despite the publicity that global warming has received, there is a large gap between

  5. Global warming and body mass decline in Israeli passerine birds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yom-Tov, Yoram

    Global warming and body mass decline in Israeli passerine birds Yoram Yom-Tov Department of Zoology,Tel Aviv University,Tel Aviv 69978, Israel ( yomtov@post.tau.ac.il) Global warming may a隆ect the physiology in body mass and tarsus length are due to global warming and also in accordance with Bergmann's rule

  6. Separating Signal from Noise in Global Warming Bert W. Rust

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rust, Bert W.

    Separating Signal from Noise in Global Warming Bert W. Rust Reprinted from the CD Rust, B. W. (2003) "Separating Signal from Noise in Global Warming," Computing Science and Statistics, 35, 263-277. 颅 or 颅 Rust, B. W. (2003) "Separating Signal from Noise in Global Warming," Computing Science and Statistics, 35

  7. Communicating Dangers and Opportunities in Global Warming 13 December Draft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    Communicating Dangers and Opportunities in Global Warming 13 December Draft James Hansen American: "Subversion of Public Affairs Chart 7: The Global Warming Story C. Tenets of a Democracy: "An Informed Public, not as a spokesman for NASA There is a huge gap between what is understood about global warming and what is known

  8. Observationally based assessment of polar amplification of global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatt, Uma

    Observationally based assessment of polar amplification of global warming Igor V. Polyakov,1) are similar, and do not support the predicted polar amplification of global warming. The possible moderating amplification of global warming. Intrinsic arctic variability obscures long-term changes, limiting our ability

  9. WHAT'S IN A NAME? GLOBAL WARMING VERSUS CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Gary L.

    WHAT'S IN A NAME? GLOBAL WARMING VERSUS CLIMATE CHANGE May 2014 #12;What's In A Name? Global NATIONAL SURVEY STUDY 2: GLOBAL WARMING VS. CLIMATE CHANGE............................ 10 Is global?................................................................10 When you think of global warming / climate change, what comes first to mind

  10. GLOBAL WARMING: THE PSYCHOLOGY OF LONG TERM RISK Guest Editorial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Todorov, Alex

    GLOBAL WARMING: THE PSYCHOLOGY OF LONG TERM RISK Guest Editorial Beyond its objective basis in natural science, understanding, discussion, and res- olution of the policy issue labeled "global warming the global warming problem. In public discussion, natu- ral scientists tend to frame the issue through

  11. Global Warming 20 Years Later: Tipping Points Near

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    Global Warming 20 Years Later: Tipping Points Near Jim Hansen 23 June 2008 National Press Club, and House Select Committee on Energy Independence & Global Warming Washington, DC #12;1988 Testimony Has Big Effects Did Not Emphasize That Global Warming Enhances Both Extremes of Water Cycle - More

  12. The Logic of Global Warming A bitter pill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratt, Vaughan

    The Logic of Global Warming A bitter pill Vaughan Pratt Stanford University June 23, 2011 Vaughan PrattStanford University () The Logic of Global WarmingA bitter pill June 23, 2011 1 / 1 What is climate population growth. 2. Accumulation of hazardous materials: lead, mercury, CFCs, . . . 3. Global warming

  13. Strategies to Address Global Warming Is Sundance Kid a Criminal?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    Strategies to Address Global Warming & Is Sundance Kid a Criminal? Jim Hansen In my opinion, it is still feasible to solve the global warming problem before we pass tipping points that would guarantee ppm yields global warming about 2掳C (3.6掳F) above the preindustrial level. Such a level of atmospheric

  14. Carbon Dioxide, Global Warming, and Michael Crichton's "State of Fear"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rust, Bert W.

    Carbon Dioxide, Global Warming, and Michael Crichton's "State of Fear" Bert W. Rust Mathematical- tioned the connection between global warming and increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide by pointing out of these plots to global warming have spilled over to the real world, inviting both praise [4, 17] and scorn [15

  15. Infrared absorption spectra, radiative efficiencies, and global warming potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Infrared absorption spectra, radiative efficiencies, and global warming potentials of newly.mdpi.com/journal/atmosphere Article Infrared Absorption Spectra, Radiative Efficiencies, and Global Warming Potentials of Newly of 600颅1730 cm-1 . These spectra are then used to calculate the radiative efficiencies and global warming

  16. Measuring evolutionary responses to global warming: cautionary lessons from Drosophila

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodr铆guez, Miguel 脕ngel

    Measuring evolutionary responses to global warming: cautionary lessons from Drosophila FRANCISCO. Understanding evolutionary responses to global climate warming can be daunt- ingly complex. But, primarily of the magnitude of long-term responses to global warming; standardising by equivalent seasonal tem- perature

  17. Possible global warming futures Minh Ha-Duong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Possible global warming futures Minh Ha-Duong Minh.Ha.Duong@cmu.edu CNRS, France HDGC, Carnegie Mellon Possible global warming futures 颅 p.1/36 #12;SRES: Forecasts or scenarios? +5.5 C in 2100 the controversy using imprecise probabilities, a more general information theory. . . Possible global warming

  18. Global warming potentials and radiative efficiencies of halocarbons and related

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Global warming potentials and radiative efficiencies of halocarbons and related compounds 7A=E472C43AD.A0794E 0794E:CA27C725 AD383CADE64E7 #12;1 Global Warming Potentials and Radiative of REs and global39 warming potentials (GWPs) for these compounds, mostly employing atmospheric lifetimes

  19. The global warming signal is the average of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Peter JS

    , uncertainty in the isopycnal diffusivity causes uncertainty of up to 50% in the global warming signalThe global warming signal is the average of years 70-80 in the increasing CO2 run minus the average represent significant uncertainty in the global warming signal (Fig. 5). The differences at high latitudes

  20. Estimating present climate in a warming world: a model-based approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raeisaenen, J.; Ruokolainen, L. [University of Helsinki (Finland). Division of Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysics

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Weather services base their operational definitions of 'present' climate on past observations, using a 30-year normal period such as 1961-1990 or 1971-2000. In a world with ongoing global warming, however, past data give a biased estimate of the actual present-day climate. Here we propose to correct this bias with a 'delta change' method, in which model-simulated climate changes and observed global mean temperature changes are used to extrapolate past observations forward in time, to make them representative of present or future climate conditions. In a hindcast test for the years 1991-2002, the method works well for temperature, with a clear improvement in verification statistics compared to the case in which the hindcast is formed directly from the observations for 1961-1990. However, no improvement is found for precipitation, for which the signal-to-noise ratio between expected anthropogenic changes and interannual variability is much lower than for temperature. An application of the method to the present (around the year 2007) climate suggests that, as a geographical average over land areas excluding Antarctica, 8-9 months per year and 8-9 years per decade can be expected to be warmer than the median for 1971-2000. Along with the overall warming, a substantial increase in the frequency of warm extremes at the expense of cold extremes of monthly-to-annual temperature is expected.

  1. Warm-Intermediate inflationary universe model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergio del Campo; Ramon Herrera

    2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Warm inflationary universe models in the context of intermediate expansion, between power law and exponential, are studied. General conditions required for these models to be realizable are derived and discussed. This study is done in the weak and strong dissipative regimes. The inflaton potentials considered in this study are negative-power-law and powers of logarithms, respectively. The parameters of our models are constrained from the WMAP three and five year data.

  2. Global warming, bad weather, insurance losses and the global economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Low, N.C. [UOB Life Assurance Ltd., Singapore (Singapore); Shen, S. [Global Warming International Center, Woodridge, IL (United States)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global warming causes extremely bad weather in the near term. The impact on the insurance industry is described. Why global warming in the near term causes very bad weather is explained. The continuing trend of very bad weather and the future impact on the insurance industry is explored. How very bad weather can affect the global financial market is explained. Taking a historical view of the development of the modern economy, the authors describe in the near term the impact of global warming on the global economy. The long term impact of global warming on the global economy and the human race is explored. Opportunities presented by global warming are described.

  3. 130 LPW 1000 Lm Warm White LED for Illumination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soer, Wouter

    2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An illumination-grade warm-white LED, having correlated color temperature (CCT) between 2700 and 3500 K and capable of producing 1000 lm output at over 130 lm/W at room temperature, has been developed in this program. The high-power warm-white LED is an ideal source for use in indoor and outdoor lighting applications. Over the two year period, we have made the following accomplishments: Developed a low-cost high-power white LED package and commercialized a series of products with CCT ranging from 2700 to 5700 K under the product name LUXEON M; Demonstrated a record efficacy of 124.8 lm/W at a flux of 1023 lm, CCT of 3435 K and color rendering index (CRI) over 80 at room temperature in the productized package; Demonstrated a record efficacy of 133.1 lm/W at a flux of 1015 lm, CCT of 3475 K and CRI over 80 at room temperature in an R&D package. The new high-power LED package is a die-on-ceramic surface mountable LED package. It has four 2 mm2 InGaN pump dice, flip-chip attached to a ceramic submount in a 2x2 array configuration. The submount design utilizes a design approach that combines a high-thermal- conductivity ceramic core for die attach and a low-cost and low-thermal-conductivity ceramic frame for mechanical support and as optical lens carrier. The LED package has a thermal resistance of less than 1.25 K/W. The white LED fabrication also adopts a new batch level (instead of die-by-die) phosphor deposition process with precision layer thickness and composition control, which provides not only tight color control, but also low cost. The efficacy performance goal was achieved through the progress in following key areas: (1) high-efficiency royal blue pump LED development through active region design and epitaxial growth quality improvement (funded by internal programs); (2) improvement in extraction efficiency from the LED package through improvement of InGaN-die-level and package-level optical extraction efficiency; and (3) improvement in phosphor system efficiency by improving the lumen equivalent (LE) and phosphor package efficiency (PPE) through improvement in phosphor-package interactions. The high-power warm-white LED product developed has been proven to have good reliability through extensive reliability tests. The new kilo-lumen package has been commercialized under the product name LUXEON M. As of the end of the program, the LUXEON M product has been released in the following CCT/CRI combinations: 3000K/70, 4000K/70, 5000K/70, 5700K/70, 2700K/80, 3000K/80 and 4000K/80. LM-80 tests for the products with CCTs of 4000 K and higher have reached 8500 hours, and per IESNA TM-21-11 have established an L70 lumen maintenance value of >51,000 hours at A drive current and up to 120 癈 board temperature.

  4. Warm Water Oxidation Verification - Scoping and Stirred Reactor Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braley, Jenifer C.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Scoping tests to evaluate the effects of agitation and pH adjustment on simulant sludge agglomeration and uranium metal oxidation at {approx}95 C were performed under Test Instructions(a,b) and as per sections 5.1 and 5.2 of this Test Plan prepared by AREVA. (c) The thermal testing occurred during the week of October 4-9, 2010. The results are reported here. For this testing, two uranium-containing simulant sludge types were evaluated: (1) a full uranium-containing K West (KW) container sludge simulant consisting of nine predominant sludge components; (2) a 50:50 uranium-mole basis mixture of uraninite [U(IV)] and metaschoepite [U(VI)]. This scoping study was conducted in support of the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) Phase 2 technology evaluation for the treatment and packaging of K-Basin sludge. The STP is managed by CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) for the U.S. Department of Energy. Warm water ({approx}95 C) oxidation of sludge, followed by immobilization, has been proposed by AREVA and is one of the alternative flowsheets being considered to convert uranium metal to UO{sub 2} and eliminate H{sub 2} generation during final sludge disposition. Preliminary assessments of warm water oxidation have been conducted, and several issues have been identified that can best be evaluated through laboratory testing. The scoping evaluation documented here was specifically focused on the issue of the potential formation of high strength sludge agglomerates at the proposed 95 C process operating temperature. Prior hydrothermal tests conducted at 185 C produced significant physiochemical changes to genuine sludge, including the formation of monolithic concretions/agglomerates that exhibited shear strengths in excess of 100 kPa (Delegard et al. 2007).

  5. Effects of experimental warming and clipping on metabolic change of microbial community in a US Great Plains tallgrass prairie

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Jianping; Liu, Xinxing; Liu, Xueduan; Nostrand, Joy D. Van; Deng, Ye; Wu, Liyou; He, Zhili; Qiu, Guanzhou; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    While more and more studies are being conducted on the effects of global warming, little is known regarding the response of metabolic change of whole soil microbial communities to this phenomenon. In this study, functional gene changes at the mRNA level were analyzed by our new developed GeoChip 3.0. Soil samples were taken from a long-term climate warming experiment site, which has been conducted for ~;;8 years at the Kessler Farm Field Laboratory, a 137.6-ha farm located in the Central Redbed Plains, in McClain County, Oklahoma. The experiment uses a paired factorial design with warming as the primary factor nested with clipping as a secondary factor. An infrared heater was used to simulate global warming, and clipping was used to mimic mowing hay. Twelve 2m x 2m plots were divided into six pairs of warmed and control plots. The heater generates a constant output of ~;;100 Watts m-2 to approximately 2 oC increase in soil temperature above the ambient plots, which is at the low range of the projected climate warming by IPCC. Soil whole microbial communities? mRNA was extracted, amplified, labeled and hybridized with our GeoChip 3.0, a functional gene array covering genes involved in N, C, P, and S cycling, metal resistance and contaminant degradation, to examine expressed genes. The results showed that a greater number and higher diversity of genes were expressed under warmed plots compared to control. Detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) of all detected genes showed that the soil microbial communities were clearly altered by warming, with or without clipping. The dissimilarity of the communities based on functional genes was tested and results showed that warming and control communities were significantly different (P<0.05), with or without clipping. Most genes involved in C, N, P and S cycling were expressed at higher levels in warming samples compared to control samples. All of the results demonstrated that the whole microbial communities increase functional gene expression under warming with or without clipping in order to adapt the changed out environment. More detail analysis is underway.

  6. Warm wave breaking of nonlinear plasma waves with arbitrary phase velocities C. B. Schroeder, E. Esarey, and B. A. Shadwick

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    Warm wave breaking of nonlinear plasma waves with arbitrary phase velocities C. B. Schroeder, E, collisionless plasma is developed to analyze nonlinear plasma waves excited by intense drive beams. The maximum amplitude and wavelength are calculated for nonrelativistic plasma temperatures and arbitrary plasma wave

  7. Warm-polytropic inflationary universe model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Setare, M R; Kamali, V

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present paper we study warm inflationary universe models in the context of a polytropic gas. We derive the characteristics of this model in slow-roll approximation and develop our model in two cases, 1- For a constant dissipative parameter $\\Gamma$. 2- $\\Gamma$ as a function of scalar field $\\phi$. In these cases we will obtain exact solution for the scalar field and Hubble parameter. We will also obtain explicit expressions for the tensor-scalar ratio $R$, scalar spectrum index $n_s$ and its running $\\alpha_s$, in slow-roll approximation.

  8. Warm-polytropic inflationary universe model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. R. Setare; M. J. S. Houndjo; V. Kamali

    2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present paper we study warm inflationary universe models in the context of a polytropic gas. We derive the characteristics of this model in slow-roll approximation and develop our model in two cases, 1- For a constant dissipative parameter $\\Gamma$. 2- $\\Gamma$ as a function of scalar field $\\phi$. In these cases we will obtain exact solution for the scalar field and Hubble parameter. We will also obtain explicit expressions for the tensor-scalar ratio $R$, scalar spectrum index $n_s$ and its running $\\alpha_s$, in slow-roll approximation.

  9. Warm or Steaming Ground | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwide Permit webpageWalthallFacility | Open Energy InformationWarm

  10. Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Warm Dense Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin TransitionProgram |FrankUltrafast Spectroscopy of Warm Dense Matter

  11. Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Warm Dense Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin TransitionProgram |FrankUltrafast Spectroscopy of Warm Dense

  12. Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Warm Dense Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin TransitionProgram |FrankUltrafast Spectroscopy of Warm

  13. Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Warm Dense Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin TransitionProgram |FrankUltrafast Spectroscopy of WarmUltrafast

  14. alternating temperature preculture: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A; Moi, L 2013-01-01 3 Warm Humid Climate: Methodology to Study Air Temperature Distribution: Mobile Phones Base Stations as Viable Alternative for Fixed Points Texas A&M...

  15. Valuation of mountain glaciation response on global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ananicheva, M.D.; Davidovich, N.V. [Institute of Geography, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantitative estimates of main climatic parameters, influencing the glacier regime (summer air temperature and annual solid precipitation), and glaciologic characteristics (mass balance components, equilibrium line altitude and rate of air temperature at this height), received on the basis of the scenario for a climate development according to R. Wetherald and S. Manabe (1982) are submitted. The possible reaction of mountain glaciation on global warming is considered for two mountain countries: South-eastern Alaska and Pamir-Alay (Central Asia). In given paper we have tried to evaluate changes of the mountain glaciation regime for a time of CO{sub 2} doubling in the atmosphere, basing on the scenario of climate development and modern statistical relationships between climatic and glaciologic parameters. The GCM scenario of R. Wetherald and C. Manabe (GFDL model) which is made with respect of mountain territories is in the basis our calculations. As initial materials we used data of long-term observations and the maps of World Atlas of Snow and Ice Resources (WASIR).

  16. Statistical Analysis and Time Series Models for Minimum/Maximum Temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sidorov, Nikita

    temperatures, thereby reducing the adverse effect of global warming in the Antarctic Peninsula. Keywords that the observed increase in the minimum temperatures is a consequence of human activity rather than natural causes

  17. Modulational instability of ion acoustic wave with warm ions in electron-positron-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahmood, S. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Department of Physics and Applied Mathematics, PIEAS, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Siddiqui, Sadiya [Department of Physics and Applied Mathematics, PIEAS, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Jehan, Nusrat [Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission, P.O. Box 1114, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)

    2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The nonlinear amplitude modulation of ion acoustic wave is studied in the presence of warm ions in unmagnetized electron-positron-ion plasmas. The Krylov-Bogoliubov-Mitropolsky (KBM) method is used to derive the nonlinear Schroedinger equation. The dispersive and nonlinear coefficients are obtained which depends on the ion temperature and positron density in electron-positron-ion plasmas. The modulationally stable and unstable regions are studied numerically for a wide range of wave number. It is found that both ion temperature and positron density play a significant role in the formation of bright and dark envelope solitons in electron-positron-ion plasmas.

  18. Global warming potentials and radiative efficiencies of halocarbons and related

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Global warming potentials and radiative efficiencies of halocarbons and related compounds4599857392 CentAUR #7326E125C47E3E3C7E=472B43!E.E07D4 07D4:BE27B725CE9393BE647 #12;GLOBAL WARMING POTENTIALS. In addition, we provide a comprehensive and self-consistent set of new calculations of REs and global warming

  19. Progress toward Biomass and Coal-Derived Syngas Warm Cleanup...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Progress toward Biomass and Coal-Derived Syngas Warm Cleanup: Proof-of-Concept Process Demonstration of Multicontaminant Removal Progress toward Biomass and Coal-Derived Syngas...

  20. Potential Effect of Pollutantn Emissions on Global Warming: First...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    E. JOUBERT & G.PLASSAT, August 2004 Pollutants Emissions Global warming Potential Effect First Comparison using External Costs on Urban Buses Gabriel PLASSAT, ADEME French Agency...

  1. A pulsed power hydrodynamics approach to exploring properties of warm dense matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reinovsky, Robert Emil [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pulsed Power Hydrodynamics, as an application of low-impedance, pulsed power, and high magnetic field technology developed over the last decade to study advanced hydrodynamic problems, instabilities, turbulence, and material properties, can potentially be applied to the study of the behavior and properties of warm dense matter (WDM) as well. Exploration of the properties, such as equation of state and conductivity, of warm dense matter is an emerging area of study focused on the behavior of matter at density near solid density (from 10% of solid density to a few times solid density) and modest temperatures ({approx}1-10 eV). Warm dense matter conditions can be achieved by laser or particle beam heating of very small quantities of matter on timescales short compared to the subsequent hydrodynamic expansion timescales (isochoric heating) and a vigorous community of researchers is applying these techniques using petawatt scale laser systems, but the microscopic size scale of the WDM produced in this way limits access to some physics phenomena. Pulsed power hydrodynamics techniques, either through high convergence liner compression of a large volume, modest density, low temperature plasma to densities approaching solid density or through the explosion and subsequent expansion of a conductor (wire) against a high pressure (density) gas background (isobaric expansion) techniques both offer the prospect for producing warm dense matter in macroscopic quantities. However, both techniques demand substantial energy, proper power conditioning and delivery, and an understanding of the hydrodynamic and instability processes that limit each technique. Similarly, liner compression of normal density material, perhaps using multiple reflected shocks can provide access to the challenging region above normal density -- again with the requirement of very large amounts of driving energy. In this paper we will provide an introduction to techniques that might be applied to explore this interesting new application of the energy-rich technology of pulse power and high magnetic fields.

  2. The dynamic response of high Arctic glaciers to global warming and their contribution to sea-level rise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lam, J.K.W. [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom). Scott Polar Research Inst.; Dowdeswell, J.A. [Univ. of Wales (United Kingdom)

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulations with General Circulation Models have indicated that global warming will be enhanced at high latitudes. Regions in the high Arctic are highly sensitive to increased concentrations of greenhouse gases, with an amplified theoretical rise of 8--14 C predicted to take place in winter and a negligible rise of 2 C in summer. Wetter conditions in these regions are quite plausible with global warming due to warmer sea surface temperatures, melting of sea ice and a greater moisture holding capacity of the atmosphere. Recent observations show a marked increase in precipitation in the high Arctic regions during the past decades, particularly in the winters. The notion of whether the increased melting of snow due to global warming would be offset by increased snowfall is investigated in this study. To make reliable predictions of the response of high Arctic glaciers to global warming and hence their contribution to sea-level rise, a numerical model has been developed to investigate the interactions of the glaciers with climate change induced by global warming. The model is a one-dimensional numerical ice-flow model coupled with a surface balance model. Accumulation and ablation at the glacier surface are determined by the surface balance model using an energy balance approach.

  3. Q&A on "Impacts of Wind Farms on Land Surface Temperature" Published by Nature Climate Change on April 29, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Liming

    1 Q&A on "Impacts of Wind Farms on Land Surface Temperature" Published by Nature Climate Change? This study presents the first observational evidence of wind farm impacts on land surface temperature downwind of wind farms. Why do the operating wind turbines warm nighttime temperature? This warming effect

  4. f4: Facebook's Warm BLOB Storage System Subramanian Muralidhar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Govindan, Ramesh

    f4: Facebook's Warm BLOB Storage System Subramanian Muralidhar , Wyatt Lloyd , Sabyasachi Roy , Sanjeev Kumar Facebook Inc., University of Southern California, Princeton University Abstract Facebook, and datacenter failures; and provides sufficient throughput for warm BLOBs. 1. Introduction As Facebook has grown

  5. When Weather Warms, Water Wises Control No. #2281

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrow, James A.

    . In the next century, the most important result of this global warming will be the melting of the polar ice caps and the associated rise in sea levels. We develop a model for global climate change, with both . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 7 Effect of global warming on the state of Florida 14 7.1 Previously conjectured effects

  6. The Apollo Alliance: How Global Warming Can Save

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    The Apollo Alliance: How Global Warming Can Save Democracy Joel Rogers UW-Madison, COWS, JR Commons. #12;I really wonder about power point sometimes #12;Global warming and Apollo #12;The end (orange) in recent years. Source: Arctic Climate Impact Assessment #12;Global Climate Disruption 路 Carbon

  7. Decision-making in Electricity Generation Based on Global Warming Potential and Life-cycle Assessment for Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horvath, Arpad

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the global warming effect associated with electricityin Electricity Generation Based on Global Warming Potentialin Electricity Generation Based on Global Warming Potential

  8. Global Warming: What It Is What Is Controversial About It and What We Might Do in Response to It

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botkin, Daniel B.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    along coasts. If global warming occurs, many environmentalSee, eg. , S. SCHNEIDER, GLOBAL WARMING: ARE WE ENTERING THETRANSITION (1989); Roberts, Global Warming: Blaming The Sun,

  9. Will U.S. Agriculture Really Benefit from Global Warming? Accounting for Irrigation in the Hedonic Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlenker, Wolfram; Hanemann, W. Michael; Fisher, Anthony C.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Really Benefit from Global Warming? Accounting forR. , 揟he Impact of Global Warming on Agriculture: Comment,371411. , 揟he Impact of Global Warming on Agriculture: A

  10. Bull Trout Distribution and Abundance in the Waters on and Bordering the Warm Springs Reservation : 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brun, Christopher V.; Dodson, Rebekah

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The range of bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in the Deschutes River basin has decreased from historic levels due to many factors including dam construction, habitat degradation, brook trout introduction and eradication efforts. While the bull trout population appears to be healthy in the Metolius River-Lake Billy Chinook system they have been largely extirpated from the upper Deschutes River (Buchanan et al. 1997). Little was known about bull trout in the lower Deschutes basin until BPA funded project No.9405400 began during 1998. In this progress report we describe the findings to date from this multi-year study aimed at determining the life history, habitat needs and limiting factors of bull trout in the lower Deschutes subbasin. Juvenile bull trout and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) relative abundance has been assessed in the Warm Springs River and Shitike Creek since 1999. In the Warm Springs R. the relative densities of juvenile bull trout and brook trout were .003 fish/m{sup 2} and .001 fish/m{sup 2} respectively during 2002. These densities were the lowest recorded in the Warm Springs River during the period of study. In Shitike Cr. the relative densities of juvenile bull trout and brook trout were .025 fish/m{sup 2} and .01 fish/m{sup 2} respectively during 2002. The utility of using index reaches to monitor trends in juvenile bull trout and brook trout relative abundance in the Warm Springs R. has been assessed since 1999. During 2002 the mean relative densities of juvenile bull trout within the 2.4 km study area was higher than what was observed in four index reaches. However, the mean relative densities of brook trout was slightly higher in the index reaches than what was observed in the 2.4 km study area. Habitat use by both juvenile bull trout and brook trout was determined in the Warm Springs R. Juvenile bull trout and brook trout were most abundant in pools and glides. However pools and glides comprised less than 20% of the available habitat in the study area during 2002. Multiple-pass spawning ground surveys were conducted during late August through October in the Warm Springs R. and Shitike Cr. during 2002. One-hundred and thirteen (113) redds were enumerated in the Warm Springs R. and 204 redds were found in Shitike Cr. The number of redds enumerated in both the Warm Springs R. and Shitike Cr. were the most redds observed since surveys began in 1998. Spatial and temporal distribution in spawning within the Warm Springs R. and Shitike Cr. is discussed. Juvenile emigration has been monitored in Shitike Creek since 1996. A total of 312 juveniles were estimated to have emigrated from Shitike Cr. during the spring, 2002. Adult escapement was monitored in the Warm Springs R. and Shitike Cr. Thirty adults were recorded at the Warm Springs National Fish Hatchery weir during 2002. This was the highest number of spawning adults recorded to date. A weir equipped with an underwater video camera near the spawning grounds was operated in the Warm Springs R. Thirty-one adults were recorded at the weir in day counts. The adult trap in Shitike Cr. was unsuccessful in capturing adult bull trout during 2002 due to damage from a spring high water event. Thermographs were placed throughout Warm Springs R. and Shitike Cr. to monitor water temperatures during bull trout migration, holding and spawning/rearing periods. During 1999-2002 water temperatures ranged from 11.8-15.4 C near the mouths during adult migration; 11.4-14.6 C during pre-spawning holding; and 6.5-8.4 C during adult spawning and juvenile rearing.

  11. Investigation of stopping power for deuterons in partially ionized warm Al plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Bin, E-mail: hebin-rc@163.com; Wang, Jian-Guo [Data center for high energy density physics research, Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The stopping powers for deuterons in Al plasmas with a fixed density of 0.02?g/cm{sup 3} and the temperatures at 4.5, 13, and 17?eV are studied in detail for a wide projectile energy range with different models. Comparison of these models indicates that our model is totally in best agreement with the experimental data and the main reason for this is that our calculation for the inelastic processes should be the most reliable. It is found that the difference between our model and the local density approximation model (Wang et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 2977 (1998)) is mainly due to the quite different physical picture behind them. In Mehlhorn's model (J. Appl. Phys. 52, 6522 (1981)), the Bethe equation is found to overestimate the inelastic stopping in Al plasmas, meanwhile, it is gradually close to our results with temperature decreasing. The model by classical dielectric function with the choice of the maximum of the momentum transfer associated with the temperature is found not suitable to describe the stopping in warm plasmas. With temperature increasing the stopping due to plasma wave rises up which rapidly exceeds the inelastic stopping in warm Al plasmas.

  12. Review: The Global Warming Reader: A Century of Writing About Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Byron P.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review: The Global Warming Reader: A Century of WritingMcKibben, Bill, ed. The Global Warming Reader: A Century ofrecord of no action on global warming. Those who have done

  13. Review: Behind the Curve: Science and the Politics of Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Ryder W.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    realities of global warming history and contemporary climatemoral discussions about global warming at home that gives meScience and the Politics of Global Warming By Joshua P. Howe

  14. Global warming from chlorofluorocarbons and their alternatives: Time scales of chemistry and climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ko, Malcolm K.W.; Sze, Nien Dak; Molnar, Gyula; Prather, Michael J

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and their replacements on global warming. Nature Hansen J. ,gas emissions to global warming. Nature London Amendment toNature 315, 649-652, Global warming time scales WMO (World

  15. Review: Air Pollution and Global Warming: History, Science, and Solutions, 2nd ed.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laberge, Yves

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review: Air Pollution and Global Warming: History, Science,Jacobson, Mark Z. Air Pollution and Global Warming: History,and hazards related to pollution, Professor Mark Z. Jacobson

  16. Halo Formation in Warm Dark Matter Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul Bode; Jeremiah P. Ostriker; Neil Turok

    2001-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Discrepancies have emerged between the predictions of standard cold dark matter (CDM) theory and observations of clustering on sub-galactic scales. Warm dark matter (WDM) is a simple modification of CDM in which the dark matter particles have initial velocities due either to their having decoupled as thermal relics, or having been formed via non-equilibrium decay. We investigate the nonlinear gravitational clustering of WDM with a high resolution N-body code, and identify a number of distinctive observational signatures. Relative to CDM, halo concentrations and core densities are lowered, core radii are increased, and large halos emerge with far fewer low mass satellites. The number of small halos is suppressed, and those present are formed by `top down' fragmentation of caustics, as part of a `cosmic web' connecting massive halos. Few small halos form outside this web. If we identify small halos with dwarf galaxies, their number, spatial distribution, and formation epoch appear in better agreement with the observations for WDM than they are for CDM.

  17. A sensitivity study of the thermodynamic environment on GFDL model hurricane intensity: Implications for global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, W.; Tuleya, R.E.; Ginis, I.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, the effect of thermodynamic environmental changes on hurricane intensity is extensively investigated with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory hurricane model for a suite of experiments with different initial upper-tropospheric temperature anomalies up to {+-}4 C and sea surface temperatures ranging from 26 to 31 C given the same relative humidity profile. The results indicate that stabilization in the environmental atmosphere and sea surface temperature (SST) increase cause opposing effects on hurricane intensity. The offsetting relationship between the effects of atmospheric stability increase (decrease) and SST increase (decrease) is monotonic and systematic in the parameter space. This implies that hurricane intensity increase due to a possible global warming associated with increased CO{sub 2} is considerably smaller than that expected from warming of the oceanic waters alone. The results also indicate that the intensity of stronger (weaker) hurricanes is more (less) sensitive to atmospheric stability and SST changes. The model-attained hurricane intensity is found to be well correlated with the maximum surface evaporation and the large-scale environmental convective available potential energy. The model-attained hurricane intensity if highly correlated with the energy available from wet-adiabatic ascent near the eyewall relative to a reference sounding in the undisturbed environment for all the experiments. Coupled hurricane-ocean experiments show that hurricane intensity becomes less sensitive to atmospheric stability and SST changes since the ocean coupling causes larger (smaller) intensity reduction for stronger (weaker) hurricanes. This implies less increase of hurricane intensity related to a possible global warming due to increased CO{sub 2}.

  18. Philips Lumileds Develops a Low-Cost, High-Power, Warm-White LED Package

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With the help of DOE funding, Philips Lumileds has developed a low-cost, high-power, warm-white LED package for general illumination. During the course of the two-year project, this package was used to commercialize a series of products with correlated color temperatures (CCTs) ranging from 2700 to 5700 K, under the product name LUXEON M. A record efficacy of nearly 125 lm/W was demonstrated at a flux of 1023 lumens, a CCT of 3435 K, and a color rendering index (CRI) of more than 80 at room temperature in the productized package. In an R&D package, a record efficacy of more than 133 lm/W at a flux of 1015 lumens, a CCT of 3475 K, and a CRI greater than 80 at room temperature were demonstrated.

  19. Asymmetry of Daily Temperature Records YOSEF ASHKENAZY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tziperman, Eli

    Asymmetry of Daily Temperature Records YOSEF ASHKENAZY Solar Energy and Environmental Physics, BIDR author address: Yosef Ashkenazy, Department of Solar Energy and Environmental Physics, The J. Blaustein cold fronts are significantly faster and steeper than warm fronts, and to intrusions of cold air

  20. Large amplitude solitary waves in a warm magnetoplasma with kappa distributed electrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Tantawy, S. A. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Port Said University, Port Said 42521 (Egypt); El-Bedwehy, N. A. [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, Damietta University, New Damietta 34517 (Egypt); Abd El-Razek, H. N. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Damietta University, New Damietta 34517 (Egypt); Mahmood, S. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); National Centre for Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The large amplitude nonlinear ion acoustic solitary wave propagating obliquely to an external magnetic field in a magnetized plasma with kappa distributed electrons and warm ions is investigated through deriving energy-balance-like expression involving a Sagdeev potential. Analytical and numerical calculations of the values of Mach number reveal that both of subsonic and supersonic electrostatic solitary structures can exist in this system. The influence on the soliton characteristics of relevant physical parameters such as the Mach number, the superthermal parameter, the directional cosine, the ratio of ion-to-electron temperature, and the ion gyrofrequency has been investigated.

  1. The effect of global warming on U.S. agriculture and its variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Qifen

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that the temperature and precipitation changes would reduce average farm values in the U. S. However, the analysis did not factor in all the likely effects of global warming on agriculture, and therefore, the economic results were very limited. In this study, a... yields and the resultant market effects. Thus, the climate-induced-yield risk will be incorporated into the U. S. agricultural sector model in an effort to reflect the importance of such risk consideration in the economic analysis of global climate...

  2. Probing warm dense lithium by inelastic X-ray scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    of warm dense matter states has practical applications for controlled thermonuclear fusion, where, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, OX11 0QX, UK 4 Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics

  3. Plants reverse warming effect on ecosystem water balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zavaleta, Erika

    ; and Carnegie Institution of Washington, 260 Panama Street, Stanford, CA 94305 Edited by W. G. Ernst, Stanford. Since November 1998, we have exposed these plots to simulated warming (80 W m-2 of thermal radiation

  4. Environmental Impact on Applied Technology- Global Warming CFCs & VOCs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, J. S.

    Hardly a day goes by that the threats to our environment are not brought to our attention. Whether you are following oil spills, groundwater contamination, global warming, chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) or volatile organic compounds (VOCs), you must...

  5. Are You Keeping Warm This Winter? | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    your heating options to warm your home while saving money. Last week, I turned on the weather forecast to find that the entire central United States was hovering somewhere between...

  6. The variability of warm absorbers in Active Galactic Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibson, Robert R. (Robert Ross)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents three studies of warm (photoionized) absorber variability in Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) using high-resolution X-ray spectra provided by the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating (HETG). The first ...

  7. americas warm water: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2012. Yale University and George Mason and Costs of Reducing Fossil Fuel Use and Global Warming 8 The Alarmed 9 The Concerned 10 The Cautious 11 Haller, Gary L. 2...

  8. GUT Cosmic Magnetic Fields in a Warm Inflationary Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arjun Berera; Thomas W. Kephart; Stuart D. Wick

    1998-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Sources of magnetic fields from grand unified theories are studied in the warm inflation regime. A ferromagnetic Savvidy vacuum scenario is presented that yields observationally interesting large scale magnetic fields. As an intermediate step, a general analysis is made of defect production at the onset of warm inflation and monopole constraints are obtained. Many features of this Savvidy vacuum scenario are applicable within a supercooled inflation regime and these points are discussed.

  9. Control optimization of the cryoplant warm compressor station for EAST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhuang, M.; Hu, L. B.; Zhou, Z. W.; Xia, G. H. [Cryogenic Engineering Division, Institute of Plasma Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O.Box 1126,Shushanhu Road 350, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The cryogenic control system for EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak) was designed based on DeltaV DCS of Emerson Corporation. The automatic control of the cryoplant warm compressors has been implemented. However, with ever-degrading performance of critical equipment, the cryoplant operation in the partial design conditions makes the control system fluctuate and unstable. In this paper, the warm compressor control system was optimized to eliminate the pressure oscillation based on the expert PID theory.

  10. Consistency of the tachyon warm inflationary universe models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Xiao-Min

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The consistency of the tachyon warm inflationary models is studied. We perform a linear stability analysis to give the slow-roll conditions characterized by the potential slow-roll (PSR) parameters for the existence of a tachyon warm inflationary attractor in the system. The PSR parameters in the tachyon warm inflationary models are new defined in our paper. The two cases of an exponential potential and an inverse power law potential are studied when the dissipative coefficient $\\Gamma=\\Gamma_0$ and $\\Gamma=\\Gamma(\\phi)$, respectively. A crucial condition for a workable tachyon warm inflationary model characterized by the Hubble slow-roll (HSR) parameter $\\epsilon_{_H}$ is obtained and extends to some other inflationary models. We can get a proper number of the e-folds in both cases of the tachyon warm inflation, contrary to some existing papers. We also point out that a constant dissipative coefficient $(\\Gamma=\\Gamma_0)$ is usually not a good assumption for a workable warm inflationary model.

  11. Consistency of the tachyon warm inflationary universe models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao-Min Zhang; Jian-Yang Zhu

    2014-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This study concerns the consistency of the tachyon warm inflationary models. A linear stability analysis is performed to find the slow-roll conditions, characterized by the potential slow-roll (PSR) parameters, for the existence of a tachyon warm inflationary attractor in the system. The PSR parameters in the tachyon warm inflationary models are redefined. Two cases, an exponential potential and an inverse power-law potential, are studied, when the dissipative coefficient $\\Gamma=\\Gamma_0$ and $\\Gamma=\\Gamma(\\phi)$, respectively. A crucial condition is obtained for a tachyon warm inflationary model characterized by the Hubble slow-roll (HSR) parameter $\\epsilon_{_H}$, and the condition is extendable to some other inflationary models as well. A proper number of e-folds is obtained in both cases of the tachyon warm inflation, in contrast to existing works. It is also found that a constant dissipative coefficient $(\\Gamma=\\Gamma_0)$ is usually not a suitable assumption for a warm inflationary model.

  12. Air-cooled CWS warm air furnace. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Litka, A.F.; Becker, F.E.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermo Power Corporation, Tecogen Division, has developed coal water slurry (CWS) combustion technologies specifically tailored to meet the space heating needs of the residential, commercial, and industrial market sectors. This furnace was extensively tested and met all the design and operating criteria of the development program, which included combustion efficiencies in excess of 99%, response to full load from a cold start in less than 5 minutes, and steady-state thermal efficiencies as high as 85%. While this furnace design is extremely versatile, versatility came at the expense of system complexity and cost. To provide a more cost effective CWS-based option for the residential market sector, Tecogen, developed a totally air-cooled CWS-fired residential warm air heating system. To minimize system cost and to take advantage of industry manufacturing practices and experience, a commercially available oil/gas solid fuel-fired central furnace, manufactured by Yukon Energy Corporation, was used as the platform for the CWS combustor and related equipment. A prototype furnace was designed, built, and tested in the laboratory to verify system integrity and operation. This unit was then shipped to the PETC to undergo demonstration operation and serve as a showcase of the CWS technology. An in-depth Owners Manual was prepared and delivered with the furnace. This Owners Manual, which is included as Appendix A of this report, includes installation instructions, operating procedures, wiring diagrams, and equipment bulletins on the major components. It also contains coal water slurry fuel specifications and typical system operating variables, including key temperatures, pressures, and flowrates.

  13. B4WARMED: Boreal Forest Warming at an Ecotone in Danger Principal Investigator: Peter Reich (Regents Professor)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    composition by experimentallywarming forest plots (with infrared lamps and soil heating cables of warming treatment and Infrared lamps used in experiment (Bruce Kimball ARS,USDA) Our central hypothesis

  14. SOME CHILLING CONSIDERATIONS ABOUT GLOBAL WARMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    of Arizona #12;Weiss and Overpeck, University of Arizona #12;MELTING OF GREENLAND ICE CAP Satellite Complete melt of the Greenland ice sheet would raise the level of the global ocean 7 meters. #12 thousand years Polar ice cores #12;GREENHOUSE GAS FORCING AND CHANGE IN GLOBAL MEAN SURFACE TEMPERATURE

  15. Inelastic X-ray Scattering Measurements of Ionization in Warm, Dense Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Paul

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    attention to hydrogens high-pressure properties has sinceal. , Thermophysical properties of warm dense hydrogen using

  16. Game Theory and Global Warming Steve Schecter (North Carolina State University)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schecter, Stephen

    Game Theory and Global Warming Steve Schecter (North Carolina State University) Mary Lou Zeeman global warming game It's time to negotiate a new treaty to stop global warming. 路 Player 1: Governments, Brazil, Mexico, . . . ). Situation: 路 An investment of $2 trillion is needed to stop global warming

  17. KNMI PR 2003-05, revised On the relationship between global warming,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    KNMI PR 2003-05, revised On the relationship between global warming, local warming. This is supported by the spatial homogeneity of global warming during the twentieth century, the lack of seasonality century. This study addresses the statistical relationships of this rise to global warming (IPCC, 2001

  18. Impact of global dimming and brightening on global warming Martin Wild,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    Impact of global dimming and brightening on global warming Martin Wild,1 Atsumu Ohmura,1 and Knut February 2007. [1] Speculations on the impact of variations in surface solar radiation on global warming was responsible for the observed warming. To disentangle surface solar and greenhouse influences on global warming

  19. Increased Climate Variability Is More Visible Than Global Warming: A General

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    Increased Climate Variability Is More Visible Than Global Warming: A General System@utep.edu Abstract While global warming is a statistically confirmed long-term phenomenon, its most visible than the global warming itself. 1 Formulation of the Problem What is global warming. The term "global

  20. Predicting and mitigating the global warming potential of agro-ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

    Predicting and mitigating the global warming potential of agro-ecosystems S. Lehugera 1 , B and methane are the main biogenic greenhouse gases (GHG) con-2 tributing to the global warming potential (GWP to design productive16 agro-ecosystems with low global warming impact.17 Keywords18 Global warming potential

  1. Joint CO2 and CH4 accountability for global warming Kirk R. Smitha,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Whendee

    the causes of global warming, because the amount of global warming occurring at any time is ac- tually dueJoint CO2 and CH4 accountability for global warming Kirk R. Smitha,1,2 , Manish A. Desaia,1 for global warming is its current annual emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs)*. The second most common

  2. Determination of the Acceptable Room Temperature Range for Local Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Y.; Zhao, R.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Determination of the acceptable room temperature range is a key problem in satisfactory design of local cooling for energy savings. At the room temperatures ranging from neutral to warm, three sensitive body parts-the face, chest and back-were each...

  3. Sorption Mechanisms for Mercury Capture in Warm Post-Gasification Gas Clean-Up Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jost Wendt; Sung Jun Lee; Paul Blowers

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The research was directed towards a sorbent injection/particle removal process where a sorbent may be injected upstream of the warm gas cleanup system to scavenge Hg and other trace metals, and removed (with the metals) within the warm gas cleanup process. The specific objectives of this project were to understand and quantify, through fundamentally based models, mechanisms of interaction between mercury vapor compounds and novel paper waste derived (kaolinite + calcium based) sorbents (currently marketed under the trade name MinPlus). The portion of the research described first is the experimental portion, in which sorbent effectiveness to scavenge metallic mercury (Hg{sup 0}) at high temperatures (>600 C) is determined as a function of temperature, sorbent loading, gas composition, and other important parameters. Levels of Hg{sup 0} investigated were in an industrially relevant range ({approx} 25 {micro}g/m{sup 3}) although contaminants were contained in synthetic gases and not in actual flue gases. A later section of this report contains the results of the complementary computational results.

  4. THE SIGNATURE OF THE WARM-HOT INTERGALACTIC MEDIUM IN WMAP AND THE FORTHCOMING PLANCK DATA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suarez-Velasquez, I.; Kitaura, F.-S.; Muecket, J. P. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Astrophysik, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Atrio-Barandela, F., E-mail: isuarez@aip.de, E-mail: kitaura@aip.de, E-mail: jpmuecket@aip.de, E-mail: atrio@usal.es [Fisica Teorica, Universidad de Salamanca, E-37008 Salamanca (Spain)

    2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the cross-correlation between the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium and maps of cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropies using a log-normal probability density function to describe the weakly nonlinear matter density field. We search for this contribution in the data measured by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe. We use a template of projected matter density reconstructed from the Two-Micron All-Sky Redshift Survey as a tracer of the electron distribution. The spatial distribution of filaments is modeled using the recently developed Augmented Lagrangian Perturbation Theory. On the scales considered here, the reconstructed density field is very well described by the assumed log-normal distribution function. We predict that the cross-correlation will have an amplitude of 0.03-0.3 {mu}K. The measured value is close to 1.5 {mu}K, compatible with random alignments between structure in the template and in the temperature anisotropy data. Using the W1 Differencing Assembly to remove this systematic gives a residual correlation dominated by Galactic foregrounds. Planck could detect the Warm-Hot Medium if it is well traced by the density field reconstructed from galaxy surveys. The 217 GHz channel will allow to eliminate spurious contributions and its large frequency coverage can show the sign change from the Rayleigh-Jeans to the Wien part of the spectrum, characteristic of the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect.

  5. Filament velocity scaling laws for warm ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manz, P. [Physik-Department E28, Technische Universit鋞 M黱chen, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany) [Physik-Department E28, Technische Universit鋞 M黱chen, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut f黵 Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Carralero, D.; Birkenmeier, G.; M黮ler, H. W.; Scott, B. D. [Max-Planck-Institut f黵 Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut f黵 Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); M黮ler, S. H. [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California at San Diego, San Diego 92093 (United States)] [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California at San Diego, San Diego 92093 (United States); Fuchert, G. [Insitut f黵 Grenzfl鋍henverfahrenstechnik und Plasmatechnologie, Universit鋞 Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)] [Insitut f黵 Grenzfl鋍henverfahrenstechnik und Plasmatechnologie, Universit鋞 Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Stroth, U. [Max-Planck-Institut f黵 Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany) [Max-Planck-Institut f黵 Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Physik-Department E28, Technische Universit鋞 M黱chen, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamics of filaments or blobs in the scrape-off layer of magnetic fusion devices are studied by magnitude estimates of a comprehensive drift-interchange-Alfv閚 fluid model. The standard blob models are reproduced in the cold ion case. Even though usually neglected, in the scrape-off layer, the ion temperature can exceed the electron temperature by an order of magnitude. The ion pressure affects the dynamics of filaments amongst others by adding up to the interchange drive and the polarisation current. It is shown how both effects modify the scaling laws for filament velocity in dependence of its size. Simplifications for experimentally relevant limit regimes are given. These are the sheath dissipation, collisional, and electromagnetic regime.

  6. Heterotrophic Soil Respiration in Warming Experiments: Using Microbial Indicators to Partition Contributions from Labile and Recalcitrant Soil Organic Carbon. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradford, M A; Melillo, J M; Reynolds, J F; Treseder, K K; Wallenstein, M D

    2010-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The central objective of the proposed work was to develop a genomic approach (nucleic acid-based) that elucidates the mechanistic basis for the observed impacts of experimental soil warming on forest soil respiration. The need to understand the mechanistic basis arises from the importance of such information for developing effective adaptation strategies for dealing with projected climate change. Specifically, robust predictions of future climate will permit the tailoring of the most effective adaptation efforts. And one of the greatest uncertainties in current global climate models is whether there will be a net loss of carbon from soils to the atmosphere as climate warms. Given that soils contain approximately 2.5 times as much carbon as the atmosphere, a net loss could lead to runaway climate warming. Indeed, most ecosystem models predict that climate warming will stimulate microbial decomposition of soil carbon, producing such a positive feedback to rising global temperatures. Yet the IPCC highlights the uncertainty regarding this projected feedback. The uncertainty arises because although warming-experiments document an initial increase in the loss of carbon from soils, the increase in respiration is short-lived, declining to control levels in a few years. This attenuation could result from changes in microbial physiology with temperature. We explored possible microbial responses to warming using experiments and modeling. Our work advances our understanding of how soil microbial communities and their activities are structured, generating insight into how soil carbon might respond to warming. We show the importance of resource partitioning in structuring microbial communities. Specifically, we quantified the relative abundance of fungal taxa that proliferated following the addition of organic substrates to soil. We added glycine, sucrose, cellulose, lignin, or tannin-protein to soils in conjunction with 3-bromo-deoxyuridine (BrdU), a nucleotide analog. Active microbes absorb BrdU from the soil solution; if they multiply in response to substrate additions, they incorporate the BrdU into their DNA. After allowing soils to incubate, we extracted BrdU-labeled DNA and sequenced the ITS regions of fungal rDNA. Fungal taxa that proliferated following substrate addition were likely using the substrate as a resource for growth. We found that the structure of active fungal communities varied significantly among substrates. The active fungal community under glycine was significantly different from those under other conditions, while the active communities under sucrose and cellulose were marginally different from each other and the control. These results indicate that the overall community structure of active fungi was altered by the addition of glycine, sucrose, and cellulose and implies that some fungal taxa respond to changes in resource availability. The community composition of active fungi is also altered by experimental warming. We found that glycine-users tended to increase under warming, while lignin-, tannin/protein-, and sucrose-users declined. The latter group of substrates requires extracellular enzymes for use, but glycine does not. It is possible that warming selects for fungal species that target, in particular, labile substrates. Linking these changes in microbial communities and resource partitioning to soil carbon dynamics, we find that substrate mineralization rates are, in general, significantly lower in soils exposed to long-term warming. This suggests that microbial use of organic substrates is impaired by warming. Yet effects are dependent on substrate identity. There are fundamental differences in the metabolic capabilities of the communities in the control and warmed soils. These differences might relate to the changes in microbial community composition, which appeared to be associated with groups specialized on different resources. We also find that functional responses indicate temperature acclimation of the microbial community. There are distinct seasonal patterns and to long-term soil warming, with

  7. Soil organic matter stability and the temperature sensitivity of soil respiration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burns, Nancy Rosalind

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil respiration is an important source of atmospheric CO2, with the potential for large positive feedbacks with global warming. The size of these feedbacks will depend on the relative sensitivity to temperature of very ...

  8. Temperature, Temperature, Earth, geotherm for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treiman, Allan H.

    Temperature, Temperature, Earth, geotherm for total global heat flow Venus, geotherm for total global heat flow, 500 Ma #12;Temperature, Temperature, #12;Earth's modern regional continental geotherms Venusian Geotherms, 500 Ma Temperature, Temperature, After Blatt, Tracy, and Owens Petrology #12;Ca2Mg5Si8

  9. Quantifying global warming from the retreat of glaciers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oerlemans, J. (Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands))

    1994-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Records of glacier fluctuations compiled by the World Glacier Monitoring Service can be used to derive an independent estimate of global warming during the last 100 years. Records of different glaciers are made comparable by a two-step scaling procedure; one allowing for differences in glacier geometry, the other for differences in climate sensitivity. The retreat of glaciers during the last 100 years appears to be coherent over the globe. On the basis of modeling of the climate sensitivity of glaciers, the observed glacier retreat can be explained by a linear warming trend of 0.66 kelvin per century.

  10. Effect of global ocean temperature change on deep ocean ventilation A. M. de Boer,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sigman, Daniel M.

    Effect of global ocean temperature change on deep ocean ventilation A. M. de Boer,1,2 D. M. Sigman suggest that the ocean's deep ventilation is stronger in warm climates than in cold climates. Here we use that a dynamically cold ocean is globally less ventilated than a dynamically warm ocean. With dynamic cooling

  11. Link between K-absorption edges and thermodynamic properties of warm-dense plasmas established by improved first-principles method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Shen; Kang, Wei; Zhang, Ping; He, Xian-Tu

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A precise calculation that translates shifts of X-ray K-absorption edges to variations of thermodynamic properties allows quantitative characterization of interior thermodynamic properties of warm dense plasmas by X-ray absorption techniques, which provides essential information for inertial confinement fusion and other astrophysical applications. We show that this interpretation can be achieved through an improved first-principles method. Our calculation shows that the shift of K-edges exhibits selective sensitivity to thermal parameters and thus would be a suitable temperature index to warm dense plasmas. We also show with a simple model that the shift of K-edges can be used to detect inhomogeneity inside warm dense plasmas when combined with other experimental tools.

  12. American Public Opinion on Global Warming in the American States: An In-Depth Study of Florida, Maine, and Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Andrew

    1 American Public Opinion on Global Warming in the American States: An In-Depth Study of Florida Public Opinion on Global Warming in the American States: An In-Depth Study of Florida, Maine warming has been happening 路 What might have caused global warming 路 Whether global warming

  13. Interdiurnal temperature variability over the conterminous United States and Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rice, Peter Bruce

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the mean interdiurnal temperature vari- ability (MITV) of maximum, minimum, or mean temperature for this period. The periods usually chosen in climatological studies are the twelve months, and when the n-I values characterizing a particular month of n... required to obtai n stability of means . They both determined that periods of rapidly changing warm and cold air masses are associated with large mean interdiurnal temperature variability. Landsberg chose a five-year period, 1957-1961, based on Ca...

  14. Adaptation of US Maize to Temperature Variations Ethan E. Butler1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huybers, Peter

    @fas.harvard.edu High temperatures are associated with reduced crop yields1,2 , and predictions for future warming3 have maize is locally adapted to hot temperatures across U.S. counties. Using this spatial adaptation. This result does not ac- count for possible changes in temperature variability or water resources, nor does

  15. DEVELOPMENTAL RATES AT VARIOUS TEMPERATURES OF EMBRYOS OF THE NORTHERN LOBSTER (Homarus americanus MILNE-EDWARDS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of larvae and con- trol hatching times by manipulating the water temperature in tanks holding egg-bearing fe at seasonal water temperatures or in water warmed to various constant temperatures. Water from the laboratory's seawater system was piped to the heated tanks at rates consistent with the capacity of the heaters

  16. Tachyon warm inflationary universe model in the weak dissipative regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergio del Campo; Ramon Herrera; Joel Saavedra

    2008-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Warm inflationary universe model in a tachyon field theory is studied in the weak dissipative regime. We develop our model for an exponential potential and the dissipation parameter $\\Gamma=\\Gamma_0$=constant. We describe scalar and tensor perturbations for this scenario.

  17. Non-linear Langmuir waves in a warm quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubinov, Alexander E., E-mail: dubinov-ae@yandex.ru; Kitaev, Ilya N. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center桝ll-Russia Scientific and Research Institute of Experimental Physics (RFNC-VNIIEF), 37 Mira Ave., Nizhny Novgorod region, Sarov 607188 (Russian Federation); Sarov State Institute of Physics and Technology (SarFTI), National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, 607186 Sarov, Nizhny Novgorod region (Russian Federation)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-linear differential equation describing the Langmuir waves in a warm quantum electron-ion plasma has been derived. Its numerical solutions of the equation show that ordinary electronic oscillations, similar to the classical oscillations, occur along with small-scale quantum Langmuir oscillations induced by the Bohm quantum force.

  18. ORIGINAL PAPER Global warming impact on the dominant precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Jason

    is then used to simulate the changes due to global warming over the twenty-first century. The regional climate to potentially negative impacts of climate change while decreasing the likelihood of successful region-wide adaptation strategies emerging. While much of the region has a Mediterranean-type climate, the region spans

  19. Sweet potatoes are a warm-weather vegetable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweet potatoes are a warm- weather vegetable related to the morning glory family.Although Louisiana sweet potatoes are often referred to as yams, they truly are sweet potatoes. The Louisiana producers began calling the orange-fleshed sweet potatoes grown in Louisiana"yams" to distinguish them from

  20. High-Power Warm-White Hybrid LED Package for Illumination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soer, Wouter

    2013-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In this project, an integrated warm-white hybrid light engine was developed. The hybrid approach involves combining phosphor-converted off-white InGaN LEDs and direct-emitting red AlInGaP LEDs in a single light engine to achieve high efficacy together with high color rendering index. We developed and integrated technology improvements in InGaN and AlInGaP die technology, phosphor technology, package architecture and encapsulation, to realize a hybrid warm-white LED package with an efficacy of 140 lm/W at a correlated color temperature of 3000K and a color rendering index of 90, measured under representative operating conditions. This efficacy is 26% higher than the best warm-white LEDs of similar specification that are commercially available at the end of the project. Since the InGaN- and AlInGaP-based LEDs used in the hybrid engine show different behavior as a function of current and temperature, a control system needs to be in place to ensure a stable color point over all operating conditions. In this project, we developed an electronic control circuit that is fully integrated into the light engine in such a way that the module can simply be driven by a conventional single-channel driver. The integrated control circuit uses a switch-mode boost converter topology to control the LED drive currents based on the temperature and the input current of the light engine. A color control performance of 5 SDCM was demonstrated, and improvement to 3 SDCM is considered well within reach. The combination of high efficacy and ease of integration with existing single-channel drivers is expected to facilitate the adoption of the hybrid technology and accelerate the energy savings associated with solid-state lighting. In the product commercialization plan, downlights and indirect-lit troffers have been selected as the first target applications for this product concept. Fully functional integrated prototypes have been developed for both applications, and the business case evaluation is ongoing as of the end of the project.

  1. Responses of soil respiration to elevated CO2, air warming, and changing soil water availability in an old-field grassland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wan, Shiqiang [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Norby, Richard J [ORNL; Childs, Joanne [ORNL; Weltzin, Jake [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Responses of soil respiration to atmospheric and climatic change will have profound impacts on ecosystem and global C cycling in the future. This study was conducted to examine effects on soil respiration of the concurrent driving factors of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration, rising temperature, and changing precipitation in a constructed old-field grassland in eastern Tennessee, USA. Model ecosystems of seven old-field species in 12 open-top chambers (4 m in diameter) were treated with two CO2 (ambient and ambient plus 300 ppm) and two temperature (ambient and ambient plus 3 C) levels. Two split plots with each chamber were assigned with high and low soil moisture levels. During the 19-month experimental period from June 2003 to December 2004, higher CO2 concentration and soil water availability significantly increased mean soil respiration by 35.8% and 15.7%, respectively. The effects of air warming on soil respiration varied seasonally from small reductions to significant increases to no response, and there was no significant main effect. In the wet side of elevated CO2 chambers, air warming consistently caused increases in soil respiration, whereas in other three combinations of CO2 and water treatments, warming tended to decrease soil respiration over the growing season but increase it over the winter. There were no interactive effects on soil respiration among any two or three treatment factors irrespective of testing time period. Temperature sensitivity of soil respiration was reduced by air warming, lower in the wet than the dry side, and not affected by CO2 treatment. Variations of soil respiration responses with soil temperature and soil moisture ranges could be primarily attributable to the seasonal dynamics of plant growth and its responses to the three treatments. Using a conceptual model to interpret the significant relationships of treatment-induced changes in soil respiration with changes in soil temperature and moisture observed in this study, we conclude that elevated CO2, air warming, and changing soil water availability had both direct and indirect effects on soil respiration via changes in the three controlling factors: soil temperature, soil moisture, and C substrate. Our results demonstrate that the response of soil respiration to climatic warming should not be represented in models as a simple temperature response function. A more mechanistic understanding of the direct and indirect impacts of concurrent global change drivers on soil respiration is needed to facilitate the interpretation and projection of ecosystem and global C cycling in response to atmospheric and climate change.

  2. Ion-acoustic cnoidal waves in plasmas with warm ions and kappa distributed electrons and positrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaladze, T. [Department of Physics, Government College University (GCU), Lahore 54000 (Pakistan) [Department of Physics, Government College University (GCU), Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); I.Vekua Institute of Applied Mathematics, Tbilisi State University, 0186 Georgia (United States); Mahmood, S., E-mail: shahzadm100@gmail.com [Theoretical Physics Division (TPD), PINSTECH P.O. Nilore Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); National Center for Physics (NCP), Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrostatic ion-acoustic periodic (cnoidal) waves and solitons in unmagnetized electron-positron-ion (EPI) plasmas with warm ions and kappa distributed electrons and positrons are investigated. Using the reductive perturbation method, the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation is derived with appropriate boundary conditions for periodic waves. The corresponding analytical and various numerical solutions are presented with Sagdeev potential approach. Differences between the results caused by the kappa and Maxwell distributions are emphasized. It is revealed that only hump (compressive) structures of the cnoidal waves and solitons are formed. It is shown that amplitudes of the cnoidal waves and solitons are reduced in an EPI plasma case in comparison with the ordinary electron-ion plasmas. The effects caused by the temperature variations of the warm ions are also discussed. It is obtained that the amplitude of the cnoidal waves and solitons decreases for a kappa distributed (nonthermal) electrons and positrons plasma case in comparison with the Maxwellian distributed (thermal) electrons and positrons EPI plasmas. The existence of kappa distributed particles leads to decreasing of ion-acoustic frequency up to thermal ions frequency.

  3. Relationship between MTBE-blended gasoline properties and warm-up driveability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suzawa, Takumi; Yamaguchi, Kazunori; Kashiwabara, Kimito [Mitsubishi Motors Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Fujisawa, Norihiro; Matsubara, Michiro

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The relationship between MBE-blended gasoline properties and warm-up driveability is investigated by focusing on the transient combustion air-fuel ratio that strongly relates to the combustion state of the engine. As a result, although warm-up driveability of MTBE-free gasoline has a high correlation with 50% distillation temperature (T50) and a high correlation with 100 C distillation volume (E100), the correlation is found to be low when blended with MTBE. Various formulas that improve correlation with peak excess air ratio ({lambda}) by correcting T50 and E100 for the amount of MTBE blended are examined. The formula for which the highest determination coefficient is obtained is proposed as a new driveability index (DI) that can also be applied to MTBE-blended gasoline. In addition, the effect on driveability by gasoline base materials using this new DI also is investigated. The results indicate that the new DI worsen when heavy reformate containing large amounts of aromatics or MTBE, an oxygen-containing compound, is used for the octane improver, leaving the balance of the volatility out of consideration.

  4. Viscosity and mutual diffusion of deuterium-tritium mixtures in the warm-dense-matter regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kress, J. D.; Cohen, James S.; Horner, D. A.; Collins, L. A. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Lambert, F. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have calculated viscosity and mutual diffusion of deuterium-tritium (DT) in the warm, dense matter regime for densities from 5 to 20 g/cm{sup 3} and temperatures from 2 to 10 eV, using both finite-temperature Kohn-Sham density-functional theory molecular dynamics (QMD) and orbital-free molecular dynamics (OFMD). The OFMD simulations are in generally good agreement with the benchmark QMD results, and we conclude that the simpler OFMD method can be used with confidence in this regime. For low temperatures (3 eV and below), one-component plasma (OCP) model simulations for diffusion agree with the QMD and OFMD calculations, but deviate by 30% at 10 eV. In comparison with the QMD and OFMD results, the OCP viscosities are not as good as for diffusion, especially for 5 g/cm{sup 3} where the temperature dependence is significantly different. The QMD and OFMD reduced diffusion and viscosity coefficients are found to depend largely, though not completely, only on the Coulomb coupling parameter {Gamma}, with a minimum in the reduced viscosity at {Gamma}{approx_equal}25, approximately the same position found in the OCP simulations. The QMD and OFMD equations of state (pressure) are also compared with the hydrogen two-component plasma model.

  5. The potential to mitigate global warming with no-tillage management is only realized when practised in the long term

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Six, J; Ogle, S M; Breidt, F J; Conant, R T; Mosier, A R; Paustian, K

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential to mitigate global warming with no-tillageNT adoption reduces the net global warming potential (GWP)soil for purposes of global warming mitigation. Our results

  6. The Impact of Global Warming on U.S. Agriculture: An Econometric Analysis of Optimal Growing Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlenker, Wolfram; Hanemann, W. Michael; Fisher, Anthony C.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Really Bene?t From Global Warming? Accounting for IrrigationR. , The Economics of Global Warming, Washington, D.C. :1992. , 揟he Impact of Global Warming on Agriculture:

  7. Is global warming just a giant natural fluctuation? When estimating voter's intentions, pollsters know that statements like "40%

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovejoy, Shaun

    Is global warming just a giant natural fluctuation? When estimating voter theory. So what about global warming? Shouldn't we apply the same warming since the mid-20th century" (IPCC, Assessment Report 5, AR5), then surely

  8. How strong is carbon cycle-climate feedback under global warming?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    and physical climate system in a global warming scenario is studied using an Earth system model including

  9. Winter 2010 in Europe: A cold extreme in a warming climate J. Cattiaux,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Codron, Francis

    by a mean warm anomaly at global scale, especially over Greenland, Canada, North Africa and Middle East (see

  10. Interaction of ion-acoustic solitons with electron beam in warm plasmas with superthermal electrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Esfandyari-Kalejahi, A R

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Propagation of ion-acoustic solitary waves (IASWs) is studied using the hydrodynamic equations coupled with the Poisson equation in a warm plasma consisting of adiabatic ions and superthermal (Kappa distributed) electrons in presence of an electron-beam component. In the linear limit, the dispersion relation for ion-acoustic (IA) waves is obtained by linearizing of basic equations. On the other hand, in the nonlinear analysis, an energy-balance like equation involving Sagdeev's pseudo-potential is derived in order to investigate arbitrary amplitude IA solitons. The Mach number range is determined in which, propagation and characteristics of IA solitons are analyzed both parametrically and numerically. The variation of amplitude and width of electrostatic (ES) excitations as a result of superthermality (via) and also the physical parameters (ion temperature, soliton speed, electron-beam density and electron-beam velocity) are examined. A typical interaction between IASWs and the electron-beam in plasma is conf...

  11. Ion acoustic shock waves in plasmas with warm ions and kappa distributed electrons and positrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussain, S.; Mahmood, S.; Hafeez Ur-Rehman [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 44000, Pakistan and Department of Physics and Applied Mathematics, PIEAS, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)] [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 44000, Pakistan and Department of Physics and Applied Mathematics, PIEAS, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The monotonic and oscillatory ion acoustic shock waves are investigated in electron-positron-ion plasmas (e-p-i) with warm ions (adiabatically heated) and nonthermal kappa distributed electrons and positrons. The dissipation effects are included in the model due to kinematic viscosity of the ions. Using reductive perturbation technique, the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili-Burgers (KPB) equation is derived containing dispersion, dissipation, and diffraction effects (due to perturbation in the transverse direction) in e-p-i plasmas. The analytical solution of KPB equation is obtained by employing tangent hyperbolic (Tanh) method. The analytical condition for the propagation of oscillatory and monotonic shock structures are also discussed in detail. The numerical results of two dimensional monotonic shock structures are obtained for graphical representation. The dependence of shock structures on positron equilibrium density, ion temperature, nonthermal spectral index kappa, and the kinematic viscosity of ions are also discussed.

  12. Discussion on common errors in analyzing sea level accelerations, solar trends and global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scafetta, Nicola

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Errors in applying regression models and wavelet filters used to analyze geophysical signals are discussed: (1) multidecadal natural oscillations (e.g. the quasi 60-year Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO), North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO)) need to be taken into account for properly quantifying anomalous accelerations in tide gauge records such as in New York City; (2) uncertainties and multicollinearity among climate forcing functions prevent a proper evaluation of the solar contribution to the 20th century global surface temperature warming using overloaded linear regression models during the 1900-2000 period alone; (3) when periodic wavelet filters, which require that a record is pre-processed with a reflection methodology, are improperly applied to decompose non-stationary solar and climatic time series, Gibbs boundary artifacts emerge yielding misleading physical interpretations. By correcting these errors and using optimized regression models that reduce multico...

  13. Measurement of charged-particle stopping in warm-dense plasma

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zylstra, A.? B.; Frenje, J.? A.; Grabowski, P. E.; Li, C. ?K.; Collins, G.? W.; Fitzsimmons, P.; Glenzer, S.; Graziani, F.; Hansen, S.? B.; Hu, S. X.; et al

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We measured the stopping of energetic protons in an isochorically-heated solid-density Be plasma with an electron temperature of ~32 eV, corresponding to moderately-coupled [(e/a/(kBTe + EF ) ~ 0.3] and moderately-degenerate [kBTe/EF ~2] 'warm dense matter' (WDM) conditions. We present the first high-accuracy measurements of charged-particle energy loss through dense plasma, which shows an increased loss relative to cold matter, consistent with a reduced mean ionization potential. The data agree with stopping models based on an ad-hoc treatment of free and bound electrons, as well as the average-atom local-density approximation; this work is the first test of these theories inmore牷WDM plasma.珷less

  14. Measurement of charged-particle stopping in warm-dense plasma

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zylstra, A.? B. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Frenje, J.? A. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Grabowski, P. E. [Univ. of California Irvine, Irvine, CA (United States); Li, C. ?K. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Collins, G.? W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fitzsimmons, P. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Glenzer, S. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Graziani, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hansen, S.? B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hu, S. X. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Johnson, M. Gatu [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Keiter, P. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Reynolds, H. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Rygg, J.? R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); S間uin, F. H. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Petrasso, R. D. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We measured the stopping of energetic protons in an isochorically-heated solid-density Be plasma with an electron temperature of ~32 eV, corresponding to moderately-coupled [(e/a/(kBTe + EF ) ~ 0.3] and moderately-degenerate [kBTe/EF ~2] 'warm dense matter' (WDM) conditions. We present the first high-accuracy measurements of charged-particle energy loss through dense plasma, which shows an increased loss relative to cold matter, consistent with a reduced mean ionization potential. The data agree with stopping models based on an ad-hoc treatment of free and bound electrons, as well as the average-atom local-density approximation; this work is the first test of these theories in WDM plasma.

  15. Tropical drought regions in global warming and El Nin~o teleconnections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chou, Chia

    warming, and the drought regions are particularly likely to have substantial human impacts. [3] VariationsTropical drought regions in global warming and El Nin~o teleconnections J. D. Neelin Department; accepted 19 November 2003; published 24 December 2003. [1] Climate model global warming simulations predict

  16. DO GLOBAL WARMING AND CLIMATE CHANGE REPRESENT A SERIOUS THREAT TO OUR WELFARE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DO GLOBAL WARMING AND CLIMATE CHANGE REPRESENT A SERIOUS THREAT TO OUR WELFARE AND ENVIRONMENT? By Michael E. Mann I. Introduction The subjects of "global warming" and "climate change" have become parts of both the popular lexicon and the public discourse. Discussions of global warming often evoke passionate

  17. Rapid and extensive warming following cessation of1 solar radiation management2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Battisti, David

    , and sustained warming over land occurs17 that is well outside 20th century climate variability bounds. Global controlled by background GHG levels. Thus, a risk of22 abrupt and dangerous warming is inherent to the large aerosol34 layer could effectively curb global warming. In order to stabilize global climate near35 present

  18. Greenhouse-gas emission targets for limiting global warming to 2 6C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Imamoglu, Atac

    LETTERS Greenhouse-gas emission targets for limiting global warming to 2 6C Malte Meinshausen1. Frame6,7 & Myles R. Allen7 More than 100 countries have adopted a global warming limit of 2 6C or below levels in 2050 are robust indicators of the probability that twenty-first century warming will not exceed

  19. How Does the Eye Warm? Part II: Sensitivity to Vertical Wind Shear and a Trajectory Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    How Does the Eye Warm? Part II: Sensitivity to Vertical Wind Shear and a Trajectory Analysis DANIEL of vertical wind shear on the structure of warming and descent in the eye; results are compared with the no environment, time-averaged eye descent is maximized at 12颅13-km height. Warming is not generally maximized

  20. Equatorial currents transport changes for extreme warm and cold events in the Atlantic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Equatorial currents transport changes for extreme warm and cold events in the Atlantic Ocean Marlos compositedevents.For the cold(warm)eventthe EUC shows a greater (reduced) transport and core velocity, and a deeper.Wainer, Equatorial currents transport changes for extreme warm and cold events in the Atlantic Ocean, Geophys. Res

  1. Can ozone depletion and global warming interact to produce rapid climate change?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limpasuvan, Varavut

    Can ozone depletion and global warming interact to produce rapid climate change? Dennis L. Hartmann of Climate Change (IPCC) assess- ment of the status of global warming, which reported that winter stratospheric ozone depletion and greenhouse warming are possible. These interactions may be responsible

  2. 16 APRIL 2004 VOL 304 SCIENCE www.sciencemag.org388 Future Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gazzaniga, Michael

    16 APRIL 2004 VOL 304 SCIENCE www.sciencemag.org388 Future Global Warming Scenarios INA STUDY the short-term consequences of global warming. This scenario, which predicts a shutdown of the Atlantic, if global warming were to cause a repeat of such an abrupt change, the consequences would be akin to those

  3. Climate changes mirror global warming predictions BY THOMAS CROWLEY Guest columnist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate changes mirror global warming predictions BY THOMAS CROWLEY Guest columnist The Herald" and must reflect, at least in part, the climate system response to the increase in global warming. What if we wanted to prevent global warming. This is just doomsday speaking of the same type that he

  4. Influence of weather and global warming in chloride ingress into concrete: a stochastic approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

    Influence of weather and global warming in chloride ingress into concrete: a stochastic approach E the influence of weather conditions and global warming on chloride ingress into concrete. The assessment including seasonal variations and global warming is also proposed in this work. Three scenarios of global

  5. Needed: A Realistic Strategy for Global Warming Henry D. Jacoby, Ronald G. Prinn and Richard Schmalensee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Needed: A Realistic Strategy for Global Warming Henry D. Jacoby, Ronald G. Prinn and Richard of this issue. One day we hear that all responsible scientists agree that global warming is a dagger be slashed immediately to save our planet. The next day we're told that global warming is the illegitimate

  6. The Threat to the Planet* Dark & Bright Sides of Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    The Threat to the Planet* Dark & Bright Sides of Global Warming Jim Hansen 3 October 2007 presented provides most important information on global warming. Recorded human history occurs within the Holocene for these large climate change is perturbations of Earth's orbit. #12;Continental Drift Fig. 1 "Global Warming

  7. Response of the Zonal Mean Atmospheric Circulation to El Nio versus Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Gang

    Response of the Zonal Mean Atmospheric Circulation to El Ni帽o versus Global Warming JIAN LU Pacific. The hydrological impacts of global warming also exhibit distinct patterns over the subtropics response to global warming: 1) The increase in static stability of the subtropical and midlatitude

  8. LETTER doi:10.1038/nature09407 Global metabolic impacts of recent climate warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huey, Raymond B.

    LETTER doi:10.1038/nature09407 Global metabolic impacts of recent climate warming Michael E. Dillon and projected climate warming2,13,14 . Global warming is probably having profound and diverse effects phenology3,4 , community interactions5 , genetics3,6 and extinctions7 have been attributed to recent global

  9. Global warming shifts Pacific tropical cyclone location MinHo Kwon,1,3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Tim

    Global warming shifts Pacific tropical cyclone location Tim Li,1 MinHo Kwon,1,3 Ming Zhao,3 Jong) is used to investigate the change of tropical cyclone frequency in the North Pacific under global warming, and W. Yu (2010), Global warming shifts Pacific tropical cyclone location, Geophys. Res. Lett., 37, L

  10. What should we do about the dangers posed by global warming? Judging by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    What should we do about the dangers posed by global warming? Judging by the collective actions rainandozonedepletioninanattempt toconfusethepublicaboutthescience of global warming and delay regula- tion of greenhouse of Engineering,itdiffersfromtheothers in its attitude towards those who deny the reality of global warming, or hu

  11. Report narrows down impact of global warming People will soon be able to find out how

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feigon, Brooke

    Report narrows down impact of global warming People will soon be able to find out how vulnerable their own local area is to global warming, thanks to a new report led by UEA. STARDEX, a European Union is taken to reduce human-induced global warming. "Although more research is needed to increase our

  12. Journal of Mammalogy, 84(2):354368, 2003 MAMMALIAN RESPONSE TO GLOBAL WARMING ON VARIED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    354 Journal of Mammalogy, 84(2):354颅368, 2003 MAMMALIAN RESPONSE TO GLOBAL WARMING ON VARIED how Rocky Mountain mam- malian communities changed during past global warming events characterized not) in different ways. Nevertheless, examination of past global warming episodes suggested

  13. Can Oceanic Freshwater Flux Amplify Global Warming? LIPING ZHANG AND LIXIN WU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Can Oceanic Freshwater Flux Amplify Global Warming? LIPING ZHANG AND LIXIN WU Physical Oceanography in global warming are studied using simulations of a climate model in which the freshwater flux changes that the warm climate leads to an acceleration of the global water cycle, which causes freshening in the high

  14. Detection-attribution of global warming at the regional scale: How to deal with precipitation variability?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribes, Aur茅lien

    Detection-attribution of global warming at the regional scale: How to deal with precipitation record over recent decades. Citation: Douville, H. (2006), Detection-attribution of global warming at recent climate scenarios, Douville et al. [2005] showed that the precipitation response to global warming

  15. Global warming, Bergmann's rule and body mass are they related? The chukar partridge (Alectoris chukar) case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yom-Tov, Yoram

    Global warming, Bergmann's rule and body mass 卤 are they related? The chukar partridge (Alectoris of chukar partridges Alectoris chukar has changed as a result of global warming. Body mass showed warming, Israel INTRODUCTION Recent global environmental changes are providing scientists

  16. Why are climate models reproducing the observed global surface warming so well?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    Why are climate models reproducing the observed global surface warming so well? Reto Knutti1 global surface warming so well?, Geophys. Res. Lett., 35, L18704, doi:10.1029/ 2008GL034932. 1 models reproduce the observed surface warming better than one would expect given the uncertainties

  17. Mechanisms for Tropical Tropospheric Circulation Change in Response to Global Warming*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    Mechanisms for Tropical Tropospheric Circulation Change in Response to Global Warming* JIAN MA change in global warming is studied by comparing the response of an atmospheric general circulation model globally in response to SST warming. A diagnostic framework is developed based on a linear baroclinic model

  18. A SLIPPERY SLOPE: HOW MUCH GLOBAL WARMING CONSTITUTES "DANGEROUS ANTHROPOGENIC INTERFERENCE"?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    A SLIPPERY SLOPE: HOW MUCH GLOBAL WARMING CONSTITUTES "DANGEROUS ANTHROPOGENIC INTERFERENCE on the global warming that can be tolerated without risking dangerous anthropogenic interference with climate. I" mainly as a metaphor for the danger posed by global warming. So I changed "Hell" to "disaster." What

  19. Thursday, November 13 2014 Global warming could increase U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romps, David M.

    Thursday, November 13 2014 Ad Wonkblog Global warming could increase U.S. lightning strikes by 50, a team of researchers deliver an alarming prediction: A global warming world will see a major increase affect lightning. The upshot was that while precipitation may increase in some areas under global warming

  20. Sensitivities of zonal mean atmospheric circulation to SST warming in an aquaplanet model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Gang

    ] What causes these circulation changes is not fully understood. Since global warming and El Ni帽o, storm tracks, or the boundaries of Hadley cell circulations under global warming [e.g., Yin, 2005 and the latitude of surface westerlies in response to El Ni帽o versus global warming [Lu et al., 2008; Chen et al

  1. WARMING TRENDS IN THE TAHOE HAPPY HOUR WITH ROBERT COATS, PH.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schladow, S. Geoffrey

    to the causes of global warming lie at the national and international level, addressing the consequencesWARMING TRENDS IN THE TAHOE BASIN HAPPY HOUR WITH ROBERT COATS, PH.D. (HYDROIKOS LTD.) Date scientists agree that the earth's atmosphere and oceans are warming and the consequences will fall somewhere

  2. Could the Earth's surface Ultraviolet irradiance be blamed for the global warming? A new effect may exist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jilong; Zhao, Juan; Zheng, Yujun

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Whether natural factors could interpret the rise of the Earth's surface temperature is still controversial. Though numerous recent researches have reported apparent correlations between solar activity and the Earth's climate, solar activity has encountered a big problem when describing the rapid global warming after 1970s. Our investigation shows the good positive correlations between the Earth's surface Ultraviolet irradiance (280-400 nm) and the Earth's surface temperature both in temporal and spatial variations by analyzing the global surface Ultraviolet irradiance (280-400 nm) and global surface temperature data from 1980-1999. The rise of CO$_2$ cannot interpret the good positive correlations, and we could even get an opposite result to the good correlations when employing the rise of CO$_2$ to describe the relation between them. Based on the good positive correlations, we suggest a new effect, named "Highly Excited Water Vapor" (HEWV) effect, which can interpret how the Sun influences the Earth's surfac...

  3. Warm Springs Resort Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwide Permit webpageWalthall

  4. Roosevelt Warm Springs Institute for Rehab. Pool & Spa Low Temperature

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation,MazeOhio:Ohio:RockwallRollingRooseveltPark,Geothermal

  5. Energy and global warming impacts of CFC alternative technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, S.K.; Hughes, P.J.; Fairchild, P.D. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Kusik, C.L.; Dieckmann, J.T.; McMahon, E.M.; Hobday, N. (Little (Arthur D.), Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States))

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this study is to develop representative indications of the relative energy use, associated CO{sub 2} emissions, and total equivalent warming impact (TEWI) of viable option to replace CFCs in their major energy-related application areas. It was motivated, in part, by a concern that most attention to data has focused on the DIRECT global warming effect of CFCs and their alternatives, with inadequate attention being paid to the INDIRECT effect of the CO{sub 2} emissions arising from the differences in energy consumption by systems using different alternatives. The DIRECT and INDIRECT contributions are combined in this analysis to determine the TEWI of the various technical options. The study is international in scope and takes into account significant differences in present CFC end-use practices, sources of energy, and other societal factors between Europe, Japan, and North America.

  6. Surface electromagnetic wave equations in a warm magnetized quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Chunhua; Yang, Weihong [Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, 230026 Hefei (China); Wu, Zhengwei, E-mail: wuzw@ustc.edu.cn [Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, 230026 Hefei (China); Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Center of Low Temperature Plasma Application, Yunnan Aerospace Industry Company, Kunming, 650229 Yunnan (China); Chu, Paul K. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on the single-fluid plasma model, a theoretical investigation of surface electromagnetic waves in a warm quantum magnetized inhomogeneous plasma is presented. The surface electromagnetic waves are assumed to propagate on the plane between a vacuum and a warm quantum magnetized plasma. The quantum magnetohydrodynamic model includes quantum diffraction effect (Bohm potential), and quantum statistical pressure is used to derive the new dispersion relation of surface electromagnetic waves. And the general dispersion relation is analyzed in some special cases of interest. It is shown that surface plasma oscillations can be propagated due to quantum effects, and the propagation velocity is enhanced. Furthermore, the external magnetic field has a significant effect on surface wave's dispersion equation. Our work should be of a useful tool for investigating the physical characteristic of surface waves and physical properties of the bounded quantum plasmas.

  7. A General Systems Theory for Rain Formation in Warm Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Selvam

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A cumulus cloud model which can explain the observed characteristics of warm rain formation in monsoon clouds is presented. The model is based on classical statistical physical concepts and satisfies the principle of maximum entropy production. Atmospheric flows exhibit selfsimilar fractal fluctuations that are ubiquitous to all dynamical systems in nature, such as physical, chemical, social, etc and are characterized by inverse power law form for power (eddy energy) spectrum signifying long-range space-time correlations. A general systems theory model for atmospheric flows developed by the author is based on the concept that the large eddy energy is the integrated mean of enclosed turbulent (small scale) eddies. This model gives scale-free universal governing equations for cloud growth processes. The model predicted cloud parameters are in agreement with reported observations, in particular, the cloud dropsize distribution. Rain formation can occur in warm clouds within 30minutes lifetime under favourable conditions of moisture supply in the environment.

  8. Gametogenesis of the warm water coral Astrangia astreiformis (Anthozoa: Scleractinia)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    St. Pierre, Lauren Jean

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 19g6 Major Subject: Zoology GAMETOGENESIS OF THE WARM WATER CORAL ASTRANGIA ASTREIFORMIS (ANTHOZOA: SCLERACTINIA) A Thesis by LAUREN 3EAN ST. PIERRE Approved as to style and content by: ary K. Wicksten Chair of Committee... Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Mary K. Wicksten ~At t f (?th: I t ) h tyy (non-reef building) coral naturally occurring with and without symbiotic zooxanthellae (endosymbiotic dfnoflagellates). It has a recorded range from Massachusetts, along...

  9. Warm inflation in the presence of magnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabriella Piccinelli; Angel Sanchez; Alejandro Ayala; Ana Julia Mizher

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the effects of primordial magnetic fields on the inflationary potential in the context of a warm inflation scenario. The model, based on global supersymmetry with a new-inflation-type potential and a coupling between the inflaton and a heavy intermediate superfield, is already known to preserve the flatness required for slow-roll conditions even after including thermal contributions. Here we show that the magnetic field makes the potential even flatter, retarding the transition and rendering it smoother.

  10. A LEO-Based Solar-Shade System to Mitigate Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahul Suresh; Andrew Meulenberg

    2015-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of a Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO) based solar-shade system, as part of a technically- and financially-viable multipurpose system to provide long-term solutions to global warming and the energy crisis is discussed. The proposed solar-shade and power system would be enabled by the development of a previously-proposed less-expensive, environment-friendly, space-elevator system to lift mass into space. The solar shades, even during their early deployment and growth in LEO, would provide benefits such as reduction of space-debris and depletion of the Van Allen radiation belts.The Terrestrial temperature profile has been approximated for each latitudinal zone with a one-dimensional model. A shade ring at an altitude of 2000-4000 km, consisting of thin-film mega panels totaling up to 4% of the earths surface area (to block ~1% of insolation), is proposed. The effects of such near-polar rings on the global temperature pattern has been examined using the simple model. Specific emphasis has been laid on this effect in the Polar Regions. One such proposed ring could reduce the peak summer temperature of the Polar Regions (80-90 degree latitude) by almost 3K. The tilting of the solar-shades, to reduce their cooling effect at the poles and to increase it in the near-polar regions, is recommended.

  11. Earth Interactions Interannual Temperature Events and Shifts in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    or two warm and cold events with sea surface temperature fluctuations in the eastern tropical Pacific, the relationship between ENSO and the transient storage of heat in the tropical upper ocean layer dioxide levels has been observed since the dawn of industrialization. It has been debated whether

  12. Ground surface temperatures in Canada: Spatial and temporal variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Bernard

    show that the ground has warmed about 0.7 K in the last 100 years. Spatial variability is significant temperatures in Canada: Spatial and temporal variability, Geophys. Res. Lett., 30(10), 1499, doi:10.1029/2003GL inferred from geothermal data have shown that the study of perturbations to the Earth's energy balance

  13. Phase relation between global temperature and atmospheric carbon dioxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stallinga, Peter

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary ingredient of Anthropogenic Global Warming hypothesis is the assumption that atmospheric carbon dioxide variations are the cause for temperature variations. In this paper we discuss this assumption and analyze it on basis of bi-centenary measurements and using a relaxation model which causes phase shifts and delays.

  14. Climate Change over the Equatorial Indo-Pacific in Global Warming* CHIE IHARA, YOCHANAN KUSHNIR, AND MARK A. CANE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change over the Equatorial Indo-Pacific in Global Warming* CHIE IHARA, YOCHANAN KUSHNIR to global warming is investigated using model outputs submitted to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate equatorial Indian Ocean warm more than the SSTs in the eastern equatorial Indian Ocean under global warming

  15. Greenland Ice Sheet Surface Air Temperature Variability: 18402007* JASON E. BOX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    Greenland Ice Sheet Surface Air Temperature Variability: 18402007* JASON E. BOX Byrd Polar, seasonal, and annual mean Greenland ice sheet near- surface air temperatures. Independent observations Greenland in autumn and southern Greenland in winter. Spring trends marked the 1920s warming onset, while

  16. Rapid Communication Modest summer temperature variability during DO cycles in western Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wohlfarth, Barbara

    February 2010 Accepted 1 March 2010 a b s t r a c t Abrupt climatic shifts between cold stadials and warm is registered in paleorecords worldwide, but little is known about the actual temperature change both annually characterised by distinct changes in seasonality in the Northern Hemisphere. The largest temperature change

  17. FINAL REPORT WIND POWER WARM SPRINGS RESERVATION TRIBAL LANDS DOE GRANT NUMBER DE-FG36-07GO17077 SUBMITTED BY WARM SPRINGS POWER & WATER ENTERPRISES A CORPORATE ENTITY OF THE CONFEDERATED TRIBES OF WARM SPRINGS WARM SPRINGS, OREGON

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jim Manion; Michael Lofting; Wil Sando; Emily Leslie; Randy Goff

    2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Generation Feasibility Warm Springs Power and Water Enterprises (WSPWE) is a corporate entity owned by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation, located in central Oregon. The organization is responsible for managing electrical power generation facilities on tribal lands and, as part of its charter, has the responsibility to evaluate and develop renewable energy resources for the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs. WSPWE recently completed a multi-year-year wind resource assessment of tribal lands, beginning with the installation of wind monitoring towers on the Mutton Mountains site in 2003, and collection of on-site wind data is ongoing. The study identified the Mutton Mountain site on the northeastern edge of the reservation as a site with sufficient wind resources to support a commercial power project estimated to generate over 226,000 MWh per year. Initial estimates indicate that the first phase of the project would be approximately 79.5 MW of installed capacity. This Phase 2 study expands and builds on the previously conducted Phase 1 Wind Resource Assessment, dated June 30, 2007. In order to fully assess the economic benefits that may accrue to the Tribes through wind energy development at Mutton Mountain, a planning-level opinion of probable cost was performed to define the costs associated with key design and construction aspects of the proposed project. This report defines the Mutton Mountain project costs and economics in sufficient detail to allow the Tribes to either build the project themselves or contract with a developer under the most favorable terms possible for the Tribes.

  18. Warm-Intermediate inflationary universe model in braneworld cosmologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrera, Ramon

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Warm-intermediate inflationary universe models in the context of braneworld cosmologies, are studied. This study is done in the weak and strong dissipative regimes. We find that, the scalar potentials and dissipation coefficients in terms of the scalar field, evolves as type-power-law and powers of logarithms, respectively. General conditions required for these models to be realizable are derived and discussed. We also study the scalar and tensor perturbations for each regime. We use recent astronomical observations to constraint the parameters appearing in the braneworld models.

  19. Warm-Intermediate inflationary universe model in braneworld cosmologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramon Herrera; Eugenio San Martin

    2011-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Warm-intermediate inflationary universe models in the context of braneworld cosmologies, are studied. This study is done in the weak and strong dissipative regimes. We find that, the scalar potentials and dissipation coefficients in terms of the scalar field, evolves as type-power-law and powers of logarithms, respectively. General conditions required for these models to be realizable are derived and discussed. We also study the scalar and tensor perturbations for each regime. We use recent astronomical observations to constraint the parameters appearing in the braneworld models.

  20. Sensitivity of glaciers and small ice caps to greenhouse warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oerlemans, J.; Fortuin, J.P.F. (Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands))

    1992-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent field programs on glaciers have supplied information that makes simulation of glacier mass balance with meteorological models meaningful. An estimate of world-wide glacier sensitivity based on a modeling study of 12 selected glaciers situated in widely differing climatic regimes shows that for a uniform 1 K warming the area-weighted glacier mass balance will decrease by 0.40 meter per year. This corresponds to a sea-level rise of 0.58 millimeter per year, a value significantly less than earlier estimates.

  1. KeV Warm Dark Matter and Composite Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean J Robinson; Yuhsin Tsai

    2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Elementary keV sterile Dirac neutrinos can be a natural ingredient of the composite neutrino scenario. For a certain class of composite neutrino theories, these sterile neutrinos naturally have the appropriate mixing angles to be resonantly produced warm dark matter (WDM). Alternatively, we show these sterile neutrinos can be WDM produced by an entropy-diluted thermal freeze-out, with the necessary entropy production arising not from an out-of-equilibrium decay, but rather from the confinement of the composite neutrino sector, provided there is sufficient supercooling.

  2. Sheet metal stamping die design for warm forming

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Amit K. (Ann Arbor, MI)

    2003-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In metal stamping dies, by taking advantage of improved material flow by selectively warming the die, flat sections of the die can contribute to the flow of material throughout the workpiece. Local surface heating can be accomplished by placing a heating block in the die. Distribution of heating at the flat lower train central regions outside of the bend region allows a softer flow at a lower stress to enable material flow into the thinner, higher strain areas at the bend/s. The heating block is inserted into the die and is powered by a power supply.

  3. Warm Weather and the Daily Commute | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you sureReportsofDepartmentSeries |Attacks |VisualizingWarm Weather and the

  4. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternativeOperational ManagementDemand Module ThisAtAugust2Tropical Warm

  5. Wildfires may contribute more to global warming than previously predicted

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfires may contribute more to global warming Wildfires may

  6. Wildfires may contribute more to global warming than previously predicted

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfires may contribute more to global warming Wildfires

  7. A LEO-Based Solar-Shade System to Mitigate Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suresh, Rahul

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of a Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO) based solar-shade system, as part of a technically- and financially-viable multipurpose system to provide long-term solutions to global warming and the energy crisis is discussed. The proposed solar-shade and power system would be enabled by the development of a previously-proposed less-expensive, environment-friendly, space-elevator system to lift mass into space. The solar shades, even during their early deployment and growth in LEO, would provide benefits such as reduction of space-debris and depletion of the Van Allen radiation belts.The Terrestrial temperature profile has been approximated for each latitudinal zone with a one-dimensional model. A shade ring at an altitude of 2000-4000 km, consisting of thin-film mega panels totaling up to 4% of the earths surface area (to block ~1% of insolation), is proposed. The effects of such near-polar rings on the global temperature pattern has been examined using the simple model. Specific emphasis has been laid on this e...

  8. The Transient Circulation Response to Radiative Forcings and Sea Surface Warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staten, Paul; Reichler, Thomas; Lu, Jian

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Tropospheric circulation shifts have strong potential to impact surface climate. But the magnitude of these shifts in a changing climate, and the attending regional hydrological changes, are difficult to project. Part of this difficulty arises from our lack of understanding of the physical mechanisms behind the circulation shifts themselves. In order to better delineate circulation shifts and their respective causes, we decompose the circulation response into (1) the "direct" response to radiative forcings themselves, and (2) the "indirect" response to changing sea surface temperatures. Using ensembles of 90-day climate model simulations with immediate switch-on forcings, including perturbed greenhouse gas concentrations, stratospheric ozone concentrations, and sea surface temperatures, we document the direct and indirect transient responses of the zonal mean general circulation, and investigate the roles of previously proposed mechanisms in shifting the midlatitude jet. We find that both the direct and indirect wind responses often begin in the lower stratosphere. Changes in midlatitude eddies are ubiquitous and synchronous with the midlatitude zonal wind response. Shifts in the critical latitude of wave absorption on either flank of the jet are not indicted as primary factors for the poleward shifting jet, although we see some evidence for increasing equatorward wave reflection over the southern hemisphere in response to sea surface warming. Mechanisms for the northern hemisphere jet shift are less clear.

  9. Evidence for a Global Warming at the Termination I Boundary and Its Possible Cosmic Dust Cause

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul A. LaViolette

    2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A comparison of northern and southern hemispheric paleotemperature profiles suggests that the Bolling-Allerod Interstadial, Younger Dryas stadial, and subsequent Preboreal warming which occurred at the end of the last ice age were characterized by temperatures that changed synchronously in various parts of the world, implying that these climatic oscillations were produced by significant changes in the Earth's energy balance. These globally coordinated oscillations are not easily explained by ocean current mechanisms such as bistable flipping of ocean deep-water production or regional temperature changes involving the NW/SE migration of the North Atlantic polar front. They also are not accounted for by Earth orbital changes in seasonality or by increases in atmospheric CO-2 or CH-4. On the other hand, evidence of an elevated cosmic ray flux and of a major interstellar dust incursion around 15,800 years B.P. suggest that a cosmic ray wind driven incursion of interstellar dust and gas may have played a key role through its activation of the Sun and alteration of light transmission through the interplanetary medium.

  10. Evidence for a Global Warming at the Termination I Boundary and Its Possible Cosmic Dust Cause

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaViolette, P A

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A comparison of northern and southern hemispheric paleotemperature profiles suggests that the Bolling-Allerod Interstadial, Younger Dryas stadial, and subsequent Preboreal warming which occurred at the end of the last ice age were characterized by temperatures that changed synchronously in various parts of the world, implying that these climatic oscillations were produced by significant changes in the Earth's energy balance. These globally coordinated oscillations are not easily explained by ocean current mechanisms such as bistable flipping of ocean deep-water production or regional temperature changes involving the NW/SE migration of the North Atlantic polar front. They also are not accounted for by Earth orbital changes in seasonality or by increases in atmospheric CO-2 or CH-4. On the other hand, evidence of an elevated cosmic ray flux and of a major interstellar dust incursion around 15,800 years B.P. suggest that a cosmic ray wind driven incursion of interstellar dust and gas may have played a key role ...

  11. Simulations for experimental study of warm dense matter and inertial fusion energy applications on NDCX-II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnard, J J; Armijo, J; Bieniosek, F M; Friedman, A; Hay, M J; Henestroza, E; Logan, B G; More, R M; Ni, P A; Perkins, L J; Ng, S; Wurtele, J S; Yu, S S; Zylstra, A B

    2010-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment II (NDCX II) is an induction accelerator planned for initial commissioning in 2012. The final design calls for a {approx}3 MeV, {approx}30 A Li{sup +} ion beam, delivered in a bunch with characteristic pulse duration of 1 ns, and transverse dimension of order 1 mm. The purpose of NDCX II is to carry out experimental studies of material in the warm dense matter regime, and ion beam/hydrodynamic coupling experiments relevant to heavy ion based inertial fusion energy. In preparation for this new machine, we have carried out hydrodynamic simulations of ion-beam-heated, metallic solid targets, connecting quantities related to observables, such as brightness temperature and expansion velocity at the critical frequency, with the simulated fluid density, temperature, and velocity. We examine how these quantities depend on two commonly used equations of state.

  12. DISCOVERY OF 'WARM DUST' GALAXIES IN CLUSTERS AT z {approx} 0.3: EVIDENCE FOR STRIPPING OF COOL DUST IN THE DENSE ENVIRONMENT?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rawle, T. D.; Rex, M.; Egami, E.; Walth, G.; Pereira, M. J. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Chung, S. M.; Gonzalez, A. H. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-2055 (United States); Perez-Gonzalez, P. G. [Departamento de Astrofisica, Facultad de CC. Fisicas,Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Smail, I. [Institute for Computational Cosmology, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Altieri, B.; Valtchanov, I. [Herschel Science Centre, ESAC, ESA, P.O. Box 78, Villanueva de la Canada, E-28691 Madrid (Spain); Appleton, P.; Fadda, D. [IPAC, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Alba, A. Berciano [ASTRON, Oude Hoogeveensedijk 4, NL-7991 PD Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Blain, A. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Dessauges-Zavadsky, M. [Observatoire de Geneve, Universite de Geneve, 51 Ch. des Maillettes, CH-1290 Sauverny (Switzerland); Van der Werf, P. P. [Sterrewacht Leiden, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Zemcov, M., E-mail: trawle@as.arizona.edu [Department of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Using far-infrared imaging from the 'Herschel Lensing Survey', we derive dust properties of spectroscopically confirmed cluster member galaxies within two massive systems at z {approx} 0.3: the merging Bullet Cluster and the more relaxed MS2137.3-2353. Most star-forming cluster sources ({approx}90%) have characteristic dust temperatures similar to local field galaxies of comparable infrared (IR) luminosity (T{sub dust} {approx} 30 K). Several sub-luminous infrared galaxy (LIRG; L{sub IR} < 10{sup 11} L{sub Sun }) Bullet Cluster members are much warmer (T{sub dust} > 37 K) with far-infrared spectral energy distribution (SED) shapes resembling LIRG-type local templates. X-ray and mid-infrared data suggest that obscured active galactic nuclei do not contribute significantly to the infrared flux of these 'warm dust' galaxies. Sources of comparable IR luminosity and dust temperature are not observed in the relaxed cluster MS2137, although the significance is too low to speculate on an origin involving recent cluster merging. 'Warm dust' galaxies are, however, statistically rarer in field samples (>3{sigma}), indicating that the responsible mechanism may relate to the dense environment. The spatial distribution of these sources is similar to the whole far-infrared bright population, i.e., preferentially located in the cluster periphery, although the galaxy hosts tend toward lower stellar masses (M{sub *} < 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }). We propose dust stripping and heating processes which could be responsible for the unusually warm characteristic dust temperatures. A normal star-forming galaxy would need 30%-50% of its dust removed (preferentially stripped from the outer reaches, where dust is typically cooler) to recover an SED similar to a 'warm dust' galaxy. These progenitors would not require a higher IR luminosity or dust mass than the currently observed normal star-forming population.

  13. Sequential high temperature reduction, low temperature hydrolysis...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    high temperature reduction, low temperature hydrolysis for the regeneration of sulfated NOx trap catalysts. Sequential high temperature reduction, low temperature hydrolysis for...

  14. Energy and global warming impacts of CFC alternative technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, S.K.; Hughes, P.J.; Fairchild, P.D. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Kusik, C.L.; Dieckmann, J.T.; McMahon, E.M.; Hobday, N. (Little (Arthur D.), Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States))

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this study is to develop representative indications of the relative energy use, associated CO{sub 2} emissions, and total equivalent warming impact (TEWI) of viable options to replace CFCs in their major energy-related application areas. It was motivated, in part, by a concern that most attention to date has focused on the DIRECT global warming effect of CFC's and their alternatives, with adequate attention being paid to the INDIRECT effect of the CO{sub 2} emissions arising from the differences in energy consumption by systems using different alternatives. The DIRECT and INDIRECT contributions are combined in this analysis to determine the TEWI of the various technical options. The study is international in scope and takes into account significant differences in present CFC end-use practices, sources of energy, and other societal factors between Europe, Japan, and North America. This study should be considered an overview of key issues. The analysis addressed CFCs as well as alternative chemicals and technology alternatives in uses such as refrigeration, foam insulation, and metal and electronic cleaning and drying processes.

  15. Energy and global warming impacts of CFC alternative technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, S.K.; Hughes, P.J.; Fairchild, P.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kusik, C.L.; Dieckmann, J.T.; McMahon, E.M.; Hobday, N. [Little (Arthur D.), Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this study is to develop representative indications of the relative energy use, associated CO{sub 2} emissions, and total equivalent warming impact (TEWI) of viable options to replace CFCs in their major energy-related application areas. It was motivated, in part, by a concern that most attention to date has focused on the DIRECT global warming effect of CFC`s and their alternatives, with adequate attention being paid to the INDIRECT effect of the CO{sub 2} emissions arising from the differences in energy consumption by systems using different alternatives. The DIRECT and INDIRECT contributions are combined in this analysis to determine the TEWI of the various technical options. The study is international in scope and takes into account significant differences in present CFC end-use practices, sources of energy, and other societal factors between Europe, Japan, and North America. This study should be considered an overview of key issues. The analysis addressed CFCs as well as alternative chemicals and technology alternatives in uses such as refrigeration, foam insulation, and metal and electronic cleaning and drying processes.

  16. Coal-Derived Warm Syngas Purification and CO2 Capture-Assisted Methane Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dagle, Robert A.; King, David L.; Li, Xiaohong S.; Xing, Rong; Spies, Kurt A.; Zhu, Yunhua; Rainbolt, James E.; Li, Liyu; Braunberger, B.

    2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Gasifier-derived syngas from coal has many applications in the area of catalytic transformation to fuels and chemicals. Raw syngas must be treated to remove a number of impurities that would otherwise poison the synthesis catalysts. Inorganic impurities include alkali salts, chloride, sulfur compounds, heavy metals, ammonia, and various P, As, Sb, and Se- containing compounds. Systems comprising multiple sorbent and catalytic beds have been developed for the removal of impurities from gasified coal using a warm cleanup approach. This approach has the potential to be more economic than the currently available acid gas removal (AGR) approaches and improves upon currently available processes that do not provide the level of impurity removal that is required for catalytic synthesis application. Gasification also lends itself much more readily to the capture of CO2, important in the regulation and control of greenhouse gas emissions. CO2 capture material was developed and in this study was demonstrated to assist in methane production from the purified syngas. Simultaneous CO2 sorption enhances the CO methanation reaction through relaxation of thermodynamic constraint, thus providing economic benefit rather than simply consisting of an add-on cost for carbon capture and release. Molten and pre-molten LiNaKCO3 can promote MgO and MgO-based double salts to capture CO2 with high cycling capacity. A stable cycling CO2 capacity up to 13 mmol/g was demonstrated. This capture material was specifically developed in this study to operate in the same temperature range and therefore integrate effectively with warm gas cleanup and methane synthesis. By combining syngas methanation, water-gas-shift, and CO2 sorption in a single reactor, single pass yield to methane of 99% was demonstrated at 10 bar and 330oC when using a 20 wt% Ni/MgAl2O4 catalyst and a molten-phase promoted MgO-based sorbent. Under model feed conditions both the sorbent and catalyst exhibited favorable stability after multiple test cycles. The cleanup for warm gas cleanup of inorganics was broken down into three major steps: chloride removal, sulfur removal, and the removal for a multitude of trace metal contaminants. Na2CO3 was found to optimally remove chlorides at an operating temperature of 450篊. For sulfur removal two regenerable ZnO beds are used for bulk H2S removal at 450篊 (<5 ppm S) and a non-regenerable ZnO bed for H2S polishing at 300篊 (<40 ppb S). It was also found that sulfur from COS could be adsorbed (to levels below our detection limit of 40 ppb) in the presence of water that leads to no detectable slip of H2S. Finally, a sorbent material comprising of Cu and Ni was found to be effective in removing trace metal impurities such as AsH3 and PH3 when operating at 300篊. Proof-of-concept of the integrated cleanup process was demonstrated with gasifier-generated syngas produced at the Western Research Institute using Wyoming Decker Coal. When operating with a ~1 SLPM feed, multiple inorganic contaminant removal sorbents and a tar-reforming bed was able to remove the vast majority of contaminants from the raw syngas. A tar-reforming catalyst was employed due to the production of tars generated from the gasifier used in this particular study. It is envisioned that in a real application a commercial scale gasifier operating at a higher temperature would produce lesser amount of tar. Continuous operation of a poison-sensitive copper-based WGS catalyst located downstream from the cleanup steps resulted in successful demonstration. ?

  17. Next Generation Low-Global Warming Potential Refrigerants R&D...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of low-global warming potential (GWP) refrigerants. DOE commissioned this roadmap to establish a set of high-priority research and development (R&D) activities that...

  18. Development of High-Volume Warm Forming of Low-Cost Magnesium...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    mccarty13.pdf More Documents & Publications Warm Forming of AluminumAMD 307 Magnesium Front End Research And Development (AMD604) Magnesium Front End Design And Development...

  19. Preferred temperature of bluegill, Lepomis macrochirus, relative to changing ambient temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hagar, Arthur Freeman

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -Changes in Ambient Tempezature Figure 5. Relationship of Rate Parameters KC and KW to 21 23 Ambient Tempezatuze Figure 6. Relationship of the Time-Lag Parameter, LAMBDA, to Ambient Temperature 36 Figure 7. Relative Contribution of' the "Warm" (BWE) and "Cold... and cold components of temperature preference are treated separately in the simulation model. Their steaQ-state contributions 39 to TP, which were labeled BWE and BCE, were computed. by 1) arbitrarily setting BWE=O. O C at TA=10. 0 0 and BCE=O. O C...

  20. Elevated air temperature alters an old-field insect community in a multi-factor climate change experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villalpando, Sean [Appalachian State University; Williams, Ray [ORNL; Norby, Richard J [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To address how multiple, interacting climate drivers may affect plant-insect community associations, we sampled the insect community from a constructed old-field plant community grown under simultaneous [CO2], temperature, and water manipulation. Insects were identified to morphospecies, assigned to feeding guilds and abundance, richness and evenness quantified. Warming significantly increased Order Thysanoptera abundance and reduced overall morphospecies richness and evenness. Non-metric multidimensional scaling clearly supported the effect of warming on insect community composition. Reductions in richness for herbivores and parasitoids suggest trophic-level effects within the insect community. Analysis of dominant insects demonstrated the effects of warming were limited to a relatively small number of morphospecies. Reported reductions in whole-community foliar N at elevated [CO2] unexpectedly did not result in any effects on herbivores. These results demonstrate climatic warming may alter certain insect communities via effects on insect species most responsive to higher temperature, contributing to a change in community structure.

  1. Storage and Retrieval of Thermal Light in Warm Atomic Vapor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young-Wook Cho; Yoon-Ho Kim

    2010-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We report slowed propagation and storage and retrieval of thermal light in warm rubidium vapor using the effect of electromagnetically-induced transparency (EIT). We first demonstrate slowed-propagation of the probe thermal light beam through an EIT medium by measuring the second-order correlation function of the light field using the Hanbury-Brown$-$Twiss interferometer. We also report an experimental study on the effect of the EIT slow-light medium on the temporal coherence of thermal light. Finally, we demonstrate the storage and retrieval of thermal light beam in the EIT medium. The direct measurement of the photon number statistics of the retrieved light field shows that the photon number statistics is preserved during the storage and retrieval process.

  2. Warm inflationary universe model with viscous pressure on the brane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Setare, M R

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present work warm inflationary universe model with viscous pressure on the brane in high-dissipation regime is studied. We derive a condition which is required for this model to be realizable in slow-roll approximation. We also present analytic expressions for density perturbation and amplitude of tensor perturbation in longitudinal gauge. General expressions of tensor-to-scalar ratio, scalar spectral index and its running are obtained. We develop our model by using chaotic potential, the characteristics of this model are calculated for two specific cases: 1- Dissipative parameter $\\Gamma$ and bulk viscous parameter $\\zeta$ are constant parameters. 2- Dissipative parameter as a function of scalar field $\\phi$ and bulk viscous parameter as a function of radiation-matter mixture energy density $\\rho$. The parameters of the model are restricted by the nine-year Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe (WMAP9) and Planck observational data.

  3. Status of the warm front end of PXIE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shemyakin, A; Andrews, R; Baffes, C; Chen, A; Hanna, B; Prost, L; Saewert, G; Scarpine, V; Steimel, J; Sun, D; Li, D; D'Arcy, R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A CW-compatible, pulsed H- superconducting linac is envisaged as a possible path for upgrading Fermilab's injection complex. To validate the concept of the front- end of such a machine, a test accelerator (a.k.a. PXIE) is under construction. The warm part of this accelerator comprises a 10 mA DC, 30 keV H- ion source, a 2m-long LEBT, a 2.1 MeV CW RFQ, and a 10-m long MEBT that is capable of creating a large variety of bunch structures. The paper will report commissioning results of a partially assembled LEBT, status of RFQ manufacturing, and describe development of the MEBT, in particular, of elements of its chopping system.

  4. Acclimatization of soil respiration to warming in a tall grass prairie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to climatic warming24 . The feedback mechanism is usually based on the assumption that observed sensitivity feedbacks into the climatic system. Climatic warming, on one hand, potentially stimulates nutrient) since 21 November 1999 to study respiratory sensitivity to climate change. We also used clipping

  5. Mechanisms of summertime upper Arctic Ocean warming and the effect on sea ice melt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    but occurs over a much broader area of the ice pack. Citation: Steele, M., J. Zhang, and W. Ermold (2010Mechanisms of summertime upper Arctic Ocean warming and the effect on sea ice melt Michael Steele,1 summertime upper ocean warming and sea ice melt during the 21st century in the Arctic Ocean. Our first

  6. GLOBAL CHANGE ECOLOGY -ORIGINAL RESEARCH Warming and the dependence of limber pine (Pinus flexilis)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kueppers, Lara M.

    experimental warming did not appear to reduce cold limitation at high elevation. Instead, gas exchange users. A. B. Moyes (&) L. M. Kueppers School of Natural Sciences, University of California Merced) 171:271282 DOI 10.1007/s00442-012-2410-0 #12;models forecast warming of 26 癈 (median 3.4 癈) across

  7. Monsoons in a warming and more populous world: the question of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the 1990's 45% were in Asia 30% in US 10% in Europe Human impact 2 billion people affected 400. Global warming and climate change 3. Population increase and attendant problems 4. Societal and human if global warming were to occur? Monsoons Tropical cyclones Droughts Floods Dust Storms How can

  8. Global warming due to increasing absorbed solar radiation Kevin E. Trenberth1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fasullo, John

    Global warming due to increasing absorbed solar radiation Kevin E. Trenberth1 and John T. Fasullo1 from an energy budget standpoint comes from increases in absorbed solar radiation that stem directly. T. Fasullo (2009), Global warming due to increasing absorbed solar radiation, Geophys. Res. Lett

  9. Teaching Energy Balance using Round Numbers: A Quantitative Approach to the Greenhouse Effect and Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blais, Brian

    Teaching Energy Balance using Round Numbers: A Quantitative Approach to the Greenhouse Effect, 2003 Abstract The idea of energy balance used to explain the greenhouse effect and global warming and astronomy curricula. The idea of energy balance is used to explain the greenhouse effect and global warming

  10. The Effects of Three-Dimensional Canopy Management on Overseeded Warm-Season Fairway Turf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as a sustainable warm-season turfgrass but a lack of cultural management data has hindered its acceptance. FineThe Effects of Three-Dimensional Canopy Management on Overseeded Warm-Season Fairway Turf Scientist: Kurt Steinke, Department of Soil and Crop Sciences Funding: $7,000 The objectives are to 1) discover

  11. Warming may create substantial water supply shortages in the Colorado River basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warming may create substantial water supply shortages in the Colorado River basin Gregory J. Mc (2007), Warming may create substantial water supply shortages in the Colorado River basin, Geophys. Res; published 27 November 2007. [1] The high demand for water, the recent multiyear drought (1999

  12. Ion beam heated target simulations for warm dense matter physics and inertial fusion energy$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    Ion beam heated target simulations for warm dense matter physics and inertial fusion energy$ J Keywords: Ion beam heating Warm dense matter Inertial fusion energy targets Hydrodynamic simulation a b fusion energy-related beam-target coupling. Simulations of various target materials (including solids

  13. Climate Change: Sources of Warming in the Late 20th Century

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerald E. Marsh

    2009-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The role of the North Atlantic Oscillation, the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, volcanic and other aerosols, as well as the extraordinary solar activity of the late 20th century are discussed in the context of the warming since the mid-1970s. Much of that warming is found to be due to natural causes.

  14. Entropy Shows that Global Warming Should Cause Increased Variability in the Weather

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Michael Williams

    2001-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Elementary physical reasoning seems to leave it inevitable that global warming would increase the variability of the weather. The first two terms in an approximation to the global entropy are used to show that global warming has increased the free energy available to drive the weather, and that the variance of the weather should increase correspondingly.

  15. The warming climate could put food supplies at risk over the next decade or two.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floeter, Sergio Ricardo

    change. The results suggest that with climate warming, the risk of losing 10% or more of the global wheat by 20 times, to a 1 in 10 chance. Environ. Res. Lett. 9, 074003 (2014) AGRICULTURE Global warming could, has a buried ocean that is saltier than many seas on Earth. Titan, with its thick atmosphere

  16. High performance flexible top-emitting warm-white organic light-emitting devices and chromaticity shift mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Hongying; Deng, Lingling; Chen, Shufen, E-mail: iamsfchen@njupt.edu.cn, E-mail: wei-huang@njupt.edu.cn; Xu, Ying; Zhao, Xiaofei; Cheng, Fan [Key Laboratory for Organic Electronics and Information Displays (KLOEID) and Institute of Advanced Materials (IAM), Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, 210023 Nanjing (China)] [Key Laboratory for Organic Electronics and Information Displays (KLOEID) and Institute of Advanced Materials (IAM), Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, 210023 Nanjing (China); Huang, Wei, E-mail: iamsfchen@njupt.edu.cn, E-mail: wei-huang@njupt.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Organic Electronics and Information Displays (KLOEID) and Institute of Advanced Materials (IAM), Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, 210023 Nanjing (China) [Key Laboratory for Organic Electronics and Information Displays (KLOEID) and Institute of Advanced Materials (IAM), Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, 210023 Nanjing (China); Jiangsu-Singapore Joint Research Center for Organic/Bio- Electronics and Information Displays and Institute of Advanced Materials, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing 211816 (China)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Flexible warm-white top-emitting organic light-emitting devices (TEOLEDs) are fabricated onto PET substrates with a simple semi-transparent cathode Sm/Ag and two-color phosphors respectively doped into a single host material TCTA. By adjusting the relative position of the orange-red EML sandwiched between the blue emitting layers, the optimized device exhibits the highest power/current efficiency of 8.07 lm/W and near 13 cd/A, with a correlated color temperature (CCT) of 4105 K and a color rendering index (CRI) of 70. In addition, a moderate chromaticity variation of (-0.025, +0.008) around warm white illumination coordinates (0.45, 0.44) is obtained over a large luminance range of 1000 to 10000 cd/m{sup 2}. The emission mechanism is discussed via delta-doping method and single-carrier device, which is summarized that the carrier trapping, the exciton quenching, the mobility change and the recombination zone alteration are negative to color stability while the energy transfer process and the blue/red/blue sandwiched structure are contributed to the color stability in our flexible white TEOLEDs.

  17. LUMINOUS AND VARIABLE STARS IN M31 AND M33. I. THE WARM HYPERGIANTS AND POST-RED SUPERGIANT EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Humphreys, Roberta M.; Davidson, Kris; Grammer, Skyler; Kneeland, Nathan [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, 116 Church Street SE, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Martin, John C. [University of Illinois, Springfield, IL (United States); Weis, Kerstin; Burggraf, Birgitta, E-mail: roberta@umn.edu [Astronomical Institute, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum (Germany)

    2013-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The progenitors of Type IIP supernovae (SNe) have an apparent upper limit to their initial masses of about 20 M{sub Sun }, suggesting that the most massive red supergiants evolve to warmer temperatures before their terminal explosion. But very few post-red supergiants are known. We have identified a small group of luminous stars in M31 and M33 that are candidates for post-red supergiant evolution. These stars have A-F-type supergiant absorption line spectra and strong hydrogen emission. Their spectra are also distinguished by the Ca II triplet and [Ca II] doublet in emission formed in a low-density circumstellar environment. They all have significant near- and mid-infrared excess radiation due to free-free emission and thermal emission from dust. We estimate the amount of mass they have shed and discuss their wind parameters and mass loss rates, which range from a few Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} to 10{sup -4} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. On an H-R diagram, these stars will overlap the region of the luminous blue variables (LBVs) at maximum light; however, the warm hypergiants are not LBVs. Their non-spherical winds are not optically thick, and they have not exhibited any significant variability. We suggest, however, that the warm hypergiants may be the progenitors of the ''less luminous'' LBVs such as R71 and even SN1987A.

  18. Illusory Sense of Human Touch from a Warm and Soft Artificial Hand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cabibihan, John-John; Srinivasa, Yeshwin Mysore; Chan, Mark Aaron; Muruganantham, Arrchana

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To touch and be touched are vital to human development, well being, and relationships. However, to those who have lost their arms and hands due to accident or war, touching becomes a serious concern that often leads to psychosocial issues and social stigma. In this paper, we demonstrate that the touch from a warm and soft rubber hand can be perceived by another person as if the touch were coming from a human hand. We describe a three step process toward this goal. First, we made participants select artificial skin samples according to their preferred warmth and softness characteristics. At room temperature, the preferred warmth was found to be 28.4 deg C at the skin surface of a soft silicone rubber material that has a Shore durometer value of 30 at the OO scale. Second, we developed a process to create a rubber hand replica of a human hand. To compare the skin softness of a human hand and artificial hands, a robotic indenter was employed to produce a softness map by recording the displacement data when const...

  19. A Dynamical Framework for KeV Dirac Neutrino Warm Dark Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean J. Robinson; Yuhsin Tsai

    2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    If the source of the reported $3.5$ keV x-ray line is a sterile neutrino, comprising an $\\mathcal{O}(1)$ fraction of the dark matter (DM), then it exhibits the property that its mass times mixing angle is $\\sim \\mbox{few} \\times 10^{-2}$ eV, a plausible mass scale for the active neutrinos. This property is a common feature of Dirac neutrino mixing. We present a framework that dynamically produces light active and keV sterile Dirac neutrinos, with appropriate mixing angles to be the x-ray line source. The central idea is that the right-handed active neutrino is a composite state, while elementary sterile neutrinos gain keV masses similarly to the quarks in extended Technicolor. The entire framework is fixed by just two dynamical scales and may automatically exhibit a warm dark matter (WDM) production mechanism -- dilution of thermal relics from late decays of a heavy composite neutrino -- such that the keV neutrinos may comprise an $\\mathcal{O}(1)$ fraction of the DM. In this framework, the WDM is typically quite cool and within structure formation bounds, with temperature $\\sim \\mbox{few}\\times 10^{-2}~T_\

  20. GISS 2007 Temperature Analysis The year 2007 tied for second warmest in the period of instrumental data, behind the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    is an expected characteristic of global warming, as the loss of ice and snow engenders a positive feedback via causes of global temperature change including unforced chaotic fluctuations. The solar minimum forcing. Figure 1 shows 2007 temperature anomalies relative to the 1951-1980 base period mean. The global mean

  1. PUBLISHED ONLINE: 25 MARCH 2012 | DOI: 10.1038/NGEO1430 Broad range of 2050 warming from an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    assessments. From our simulations, we conclude that warming by the mid- dle of the twenty-first century

  2. Experimental Study on Shear Fatigue Behavior and Stiffness Performance of Warm Mix Asphalt by adding Synthetic Wax

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petit, Christophe; Canestrari, Francesco; Pannunzio, Valter; Virgili, Amadeo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthetic waxes produced by standard and registered processes may be used to manufacture Warm Mix Asphalt (WMA), which is a modified asphalt concrete produced, applied and compacted at temperatures below those typically required. This feature leads to environmental benefits, such as reduced energy consumption, gas and fume emissions, as well as to economic/operational advantages, such as lower production costs and greater hauling distances for extended construction seasons with tighter schedules. The present article serves to compare the mechanical performance of a WMA produced by adding synthetic wax with a traditional Hot Mix Asphalt (HMA) specimen, in terms of shear fatigue response and both complex and stiffness moduli. The experimental results and related modeling work demonstrate that adding synthetic wax into the WMA composition does not hinder either the destructive or non-destructive performance of an HMA, and this finding is corroborated by respectively measuring fatigue life and stiffness.

  3. Global Cooling: Policies to Cool the World and Offset Global Warming from CO2 Using Reflective Roofs and Pavements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen; Rosenfeld, Arthur; Elliot, Matthew

    2009-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Increasing the solar reflectance of the urban surface reduce its solar heat gain, lowers its temperatures, and decreases its outflow of thermal infrared radiation into the atmosphere. This process of 'negative radiative forcing' can help counter the effects of global warming. In addition, cool roofs reduce cooling-energy use in air conditioned buildings and increase comfort in unconditioned buildings; and cool roofs and cool pavements mitigate summer urban heat islands, improving outdoor air quality and comfort. Installing cool roofs and cool pavements in cities worldwide is a compelling win-win-win activity that can be undertaken immediately, outside of international negotiations to cap CO{sub 2} emissions. We propose an international campaign to use solar reflective materials when roofs and pavements are built or resurfaced in temperate and tropical regions.

  4. Experimental Study on Shear Fatigue Behavior and Stiffness Performance of Warm Mix Asphalt by adding Synthetic Wax

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christophe Petit; Anne Millien; Francesco Canestrari; Valter Pannunzio; Amadeo Virgili

    2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthetic waxes produced by standard and registered processes may be used to manufacture Warm Mix Asphalt (WMA), which is a modified asphalt concrete produced, applied and compacted at temperatures below those typically required. This feature leads to environmental benefits, such as reduced energy consumption, gas and fume emissions, as well as to economic/operational advantages, such as lower production costs and greater hauling distances for extended construction seasons with tighter schedules. The present article serves to compare the mechanical performance of a WMA produced by adding synthetic wax with a traditional Hot Mix Asphalt (HMA) specimen, in terms of shear fatigue response and both complex and stiffness moduli. The experimental results and related modeling work demonstrate that adding synthetic wax into the WMA composition does not hinder either the destructive or non-destructive performance of an HMA, and this finding is corroborated by respectively measuring fatigue life and stiffness.

  5. Long-term experimental warming reduces soil nematode populations in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wall, Diana

    warming is expected to increase snow and glacial melt, resulting in higher stream discharge, rising lake levels, and an increase in areas of moist soil, but the potential influence of warming and associated changes in hydrology on the soil ecosystem is poorly understood. To examine the effects of soil warming

  6. Scientist warns against overselling climate change Climate change forecasters should admit that they cannot predict how global warming will affect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, Paul

    that they cannot predict how global warming will affect individual countries, a leading physicist has said-of-deaths-from-ozone-predicted.html) Antarctic sea floor gives clues about effects of future global warming (/earth/environment/climatechange /5279223/Antarctic-sea-floor-gives-clues-about-affects-of-future-global-warming.html) The Vanishing Face

  7. Response and impact of equatorial ocean dynamics and tropical instability waves in the tropical Atlantic under global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    Atlantic under global warming: A regional coupled downscaling study Hyodae Seo1,2 and ShangPing Xie1. Under global warming, both global and regional models exhibit an increased (decreased) rainfall thermal stratification is suggested to be more important under global warming. The strengthened upwelling

  8. A ten-year decrease in plant species richness on a neotropical inselberg:1 detrimental effects of global warming?2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

    of global warming?2 3 EMILE FONTY*, CORINNE SARTHOU, DENIS LARPIN搂 and JEAN-FRAN?OIS4 PONGE*1 5 6 *Mus茅um 15 Keywords: aridity, biodiversity loss, global warming, low forest, plant communities, tropical16 probable cause of the observed species disappearance is global warming, which severely28 affected northern

  9. An Occam's razor view of the lead-lag dispute in global warming Tadeusz J. Ulrych1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woodbury, Allan D.

    1 An Occam's razor view of the lead-lag dispute in global warming Tadeusz J. Ulrych1 and Allan D to the solar flux) which is responsible for the undeniable global warming. For example, "The observation-correlation=non- causality' statement is bogus. The Lead-Lag Dispute in Global Warming An excellent example of the debate

  10. "Global warming and global cooling are physical phenomenon. But the battle over these real or presumed developments is a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baez, John

    "Global warming and global cooling are physical phenomenon. But the battle over these real of catastrophic global warming the greatest hoax ever perpetrated on the American people" What is climate change we have ever seen" What is climate change? Lord Nicholas Stern, October 2006 #12;"Global warming

  11. In Proceedings of the 76th American Meteorological SocietyMeetings,January 1996. STUDENT CONFERENCEON GLOBAL WARMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    CONFERENCEON GLOBAL WARMING: A COLLABORATIVENETWORK-SUPPORTED ECOLOGICALLYHlERARCHIC GEOSCIENCES CURRICULUM Schoolof Education and SocialPolicy Evanston, Illinois 60208 1. INTRODUCTION A five week global warming. WHY GLOBALWARMING? The controversyaround global warming has been growing over the past few decades

  12. Polar versus temperate grounding-line sedimentary systems and marine glacier stability during sea level rise by global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, R.D. (Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States). Geology Dept.); Pyne, A.R. (Victoria Univ., Wellington (New Zealand). Antarctic Research Center); Hunter, L.E.; Rynes, N.R.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Marine-ending glaciers may retreat with global warming as sea level rises by ocean thermal expansion. If the sea floor rises by sediment accumulation, then glaciers may not feel the effect of sea level rise. A submersible ROV and other techniques have been used to collect data from temperate and polar glaciers to compare sediment production and mass balance of their grounding-line systems. Temperature Alaskan valley glaciers flow at about 0.2--2 km/a and have high volumes of supraglacial, englacial and subglacial debris. However, most sediment contributed to the base of their tidewater cliffs comes from subglacial streams or squeezing out subglacial sediment and pushing it with other marine sediment into a morainal bank. Blue Glacier, a thin, locally fed polar glacier in Antarctica, flows slowly and has minimal glacial debris. The grounding-line system at the tidewater cliff is a morainal bank that forms solely by pushing of marine sediment. An Antarctic polar outlet glacier, Mackay Glacier, terminating as a floating glacier-tongue, has similar volumes of basal debris to Alaskan temperature glaciers and flows at 250 m/a. However, no subglacial streams issued from Mackay's grounding line and all sedimentation was by rockfall and grainfall rainout from seawater undermelt of the tongue. A grounding-line wedge of glacimarine diamicton is deposited over subglacial (lodgement ) till. Although Antarctic grounding-line accumulation rates are three orders of magnitude smaller than Alaskan rates, both are capable of compensating for predicted rises in sea level by thermal heating from global warming.

  13. Advance of East Antarctic outlet glaciers during the Hypsithermal: Implications for the volume state of the Antarctic ice sheet under global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Domack, E.W. (Hamilton College, Clinton, NY (United States)); Jull, A.J.T. (Univ. of Arizona, Tucson (United States)); Nakao, Seizo (Geological Survey of Japan, Ibaraki (Japan))

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors present the first circum-East Antarctic chronology for the Holocene, based on 17 radiocarbon dates generated by the accelerator method. Marine sediments form around East Antarctica contain a consistent, high-resolution record of terrigenous (ice-proximal) and biogenic (open-marine) sedimentation during Holocene time. This record demonstrates that biogenic sedimentation beneath the open-marine environment on the continental shelf has been restricted to approximately the past 4 ka, whereas a period of terrigenous sedimentation related to grounding line advance of ice tongues and ice shelves took place between 7 and 4 ka. An earlier period of open-marine (biogenic sedimentation) conditions following the late Pleistocene glacial maximum is recognized from the Prydz Bay (Ocean Drilling Program) record between 10.7 and 7.3 ka. Clearly, the response of outlet systems along the periphery of the East Antarctic ice sheet during the mid-Holocene was expansion. This may have been a direct consequence of climate warming during an Antarctic Hypsithermal. Temperature-accumulation relations for the Antarctic indicate that warming will cause a significant increase in accumulation rather than in ablation. Models that predict a positive mass balance (growth) of the Antarctic ice sheet under global warming are supported by the mid-Holocene data presented herein.

  14. FORMATION OF ORGANIC MOLECULES AND WATER IN WARM DISK ATMOSPHERES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Najita, Joan R. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Adamkovics, Mate; Glassgold, Alfred E. [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations from Spitzer and ground-based infrared spectroscopy reveal significant diversity in the molecular emission from the inner few AU of T Tauri disks. We explore theoretically the possible origin of this diversity by expanding on our earlier thermal-chemical model of disk atmospheres. We consider how variations in grain settling, X-ray irradiation, accretion-related mechanical heating, and the oxygen-to-carbon ratio can affect the thermal and chemical properties of the atmosphere at 0.25-40 AU. We find that these model parameters can account for many properties of the detected molecular emission. The column density of the warm (200-2000 K) molecular atmosphere is sensitive to grain settling and the efficiency of accretion-related heating, which may account, at least in part, for the large range in molecular emission fluxes that have been observed. The dependence of the atmospheric properties on the model parameters may also help to explain trends that have been reported in the literature between molecular emission strength and mid-infrared color, stellar accretion rate, and disk mass. We discuss whether some of the differences between our model results and the observations (e.g., for water) indicate a role for vertical transport and freezeout in the disk midplane. We also discuss how planetesimal formation in the outer disk (beyond the snowline) may imprint a chemical signature on the inner few AU of the disk and speculate on possible observational tracers of this process.

  15. Transitional solar dynamics, cosmic rays and global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Bershadskii

    2009-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar activity is studied using a cluster analysis of the time-fluctuations of the sunspot number. It is shown that in an Historic period the high activity components of the solar cycles exhibit strong clustering, whereas in a Modern period (last seven solar cycles: 1933-2007) they exhibit a white-noise (non-)clustering behavior. Using this observation it is shown that in the Historic period, emergence of the sunspots in the solar photosphere was strongly dominated by turbulent photospheric convection. In the Modern period, this domination was broken by a new more active dynamics of the inner layers of the convection zone. Then, it is shown that the dramatic change of the sun dynamics at the transitional period (between the Historic and Modern periods, solar cycle 1933-1944yy) had a clear detectable impact on Earth climate. A scenario of a chain of transitions in the solar convective zone is suggested in order to explain the observations, and a forecast for the global warming is suggested on the basis of this scenario. A relation between the recent transitions and solar long-period chaotic dynamics has been found. Contribution of the galactic turbulence (due to galactic cosmic rays) has been discussed. These results are also considered in a content of chaotic climate dynamics at millennial timescales.

  16. Effects of warming on the structure and function of a boreal black spruce forest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stith T.Gower

    2010-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A strong argument can be made that there is a greater need to study the effect of warming on boreal forests more than on any other terrestrial biome. Boreal forests, the second largest forest biome, are predicted to experience the greatest warming of any forest biome in the world, but a process-based understanding of how warming will affect the structure and function of this economically and ecologically important forest biome is lacking. The effects of warming on species composition, canopy structure and biogeochemical cycles are likely to be complex; elucidating the underlying mechanisms will require long-term whole-ecosystem manipulation to capture all the complex feedbacks (Shaver et al. 2000, Rustad et al. 2001, Stromgren 2001). The DOE Program for Ecosystem Research funded a three year project (2002-2005) to use replicated heated chambers on soil warming plots in northern Manitoba to examine the direct effects of whole-ecosystem warming. We are nearing completion of our first growing season of measurements (fall 2004). In spite of the unforeseen difficulty of installing the heating cable, our heating and irrigation systems worked extremely well, maintaining environmental conditions within 5-10% of the specified design 99% of the time. Preliminary data from these systems, all designed and built by our laboratory at the University of Wisconsin, support our overall hypothesis that warming will increase the carbon sink strength of upland boreal black spruce forests. I request an additional three years of funding to continue addressing the original objectives: (1) Examine the effect of warming on phenology of overstory, understory and bryophyte strata. Sap flux systems and dendrometer bands, monitored by data loggers, will be used to quantify changes in phenology and water use. (2) Quantify the effects of warming on nitrogen and water use by overstory, understory and bryophytes. (3) Compare effects of warming on autotrophic respiration and above- and belowground net primary production (NPP) budgets. Autotrophic respiration budgets will be constructed using chamber measurements for each tissue and NPP and standard allometry techniques (Gower et al. 1999). (4) Compare microbial and root dynamics, and net soil surface CO2 flux, of control and warmed soils to identify causes that may explain the hypothesized minimal effect of soil warming on soil surface CO2 flux. Fine root production and turnover will be quantified using minirhizotrons, and microbial dynamics will be determined using laboratory mineralization incubations. Soil surface CO2 flux will be measured using automated soil surface CO2 flux systems and portable CO2 analyzers. The proposed study builds on the existing research programs Gower has in northern Manitoba and would not be possible without in-kind services and financial support from Manitoba Hydro and University of Wisconsin.

  17. Energy and environmental policy and electric utilities' choice under uncertain global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takahashi, Masaki

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper reviews and discusses uncertainty about global warming science, impact on society. It also discusses what assumptions have been made and how appropriate the assumptions in scenarios have been for estimating global ...

  18. GR Focus Review Impacts of global warming on Permo-Triassic terrestrial ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benton, Michael

    with long-term aridification and short-term bursts of warming and acid rain. Wildfires at the Permo have succumbed primarily to acid rain, mass wasting, and aridification. Plants may have been more

  19. Global warming, energy efficiency and the role of the built environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DiBona, Donna K

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis attempts to explore the relationships between the Buildings Sector, energy efficiency and global warming. Through a qualitative analysis the author illustrates the connection between these three areas and shows ...

  20. Comment on 'Discussions on common errors in analyzing sea level accelerations, solar trends and global warming'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benestad, R E

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Comment on Scafetta, Nicola. 'Discussion on Common Errors in Analyzing Sea Level Accelerations, Solar Trends and Global Warming.' arXiv:1305.2812 (May 13, 2013a). doi:10.5194/prp-1-37-2013.

  1. Polymer material selection and testing of resistive wire arrangement for a transparent infant warming blanket

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salazar, Madeline

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ThermoCloud was designed as a portable, scalable, transparent electrical blanket to warm and insulate infants, while permitting hassle-free medical transportation and maximum visualization of a patient's thorax and ...

  2. Tropical Pacific response to 20th century Atlantic warming F. Kucharski,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, In-Sik

    and L. Feudale1 Received 16 November 2010; accepted 13 December 2010; published 1 February 2011. [1. Feudale (2011), Tropical Pacific response to 20th century Atlantic warming, Geophys. Res. Lett., 38, L

  3. The effect of surface flooding on the physical-biogeochemical dynamics of a warm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baird, Mark

    Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia Abstract Warm core eddies (WCEs) formed from the East suggest that EAC WCEs with relatively shallow surface flooding contain more phy- toplankton biomass than

  4. How Do You Stay Warm While Saving Money and Energy in Extreme...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Such weather can cause us to use energy a bit differently to stay warm and keep things running. Depending on where you are, you may be keeping the faucet dripping (so pipes don't...

  5. American exceptionalism? Similarities and differences in national attitudes toward energy policy and global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.M. Reiner; T.E. Curry; M.A. de Figueiredo; H.J. Herzog; S.D. Ansolabehere; K. Itaoka; F. Johnsson; M. Odenberger [University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom). Judge Business School

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite sharp differences in government policy, the views of the U.S. public on energy and global warming are remarkably similar to those in Sweden, Britain, and Japan. Americans do exhibit some differences, placing lower priority on the environment and global warming, and with fewer believing that 'global warming has been established as a serious problem and immediate action is necessary'. There also remains a small hard core of skeptics (<10%) who do not believe in the science of climate change and the need for action, a group that is much smaller in the other countries surveyed. The similarities are, however, pervasive. Similar preferences are manifest across a wide range of technology and fuel choices, in support of renewables, in research priorities, in a basic understanding of which technologies produce or reduce carbon dioxide (or misunderstandings in the case of nuclear power), and in willingness to pay for solving global warming. 29 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Collective guilt for harming future ingroup members: The case of American identity and global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferguson, Mark Allen

    2008-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    members on willingness to engage in behaviors that mitigate global warming. An experimental study extended these results by showing similar effects for actual behavior and pro-environmental attitudes. A final experiment extended the other studies...

  7. Upward Shift of the Atmospheric General Circulation under Global Warming: Theory and Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Martin Simran

    Many features of the general circulation of the atmosphere shift upward in response to warming in simulations of climate change with both general circulation models (GCMs) and cloud-system-resolving models. The importance ...

  8. SKIPJACK TUNA, KATSVWONVS PELAMIS, HABITAT BASED ON TEMPERATURE AND OXYGEN REQUIREMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SKIPJACK TUNA, KATSVWONVS PELAMIS, HABITAT BASED ON TEMPERATURE AND OXYGEN REQUIREMENTS RICHARD A,Katsuwonus pelamis, has generally been assumed to be the warm surface layers oftropical and subtropical ocean, where. For skipjack tuna, Katsllwonus pelamis (Lin- naeus), the question "Where are the fish?" is par- ticularly hard

  9. Phenomenological solar signature in 400 years of reconstructed Northern Hemisphere temperature record

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scafetta, Nicola

    ). The sun might have contributed approximately 50% of the observed global warming since 1900 (Scafetta of global tem- perature and TSI have been carried out in order to under- stand the causes of climate; published 15 September 2006. [1] We study the solar impact on 400 years of a global surface temperature

  10. IC5063: AGN driven outflow of warm and cold gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Morganti; J. Holt; L. Saripalli; T. A. Oosterloo; C. N. Tadhunter

    2007-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new ATCA 17- and 24-GHz radio images and ESO-NTT optical spectra of the radio-loud Seyfert galaxy IC5063, the first galaxy in which a fast (~ 600 km/s) outflow of neutral hydrogen was discovered. The new radio data confirm the triple radio structure with a central core and two resolved radio lobes. This implies that the previously detected fast outflow of neutral gas is occurring off-nucleus, near a radio lobe about 0.5 kpc from the core. The ionised gas shows complex kinematics in the region co-spatial with the radio emission. Broad and blueshifted (~ 500 km/s) emission is observed in the region of the radio lobe, at the same location as the blueshifted HI absorption. The velocity of the ionised outflow is similar to the one found in HI. The first order correspondence between the radio and optical properties suggests that the outflow is driven by the interaction between the radio jet and the ISM. Despite the high outflow velocities, no evidence is found for the ionisation of the gas being due to fast shocks in the region of the outflow, indicating that photoionisation from the AGN is likely to be the dominant ionisation mechanism. The outflow rate of the warm (ionised) gas is small compared to that of the cold gas. The mass outflow rate associated with the HI is in the same range as for ``mild'' starburst-driven superwinds in ULIRGs. However, in IC5063, the AGN-driven outflow appears to be limited to the inner kpc region of the galaxy. The kinetic power associated with the HI outflow is a small fraction (a few x 10^-4) of the Eddington luminosity of the galaxy but is a significant fraction (~ 0.1) of the nuclear bolometric luminosity. In IC5063, the outflows may have sufficient kinetic power to have a significant impact on the evolution of the ISM in the host galaxy.

  11. Optimized Phosphors for Warm White LED Light Engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Setlur, Anant; Brewster, Megan; Garcia, Florencio; Hill, M. Christine; Lyons, Robert; Murphy, James; Stecher, Tom; Stoklosa, Stan; Weaver, Stan; Happek, Uwe; Aesram, Danny; Deshpande, Anirudha

    2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this program is to develop phosphor systems and LED light engines that have steady-state LED efficacies (using LEDs with a 60% wall-plug efficiency) of 105120 lm/W with correlated color temperatures (CCT) ~3000 K, color rendering indices (CRI) >85, <0.003 distance from the blackbody curve (dbb), and <2% loss in phosphor efficiency under high temperature, high humidity conditions. In order to reach these goals, this involves the composition and processing optimization of phosphors previously developed by GE in combination with light engine package modification.

  12. Warming of Global Abyssal and Deep Southern Ocean Waters between the 1990s and 2000s: Contributions to Global Heat and Sea Level Rise Budgets*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Gregory C.

    Warming of Global Abyssal and Deep Southern Ocean Waters between the 1990s and 2000s: Contributions of recent warming of these regions in global heat and sea level budgets. The authors 1) compute warming produces a 0.053 (60.017) mm yr21 increase in global average sea level and the deep warming south

  13. What causes the excessive response of clear-sky greenhouse effect to El Nin~o warming in Community Atmosphere Models?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Dezheng

    What causes the excessive response of clear-sky greenhouse effect to El Nin~o warming in Community.-Z. Sun (2008), What causes the excessive response of clear-sky greenhouse effect to El Nin~o warming for global warming because the latter may have a different spatial pattern of warming [e.g., Sun and Held

  14. Intense Ion Beam for Warm Dense Matter Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, Joshua Eugene

    2008-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is exploring the physical limits of compression and focusing of ion beams for heating material to warm dense matter (WDM) and fusion ignition conditions. The NDCX is a beam transport experiment with several components at a scale comparable to an inertial fusion energy driver. The NDCX is an accelerator which consists of a low-emittance ion source, high-current injector, solenoid matching section, induction bunching module, beam neutralization section, and final focusing system. The principal objectives of the experiment are to control the beam envelope, demonstrate effective neutralization of the beam space-charge, control the velocity tilt on the beam, and understand defocusing effects, field imperfections, and limitations on peak intensity such as emittance and aberrations. Target heating experiments with space-charge dominated ion beams require simultaneous longitudinal bunching and transverse focusing. A four-solenoid lattice is used to tune the beam envelope to the necessary focusing conditions before entering the induction bunching module. The induction bunching module provides a head-to-tail velocity ramp necessary to achieve peak axial compression at the desired focal plane. Downstream of the induction gap a plasma column neutralizes the beam space charge so only emittance limits the focused beam intensity. We present results of beam transport through a solenoid matching section and simultaneous focusing of a singly charged K{sup +} ion bunch at an ion energy of 0.3 MeV. The results include a qualitative comparison of experimental and calculated results after the solenoid matching section, which include time resolved current density, transverse distributions, and phase-space of the beam at different diagnostic planes. Electron cloud and gas measurements in the solenoid lattice and in the vicinity of intercepting diagnostics are also presented. Finally, comparisons of improved experimental and calculated axial focus (> 100 x axial compression, < 2 ns pulses) and higher peak energy deposition on target are also presented. These achievements demonstrate the capabilities for near term target heating experiments to T{sub e} {approx} 0.1 eV and for future ion accelerators to heat targets to T{sub e} > 1 eV.

  15. Identification of external influences on temperatures in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonfils, C; Duffy, P; Santer, B; Wigley, T; Lobell, D; Phillips, T; Doutriaux, C

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use eight different observational datasets to estimate California-average temperature trends over 1950-1999. Observed results are compared to trends from a suite of control simulations of natural internal climate variability. Observed increases in annual-mean surface temperature are distinguishable from climate noise in some but not all observational datasets. The most robust results are large positive trends in mean and maximum daily temperatures in late winter/early spring, as well as increases in minimum daily temperatures from January to September. These trends are inconsistent with model-based estimates of natural internal climate variability, and thus require one or more external forcing agents to be explained. Our results suggest that the warming of Californian winters over the second half of the twentieth century is associated with human-induced changes in large-scale atmospheric circulation. We also hypothesize that the lack of a detectable increase in summertime maximum temperature arises from a cooling associated with large-scale irrigation. This cooling may have, until now, counteracted the warming induced by increasing greenhouse gases and urbanization effects.

  16. High Temperatures & Electricity Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High Temperatures & Electricity Demand An Assessment of Supply Adequacy in California Trends.......................................................................................................1 HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND.....................................................................................................................7 SECTION I: HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND ..........................9 BACKGROUND

  17. N2-associated surface warming on early Mars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    von Paris, P; Rauer, H; Stock, J W

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Early Mars may have had a warmer and denser atmosphere allowing for the presence of liquid water on the surface. However, climate model studies have not been able to reproduce these conditions even with a CO2 atmosphere of several bars. Recent 3D simulations of the early Mars climate show that mean surface temperatures only slightly below 273K could be reached locally. We want to investigate the effect of increased partial pressures of N2 on early Mars' surface temperature by including pressure broadening of absorption lines and collision-induced N2-N2 absorption. A 1D radiative-convective cloud-free atmospheric model was used to calculate temperature profiles and surface conditions. We performed a parameter study varying the N2 partial pressures from 0 to 0.5bar at CO2 partial pressures between 0.02bar and 3bar. These values are consistent with existing estimates of the initial, pre-Noachian reservoir. Solar insolation was set to be consistent with the late Noachian. Our 1D global mean simulations clearly sh...

  18. Combined x-ray scattering, radiography, and velocity interferometry/streaked optical pyrometry measurements of warm dense carbon using a novel technique of shock-and-release

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Falk, K.; Collins, L. A.; Kagan, G.; Kress, J. D.; Montgomery, D. S.; Srinivasan, B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Gamboa, E. J. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States) [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, MS 72, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Tzeferacos, P. [Flash Center for Computational Science, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)] [Flash Center for Computational Science, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Benage, J. F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States) [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This work focused on a new application of the shock-and-release technique for equation of state (EOS) measurements. Warm dense matter states at near normal solid density and at temperatures close to 10?eV in diamond and graphite samples were created using a deep release from a laser-driven shock at the OMEGA laser facility. Independent temperature, density, and pressure measurements that do not depend on any theoretical models or simulations were obtained using imaging x-ray Thomson scattering, radiography, velocity interferometry, and streaked optical pyrometry. The experimental results were reproduced by the 2-D FLASH radiation hydrodynamics simulations finding a good agreement. The final EOS measurement was then compared with widely used SESAME EOS models as well as quantum molecular dynamics simulation results for carbon, which were very consistent with the experimental data.

  19. Can Advances in Science and Technology Prevent Global Warming? A Critical Review of Limitations and Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huesemann, Michael H.

    2006-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The most stringent emission scenarios published by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) would result in the stabilization of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) at concentrations of approximately 550 ppm which would produce a global temperature increase of at least 2 C by 2100. Given the large uncertainties regarding the potential risks associated with this degree of global warming, it would be more prudent to stabilize atmospheric CO2 concentrations at or below current levels which, in turn, would require a greater than 20-fold reduction (i.e., ?95%) in per capita carbon emissions in industrialized nations within the next 50 to 100 years. Using the Kaya equation as a conceptual framework, this paper examines whether CO2 mitigation approaches such as energy efficiency improvements, carbon sequestration, and the development of carbon-free energy sources would be sufficient to bring about the required reduction in per capita carbon emissions without creating unforeseen negative impacts elsewhere. In terms of energy efficiency, large improvements (?5-fold) are in principle possible given aggressive investments in R&D and if market imperfections such as corporate subsidies are removed. However, energy efficiency improvements per se will not result in a reduction in carbon emissions if, as predicted by the IPCC, the size of the global economy has expanded 12-26 fold by 2100. Terrestrial carbon sequestration via reforestation and improved agricultural soil management has many environmental advantages but has only limited CO2 mitigation potential because the global terrestrial carbon sink (ca. 200 Gt C) is small relative to the size of fossil fuel deposits (?4000 Gt C). By contrast, very large amounts of CO2 can potentially be removed from the atmosphere via sequestration in geologic formations and oceans, but carbon storage is not permanent and is likely to create many unpredictable environmental consequences. Renewable solar energy can in theory provide large amounts of carbon-free power. However, biomass and hydroelectric energy can only be marginally expanded and large-scale solar energy installations (i.e., wind, photovoltaics, and direct thermal) are likely to have significant negative environmental impacts. Expansion of nuclear energy is highly unlikely due to concerns over reactor safety, radioactive waste management, weapons proliferation, and cost. In view of the serious limitations and liabilities of many proposed CO2 mitigation approaches it appears that there remain only few no-regrets options such as drastic energy efficiency improvements, extensive terrestrial carbon sequestration, and cautious expansion of renewable energy generation. These promising CO2 mitigation technologies have the potential to bring about the required 20-fold reduction in per capita carbon emission only if population and economic growth are halted without delay. Thus, addressing the problem of global warming requires not only technological research and development but also a reexamination of core values that mistakenly equate material consumption and economic growth to happiness and well-being.

  20. Global Cooling: Effect of Urban Albedo on Global Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, Hashem; Menon, Surabi; Rosenfeld, Arthur

    2007-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In many urban areas, pavements and roofs constitute over 60% of urban surfaces (roof 20-25%, pavements about 40%). The roof and the pavement albedo can be increased by about 0.25 and 0.10, respectively, resulting in a net albedo increase for urban areas of about 0.1. Many studies have demonstrated building cooling-energy savings in excess of 20% upon raising roof reflectivity from an existing 10-20% to about 60%. We estimate U.S. potential savings in excess of $1 billion (B) per year in net annual energy bills. Increasing albedo of urban surfaces can reduce the summertime urban temperature and improve the urban air quality. Increasing the urban albedo has the added benefit of reflecting more of the incoming global solar radiation and countering the effect of global warming. We estimate that increasing albedo of urban areas by 0.1 results in an increase of 3 x 10{sup -4} in Earth albedo. Using a simple global model, the change in air temperature in lowest 1.8 km of the atmosphere is estimated at 0.01K. Modelers predict a warming of about 3K in the next 60 years (0.05K/year). Change of 0.1 in urban albedo will result in 0.01K global cooling, a delay of {approx}0.2 years in global warming. This 0.2 years delay in global warming is equivalent to 10 Gt reduction in CO2 emissions.

  1. Final Report, Wind Power Resource Assessment on the Warm Springs Reservation Tribal Lands, Report No. DOE/GO/12103

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jim Manion, Warm Springs Power & Water Enterprises; David McClain, McClain & Associates; HDR Engineering; Dr. Stel Walker, Oregon State University

    2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report concludes a five-year assessment of wind energy potential on the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon lands.

  2. An Inconvenient Truth. The Planetary Emergency of Global Warming and What We Can Do About It

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gore, Al

    2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This book is published to tie in with a documentary film of the same name. Both the book and film were inspired by a series of multimedia presentations on global warming that the author created and delivers to groups around the world. With this book, Gore, brings together leading-edge research from top scientists around the world; photographs, charts, and other illustrations; and personal anecdotes and observations to document the fast pace and wide scope of global warming. He presents, with alarming clarity and conclusiveness, and with humor, too, that the fact of global warming is not in question and that its consequences for the world we live in will be disastrous if left unchecked.

  3. Global warming accelerates drought-induced forest death

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    McDowell, Nathan; Pockman, William

    2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Many southwestern forests in the United States will disappear or be heavily altered by 2050, according to a series of joint Los Alamos National Laboratory-University of New Mexico studies. Nathan McDowell, a Los Alamos plant physiologist, and William Pockman, a UNM biology professor, explain that their research, and more from scientists around the world, is forecasting that by 2100 most conifer forests should be heavily disturbed, if not gone, as air temperatures rise in combination with drought. "Everybody knows trees die when there's a drought, if there's bark beetles or fire, yet nobody in the world can predict it with much accuracy." McDowell said. "What's really changed is that the temperature is going up," thus the researchers are imposing artificial drought conditions on segments of wild forest in the Southwest and pushing forests to their limit to discover the exact processes of mortality and survival. The study is centered on drought experiments in woodlands at both Los Alamos and the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge in central New Mexico. Both sites are testing hypotheses about how forests die on mature, wild trees, rather than seedlings in a greenhouse, through the ecosystem-scale removal of 50 percent of yearly precipitation through large water-diversion trough systems.

  4. Global warming accelerates drought-induced forest death

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDowell, Nathan; Pockman, William

    2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Many southwestern forests in the United States will disappear or be heavily altered by 2050, according to a series of joint Los Alamos National Laboratory-University of New Mexico studies. Nathan McDowell, a Los Alamos plant physiologist, and William Pockman, a UNM biology professor, explain that their research, and more from scientists around the world, is forecasting that by 2100 most conifer forests should be heavily disturbed, if not gone, as air temperatures rise in combination with drought. "Everybody knows trees die when there's a drought, if there's bark beetles or fire, yet nobody in the world can predict it with much accuracy." McDowell said. "What's really changed is that the temperature is going up," thus the researchers are imposing artificial drought conditions on segments of wild forest in the Southwest and pushing forests to their limit to discover the exact processes of mortality and survival. The study is centered on drought experiments in woodlands at both Los Alamos and the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge in central New Mexico. Both sites are testing hypotheses about how forests die on mature, wild trees, rather than seedlings in a greenhouse, through the ecosystem-scale removal of 50 percent of yearly precipitation through large water-diversion trough systems.

  5. Warm Humid Climate: Methodology to Study Air Temperature Distribution: Mobile Phones Base Stations as Viable Alternative for Fixed Points

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Araujo, V.; Costa, A.; Labaki, L.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    always under that of human skin and with variable wind speed predominantly in southeast direction. The city is the capital of the state of Rio Grande do Norte, in the oriental coast of Brazil (Figure 01). Figure 01 Natal localization in Brazil... Engineering, Architecture and Urban Planning UNICAMP, Campinas, Brazil e-mail: angelina@fec.unicamp.br; e-mail: lucila@fec.unicamp.br (3) Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte - Department of Architecture and Urban Planning Caixa Postal 6021 Cep...

  6. How Does the Eye Warm? Part I: A Potential Temperature Budget Analysis of an Idealized Tropical Cyclone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , as shown in Stern and Nolan (2012, hereafter SN12). SN12 further showed that in idealized numerical; Holland 1997; Knaff et al. 2004; Braun 2002; Emanuel 1986; Wang 2001; Powell et al. 2009). In this study

  7. Thermal Comfort under Transient Metabolic and Dynamic Localized Airflow Conditions Combined with Neutral and Warm Ambient Temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ugursal, Ahmet

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Human thermal environments constitute complex combinations of various interacting thermal factors. The transient and non-uniform nature of those thermal factors further increases the complexity of the thermal comfort problem. The conventional...

  8. The effects of temperature and soil moisture on the germination and emergence of three perennial warm season grasses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohlenbusch, Paul Dietrich

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1'he seed unit was the extracted caryopsls The caryopsos were examined under magnification to insure that only w?hole, undamaged seed units w re used, Cne hundred treated c:. . ryopses distribut??d evenly over blotter or pl n ed at a one-h, *, lf... within 'SOOI83d 3Wli 3Ald. h03SNOO 338'. 83hO 3AIJV1AWAQ S3WIS38 38ALVII3dW33. NAOd LV S3SSVBS 33IIHJ dO NOIJVNII%I3S 1 38ASIB I wvBs sdvo30ls Xo ' C 'LD 'LD 'Lee 'Lee 1 99 1 I9 'L 99 '1 '169 90 ?99 169 'ale 19l 'Lel Cl '196 1 CD C 00...

  9. Marine Turtle Newsletter No. 131, 2011 -Page 48 Global temperatures have warmed by approximately 0.61 C in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Girondot, Marc

    animal and plant species in concert with observed climate change. Most commonly, spring events occur did so highly significantly in accord with climate change. However, this future climate change are expected. This is the case in the Mediterranean Sea, where the mix between projected water current changes

  10. Energy and global warming impacts of HFC refrigerants and emerging technologies: TEWI-III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sand, J.R.; Fischer, S.K.; Baxter, V.D.

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of hydrofluorocarbons (BFCs) which were developed as alternative refrigerants and insulating foam blowing agents to replace chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) is now being affected by scientific investigations of greenhouse warming and questions about the effects of refrigerants and blowing agents on global warming. A Total Equivalent Warming Impact (TEWI) assessment analyzes the environmental affects of these halogenated working fluids in energy consuming applications by combining a direct effect resulting from the inadvertent release of HFCs to the atmosphere with an indirect effect resulting from the combustion of fossil fuels needed to provide the energy to operate equipment using these compounds as working fluids. TEWI is a more balanced measure of environmental impact because it is not based solely on the global warming potential (GWP) of the working fluid. It also shows the environmental benefit of efficient technologies that result in less CO{sub 2} generation and eventual emission to the earth`s atmosphere. The goal of TEWI is to assess total global warming impact of all the gases released to the atmosphere, including CO{sub 2} emissions from energy conversion. Alternative chemicals and technologies have been proposed as substitutes for HFCs in the vapor-compression cycle for refrigeration and air conditioning and for polymer foams in appliance and building insulations which claim substantial environmental benefits. Among these alternatives are: (1) Hydrocarbon (HC) refrigerants and blowing agents which have zero ozone depleting potential and a negligible global warming potential, (2) CO{sub 2} as a refrigerant and blowing agent, (3) Ammonia (NH{sub 3}) vapor compression systems, (4) Absorption chiller and heat pumping cycles using ammonia/water or lithium bromide/water, and (5) Evacuated panel insulations. This paper summarizes major results and conclusions of the detailed final report on the TEWI-111 study.

  11. Warm Forming of Aluminum聟AMD 307 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and03/02Report |toVEHICLE TECHNOLOGIES5Walking the WalkWarmWarm

  12. Development and Evaluation of Nanoscale Sorbents for Mercury Capture from Warm Fuel Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raja A. Jadhav

    2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Several different types of nanocrystalline metal oxide sorbents were synthesized and evaluated for capture of mercury (Hg) from coal-gasifier warm fuel gas. Detailed experimental studies were carried out to understand the fundamental mechanism of interaction between mercury and nanocrystalline sorbents over a range of fuel gas conditions. The metal oxide sorbents evaluated in this work included those prepared by GTI's subcontractor NanoScale Materials, Inc. (NanoScale) as well as those prepared in-house. These sorbents were evaluated for mercury capture in GTI's Mercury Sorbent Testing System. Initial experiments were focused on sorbent evaluation for mercury capture in N{sub 2} stream over the temperature range 423-533 K. These exploratory studies demonstrated that NanoActive Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} along with its supported form was the most active of the sorbent evaluated. The capture of Hg decreased with temperature, which suggested that physical adsorption was the dominant mechanism of Hg capture. Desorption studies on spent sorbents indicated that a major portion of Hg was attached to the sorbent by strong bonds, which suggested that Hg was oxidized by the O atoms of the metal oxides, thus forming a strong Hg-O bond with the oxide. Initial screening studies also indicated that sulfided form of CuO/alumina was the most active for Hg capture, therefore was selected for detailed evaluation in simulated fuel gas (SFG). It was found that such supported CuO sorbents had high Hg-sorption capacity in the presence of H{sub 2}, provided the gas also contained H{sub 2}S. Exposure of supported CuO sorbent to H{sub 2}S results in the formation of CuS, which is an active sorbent for Hg capture. Sulfur atom in CuS forms a bond with Hg that results into its capture. Although thermodynamically CuS is predicted to form unreactive Cu{sub 2}S form when exposed to H{sub 2}, it is hypothesized that Cu atoms in such supported sorbents are in ''dispersed'' form, with two Cu atoms separated by a distance longer than required to form a Cu{sub 2}S molecule. Thus CuS remains in the stable reactive form as long as H{sub 2}S is present in the gas phase. It was also found that the captured Hg on such supported sorbents could be easily released when the spent sorbent is exposed to a H2-containing stream that is free of Hg and H{sub 2}S. Based on this mechanism, a novel regenerative process has been proposed to remove Hg from fuel gas at high temperature. Limited multicyclic studies carried out on the supported Cu sorbents showed their potential to capture Hg from SFG in a regenerative manner. This study has demonstrated that supported nanocrystalline Cu-based sorbents have potential to capture mercury from coal syngas over multiple absorption/regeneration cycles. Further studies are recommended to evaluate their potential to remove arsenic and selenium from coal fuel gas.

  13. Using a Relativistic Electron Beam to Generate Warm Dense Matter for Equation of State Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berninger, M.

    2011-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental equation-of-state (EOS) data are difficult to obtain for warm dense matter (WDM)杋onized materials at near-solid densities and temperatures ranging from a few to tens of electron volts杁ue to the difficulty in preparing suitable plasmas without significant density gradients and transient phenomena. We propose that the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) facility can be used to create a temporally stationary and spatially uniform WDM. DARHT has an 18 MeV electron beam with 2 kA of current and a programmable pulse length of 20 ns to 200 ns. This poster describes how Monte Carlo n-Particle (MCNP) radiation transport and LASNEX hydrodynamics codes were used to demonstrate that the DARHT beam is favorable for avoiding the problems that have hindered past attempts to constrain WDM properties. In our concept, a 60 ns pulse of electrons is focused onto a small, cylindrical (1 mm diameter 1 mm long) foam target, which is inside a stiff high-heat capacity tube that both confines the WDM and allows pressure measurements. In our model, the foam is made of 30% density Au and the tamper is a B4C tube. An MCNP model of the DARHT beam investigated electron collisions and the amount of energy deposited in the foam target. The MCNP data became the basis for a LASNEX source model, where the total energy was distributed over a 60 ns time-dependent linear ramp consistent with the DARHT pulse. We used LASNEX to calculate the evolution of the foam EOS properties during and after deposition. Besides indicating that a ~3 eV Au plasma can be achieved, LASNEX models also showed that the WDM generates a shock wave into the tamper whose speed can be measured using photonic Doppler velocimetry. EOS pressures can be identified to better than 10% precision. These pressures can be correlated to energy deposition with electron spectrometry in order to obtain the Au EOS. Radial uniformity in the DARHT beam was also investigated. To further obtain uniform radial energy deposition, MCNP calculations were carried out with radial beam filters. Results are presented.

  14. Spatial patterns of warming off Western Australia during the 2011 Ningaloo Nio: Quantifying impacts of remote and local forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Ming

    Spatial patterns of warming off Western Australia during the 2011 Ningaloo Ni駉: Quantifying and Atmosphere Flagship, Floreat, Western Australia, Australia a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 24 occurred in which a marine heat wave led to extreme warming of Western Australia's coastal waters. The sea

  15. http://sciencedude.ocregister.com/2012/06/11/uci-heating-soil-could-worsen-warming/172695/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    http://sciencedude.ocregister.com/2012/06/11/uci-heating-soil-could-worsen- warming/172695/ UCI: Heating soil could worsen warming June 11th, 2012, 4:59 pm posted by Pat Brennan, science, environment a longstanding problem: whether the heating of carbon that has lain in soil for decades causes the same release

  16. October 1986 R. H. Johnson 721 Lower-Tropospheric Warming and Drying in Tropical Mesoscale Convective Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Richard H.

    October 1986 R. H. Johnson 721 Lower-Tropospheric Warming and Drying in Tropical Mesoscale components of tropical mesoscale convective systems. It is found that while the apparent heat source Q1 of mesoscale downdrafts within the mesoscale convective systems. The warming and drying at low levels

  17. Response of the Greenland and Antarctic Ice Sheets to Multi-Millennial Greenhouse Warming in the Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goelzer, Heiko

    Response of the Greenland and Antarctic Ice Sheets to Multi-Millennial Greenhouse Warming of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets to sustained multi-millennial greenhouse warming. Use was made of fully polar regions. This leads to an almost complete disintegration of the Greenland ice sheet after 3

  18. Global warming and wintering in Dippers Degree project in Biology, 15hp (15 ETCS), 2014-2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uppsala Universitet

    Global warming and wintering in Dippers Degree project in Biology, 15hp (15 ETCS), 2014-2015 Aim: Investigate changes in wintering ecology of the dipper over a period of 35 years in the light of global warming. Dippers overwinter in streams and they arrive to their overwintering grounds in late fall

  19. PUBLISHED ONLINE: 29 JANUARY 2012 | DOI: 10.1038/NCLIMATE1353 Enhanced warming over the global subtropical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Bo

    surface ocean warming rate over the path of these currents is two to three times faster than the globalLETTERS PUBLISHED ONLINE: 29 JANUARY 2012 | DOI: 10.1038/NCLIMATE1353 Enhanced warming over the global subtropical western boundary currents Lixin Wu1 *, Wenju Cai2 , Liping Zhang1 , Hisashi Nakamura3

  20. Tropical Cyclone Changes in the Western North Pacific in a Global Warming Scenario MARKUS STOWASSER, YUQING WANG, AND KEVIN HAMILTON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuqing

    Tropical Cyclone Changes in the Western North Pacific in a Global Warming Scenario MARKUS STOWASSER The influence of global warming on the climatology of tropical cyclones in the western North Pacific basin Model version 2 (CCSM2) coupled global climate model. The regional model is first tested in 10 yr

  1. Role of AirSea Interaction in the Long Persistence of El Nin~oInduced North Indian Ocean Warming*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    Walker circulation adjustments, causing a sustained SST warming in the tropical southwest IO (SWIO) where in the equatorial Pacific with pro- found influences on the global climate. For example, El Nin~o causes sea surfaceRole of Air颅Sea Interaction in the Long Persistence of El Nin~o颅Induced North Indian Ocean Warming

  2. A MEDIEVAL WARM PERIOD l)13 C RECORD FROM THE GAURA CU MUSCA CAVE, SW ROMANIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forray, Ferenc

    A MEDIEVAL WARM PERIOD l)13 C RECORD FROM THE GAURA CU MUSCA CAVE, SW ROMANIA Bogdan P. ONAC1 路 2, Romania (2) School of Geosciences, University of South Florida, 4202 E. Fowler Ave., NES 107, Tampa, FL and Romania. B. Geological map of the region {modified fromlancu et al., 1995). The mapof the Gaura cu Musca

  3. Global Warming Effects on U.S. Hurricane Damage KERRY EMANUEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Entekhabi, Dara

    that probability density distributions of aggregate damage become appreciably separated from those of the control have a substantial influence on trop- ical cyclone activity around the world. Global warming generally increases the thermodynamic potential for tropical cyclones (Emanuel 1987), while changing at- mospheric

  4. VIRGINIA CENTER FOR COAL & ENERGY RESEARCH WINTER 1998-99 / VOL. XVIII, NO. 1 Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VIRGINIA CENTER FOR COAL & ENERGY RESEARCH WINTER 1998-99 / VOL. XVIII, NO. 1 Global Warming Our the opinion. Can the VCCER with its mandated interests in coal and energy be any different? Well, we do try QUARTERLY COAL PRODUCTION STATISTICS 5 GAS PRODUCTION STATISTICS 6 1840 1860 1880 1900 1920 1940 1960 1980

  5. BILLS IMPORTANT TO THOSE INTERESTED IN GLOBAL WARMING League of Women Voters, Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BILLS IMPORTANT TO THOSE INTERESTED IN GLOBAL WARMING League of Women Voters, Washington Current.85% annually by 2010) and renewable energy (15% by 2023) standards for Washington electric utilities, increase in local tax revenues, additional income for farmers with the added benefits of stable electricity

  6. Equilibration of a warm pumped lens on a -plane. Timour Radko, John Marshall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall, John

    Equilibration of a warm pumped lens on a -plane. Timour Radko, John Marshall Department of Earth of the baroclinic instability of a large-scale current. In a recent paper (briefly re- viewed in Sec. 2) Marshall et to the -plane. A fundamental differ- ence between Marshall's et al. (2002) study and the present one is that now

  7. September Arctic sea ice predicted to disappear near 2 warming above present

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    September Arctic sea ice predicted to disappear near 2 C global warming above present Irina; published 24 March 2012. [1] The decline of Arctic sea ice is one of the most visible signs of climate change over the past several decades. Arctic sea ice area shows large interannual variability due

  8. IMPLICATIONS OF CO, GLOBAL WARMING O N GREAT LAKES ICE COVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IMPLICATIONS OF CO, GLOBAL WARMING O N GREAT LAKES ICE COVER RAYMOND A. ASSEL US. Department to project daily mean basin ice cover and annual ice cover duration for Lakes Superior and Erie. Models were), and the Oregon State University (OSU)general circulationmodels. Ice cover estimateswere made for the West

  9. Persistent effects of a discrete warming event on a polar desert ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fountain, Andrew G.

    Persistent effects of a discrete warming event on a polar desert ecosystem J . E . B A R R E over the previous decade and altered ecosystem properties in both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems of melt-water had significant influences on Taylor Valley ecosystems that persisted for several years

  10. Prolonged suppression of ecosystem carbon dioxide uptake after an anomalously warm year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    LETTERS Prolonged suppression of ecosystem carbon dioxide uptake after an anomalously warm year , Yiqi Luo5 & David S. Schimel6 Terrestrial ecosystems control carbon dioxide fluxes to and from and heterotrophic respira- tion, that determines whether an ecosystem is sequestering carbon or releasing

  11. Mechanisms for the Interannual Variability of SST in the East Pacific Warm Pool KRISTOPHER B. KARNAUSKAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karnauskas, Kristopher

    with the western and equatorial Pacific Ocean, relatively little is known about the east Pacific warm pool (EPWP model (OGCM) of the tropical Pacific Ocean and various atmospheric and oceanic observations are used correlation between SST in the EPWP and eastern equatorial Pacific is therefore explained not by ocean

  12. The depth of the tropical Pacific Ocean's warm surface layer shrank during the last three

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanik, Mehmet Fatih

    The depth of the tropical Pacific Ocean's warm surface layer shrank during the last three decades Pacific Ocean, off an island in Palau. They analysed the ratio of nitrogen and carbon isotopes.1029/2010GL044867 (2010) OceanOgraphy Cold water rising in the Pacific DrUg DeVeLOpMenT Worm surgery on a chip

  13. Triple-picket warm plastic-shell implosions on OMEGA P. B. Radha,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Triple-picket warm plastic-shell implosions on OMEGA P. B. Radha,1 C. Stoeckl,1 V. N. Goncharov,1 J-gas-filled plastic shells are imploded by direct irradiation from the OMEGA laser T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun

  14. Pathways of inflow and dispersion of warm waters in the Nordic seas T. Rossby,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; these regions have a distinct east-west organization with cold Arctic waters all along the east coast and spreading of warm North Atlantic waters entering the Norwegian Sea between Iceland and the Faroes the Iceland-Faroe Front, but rather than continue north with the outer branch of the Norwegian Atlantic

  15. Warmly Debated: The Little Ice Age and the Construction of Historical Climatic Regimes, 1650-1950

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilson, Christopher R.

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    . The Medieval Warm Period and the Little Ice Age are the two most commonly referenced and discussed of such regimes. This thesis examines the theories and debates that preceded and surrounded the formal definition of the Little Ice Age as an historic period...

  16. 1 Potential impacts of Asian carbon aerosols on future US warming 2 Haiyan Teng,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -ocean fully coupled 6 climate model to investigate possible remote impacts of 7 Asian carbonaceous aerosols effect of aerosols is included) over Asia induces 15 tropospheric heating anomalies that force large.4 C warming over the eastern 18 US during winter and over most of the US during summer. 19 Such remote

  17. Warm-white light-emitting diodes integrated with colloidal quantum dots for high luminous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    Warm-white light-emitting diodes integrated with colloidal quantum dots for high luminous efficacy NQD-LED design with both high luminous efficacy of optical radiation and CRI is presented to have luminous efficacy of optical ra- diation (LER), which is challenging using conventional phosphors

  18. Atlantic warm pool, Caribbean low-level jet, and their potential impact on Atlantic hurricanes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chunzai

    Atlantic warm pool, Caribbean low-level jet, and their potential impact on Atlantic hurricanes than 28.5掳C) that appears in the Gulf of Mexico, the Caribbean Sea, and the western tropical North the tropical North Atlantic into the Caribbean Sea where the flow intensifies forming the Caribbean Low

  19. Climate Warming and Adaptability of High-Elevation Hydropower Generation in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Arturo A.

    Climate Warming and Adaptability of High-Elevation Hydropower Generation in California Kaveh Madani's high-elevation hydropower system is composed of more than 150 power plants. Most of the associated to winter, the adaptability of high-elevation hydropower system to new climatic conditions is in question

  20. An Investigation of Bonding Mechanism in Metal Cladding by Warm Rolling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Wei

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    the knowledge of the roll cladding process. To accomplish the objectives, aluminum 1100 sheet (Al 1100) and stainless steel 304 sheet (SST 304) are bonded by warm rolling under controlled conditions. The 180 degrees peel test is used to determine the bonding...

  1. Eocene circulation of the Southern Ocean: Was Antarctica kept warm by subtropical waters?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D鲻s, Kristofer

    climate model simulations. We find that the EAC did not penetrate to high latitudes and ocean heatEocene circulation of the Southern Ocean: Was Antarctica kept warm by subtropical waters? Matthew suddenly grew and ocean productivity patterns changed. Previous studies conjectured that poleward

  2. Carbon capture and storage in geologic formations has been proposed as a global warming mitigation strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    Abstract Carbon capture and storage in geologic formations has been proposed as a global warming mitigation strategy that can contribute to stabilize the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide to maintain adsorbed methane in the coalbed formation. But now carbon dioxide will replace the methane

  3. Carbon Cycle Discussion After the warm-up quiz, discuss the carbon cycle.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carrington, Emily

    Carbon Cycle Discussion After the warm-up quiz, discuss the carbon cycle. Carbon is one is without carbon. Where else is carbon on our Earth? In rocks, living organisms, the atmosphere, oceans Does carbon stay in one place? What processes include moving carbon? Introduce residence time: How long does

  4. WHY HASN'T THE EARTH CLIMATE WARMED AS MUCH AS EXPECTED?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    in greenhouse gas forcing. Countervailing natural cooling over the industrial period. Lag in reaching University, Stockholm, Sweden #12;HOW MUCH WARMING IS EXPECTED? Equilibrium change in global mean surface and natural variability. #12;Cloud-Climate Feedbacks Cloud feedback has been identified as a part

  5. Sensitivity of Vatnajokull ice cap hydrology and dynamics to climate warming over the next 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flowers, Gwenn

    and is the largest nonpolar ice cap in Europe. Because it is temperate (isothermal at the melting point) and storesSensitivity of Vatnajo╧ull ice cap hydrology and dynamics to climate warming over the next 2] The sensitivity of Vatnajo╧ull ice cap to future climate change is examined using spatially distributed coupled

  6. Crystal coat warms up LED light 16:46 01 February 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    in the commercial market. Illuminating buildings accounts for about a quarter of the electricity used in the US in the home. Now researchers have used nanocrystals to create LEDs that give off a warm white light. Fine Articles 'Smart' lamp offers true mood lighting http://technology.newscientist.com/article/mg19626276

  7. Confirmation of X-ray Absorption by Warm-hot Intergalactic Medium in the Sculptor Wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Taotao

    In a previous paper, we reported a 3? detection of an absorption line from the warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM) using the Chandra and XMM X-ray grating spectra of the blazar H2356-309, the sight line of which intercepts ...

  8. Aerosol--cloud drop concentration closure in warm cumulus W. C. Conant,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jimenez, Jose-Luis

    layer aerosol's effect on cloud microphysics throughout the lowest 1 km of cloud depth. Onboard the radiation balance and hydrological cycle, they are called indirect effects of aerosol on climate, or 4Aerosol--cloud drop concentration closure in warm cumulus W. C. Conant,1 T. M. VanReken,2 T. A

  9. Relativistic self-focusing of ultra-high intensity X-ray laser beams in warm quantum plasma with upward density profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habibi, M., E-mail: habibi.physics@gmail.com [Young Researchers and Elite Club, Shirvan Branch, Islamic Azad University, Shirvan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghamari, F. [Young Researchers and Elite Club, Khorramabad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Khorramabad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of a numerical study of high-intensity X-ray laser beam interaction with warm quantum plasma (WQP) are presented. By means of an upward ramp density profile combined with quantum factors specially the Fermi velocity, we have demonstrated significant relativistic self-focusing (RSF) of a Gaussian electromagnetic beam in the WQP where the Fermi temperature term in the dielectric function is important. For this purpose, we have considered the quantum hydrodynamics model that modifies refractive index of inhomogeneous WQPs with the inclusion of quantum correction through the quantum statistical and diffraction effects in the relativistic regime. Also, to better illustration of the physical difference between warm and cold quantum plasmas and their effect on the RSF, we have derived the envelope equation governing the spot size of X-ray laser beam in Q-plasmas. In addition to the upward ramp density profile, we have found that the quantum effects would be caused much higher oscillation and better focusing of X-ray laser beam in the WQP compared to that of cold quantum case. Our computational results reveal the importance of the use of electrons density profile and Fermi speed in enhancing self-focusing of laser beam.

  10. Response of precipitation extremes to idealized global warming in an aqua-planet climate model: Towards robust projection across different horizontal resolutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, F.; Collins, W.D.; Wehner, M.F.; Williamson, D.L.; Olson, J.G.

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Current climate models produce quite heterogeneous projections for the responses of precipitation extremes to future climate change. To help understand the range of projections from multimodel ensembles, a series of idealized 'aquaplanet' Atmospheric General Circulation Model (AGCM) runs have been performed with the Community Atmosphere Model CAM3. These runs have been analysed to identify the effects of horizontal resolution on precipitation extreme projections under two simple global warming scenarios. We adopt the aquaplanet framework for our simulations to remove any sensitivity to the spatial resolution of external inputs and to focus on the roles of model physics and dynamics. Results show that a uniform increase of sea surface temperature (SST) and an increase of low-to-high latitude SST gradient both lead to increase of precipitation and precipitation extremes for most latitudes. The perturbed SSTs generally have stronger impacts on precipitation extremes than on mean precipitation. Horizontal model resolution strongly affects the global warming signals in the extreme precipitation in tropical and subtropical regions but not in high latitude regions. This study illustrates that the effects of horizontal resolution have to be taken into account to develop more robust projections of precipitation extremes.

  11. Development of Low Global Warming Potential Refrigerant Solutions for Commercial Refrigeration Systems using a Life Cycle Climate Performance Design Tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL] [ORNL; Fricke, Brian A [ORNL] [ORNL; Vineyard, Edward Allan [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial refrigeration systems are known to be prone to high leak rates and to consume large amounts of electricity. As such, direct emissions related to refrigerant leakage and indirect emissions resulting from primary energy consumption contribute greatly to their Life Cycle Climate Performance (LCCP). In this paper, an LCCP design tool is used to evaluate the performance of a typical commercial refrigeration system with alternative refrigerants and minor system modifications to provide lower Global Warming Potential (GWP) refrigerant solutions with improved LCCP compared to baseline systems. The LCCP design tool accounts for system performance, ambient temperature, and system load; system performance is evaluated using a validated vapor compression system simulation tool while ambient temperature and system load are devised from a widely used building energy modeling tool (EnergyPlus). The LCCP design tool also accounts for the change in hourly electricity emission rate to yield an accurate prediction of indirect emissions. The analysis shows that conventional commercial refrigeration system life cycle emissions are largely due to direct emissions associated with refrigerant leaks and that system efficiency plays a smaller role in the LCCP. However, as a transition occurs to low GWP refrigerants, the indirect emissions become more relevant. Low GWP refrigerants may not be suitable for drop-in replacements in conventional commercial refrigeration systems; however some mixtures may be introduced as transitional drop-in replacements. These transitional refrigerants have a significantly lower GWP than baseline refrigerants and as such, improved LCCP. The paper concludes with a brief discussion on the tradeoffs between refrigerant GWP, efficiency and capacity.

  12. Cooled, temperature controlled electrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morgan, John P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cooled, temperature controlled electrometer for the measurement of small currents. The device employs a thermal transfer system to remove heat from the electrometer circuit and its environment and dissipate it to the external environment by means of a heat sink. The operation of the thermal transfer system is governed by a temperature regulation circuit which activates the thermal transfer system when the temperature of the electrometer circuit and its environment exceeds a level previously inputted to the external variable temperature control circuit. The variable temperature control circuit functions as subpart of the temperature control circuit. To provide temperature stability and uniformity, the electrometer circuit is enclosed by an insulated housing.

  13. Cooled, temperature controlled electrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morgan, John P.

    1992-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A cooled, temperature controlled electrometer for the measurement of small currents. The device employs a thermal transfer system to remove heat from the electrometer circuit and its environment and dissipate it to the external environment by means of a heat sink. The operation of the thermal transfer system is governed by a temperature regulation circuit which activates the thermal transfer system when the temperature of the electrometer circuit and its environment exceeds a level previously inputted to the external variable temperature control circuit. The variable temperature control circuit functions as subpart of the temperature control circuit. To provide temperature stability and uniformity, the electrometer circuit is enclosed by an insulated housing.

  14. Accounting for global-mean warming and scaling uncertainties in climate change impact studies Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 11(3), 12071226, 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

    Accounting for global-mean warming and scaling uncertainties in climate change impact studies 1207(s) 2007. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Accounting for global-mean warming from a few regional climate model runs are scaled, based on different global-mean warming projections

  15. JY Tsao Some Simple Physics of Global Warming 2008 April Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JY Tsao 路 Some Simple Physics of Global Warming 路 2008 April Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory Sciences Center Sandia National Laboratories Some Simple Physics of Global Warming 路 I'm Jeff Tsao. I and on had the opportunity to delve into global warming issues, and I'm happy to be able to share a little

  16. Probability distributions for regional climate change from uncertain global mean warming and uncertain scaling relationship Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 11(3), 10971114, 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

    Probability distributions for regional climate change from uncertain global mean warming of probability distributions for regional climate change from uncertain global mean warming and an uncertain/precipitation per degree global mean warming. Each scaling variable is assumed to be normally distributed

  17. Analyzing the time-course variation of apple and pear tree dates of flowering1 stages in the global warming context2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

    in the global warming context2 3 Yann Gu茅don (1) and Jean Michel Legave (2)* 4 5 (1) CIRAD, UMR DAP and INRIA the relationship between flowering advances in fruit trees and19 global warming. After an exploratory analysis;2 to consider the flowering advances in apple and pear trees as impacts of global warming. The26 suddenness

  18. Global Warming What is Climate? Ocean's Role in Climate Change Uncertainty Quantification, the Next Frontier The Role Played by Oceans in Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Restrepo, Juan M.

    Global Warming What is Climate? Ocean's Role in Climate Change Uncertainty Quantification, the Next Department University of Arizona October 11, 2008 #12;Global Warming What is Climate? Ocean's Role in Climate, Undergraduate Students: 2. UQGQG #12;Global Warming What is Climate? Ocean's Role in Climate Change Uncertainty

  19. Reply to comment by J. L. Lean on ``Estimated solar contribution to the global surface warming using the ACRIM TSI satellite composite''

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scafetta, Nicola

    Reply to comment by J. L. Lean on ``Estimated solar contribution to the global surface warming contributed at least 10颅30% of the 0.40 卤 0.04 K global surface warming) depends crucially on the adoption, because it lacks any upward trend between solar cycles 21颅23, the solar contribution to the global warming

  20. ULTRALUMINOUS STAR-FORMING GALAXIES AND EXTREMELY LUMINOUS WARM MOLECULAR HYDROGEN EMISSION AT z = 2.16 IN THE PKS 1138-26 RADIO GALAXY PROTOCLUSTER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogle, P.; Davies, J. E.; Helou, G. [IPAC, California Institute of Technology, Mail Code 220-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Appleton, P. N. [NHSC, California Institute of Technology, Mail Code 220-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bertincourt, B. [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Seymour, N., E-mail: ogle@ipac.caltech.edu [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)

    2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A deep Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph map of the PKS 1138-26 galaxy protocluster reveals ultraluminous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission from obscured star formation in three protocluster galaxies, including H{alpha}-emitter (HAE) 229, HAE 131, and the central Spiderweb Galaxy. Star formation rates of {approx}500-1100 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} are estimated from the 7.7 {mu}m PAH feature. At such prodigious formation rates, the galaxy stellar masses will double in 0.6-1.1 Gyr. We are viewing the peak epoch of star formation for these protocluster galaxies. However, it appears that extinction of H{alpha} is much greater (up to a factor of 40) in the two ULIRG HAEs compared to the Spiderweb. This may be attributed to different spatial distributions of star formation-nuclear star formation in the HAEs versus extended star formation in accreting satellite galaxies in the Spiderweb. We find extremely luminous mid-IR rotational line emission from warm molecular hydrogen in the Spiderweb Galaxy, with L(H{sub 2} 0-0 S(3)) = 1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1} (3.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} L{sub Sun }), {approx}20 times more luminous than any previously known H{sub 2} emission galaxy (MOHEG). Depending on the temperature, this corresponds to a very large mass of >9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6}-2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} of T > 300 K molecular gas, which may be heated by the PKS 1138-26 radio jet, acting to quench nuclear star formation. There is >8 times more warm H{sub 2} at these temperatures in the Spiderweb than what has been seen in low-redshift (z < 0.2) radio galaxies, indicating that the Spiderweb may have a larger reservoir of molecular gas than more evolved radio galaxies. This is the highest redshift galaxy yet in which warm molecular hydrogen has been directly detected.

  1. PHYSICAL CONDITIONS IN BARNARD'S LOOP, COMPONENTS OF THE ORION-ERIDANUS BUBBLE, AND IMPLICATIONS FOR THE WARM IONIZED MEDIUM COMPONENT OF THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Dell, C. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Ferland, G. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Porter, R. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Center for Simulational Physics, University of Georgia at Athens, Athens, GA 30602-2451 (United States); Van Hoof, P. A. M. [Royal Observatory of Belgium, Ringlaan 3, 1180 Brussels (Belgium)

    2011-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We have supplemented existing spectra of Barnard's Loop with high accuracy spectrophotometry of one new position. Cloudy photoionization models were calculated for a variety of ionization parameters and stellar temperatures and compared with the observations. After testing the procedure with recent observations of M43, we establish that Barnard's Loop is photoionized by four candidate ionizing stars, but agreement between the models and observations is only possible if Barnard's Loop is enhanced in heavy elements by about a factor of 1.4. Barnard's Loop is very similar in properties to the brightest components of the Orion-Eridanus Bubble and the warm ionized medium (WIM). We are able to establish models that bound the range populated in low-ionization color-color diagrams (I([S II])/I(H{alpha}) versus I([N II])/I(H{alpha})) using only a limited range of ionization parameters and stellar temperatures. Previously established variations in the relative abundance of heavy elements render uncertain the most common method of determining electron temperatures for components of the Orion-Eridanus Bubble and the WIM based only on the I([N II])/I(H{alpha}) ratio, although we confirm that the lowest surface brightness components of the WIM are on average of higher electron temperature. The electron temperatures for a few high surface brightness WIM components determined by direct methods are comparable to those of classical bright H II regions. In contrast, the low surface brightness H II regions studied by the Wisconsin H{alpha} Mapper are of lower temperatures than the classical bright H II regions.

  2. Ponderomotive self-focusing of Gaussian laser beam in warm collisional plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jafari Milani, M. R., E-mail: mrj.milani@gmail.com [Plasma Physics Research School, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Energy Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Niknam, A. R., E-mail: a-niknam@sbu.ac.ir [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Farahbod, A. H. [Plasma Physics Research School, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The propagation characteristics of a Gaussian laser beam through warm collisional plasma are investigated by considering the ponderomotive force nonlinearity and the complex eikonal function. By introducing the dielectric permittivity of warm unmagnetized plasma and using the WKB and paraxial ray approximations, the coupled differential equations defining the variations of laser beam parameters are obtained and solved numerically. Effects of laser and plasma parameters such as the collision frequency, the initial laser intensity and its spot size on the beam width parameter and the axis laser intensity distribution are analyzed. It is shown that, self-focusing of the laser beam takes place faster by increasing the collision frequency and initial laser spot size and then after some distance propagation the laser beam abruptly loses its initial diameter and vastly diverges. Furthermore, the modified electron density distribution is obtained and the collision frequency effect on this distribution is studied.

  3. Development of Advanced Manufacturing Methods for Warm White LEDs for General Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deshpande, Anirudha; Kolodin, Boris; Jacob, Cherian; Chowdhury, Ashfaqul; Kuenzler, Glenn; Sater, Karen; Aesram, Danny; Glaettli, Steven; Gallagher, Brian; Langer, Paul; Setlur, Anant; Beers, Bill

    2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    GE Lighting Solutions will develop precise and efficient manufacturing techniques for the 搑emote phosphor platform of warm-white LED products. In volume, this will be demonstrated to drive significant materials, labor and capital productivity to achieve a maximum possible 53% reduction in overall cost. In addition, the typical total color variation for these white LEDs in production will be well within the ANSI bins and as low as a 4-step MacAdam ellipse centered on the black body curve. Achievement of both of these objectives will be demonstrated while meeting a performance target of > 75 lm/W for a warm-white LED and a reliability target of <30% lumen drop / <2-step MacAdam ellipse shift, estimated over 50,000 hrs.

  4. Energy and global warming impacts of CFC alternative technologies. Executive summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, S.K.; Hughes, P.J.; Fairchild, P.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kusik, C.L.; Dieckmann, J.T.; McMahon, E.M.; Hobday, N. [Little (Arthur D.), Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this study is to develop representative indications of the relative energy use, associated CO{sub 2} emissions, and total equivalent warming impact (TEWI) of viable option to replace CFCs in their major energy-related application areas. It was motivated, in part, by a concern that most attention to data has focused on the DIRECT global warming effect of CFCs and their alternatives, with inadequate attention being paid to the INDIRECT effect of the CO{sub 2} emissions arising from the differences in energy consumption by systems using different alternatives. The DIRECT and INDIRECT contributions are combined in this analysis to determine the TEWI of the various technical options. The study is international in scope and takes into account significant differences in present CFC end-use practices, sources of energy, and other societal factors between Europe, Japan, and North America.

  5. Battery self-warming mechanism using the inverter and the battery main disconnect circuitry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ashtiani, Cyrus N.; Stuart, Thomas A.

    2005-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus connected to an energy storage device for powering an electric motor and optionally providing a warming function for the energy storage device is disclosed. The apparatus includes a circuit connected to the electric motor and the energy storage device for generating a current. The apparatus also includes a switching device operably associated with the circuit for selectively directing the current to one of the electric motor and the energy storage device.

  6. EXPERIENCE IN REDUCING ELECTRON CLOUD AND DYNAMIC PRESSURE RISE IN WARM AND COLD REGIONS IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ZHANG, S.Y.; AHRENS,L.; ALLESI, J.; BAI, M.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; CAMERON, P.; CONNOLLY, R.; DREES, A.; FISCHER, W.; GULLOTTA, J.; HE, P.; HSEUH, H.C.; HUANG, H.; LEE, R.; LITVINENKO, V.; MACKAY, W.W.; MONTAG, C.; NICOLETTI, A.; OERTER, B.; PILAT, F.; PTITSYN, V.; ROSER, T.; SATOGATA, T.; SMART, L.; SYNDSTRUP, L.; TEPIKIAN, S.; THIEBERGER, P.; TRBOJEVIC, D.; WEI, J.; ZENO, K.

    2006-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The large scale application of non-evaporable getter coating in RHIC has been effective in reducing the electron cloud. Since beams with higher intensity and smaller bunch spacing became possible in operation, the emittance growth is of concern. Study results are reported together with experiences of machine improvements: saturated NEG coatings, anti-grazing ridges in warm sections, and the pre-pumping in cryogenic regions.

  7. ANALYSIS OF BEAM INDUCED PRESSURE INCREASES IN RHIC WARM VACUUM SECTIONS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HSEUH,H.C.; SMART,L.A.; ZHANG,S.Y.

    2002-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    With increasing intensity of gold and proton beams during recent RHIC operations, pressure rises of several decades were observed at a few RHIC warm vacuum sections. The pressure increases were analyzed and compared with the beam parameters such as ion species, bunch intensity, total intensity, number ofbunches, bunch spacing and beam loss. Most of these pressure increases were found to be consistent with those induced by either beam loss and/or electron multipacting.

  8. A historical perspective of Global Warming Potential from Municipal Solid Waste Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habib, Komal, E-mail: koh@kbm.sdu.dk [Institute of Chemical Engineering, Biotechnology and Environmental Technology, University of Southern Denmark, Niels Bohr抯 Alle 1, 5230 Odense M (Denmark); Schmidt, Jannick H.; Christensen, Per [Department of Development and Planning, Aalborg University, Fibigerstraede 13, DK-9220 Aalborg OE (Denmark)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Five scenarios are compared based on different waste management systems from 1970 to 2010. Technology development for incineration and vehicular exhaust system throughout the time period is considered. Compared scenarios show continuous improvement regarding environmental performance of waste management system. Energy and material recovery from waste account for significant savings of Global Warming Potential (GWP) today. Technology development for incineration has played key role in lowering the GWP during past five decades. - Abstract: The Municipal Solid Waste Management (MSWM) sector has developed considerably during the past century, paving the way for maximum resource (materials and energy) recovery and minimising environmental impacts such as global warming associated with it. The current study is assessing the historical development of MSWM in the municipality of Aalborg, Denmark throughout the period of 1970 to 2010, and its implications regarding Global Warming Potential (GWP{sub 100}), using the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) approach. Historical data regarding MSW composition, and different treatment technologies such as incineration, recycling and composting has been used in order to perform the analysis. The LCA results show a continuous improvement in environmental performance of MSWM from 1970 to 2010 mainly due to the changes in treatment options, improved efficiency of various treatment technologies and increasing focus on recycling, resulting in a shift from net emission of 618 kg CO{sub 2}-eq. tonne{sup ?1} to net saving of 670 kg CO{sub 2}-eq. tonne{sup ?1} of MSWM.

  9. A very oligotrophic zone observed from space in the equatorial Pacific warm pool1 Marie-Hlne Radenaca

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    -H閘鑞e Radenaca , Monique Messi閎 , Fabien L間erc , and Christelle Boscd 3 a IRD/LEGOS, UMR5566, 14 avenue Edouard. Introduction44 45 The warm pool of the western tropical Pacific is a major component of the world climate46

  10. The distinct behaviors of Pacific and Indian Ocean warm pool properties on seasonal and interannual time scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Seon Tae; Yu, Jin-Yi; Lu, Mong-Ming

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the tropical Indian and Pacific Ocean regions, Mon. WeatherIndian Ocean and in the Pacific Ocean, J. Ocean Univ. China,KIM ET AL. : PACIFIC AND INDIAN OCEAN WARM POOL Rayner, N.

  11. Anvil characteristics as seen by C-POL during the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frederick, Kaycee Loretta

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tropical Pacific Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) took place in Darwin, Australia in early 2006. C-band radar data from this experiment were used to characterize tropical anvil areal coverage, height, and thickness during...

  12. Dinner Buffetchoose three entrees or two entrees and one carving station. served with warmed yeast rolls, tea, water and coffee.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    with warmed yeast rolls, tea, water and coffee. Entrees Tuscan Chicken, stuffed with portobello mushrooms dressings Roasted Corn and Black Bean, with vinaigrette on a bed of bibb lettuce Baby Spinach, with fresh

  13. Comparison of "warm and wet" and "cold and icy" scenarios for early Mars in a 3D climate model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wordsworth, Robin D; Pierrehumbert, Raymond T; Forget, Francois; Head, James W

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use a 3D general circulation model to compare the primitive Martian hydrological cycle in "warm and wet" and "cold and icy" scenarios. In the warm and wet scenario, an anomalously high solar flux or intense greenhouse warming artificially added to the climate model are required to maintain warm conditions and an ice-free northern ocean. Precipitation shows strong surface variations, with high rates around Hellas basin and west of Tharsis but low rates around Margaritifer Sinus (where the observed valley network drainage density is nonetheless high). In the cold and icy scenario, snow migration is a function of both obliquity and surface pressure, and limited episodic melting is possible through combinations of seasonal, volcanic and impact forcing. At surface pressures above those required to avoid atmospheric collapse (~0.5 bar) and moderate to high obliquity, snow is transported to the equatorial highland regions where the concentration of valley networks is highest. Snow accumulation in the Aeolis quadr...

  14. The Development of Warm Gas Cleanup Technologies for the Removal of Sulfur Containing Species from Steam Hydrogasification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luo, Qian

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for biomas-derived syngas. National Renewable EnergyM. Lesemann. RTI/Eastman warm syngas clean-up technology:v the composition of syngas from steam hydrogasification

  15. Strings at finite temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arago C. de; Bazeia, D.; Eboli, O.J.P.; Marques, G.C.

    1985-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We obtain a semiclassical evaluation of the temperature for which the free energy of the strings of spontaneously broken scalar electrodynamics vanishes. We argue that, above this temperature, these objects should play a significant physical role.

  16. Method for low temperature preparation of a noble metal alloy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Even, Jr., William R. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for producing fine, essentially contamination free, noble metal alloys is disclosed. The alloys comprise particles in a size range of 5 to 500 nm. The method comprises 1. A method for preparing a noble metal alloy at low temperature, the method comprising the steps of forming solution of organometallic compounds by dissolving the compounds into a quantity of a compatible solvent medium capable of solvating the organometallic, mixing a portion of each solution to provide a desired molarity ratio of ions in the mixed solution, adding a support material, rapidly quenching droplets of the mixed solution to initiate a solute-solvent phase separation as the solvent freezes, removing said liquid cryogen, collecting and freezing drying the frozen droplets to produce a dry powder, and finally reducing the powder to a metal by flowing dry hydrogen over the powder while warming the powder to a temperature of about 150.degree. C.

  17. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 95, NO. C10, PAGES 18,081-18,094,OCTOBER 15, 1990 Surface Patterns in Temperature, Flow, Phytoplankton Biomass, and Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    Patterns in Temperature, Flow, Phytoplankton Biomass, and Species Composition in the Coastal Transition enriched in phytoplankton biomass, due to the presence of large diatoms. On the seaward side of the front (jet) we observed relatively warm water where the phytoplankton biomass was low and the diatoms were

  18. Modeling Warm Dense Matter Experiments using the 3D ALE-AMR Code and the Move Toward Exascale Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koniges, A; Eder, E; Liu, W; Barnard, J; Friedman, A; Logan, G; Fisher, A; Masers, N; Bertozzi, A

    2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment II (NDCX II) is an induction accelerator planned for initial commissioning in 2012. The final design calls for a 3 MeV, Li+ ion beam, delivered in a bunch with characteristic pulse duration of 1 ns, and transverse dimension of order 1 mm. The NDCX II will be used in studies of material in the warm dense matter (WDM) regime, and ion beam/hydrodynamic coupling experiments relevant to heavy ion based inertial fusion energy. We discuss recent efforts to adapt the 3D ALE-AMR code to model WDM experiments on NDCX II. The code, which combines Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) hydrodynamics with Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR), has physics models that include ion deposition, radiation hydrodynamics, thermal diffusion, anisotropic material strength with material time history, and advanced models for fragmentation. Experiments at NDCX-II will explore the process of bubble and droplet formation (two-phase expansion) of superheated metal solids using ion beams. Experiments at higher temperatures will explore equation of state and heavy ion fusion beam-to-target energy coupling efficiency. Ion beams allow precise control of local beam energy deposition providing uniform volumetric heating on a timescale shorter than that of hydrodynamic expansion. The ALE-AMR code does not have any export control restrictions and is currently running at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) at LBNL and has been shown to scale well to thousands of CPUs. New surface tension models that are being implemented and applied to WDM experiments. Some of the approaches use a diffuse interface surface tension model that is based on the advective Cahn-Hilliard equations, which allows for droplet breakup in divergent velocity fields without the need for imposed perturbations. Other methods require seeding or other methods for droplet breakup. We also briefly discuss the effects of the move to exascale computing and related computational changes on general modeling codes in fusion energy.

  19. Global Warming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.NewofGeothermal Heat Pump Basics31/2007 TeppeiProgramsGlobal1

  20. Temperature compensated photovoltaic array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mosher, D.M.

    1997-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A temperature compensated photovoltaic module comprises a series of solar cells having a thermally activated switch connected in parallel with several of the cells. The photovoltaic module is adapted to charge conventional batteries having a temperature coefficient differing from the temperature coefficient of the module. The calibration temperatures of the switches are chosen whereby the colder the ambient temperature for the module, the more switches that are on and form a closed circuit to short the associated solar cells. By shorting some of the solar cells as the ambient temperature decreases, the battery being charged by the module is not excessively overcharged at lower temperatures. PV module is an integrated solution that is reliable and inexpensive. 2 figs.

  1. Temperature compensated photovoltaic array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mosher, Dan Michael (Plano, TX)

    1997-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A temperature compensated photovoltaic module (20) comprised of a series of solar cells (22) having a thermally activated switch (24) connected in parallel with several of the cells (22). The photovoltaic module (20) is adapted to charge conventional batteries having a temperature coefficient (TC) differing from the temperature coefficient (TC) of the module (20). The calibration temperatures of the switches (24) are chosen whereby the colder the ambient temperature for the module (20), the more switches that are on and form a closed circuit to short the associated solar cells (22). By shorting some of the solar cells (22) as the ambient temperature decreases, the battery being charged by the module (20) is not excessively overcharged at lower temperatures. PV module (20) is an integrated solution that is reliable and inexpensive.

  2. The temperature market A stochastic model for temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Holger

    The temperature market A stochastic model for temperature Temperature futures Conclusions The Volatility of Temperature and Pricing of Weather Derivatives Fred Espen Benth Work in collaboration with J Universit╝t Ulm, April 2007 #12;The temperature market A stochastic model for temperature Temperature

  3. Warm-Dense Molecular Gas in the ISM of Starbursts, LIRGs and ULIRGs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Desika Narayanan; Christopher K. Walker; Christopher E. Groppi

    2005-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The role of star formation in luminous and ultraluminous infrared galaxies is a hotly debated issue: while it is clear that starbursts play a large role in powering the IR luminosity in these galaxies, the relative importance of possible enshrouded AGNs is unknown. It is therefore important to better understand the role of star forming gas in contributing to the infrared luminosity in IR-bright galaxies. The J=3 level of 12CO lies 33K above ground and has a critical density of ~1.5 X 10^4 cm^-3. The 12CO(J=3-2) line serves as an effective tracer for warm-dense molecular gas heated by active star formation. Here we report on 12CO (J=3-2) observations of 17 starburst spirals, LIRGs and ULIRGs which we obtained with the Heinrich Hertz Submillimeter Telescope on Mt. Graham, Arizona. Our main results are the following: 1. We find a nearly linear relation between the infrared luminosity and warm-dense molecular gas such that the infrared luminosity increases as the warm-dense molecular gas to the power 0.92; We interpret this to be roughly consistent with the recent results of Gao & Solomon (2004a,b). 2. We find L_IR/M_H2 ratios ranging from ~10 to ~128 L_sun/M_sun using a standard CO-H2 conversion factor of 3 X 10^20 cm^-2 (K km s^-1)^-1. If this conversion factor is ~an order of magnitude less, as suggested in a recent statistical survey (Yao et al. 2003), then 2-3 of our objects may have significant contributions to the L_IR by dust-enshrouded AGNs.

  4. Reconstruction of spatial patterns of climatic anomalies during the medieval warm period (AD 900-1300)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diaz, H.F. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (United States). Environmental Research Labs.; Hughes, M.K. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States). Lab. of Tree-Ring Research

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The workshop will focus on climatic variations during the Medieval Warm Period or Little Climatic Optimum. The nominal time interval assigned to this period is AD 900--1300, but climate information available during the century or two preceding and following this episode is welcome. The aims of the workshop will be to: examine the available evidence for the existence of this episode; assess the spatial and temporal synchronicity of the climatic signals; discuss possible forcing mechanisms; and identify areas and paleoenvironmental records where additional research efforts are needed to improve our knowledge of this period. This document consists of abstracts of eighteen papers presented at the meeting.

  5. Warm-Intermediate Inflationary Universe Model with Viscous Pressure in High Dissipative Regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. R. Setare; V. Kamali

    2014-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Warm inflation model with bulk viscous pressure in the context of "intermediate inflation" where the cosmological scale factor expands as $a(t)=a_0\\exp(At^f)$, is studied. The characteristics of this model in slow-roll approximation and in high dissipative regime are presented in two cases: 1- Dissipative parameter $\\Gamma$ as a function of scalar field $\\phi$ and bulk viscous coefficient $\\zeta$ as a function of energy density $\\rho$. 2- $\\Gamma$ and $\\zeta$ are constant parameters. Scalar, tensor perturbations and spectral indices for this scenario are obtained. The cosmological parameters appearing in the present model are constrained by recent observational data (WMAP7).

  6. Tachyon Warm-Intermediate Inflationary Universe Model in High Dissipative Regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. R. Setare; V. Kamali

    2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider tachyonic warm-inflationary models in the context of intermediate inflation. We derive the characteristics of this model in slow-roll approximation and develop our model in two cases, 1- For a constant dissipative parameter $\\Gamma$. 2- $\\Gamma$ as a function of tachyon field $\\phi$. We also describe scalar and tensor perturbations for this scenario. The parameters appearing in our model are constrained by recent observational data. We find that the level of non-Gaussianity for this model is comparable with non-tachyonic model.

  7. Tachyon Warm-Intermediate Inflationary Universe Model in High Dissipative Regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Setare, M R

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider tachyonic warm-inflationary models in the context of intermediate inflation. We derive the characteristics of this model in slow-roll approximation and develop our model in two cases, 1- For a constant dissipative parameter $\\Gamma$. 2- $\\Gamma$ as a function of tachyon field $\\phi$. We also describe scalar and tensor perturbations for this scenario. The parameters appearing in our model are constrained by recent observational data. We find that the level of non-Gaussianity for this model is comparable with non-tachyonic model.

  8. Scalar perturbation in warm tachyon inflation in LQC in light of Plank and BICEP2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. R. Setare; V. Kamali

    2014-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We study warm-tachyon inflationary universe model in the context of the effective field theory of loop quantum cosmology. In slow-roll approximation the primordial perturbation spectrums for this model are calculated. We also obtain the general expressions of the tensor-to-scalar ratio, scalar spectral index. We develop this model by using exponential potential, the characteristics of this model is calculated in great details. The parameters of the model are restricted by recent observational data from Planck, WMAP9 and BICEP2.

  9. Warm-Intermediate Inflationary Universe Model with Viscous Pressure in High Dissipative Regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Setare, M R

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Warm inflation model with bulk viscous pressure in the context of "intermediate inflation" where the cosmological scale factor expands as $a(t)=a_0\\exp(At^f)$, is studied. The characteristics of this model in slow-roll approximation and in high dissipative regime are presented in two cases: 1- Dissipative parameter $\\Gamma$ as a function of scalar field $\\phi$ and bulk viscous coefficient $\\zeta$ as a function of energy density $\\rho$. 2- $\\Gamma$ and $\\zeta$ are constant parameters. Scalar, tensor perturbations and spectral indices for this scenario are obtained. The cosmological parameters appearing in the present model are constrained by recent observational data (WMAP7).

  10. Parametrization of light nuclei quasiparticle energy shifts and composition of warm and dense nuclear matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. R鰌ke

    2011-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Correlations and the formation of bound states (nuclei) are essential for the properties of nuclear matter in equilibrium as well as in nonequilibrium. In a quantum statistical approach, quasiparticle energies are obtained for the light elements that reflect the influence of the medium. We present analytical fits for the quasiparticle energy shifts of light nuclei that can be used in various applications. This is a prerequisite for the investigation of warm and dense matter that reproduces the nuclear statistical equilibrium and virial expansions in the low-density limit as well as relativistic mean field and Brueckner Hartree-Fock approaches near saturation density.

  11. Residual Stresses in 21-6-9 Stainless Steel Warm Forgings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Everhart, Wesley A.; Lee, Jordan D.; Broecker, Daniel J.; Bartow, John P.; McQueen, Jamie M.; Switzner, Nathan T.; Neidt, Tod M.; Sisneros, Thomas A.; Brown, Donald W.

    2012-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Forging residual stresses are detrimental to the production and performance of derived machined parts due to machining distortions, corrosion drivers and fatigue crack drivers. Residual strains in a 21-6-9 stainless steel warm High Energy Rate Forging (HERF) were measured via neutron diffraction. The finite element analysis (FEA) method was used to predict the residual stresses that occur during forging and water quenching. The experimentally measured residual strains were used to calibrate simulations of the three-dimensional residual stress state of the forging. ABAQUS simulation tools predicted residual strains that tend to match with experimental results when varying yield strength is considered.

  12. Methodology and characterization of root hair density, distribution and viability among warm-season perennial grasses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oprisko, Marianne Jo

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    been previously assumed for warm-season perennial grasses. DEDICATION This thesis is dedicated to my parents, Florence N. and George W. Oprisko, Sr. , who didn't quite live to see this day. This thesis was completed due to the efforts of a great... Turfgrasses. Study 3. Conf irmation of the Accuracy of Evan's Blue by Comparison with Sucrose Dehydration. Study 4. Storability of Root Hair Material. Study 5. The Necessity of Root Caps on Roots When Evaluating Root Hair Distribution in Field Grown...

  13. Chimneys: Warm and Cozy or Easy Exit for Your Heat? | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'sEnergyTexas1. Feedstock & ProductionChapterChimneys: Warm and Cozy

  14. Warm Bavarian-Style Pretzels 6. Raye's Mustard & Smoked Cheddar Sauce

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradley Nickell Director ofDepartment of Energy ThisWandaWarm

  15. Warm Bavarian-Style Pretzels 6. Raye's Mustard & Smoked Cheddar Sauce

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015Visiting Strong, Smart, andThomas H.Walk-In PanelsWarm Bavarian-Style

  16. Resource investigation of low- and moderate-temperature geothermal areas in Paso Robles, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campion, L.F.; Chapman, R.H.; Chase, G.W.; Youngs, L.G.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ninety-eight geothermal wells and springs were identified and plotted, and a geologic map and cross sections were compiled. Detailed geophysical, geochemical, and geological surveys were conducted. The geological and geophysical work delineated the basement highs and trough-like depressions that can exercise control on the occurrence of the thermal waters. The Rinconada fault was also evident. Cross sections drawn from oil well logs show the sediments conforming against these basement highs and filling the depressions. It is along the locations where the sediments meet the basement highs that three natural warm springs in the area occur. Deep circulation of meteoric waters along faults seems to be a reasonable source for the warm water. The Santa Margarita, Pancho Rico, and Paso Robles Formations would be the first permeable zones that abut the faults through which water would enter. Temperatures and interpretation of well logs indicate the warmest aquifer at the base of the Paso Robles Formation. Warm water may be entering higher up in the section, but mixing with water from cooler zones seems to be evident. Geothermometry indicates reservoir temperatures could be as high as 91/sup 0/C (196/sup 0/F).

  17. Automatic temperature adjustment apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaplin, James E. (66 Overlook Rd., Bloomingdale, NJ 07403)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for increasing the efficiency of a conventional central space heating system is disclosed. The temperature of a fluid heating medium is adjusted based on a measurement of the external temperature, and a system parameter. The system parameter is periodically modified based on a closed loop process that monitors the operation of the heating system. This closed loop process provides a heating medium temperature value that is very near the optimum for energy efficiency.

  18. Low temperature cryoprobe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sungaila, Zenon F. (Orland Park, IL)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A portable, hand held probe usable within a small confine to produce a point source of nitrogen or helium at a relatively constant temperature of 77 degrees Kelvin.

  19. Temperature and RH Targets

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presented by Vishal O Mittal of the Florida Solar Energy Center at the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting, San Francisco, September 14, 2006.

  20. EVALUATION OF ZERO-POWER, ELEVATED-TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENTS AT JAPAN扴 HIGH TEMPERATURE ENGINEERING TEST REACTOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Bess; Nozomu Fujimoto; James W. Sterbentz; Luka Snoj; Atsushi Zukeran

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is a 30 MWth, graphite-moderated, helium-cooled reactor that was constructed with the objectives to establish and upgrade the technological basis for advanced high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) as well as to conduct various irradiation tests for innovative high-temperature research. The core size of the HTTR represents about one-half of that of future HTGRs, and the high excess reactivity of the HTTR, necessary for compensation of temperature, xenon, and burnup effects during power operations, is similar to that of future HTGRs. During the start-up core physics tests of the HTTR, various annular cores were formed to provide experimental data for verification of design codes for future HTGRs. The experimental benchmark performed and currently evaluated in this report pertains to the data available for two zero-power, warm-critical measurements with the fully-loaded HTTR core. Six isothermal temperature coefficients for the fully-loaded core from approximately 340 to 740 K have also been evaluated. These experiments were performed as part of the power-up tests (References 1 and 2). Evaluation of the start-up core physics tests specific to the fully-loaded core (HTTR-GCR-RESR-001) and annular start-up core loadings (HTTR-GCR-RESR-002) have been previously evaluated.

  1. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Garfield County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Garfield Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Garfield County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4441550.552290 m Left: 271445.053363 m Right: 359825.053363 m Bottom: 4312490.552290 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS 1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  2. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Routt County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Routt Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Routt County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4501071.574000 m Left: 311351.975000 m Right: 359681.975000 m Bottom: 4447251.574000 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS 1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  3. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Chaffee County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Chaffee Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Chaffee County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4333432.368072 m Left: 366907.700763 m Right: 452457.816015 m Bottom: 4208271.566715 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS 1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  4. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Archuleta County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Archuleta Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Archuleta County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4144691.792023 m Left: 285531.662851 m Right: 348694.182686 m Bottom: 4097005.210304 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS 1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  5. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Dolored County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Dolores Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Dolores County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4186234.213315 m Left: 212558.673056 m Right: 232922.811862 m Bottom: 4176781.467043 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS 1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  6. Comparison of global warming impacts of automobile air-conditioning concepts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The global warming impacts of conventional vapor compression automobile air conditioning using HFC-134a are compared with the potential impacts of four alternative concepts. Comparisons are made on the basis of total equivalent warming impact (TEWI) which accounts for the effects of refrigerant emissions, energy use to provide comfort cooling, and fuel consumed to transport the weight of the air conditioning system. Under the most favorable assumptions on efficiency and weight, transcritical compression using CO{sub 2} as the refrigerant and adsorption cooling with water and zeolite beds could reduce TEWI by up to 18%rlative to HFC-134a compression air conditioning. Other assumptions on weight and efficiency lead to significant increases in TEWI relative to HFC-134a, and it is impossible to determine which set of assumptios is valid from existing data, Neither Stirling cycle or thermoelectric cooling will reduce TEWI relative to EFC-134a. Brief comments are also made concerning technical barriers that must be overcome for succesful development of the new technologies.

  7. Historic Trends in U. S. Drought Forcing in a Warming Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muschinski, T

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mean North American and world climates have warmed significantly since the beginning of climatologically significant anthropogenic emission of greenhouse gases in the 19th Century. It has been suggested that warming may increase the frequency or severity of droughts. We define and study the statistics of an aridity index that describes the precipitation forcing function of a drought, considering drought to be a season with low enough precipitation to be significant for agriculture. Our aridity index is a reciprocal function of the seasonal precipitation, which is more significant for agriculture than mean precipitation. Using NOAA data from sites in 13 diverse climate regimes in the 48 contiguous United States with time series running over the period 1940--1999 but including two data series from 1900 or 1910, and computing their decadal averages, we search for linear trends in their aridity indices. We find no linear trends significant at the $2\\sigma$ level. At five sites $3\\sigma$ upper bounds on any sy...

  8. Response of snow-dependent hydrologic extremes to continued global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diffenbaugh, Noah [Stanford University; Scherer, Martin [Stanford University; Ashfaq, Moetasim [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Snow accumulation is critical for water availability in the Northern Hemisphere1,2, raising concern that global warming could have important impacts on natural and human systems in snow-dependent regions1,3. Although regional hydrologic changes have been observed (for example, refs 1,3 5), the time of emergence of extreme changes in snow accumulation and melt remains a key unknown for assessing climate- change impacts3,6,7. We find that the CMIP5 global climate model ensemble exhibits an imminent shift towards low snow years in the Northern Hemisphere, with areas of western North America, northeastern Europe and the Greater Himalaya showing the strongest emergence during the near- termdecadesandat2 Cglobalwarming.Theoccurrenceof extremely low snow years becomes widespread by the late twenty-first century, as do the occurrences of extremely high early-season snowmelt and runoff (implying increasing flood risk), and extremely low late-season snowmelt and runoff (implying increasing water stress). Our results suggest that many snow-dependent regions of the Northern Hemisphere are likely to experience increasing stress from low snow years within the next three decades, and from extreme changes in snow-dominated water resources if global warming exceeds 2 C above the pre-industrial baseline.

  9. Thermoelectric Temperature Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saffman, Mark

    NOTE 201TM TECHNICAL Optimizing Thermoelectric Temperature Control Systems #12;2 May 1995 92-040000A 1995 Wavelength Electronics, Inc. Thermoelectric coolers (TECs) are used in a variety understanding of thermal management techniques and carefully select the thermoelectric module, temperature

  10. Regional calibration of coral-based climate reconstructions from Palau, West Pacific Warm Pool (WPWP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osborne, Michael C; Dunbar, Robert B; Mucciarone, David A; Sanchez-Cabeza, Joan-Albert; Druffel, Ellen

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for assistance with coral drilling as well as Captain Jimabout coral drilling targets as well as temperature logger

  11. Overview of engineering and agricultural design considerations of the Raft River soil-warming and heat-dissipation experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stanley, N.E.; Engen, I.A.; Yrene, C.S.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The engineering and agricultural considerations of the Raft River soil-warming and heat-dissipation experiment are presented. The experiment is designed to investigate the thermal characteristics of a subsurface pipe network for cooling power-plant condenser effluent, and crop responses to soil warming in an open-field plot. The subsurface soil-warming system is designed to dissipate approximately 100 kW of heat from circulating, 38/sup 0/C geothermal water. Summer operating conditions in the Raft River area, located on the Intermountain Plateau are emphasized. Design is based on the thermal characteristics of the local soil, the climate of the Raft River Valley, management practices for normal agriculture, and the need for an unheated control plot. The resultant design calls for 38-mm polyvinyl chloride (PVC) pipe in a grid composed of parallel loops, for dissipating heat into a 0.8-hectare experimental plot.

  12. Observed Holiday Aerosol Reduction and Temperature Cooling over East Asia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gong, Daoyi; Wang, Wenshan; Qian, Yun; Bai, Wenbing; Guo, Yuanxi; Mao, Rui

    2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Spring Festival air pollution in China was investigated using the long-term observations from 2001-2012 over 323 stations. During the Spring Festival with nearly half of urban population leaving the cities for holidays, the particulate matter (PM10) concentration is about 24.5?gm-3 (23%) lower than normal days. Associated with the national-wide burning of firework, the PM10 concentration sharply increases to 123.8?gm-3 at Chinese New Year Day (increment of 35%). Similar to PM10, the SO2 and NO2 decrease from high values in normal days to a holiday minimum with reduction of 23.3% and 30.6%, respectively. The NO2 has no peak in New Year Day because of the different emission source. The night mean and minimum temperature co-vary with PM10. Both nighttime mean and minimum temperature decrease by about 2.1癈 during the holidays. And in association with the pollution jump at New Year Day the night temperature simultaneously increase by about 0.89癈. The in-phase co-variations between PM10 and night temperature suggest an overall warming effect of holiday aerosol during winter in China.

  13. Temperature-sensitive optrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hirschfeld, T.B.

    1985-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus are provided for measuring temperature and for generating optical signals related to temperature. Light from a fiber optic is directed to a material whose fluorescent response varies with ambient temperature. The same fiber optic delivering the excitation beam also collects a portion of the fluorescent emission for analysis. Signal collection efficiency of the fiber optic is enhanced by requiring that the fluorescent probe material be in the shape of an oblong parabolically tapered solid. Reproducibility is enhanced by using Raman backscatter to monitor excitation beam fluctuations, and by using measurements of fluorescence lifetime. 10 figs.

  14. High Temperature Capacitor Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Kosek

    2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The absence of high-temperature electronics is an obstacle to the development of untapped energy resources (deep oil, gas and geothermal). US natural gas consumption is projected to grow from 22 trillion cubic feet per year (tcf) in 1999 to 34 tcf in 2020. Cumulatively this is 607 tcf of consumption by 2020, while recoverable reserves using current technology are 177 tcf. A significant portion of this shortfall may be met by tapping deep gas reservoirs. Tapping these reservoirs represents a significant technical challenge. At these depths, temperatures and pressures are very high and may require penetrating very hard rock. Logistics of supporting 6.1 km (20,000 ft) drill strings and the drilling processes are complex and expensive. At these depths up to 50% of the total drilling cost may be in the last 10% of the well depth. Thus, as wells go deeper it is increasingly important that drillers are able to monitor conditions down-hole such as temperature, pressure, heading, etc. Commercial off-the-shelf electronics are not specified to meet these operating conditions. This is due to problems associated with all aspects of the electronics including the resistors and capacitors. With respect to capacitors, increasing temperature often significantly changes capacitance because of the strong temperature dependence of the dielectric constant. Higher temperatures also affect the equivalent series resistance (ESR). High-temperature capacitors usually have low capacitance values because of these dielectric effects and because packages are kept small to prevent mechanical breakage caused by thermal stresses. Electrolytic capacitors do not operate at temperatures above 150oC due to dielectric breakdown. The development of high-temperature capacitors to be used in a high-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) drilling environment was investigated. These capacitors were based on a previously developed high-voltage hybridized capacitor developed at Giner, Inc. in conjunction with a unique high-temperature electrolyte developed during the course of the program. During this program the feasibility of operating a high voltage hybridized capacitor at 230oC was demonstrated. Capacitor specifications were established in conjunction with potential capacitor users. A method to allow for capacitor operation at both ambient and elevated temperatures was demonstrated. The program was terminated prior to moving into Phase II due to a lack of cost-sharing funds.

  15. Finite Temperature Effective Actions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashok Das; J. Frenkel

    2009-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We present, from first principles, a direct method for evaluating the exact fermion propagator in the presence of a general background field at finite temperature, which can be used to determine the finite temperature effective action for the system. As applications, we determine the complete one loop finite temperature effective actions for 0+1 dimensional QED as well as the Schwinger model. These effective actions, which are derived in the real time (closed time path) formalism, generate systematically all the Feynman amplitudes calculated in thermal perturbation theory and also show that the retarded (advanced) amplitudes vanish in these theories.

  16. air surface temperature: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    stations are confined mainly to continental and island locations. The results indicate a global warming of about 0.5-0.7C in the past century, with warming of similar...

  17. High-Temperature Superconductivity

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Peter Johnson

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Like astronomers tweaking images to gain a more detailed glimpse of distant stars, physicists at Brookhaven National Laboratory have found ways to sharpen images of the energy spectra in high-temperature superconductors ? materials that carry electrical c

  18. Penrose Well Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopherson, Karen

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Penrose Well Temperatures Geothermal waters have been encountered in several wells near Penrose in Fremont County, Colorado. Most of the wells were drilled for oil and gas exploration and, in a few cases, production. This ESRI point shapefile utilizes data from 95 wells in and around the Penrose area provided by the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) database at http://cogcc.state.co.us/ . Temperature data from the database were used to calculate a temperature gradient for each well. This information was then used to estimate temperatures at various depths. Projection: UTM Zone 13 NAD27 Extent: West -105.224871 East -105.027633 North 38.486269 South 38.259507 Originators: Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) Karen Christopherson

  19. Low temperature cryoprobe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sungaila, Z.F.

    1988-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A portable, hand held probe usable within a small confine to produce a point source of nitrogen or helium at a relatively constant temperatures of 77 degrees Kelvin, is discussed. 3 figs.

  20. Temperature in the Throat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dariush Kaviani; Amir Esmaeil Mosaffa

    2015-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the temperature of extended objects in string theory. Rotating D-branes in warped Calabi-Yau throats have induced metrics with thermal horizons and Hawking temperatures a la Unruh effect. We solve the equations of motion for slow rotating probe branes and derive their induced metrics in the UV/IR solutions of warped conifold throats. Our analysis shows that horizons and temperatures of expected features form on the world volume of the rotating probe brane in terms of conserved charges in the UV solutions of the conifold throat. In certain limits, we find world volume horizons and temperatures of the form similar to those of rotating probes in the AdS throat.