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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unsaturated zone yucca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Modeling studies of mountain-scale radionuclide transport in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Investigations at Yucca Mountain - The Potential Repositoryin the Unsaturated Zone, Yucca Mountain, Nevada, ResourcesIN THE UNSATURATED ZONE AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA George J.

Moridis, George J.; Seol, Yongkoo; Wu, Yu-Shu

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

A site scale model for modeling unsaturated zone processes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unsaturated Zone Model of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for theZone Trocesses at yucca Mountain, N G. S. Bodvarsson, Y. S.unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as a permanent

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Calibration of Yucca Mountain unsaturated zone flow and transport model using porewater chloride data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of hydrogeologic units at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. U.S.infiltration for the Yucca Mountain Area, Nevada. Milestonethe unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. J. Contam.

Liu, Jianchun; Sonnenthal, Eric L.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

The Influence of Proposed Repository Thermal Load on Multiphase Flow and Heat Transfer in the Unsaturated Zone of Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studies Using the Yucca Mountain Unsaturated Zone Model,Unsaturated Zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, to Thermal LoadLarge Block Test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Water Resources

Wu, Y.-S.; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Zhang, Keni; Bodvarsson, G.S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Modeling thermal-hydrological response of the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, to thermal load at a potential repository  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Repository at Yucca Mountain. In Materials Research Societystudies using the Yucca Mountain unsaturated zone model.Unsaturated Zone, Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Water Resources

Haukwa, C.B.; Wu, Yu-Shu; Bodvarsson, G.S.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Sensitivity Analysis Of Hydrological Parameters In Modeling Flow And Transport In The Unsaturated Zone Of Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unsaturated Zone of Yucca Mountain Keni Zhang, Yu-Shu Wu,volcanic deposits at Yucca Mountain have been intensivelyhydraulic properties, Yucca Mountain Introduction Site

Zhang, Keni; Wu, Yu-Shu; Houseworth, James E

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

A Site-Scale Model For Fluid And Heat Flow In The Unsaturated Zone Of Yucca  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Site-Scale Model For Fluid And Heat Flow In The Unsaturated Zone Of Yucca Site-Scale Model For Fluid And Heat Flow In The Unsaturated Zone Of Yucca Mountain, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Site-Scale Model For Fluid And Heat Flow In The Unsaturated Zone Of Yucca Mountain, Nevada Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: A three-dimensional unsaturated-zone numerical model has been developed to simulate flow and distribution of moisture, gas and heat at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a potential repository site for high-level radioactive waste. The model takes into account the simultaneous flow dynamics of liquid water, vapor, air and heat in the highly heterogeneous, fractured porous rock in the unsaturated zone (UZ). This model is intended for use in the prediction of the current and future conditions in the UZ so

8

Preliminary 3-D site-scale studies of radioactive colloid transort in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into drifts at Yucca Mountain. ” J. Contam. Hydrol. , 38(1–pneumatic response at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. J. Contam.unsaturated zone model of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. J. Contam.

Moridis, G.J.; Hu, Q.; Wu, Y.-S.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Temporal Damping Effect of the Yucca Mountain Fractured Unsaturated Rock on Transient Infiltration Pulses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain. J. of Cont. Hydrol. ,2003b. Calibration of Yucca Mountain unsaturated zone flowthe unsaturated zone, Yucca Mountain, USGS Water Resources

Zhang, Keni; Wu, Yu-Shu; Pan, Lehua

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Evolution of the unsaturated zone testing at Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INTO DRIFTS AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN." JOURNAL OF CONTAMINANTFRACTURES AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN." JOURNAL OF CONTAMINANTPneumatic Testing at Yucca Mountain." International Journal

Wang, J.S.Y.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Massively parallel computing simulation of fluid flow in the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Central Block Area, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. Mapunsaturated zone, Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Water-Resourcesisotope distributions at Yucca Mountain. Sandia National

Zhang, Keni; Wu, Yu-Shu; Bodvarsson, G.S.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

A mountain-scale model for characterizing unsaturated flow and transport in fractured tuffs of Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Fault Zones at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, International2003c. Calibration of Yucca Mountain Unsaturated Zone FlowUnsaturated Zone, Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Water-Resources

Wu, Yu-Shu; Lu, Guoping; Zhang, Keni; Bodvarsson, G.S.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Conceptual evaluation of the potential role of fractures in unsaturated processes at Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Process Models, Yucca Mountain, Nevada. U.S. GeologicalUnsaturated Zone Model of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. J. Contam.Studies Facility, Yucca Mountain Project. Yucca Mountain,

Hinds, Jennifer J.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.; Nieder-Westermann, Gerald H.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Evolution of the conceptual model of unsaturated zone hydrology at yucca mountain, nevada  

SciTech Connect

Yucca Mountain is an arid site proposed for consideration as the United States' first underground high-level radioactive waste repository. Low rainfall (approximately 170 mm/yr) and a thick unsaturated zone (500-1000 m) are important physical attributes of the site because the quantity of water likely to reach the waste and the paths and rates of movement of the water to the saturated zone under future climates would be major factors in controlling the concentrations and times of arrival of radionuclides at the surrounding accessible environment. The framework for understanding the hydrologic processes that occur at this site and that control how quickly water will penetrate through the unsaturated zone to the water table has evolved during the past 15 yr. Early conceptual models assumed that very small volumes of water infiltrated into the bedrock (0.5-4.5 mm/yr, or 2-3 percent of rainfall), that much of the infiltrated water flowed laterally within the upper nonwelded units because o f capillary barrier effects, and that the remaining water flowed down faults with a small amount flowing through the matrix of the lower welded, fractured rocks. It was believed that the matrix had to be saturated for fractures to show. However, accumulating evidence indicated that infiltration rates were higher than initially estimated, such as infiltration modeling based on neutron borehole data, bomb-pulse isotopes deep in the mountain, perched water analyses and thermal analyses. Mechanisms supporting lateral diversion did not apply at these higher fluxes, and the flux calculated in the lower welded unit exceeded the conductivity of the matrix, implying vertical flow of water into the high permeability fractures of the potential repository host rock, and disequilibrium between matrix and fracture water potentials. The development of numerical modeling methods and parameter values evolved concurrently with the conceptual model in order to account for the observed field data, particularly fracture flow deep in the unsaturated zone. This paper presents the history of the evolution of conceptual models of hydrology and numerical models of unsaturated zone flow at Yucca Mountain, Nevada (Flint, A.L., Flint, L.E., Kwicklis, E.M., Bodvarsson, G.S., Fabryka-Martin, J.M., 2001. Hydrology of Yucca Mountain. Reviews of Geophysics in press). This retrospective is the basis for recommendations for optimizing the efficiency with which a viable and robust conceptual model can be developed for a complex site. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. [References: 87

Flint, A. L.; Flint, L. E.; Bodvarsson, G. S.; Kwicklis, E. M.; Fabryka-Martin, J.

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Characterization of Spatial Variability of Hydrogeologic Properties for Unsaturated Flow in the Fractured Rocks at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using matrix properties , Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USGS Waterof hydrogeologic units at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, U.S.Unsaturated Zone, Yucca Mountain, Nevada . Water-Resources

Zhou, Quanlin; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.; Liu, Hui-Hai; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Modeling Unsaturated Flow and Transport Processes in Fractured Tuffs of Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

zone site-scale model, Yucca Mountain Site Characterizationsite-scale model, Yucca Mountain Project Milestone 3GLM105M,unsaturated zone, Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Water-Resources

Wu, Yu-Shu; Lu, Guoping; Zhang, Keni; Bodvarsson, G.S.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

A Radionuclide Transport Model for the Unsaturated Zone at Yucca Mountain Bruce A. Robinson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.S. Geological Survey #12;Yucca Mountain (arrow) in its regional setting. From lower left to upper right (toward southeast), Forty-Mile Wash (trending south), and Jackass Flat (JF, sandy-colored area east ofYucca Mountain). Between Yucca Mountain and theAmargosa River lie Crater Flat (CF) with its young volcanic centers (red

Lu, Zhiming

18

Repository site data report for unsaturated tuff, Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy is currently considering the thick sequences of unsaturated, fractured tuff at Yucca Mountain, on the southwestern boundary of the Nevada Test Site, as a possible candidate host rock for a nuclear-waste repository. Yucca Mountain is in one of the most arid areas in the United States. The site is within the south-central part of the Great Basin section of the Basin and Range physiographic province and is located near a number of silicic calderas of Tertiary age. Although localized zones of seismic activity are common throughout the province, and faults are present at Yucca Mountain, the site itself is basically aseismic. No data are available on the composition of ground water in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain. It has been suggested that the composition is bounded by the compositions of water from wells USW-H3, UE25p-1, J-13, and snow or rain. There are relatively few data available from Yucca Mountain on the moisture content and saturation, hydraulic conductivity, and characteristic curves of the unsaturated zone. The available literature on thermomechanical properties of tuff does not always distinguish between data from the saturated zone and data from the unsaturated zone. Geochemical, hydrologic, and thermomechanical data available on the unsaturated tuffs of Yucca Mountain are tabulated in this report. Where the data are very sparse, they have been supplemented by data from the saturated zone or from areas other than Yucca Mountain. 316 refs., 58 figs., 37 tabs.

Tien, P.L.; Updegraff, C.D.; Siegel, M.D.; Wahi, K.K.; Guzowski, R.V.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Massively parallel computing simulation of fluid flow in the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at Yucca Mountain. Sandia National Laboratories Milestone3672. Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.Computing Research Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories,

Zhang, Keni; Wu, Yu-Shu; Bodvarsson, G.S.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Modeling studies of mountain-scale radionuclide transport in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wu, and G.S. Bodvarsson, Radionuclide Transport Models Underdaughters of certain radionuclides. Increasing infiltrationOF MOUNTAIN-SCALE RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT IN THE UNSATURATED

Moridis, George J.; Seol, Yongkoo; Wu, Yu-Shu

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unsaturated zone yucca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

A Mountain-Scale Thermal Hydrologic Model for Simulating Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer in Unsaturated Fractured Rock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studies Using the Yucca Mountain Unsaturated Zone Model,Unsaturated Zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, to Thermal LoadUnsaturated Zone, Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Water-Resources

Wu, Yu-Shu; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Zhang, Keni; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Reactive transport model for the ambient unsaturated hydrogeochemical system at Yucca mountain, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To assist a technical review of a potential application for a geologic repository, a reactive transport model is presented for the ambient hydrogeochemical system at Yucca Mountain (YM). The model simulates two-phase, nonisothermal, advective and diffusive ... Keywords: Yucca mountain, geochemistry, groundwater chemistry, groundwater flow and transport, hydrology, reactive transport model, unsaturated zone

Lauren Browning; William M. Murphy; Chandrika Manepally; Randall Fedors

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

NaturAnalogs for the Unsaturated Zone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document natural and anthropogenic (human-induced) analog sites and processes that are applicable to flow and transport processes expected to occur at the potential Yucca Mountain repository in order to build increased confidence in modeling processes of Unsaturated Zone (UZ) flow and transport. This AMR was prepared in accordance with ''AMR Development Plan for U0135, Natural Analogs for the UZ'' (CRWMS 1999a). Knowledge from analog sites and processes is used as corroborating information to test and build confidence in flow and transport models of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This AMR supports the Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR) and the Yucca Mountain Site Description. The objectives of this AMR are to test and build confidence in the representation of UZ processes in numerical models utilized in the UZ Flow and Transport Model. This is accomplished by: (1) applying data from Boxy Canyon, Idaho in simulations of UZ flow using the same methodologies incorporated in the Yucca Mountain UZ Flow and Transport Model to assess the fracture-matrix interaction conceptual model; (2) Providing a preliminary basis for analysis of radionuclide transport at Pena Blanca, Mexico as an analog of radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain; and (3) Synthesizing existing information from natural analog studies to provide corroborating evidence for representation of ambient and thermally coupled UZ flow and transport processes in the UZ Model.

A. Simmons; A. Unger; M. Murrell

2000-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

24

The Influence of Proposed Repository Thermal Load on Multiphase Flow and Heat Transfer in the Unsaturated Zone of Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

two-phase zone, is the heat-pipe (i.e. , a zone of constant4a), when there is a heat pipe just above the emplacementduring ventilation, the heat-pipe signature is absent in

Wu, Y.-S.; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Zhang, Keni; Bodvarsson, G.S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Unsaturated Zone I. Overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

waste management program in addition to the site-characterization efforts at Yucca Mountain Upwelling at Yucca Mountain The Board completed its review of material (11 re- ports) first submitted that there is evidence of ongoing, intermittent hydrothermal upwelling at Yucca Mountain and that large earth- quake

26

Analyzing flow patterns in unsaturated fractured rock of YuccaMountain using an integrated modeling approach  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a series of modeling investigations to characterize percolation patterns in the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a proposed underground repository site for storing high-level radioactive waste. The investigations are conducted using a modeling approach that integrates a wide variety of moisture, pneumatic, thermal, and isotopic geochemical field data into a comprehensive three-dimensional numerical model through model calibration. This integrated modeling approach, based on a dual-continuum formulation, takes into account the coupled processes of fluid and heat flow and chemical isotopic transport in Yucca Mountain's highly heterogeneous, unsaturated fractured tuffs. In particular, the model results are examined against different types of field-measured data and used to evaluate different hydrogeological conceptual models and their effects on flow patterns in the unsaturated zone. The objective of this work to provide understanding of percolation patterns and flow behavior through the unsaturated zone, which is a crucial issue in assessing repository performance.

Wu, Yu-Shu; Lu, Guoping; Zhang, Keni; Pan, Lehua; Bodvarsson,Gudmundur S.

2003-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

27

Unsaturated Zone and Saturated Zone Transport Properties (U0100)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Analysis/Model Report (AMR) summarizes transport properties for the lower unsaturated zone hydrogeologic units and the saturated zone at Yucca Mountain and provides a summary of data from the Busted Butte Unsaturated Zone Transport Test (UZTT). The purpose of this report is to summarize the sorption and transport knowledge relevant to flow and transport in the units below Yucca Mountain and to provide backup documentation for the sorption parameters decided upon for each rock type. Because of the complexity of processes such as sorption, and because of the lack of direct data for many conditions that may be relevant for Yucca Mountain, data from systems outside of Yucca Mountain are also included. The data reported in this AMR will be used in Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) calculations and as general scientific support for various Process Model Reports (PMRs) requiring knowledge of the transport properties of different materials. This report provides, but is not limited to, sorption coefficients and other relevant thermodynamic and transport properties for the radioisotopes of concern, especially neptunium (Np), plutonium (Pu), Uranium (U), technetium (Tc), iodine (I), and selenium (Se). The unsaturated-zone (UZ) transport properties in the vitric Calico Hills (CHv) are discussed, as are colloidal transport data based on the Busted Butte UZTT, the saturated tuff, and alluvium. These values were determined through expert elicitation, direct measurements, and data analysis. The transport parameters include information on interactions of the fractures and matrix. In addition, core matrix permeability data from the Busted Butte UZTT are summarized by both percent alteration and dispersion.

J. Conca

2000-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

28

Analyzing flow patterns in unsaturated fractured rock of Yucca Mountain using an integrated modeling approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

zone site-scale model, Yucca Mountain Site Characterizationzone site- scale model, Yucca Mountain Project Milestonelateral diversion at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Water Resources

Wu, Yu-Shu; Lu, Guoping; Zhang, Keni; Pan, Lehua; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Several TOUGH2 Modules Developed for Site Characterization Studies of Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unsaturated Zone Model of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Lawrencestudies of Yucca Mountain. The model formulations arebeing used in the Yucca Mountain project. Pruess, K . ,

Wu, Yu-Shu; Pruess, Karsten

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Effect of small-scale fractures on flow and transport processes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transport Processes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada Yu-Shu Wu, H.matrix interaction in Yucca Mountain site characterizationthe Unsaturated Zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Journal of

Wu, Yu-Shu; Liu, H.H.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Fluid flow and reactive transport around potential nuclear waste emplacement tunnels at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unsaturated Zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. U.S. Geologicalzone model at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. J. Contaminantinvesti- gations at Yucca Mountain - the potential

Spycher, N.F.; Sonnenthal, E.L.; Apps, J.A.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Estimating large-scale fracture permeability of unsaturated rock using barometric pressure data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studies Facility, Yucca Mountain, Nevada, U.S. GeologicalUnsaturated Zone, Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Water-Resourcesstudies facility, Yucca Mountain, Nevada, U.S. Geological

Wu, Yu-Shu; Zhang, Keni; Liu, Hui-Hai

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

The use of TOUGH2/iTOUGH2 in support of the Yucca Mountain Project: Successes and limitations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emplace- ment drifts at Yucca Mountain, Proceedings: TOUGHLarge Block Test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Water Resourcesthe Unsaturated Zone, Yucca Mountain, Ne- vada. LBL-20553.

Bodvarsson, G.S.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Finsterle, S.; Liu, H.H.; Rutqvist, J.; Wu, Y.S.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Colloid Transport and Deposition in Water-Saturated and Unsaturated Sand and Yucca Mountain Tuff: Effect of Ionic Strength and Moisture Saturation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Colloid-aided radionuclide transport has been considered a potentially important mechanism for the candidate spent fuel and high level waste (HLW) repository at Yucca Mountain. This mechanism, however, has not been treated in Yucca Mountain Total System Performance Assessments (TSPAs) until recently. Even then there has been little discussion of possible colloid retention in the unsaturated zone. This report summarizes investigations of potential colloid retention in sand and Yucca Mountain tuff as a fun...

1999-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

35

Reply to "Commentary: Assessment of past infiltration fluxes through Yucca Mountain on the basis of the secondary mineral record-is it a viable methodology?", by Y.V. Dublyansky and S.Z. Smirnov  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

infiltration fluxes through Yucca Mountain on the basis ofdata for the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain (Nevada).AMR U0085, Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Disposal Project,

Sonnenthal, Eric; Xu, Tianfu; Bodvarrson, Gudmundur

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Seepage into drifts in unsaturated fractured rock at Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fractured Rock at Yucca Mountain Jens Birkholzer, Guomin Lrepository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as it is locatedclimate conditions at Yucca Mountain. The numerical study is

Birkholzer, Jens; Li, Guomin; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Tsang, Yvonne

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Simulation of heat transfer in the unsaturated zone  

SciTech Connect

Heat transfer can play an important role in fluid flow near the emplacement site of high-level nuclear waste. The effects on far- field flow can be important in understanding net moisture fluxes above the repository zone. The convection in the unsaturated zone at the Yucca Mountain site was responsible for this movement. If this is so, then the convection could provide a mechanism for drying the rock above the repository zone and thus provide a buffer for heavy rainfall events. In addition, the convection would increase the movement of gaseous radionuclides such as {sup 14}CO{sub 2}, tritiated water vapor, and {sup 129}I (Weeks, 1987). Because of the complexity of the problem, numerical models were required to calculate gas flow and vapor transport at the site. Kipp previously modeled this problem using the code HST3D. This code represents the flow of a single-phase fluid with both heat- and mass-transfer effects included. Water density and partial pressure effects are accounted for by the virtual temperature method. In this paper, the problem was simulated using the code FEHMN, a finite-element heat- and mass-transfer code being developed for the Yucca Mountain Project. The work described in this paper was done in preparation of the upcoming problem to be formulated for the Performance Assessment Calculation Exercise. 5 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

Zyvoloski, G.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

A Conceptual and Numerical Model for Thermal-Hydrological-Chemical Processes in the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, NV from three-Scale Heater Test. Yucca Mountain Project Level 4 MilestoneReport, Chapter 6. Yucca Mountain Project Level 4 Milestone

Sonnenthal, Eric L.; Spycher, Nicolas F.; Conrad, Mark; Apps, John

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Yucca Mountain Area Saturated Zone Dissolved Organic Carbon Isotopic Data  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater samples in the Yucca Mountain area were collected for chemical and isotopic analyses and measurements of water temperature, pH, specific conductivity, and alkalinity were obtained at the well or spring at the time of sampling. For this project, groundwater samples were analyzed for major-ion chemistry, deuterium, oxygen-18, and carbon isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) performed all the fieldwork on this project including measurement of water chemistry field parameters and sample collection. The major ions dissolved in the groundwater, deuterium, oxygen-18, and carbon isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were analyzed by the USGS. All preparation and processing of samples for DOC carbon isotopic analyses and geochemical modeling were performed by the Desert Research Institute (DRI). Analysis of the DOC carbon dioxide gas produced at DRI to obtain carbon-13 and carbon-14 values was conducted at the University of Arizona Accelerator Facility (a NSHE Yucca Mountain project QA qualified contract facility). The major-ion chemistry, deuterium, oxygen-18, and carbon isotopes of DIC were used in geochemical modeling (NETPATH) to determine groundwater sources, flow paths, mixing, and ages. The carbon isotopes of DOC were used to calculate groundwater ages that are independent of DIC model corrected carbon-14 ages. The DIC model corrected carbon-14 calculated ages were used to evaluate groundwater travel times for mixtures of water including water beneath Yucca Mountain. When possible, groundwater travel times were calculated for groundwater flow from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient sample sites. DOC carbon-14 groundwater ages were also calculated for groundwaters in the Yucca Mountain area. When possible, groundwater travel times were estimated for groundwater flow from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient groundwater sample sites using the DOC calculated groundwater ages. The DIC calculated groundwater ages were compared with DOC calculated groundwater ages and both of these ages were compared to travel times developed in ground-water flow and transport models. If nuclear waste is stored in Yucca Mountain, the saturated zone is the final barrier against the release of radionuclides to the environment. The most recent rendition of the TSPA takes little credit for the presence of the saturated zone and is a testament to the inadequate understanding of this important barrier. If radionuclides reach the saturated zone beneath Yucca Mountain, then there is a travel time before they would leave the Yucca Mountain area and flow down gradient to the Amargosa Valley area. Knowing how long it takes groundwater in the saturated zone to flow from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient areas is critical information for potential radionuclide transport. Radionuclide transport in groundwater may be the quickest pathway for radionuclides in the proposed Yucca Mountain repository to reach land surface by way of groundwater pumped in Amargosa Valley. An alternative approach to ground-water flow and transport models to determine the travel time of radionuclides from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient areas in the saturated zone is by carbon-14 dating of both inorganic and organic carbon dissolved in the groundwater. A standard method of determining ground-water ages is to measure the carbon-13 and carbon-14 of DIC in the groundwater and then correct the measured carbon-14 along a flow path for geochemical reactions that involve carbon containing phases. These geochemical reactions are constrained by carbon-13 and isotopic fractionations. Without correcting for geochemical reactions, the ground-water ages calculated from only the differences in carbon-14 measured along a flow path (assuming the decrease in carbon-14 is due strictly to radioactive decay) could be tens of thousands of years too old. The computer program NETPATH, developed by the USGS, is the best geochemical program for correcting carbon-14 activities for geochemical r

Thomas, James; Decker, David; Patterson, Gary; Peterman, Zell; Mihevc, Todd; Larsen, Jessica; Hershey, Ronald

2007-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

40

Development of discrete flow paths in unsaturated fractures at Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into drifts at Yucca Mountain. Journal of Contaminantof infiltration for the Yucca Mountain Area, Nevada, U. S.matrix properties, Yucca Mountain, Nevada, U.S. Geological

Bodvarsson, G.S.; Wu, Yu-Shu; Zhang, Keni

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unsaturated zone yucca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

[Characterization of historical infiltration in the unsaturated zone at the Nevada Test Site using chloride, bromide, and chlorine-36 as environmental tracers]; [Final subcontract report  

SciTech Connect

This document is an end-of-contract report, prepared by Hydro Geo Chem for Los Alamos National Laboratory under contract number 9-XDD-6329F-1. The ultimate goal of this work is to characterize historical infiltration and unsaturated flow in the Yucca Mountain area of the Nevada Test Site. Work on this contract has focused on using chloride, bromide, stable chlorine isotopes, and chlorine-36 distributions to evaluate the depth of infiltration in the unsaturated zone. Effort in support of this work has included developing analytical procedures, exploring ways in which to separate the. meteoric component from the rock component, and meeting quality assurance requirements.

NONE

1991-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

42

Vapor Flow to Horizontal Wells in Unsaturated Zones Hongbin Zhan* and Eungyu Park  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vapor Flow to Horizontal Wells in Unsaturated Zones Hongbin Zhan* and Eungyu Park ABSTRACT and vaporthree dimensional form for a horizontal-well sink in an unsaturated zone. This is done by solving; horizontal-well axis to obtain the solution of flow to a horizontal-well Zhan and Cao, 2000). Horizontal

Zhan, Hongbin

43

Modeling coupled thermal-hydrological-chemical processes in the unsaturated fractured rock of Yucca Mountain, Nevada: Heterogeneity and seepage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emplacement drift at Yucca Mountain. Journal of ContaminantScale Heater Test at Yucca Mountain. International Journalemplacement tunnels at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Journal of

Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Sonnenthal, Eric L.; Spycher, Nicolas

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE DESCRIPTION  

SciTech Connect

The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' summarizes, in a single document, the current state of knowledge and understanding of the natural system at Yucca Mountain. It describes the geology; geochemistry; past, present, and projected future climate; regional hydrologic system; and flow and transport within the unsaturated and saturated zones at the site. In addition, it discusses factors affecting radionuclide transport, the effect of thermal loading on the natural system, and tectonic hazards. The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' is broad in nature. It summarizes investigations carried out as part of the Yucca Mountain Project since 1988, but it also includes work done at the site in earlier years, as well as studies performed by others. The document has been prepared under the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management quality assurance program for the Yucca Mountain Project. Yucca Mountain is located in Nye County in southern Nevada. The site lies in the north-central part of the Basin and Range physiographic province, within the northernmost subprovince commonly referred to as the Great Basin. The basin and range physiography reflects the extensional tectonic regime that has affected the region during the middle and late Cenozoic Era. Yucca Mountain was initially selected for characterization, in part, because of its thick unsaturated zone, its arid to semiarid climate, and the existence of a rock type that would support excavation of stable openings. In 1987, the United States Congress directed that Yucca Mountain be the only site characterized to evaluate its suitability for development of a geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel.

A.M. Simmons

2004-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

45

YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE DESCRIPTION  

SciTech Connect

The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' summarizes, in a single document, the current state of knowledge and understanding of the natural system at Yucca Mountain. It describes the geology; geochemistry; past, present, and projected future climate; regional hydrologic system; and flow and transport within the unsaturated and saturated zones at the site. In addition, it discusses factors affecting radionuclide transport, the effect of thermal loading on the natural system, and tectonic hazards. The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' is broad in nature. It summarizes investigations carried out as part of the Yucca Mountain Project since 1988, but it also includes work done at the site in earlier years, as well as studies performed by others. The document has been prepared under the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management quality assurance program for the Yucca Mountain Project. Yucca Mountain is located in Nye County in southern Nevada. The site lies in the north-central part of the Basin and Range physiographic province, within the northernmost subprovince commonly referred to as the Great Basin. The basin and range physiography reflects the extensional tectonic regime that has affected the region during the middle and late Cenozoic Era. Yucca Mountain was initially selected for characterization, in part, because of its thick unsaturated zone, its arid to semiarid climate, and the existence of a rock type that would support excavation of stable openings. In 1987, the United States Congress directed that Yucca Mountain be the only site characterized to evaluate its suitability for development of a geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel.

A.M. Simmons

2004-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

46

A strategy to seal exploratory boreholes in unsaturated tuff; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a strategy for sealing exploratory boreholes associated with the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. Over 500 existing and proposed boreholes have been considered in the development of this strategy, ranging from shallow (penetrating into alluvium only) to deep (penetrating into the groundwater table). Among the comprehensive list of recommendations are the following: Those boreholes within the potential repository boundary and penetrating through the potential repository horizon are the most significant boreholes from a performance standpoint and should be sealed. Shallow boreholes are comparatively insignificant and require only nominal sealing. The primary areas in which to place seals are away from high-temperature zones at a distance from the potential repository horizon in the Paintbrush nonwelded tuff and the upper portion of the Topopah Spring Member and in the tuffaceous beds of the Calico Hills Unit. Seals should be placed prior to waste emplacement. Performance goals for borehole seals both above and below the potential repository are proposed. Detailed construction information on the boreholes that could be used for future design specifications is provided along with a description of the environmental setting, i.e., the geology, hydrology, and the in situ and thermal stress states. A borehole classification scheme based on the condition of the borehole wall in different tuffaceous units is also proposed. In addition, calculations are presented to assess the significance of the boreholes acting as preferential pathways for the release of radionuclides. Design calculations are presented to answer the concerns of when, where, and how to seal. As part of the strategy development, available technologies to seal exploratory boreholes (including casing removal, borehole wall reconditioning, and seal emplacement) are reviewed.

Fernandez, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Case, J.B.; Givens, C.A.; Carney, B.C. [IT Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Estimation of Unsaturated Zone Traveltimes for Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain, Nevada Test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Las Vegas. The NTS is bordered by the Nellis Air Force Range and the Tonopah 5 #12;Test RangeEstimation of Unsaturated Zone Traveltimes for Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain, Nevada Test Site for Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, using a source-responsive preferential

48

Initial field testing definition of subsurface sealing and backfilling tests in unsaturated tuff; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect

This report contains an initial definition of the field tests proposed for the Yucca Mountain Project repository sealing program. The tests are intended to resolve various performance and emplacement concerns. Examples of concerns to be addressed include achieving selected hydrologic and structural requirements for seals, removing portions of the shaft liner, excavating keyways, emplacing cementitious and earthen seals, reducing the impact of fines on the hydraulic conductivity of fractures, efficient grouting of fracture zones, sealing of exploratory boreholes, and controlling the flow of water by using engineered designs. Ten discrete tests are proposed to address these and other concerns. These tests are divided into two groups: Seal component tests and performance confirmation tests. The seal component tests are thorough small-scale in situ tests, the intermediate-scale borehole seal tests, the fracture grouting tests, the surface backfill tests, and the grouted rock mass tests. The seal system tests are the seepage control tests, the backfill tests, the bulkhead test in the Calico Hills unit, the large-scale shaft seal and shaft fill tests, and the remote borehole sealing tests. The tests are proposed to be performed in six discrete areas, including welded and non-welded environments, primarily located outside the potential repository area. The final selection of sealing tests will depend on the nature of the geologic and hydrologic conditions encountered during the development of the Exploratory Studies Facility and detailed numerical analyses. Tests are likely to be performed both before and after License Application.

Fernandez, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Case, J.B.; Tyburski, J.R. [I. T. Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Field testing plan for unsaturated zone monitoring and field studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The University of Arizona, in cooperation with the Bureau of Economic Geology at The University of Texas at Austin, and Stephens and Associates in Albuquerque, New Mexico has developed a field testing plan for evaluating subsurface monitoring systems. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has requested development of these testing plans for low-level radioactive waste disposal sites (LLW) and for monitoring at decommissioned facilities designated under the {open_quotes}Site Decommissioning Management Plan{close_quotes} (SDMP). The tests are conducted on a 50 m by 50 m plot on the University of Arizona`s Maricopa Agricultural Center. Within the 50 m by 50 m plot one finds: (1) an instrumented buried trench, (2) monitoring islands similar to those proposed for the Ward Valley, California LLW Facility, (3) deep borehole monitoring sites, (4) gaseous transport monitoring, and (5) locations for testing non-invasive geophysical measurement techniques. The various subplot areas are instrumented with commercially available instruments such as neutron probes, time domain reflectometry probes, tensiometers, psychrometers, heat dissipation sensors, thermocouples, solution samplers, and cross-hole geophysics electrodes. Measurement depths vary from ground surface to 15 m. The data from the controlled flow and transport experiments, conducted over the plot, will be used to develop an integrated approach to long-term monitoring of the vadose zone at waste disposal sites. The data will also be used to test field-scale flow and transport models. This report describes in detail the design of the experiment and the methodology proposed for evaluating the data.

Young, M.H.; Wierenga, P.J.; Warrick, A.W. [and others

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

MODELING U TRANSPORT IN THE UNSATURATED ZONE AT PENA BLANCA, MEXICO  

SciTech Connect

We present a quantitative model to describe transport of radionuclides underground. Applicable to unsaturated (vadose) as well as saturated (phreatic) layers, the model provides constraints on the in-situ migratory behavior of radioisotopes in dissolved and colloidal pools of a groundwater system. It shows, for examples, that uranium in water percolating through the vadose zone will have its concentration and ratio {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U linearly correlated under the ideal condition of a constant removal of the two U isotopes from vadose-zone solids. The intercept and slope of the linearity serve to constrain removal rates of the two uranium isotopes from solids to the solution through dissolution and alpha recoil. The model also allows estimation of the fluid transit time in the vadose zone. At Pena Blanca, the uneven distribution of rainfall between winter (wet) and summer (dry) results in a conspicuous seasonal variability in uranium removal rate, hence dissolved uranium signals, within the unsaturated zone. Our data indicate a much higher uranium dissolution rate during the dry season than during the wet season, possibly reflecting a condition of increased oxygenation in the zone during the dry period.

T.L. Ku; S. Luo; M. Murrell; S. Goldstein

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Nuclear-waste isolation in the unsaturated zone of arid regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vadose zone in arid regions is considered as a possible environment for geologic isolation of nuclear waste. There are several topographic and lithologic combinations in the vadose zone of arid regions that may lend themselves to waste isolation considerations. In some cases, topographic highs such as mesas and interbasin ranges - comprised of several rock types, may contain essentially dry or partially saturated conditions favorable for isolation. The adjacent basins, especially in the far western and southwestern US, may have no surface or subsurface hydrologic connections with systems ultimately leading to the ocean. Some rock types may have the favorable characteristics of very low permeability and contain appropriate minerals for the strong chemical retardation of radionuclides. Environments exhibiting these hydrologic and geochemical attributes are the areas underlain by tuffaceous rocks, relatively common in the Basin and Range geomorphic province. Adjacent valley areas, where tuffaceous debris makes up a significant component of valley fill alluvium, may also contain thick zones of unsaturated material, and as such also lend themselves to strong consideration as respository environments. This paper summarizes the aspects of nuclear waste isolation in unsaturated regimes in alluvial-filled valleys and tuffaceous rocks of the Basin and Range province.

Wollenberg, H.A.; Wang, J.S.Y.; Korbin, G.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Limited hydrologic response to Pleistocene climate change in deep vadose zones --Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

regulations for radiation releases from the planned permanent U.S. nuclear-waste repository in Yucca Mountain releases from the proposed U.S. nuclear-waste repository in Yucca Mountain, Nevada.1 E.P.A. recommended these guarantees for Yucca Mountain. Instead E.P.A. recommends changes both in the exposure-limits and in how

Holliday, Vance T.

53

The hydrology of Yucca Mountain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Yucca Mountain, located in southern Nevada in the Mojave Desert, is being considered as a geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste. Although the site is arid, previous studies indicate net infiltration rates of 5-10 mm yr(-1) under current climate conditions. Unsaturated flow of water through the mountain generally is vertical and rapid through the fractures of the welded tuffs and slow through the matrix of the nonwelded tuffs. The vitric-zeolitic boundary of the nonwelded tuffs below the potential repository, where it exists, causes perching and substantial lateral flow that eventually flows through faults near the eastern edge of the potential repository and recharges the underlying groundwater system. Fast pathways are located where water flows relatively quickly through the unsaturated zone to the water table. For the bulk of the water a large part of the travel time from land surface to the potential repository horizon (similar to 300 m below land surface) is through the interlayered, low fracture density, nonwelded tuff where flow is predominantly through the matrix. The unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain is being modeled using a three-dimensional, dual-continuum numerical model to predict the results of measurements and observations in new boreholes and excavations. The interaction between experimentalists and modelers is providing confidence in the conceptual model and the numerical model and is providing researchers with the ability to plan further testing and to evaluate the usefulness or necessity of further data collection.

Flint, A.L.; Flint, L.E.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Kwicklis, E.M.; Fabryka-Martin, J.M.

2000-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

54

Massively parallel computing simulation of fluid flow in the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

flows of multiphase, multicomponents in porous and fracturedmultiphase flow and multicomponent transport in porous and

Zhang, Keni; Wu, Yu-Shu; Bodvarsson, G.S.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Status of understanding of the saturated-zone ground-water flow system at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as of 1995  

SciTech Connect

Yucca Mountain, which is being studied extensively because it is a potential site for a high-level radioactive-waste repository, consists of a thick sequence of volcanic rocks of Tertiary age that are underlain, at least to the southeast, by carbonate rocks of Paleozoic age. Stratigraphic units important to the hydrology of the area include the alluvium, pyroclastic rocks of Miocene age (the Timber Mountain Group; the Paintbrush Group; the Calico Hills Formation; the Crater Flat Group; the Lithic Ridge Tuff; and older tuffs, flows, and lavas beneath the Lithic Ridge Tuff), and sedimentary rocks of Paleozoic age. The saturated zone generally occurs in the Calico Hills Formation and stratigraphically lower units. The saturated zone is divided into three aquifers and two confining units. The flow system at Yucca Mountain is part of the Alkali Flat-Furnace Creek subbasin of the Death Valley groundwater basin. Variations in the gradients of the potentiometric surface provided the basis for subdividing the Yucca Mountain area into zones of: (1) large hydraulic gradient where potentiometric levels change at least 300 meters in a few kilometers; (2) moderate hydraulic gradient where potentiometric levels change about 45 meters in a few kilometers; and (3) small hydraulic gradient where potentiometric levels change only about 2 meters in several kilometers. Vertical hydraulic gradients were measured in only a few boreholes around Yucca Mountain; most boreholes had little change in potentiometric levels with depth. Limited hydraulic testing of boreholes in the Yucca Mountain area indicated that the range in transmissivity was more than 2 to 3 orders of magnitude in a particular hydrogeologic unit, and that the average values for the individual hydrogeologic units generally differed by about 1 order of magnitude. The upper volcanic aquifer seems to be the most permeable hydrogeologic unit, but this conclusion was based on exceedingly limited data.

Luckey, R.R.; Tucci, P.; Faunt, C.C.; Ervin, E.M. [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

56

Comparisons of diffusive and advective fluxes of gas phase volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in unsaturated zones under natural conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is traditionally treated as the dominant mechanism of gas transport in unsaturated zones under natural conditions of the gas pressure are less than 5% [32], which is satisfied in natural attenuation. At the ground surface contri- bution of the advective flux is a more important concern in natural attenuation. According to Fig

Zhan, Hongbin

57

Characterization and Prediction of Subsurface Pneumatic Pressure Variations at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Group Exposed at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, U. S. Geologicalunsaturated zone, Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Water Resourcesgeologic map of Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada, with

Ahlers, C. Fredrik; Finsterle, Stefan; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

An Integrated Modeling Analysis of Unsaturated Flow Patterns in Fractured Rock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

zone transport model of Yucca Mountain, Las Alamos Nationalisotope distributions at Yucca Mountain, Las Alamos Nationalpneumatic response of at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Journal of

Wu, Yu-Shu; Lu, Guoping; Zhang, Keni; Pan, Lehua; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Potentially disruptive hydrologic features, events and processes at the Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Yucca Mountain, Nevada, has been selected by the United States to be evaluated as a potential site for the development of a geologic repository for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. If the site is determined to be suitable for repository development and construction is authorized, the repository at the Yucca Mountain site is planned to be constructed in unsaturated tuff at a depth of about 250 meters below land surface and at a distance of about 250 meters above the water table. The intent of locating a repository in a thick unsaturated-zone geohydrologic setting, such as occurs at Yucca Mountain under the arid to semi-arid climatic conditions that currently prevail in the region, is to provide a natural setting for the repository system in which little ground water will be available to contact emplaced waste or to transport radioactive material from the repository to the biosphere. In principle, an unsaturated-zone repository will be vulnerable to water entry from both above and below. Consequently, a major effort within the site-characterization program at the Yucca Mountain site is concerned with identifying and evaluating those features, events, and processes, such as increased net infiltration or water-table rise, whose presence or future occurrence could introduce water into a potential repository at the site in quantities sufficient to compromise the waste-isolation capability of the repository system.

Hoxie, D.T.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

The Influence of Proposed Repository Thermal Load on Multiphase Flow and Heat Transfer in the Unsaturated Zone of Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

22]. Fluid flow and heat-transfer processes in a two-phase,processes associated with multiphase flow and heat transferprocesses has also motivated development of fluid flow and heat transfer

Wu, Y.-S.; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Zhang, Keni; Bodvarsson, G.S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unsaturated zone yucca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Preliminary 3-D site-scale studies of radioactive colloid transort in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on colloid facilitated radionuclide transport in porouscontaminants in groundwater: Radionuclide migration at theK. , 2000. Modeling studies of radionuclide transport in the

Moridis, G.J.; Hu, Q.; Wu, Y.-S.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

An integrated methodology for characterizing flow and transport processes in fractured rock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unsaturated Zone, Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Water-Resourcesof the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, NV from three-in fractured tuffs of Yucca Mountain, Vadose Zone Journal,

Wu, Yu-Shu

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

An Integrated Modeling Analysis of Unsaturated Flow Patterns inFractured Rock  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characterizing percolation patterns in unsaturated zones hasposed a greater challenge to numerical modeling investigations thancomparable saturated zone studies, because of the heterogeneous nature ofunsaturated media as well as the great number of variables impactingunsaturated zone flow. This paper presents an integrated modelingmethodology for quantitatively characterizing percolation patterns in theunsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a proposed undergroundrepository site for storing high-level radioactive waste. It takes intoaccount the multiple coupled processes of air, water, heat flow andchemical isotopic transport in Yucca Mountain s highly heterogeneous,unsaturated fractured tuffs. The modeling approach integrates a widevariety of moisture, pneumatic, thermal, and isotopic geochemical fielddata into a comprehensive three-dimensional numerical model for modelinganalyses. Modeling results are examined against different types offield-measured data and then used to evaluate different hydrogeologicalconceptual models and their results of flow patterns in the unsaturatedzone. In particular, this integration model provides a much clearerunderstanding of percolation patterns and flow behavior through theunsaturated zone, both crucial issues in assessing repositoryperformance. The integrated approach for quantifying Yucca Mountain sflow system is also demonstrated to provide a comprehensive modeling toolfor characterizing flow and transport processes in complex subsurfacesystems.

Wu, Yu-Shu; Lu, Guoping; Zhang, Keni; Pan, Lehua; Bodvarsson,Gudmundur S.

2005-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

64

Estimation of unsaturated zone traveltimes for Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, using a source-responsive preferential-flow model  

SciTech Connect

Traveltimes for contaminant transport by water from a point in the unsaturated zone to the saturated zone are a concern at Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain in the Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Where nuclear tests were conducted in the unsaturated zone, contaminants must traverse hundreds of meters of variably saturated rock before they enter the saturated zone in the carbonate rock, where the regional groundwater system has the potential to carry them substantial distances to a location of concern. The unsaturated-zone portion of the contaminant transport path may cause a significant delay, in addition to the time required to travel within the saturated zone, and thus may be important in the overall evaluation of the potential hazard from contamination. Downward contaminant transport through the unsaturated zone occurs through various processes and pathways; this can lead to a broad distribution of contaminant traveltimes, including exceedingly slow and unexpectedly fast extremes. Though the bulk of mobile contaminant arrives between the time-scale end members, the fastest contaminant transport speed, in other words the speed determined by the combination of possible processes and pathways that would bring a measureable quantity of contaminant to the aquifer in the shortest time, carries particular regulatory significance because of its relevance in formulating the most conservative hazard-prevention scenarios. Unsaturated-zone flow is usually modeled as a diffusive process responding to gravity and pressure gradients as mediated by the unsaturated hydraulic properties of the materials traversed. The mathematical formulation of the diffuse-flow concept is known as Richards' equation, which when coupled to a solute transport equation, such as the advection-dispersion equation, provides a framework to simulate contaminant migration in the unsaturated zone. In recent decades awareness has increased that much fluid flow and contaminant transport within the unsaturated zone takes place as preferential flow, faster than would be predicted by the coupled Richards' and advection-dispersion equations with hydraulic properties estimated by traditional means. At present the hydrologic community has not achieved consensus as to whether a modification of Richards' equation, or a fundamentally different formulation, would best quantify preferential flow. Where the fastest contaminant transport speed is what needs to be estimated, there is the possibility of simplification of the evaluation process. One way of doing so is by a two-step process in which the first step is to evaluate whether significant preferential flow and solute transport is possible for the media and conditions of concern. The second step is to carry out (a) a basic Richards' and advection-dispersion equation analysis if it is concluded that preferential flow is not possible or (b) an analysis that considers only the fastest possible preferential-flow processes, if preferential flow is possible. For the preferential-flow situation, a recently published model describable as a Source-Responsive Preferential-Flow (SRPF) model is an easily applied option. This report documents the application of this two-step process to flow through the thick unsaturated zones of Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain in the Nevada Test Site. Application of the SRPF model involves distinguishing between continuous and intermittent water supply to preferential flow paths. At Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain this issue is complicated by the fact that contaminant travel begins at a location deep in the subsurface, where there may be perched water that may or may not act like a continuous supply, depending on such features as the connectedness of fractures and the nature of impeding layers. We have treated this situation by hypothesizing both continuous and intermittent scenarios for contaminant transport to the carbonate aquifer and reporting estimation of the fastest speed for both of these end members.

Brian A. Ebel; John R. Nimmo

2009-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

65

Age constraints on fluid inclusions in calcite at Yucca Mountain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The {sup 207}Pb/{sup 235}U ages for 14 subsamples of opal or chalcedony layers younger than calcite formed at elevated temperature range between 1.88 {+-} 0.05 and 9.7 {+-} 1.5 Ma with most values older than 6-8 Ma. These data indicate that fluids with elevated temperatures have not been present in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain since about 1.9 Ma and most likely since 6-8 Ma. Discordant U-Pb isotope data for chalcedony subsamples representing the massive silica stage in the formation of the coatings are interpreted using a model of the diffusive loss of U decay products. The model gives an age estimate for the time of chalcedony formation around 10-11 Ma, which overlaps ages of clay minerals formed in tuffs below the water table at Yucca Mountain during the Timber Mountain thermal event.

Neymark, Leonid A.; Amelin, Yuri V.; Paces, James B.; Peterman, Zell E.; Whelan, Joseph F.

2001-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

66

Geology of the Yucca Mountain Region, Chapter in Stuckless, J.S., ED., Yucca Mountain, Nevada - A Proposed Geologic Repository for High-Level Radioactive Waste  

SciTech Connect

Yucca Mountain has been proposed as the site for the Nation's first geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste. This chapter provides the geologic framework for the Yucca Mountain region. The regional geologic units range in age from late Precambrian through Holocene, and these are described briefly. Yucca Mountain is composed dominantly of pyroclastic units that range in age from 11.4 to 15.2 Ma. The proposed repository would be constructed within the Topopah Spring Tuff, which is the lower of two major zoned and welded ash-flow tuffs within the Paintbrush Group. The two welded tuffs are separated by the partly to nonwelded Pah Canyon Tuff and Yucca Mountain Tuff, which together figure prominently in the hydrology of the unsaturated zone. The Quaternary deposits are primarily alluvial sediments with minor basaltic cinder cones and flows. Both have been studied extensively because of their importance in predicting the long-term performance of the proposed repository. Basaltic volcanism began about 10 Ma and continued as recently as about 80 ka with the eruption of cones and flows at Lathrop Wells, approximately 10 km south-southwest of Yucca Mountain. Geologic structure in the Yucca Mountain region is complex. During the latest Paleozoic and Mesozoic, strong compressional forces caused tight folding and thrust faulting. The present regional setting is one of extension, and normal faulting has been active from the Miocene through to the present. There are three major local tectonic domains: (1) Basin and Range, (2) Walker Lane, and (3) Inyo-Mono. Each domain has an effect on the stability of Yucca Mountain.

J.S. Stuckless; D. O'Leary

2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

67

TOUGH2 Software Qualification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unsaturated Zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Proceedings ofthe Unsaturated Zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, RadioactiveSite-Scale Model of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Report LBL-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

User`s Guide: Database of literature pertaining to the unsaturated zone and surface water-ground water interactions at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Since its beginnings in 1949, hydrogeologic investigations at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) have resulted in an extensive collection of technical publications providing information concerning ground water hydraulics and contaminant transport within the unsaturated zone. Funding has been provided by the Department of Energy through the Department of Energy Idaho Field Office in a grant to compile an INEL-wide summary of unsaturated zone studies based on a literature search. University of Idaho researchers are conducting a review of technical documents produced at or pertaining to the INEL, which present or discuss processes in the unsaturated zone and surface water-ground water interactions. Results of this review are being compiled as an electronic database. Fields are available in this database for document title and associated identification number, author, source, abstract, and summary of information (including types of data and parameters). AskSam{reg_sign}, a text-based database system, was chosen. WordPerfect 5.1{copyright} is being used as a text-editor to input data records into askSam.

Hall, L.F.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Briefing package for the Yucca Flat pre-emptive review, including overview, UZ model, SZ volcanics model and summary and conclusions sections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Much progress has been made in the last several years in modeling radionuclide transport from tests conducted both in the unsaturated zone and saturated volcanic rocks of Yucca Flat, Nevada. The presentations to the DOE NNSA pre-emptive review panel contained herein document the progress to date, and discuss preliminary conclusions regarding the present and future extents of contamination resulting from past nuclear tests. The presentations also discuss possible strategies for addressing uncertainty in the model results.

Kwicklis, Edward Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Keating, Elizabeth H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

70

Geothermal areas as analogues to chemical processes in the near-field and altered zone of the potential Yucca Mountain, Nevada repository  

SciTech Connect

The need to bound system performance of the potential Yucca Mountain repository for thousands of years after emplacement of high-level nuclear waste requires the use of computer codes. The use of such codes to produce reliable bounds over such long time periods must be tested using long-lived natural and historical systems as analogues. The geothermal systems of the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ) in New Zealand were selected as the site most amenable to study. The rocks of the TVZ are silicic volcanics that are similar in composition to Yucca Mountain. The area has been subjected to temperatures of 25 to 300 C which have produced a variety of secondary minerals similar to those anticipated at Yucca Mountain. The availability of rocks, fluids and fabricated materials for sampling is excellent because of widespread exploitation of the systems for geothermal power. Current work has focused on testing the ability of the EQ3/6 code and thermodynamic data base to describe mineral-fluid relations at elevated temperatures. Welfare starting long-term dissolution/corrosion tests of rocks, minerals and manufactured materials in natural thermal features in order to compare laboratory rates with field-derived rates. Available field data on rates of silica precipitation from heated fluids have been analyzed and compared to laboratory rates. New sets of precipitation experiments are being planned. The microbially influenced degradation of concrete in the Broadlands-Ohaaki geothermal field is being characterized. The authors will continue to work on these projects in FY 1996 and expand to include the study of naturally occurring uranium and thorium series radionuclides, as a prelude to studying radionuclide migration in heated silicic volcanic rocks. 32 refs.

Bruton, C.J.; Glassley, W.E.; Meike, A.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Estimating recharge at Yucca Mountain, Nevada: A case study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Obtaining values of net infiltration, groundwater travel time, and recharge is necessary at the Yucca Mountain site, Nevada, USA, in order to evaluate the expected performance of a potential repository as a containment system for high-level radioactive waste. However, the geologic complexities of this site, its low precipitation and net infiltration, with numerous mechanisms operating simultaneously to move water through the system, provide many challenges for the estimation of the spatial distribution of recharge. A variety of methods appropriate for arid environments has been applied, including water-balance techniques, calculations using Darcy's law in the unsaturated zone, a soil-physics method applied to neutron-hole water-content data, inverse modeling of thermal profiles in boreholes extending through the thick unsaturated zone, chloride mass balance, atmospheric radionuclides, and empirical approaches. These methods indicate that near-surface infiltration rates at Yucca Mountain are highly variable in time and space, with local (point) values ranging from zero to several hundred millimeters per year. Spatially distributed net-infiltration values average 5 mm/year, with the highest values approaching 20 mm/year near Yucca Crest. Site-scale recharge estimates range from less than 1 to about 12 mm/year. These results have been incorporated into a site-scale model that has been calibrated using these data sets that reflect infiltration processes acting on highly variable temporal and spatial scales. The modeling study predicts highly non-uniform recharge at the water table, distributed significantly differently from the non-uniform infiltration pattern at the surface.

Flint, A.; Flint, L.; Kwicklis, E.; Fabryka-Martin, J.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

2001-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

72

Estimating recharge at yucca mountain, nevada, usa: comparison of methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Obtaining values of net infiltration, groundwater travel time, and recharge is necessary at the Yucca Mountain site, Nevada, USA, in order to evaluate the expected performance of a potential repository as a containment system for high-level radioactive waste. However, the geologic complexities of this site, its low precipitation and net infiltration, with numerous mechanisms operating simultaneously to move water through the system, provide many challenges for the estimation of the spatial distribution of recharge. A variety of methods appropriate for and environments has been applied, including water-balance techniques, calculations using Darcy's law in the unsaturated zone, a soil-physics method applied to neutron-hole water-content data, inverse modeling of thermal profiles in boreholes extending through the thick unsaturated zone, chloride mass balance, atmospheric radionuclides, and empirical approaches. These methods indicate that near-surface infiltration rates at Yucca Mountain are highly variable in time and space, with local (point) values ranging from zero to several hundred millimeters per year. Spatially distributed net-infiltration values average 5 mm/year, with the highest values approaching 20 nun/year near Yucca Crest. Site-scale recharge estimates range from less than I to about 12 mm/year. These results have been incorporated into a site-scale model that has been calibrated using these data sets that reflect infiltration processes acting on highly variable temporal and spatial scales. The modeling study predicts highly non-uniform recharge at the water table, distributed significantly differently from the non-uniform infiltration pattern at the surface. [References: 57

Flint, A. L.; Flint, L. E.; Kwicklis, E. M.; Fabryka-Martin, J. T.; Bodvarsson, G. S.

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Influence of Atmospheric Pressure and Water Table Fluctuations on Gas Phase Flow and Transport of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Unsaturated Zones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding the gas phase flow and transport of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in unsaturated zones is indispensable to develop effective environmental remediation strategies, to create precautions for fresh water protection, and to provide guidance for land and water resources management. Atmospheric pressure and water table fluctuations are two important natural processes at the upper and lower boundaries of the unsaturated zone, respectively. However, their significance has been neglected in previous studies. This dissertation systematically investigates their influence on the gas phase flow and transport of VOCs in soil and ground water remediation processes using analytically and numerically mathematical modeling. New semi-analytical and numerical solutions are developed to calculate the subsurface gas flow field and the gas phase transport of VOCs in active soil vapor extraction (SVE), barometric pumping (BP) and natural attenuation taking into account the atmospheric pressure and the water table fluctuations. The accuracy of the developed solutions are checked by comparing with published analytical solutions under extreme conditions, newly developed numerical solutions in COMSOL Multiphysics and field measured data. Results indicate that both the atmospheric pressure and the tidal-induced water table fluctuations significantly change the gas flow field in active SVE, especially when the vertical gas permeability is small (less than 0.4 Darcy). The tidal-induced downward moving water table increases the depth-averaged radius of influence (ROI) for the gas pumping well. However, this downward moving water table leads to a greater vertical pore gas velocity away from the gas pumping well, which is unfavorable for removing VOCs. The gas flow rate to/from the barometric pumping well can be accurately calculated by our newly developed solutions in both homogeneous and multi-layered unsaturated zones. Under natural unsaturated zone conditions, the time-averaged advective flux of the gas phase VOCs induced by the atmospheric pressure and water table fluctuations is one to three orders of magnitude less than the diffusive flux. The time-averaged advective flux is comparable with the diffusive flux only when the gas-filled porosity is very small (less than 0.05). The density-driven flux is negligible.

You, Kehua

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Modeling flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock: An evaluation of the continuum approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because the continuum approach is relatively simple and straightforward to implement, it has been commonly used in modeling flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock. However, the usefulness of this approach can be questioned in terms of its adequacy for representing fingering flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock. The continuum approach thus needs to be evaluated carefully by comparing simulation results with field observations directly related to unsaturated flow and transport processes. This paper reports on such an evaluation, based on a combination of model calibration and prediction, using data from an infiltration test carried out in a densely fractured rock within the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Comparisons between experimental and modeling results show that the continuum approach may be able to capture important features of flow and transport processes observed from the test. The modeling results also show that matrix diffusion may have a significant effect on the overall transport behavior in unsaturated fractured rocks, which can be used to estimate effective fracture-matrix interface areas based on tracer transport data. While more theoretical, numerical, and experimental studies are needed to provide a conclusive evaluation, this study suggests that the continuum approach is useful for modeling flow and transport in unsaturated, densely fractured rock.

Liu, Hui-Hai; Haukwa, Charles B.; Ahlers, C. Fredrik; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.; Flint, Alan L.; Guertal, William B.

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Test concept for waste package environment tests at Yucca Mountain  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project is characterizing a tuffaceous rock unit at Yucca Mountain, Nevada to evaluate its suitability for a repository for high level radioactive waste. The candidate repository horizon is a welded, devitrified tuff bed located at a depth of about 300 m in the unsaturated zone, over 100 m above the water table. As part of the project, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is responsible for designing the waste packages and for assessing their expected performance in the repository environment. The primary region of interest to package design and performance assessment is the portion of the rock mass within a few meters of waste emplacement holes. Hydrologic mechanisms active in this unsaturated near-field environment, along with thermal and mechanical phenomena that influence the hydrology, need to be understood well enough to confirm the basis of the waste package designs and performance assessment. Large scale in situ tests (called waste package environment tests) are being planned in order to develop this understanding and to provide data sets for performance assessment model validation (Yow, 1985). Exploratory shafts and limited underground facilities for in-situ testing will be constructed at Yucca Mountain during site characterization. Multiple waste package environment tests are being planned for these facilities to represent horizontal and vertical waste emplacement configurations in the repository target horizon. These approximately half-scale tests are being designed to investigate rock mass hydrologic conditions during a cycle of thermal loading.

Yow, J.L. Jr.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Borehole and geohydrologic data for test hole USW UZ-6, Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Test hole USW UZ-6, located 1.8 kilometers west of the Nevada Test Site on a major north-trending ridge at Yucca Mountain, was dry drilled in Tertiary tuff to a depth of 575 meters. The area near this site is being considered by the US Department of Energy for potential construction of a high-level, radioactive-waste repository. Test hole USW UZ-6 is one of seven test holes completed in the unsaturated zone as part of the US Geological Survey`s Yucca Mountain Project to characterize the potential repository site. Data pertaining to borehole drilling and construction, lithology of geologic units penetrated, and laboratory analyses for hydrologic characteristics of samples of drill-bit cuttings are included in this report.

Whitfield, M.S. Jr.; Loskot, C.L. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Cope, C.M. [Foothill Engineering Consultants, Inc., Golden, CO (United States)

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Unsaturated hydraulic parameters determined from direct and indirect methods  

SciTech Connect

Hydraulic parameters are required for numerical simulations of unsaturated flow at Yucca Mountain, a vertically heterogeneous volcanic site for a potential high-level waste repository in the desert southwest. In this paper, direct measurements of the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity using a centrifuge with a specialized rotor are compared to those estimated using a predictive conductivity equation and two methods of measuring moisture retention.

Flint, Lorraine E.; Hudson, David B.; Flint, Alan L.

1997-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

78

Preparing to Submit a License Application for Yucca Mountain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1982, the U.S. Congress passed the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, a Federal law that established U.S. policy for the permanent disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Congress amended the Act in 1987, directing the Department of Energy to study only Yucca Mountain, Nevada as the site for a permanent geologic repository. As the law mandated, the Department evaluated Yucca Mountain to determine its suitability as the site for a permanent geologic repository. Decades of scientific studies demonstrated that Yucca Mountain would protect workers, the public, and the environment during the time that a repository would be operating and for tens of thousands of years after closure of the repository. A repository at this remote site would also: preserve the quality of the environment; allow the environmental cleanup of Cold War weapons facilities; provide the nation with additional protection from acts of terrorism; and support a sound energy policy. Throughout the scientific evaluation of Yucca Mountain, there has been no evidence to disqualify Yucca Mountain as a suitable site for the permanent disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Upon completion of site characterization, the Secretary of Energy considered the results and concluded that a repository at Yucca Mountain would perform in a manner that protects public health and safety. The Secretary recommended the site to the President in February 2002; the President agreed and recommended to Congress that the site be approved. The Governor of Nevada submitted a notice of disapproval, and both houses of Congress acted to override the disapproval. In July 2002, the President's approval allowed the Department to begin the process of submittal of a license application for Yucca Mountain as the site for the nation's first repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Yucca Mountain is located on federal land in Nye County in southern Nevada, an arid region of the United States, approximately 100 miles (160 kilometers) northwest of Las Vegas (Figure 1). The location is remote from population centers, and there are no permanent residents within approximately 14 miles (23 km) of the site. Overall, Nye County has a population density of about two persons per square mile (two persons per 2.5 square km); in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, it is significantly less. Yucca Mountain is a series of north-south-trending ridges extending approximately 25 miles (40 km), and consists of successive layers of fine-grained volcanic tuffs, millions of years old, underlain by older carbonate rocks. The alternating layers of welded and nonwelded volcanic tuffs have differing hydrologic properties that significantly impact the manner in which water moves through the mountain. The repository horizon will be in welded tuff located in the unsaturated zone, more than 1,000 feet (300 meters) above the water table in the present-day climate, and is expected to remain well above the water table during wetter future climate conditions. Future meteorology and climatology at Yucca Mountain are important elements in understanding the amount of water available to potentially interact with the waste.

W.J. Arthur; M.D. Voegele

2005-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

79

Review and selection of unsaturated flow models  

SciTech Connect

Since the 1960`s, ground-water flow models have been used for analysis of water resources problems. In the 1970`s, emphasis began to shift to analysis of waste management problems. This shift in emphasis was largely brought about by site selection activities for geologic repositories for disposal of high-level radioactive wastes. Model development during the 1970`s and well into the 1980`s focused primarily on saturated ground-water flow because geologic repositories in salt, basalt, granite, shale, and tuff were envisioned to be below the water table. Selection of the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for potential disposal of waste began to shift model development toward unsaturated flow models. Under the US Department of Energy (DOE), the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor (CRWMS M&O) has the responsibility to review, evaluate, and document existing computer models; to conduct performance assessments; and to develop performance assessment models, where necessary. This document describes the CRWMS M&O approach to model review and evaluation (Chapter 2), and the requirements for unsaturated flow models which are the bases for selection from among the current models (Chapter 3). Chapter 4 identifies existing models, and their characteristics. Through a detailed examination of characteristics, Chapter 5 presents the selection of models for testing. Chapter 6 discusses the testing and verification of selected models. Chapters 7 and 8 give conclusions and make recommendations, respectively. Chapter 9 records the major references for each of the models reviewed. Appendix A, a collection of technical reviews for each model, contains a more complete list of references. Finally, Appendix B characterizes the problems used for model testing.

Reeves, M.; Baker, N.A.; Duguid, J.O. [INTERA, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States)

1994-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

80

Multiphase Reactive Transport modeling of Stable Isotope Fractionation of Infiltrating Unsaturated Zone Pore Water and Vapor Using TOUGHREACT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical simulations of transport and isotope fractionation provide a method to quantitatively interpret vadose zone pore water stable isotope depth profiles based on soil properties, climatic conditions, and infiltration. We incorporate the temperature-dependent equilibration of stable isotopic species between water and water vapor, and their differing diffusive transport properties into the thermodynamic database of the reactive transport code TOUGHREACT. These simulations are used to illustrate the evolution of stable isotope profiles in semiarid regions where recharge during wet seasons disturbs the drying profile traditionally associated with vadose zone pore waters. Alternating wet and dry seasons lead to annual fluctuations in moisture content, capillary pressure, and stable isotope compositions in the vadose zone. Periodic infiltration models capture the effects of seasonal increases in precipitation and predict stable isotope profiles that are distinct from those observed under drying (zero infiltration) conditions. After infiltration, evaporation causes a shift to higher 18O and D values, which are preserved in the deeper pore waters. The magnitude of the isotopic composition shift preserved in deep vadose zone pore waters varies inversely with the rate of infiltration.

Singleton, Michael J.; Sonnenthal, Eric L.; Conrad, Mark E.; DePaolo, Donald J.

2003-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unsaturated zone yucca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Abstracts and parameter index database for reports pertaining to the unsaturated zone and surface water-ground water interactions at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This report is a product generated by faculty at the University of Idaho in support of research and development projects on Unsaturated Zone Contamination and Transport Processes, and on Surface Water-Groundwater Interactions and Regional Groundwater Flow at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. These projects are managed by the State of Idaho`s INEL Oversight Program under a grant from the US Department of Energy. In particular, this report meets project objectives to produce a site-wide summary of hydrological information based on a literature search and review of field, laboratory and modeling studies at INEL, including a cross-referenced index to site-specific physical, chemical, mineralogic, geologic and hydrologic parameters determined from these studies. This report includes abstracts of 149 reports with hydrological information. For reports which focus on hydrological issues, the abstracts are taken directly from those reports; for reports dealing with a variety of issues beside hydrology, the abstracts were generated by the University of Idaho authors concentrating on hydrology-related issues. Each abstract is followed by a ``Data`` section which identifies types of technical information included in a given report, such as information on parameters or chemistry, mineralogy, stream flows, water levels. The ``Data`` section does not include actual values or data.

Bloomsburg, G.; Finnie, J.; Horn, D.; King, B.; Liou, J. [Idaho Univ., Moscow, ID (United States)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Behavior of spent fuel under unsaturated conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To evaluate the performance of spent fuel in the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, spent fuel fragments are being exposed to small and intermittent amounts of simulated groundwater under unsaturated conditions. Both the leachate and the visual appearance of the spent fuel have been characterized for 581 days of testing. The amount of Am and Cm measured in the leachates was one to two orders of magnitude greater than that released from spent fuel under saturated conditions. The cause of this difference has not been firmly identified but may be attributable to the presence of large amounts of actinide-containing colloids in the leachate of the unsaturated tests.

Finn, P.A.; Hoh, J.C.; Bates, J.K.; Wolf, S.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemical Technology Div.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

83

Unclassified Sources Term and Radionuclide Data for Corrective Action Unit 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the evaluation of the information and data available on the unclassified source term and radionuclide contamination for CAU 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine. The total residual inventory of radionuclides associated with one or more tests is known as the radiologic source term (RST). The RST is comprised of radionuclides in water, glass, or other phases or mineralogic forms. The hydrologic source term (HST) of an underground nuclear test is the portion of the total RST that is released into the groundwater over time following the test. In this report, the HST represents radionuclide release some time after the explosion and does not include the rapidly evolving mechanical, thermal, and chemical processes during the explosion. The CAU 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine has many more detonations and a wider variety of settings to consider compared to other CAUs. For instance, the source term analysis and evaluation performed for CAUs 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa and CAU 98: Frenchman Flat did not consider vadose zone attenuation because many detonations were located near or below the water table. However, the large number of Yucca Flat/Climax Mine tests and the location of many tests above the water table warrant a more robust analysis of the unsaturated zone. The purpose of this report is to develop and document conceptual models of the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine HST for use in implementing source terms for the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine models. This document presents future plans to incorporate the radionuclide attenuation mechanisms due to unsaturated/multiphase flow and transport within the Yucca Flat CAU scale modeling. The important processes that influence radionuclide migration for the unsaturated and saturated tests in alluvial, volcanic, and carbonate settings are identified. Many different flow and transport models developed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), including original modeling of multiphase flow and transport by the Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), are integrated to form a general understanding of how the RST relates to the HST. This report is unlike the Frenchman Flat source term analysis because it does not calculate the HST for each test. Instead, this work only identifies the important processes that must be considered when the CAU-transport modeling is performed.

Peter Martian

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Modeling acid-gas generation from boiling chloride brines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. J. ofwaste emplacement tunnels at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. J. ofScale Heater Test at Yucca Mountain. International Journal

Zhang, Guoxiang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Climatic Forecasting of Net Infiltration at Yucca Mountain UsingAnalogue Meteorological Data  

SciTech Connect

At Yucca Mountain, NV, future changes in climatic conditionswill probably alter net infiltration, drainage below the bottom of theevapotranspiration zone within the soil profile, or flow across theinterface between soil and the densely welded part of the Tiva CanyonTuff. The objectives of this study were to: (i) develop a semiempiricalmodel and forecast average net infiltration rates, using the limitedmeteorological data from analog meteorological stations, for interglacial(present day), and future monsoon, glacial transition, and glacialclimates over the Yucca Mountain region; and (ii) corroborate thecomputed net infiltration ratesby comparing them with the empiricallyand numerically determined groundwater recharge and percolation ratesthrough the unsaturated zone from published data. This study approachedcalculations of net infiltration, aridity, and precipitationeffectiveness indices using a modified Budyko's water-balance model, withreference-surface potential evapotranspiration determined from theradiation-based Penman formula. Results of calculations show that netinfiltration rates are expected to generally increase from thepresent-day climate to monsoon climate, to glacial transition climate,and then to the glacial climate, following a power law relationshipbetween net infiltration and precipitation. The forecasting resultsindicate the overlap between the ranges of net infiltration for differentclimates. Forecasting of net infiltration for different climate states issubject to numerous uncertainties associated with selecting climateanalog sites, using relatively short analog meteorological records,neglecting the effects of vegetation and surface runoff and run-on on alocal scale, as well as possible anthropogenically induced climatechanges.

Faybishenko, Boris

2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

86

The importance of thermal loading conditions to waste package performance at Yucca Mountain  

SciTech Connect

Temperature and relative humidity are primary environmental factors affecting waste package corrosion rates for the potential repository in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Under ambient conditions, the repository environment is quite humid. If relative humidity is low enough (<70%), corrosion will be minimal. Under humid conditions, corrosion is reduced if the temperature is low (<60 C). Using the V-TOUGH code, the authors model thermo-hydrological flow to investigate the effect of repository heat on temperature and relative humidity in the repository for a wide range of thermal loads. These calculations indicate that repository heat may substantially reduce relative humidity on the waste package, over hundreds of years for low thermal loads and over tens of thousands of year for high thermal loads. Temperatures associated with a given relative humidity decrease with increasing thermal load. Thermal load distributions can be optimized to yield a more uniform reduction in relative humidity during the boiling period.

Buscheck, T.A.; Nitao, J.J.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Unclassified Source Term and Radionuclide Data for Corrective Action Unit 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the evaluation of the information and data available on the unclassified source term and radionuclide contamination for CAU 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine. The total residual inventory of radionuclides associated with one or more tests is known as the radiologic source term (RST). The RST is comprised of radionuclides in water, glass, or other phases or mineralogic forms. The hydrologic source term (HST) of an underground nuclear test is the portion of the total RST that is released into the groundwater over time following the test. In this report, the HST represents radionuclide release some time after the explosion and does not include the rapidly evolving mechanical, thermal, and chemical processes during the explosion. The CAU 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine has many more detonations and a wider variety of settings to consider compared to other CAUs. For instance, the source term analysis and evaluation performed for CAUs 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa and CAU 98: Frenchman Flat did not consider vadose zone attenuation because many detonations were located near or below the water table. However, the large number of Yucca Flat/Climax Mine tests and the location of many tests above the water table warrant a more robust analysis of the unsaturated zone.

Peter Martian

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

DOE submits Yucca Mtn  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

submits Yucca Mountain license application; Argonne contributes science, engineering support The U.S. Department of Energy reached a milestone in its efforts to help enable the...

89

A Reaction-Transport Model for Calcite Precipitation andEvaluation of Infiltration Fluxes in unsaturated fractured rock  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The percolation flux in the unsaturated zone (UZ) is an important parameter addressed in site characterization and flow and transport modeling of the potential nuclear-waste repository at Yucca Mountain, NV, USA. The US Geological Survey (USGS) has documented hydrogenic calcite abundances in fractures and lithophysal cavities at Yucca Mountain to provide constraints on percolation fluxes in the UZ. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between percolation flux and measured calcite abundances using reactive transport modeling. Our model considers the following essential factors affecting calcite precipitation: (1) infiltration, (2) the ambient geothermal gradient, (3) gaseous CO2 diffusive transport and partitioning in liquid and gas phases, (4) fracture matrix interaction for water flow and chemical constituents, and (5) water rock interaction. Over a bounding range of 2 20 mm/year infiltration rate, the simulated calcite distributions capture the trend in calcite abundances measured in a deep borehole (WT-24) by the USGS. The calcite is found predominantly in fractures in the welded tuffs, which is also captured by the model simulations. Simulations showed that from about 2 to 6 mm/year, the amount of calcite precipitated in the welded Topopah Spring tuff is sensitive to the infiltration rate. This dependence decreases at higher infiltration rates owing to a modification of the geothermal gradient from the increased percolation flux. The model also confirms the conceptual model for higher percolation fluxes in the fractures compared to the matrix in the welded units, and the significant contribution of Ca from water rock interaction. This study indicates that reactive transport modeling of calcite deposition can yield important constraints on the unsaturated zone infiltration-percolation flux and provide useful insight into processes such as fracture matrix interaction as well as conditions and parameters controlling calcite deposition.

Xu, Tianfu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur

2001-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

Silica Deposition in Field and Laboratory Thermal Tests of Yucca Mountain Tuff  

SciTech Connect

A field thermal test was conducted by the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project to observe changes in the Topopah Spring Tuff middle nonlithophysal zone geohydrologic system due to thermal loading. A laboratory-scale crushed-tuff hydrothermal column test was used to investigate the tuff as a potential construction material within a nuclear-waste repository. Results of similar column tests have been cited as indications that silica deposition would plug the rock fractures above a repository and create unfavorable drainage conditions. Data from field and laboratory tests are used here to predict the magnitude of fracture sealing. For the crushed-tuff column test, a one-meter-high column was packed with crushed tuff to a porosity of about 50%. Water filling the lowermost 10 cm of the column was boiled and the vapor condensed at the top of the column, percolating down to the boiling zone. After 100 days, intergranular pore space in the saturated portion of the column was almost filled with amorphous silica. The Drift Scale Test at Yucca Mountain is a heating test in the unsaturated zone. It consists of a four-year heating phase, now complete, followed by a four-year cooling phase. Heaters in a 60-m-long drift and in the adjacent rock have heated the drift walls to 200 C. As the rock was heated, fluids naturally present in the rock migrated away from the heat sources. A boiling zone now separates an inner dry-out zone from an outer condensation zone. A heat-pipe region exists in the outer margin of the boiling zone above the heated drift. Amorphous silica coatings up to a few micrometers thick were deposited in this region. Deposits were observed in less than 10% of the fractures in the heat pipe region. Drift-scale test results yield a silica deposition rate of about 250 {micro}m/1000 years in 10% of the fractures in the heat-pipe region. We did not calculate deposition rates from our column test, but a rate of 9.1 mm/1000 years in all fractures of the heat-pipe region is predicted by Sun and Rimstidt (2002) from the results of a similar test. We believe the rate based on field-test observations is a better prediction because the field test more closely resembles the expected environment in a repository. Rates based on column-test results may be reasonable for local zones of preferred fluid flow.

S.S. Levy; S.J. Chipera; M.G. Snow

2002-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

91

Yucca Mountain | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Yucca Mountain Yucca Mountain Yucca Mountain Addthis Fuel assembly for production of nuclear power 1 of 13 Fuel assembly for production of nuclear power Nuclear fuel pellets 2 of 13 Nuclear fuel pellets Aerial view of north end of the Yucca Mountain crest in February 1993 3 of 13 Aerial view of north end of the Yucca Mountain crest in February 1993 View of the first curve in the main drift of the Exploratory Studies Facility in October 1995 4 of 13 View of the first curve in the main drift of the Exploratory Studies Facility in October 1995 Aerial view of the crest of Yucca Mountain 5 of 13 Aerial view of the crest of Yucca Mountain Location of Yucca Mountain, Nevada 6 of 13 Location of Yucca Mountain, Nevada A scientist uses ultra-violet light to study how fluids move through rock

92

Total-system performance assessment for Yucca Mountain - SNL second iteration (TSPA-1993); Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories has completed the second iteration of the periodic total-system performance assessments (TSPA-93) for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). These analyses estimate the future behavior of a potential repository for high-level nuclear waste at the Yucca Mountain, Nevada, site under consideration by the Department of Energy. TSPA-93 builds upon previous efforts by emphasizing YMP concerns relating to site characterization, design, and regulatory compliance. Scenarios describing expected conditions (aqueous and gaseous transport of contaminants) and low-probability events (human-intrusion drilling and volcanic intrusion) are modeled. The hydrologic processes modeled include estimates of the perturbations to ambient conditions caused by heating of the repository resulting from radioactive decay of the waste. Hydrologic parameters and parameter probability distributions have been derived from available site data. Possible future climate changes are modeled by considering two separate groundwater infiltration conditions: {open_quotes}wet{close_quotes} with a mean flux of 10 mm/yr, and {open_quotes}dry{close_quotes} with a mean flux of 0.5 mm/yr. Two alternative waste-package designs and two alternative repository areal thermal power densities are investigated. One waste package is a thin-wall container emplaced in a vertical borehole, and the second is a container designed with corrosion-resistant and corrosion-allowance walls emplaced horizontally in the drift. Thermal power loadings of 57 kW/acre (the loading specified in the original repository conceptual design) and 114 kW/acre (a loading chosen to investigate effects of a {open_quotes}hot repository{close_quotes}) are considered. TSPA-93 incorporates significant new detailed process modeling, including two- and three-dimensional modeling of thermal effects, groundwater flow in the saturated-zone aquifers, and gas flow in the unsaturated zone.

Wilson, M.L.; Barnard, R.W.; Barr, G.E.; Dockery, H.A.; Dunn, E.; Eaton, R.R.; Martinez, M.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gauthier, J.H.; Guerin, D.C.; Lu, N. [and others

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Climatic Forecasting of Net Infiltration at Yucca Montain Using Analogue Meteororological Data  

SciTech Connect

At Yucca Mountain, Nevada, future changes in climatic conditions will most likely alter net infiltration, or the drainage below the bottom of the evapotranspiration zone within the soil profile or flow across the interface between soil and the densely welded part of the Tiva Canyon Tuff. The objectives of this paper are to: (a) develop a semi-empirical model and forecast average net infiltration rates, using the limited meteorological data from analogue meteorological stations, for interglacial (present day), and future monsoon, glacial transition, and glacial climates over the Yucca Mountain region, and (b) corroborate the computed net-infiltration rates by comparing them with the empirically and numerically determined groundwater recharge and percolation rates through the unsaturated zone from published data. In this paper, the author presents an approach for calculations of net infiltration, aridity, and precipitation-effectiveness indices, using a modified Budyko's water-balance model, with reference-surface potential evapotranspiration determined from the radiation-based Penman (1948) formula. Results of calculations show that net infiltration rates are expected to generally increase from the present-day climate to monsoon climate, to glacial transition climate, and then to the glacial climate. The forecasting results indicate the overlap between the ranges of net infiltration for different climates. For example, the mean glacial net-infiltration rate corresponds to the upper-bound glacial transition net infiltration, and the lower-bound glacial net infiltration corresponds to the glacial transition mean net infiltration. Forecasting of net infiltration for different climate states is subject to numerous uncertainties-associated with selecting climate analogue sites, using relatively short analogue meteorological records, neglecting the effects of vegetation and surface runoff and runon on a local scale, as well as possible anthropogenic climate changes.

B. Faybishenko

2006-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

94

Total-system performance assessment for Yucca Mountain - SNL second iteration (TSPA-1993); Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories has completed the second iteration of the periodic total-system performance assessments (TSPA-93) for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). These analyses estimate the future behavior of a potential repository for high-level nuclear waste at the Yucca Mountain, Nevada, site under consideration by the Department of Energy. TSPA-93 builds upon previous efforts by emphasizing YMP concerns relating to site characterization, design, and regulatory compliance. Scenarios describing expected conditions (aqueous and gaseous transport of contaminants) and low-probability events (human-intrusion drilling and volcanic intrusion) are modeled. The hydrologic processes modeled include estimates of the perturbations to ambient conditions caused by heating of the repository resulting from radioactive decay of the waste. Hydrologic parameters and parameter probability distributions have been derived from available site data. Possible future climate changes are modeled by considering two separate groundwater infiltration conditions: {open_quotes}wet{close_quotes} with a mean flux of 10 mm/yr, and {open_quotes}dry{close_quotes} with a mean flux of 0.5 mm/yr. Two alternative waste-package designs and two alternative repository areal thermal power densities are investigated. One waste package is a thin-wall container emplaced in a vertical borehole, and the second is a container designed with corrosion-resistant and corrosion-allowance walls emplaced horizontally in the drift. Thermal power loadings of 57 kW/acre (the loading specified in the original repository conceptual design) and 114 kW/acre (a loading chosen to investigate effects of a {open_quotes}hot repository{close_quotes}) are considered. TSPA-93 incorporates significant new detailed process modeling, including two- and three-dimensional modeling of thermal effects, groundwater flow in the saturated-zone aquifers, and gas flow in the unsaturated zone.

Wilson, M.L.; Gauthier, J.H.; Barnard, R.W.; Barr, G.E.; Dockery, H.A.; Dunn, E.; Eaton, R.R.; Guerin, D.C.; Lu, N.; Martinez, M.J. [and others] [and others

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Conceptual, experimental and computational approaches to support performance assessment of hydrology and chemical transport at Yucca Mountain; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect

The authors of this report have been participating in the Sandia National Laboratory`s hydrologic performance assessment of the Yucca Mountain, Nevada, since 1983. The scope of this work is restricted to the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain and to technical questions about hydrology and chemical transport. The issues defined here are not to be confused with the elaborate hierarchy of issues that forms the framework of the US Department of Energy plans for characterizing the site (DOE, 1989). The overall task of hydrologic performance assessment involves issues related to hydrology, geochemistry, and energy transport in a highly heterogeneous natural geologic system which will be perturbed in a major way by the disposal activity. Therefore, a rational evaluation of the performance assessment issues must be based on an integrated appreciation of the aforesaid interacting processes. Accordingly, a hierarchical approach is taken in this report, proceeding from the statement of the broad features of the site that make it the site for intensive studies and the rationale for disposal strategy, through the statement of the fundamental questions that need to be answered, to the identification of the issues that need resolution. Having identified the questions and issues, the report then outlines the tasks to be undertaken to resolve the issues. The report consists essentially of two parts. The first part deals with the definition of issues summarized above. The second part summarizes the findings of the authors between 1983 and 1989 under the activities of the former Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) and the current YMP.

Narasimhan, T.N.; Wang, J.S.Y. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

In Situ Characterization of Unsaturated Soil Hydraulic Properties at the Maricopa Environmental Monitoring Site.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Characterization of the unsaturated hydraulic properties is fundamental in modeling soil water flow and contaminant transport in the vadose zone. The objective of this study… (more)

Graham, Aaron Robert.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

The Development and Application of Reactive Transport Modeling Techniques to Study Radionuclide Migration at Yucca Mountain, NV  

SciTech Connect

Yucca Mountain, Nevada has been chosen as a possible site for the first high level radioactive waste repository in the United States. As part of the site investigation studies, we need to make scientifically rigorous estimations of radionuclide migration in the event of a repository breach. Performance assessment models used to make these estimations are computationally intensive. We have developed two reactive transport modeling techniques to simulate radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain: (1) the selective coupling approach applied to the convection-dispersion-reaction (CDR) model and (2) a reactive stream tube approach (RST). These models were designed to capture the important processes that influence radionuclide migration while being computationally efficient. The conventional method of modeling reactive transport models is to solve a coupled set of multi-dimensional partial differential equations for the relevant chemical components in the system. We have developed an iterative solution technique, denoted the selective coupling method, that represents a versatile alternative to traditional uncoupled iterative techniques and the filly coupled global implicit method. We show that selective coupling results in computational and memory savings relative to these approaches. We develop RST as an alternative to the CDR method for solving large two- or three-dimensional reactive transport simulations for cases in which one is interested in predicting the flux across a specific control plane. In the RST method, the multidimensional problem is reduced to a series of one-dimensional transport simulations along streamlines. The key assumption with RST is that mixing at the control plane approximates the transverse dispersion between streamlines. We compare the CDR and RST approaches for several scenarios that are relevant to the Yucca Mountain Project. For example, we apply the CDR and RST approaches to model an ongoing field experiment called the Unsaturated Zone Transport Test.

Hari Selvi Viswanathan

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Experimental unsaturated soil mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this general report, experimental systems and procedures of investigating the hydro-mechanical behaviour of unsaturated soils are presented. The water retention properties of unsaturated soils are commented and linked to various physical parameters and properties of the soils. Techniques of controlling suction are described together with their adaptation in various laboratory testing devices. Some typical features of the mechanical behaviour of unsaturated soils are presented within an elasto-plastic framework. An attempt to describe the numerous and significant recent advances in the investigation of the behaviour of unsaturated soils, including the contributions to this Conference, is proposed.

Delage, Pierre

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Moving Beyond the Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Energy in characterizing a site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as a possible location for a permanent to a decision by the Secretary of Energycurrently scheduled for 2001on whether to recommend the Yucca Mountain a clear description of how a Yucca Mountain repository would perform over thousands of years and how

100

CLIMATIC FORECASTING OF NET INFILTRATION AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, USING ANALOGUE METEOROLOGICAL DATA  

SciTech Connect

Net infiltration is a key hydrologic parameter that controls the rate of deep percolation through the unsaturated zone, the groundwater recharge, radionuclide transport, and seepage into the underground tunnels. Because net infiltration is largely affected by climatic conditions, future changes in climatic conditions will potentially alter net infiltration. The objectives of this presentation are to: (1) Present a conceptual model and a semi-empirical approach for regional, climatic forecasting of net infiltration, based on the precipitation and temperature data from analogue meteorological stations, and (2) Demonstrate the results of forecasting net infiltration for future climates--interglacial, monsoon and glacial--over the Yucca Mountain region for the period of 500,000 years. Calculations of the net infiltration were performed using a modified Budyko's water-balance model, for which potential evapotranspiration was evaluated from the temperature-based Thornthwaite formula. (Both Budyko's and Thornthwaite's formulae have been used broadly in hydrological studies.) The results of calculations were used for ranking net infiltration, along with the aridity and precipitation-effectiveness (P-E) indexes, for future climatic scenarios. Using this approach, we determined a general trend of increasing net infiltration from the present-day (interglacial) climate to monsoon, intermediate (glacial transition), and then to the glacial climate. Ranking of the aridity and P-E indexes is practically the same as that of net infiltration. The validation of the computed net infiltration rates yielded a good match with other field and modeling study results of groundwater recharge and net infiltration evaluation.

B. Faybishenko

2005-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unsaturated zone yucca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Stochastic analysis of unsaturated flow with probabilistic collocation method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with probabilistic collocation method, Water Resour. Res., 45, W08425, doi:10.1029/2008WR007530. 1. Introduction [2, the vadose zone has received increasing attention in recent years. Because of the coexis- tence of water to study the effect of spatial variability on flow in unsaturated zone [Jury, 1982; Yeh et al., 1985a, 1985

Lu, Zhiming

102

Characterizing unsaturated diffusion in porous tuff gravel  

SciTech Connect

Evaluation of solute diffusion in unsaturated porous gravel is very important for investigations of contaminant transport and remediation, risk assessment, and waste disposal (for example, the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada). For a porous aggregate medium such as granular tuff, the total water content is comprised of surface water and interior water. The surface water component (water film around grains and pendular water between the grain contacts) could serve as a predominant diffusion pathway. To investigate the extent to which surface water films and contact points affect solute diffusion in unsaturated gravel, we examined the configuration of water using x-ray computed tomography in partially saturated gravel, and made quantitative measurements of diffusion at multiple water contents using two different techniques. In the first, diffusion coefficients of potassium chloride in 2-4 mm granular tuff at multiple water contents were calculated from electrical conductivity measurements using the Nernst-Einstein equation. In the second, we used laser ablation with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry to perform micro-scale mapping, allowing the measurement of diffusion coefficients for a mixture of chemical tracers for tuff cubes and tetrahedrons having two contact geometries (cube-cube and cube-tetrahedron). The x-ray computed tomography images show limited contact between grains, and this could hinder the pathways for diffusive transport. Experimental results show the critical role of surface water in controlling transport pathways and hence the magnitude of diffusion. Even with a bulk volumetric water content of 1.5%, the measured solute diffusion coefficient is as low as 1.5 x 10{sup -14} m{sup 2}/s for tuff gravel. Currently used diffusion models relating diffusion coefficients to total volumetric water content inadequately describe unsaturated diffusion behavior in porous gravel at very low water contents.

Hu, Qinhong; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Roberts, Jeffery J.; Tomutsa, Liviu; Wang, Joseph, S.Y.

2003-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

103

Chlorine-36 alidation Study at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The amount, spatial distribution, and velocity of water percolating through the unsaturated zone (UZ) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, are important issues for assessing the performance of the proposed deep geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To help characterize the nature and history of UZ flow, isotopic studies were initiated in 1995, using rock samples collected from the Miocene ash-flow tuffs in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), an 8-km-long tunnel constructed along the north-south extent of the repository block, and the Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB) Cross Drift, a 2.5-km-long tunnel constructed across the repository block (Figure 1-1, Sources: Modified from DOE 2002 [Figure 1-14] and USBR 1996). Scientists from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) analyzed for chlorine-36 ({sup 36}Cl) in salts leached from whole-rock samples collected from tunnel walls and subsurface boreholes, and scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) analyzed for isotopes of oxygen, carbon, uranium, lead, thorium, and strontium in secondary minerals collected from subsurface fractures and lithophysal cavities. Elevated values for ratios of {sup 36}Cl to total chloride ({sup 36}Cl/CL) at the level of the proposed repository indicated that small amounts of water carrying bomb-pulse {sup 36}Cl (i.e., {sup 36}Cl/Cl ratios greater than 1250 x 10{sup -15} resulting from {sup 36}Cl produced by atmospheric testing of nuclear devices during the 1950s and early 1960s) had percolated through welded and nonwelded tuffs to depths of 200 to 300 meters (m) beneath the land surface over the past 50 years. Because of the implications of short travel times to the performance of the proposed repository, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)/Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), Office of Repository Development (ORD), decided to verify the {sup 36}Cl/Cl data with an independent validation study. DOE asked the USGS to design and implement a validation study that would include {sup 36}Cl and tritium ({sup 3}H) analyses. Core samples were taken from 50 new boreholes drilled across two zones in the ESF where a substantial number of samples with elevated {sup 36}Cl/Cl ratios had been identified previously. Also, core intervals from the Sample Management Facility (SMF) were acquired for water extraction and {sup 3H} analyses. This report documents the background and history of the validation study and presents the results of the {sup 36}Cl to total chloride ({sup 36}Cl/Cl) and {sup 3}H analyses.

J. Paces

2006-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

104

Information Request Yucca Mountain Site | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Information Request Yucca Mountain Site Information Request Yucca Mountain Site The Suitability of the Yucca Mountain Site and the Issue of Natural Barriers as the Principal...

105

U.S. NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and Zhongbo Yu, "Assessment of Radionuclide Transport Uncertainty in the Unsaturated Zone of Yucca Mountain Pan, "Temporal Damping Effect of the Yucca Mountain Fractured Unsaturated Rock on Transient in Modeling Flow Processes within the Unsaturated Zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada," Journal of Hydraulic

106

Determination of HEat Capacity of Yucca Mountain Strtigraphic Layers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The heat generated from the radioactive waste to be placed in the proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, will affect the thermal-hydrology of the Yucca Mountain stratigraphic layers. In order to assess the effect of the movement of repository heat into the fractured rocks accurate determination of thermodynamic and hydraulic properties is important. Heat capacity is one of the properties that are required to evaluate energy storage in the fractured rock. Rock-grain heat capacity, the subject of this study, is the heat capacity of the solid part of the rock. Yucca Mountain consists of alternating lithostratigraphic units of welded and non-welded ash-flow tuff, mainly rhyolitic in composition and displaying varying degrees of vitrification and alteration. A number of methods exist that can be used to evaluate heat capacity of the stratigraphic layers that consist of different compositions. In this study, the mineral summation method has been used to quantify the heat capacity of the stratigraphic layers based on Kopp's rule. The mineral summation method is an addition of the weighted heat capacity of each mineral found in a specific layer. For this study the weighting was done based on the mass percentage of each mineral in the layer. The method utilized a mineralogic map of the rocks at the Yucca Mountain repository site. The Calico Hills formation and adjacent bedded tuff layers display a bimodal mineral distribution of vitric and zeolitic zones with differing mineralogies. Based on this bimodal distribution in zeolite abundance, the boundary between the vitric and zeolitic zones was selected to be 15% zeolitic abundance. Thus, based on the zeolite abundance, subdivisions have been introduced to these layers into ''vitric'' and ''zeolitic'' zones. Heat capacity values have been calculated for these layers both as ''layer average'' and ''zone average''. The heat capacity determination method presented in this report did not account for spatial variability in the horizontal direction within each layer.

T. Hadgu; C. Lum; J.E. Bean

2006-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

107

Volcanism Studies: Final Report for the Yucca Mountain Project  

SciTech Connect

This report synthesizes the results of volcanism studies conducted by scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and collaborating institutions on behalf of the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. An assessment of the risk of future volcanic activity is one of many site characterization studies that must be completed to evaluate the Yucca Mountain site for potential long-term storage of high-level radioactive waste. The presence of several basaltic volcanic centers in the Yucca Mountain region of Pliocene and Quaternary age indicates that there is a finite risk of a future volcanic event occurring during the 10,000-year isolation period of a potential repository. Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The risk of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Future volcanic events cannot be predicted with certainty but instead are estimated using formal methods of probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment (PVHA). Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The distribution, eruptive history, and geochronology of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers are described by individual center emphasizing the younger postcaldera basalt (<5 Ma). The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is described in detail because it is the youngest basalt center in the YMR. The age of the Lathrop Wells center is now confidently determined to be about 75 thousand years old. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. The Crater Flat volcanic zone is defined and described as one of many alternative models of the structural controls of the distribution of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers in the YMR. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of basaltic volcanic centers. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the Basin and Range province. Geochemical and isotopic data are presented for post-Miocene basalts of the Yucca Mountain region. Alternative petrogenetic models are assessed for the formation of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. Based on geochemical data, basaltic ash in fault trenches near Yucca Mountain is shown to have originated from the Lathrop Wells center. Chapter 5 synthesizes eruptive and subsurface effects of basaltic volcanism on a potential repository and summarizes current concepts of the segregation, ascent, and eruption of basalt magma. Chapter 6 synthesizes current knowledge of the probability of disruption of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. In 1996, an Expert Elicitation panel was convened by DOE that independently conducted PVHA for the Yucca Mountain site. Chapter 6 does not attempt to revise this PVHA; instead, it further examines the sensitivity of variables in PVHA. The approaches and results of PVHA by the expert judgment panel are evaluated and incorporated throughout this chapter. The disruption ratio (E2) is completely re-evaluated using simulation modeling that describes volcanic events based on the geometry of basaltic feeder dikes. New estimates of probability bounds are developed. These comparisons show that it is physically implausible for the probability of magmatic disruption of the Yucca Mountain site to be > than about 7 x 10{sup {minus}8} events yr{sup {minus}1} . Simple probability estimates are used to assess possible implications of not drilling aeromagnetic anomalies in the Amargosa Valley. The sensitivity of the disruption probability to the location of northeast boundaries of volcanic zones near the Yucca Mountain si

Bruce M. Crowe; Frank V. Perry; Greg A. Valentine; Lynn M. Bowker

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Volcanism Studies: Final Report for the Yucca Mountain Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report synthesizes the results of volcanism studies conducted by scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and collaborating institutions on behalf of the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. An assessment of the risk of future volcanic activity is one of many site characterization studies that must be completed to evaluate the Yucca Mountain site for potential long-term storage of high-level radioactive waste. The presence of several basaltic volcanic centers in the Yucca Mountain region of Pliocene and Quaternary age indicates that there is a finite risk of a future volcanic event occurring during the 10,000-year isolation period of a potential repository. Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The risk of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Future volcanic events cannot be predicted with certainty but instead are estimated using formal methods of probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment (PVHA). Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The distribution, eruptive history, and geochronology of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers are described by individual center emphasizing the younger postcaldera basalt (basalt center in the YMR. The age of the Lathrop Wells center is now confidently determined to be about 75 thousand years old. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. The Crater Flat volcanic zone is defined and described as one of many alternative models of the structural controls of the distribution of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers in the YMR. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of basaltic volcanic centers. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the Basin and Range province. Geochemical and isotopic data are presented for post-Miocene basalts of the Yucca Mountain region. Alternative petrogenetic models are assessed for the formation of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. Based on geochemical data, basaltic ash in fault trenches near Yucca Mountain is shown to have originated from the Lathrop Wells center. Chapter 5 synthesizes eruptive and subsurface effects of basaltic volcanism on a potential repository and summarizes current concepts of the segregation, ascent, and eruption of basalt magma. Chapter 6 synthesizes current knowledge of the probability of disruption of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. In 1996, an Expert Elicitation panel was convened by DOE that independently conducted PVHA for the Yucca Mountain site. Chapter 6 does not attempt to revise this PVHA; instead, it further examines the sensitivity of variables in PVHA. The approaches and results of PVHA by the expert judgment panel are evaluated and incorporated throughout this chapter. The disruption ratio (E2) is completely re-evaluated using simulation modeling that describes volcanic events based on the geometry of basaltic feeder dikes. New estimates of probability bounds are developed. These comparisons show that it is physically implausible for the probability of magmatic disruption of the Yucca Mountain site to be > than about 7 x 10{sup {minus}8} events yr{sup {minus}1} . Simple probability estimates are used to assess possible implications of not drilling aeromagnetic anomalies in the Amargosa Valley. The sensitivity of the disruption probability to the location of northeast boundaries of volcanic zones near the Yucca Mountain si

Bruce M. Crowe; Frank V. Perry; Greg A. Valentine; Lynn M. Bowker

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Boundary integral methods for unsaturated flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many large simulations may be required to assess the performance of Yucca Mountain as a possible site for the nations first high level nuclear waste repository. A boundary integral equation method (BIEM) is described for numerical analysis of quasilinear steady unsaturated flow in homogeneous material. The applicability of the exponential model for the dependence of hydraulic conductivity on pressure head is discussed briefly. This constitutive assumption is at the heart of the quasilinear transformation. Materials which display a wide distribution in pore-size are described reasonably well by the exponential. For materials with a narrow range in pore-size, the exponential is suitable over more limited ranges in pressure head. The numerical implementation of the BIEM is used to investigate the infiltration from a strip source to a water table. The net infiltration of moisture into a finite-depth layer is well-described by results for a semi-infinite layer if {alpha}D > 4, where {alpha} is the sorptive number and D is the depth to the water table. the distribution of moisture exhibits a similar dependence on {alpha}D. 11 refs., 4 figs.,

Martinez, M.J.; McTigue, D.F.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

110

Mineralogic Zonation Within the Tuff Confining Unit, Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

Recently acquired mineralogic data from drill hole samples in Yucca Flat show that the tuff confining unit (TCU) can be subdivided into three mineralogic zones based on the relative abundances of primary and secondary mineral assemblages. These zones are (1) an upper zone characterized by the abundance of the zeolite mineral clinoptilolite with lesser amounts of felsic and clay minerals; (2) a middle zone with felsic minerals dominant over clinoptilolite and clay minerals; and (3) a basal argillic zone where clay minerals are dominant over felsic minerals and clinoptilolite. Interpretation of the mineralogic data, along with lithologic, stratigraphic, and geophysical data from approximately 500 drill holes, reveals a three-layer mineralogic model for the TCU that shows all three zones are extensive beneath Yucca Flat. The mineralogic model will be used to subdivide the TCU in the Yucca Flat hydrostratigraphic framework model, resulting in a more accurate and versatile framework model. In addition, the identification of the type, quantity, and distribution of minerals within each TCU layer will permit modelers to better predict the spatial distribution and extent of contaminant transport from underground tests in Yucca Flat, at both the level of the hydrologic source term and the corrective action unit.

Lance Prothro

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

YuccaMountainasaRadioactiveWaste Circular 1184  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technical Evaluation of U.S. Department of Energy Yucca Mountain Infiltration Estimates A R e p o r elevation model of Yucca Mountain and vicinity. Contour lines of equal water table elevation are for early.S. Department of Energy Yucca Mountain Infiltration Estimates Report to the U.S. Congress and the Secretary

112

Information Request Yucca Mountain Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

, 2008 , 2008 TO: Sue Tierney, Phil Niedzielski-Eichner, Skila Harris FROM: Chris Kouts SUBJECT: Information Request As requested, enclosed is the additional information you requested last week regarding use of engineered barriers. Please let me know if you need additional information or have any questions. A,4- -/0 7 The Suitability of the Yucca Mountain Site and the Issue of Natural Barriers as the Principal Barriers for Demonstrating Safety This paper addresses two issues that are frequently raised concerning the suitability of the Yucca Mountain site for development as a repository. The first issue is that the Yucca Mountain site is technically unsound and that an engineered barrier system is required because the site is not capable of protecting public health and safety. The second issue is

113

Elements present in leach solutions from unsaturated spent fuel tests  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary results for the composition of the leachate from unsaturated tests at 90{degrees}C with spent fuel for 55--134 days with J-13 groundwater are reported. The pH of the leachate solutions was found to be acidic, ranging from 4 to 7. The actinide concentrations were 10{sup 5} greater than those reported for saturated spent fuel tests in which the leachate pH was 8. We also found that most species in the leachate were present as colloids containing both americium and curium. The presence of actinides in a form not currently included in repository radionuclide transport models provides information that can be used in spent fuel reaction modeling, the performance assessment of the repository and the design of the engineering barrier system. This report was prepared as part of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

Finn, P.A.; Bates, J.K.; Hoh, J.C.; Emery, J.W.; Hafenrichter, L.D.; Buck, E.C.; Gong, M.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Application of natural analogues in the Yucca Mountain project - overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contractor) 2000. Yucca Mountain Site Description. TDR-CRW-in silicic tuff from Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Clays and ClayHazard Analysis for Yucca Mountain, Nevada. BA0000000-01717-

Simmons, Ardyth M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Drift Natural Convection and Seepage at the Yucca Mountain Repository  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 A Simulation Code for Yucca Mountain Transport Processes:List of Figures Yucca Mountain location, southwest1 Introduction 1.1 Yucca Mountain Repository . . . . 1.1.1

Halecky, Nicholaus Eugene

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

NEPA Yucca Mountain Downloads | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NEPA Yucca Mountain Downloads NEPA Yucca Mountain Downloads NEPA Yucca Mountain Downloads October 24, 2008 EIS-0250: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Supplement to the Environmental Impact Statement Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada October 10, 2008 EIS-0369: Floodplain Statement of Finding Rail Alignment for the Construction and Operation of a Railroad in Nevada to a Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada October 10, 2008 EIS-0369: Record of Decision and Floodplain Statement of Findings Nevada Rail Alignment for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada June 2, 2008 EIS-0250-S2: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement

117

Two Independent Assessments Find the Department of Energy's Yucca...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Assessments Find the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project is on Track Two Independent Assessments Find the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project is on...

118

Department of Energy Files Motion to Withdraw Yucca Mountain...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Files Motion to Withdraw Yucca Mountain License Application Department of Energy Files Motion to Withdraw Yucca Mountain License Application March 3, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis...

119

Motion to Withdraw from Yucca Mountain application | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Motion to Withdraw from Yucca Mountain application Motion to Withdraw from Yucca Mountain application DOE's withdraws it's pending license application for a permanent geologic...

120

Scientific and Technical Priorities at Yucca Mountain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Following completion of the site characterization and site recommendation phases, the Department of Energy (DOE) is moving to prepare and submit a license application to initiate construction of the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. This report provides background on how the project arrived at this juncture in its history and detailed information on EPRI's Yucca Mountain-related activities during calendar year 2003. The report assesses the relative risk-importance of various Yucca Mountain system co...

2003-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unsaturated zone yucca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Stochastic analysis of flow in a heterogeneous unsaturated-saturated system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of multiscale, nonstationary medium features. The unsaturated and saturated zones are coupled through the water table, whose position is random in randomly heterogeneous porous media. The presence of the water table zones [e.g., Dagan and Bresler, 1979; Bresler and Dagan, 1981; Andersson and Shapiro, 1983; Yeh et al

Zhang, Dongxiao

122

Approaches to large scale unsaturated flow in heterogeneous, stratified, and fractured geologic media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report develops a broad review and assessment of quantitative modeling approaches and data requirements for large-scale subsurface flow in radioactive waste geologic repository. The data review includes discussions of controlled field experiments, existing contamination sites, and site-specific hydrogeologic conditions at Yucca Mountain. Local-scale constitutive models for the unsaturated hydrodynamic properties of geologic media are analyzed, with particular emphasis on the effect of structural characteristics of the medium. The report further reviews and analyzes large-scale hydrogeologic spatial variability from aquifer data, unsaturated soil data, and fracture network data gathered from the literature. Finally, various modeling strategies toward large-scale flow simulations are assessed, including direct high-resolution simulation, and coarse-scale simulation based on auxiliary hydrodynamic models such as single equivalent continuum and dual-porosity continuum. The roles of anisotropy, fracturing, and broad-band spatial variability are emphasized. 252 refs.

Ababou, R.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Modeling water seepage into heated waste emplacement drifts at Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into drifts at Yucca Mountain, Journal of ContaminantEMPLACEMENT DRIFTS AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN Jens Birkholzer, Sumitfor nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Heating of rock

Birkholzer, Jens; Mukhopadhyay, Sumitra; Tsang, Yvonne

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Multiple-point statistical prediction on fracture networks at Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on fracture networks at Yucca Mountain Xiaoyan Liu 1 ,systems, such as at Yucca Mountain, water flow rate andflow field behavior at the Yucca Mountain waste repository

Liu, X.Y

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Experimental and numerical simulation of dissolution and precipitation: Implications for fracture sealing at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FRACTURE SEALING AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Patrick F. Dobsonpotential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, would reducewas flowed through crushed Yucca Mountain tuff at 94°C. The

Dobson, Patrick F.; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Sonnenthal, Eric L.; Spycher, Nicolas; Apps, John A.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Climate Change at Yucca Mountain: Lessons from Earth History  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Replicated host-race formation in bogus yucca moths: genetic and ecological divergence of Prodoxus quinquepunctellus on yucca hosts Glenn P. Svensson, 1,2 * David M. Althoff 1 and Olle Pellmyr 1 1 Department of Yucca elata and Y. rostrata in west Texas, USA. Results: Moths on the two yuccas differed significantly

Schrag, Daniel

127

Yucca Mountain Archival Documents | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Yucca Mountain Archival Documents Yucca Mountain Archival Documents Yucca Mountain Archival Documents Yucca Mountain Archival Documents From the Former Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management President Obama and the Department of Energy are working to restart America's nuclear industry to help meet our energy and climate challenges and create thousands of new jobs. The Administration is fully committed to ensuring that long-term storage obligations for nuclear waste are met. The President has made clear that Yucca Mountain is not an option for waste storage. The Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future, led by Congressman Lee Hamilton and General Brent Scowcroft, has conducted a comprehensive review of policies for managing the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle, and has offered recommendations for developing a safe,

128

Yucca Mountain Press Conference | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Yucca Mountain Press Conference Yucca Mountain Press Conference Yucca Mountain Press Conference June 3, 2008 - 12:51pm Addthis Remarks as Prepared for Delivery for Secretary Bodman Thank you all for being here. I'm pleased to announce that this morning the Department of Energy submitted a license application to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission seeking authorization to build America's first national repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. We are confident that the NRC's rigorous review process will validate that the Yucca Mountain repository will provide for the safe disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in a way that protects human health and our environment. This application represents the culmination of over 20 years of work by

129

Saturated Zone I. Overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Chapter 1 Board Oversight of the DOE's Scientific and Technical Activities at Yucca Mountain . 3 I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 I. Review of Material Related to Hydrothermal Upwelling at Yucca Mountain. . . . . . . . . . . 19 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 IV. Environmental Impact Statement for a Yucca Mountain Repository

130

Saturated-Unsaturated flow in a Compressible Leaky-unconfined Aquifer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An analytical solution is developed for three-dimensional flow towards a partially penetrating large-diameter well in an unconfined aquifer bounded below by an aquitard of finite or semi-infinite extent. The analytical solution is derived using Laplace and Hankel transforms, then inverted numerically. Existing solutions for flow in leaky unconfined aquifers neglect the unsaturated zone following an assumption of instantaneous drainage assumption due to Neuman [1972]. We extend the theory of leakage in unconfined aquifers by (1) including water flow and storage in the unsaturated zone above the water table, and (2) allowing the finite-diameter pumping well to partially penetrate the aquifer. The investigation of model-predicted results shows that leakage from an underlying aquitard leads to significant departure from the unconfined solution without leakage. The investigation of dimensionless time-drawdown relationships shows that the aquitard drawdown also depends on unsaturated zone properties and the pumping-well wellbore storage effects.

Phoolendra K. Mishra; Velimir V. Vessilinov; Kristopher L. Kuhlman

2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

131

Saturated-Unsaturated flow in a Compressible Leaky-unconfined Aquifer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An analytical solution is developed for three-dimensional flow towards a partially penetrating large-diameter well in an unconfined aquifer bounded below by an aquitard of finite or semi-infinite extent. The analytical solution is derived using Laplace and Hankel transforms, then inverted numerically. Existing solutions for flow in leaky unconfined aquifers neglect the unsaturated zone following an assumption of instantaneous drainage assumption due to Neuman [1972]. We extend the theory of leakage in unconfined aquifers by (1) including water flow and storage in the unsaturated zone above the water table, and (2) allowing the finite-diameter pumping well to partially penetrate the aquifer. The investigation of model-predicted results shows that leakage from an underlying aquitard leads to significant departure from the unconfined solution without leakage. The investigation of dimensionless time-drawdown relationships shows that the aquitard drawdown also depends on unsaturated zone properties and the pumping...

Mishra, Phoolendra K; Kuhlman, Kristopher L

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Yucca Mountain and The Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Yucca Mountain Project places a high priority on protecting the environment. To ensure compliance with all state and federal environmental laws and regulations, the Project established an Environmental Management System. Important elements of the Environmental Management System include the following: (1) monitoring air, water, and other natural resources; (2) protecting plant and animal species by minimizing land disturbance; (3) restoring vegetation and wildlife habitat in disturbed areas; (4) protecting cultural resources; (5) minimizing waste, preventing pollution, and promoting environmental awareness; and (6) managing of hazardous and non-hazardous waste. Reducing the impacts of Project activities on the environment will continue for the duration of the Project.

NA

2005-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

133

Bomb-Pulse Chlorine-36 At The Proposed Yucca Mountain Repository Horizon: An Investigation Of Previous Conflicting Results And Collection Of New Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous studies by scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) found elevated ratios of chlorine-36 to total chloride ({sup 36}Cl/Cl) in samples of rock collected from the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) and the Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB) at Yucca Mountain as the tunnels were excavated. The data were interpreted as an indication that fluids containing 'bomb-pulse' {sup 36}Cl reached the repository horizon in the {approx}50 years since the peak period of above-ground nuclear testing. Moreover, the data support the concept that so-called fast pathways for infiltration not only exist but are active, possibly through a combination of porous media, faults and/or other geologic features. Due to the significance of {sup 36}Cl data to conceptual models of unsaturated zone flow and transport, the United States Geological Survey (USGS) was requested by the Department of Energy (DOE) to design and implement a study to validate the LANL findings. The USGS chose to drill new boreholes at select locations across zones where bomb-pulse ratios had previously been identified. The drill cores were analyzed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for {sup 36}Cl/Cl using both active and passive leaches, with the USGS/LLNL concluding that the active leach extracted too much rock-Cl and the passive leach did not show bomb-pulse ratios. Because consensus was not reached between the USGS/LLNL and LANL on several fundamental points, including the conceptual strategy for sampling, interpretation and use of tritium ({sup 3}H) data, and the importance and interpretation of blanks, in addition to the presence or absence of bomb-pulse {sup 36}Cl, an evaluation by an independent entity, the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), using new samples was initiated. This report is the result of that study. The overall objectives of the UNLV study were to investigate the source or sources of the conflicting results from the previous validation study, and to obtain additional data to determine whether or not there are bomb-pulse isotopes at the repository horizon. To that en4 we have engaged in discussions with previous investigators, reviewed reports, and analyzed archived samples. We have also collected new samples of rock from the ESF, soil profiles from the surface of Yucca Mountain, and opportunistic samples of seep water from inside the south ramp of the ESF.

J. Cizdziel

2006-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

134

Microsoft Word - Yucca PCard Report.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Inspection Report Yucca Mountain Project Purchase Card Programs INS-O-09-04 August 2009 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Inspections MEMORANDUM FOR DIRECTOR, OFFICE OF CILIVIAN RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT FROM: Herbert Richardson Principal Deputy Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Inspection Report on "Yucca Mountain Purchase Card Programs" BACKGROUND Yucca Mountain Project (Project) is the Nation's first proposed storage facility for spent nuclear fuel and high-level nuclear waste. The Project is managed by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). From

135

April 25, 1997: Yucca Mountain exploratory drilling  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

April 25, 1997Workers complete drilling of the five-mile long, horseshoe-shaped exploratory tunnel through Yucca Mountain at the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository in Nevada.

136

Coupled Vadose Zone and Atmospheric Surface-Layer Transport of CO2 from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1999. Reichle, D. et al. , Carbon sequestration research andfrom geologic carbon sequestration sites: unsaturated zoneCO 2 from a geologic carbon sequestration site showing the

Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Unger, Andre J.A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Correspondence with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 2 Unsaturated Zone I. Overview If the Yucca Mountain site is deemed suitable for re of the extent of welding, the tuffs within the UZ at Yucca Mountain are grouped informally into hydrogeologic Yucca Mountain is illustrated in Figure 2-1 on page 14. A. Why UZ Was Chosen Initial studies of Yucca

138

Shallow infiltration processes in arid watersheds at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A conceptual model of shallow infiltration processes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, was developed for use in hydrologic flow models to characterize net infiltration (the penetration of the wetting front below the zone influenced by evapotranspiration). The model categorizes the surface of the site into four infiltration zones. These zones were identified as ridgetops, sideslopes, terraces, and active channels on the basis of water-content changes with depth and time. The maximum depth of measured water-content change at a specific site is a function of surface storage capacity, the timing and magnitude of precipitation, evapotranspiration, and the degree of saturation of surficial materials overlying fractured bedrock. Measured water-content profiles for the four zones indicated that the potential for net infiltration is higher when evapotranspiration is low (i.e winter, cloudy periods), where surface concentration of water is likely to occur (i.e. depressions, channels), where surface storage capacity is low, and where fractured bedrock is close to the surface.

Flint, L.E.; Flint, A.L. Hevesi, J.A. [Geological Survey, Mercury, NV (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

139

New Yucca Mountain Repository Design to be Simpler, Safer and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Yucca Mountain Repository Design to be Simpler, Safer and More Cost-Effective New Yucca Mountain Repository Design to be Simpler, Safer and More Cost-Effective untitled More...

140

Analyzing flow patterns in unsaturated fractured rock of Yucca Mountain using an integrated modeling approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heat flow simulations use the 3-D thermal model grid (Figuremodel grid, which is used for gas flow and ambient heat flowgrid showing a smaller model domain, used for modeling gas and heat

Wu, Yu-Shu; Lu, Guoping; Zhang, Keni; Pan, Lehua; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unsaturated zone yucca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Analyzing flow patterns in unsaturated fractured rock of Yucca Mountain using an integrated modeling approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flint, E. L. , A. L. , Flint, and J. S. Selker, Influence ofWater Resources Research, 39, (4), 4- Flint, A. L. , J. A.Hevesi, and L. E. Flint, Conceptual and numerical model of

Wu, Yu-Shu; Lu, Guoping; Zhang, Keni; Pan, Lehua; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Temporal Damping Effect of the Yucca Mountain Fractured Unsaturated Rock on Transient Infiltration Pulses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

51, 257-288. Hevesi, J. and Flint, L. , 2000. Simulation ofC.F. ; Bodvarsson, G.S. ; Flint, A.L. ; and Guertal, W.B.76SF00098. 6. References Flint, A.L. , Hevesi, J.A. , Flint,

Zhang, Keni; Wu, Yu-Shu; Pan, Lehua

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

1. INTRODUCTION 1.1. Yucca Mountain Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Phylogeny of the pollinating yucca moths, with revision of Mexican species (Tegeticula Received 2 October 2006; accepted for publication 30 May 2007 The yucca moths (Tegeticula of yuccas. Revisionary work in recent years has revealed far higher species diversity than historically

Maerz, Norbert H.

144

NUCLEAR WASTE ISOLATION IN THE UNSATURATED ZONE OF ARID REGIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on thm Properties of Tuff, Sandia National Laboratory Reportthe Properties of Tuff, Sandia Nat. Lab. Rpfc. SANDtO-1464 (the Properties of Toff, sandia Hat. Lab. Rapt. SANDSO-1464 (

Wollenberg, H.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Numerical simulation of unsaturated soil behaviour  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mechanical behaviour of unsaturated soils is one of the challenging topics in the field of geotechnical engineering. The use of finite element techniques is considered to be a promising method to solve settlement and heave problems, which are associated ... Keywords: FEM, constitutive modelling, finite element method, geotechnical engineering, mechanical behaviour, shallow foundation, shallow foundations, soil behaviour, suction variation, unsaturated soils

Ayman A. Abed; Pieter A. Vermeer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Estimation of host rock thermal conductivities using the temperature data from the drift-scale test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Drift Scale Test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Journal ofunsaturated model of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Journal ofE. , and Spycher, N. , Yucca Mountain single heater test

Mukhopadhyay, Sumitra; Tsang, Y.W.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Uncertainties in coupled thermal-hydrological processes associated with the drift scale test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scale Test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada S. Mukhopadhyay * , Y.waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The Drift Scalerock; Radioactive waste; Yucca Mountain, Nevada Introduction

Mukhopadhyay, Sumitra; Tsang, Y.W.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Weapons test seismic investigations at Yucca Mountain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Yucca Mountain, located on and adjacent to the Nevada Test Site, is being characterized as part of an ongoing effort to identify a potential high-level nuclear waste repository. This site will be subjected to seismic ground motions induced by underground nuclear explosions. A knowledge of expected ground motion levels from these tests will enable the designers to provide for the necessary structural support in the designs of the various components of the repository. The primary objective of the Weapons Test Seismic Investigation project is to develop a method to predict the ground motions expected at the repository site as a result of future weapons tests. This paper summarizes the data base presently assembled for the Yucca Mountain Project, characteristics of expected ground motions, and characterization of the two-dimensional seismic properties along paths between Yucca Mountain and the testing areas of the Nevada Test Site.

Phillips, J.S.; Shephard, L.E.; Walck, M.C.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

SYSTHESIS OF VOLCANISM STUDIES FOR THE YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE CHARACTERIZATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

This report synthesizes the results of volcanism studies conducted by scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and collaborating institutions on behalf of the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The hazard of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Future volcanic events cannot be predicted with certainty but instead are estimated using formal methods of probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment (PVHA). Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The distribution, eruptive history, and geochronology of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers are described by individual center emphasizing the younger postcaldera basalt (<5 Ma). The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is described in detail because it is the youngest basalt center in the YMR. The age of the Lathrop Wells center is now confidently determined to be about 75 thousand years old. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. The distribution of Pliocene and Quaternary basaltic volcanic centers is evaluated with respect to tectonic models for detachment, caldera, regional and local rifting, and the Walker Lane structural zone. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of past basaltic volcanic centers and possible future magmatic processes. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the Basin and Range province. Geochemical and isotopic data are presented for post-Miocene basalts of the Yucca Mountain region. Alternative petrogenetic models are assessed for the formation of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. Based on geochemical data, basaltic ash in fault trenches near Yucca Mountain is shown to have originated from the Lathrop Wells center. Chapter 5 synthesizes eruptive and subsurface effects of basaltic volcanism on a potential repository and summarizes current concepts of the segregation, ascent, and eruption of basalt magma. Chapter 6 synthesizes current knowledge of the probability of disruption of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. In 1996, an Expert Elicitation panel was convened by DOE that independently conducted PVHA for the Yucca Mountain site. Chapter 6 does not attempt to revise this PVHA; instead, it further examines the sensitivity of variables in PVHA. The approaches and results of PVHA by the expert judgment panel are evaluated and incorporated throughout this chapter. The disruption ratio (E2) is completely re-evaluated using simulation modeling that describes volcanic events based on the geometry of basaltic feeder dikes. New estimates of probability bounds are developed. These comparisons show that it is physically implausible for the probability of magmatic disruption of the Yucca Mountain site to be greater than 10{sup -7} events per year. Bounding probability estimates are used to assess possible implications of not drilling aeromagnetic anomalies in the Arnargosa Valley and Crater Flat. The results of simulation modeling are used to assess the sensitivity of the disruption probability for the location of northeast boundaries of volcanic zones near the Yucca Mountain site. A new section on modeling of radiological releases associated with surface and subsurface magmatic activity has been added to chapter 6. The modeling results are consistent with past total system performance assessments that show future volcanic and magmatic events are not significant components of repository performance and volcanism is not a prio

FV PERRY, GA CROWE, GA VALENTINE AND LM BOWKER

1997-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

150

SYSTHESIS OF VOLCANISM STUDIES FOR THE YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE CHARACTERIZATION PROJECT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report synthesizes the results of volcanism studies conducted by scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and collaborating institutions on behalf of the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The hazard of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Future volcanic events cannot be predicted with certainty but instead are estimated using formal methods of probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment (PVHA). Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The distribution, eruptive history, and geochronology of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers are described by individual center emphasizing the younger postcaldera basalt (basalt center in the YMR. The age of the Lathrop Wells center is now confidently determined to be about 75 thousand years old. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. The distribution of Pliocene and Quaternary basaltic volcanic centers is evaluated with respect to tectonic models for detachment, caldera, regional and local rifting, and the Walker Lane structural zone. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of past basaltic volcanic centers and possible future magmatic processes. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the Basin and Range province. Geochemical and isotopic data are presented for post-Miocene basalts of the Yucca Mountain region. Alternative petrogenetic models are assessed for the formation of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. Based on geochemical data, basaltic ash in fault trenches near Yucca Mountain is shown to have originated from the Lathrop Wells center. Chapter 5 synthesizes eruptive and subsurface effects of basaltic volcanism on a potential repository and summarizes current concepts of the segregation, ascent, and eruption of basalt magma. Chapter 6 synthesizes current knowledge of the probability of disruption of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. In 1996, an Expert Elicitation panel was convened by DOE that independently conducted PVHA for the Yucca Mountain site. Chapter 6 does not attempt to revise this PVHA; instead, it further examines the sensitivity of variables in PVHA. The approaches and results of PVHA by the expert judgment panel are evaluated and incorporated throughout this chapter. The disruption ratio (E2) is completely re-evaluated using simulation modeling that describes volcanic events based on the geometry of basaltic feeder dikes. New estimates of probability bounds are developed. These comparisons show that it is physically implausible for the probability of magmatic disruption of the Yucca Mountain site to be greater than 10{sup -7} events per year. Bounding probability estimates are used to assess possible implications of not drilling aeromagnetic anomalies in the Arnargosa Valley and Crater Flat. The results of simulation modeling are used to assess the sensitivity of the disruption probability for the location of northeast boundaries of volcanic zones near the Yucca Mountain site. A new section on modeling of radiological releases associated with surface and subsurface magmatic activity has been added to chapter 6. The modeling results are consistent with past total system performance assessments that show future volcanic and magmatic events are not significant components of repository performance and volcanism is not a prio

FV PERRY, GA CROWE, GA VALENTINE AND LM BOWKER

1997-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

151

Revision 2 Yucca Mountain Review Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Yucca Mountain Review Plan provides guidance for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff to evaluate a U.S. Department of Energy license application for a geologic repository. It is not a regulation and does not impose regulatory requirements. The licensing criteria are contained in the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Title 10, Part 63

unknown authors

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Influence of faults on groundwater flow and transport at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

test well USW H- 6, Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada,by test well UE- 25p#1, Yucca Mountain Area, Nye County,assessment for Yucca Mountain-SNL second interation (TSPA-

Cohen, Andrew J.B.; Sitar, Nicholas

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Numerical analysis of thermal-hydrological conditions in the single heater test at Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Single Heater Test at Yucca Mountain, LBNL-39789, E.O. Law­Single Heater Test at Yucca Mountain Jens T. Birkholzer andwaste repository at Yucca Mountain. The heating phase of the

Birkholzer, Jens T.; Tsang, Yvonne W.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Parameter estimation from flowing fluid temperature logging data in unsaturated fractured rock using multiphase inverse modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Drift Scale Test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, J. of Contam.the Drift Scale Test at Yucca Mountain Figure 1a. Figure 1b.pneumatic response at Yucca Mountain, Journal of Contaminant

Mukhopadhyay, S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Viability Assessment of a Repository at Yucca Mountain | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Viability Assessment of a Repository at Yucca Mountain Viability Assessment of a Repository at Yucca Mountain Viability Assessment of a Repository at Yucca Mountain Summary The Viability Assessment of a Repository at Yucca Mountain describes the nuclear waste problem and explains why the United States and other nations are considering deep geologic disposal as the solution. The overview describes why the Unites States is considering Yucca Mountain and how a monitored geologic repository would work in the mountain. It presents a repository design, an assessment of its expected performance, and an evaluation of the possible effects on people living near Yucca Mountain. Also presented is the work remaining to be completed prior to a license application, along with the estimated cost of building and operating a

156

February 14, 2002: Yucca Mountain | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

14, 2002: Yucca Mountain 14, 2002: Yucca Mountain February 14, 2002: Yucca Mountain February 14, 2002: Yucca Mountain February 14, 2002 Secretary Abraham formally recommends to President Bush that the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada be developed as the nation's first long-term geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste. "I have considered whether sound science supports the determination that the Yucca Mountain site is scientifically and technically suitable for the development of a repository," the Secretary informs the President. "I am convinced that it does. The results of this extensive investigation and the external technical reviews of this body of scientific work give me confidence for the conclusion, based on sound scientific principles, that a repository at

157

DOE Replies Support NRC Commissioners and Authority to Withdraw Yucca  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Replies Support NRC Commissioners and Authority to Withdraw Replies Support NRC Commissioners and Authority to Withdraw Yucca Application DOE Replies Support NRC Commissioners and Authority to Withdraw Yucca Application July 19, 2010 - 4:07pm Addthis In a reply brief filed with the NRC today, DOE explained that the arguments that it lacked authority to withdraw the pending Yucca Mountain license application are uniformly without merit. DOE's reply brief is available here. In a separate filing, DOE explained that there is no basis for arguments that two NRC Commissioners should recuse themselves from the Yucca proceeding. That brief is available here. Addthis Related Articles DOE Makes Filing with NRC in Support OF Authority to Withdraw Yucca Application DOE Defends Its Motion to Withdraw Yucca Mountain Application DOE Opposes Injunction Motion

158

Yucca Mountain Total System Performance Assessment, Phase 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses recent developments of EPRI's Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) model applied to the candidate spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) disposal site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Building on earlier work where a probability-based methodology was developed, the report details the recent modifications to the EPRI TSPA code, IMARC, applied to Yucca Mountain. The report also includes performance analyses using IMARC, identifies key technical components important to Yucca...

1996-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

159

Yucca Mountain Exploratory Studies Facilities: Construction status; Extended summary  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the progress to date on the construction planning development of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Exploratory Studies Facilities (ESF).

Allan, J. [Morrison-Knudsen Corp. (United States); Leonard, T.M. [Reynolds Electrical and Engineering Co., Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States)

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Rail Access to Yucca Mountain: Critical Issues  

SciTech Connect

The proposed Yucca Mountain repository site currently lacks rail access. The nearest mainline railroad is almost 100 miles away. Absence of rail access could result in many thousands of truck shipments of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Direct rail access to the repository could significantly reduce the number of truck shipments and total shipments. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) identified five potential rail access corridors, ranging in length from 98 miles to 323 miles, in the Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) for Yucca Mountain. The FEIS also considers an alternative to rail spur construction, heavy-haul truck (HHT) delivery of rail casks from one of three potential intermodal transfer stations. The authors examine the feasibility and cost of the five rail corridors, and DOE's alternative proposal for HHT transport. The authors also address the potential for rail shipments through the Las Vegas metropolitan area.

Halstead, R. J.; Dilger, F.; Moore, R. C.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unsaturated zone yucca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Predicting the Future at Yucca Mountain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarizes a climate-prediction model funded by the DOE for the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository. Several articles in the open literature attest to the effects of the Global Ocean Conveyor upon paleoclimate, specifically entrance and exit from the ice age. The data shows that these millennial-scale effects are duplicated on the microscale of years to decades. This work also identifies how man may have influenced the Conveyor, affecting global cooling and warming for 2,000 years.

J. R. Wilson

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Seismicity in the Vicinity of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for the Period October 1, 2003 to September 30, 2004  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the seismicity and earthquake monitoring activities within the Yucca Mountain region during fiscal year 2004 (FY2004 - October 1, 2003, through September 30, 2004) based on operation of the Southern Great Basin Digital Seismic Network (SGBDSN). Network practices and earthquake monitoring conducted at the Nevada Seismological Laboratory (NSL) under DOE directives for prior fiscal years are covered in similar yearly reports (see references). Real-time systems, including regional data telemetry and data management at NSL, provide for the automatic determination of earthquake locations and magnitudes and notification of important earthquakes in the region to UNR staff and DOE management. All waveform and meta-data, including automatic locations, phase arrival information, and analyst reviewed information, are managed through a relational database system allowing quick and reliable evaluation and analysis of ongoing earthquake activity near Yucca Mountain. This network, which contains weak-motion and strong-motion instrumentation, addresses the seismic hazard of the Yucca Mountain area by providing accurate earthquake magnitudes for earthquake recurrence estimates, spatial hypocentral control to very low magnitudes for identifying and assessing active faults and verifying tectonic models, true ground motions over the complete range of expected earthquake amplitudes for developing predictive models, and earthquake source information for characterizing active faulting. The Nevada Seismological Laboratory operated a 30-station monitoring network within a ring of approximately 50 km radius around Yucca Mountain during FY2004. This year showed the second-lowest seismic moment rate in the NTS and Yucca Mountain region for any fiscal year reporting period since prior to the 1992 M 5.6 Little Skull Mountain (LSM) earthquake. A total of 2180 earthquakes were located for FY2004. The largest event during FY2004 was M 2.99 and there were only 12 earthquakes greater than M 2.00. This is the second year since the LSM event that no M ? 3.00 earthquake was recorded within 65 km of Yucca Mountain. (FY2003 was the first.) For FY2004, focal mechanisms were developed for 24 earthquakes. These focal mechanisms show predominantly strike-slip motion with a tension axis oriented WNW-ESE. Four earthquakes in FY2004 were within 10 km of Yucca Mountain, all having M < 0. A total of 31 earthquakes have occurred in this immediate zone around Yucca Mountain since the digital network operations started in October 1995. Activity in the Death Valley area was monitored by several analog stations still maintained in conjunction with the Yucca Mountain monitoring. There is continuing aftershock activity in the zone of the 1993 M 6.1 Eureka Valley and 1999 M 5.6 Scotty’s Junction earthquakes. Overall, the seismicity level of the Death Valley area is significantly greater than that in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain.

von Seggern, David; Smith, Ken

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

163

Modeling of coupled heat transfer and reactive transport processes in porous media: Application to seepage studies at Yucca Mountain, Nevad a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fractured Rock of Yucca Mountain, Nevada: Heterogeneity andfractured rocks of Yucca Mountain have been extensivelyHydrothermal Flow at Yucca Mountain, Part I: Modeling and

Mukhopadhyay, S.; Sonnenthal, E.L.; Spycher, N.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Evaluating the Moisture Conditions in the Fractured Rock at Yucca Mountain: The Impact of Natural Convection Processes in Heated Emplacement Drifts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE FRACTURED ROCK AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN: THE IMPACT OF NATURALgeologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, will stronglyWaste Emplacement Drifts at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Nuclear

Birkholzer, J.T.; Webb, S.W.; Halecky, N.; Peterson, P.F.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Response to "Analysis of the Treatment, by the U.S. Department of Energy, of the FEP Hydrothermal Activity in the Yucca Mountain Performance Assessment" by Yuri Dublyansky  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mineral Formation at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. ” Geochimica etand Heat Flow Near Yucca Mountain, Nevada: Some Tectonic andNuclear Waste Site, Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA: Pedogenic,

Houseworth, J.E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Rapid evolution and specialization following host colonization in a yucca moth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

America (Davis, 1967; Frack, 1982). Unlike the pollinating yucca moth, P. quinquepunctellus is commensal

Pellmyr, Olle

167

Two Independent Assessments Find the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Two Independent Assessments Find the Department of Energy's Yucca Two Independent Assessments Find the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project is on Track Two Independent Assessments Find the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project is on Track December 13, 2007 - 4:44pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Director of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) today released two independent assessments addressing areas critical to the overall success of the Yucca Mountain repository program. These assessments, which include an independent review of the OCRWM Quality Assurance (QA) Program and an independent review of its engineering processes and procedures, have concluded that the Yucca Mountain Project's current QA and engineering processes and procedures are consistent with standard nuclear industry

168

List of Yucca Mountain Archival Documents | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

List of Yucca Mountain Archival Documents List of Yucca Mountain Archival Documents List of Yucca Mountain Archival Documents March 3, 2010 Motion to Withdraw from Yucca Mountain application DOE's withdraws it's pending license application for a permanent geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. December 30, 2008 Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management-Quality Assurance Requirements and Description A report detailling the requirements and description of the Quality Assurance program. December 9, 2008 The Report To The President And The Congress By The Secretary Of Energy On The Need For A Second Repository This report is prepared pursuant to Section 161 of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, which requires the Secretary of Energy to report to the President and to the Congress on or after January 1, 2007, but not later

169

DOE Marks Milestone in Submitting Yucca Mountain License Application |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marks Milestone in Submitting Yucca Mountain License Marks Milestone in Submitting Yucca Mountain License Application DOE Marks Milestone in Submitting Yucca Mountain License Application June 3, 2008 - 12:51pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced submittal of a license application (LA) to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) seeking authorization to construct America's first repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The 8,600 page application describes DOE's plan to safely isolate spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in tunnels deep underground at Yucca Mountain, a remote ridge on federally controlled land in the Mojave Desert 90 miles northwest of Las Vegas. Currently, the waste is stored at 121 temporary locations in 39 states

170

Two Independent Assessments Find the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Assessments Find the Department of Energy's Yucca Independent Assessments Find the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project is on Track Two Independent Assessments Find the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project is on Track December 13, 2007 - 4:44pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Director of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) today released two independent assessments addressing areas critical to the overall success of the Yucca Mountain repository program. These assessments, which include an independent review of the OCRWM Quality Assurance (QA) Program and an independent review of its engineering processes and procedures, have concluded that the Yucca Mountain Project's current QA and engineering processes and procedures are consistent with standard nuclear industry

171

Yucca Mountain Science and Engineering Report | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Yucca Mountain Science and Engineering Report Yucca Mountain Science and Engineering Report Yucca Mountain Science and Engineering Report Yucca Mountain Science and Engineering Report describes the results of scientific and engineering studies of the Yucca Mountain site, the waste forms to be disposed, the repository and waste package designs, and the results of the most recent assessments of the long-term performance of the potential repository. The scientific investigations include site characterization studies of the geologic, hydrologic, and geochemical environment, and evaluation of how conditions might evolve over time. These analyses considered a range of processes that would operate in and around the potential repository. Since projections of performance for 10,000 years are inherently uncertain, the uncertainties associated with analyses and

172

DOE Announces Yucca Mountain License Application Schedule | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Yucca Mountain License Application Schedule Yucca Mountain License Application Schedule DOE Announces Yucca Mountain License Application Schedule July 19, 2006 - 3:13pm Addthis New Director Ward Sproat Testifies on Revised Timeline WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that it will submit a license application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for a nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, no later than June 30, 2008. The Department also announced that if requested legislative changes are enacted, the repository will be able to accept spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste starting in early 2017. Announcing a schedule for submitting a license application is another step in the Department's mission to provide stability, clarity and predictability in moving the Yucca Mountain Project forward as quickly as

173

Department of Energy Files Motion to Withdraw Yucca Mountain License  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Files Motion to Withdraw Yucca Mountain Files Motion to Withdraw Yucca Mountain License Application Department of Energy Files Motion to Withdraw Yucca Mountain License Application March 3, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy today filed a motion with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to withdraw the license application for a high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain with prejudice. "President Obama is fully committed to ensuring that the Nation meets our long-term storage obligations for nuclear waste," said Department of Energy General Counsel Scott Blake Harris. "In light of the decision not to proceed with the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository, the President directed Secretary Chu to establish the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's

174

Yucca Mountain Science and Engineering Report | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Yucca Mountain Science and Engineering Report Yucca Mountain Science and Engineering Report Yucca Mountain Science and Engineering Report Yucca Mountain Science and Engineering Report describes the results of scientific and engineering studies of the Yucca Mountain site, the waste forms to be disposed, the repository and waste package designs, and the results of the most recent assessments of the long-term performance of the potential repository. The scientific investigations include site characterization studies of the geologic, hydrologic, and geochemical environment, and evaluation of how conditions might evolve over time. These analyses considered a range of processes that would operate in and around the potential repository. Since projections of performance for 10,000 years are inherently uncertain, the uncertainties associated with analyses and

175

List of Yucca Mountain Archival Documents | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

List of Yucca Mountain Archival Documents List of Yucca Mountain Archival Documents List of Yucca Mountain Archival Documents March 10, 2004 EIS-0250-SA-01: Supplement Analysis Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada March 1, 2004 Nuclear Waste Policy Act Document on the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 An Act to provide for the development of repositories for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel, to establish a program of research, development, and demonstration regarding the disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel, and for other purposes. April 1, 2003 Final Report of theIgneous Consequences Peer Review Panel A report for the DOE on the Yucca Mountain Project.

176

DOE Defends Its Motion to Withdraw Yucca Mountain Application | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Defends Its Motion to Withdraw Yucca Mountain Application Defends Its Motion to Withdraw Yucca Mountain Application DOE Defends Its Motion to Withdraw Yucca Mountain Application May 27, 2010 - 2:22pm Addthis Today, the United States Department of Energy filed with the NRC's Atomic Safety and Licensing Board a reply brief making clear that its motion to withdraw the pending application to license the Yucca Mountain geologic repository is authorized by the Atomic Energy Act (AEA) and consistent with the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA). As today's filing details, the AEA vests the Department with broad authority over the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The NWPA does not strip the Department of that authority or otherwise compel the Department to go forward with the construction of the Yucca Mountain repository. Rather, the

177

DOE Defends Its Motion to Withdraw Yucca Mountain Application | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Its Motion to Withdraw Yucca Mountain Application Its Motion to Withdraw Yucca Mountain Application DOE Defends Its Motion to Withdraw Yucca Mountain Application May 27, 2010 - 2:22pm Addthis Today, the United States Department of Energy filed with the NRC's Atomic Safety and Licensing Board a reply brief making clear that its motion to withdraw the pending application to license the Yucca Mountain geologic repository is authorized by the Atomic Energy Act (AEA) and consistent with the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA). As today's filing details, the AEA vests the Department with broad authority over the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The NWPA does not strip the Department of that authority or otherwise compel the Department to go forward with the construction of the Yucca Mountain repository. Rather, the

178

Yellowstone as an Analog for Thermal-Hydrological-Chemical Processes at Yucca Mountain  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Enhanced water-rock interaction resulting from the emplacement of heat-generating nuclear waste in the potential geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, may result in changes to fluid flow (resulting from mineral dissolution and precipitation in condensation and boiling zones, respectively). Studies of water-rock interaction in active and fossil geothermal systems (natural analogs) provide evidence for changes in permeability and porosity resulting from thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes. The objective of this research is to document the effects of coupled THC processes at Yellowstone and then examine how differences in scale could influence the impact that these processes may have on the Yucca Mountain system. Subsurface samples from Yellowstone National Park, one of the largest active geothermal systems in the world, contain some the best examples of hydrothermal self-sealing found in geothermal systems. We selected core samples from two USGS research drill holes from the transition zone between conductive and convective portions of the geothermal system (where sealing was reported to occur). We analyzed the core, measuring the permeability, porosity, and grain density of selected samples to evaluate how lithology, texture, and degree of hydrothermal alteration influence matrix and fracture permeability.

P. F. Dobson; T. J. Kneafsey; A. Simmons; J. Hulen

2001-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

179

New observations of infiltration through fractured alluvium in Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site: A preliminary field investigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regional tectonics coupled with the subsurface detonation of nuclear explosives has caused widespread fracturing of the alluvium of Yucca Flat. Fractures deeper than 30 meters have been observed in boreholes. Some of these fractures are large enough to capture significant amounts of runoff during storm events. Evidence of stream capture by fractures and observations of runoff flowing into open fractures give qualitative evidence of infiltration to depths greater than several meters and possibly to the saturated zone. Our field observations contradict the assumption that little infiltration occurs on Yucca Flat. The larger, hydrologically important fractures are associated with geologic faults or the regional stress field. Additional field studies are needed to investigate the impact of fractures on the transport of contaminants.

Kao, C.S. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Smith, D.K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); McKinnis, W.B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Mercury, NV (United States)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Review of Yucca Mountain Disposal Criticality Studies  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, submitted a license application for construction authorization of a deep geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, in June of 2008. The license application is currently under review by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. However,on March 3, 2010 the DOE filed a motion requesting withdrawal of the license application. With the withdrawal request and the development of the Blue Ribbon Commission to seek alternative strategies for disposing of spent fuel, the status of the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain is uncertain. What is certain is that spent nuclear fuel (SNF) will continue to be generated and some long-lived components of the SNF will eventually need a disposition path(s). Strategies for the back end of the fuel cycle will continue to be developed and need to include the insights from the experience gained during the development of the Yucca Mountain license application. Detailed studies were performed and considerable progress was made in many key areas in terms of increased understanding of relevant phenomena and issues regarding geologic disposal of SNF. This paper reviews selected technical studies performed in support of the disposal criticality analysis licensing basis and the use of burnup credit. Topics include assembly misload analysis, isotopic and criticality validation, commercial reactor critical analyses, loading curves, alternative waste package and criticality control studies, radial burnup data and effects, and implementation of a conservative application model in the criticality probabilistic evaluation as well as other information that is applicable to operations regarding spent fuel outside the reactor. This paper summarizes the work and significant accomplishments in these areas and provides a resource for future, related activities.

Scaglione, John M [ORNL; Wagner, John C [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unsaturated zone yucca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Total system performance assessment - 1995: An evaluation of the potential Yucca Mountain repository  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently investigating the feasibility of permanently disposing the nation`s commercial high-level radioactive wastes (in the form of spent fuel from the over 100 electric power-generating nuclear reactors across the U.S.) and a portion of the defense high-level radioactive wastes (currently stored at federal facilities around the country) in the unsaturated tuffaceous rocks at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Quantitative predictions based on the most current understanding of the processes and parameters potentially affecting the long-term behavior of the disposal system are used to assess the ability of the site and its associated engineered designs to meet regulatory objectives of the US NRC and the US EPA. The evaluation of the ability of the overall system to meet the performance objectives specified in the applicable regulatory standards has been termed total system performance assessment (TSPA). Total system performance assessments require the explicit quantification of the relevant processes and process interactions. In addition assessments are useful to help define the most significant processes, the information gaps and uncertainties and therefore the additional information required for more robust and defensible assessment of the overall performance. The aim of any total system performance assessment is to be as complete and reasonably conservative as possible and to assure that the descriptions of the predictive models and parameters are sufficient to ascertain their accuracy. Total system performance assessments evolve with time. Previous iterations of total system performance assessment of the Yucca Mountain site and associated engineered barriers have been conducted in 1991 and 1993.

Atkins, J.E.; Lee, J.H.; Lingineni, S.; Mishra, S; McNeish, J.A.; Sassani, D.C.; Sevougian, S.D.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Total system performance assessment - 1995: An evaluation of the potential Yucca Mountain Repository  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently investigating the feasibility of permanently disposing the nation`s commercial high-level radioactive wastes (in the form of spent fuel from the over 100 electric power-generating nuclear reactors across the U.S.) and a portion of the defense high-level radioactive wastes (currently stored at federal facilities around the country) in the unsaturated tuffaceous rocks at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Quantitative predictions based on the most current understanding of the processes and parameters potentially affecting the long-term behavior of the disposal system are used to assess the ability of the site and its associated engineered designs to meet regulatory objectives set forward by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The evaluation of the ability of the overall system to meet the performance objectives specified in the applicable regulatory standards has been termed total system performance assessment (TSPA). The aim of any total system performance assessment is to be as complete and reasonably conservative as possible and to assure that the descriptions of the predictive models and parameters are sufficient to ascertain their accuracy. Total system performance assessments evolve with time. As additional site and design information is generated, performance assessment analyses can be revised to become more representative of the expected conditions and remove some of the conservative assumptions necessitated by the incompleteness of site and design data. Previous iterations of total system performance assessment of the Yucca Mountain site and associated engineered barriers have been conducted in 1991 and 1993. These analyses have been documented in Barnard, Eslinger, Wilson and Andrews.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Overview of the Yucca Mountain Licensing Process  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an overview of the licensing process for a Yucca Mountain repository for high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel. The paper discusses the steps in the licensing proceeding, the roles of the participants, the licensing and hearing requirements contained in the Code of Federal Regulations. A description of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff acceptance and compliance reviews of the Department of Energy (DOE) application for a construction authorization and a license to receive and possess high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel is provided. The paper also includes a detailed description of the hearing process.

M. Wisenburg

2004-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

184

Yucca MountainTransportation: Private Sector Perspective  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation: Transportation: Private Sector "Lessons Learned" US Transport Council David Blee Executive Director dblee@ustransportcouncil.org DOE Transportation External Coordination (TEC) Working Group April 4, 2005 Phoenix, Arizona US Transport Council -- DOE TEC 4/4/05 2 US Transport Council Formed in 2002 during the Yucca Mountain Ratification debate to provide factual information on nuclear materials transportation, experience, safety & emergency planning Comprised of 24 member companies from the transport sector including suppliers and customers Principal focus is transport education, policy and business commerce related to nuclear materials transport US Transport Council -- DOE TEC 4/4/05 3 USTC Members AREVA BNFL, Inc Burns & Roe Cameco

185

Implementation of variably saturated flow into PHREEQC for the simulation of biogeochemical reactions in the vadose zone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A software tool for the simulation of one-dimensional unsaturated flow and solute transport together with biogeochemical reactions in the vadose zone was developed by integrating a numerical solution of Richards' equation into the geochemical modelling ... Keywords: Cation exchange, Geochemical modelling, Hydraulic properties, Reactive transport, Surface complexation, Unsaturated flow

L. Wissmeier; D. A. Barry

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Yucca Mountain Climate Technical Support Representative  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of Project Activity ORD-FY04-012, “Yucca Mountain Climate Technical Support Representative,” was to provide the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) with expertise on past, present, and future climate scenarios and to support the technical elements of the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) climate program. The Climate Technical Support Representative was to explain, defend, and interpret the YMP climate program to the various audiences during Site Recommendation and License Application. This technical support representative was to support DOE management in the preparation and review of documents, and to participate in comment response for the Final Environmental Impact Statement, the Site Recommendation Hearings, the NRC Sufficiency Comments, and other forums as designated by DOE management. Because the activity was terminated 12 months early and experience a 27% reduction in budget, it was not possible to complete all components of the tasks as originally envisioned. Activities not completed include the qualification of climate datasets and the production of a qualified technical report. The following final report is an unqualified summary of the activities that were completed given the reduced time and funding.

Sharpe, Saxon E

2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

187

Magma Dynamics at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Small-volume basaltic volcanic activity at Yucca Mountain has been identified as one of the potential events that could lead to release of radioactive material from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) designated nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Release of material could occur indirectly as a result of magmatic dike intrusion into the repository (with no associated surface eruption) by changing groundwater flow paths, or as a result of an eruption (dike intrusion of the repository drifts, followed by surface eruption of contaminated ash) or volcanic ejection of material onto the Earth's surface and the redistribution of contaminated volcanic tephra. Either release method includes interaction between emplacement drifts and a magmatic dike or conduit, and natural (geologic) processes that might interrupt or halt igneous activity. This analysis provides summary information on two approaches to evaluate effects of disruption at the repository by basaltic igneous activity: (1) descriptions of the physical geometry of ascending basaltic dikes and their interaction with silicic host rocks similar in composition to the repository host rocks; and (2) a summary of calculations developed to quantify the response of emplacement drifts that have been flooded with magma and repressurized following blockage of an eruptive conduit. The purpose of these analyses is to explore the potential consequences that could occur during the full duration of an igneous event.

D. Krier

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

188

Coupled Analysis of Change in Fracture Permeability during the Cooling Phase of the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mechanical analysis of the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test –scale heater test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA. In.t J.and Cooling at the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test. In.t J.

Rutqvist, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Evaluating Flake Assemblage and Stone Tool Distributions at a Large Western Stemmed Tradition Site Near Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tradition Site Near Yucca Mountain, Nevada G R E G O R Y M .Institute near Yucca Mountain, Nevada, have revealed anlevel at the top of Yucca Mountain. Vegetation is typi- cal

Haynes, Gregory M

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes to unsaturated hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes to unsaturated hydrocarbons is carried out over metal vanadate catalysts under oxidizing conditions. The vanadate catalysts are represented by the formulas M[sub 3](VO[sub 4])[sub 2] and MV[sub 2]O[sub 6], M representing Mg, Zn, Ca, Pb, or Cd. The reaction is carried out in the presence of oxygen, but the formation of oxygenate by-products is suppressed.

Kung, H.H.; Chaar, M.A.

1988-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

191

Technical Report Confirms Reliability of Yucca Mountain Technical Work |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technical Report Confirms Reliability of Yucca Mountain Technical Technical Report Confirms Reliability of Yucca Mountain Technical Work Technical Report Confirms Reliability of Yucca Mountain Technical Work February 17, 2006 - 11:59am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) today released a report confirming the technical soundness of infiltration modeling work performed by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) employees. "The report makes clear that the technical basis developed by the USGS has a strong conceptual foundation and is corroborated by independently-derived scientific conclusions, and provides a solid underpinning for the 2002 site recommendation," said OCRWM's Acting Director Paul Golan. "We are committed to opening Yucca Mountain based only on sound science. The work

192

Biosphere Modeling and Dose Assessment for Yucca Mountain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report develops a biosphere model appropriate for use in calculating doses to hypothetical individuals living in the far future in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Doses are assumed to arise from potential releases from a spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) disposal facility located beneath Yucca Mountain. The model provides guidance on approaches to dealing with the biosphere appropriate for site suitability and licensing assessments.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

193

Testimony of Greg Friedman Yucca Mountain  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environment and the Economy Environment and the Economy of the Committee on Energy and Commerce U.S. House of Representatives FOR RELEASE ON DELIVERY 1:00 PM Wednesday, June 1, 2011 1 Mr. Chairman and members of the Subcommittee, I am pleased to be here at your request to testify on matters relating to the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. As you know, issues surrounding the termination of the Project have been widely publicized. They directly impact the Department's responsibilities to manage legacy waste generated from nuclear weapons production and to accept and dispose of spent nuclear fuel emanating from commercial nuclear reactors. The United States has invested nearly 30 years of effort and expended over $15 billion to

194

Applied Field Research Initiative Deep Vadose Zone  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Applied Field Research Initiative Applied Field Research Initiative Deep Vadose Zone Located on the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, the Deep Vadose Zone Applied Field Research Initiative (DVZ AFRI) was established to protect water resources by addressing the challenge of preventing contamination in the deep vadose zone from reaching groundwater. Led by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the Initiative is a collaborative effort that leverages Department of Energy (DOE) investments in basic science and applied research and the work of site contractors to address the complex deep vadose zone contamination challenges. Challenge Many vadose zone environments within the DOE complex consist of complex stratified layers of unconsolidated and water-unsaturated sediments that are, in many places, con-

195

Hydraulic properties of adsorbed water films in unsaturated porous media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ionic strength and unit hydraulic head gradient. Figure 7.of the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity on matricYork. Durner, W. (1994), Hydraulic conductivity estimation

Tokunaga, Tetsu K.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Yucca Mountain - U.S. Department of Energy's Brief in Support...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Yucca Mountain - U.S. Department of Energy's Brief in Support of Review and Reversal of the Board's Ruling on the Motion to Withdraw Yucca Mountain - U.S. Department of Energy's...

197

A mountain-scale model for characterizing unsaturated flow and transport in fractured tuffs of Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

development and analysis of radionuclide transport in theinvestigate fluid flow and radionuclide transport processeson moisture flow and radionuclide transport within or near

Wu, Yu-Shu; Lu, Guoping; Zhang, Keni; Bodvarsson, G.S.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Soil characterization methods for unsaturated low-level waste sites  

SciTech Connect

To support a license application for the disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW), applicants must characterize the unsaturated zone and demonstrate that waste will not migrate from the facility boundary. This document provides a strategy for developing this characterization plan. It describes principles of contaminant flow and transport, site characterization and monitoring strategies, and data management. It also discusses methods and practices that are currently used to monitor properties and conditions in the soil profile, how these properties influence water and waste migration, and why they are important to the license application. The methods part of the document is divided into sections on laboratory and field-based properties, then further subdivided into the description of methods for determining 18 physical, flow, and transport properties. Because of the availability of detailed procedures in many texts and journal articles, the reader is often directed for details to the available literature. References are made to experiments performed at the Las Cruces Trench site, New Mexico, that support LLW site characterization activities. A major contribution from the Las Cruces study is the experience gained in handling data sets for site characterization and the subsequent use of these data sets in modeling studies.

Wierenga, P.J.; Young, M.H. (Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Soil and Water Science); Gee, G.W.; Kincaid, C.T. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Hills, R.G. (New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Nicholson, T.J.; Cady, R.E. (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Revised potentiometric-surface map, Yucca Mountain and vicinity, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The revised potentiometric-surface map presented in this report updates earlier maps of the Yucca Mountain area using mainly 1988 average water levels. Because of refinements in the corrections to the water-level measurements, these water levels have increased accuracy and precision over older values. The small-gradient area to the southeast of Yucca Mountain is contoured with a 0.25-meter interval and ranges in water-level altitude from 728.5 to 73 1.0 meters. Other areas with different water levels, to the north and west of Yucca Mountain, are illustrated with shaded patterns. The potentiometric surface can be divided into three regions: (1) A small-gradient area to the southeast of Yucca Mountain, which may be explained by flow through high-transmissivity rocks or low ground-water flux through the area; (2) A moderate-gradient area, on the western side of Yucca Mountain, where the water-level altitude ranges from 775 to 780 meters, and appears to be impeded by the Solitario Canyon Fault and a splay of that fault; and (3) A large-gradient area, to the north-northeast of Yucca Mountain, where water level altitude ranges from 738 to 1,035 meters, possibly as a result of a semi-perched groundwater system. Water levels from wells at Yucca Mountain were examined for yearly trends using linear least-squares regression. Data from five wells exhibited trends which were statistically significant, but some of those may be a result of slow equilibration of the water level from drilling in less permeable rocks. Adjustments for temperature and density changes in the deep wells with long fluid columns were attempted, but some of the adjusted data did not fit the surrounding data and, thus, were not used.

Ervin, E.M.; Luckey, R.R.; Burkhardt, D.J.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Thermal and seismic impacts on the North Ramp at Yucca Mountain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impacts of thermal and seismic loads on the stability of the Exploratory Studies Facility North Ramp at Yucca Mountain were assessed using both empirical and analytical approaches. This paper presents the methods and results of the analyses. Thermal loads were first calculated using the computer code STRES3D. This code calculates the conductive heat transfer through a semi-infinite elastic, isotropic, homogeneous solid and the rafts thermally-induced stresses. The calculated thermal loads, combined with simulated earthquake motion, were then modeled using UDEC and DYNA3D, numerical codes with dynamic simulation capabilities. The thermal- and seismic-induced yield zones were post-processed and presented for assessment of damage. Uncoupled bolt stress analysis was also conducted to evaluate the seismic impact on the ground support components.

Lin, M.; Hardy, M.P. [Agapito (J.F.T.) and Associates, Inc., Grand Junction, CO (United States); Jung, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unsaturated zone yucca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Dynamic rupture through a branched fault2 configuration at Yucca Mountain and resulting3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the District of Columbia Circuit, which remanded to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency its Yucca Mountain). The design of surface facilities at Yucca Mountain should be an integrated part of the total waste, storage, and disposal) casks for transporting, storing, and disposing of spent fuel at Yucca Mountain

Dmowska, Renata

202

Dynamic Rupture through a Branched Fault Configuration at Yucca Mountain, and Resulting Ground Motions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-term care. Now, after decades of expensive false starts, and with an uncertain future for Yucca Mountain Yucca Mountain can handle, even if the statutory limits on its capacity are doubled repository. Second, it is unclear whether Yucca Mountain will ever receive a license from the Nuclear

Bhat, Harsha S.

203

Surface-to-tunnel seismic tomography studies at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dynamic Rupture through a Branched Fault Configuration at Yucca Mountain, and Resulting Ground of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a potential site for a high-level radioactive waste repository. The Solitario km away from the SCF beneath the crest of Yucca Mountain, causing the repository site to experience

Korneev, Valeri A.

204

Board Oversight of the DOE's Scientific and Technical Activities at Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Surface-to-tunnel seismic tomography studies at Yucca Mountain, Nevada Roland Gritto, Valeri A in the proposed nuclear waste repository area at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. A 5-km-long source line and a 3-km-long receiver line were located on top of Yucca Mountain ridge and inside the Exploratory Study Facility (ESF

205

Thermohydrologic behavior and repository design at Yucca Mountain  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Radioactive decay of nuclear waste emplaced at Yucca Mountain will produce an initial heat flux many times larger than the heat flux in some natural geothermal systems. This heat flux will change the thermal and hydrologic environment at Yucca Mountain significantly, affecting both the host rock and conditions within the emplacement tunnels (drifts). Understanding the thermohydrologic behavior in this coupled natural and engineered system is critical to the assessment of the viability of Yucca Mountain as a nuclear-waste repository site and for repository design decision-making. We report results from a study that uses our multi-scale modeling approach to explore the relationship between repository design, thermohydrologic behavior, and key repository performance measures.

Buscheck, T; Rosenberg, N D; Gansemer, J D; Sun, Y

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

The vegetation of Yucca Mountain: Description and ecology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vegetation at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, was monitored over a six-year period, from 1989 through 1994. Yucca Mountain is located at the northern limit of the Mojave Desert and is the only location being studied as a potential repository for high-level nuclear waste. Site characterization consists of a series of multidisciplinary, scientific investigations designed to provide detailed information necessary to assess the suitability of the Yucca Mountain Site as a repository. This vegetation description establishes a baseline for determining the ecological impact of site characterization activities; it porvides input for site characterization research and modeling; and it clarifies vegetation community dynamics and relationships to the physical environment. A companion study will describe the impact of site characterization of vegetation. Cover, density, production, and species composition of vascular plants were monitored at 48 Ecological Study Plots (ESPs) stratified in four vegetation associations. Precipitation, soil moisture, and maximum and minimum temperatures also were measured at each study plot.

NONE

1996-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

207

Evaluation of a Spent Fuel Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In June 2008, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) submitted a license application to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for the construction of a geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The license application was accepted for formal NRC review in September 2008. Throughout the more than 20-year history of the Yucca Mountain project, EPRI has performed independent assessments of key technical and scientific issues t...

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

208

Performance predictions for mechanical excavators in Yucca Mountain tuffs; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect

The performances of several mechanical excavators are predicted for use in the tuffs at Yucca Mountain: Tunnel boring machines, the Mobile Miner, a roadheader, a blind shaft borer, a vertical wheel shaft boring machine, raise drills, and V-Moles. Work summarized is comprised of three parts: Initial prediction using existing rock physical property information; Measurement of additional rock physical properties; and Revision of the initial predictions using the enhanced database. The performance predictions are based on theoretical and empirical relationships between rock properties and the forces-experienced by rock cutters and bits during excavation. Machine backup systems and excavation design aspects, such as curves and grades, are considered in determining excavator utilization factors. Instanteous penetration rate, advance rate, and cutter costs are the fundamental performance indicators.

Ozdemir, L.; Gertsch, L.; Neil, D.; Friant, J. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Earth Mechanics Inst.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Effects of dry fractures on matrix diffusion in unsaturated fractured rocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Symposium on Multiphase Transport in Porous Media, ASMEmultiphase heat and mass flow in unsaturated fractured porous

Seol, Yongkoo; Liu, Hui Hai; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

SYSTEMATICS Systematics of the Yucca Moth Genus Parategeticula (Lepidoptera  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the descriptions of P. pollenifera pro- vided by Frack (1982). Discussion. This species is similar to pollenifera, and together they contain all pollinating yucca moths (Frack 1982, Wagner and Powell 1988, Powell 1992, Brown. 255: 1Ð170. Frack, D. C. 1982. A systematic study of prodoxine moths (Adelidae: Prodoxinae

Pellmyr, Olle

211

Uranium and Neptunium Desorption from Yucca Mountain Alluvium  

SciTech Connect

Uranium and neptunium were used as reactive tracers in long-term laboratory desorption studies using saturated alluvium collected from south of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The objective of these long-term experiments is to make detailed observations of the desorption behavior of uranium and neptunium to provide Yucca Mountain with technical bases for a more realistic and potentially less conservative approach to predicting the transport of adsorbing radionuclides in the saturated alluvium. This paper describes several long-term desorption experiments using a flow-through experimental method and groundwater and alluvium obtained from boreholes along a potential groundwater flow path from the proposed repository site. In the long term desorption experiments, the percentages of uranium and neptunium sorbed as a function of time after different durations of sorption was determined. In addition, the desorbed activity as a function of time was fit using a multi-site, multi-rate model to demonstrate that different desorption rate constants ranging over several orders of magnitude exist for the desorption of uranium from Yucca Mountain saturated alluvium. This information will be used to support the development of a conceptual model that ultimately results in effective K{sub d} values much larger than those currently in use for predicting radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain.

C.D. Scism; P.W. Reimus; M. Ding; S.J. Chipera

2006-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

212

Natural gels in the Yucca Mountain Area, Nevada, USA  

SciTech Connect

Relict gels at Yucca Mountain include pore- and fracture-fillings of silica and zeolite related to diagenetic and hydrothermal alteration of vitric tuffs. Water-rich free gels in fractures at Rainier Mesa consist of smectite with or without silica-rich gel fragments. Gels are being studied for their potential role in transport of radionuclides from a nuclear-waste repository.

Levy, S.S.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

213

Temperature and Humidity Profiles in Mesoscale Unsaturated Downdrafts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Profiles of temperature and humidity beneath precipitating anvil clouds in tropical convective systems suggest the presence of a mesoscale unsaturated downdraft there. In this paper, a one-dimensional, steady-state, hydrostatic model of a ...

Colleen A. Leary

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Precipitation-Front Modeling: Issues Relating to Nucleation and Metastable Precipitation in the Planned Nuclear Waste Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mineralogic Model of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Rev. 1. Reportfor fracture sealing at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Journal ofWaste Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada J.A. Apps and

Apps, J.A.; Sonnenthal, E.L.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Analysis of Thermally Induced Changes in Fractured Rock Permeability during Eight Years of Heating and Cooling at the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Cooling at the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test J.mechanical analysis of the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test –scale heater test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA. Int J Rock

Rutqvist, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical analyses of the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test - Comparison of field measurements to predictions of four different numerical models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mechanical analyses of the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test –Chemical Responses in the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test.Heating Phase of the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test. In:

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Total System Performance Assessment, 1993: An evaluation of the potential Yucca Mountain repository  

SciTech Connect

Total System Performance Assessments are an important component in the evaluation of the suitability of Yucca Mountain, Nevada as a potential site for a mined geologic repository for the permanent disposal of high-level radioactive wastes in the United States. The Total System Performance Assessments are conducted iteratively during site characterization to identify issues which should be addressed by the characterization and design activities as well as providing input to regulatory/licensing and programmatic decisions. During fiscal years 1991 and 1992, the first iteration of Total System Performance Assessment (hereafter referred to as TSPA 1991) was completed by Sandia National Laboratories and Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Beginning in fiscal year 1993, the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor was assigned the responsibility to plan, coordinate, and contribute to the second iteration of Total System Performance Assessment (hereafter referred to as TSPA 1993). This document presents the objectives, approach, assumptions, input, results, conclusions, and recommendations associated with the Management and Operating Contractor contribution to TSPA 1993. The new information incorporated in TSPA 1993 includes (1) revised estimates of radionuclide solubilities (and their thermal and geochemical dependency), (2) thermal and geochemical dependency of spent fuel waste alteration and glass dissolution rates, (3) new distribution coefficient (k{sub d}) estimates, (4) revised estimates of gas-phase velocities and travel times, and (5) revised hydrologic modeling of the saturated zone which provides updated estimates of the advective flux through the saturated zone.

Andrews, R.W.; Dale, T.F.; McNeish, J.A.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Yucca Mountain - U.S. Department of Energy's Brief in Support of Review and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Yucca Mountain - U.S. Department of Energy's Brief in Support of Yucca Mountain - U.S. Department of Energy's Brief in Support of Review and Reversal of the Board's Ruling on the Motion to Withdraw Yucca Mountain - U.S. Department of Energy's Brief in Support of Review and Reversal of the Board's Ruling on the Motion to Withdraw Proceeding before the Nuclear Regulatory Commission on DOE's application for a license to construct a high-level waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada; DOE brief arguing that the NRC should review and reverse the order of the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board denying DOE's motion to withdraw its application. Yucca Mountain - U.S. Department of Energy's Brief in Support of Review and Reversal of the Board's Ruling on the Motion to Withdraw More Documents & Publications Yucca Mountain - U.S. Department of Energy's Reply to the Responses to the

219

Evaluation of the post-emplacement environment of high level radioactive waste packages at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Evaluation of the post-emplacement environment around high level radioactive waste containers is required by federal regulations. The information derived from this evaluation will be used to determine the service performance of the waste containers, the chemical and hydrological conditions that may influence radionuclide release and transport if containers are breached, and retrievability of the waste containers prior to closure of the repository. Laboratory studies, numerical simulations, and field experiments and tests are used to provide data necessary for this evaluation. Results obtained to date demonstrate that the post-emplacement environment in the welded tuff at Yucca Mountain, Nevada maintains relatively benign chemical features (i.e., near neutral pH, low concentrations of dissolved species) for most scenarios. The hydrological environment appears to be one of low flow volume and rates for the expected condition of an unsaturated medium. Emplacement borehole stability will be a function of fracture density and orientation, which may be influenced by microcrack development. Field studies and numerical simulations are in progress that will extend the results of laboratory studies to long time periods. The extent to which chemical, hydrological and mechanical processes can be adequately coupled through numerical simulations remains a matter of concern. 18 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Glassley, W.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Dorchester County- Renewable Zoning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Dorchester County zoning codes specifically permit solar arrays and small wind turbines in many zoning districts.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unsaturated zone yucca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Trace element and REE composition of five samples of the Yucca Mountain calcite-silica deposits. Special report No. 8  

SciTech Connect

The attached materials document the results of part of a recent effort of geochemical sampling and analysis at Yucca Mountain and nearby regions. The efforts come as a result of interest in comprehensive analyses of rare earth elements (REE), lanthanum (La) through lutecium (Lu). Several additional, non-REE analyses were obtained as well. Commercially available REE analyses have proved to be insufficiently sensitive for geochemical purposes. Dr. Roman Schmitt at the Radiation Center at Oregon State University in Corvallis was sent five samples as a trial effort. The results are very encouraging. The purpose of compiling Dr. Schmitt`s report and the other materials is to inform the sponsor of his independent observations of these results and other information that sent to him. To provide a more complete appreciation of the utility of REE analyses a copy of Dave Vaniman`s recent article is included in which he notes that REE analyses from Yucca Mountain indicate the occurrence of two distinctly different REE patterns as do several other chemical parameters of the calcite-silica deposits. Our four samples with high equivalent CaCO{sub 3} were collected from sites we believe to be spring deposits. One sample, 24D, is from southern Crater Flat which is acknowledged by U.S.G.S. investigators to be a spring deposit. All four of these samples have REE patterns similar to those from the saturated zone reported by Vaniman.

Livingston, D.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Preliminary numerical modeling for the G-Tunnel welded tuff mining experiment; Yucca Mountain site characterization project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Yucca Mountain, located in Southern Nevada, is to be considered as a potential site for a nuclear waste repository. Located in Rainier Mesa on the Nevada Test Site, G-Tunnel has been the site of a series of experiments, part of whose purpose is to evaluate measurement techniques for rock mechanics before testing in the Exploratory Shaft. Rainier Mesa is composed of welded and nonwelded tuffs that have thermal and mechanical properties and stress states similar to those of tuffs expected to be encountered at Yucca Mountain. A series of finite element calculations were performed to aid in designing instrumentation for the experiments in G-Tunnel and later to correlate with measured data. In this report are presented the results of the preliminary finite element calculations performed in conjunction with experimental measurements of drift convergence, or closure, and rock mass relaxation zones made before, during, and after completing the welded tuff mining experiment in G-Tunnel. Tape extensometer measurements of drift convergences and measurements determined by multiple point borehole extensometers are compared with corresponding calculated values using linear elastic and jointed rock material models. 9 refs., 25 figs., 7 tabs.

Johnson, R.L.; Bauer, S.J.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Ground water of Yucca Mountain: How high can it rise?; Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the geology, hydrology, and possible rise of the water tables at Yucca Mountain. The possibilities of rainfall and earthquakes causing flooding is discussed.

NONE

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

224

Geologyy of the Yucca Mountain Site Area, Southwestern Nevada, Chapter in Stuckless, J.S., ED., Yucca Mountain, Nevada - A Proposed Geologic Repository for High-Level Radioactive Waste (Volume 1)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Yucca Mountain in southwestern Nevada is a prominent, irregularly shaped upland formed by a thick apron of Miocene pyroclastic-flow and fallout tephra deposits, with minor lava flows, that was segmented by through-going, large-displacement normal faults into a series of north-trending, eastwardly tilted structural blocks. The principal volcanic-rock units are the Tiva Canyon and Topopah Spring Tuffs of the Paintbrush Group, which consist of volumetrically large eruptive sequences derived from compositionally distinct magma bodies in the nearby southwestern Nevada volcanic field, and are classic examples of a magmatic zonation characterized by an upper crystal-rich (> 10% crystal fragments) member, a more voluminous lower crystal-poor (< 5% crystal fragments) member, and an intervening thin transition zone. Rocks within the crystal-poor member of the Topopah Spring Tuff, lying some 280 m below the crest of Yucca Mountain, constitute the proposed host rock to be excavated for the storage of high-level radioactive wastes. Separation of the tuffaceous rock formations into subunits that allow for detailed mapping and structural interpretations is based on macroscopic features, most importantly the relative abundance of lithophysae and the degree of welding. The latter feature, varying from nonwelded through partly and moderately welded to densely welded, exerts a strong control on matrix porosities and other rock properties that provide essential criteria for distinguishing hydrogeologic and thermal-mechanical units, which are of major interest in evaluating the suitability of Yucca Mountain to host a safe and permanent geologic repository for waste storage. A thick and varied sequence of surficial deposits mantle large parts of the Yucca Mountain site area. Mapping of these deposits and associated soils in exposures and in the walls of trenches excavated across buried faults provides evidence for multiple surface-rupturing events along all of the major faults during Pleistocene and Holocene times; these paleoseismic studies form the basis for evaluating the potential for future earthquakes and fault displacements. Thermoluminescence and U-series analyses were used to date the surficial materials involved in the Quaternary faulting events. The rate of erosional downcutting of bedrock on the ridge crests and hillslopes of Yucca Mountain, being of particular concern with respect to the potential for breaching of the proposed underground storage facility, was studied by using rock varnish cation-ratio and {sup 10}Be and {sup 36}Cl cosmogenic dating methods to determine the length of time bedrock outcrops and hillslope boulder deposits were exposed to cosmic rays, which then served as a basis for calculating long-term erosion rates. The results indicate rates ranging from 0.04 to 0.27 cm/k.y., which represent the maximum downcutting along the summit of Yucca Mountain under all climatic conditions that existed there during most of Quaternary time. Associated studies include the stratigraphy of surficial deposits in Fortymile Wash, the major drainage course in the area, which record a complex history of four to five cut-and-fill cycles within the channel during middle to late Quaternary time. The last 2 to 4 m of incision probably occurred during the last pluvial climatic period, 22 to 18 ka, followed by aggradation to the present time.

W.R. Keefer; J.W. Whitney; D.C. Buesch

2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

225

Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project technical data catalog; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The June 1, 1985, Department of Energy (DOE)/Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Site-Specific Procedural Agreement for Geologic Repository Site Investigation and Characterization Program requires the DOE to develop and maintain a catalog of data which will be updated and provided to the NRC at least quarterly. This catalog is to include a description of the data; the time (date), place, and method of acquisition; and where it may be examined. The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) Technical Data Catalog is published and distributed in accordance with the requirements of the Site-Specific Agreement. The YMP Technical Data Catalog is a report based on reference information contained in the YMP Automated Technical Data Tracking System (ATDT). The reference information is provided by Participants for data acquired or developed in support of the YMP. The Technical Data Catalog is updated quarterly and published in the month following the end of each quarter. Each new publication of the Technical Data Catalog supersedes the previous edition.

NONE

1992-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

226

The National Repository at Yucca Mountain, Russ Dyer  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Repository at Repository at Yucca Mountain Presented to: EM High Level Waste Corporate Board Presented by: Russ Dyer Chief Scientist Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management July 24, 2008 Idaho National Laboratory 2 SBBB-GeneralBriefing_070808Rev1.ppt Solving a national problem now * On June 3, 2008, the U.S. Department of Energy submitted an application to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission for a license to construct a repository at Yucca Mountain 3 SBBB-GeneralBriefing_070808Rev1.ppt Repository license application * The LA seeks authorization to construct the nation's first geologic repository * It is a culmination of more than 25 years of scientific research and engineering * The LA describes DOE's plan to safely isolate spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive

227

The Hydrogeologic Character of the Lower Tuff Confining Unit and the Oak Springs Butte Confining Unit in the Tuff Pile Area of Central Yucca Flat  

SciTech Connect

The lower tuff confining unit (LTCU) in the Yucca Flat Corrective Action Unit (CAU) consists of a monotonous sequence of pervasively zeolitized volcanic tuff (i.e., mostly bedded with lesser nonwelded to poorly welded tuff; not fractured) (Bechtel Nevada, 2006). The LTCU is an important confining unit beneath Yucca Flat because it separates the alluvial and volcanic aquifers, where many underground nuclear tests were conducted, from the regional lower carbonate aquifer. Recent sub-CAU-scale modeling by Los Alamos National Laboratory in the Tuff Pile area of Yucca Flat (Boryta, et al., in review) includes postulated low-porosity, high-permeability zones (i.e., fractured welded-tuff aquifers) within the LTCU. This scenario indicates that such postulated low-porosity, high-permeability zones could provide fast-path lateral conduits to faults, and eventually to the lower carbonate aquifer. A fractured and faulted lower carbonate aquifer is postulated to provide a flow path(s) for underground test-derived contaminants to potential offsite receptors. The ramifications of such a scenario are obvious for groundwater flow and contaminant migration beneath Yucca Flat. This paper describes the reasoning for not including postulated low-porosity, high-permeability zones within the LTCU in the Tuff Pile area or within the LTCU in the Yucca Flat CAU-scale model. Both observational and analytical data clearly indicate that the LTCU in the Tuff Pile area consists of pervasively zeolitic, nonwelded to poorly welded tuffs that are classified as tuff confining units (i.e., high-porosity, low-permeability). The position regarding the LTCU in the Tuff Pile area is summarized as follows: • The LTCU in the Tuff Pile area consists of a monotonous sequence of predominantly zeolitic nonwelded to poorly welded tuffs, and thus is accurately characterized hydrogeologically as a tuff confining unit (aquitard) in the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine hydrostratigraphic framework model (Bechtel Nevada, 2006). • No welded-tuff (or lava-flow aquifers), referred to as low-porosity, high-permeability zones in Boryta et al. (in review), are present within the LTCU in the Tuff Pile area. • Fractures within the LTCU are poorly developed, a characteristic of zeolitic tuffs; and fracture distributions are independent of stratigraphic and lithologic units (Prothro, 2008). • Groundwater flow and radionuclide transport will not be affected by laterally extensive zones of significantly higher permeability within the LTCU in the Tuff Pile area. Although not the primary focus of this report, the hydrogeologic character of the Oak Spring Butte confining unit (OSBCU), located directly below the LTCU, is also discussed. The OSBCU is lithologically more diverse, and does include nonwelded to partially welded ash-flow tuffs. However, these older ash-flow tuffs are poorly welded and altered (zeolitic to quartzofeldspathic), and consequently, would tend to have properties similar to a tuff confining unit rather than a welded-tuff aquifer.

Sigmund L. Drellack, Jr., Lance B. Prothro, Jose L. Gonzales, and Jennifer M. Mercadante

2010-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

228

Hydraulic properties of adsorbed water films in unsaturated porous media  

SciTech Connect

Adsorbed water films strongly influence residual water saturations and hydraulic conductivities in porous media at low saturations. Hydraulic properties of adsorbed water films in unsaturated porous media were investigated through combining Langmuir's film model with scaling analysis, without use of any adjustable parameters. Diffuse double layer influences are predicted to be important through the strong dependence of adsorbed water film thickness (f) on matric potential ({Psi}) and ion charge (z). Film thickness, film velocity, and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity are predicted to vary with z{sup -1}, z{sup -2}, and z{sup -3}, respectively. In monodisperse granular media, the characteristic grain size ({lambda}) controls film hydraulics through {lambda}{sup -1} scaling of (1) the perimeter length per unit cross sectional area over which films occur, (2) the critical matric potential ({Psi}{sub c}) below which films control flow, and (3) the magnitude of the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity when {Psi} < {Psi}{sub c}. While it is recognized that finer textured sediments have higher unsaturated hydraulic conductivities than coarser sands at intermediate {Psi}, the {lambda}{sup -1} scaling of hydraulic conductivity predicted here extends this understanding to very low saturations where all pores are drained. Extremely low unsaturated hydraulic conductivities are predicted under adsorbed film-controlled conditions (generally < 0.1 mm y{sup -1}). On flat surfaces, the film hydraulic diffusivity is shown to be constant (invariant with respect to {Psi}).

Tokunaga, Tetsu K.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

The occurrence and distribution of erionite at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

We have conducted an investigation to determine the occurrence and distribution of erionite, a potential carcinogen, at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Using x-ray powder diffraction techniques yielding detection limits to below 0.05 wt %, we positively identified erionite in only 3 out of 76 bulk and 12 fracture samples investigated. The three erionite-bearing samples (J12-620/630, UE-25aNo.1-1296.2, and USW G4-1314) all occur above the static water level in clay/zeolite-rich horizons near the top of vitrophyres. Erionite occurs as trace amounts of less than 1 wt % in the whole rock, although it may occur locally in significant amounts as fracture fillings (e.g., UE-25aNo.1-1296.2 where it comprises approximately 45 wt % of the fracture filling material). All three occurrences appear to be extremely isolated cases since erionite was not detected in neighboring samples. Erionite at Yucca Mountain apparently formed only in localized microenvironments, possibly restricted to fractures. Since erionite occurs in trace amounts only in extremely isolated instances, it should pose little or no health hazard to workers in the potential repository at Yucca Mountain or to the public. The amounts of erionite liberated to the biosphere should be negligible, particularly when compared with the amounts of erionite occurring naturally at the surface in Nevada and surrounding states. 24 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

Chipera, S.J.; Bish, D.L.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Student Zone  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Student Zone Student Zone Homework Helpers All About Atoms - Learn about the parts of the atom! Virginia State Standards of Learning Practice Tests - Practice taking the SOL tests! Subjects currently include algebra, math, science and technology. Table of Elements - Basic physical and historical information about the elements! [Printable Version] Questions and Answers - Have a question? Need an answer? Check here first! Glossary of Science Terms - Definitions of some of the terms used on this site. Jefferson Lab Virtual Tour - How do scientists explore inside atoms? Video Resources Frostbite Theater - Short science experiments using liquid nitrogen, static electricity and more! Physics Out Loud - Jefferson Lab scientists and other experts explain some of the common words and terms used in nuclear physics research.

231

The origin and history of alteration and carbonatization of the Yucca Mountain ignimbrites. Volume 2, Appendix B  

SciTech Connect

A geological history is presented for Yucca Mountain. This appendix concentrates on the alteration and carbonatization of ignimbrites.

Szymanski, J.S.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Near-field/altered-zone models report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy is studying Yucca Mountain as the possible site for the first underground repository for permanent disposal of spent fuel from commercial nuclear reactors as well as for other types high-level nuclear waste. Emplacement of high-level radioactive waste, especially commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF), in Yucca Mountain will release a large amount of heat into the rock above and below the repository. The heating rate will decrease with time, creating a thermal pulse. Over a period of several thousand years, the rock temperature will rise initially, then drop when the production of decay heat falls below the rate at which heat escapes from the hot zone. Besides raising the rock temperature, much of this heat will vaporize water, which will then condense in cooler regions. The condensate is likely to form a gravity-driven heat pipe above the repository, creating the possibility that water may drain back onto the waste packages (WPs) or that it may ''shed'' through the pillars between emplacement drifts. The long-term importance of these effects has been investigated through the development, testing, and application of thermohydrologic (TH) models. Other effects, such coupled chemical and mechanical processes, may also influence the movement of water above, within, and below the emplacement drifts. A recent report on thermally driven coupled processes (Hardin and Chesnut, 1997) provides a qualitative assessment of the probable significance of these processes for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMSCP) and is the phenomenological framework for the present report. This report describes the conceptual and numerical models that have been developed to predict the thermal, mechanical, hydrologic, and chemical responses to the cumulative heat production of the potential host rock at Yucca Mountain. As proposed, the repository horizon will be situated within the Topopah Spring tuff, in the adjacent middle nonlithophysal and lower lithophysal units. These units are made up of moderately to densely welded, devitrified, fractured tuff. The rock's chemical composition is comparable to that of typical granite, but has textural features and mineralogical characteristics of large-scale, silicic volcanism. Because the repository horizon will be approximately 300 m below the ground surface and 200 m above the water table, the repository will be partially saturated. The welded tuff matrix in the host units is highly impermeable, but water and gas flow readily through fractures. The degree of fracturing in these units is highly variable, and the hydrologic significance of fracturing is an important aspect of site investigation. This report describes the characterization and modeling of a region around the potential repository--the altered zone--a region in which the temperature will be increased significantly by waste-generated heat. Numerical simulation has shown that, depending on the boundary conditions, rock properties, and repository design features incorporated in the models, the altered zone (AZ) may extend from the water table to the ground surface. This report also describes models of the near field, the region comprising the repository emplacement drifts and the surrounding rock, which are critical to the performance of engineered components. Investigations of near-field and altered-zone (NF/AZ) processes support the design of underground repository facilities and engineered barriers and also provide constraint data for probabilistic calculations of waste-isolation performance (i.e., performance assessment). The approach to investigation, which is an iterative process involving hypothesis testing and experimentation, has relied on conceptualizing engineered barriers and on performance analysis. This report is a collection, emphasizing conceptual and numerical models, of the recent results contributed from studies of NF/AZ processes and of quantitative measures of NF/AZ performance. The selection and presentation of contributions are intended to show the iterative development of understand

Hardin, E. L., LLNL

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Revisiting the thermodynamics of hardening plasticity for unsaturated soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A thermodynamically consistent extension of the constitutive equations of saturated soils to unsaturated conditions is often worked out through the use a unique 'effective' interstitial pressure, accounting equivalently for the pressures of the saturating fluids acting separately on the internal solid walls of the pore network. The natural candidate for this effective interstitial pressure is the space averaged interstitial pressure. In contrast experimental observations have revealed that, at least, a pair of stress state variables was needed for a suitable framework to describe stress-strain-strength behaviour of unsaturated soils. The thermodynamics analysis presented here shows that the most general approach to the behaviour of unsaturated soils actually requires three stress state variables: the suction, which is required to describe the invasion of the soil by the liquid water phase through the retention curve; two effective stresses, which are required to describe the soil deformation at water saturati...

Coussy, Olivier; Vaunat, Jean; 10.1016/j.compgeo.2009.09.003

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Numerical evaluation of effective unsaturated hydraulic properties for fractured rocks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To represent a heterogeneous unsaturated fractured rock by its homogeneous equivalent, Monte Carlo simulations are used to obtain upscaled (effective) flow properties. In this study, we present a numerical procedure for upscaling the van Genuchten parameters of unsaturated fractured rocks by conducting Monte Carlo simulations of the unsaturated flow in a domain under gravity-dominated regime. The simulation domain can be chosen as the scale of block size in the field-scale modeling. The effective conductivity is computed from the steady-state flux at the lower boundary and plotted as a function of the averaging pressure head or saturation over the domain. The scatter plot is then fitted using van Genuchten model and three parameters, i.e., the saturated conductivity K{sub s}, the air-entry parameter {alpha}, the pore-size distribution parameter n, corresponding to this model are considered as the effective K{sub s}, effective {alpha}, and effective n, respectively.

Lu, Zhiming [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kwicklis, Edward M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Yucca Mountain - U.S. Department of Energy's Response to the Motion for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Yucca Mountain - U.S. Department of Energy's Response to the Motion Yucca Mountain - U.S. Department of Energy's Response to the Motion for Recusal/Disqualification Yucca Mountain - U.S. Department of Energy's Response to the Motion for Recusal/Disqualification Brief filed before the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in the proceeding on DOE's applciation to construct a high-level waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada; DOE opposes the motion of Washington, South Carolina, Aiken County, and White Pine County to disqualify Commissioners Magwood and Ostendorff from voting on the appeal of the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board's denial of DOE's motion to withdraw its application. Yucca Mountain - U.S. Department of Energy's Response to the Motion for Recusal/Disqualification More Documents & Publications 3116 Public Meeting Summaries - November 2006

236

Yucca Mountain - The Department of Energy's Status Report on Its Archiving  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Department of Energy's Status Report on Its The Department of Energy's Status Report on Its Archiving Plan Yucca Mountain - The Department of Energy's Status Report on Its Archiving Plan Proceeding before the Nuclear Regulatory Commission on DOE's application for a license to construct a high-level waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada; DOE provides answers to the questions of the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board regarding its plans to archive its document collection on the Licensing Support Network. Yucca Mountain - The Department of Energy's Status Report on Its Archiving Plan More Documents & Publications U.S. Department of Energy's Response to Petitions to Intervene Yucca Mountain - U.S. Department of Energy's Reply to the Responses to the Motion to Withdraw Yucca Mountain - U.S. Department of Energy's Brief in Support of Review and

237

Electropositive bivalent metallic ion unsaturated polyester complexed polymer concrete  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Quick setting polymer concrete compositions which are mixtures of unsaturated polyesters and crosslinking monomers together with appropriate initiators and promoters in association with aggregate which may be wet and a source of bivalent metallic ions which will set to polymer concrete with excellent structural properties.

Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.; Horn, W.H.

1981-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

238

Electropositive bivalent metallic ion unsaturated polyester complexed polymer concrete  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Quick setting polymer concrete compositions with excellent structural properties are disclosed; these polymer concrete compositions are mixtures of unsaturated polyesters and crosslinking monomers together with appropriate initiators and promoters in association with aggregate, which may be wet, and with a source of bivalent metallic ions.

Sugama, Toshifumi (Mastic Beach, NY); Kukacka, Lawrence E. (Port Jefferson, NY); Horn, William H. (Brookhaven, NY)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Electropositive bivalent metallic ion unsaturated polyester complexed polymer concrete  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Quick setting polymer concrete compositions are described which are mixtures of unsaturated polyesters and crosslinking monomers together with appropriate initiators and promoters in association with aggregate which may be wet and a source of bivalent metallic ions which will set to polymer concrete with excellent structural properties.

Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.; Horn, W.H.

1983-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

240

Heat and mass transfer in unsaturated porous media. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary study of heat and water transport in unsaturated porous media is reported. The project provides background information regarding the feasibility of seasonal thermal energy storage in unconfined aquifers. A parametric analysis of the factors of importance, and an annotated bibliography of research findings pertinent to unconfined aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) are presented. This analysis shows that heat and mass transfer of water vapor assume dominant importance in unsaturated porous media at elevated temperature. Although water vapor fluxes are seldom as large as saturated medium liquid water fluxes, they are important under unsaturated conditions. The major heat transport mechanism for unsaturated porous media at temperatures from 50 to 90/sup 0/C is latent heat flux. The mechanism is nonexistent under saturated conditions but may well control design of unconfined aquifer storage systems. The parametric analysis treats detailed physical phenomena which occur in the flow systems study and demonstrates the temperature and moisture dependence of the transport coefficients of importance. The question of design of an unconfined ATES site is also addressed by considering the effects of aquifer temperature, depth to water table, porous medium flow properties, and surface boundary conditions. Recommendations are made for continuation of this project in its second phase. Both scientific and engineering goals are considered and alternatives are presented.

Childs, S.W.; Malstaff, G.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unsaturated zone yucca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Products of an Artificially Induced Hydrothermal System at Yucca Mountain  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Studies of mineral deposition in the recent geologic past at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, address competing hypotheses of hydrothermal alteration and deposition from percolating groundwater. The secondary minerals being studied are calcite-opal deposits in fractures and lithophysal cavities of ash-flow tuffs exposed in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), a 7.7-km tunnel excavated by the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project within Yucca Mountain. An underground field test in the ESF provided information about the minerals deposited by a short-lived artificial hydrothermal system and an opportunity for comparison of test products with the natural secondary minerals. The heating phase lasted nine months, followed by a nine-month cooling period. Natural pore fluids were the only source of water during the thermal test. Condensation and reflux of water driven away from the heater produced fluid flow in certain fractures and intersecting boreholes. The mineralogic products of the thermal test are calcite-gypsum aggregates of less than 4-micrometer crystals and amorphous silica as glassy scale less than 0.2 mm thick and as mounds of tubules with diameters less than 0.7 micrometers. The minute crystal sizes of calcite and gypsum from the field test are very different from the predominantly coarser calcite crystals (up to cm scale) in natural secondary-mineral deposits at the site. The complex micrometer-scale textures of the amorphous silica differ from the simple forms of opal spherules and coatings in the natural deposits, even though some natural spherules are as small as 1 micrometer. These differences suggest that the natural minerals, especially if they were of hydrothermal origin, may have developed coarser or simpler forms during subsequent episodes of dissolution and redeposition. The presence of gypsum among the test products and its absence from the natural secondary-mineral assemblage may indicate a higher degree of evaporation during the test than during the deposition of natural calcite-opal deposits.

S. Levy

2000-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

242

Bomb-Pulse Chlorine-36 at the Proposed Yucca Mountain Repository Horizon: An Investigation of Previous Conflicting Results and Collection of New Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous studies Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) found elevated ratios of chlorine-36 to total chloride (36Cl/Cl) in samples of rock collected from the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain (YM). The data were interpreted as an indication that fluids containing “bomb-pulse” 36Cl reached the repository horizon in the ~50 years since the peak period of above-ground nuclear testing. Due to the significance of 36Cl data to conceptual models of unsaturated zone flow, the United States Geological Survey (USGS) implemented a study to validate the LANL findings. The USGS drilled new boreholes at select locations across zones where bomb-pulse ratios had previously been identified. The drill cores were analyzed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Because consensus was not reached between the USGS/LLNL and LANL on several fundamental points including the presence or absence of bomb-pulse 36Cl, an evaluation by the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), was initiated. The overall objectives of the UNLV study were to investigate the source of the validation study’s conflicting results, and to obtain additional data on bomb-pulse isotopes at the repository horizon. UNLV engaged in discussions with previous investigators, reviewed reports, and analyzed archived samples. UNLV also collected new samples of rock from the ESF, soil profiles from the surface of YM, and samples of seep water from inside the ESF. Samples were analyzed for 36Cl/Cl ratios, and 99Tc and 129I in select samples. A column experiment was conducted mimicking the passage of bomb-pulse 36Cl through YM tuff. The work faced several obstacles including an extended shutdown of the tunnel. Only one sample yielded a background corrected 36Cl/Cl ratio that was higher than the accepted bomb-pulse threshold (1250 x 10-15). Specimen 01034214 obtained from the Drill Hole Wash fault (19+33) had a ratio of 1590 ± 80 (1?) x10-15, whereas the other separate sample from this fault zone yielded 1160 ± 50 (1?) x 10-15. Three samples collected from Alcove 6 averaged 490 ± 100 (1?) x10-15; a sample from Sundance Fault resulted in a ratio of 920 ± 60 (1?) x10-15, and a sample from the Bow Ridge Fault produced 530 ± 20 (1?) x10-15. The results are significant because: 1) they tend to be lower than LANL data for comparable samples, albeit in agreement with the range of data produced in the area, and 2) they show that a bomb-pulse 36Cl/Cl ratio was measured in rock collected at the repository horizon level by a second and independent group of investigators (UNLV). Because of time UNLV was not able to replicate the results, and these few data points are insufficient to draw major and definitive conclusions. Leachates of soil samples collected from the surface above the ESF yielded several ratios with bomb-pulse 36Cl, particularly for samples encompassing the wetting front. Soil samples collected above the south ramp, where there was limited soil coverage due to a large amount of rock outcrop, had relatively large ratios ranging from 2170 ± 110 (1?) x10-15 to 5670 ± 350 (1?) x10-15. Soil samples from profiles from above the north ramp ranged from 820 ± 70 (1?) x10-15 to 2390 ± 160 (1?) x10-15, which compare favorably with previous measurements near the site. Water seepage into the ESF south ramp and 36Cl standards made from NIST material were also analyzed. The standards were produced to have nominal 36Cl/Cl ratios (10-15) of 500, 2,500 and 10,000 and the results showed good agreement with the calculated ratios. The seepage samples ranged between 680 ± 40 (1?) x10-15 to 1110 ± 40 (1?) x10-15, consistent with that found for modern meteoric water, with a small bomb-pulse component. Bomb-pulse 36Cl may not have been incorporated in this fast-path water because the surface above the infiltration zone consists mostly of outcrop and the flow pathways have probably mostly been leached. 99Tc was measured in five of nine leaches of ESF rock but poor analytical recoveries and lack of data overlap with 36Cl limit interpretations of these data

Cizdziel, James

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

243

Preliminary study of lead isotopes in the carbonate-silica veins of Trench 14, Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sub-vertical carbonate-silica veins filling the Bow Ridge Fault, where exposed in Trench 14 on the east side of Yucca Mountain, carry a lead isotopic signature that can be explained in terms of local sources. Two isotopically distinguishable--silicate and carbonate--fractions of lead are recognized within the vein system as well as in overlying surficial calcrete deposits. The acid-insoluble silicate fraction is contributed largely from the decomposing Miocene volcanic tuff, which forms the wall rock of the fault zone and is a ubiquitous component of the overlying soil. Lead contained in the silicate fraction approaches in isotopic composition that of the Miocene volcanic rocks of Yucca Mountain, but diverges from it in some samples by being more enriched in uranogenic isotopes. The carbonate fraction of lead in both vein and calcrete samples resides dominantly in the HCl- and CH{sub 3}COOH-soluble calcite. HCl evidently also attacks and removes lead from silicate phases, but the milder CH{sub 3}COOH dissolution procedure oftentimes identifies a significantly more radiogenic lead in the calcite. Wind-blown particulate matter brought to the area from Paleozoic and Late Proterozoic limestones in surrounding mountains may be the ultimate source of the calcite. Isotopically more uniform samples suggest that locally the basaltic ash and other volcanic rock have contributed most of the lead to both fractions of the vein system. An important finding of this study is that the data does not require the more exotic mechanisms or origins that have been proposed for the veins. Instead, the remarkably similar lead isotopic properties of the veins to those of the soil calcretes support their interpretation as a surficial, pedogenic phenomenon.

Zartman, R.E.; Kwak, L.M.

1993-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

244

Report of early site suitability evaluation of the potential repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect

This study evaluated the technical suitability of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as a potential site for a mined geologic repository for the permanent disposal of radioactive waste. The evaluation was conducted primarily to determine early in the site characterization program if there are any features or conditions at the site that indicate it is unsuitable for repository development. A secondary purpose was to determine the status of knowledge in the major technical areas that affect the suitability of the site. This early site suitability evaluation (ESSE) was conducted by a team of technical personnel at the request of the Associate Director of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Geologic Disposal, a unit within the DOE`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. The Yucca Mountain site has been the subject of such evaluations for over a decade. In 1983, the site was evaluated as part of a screening process to identify potentially acceptable sites. The site was evaluated in greater detail and found suitable for site characterization as part of the Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE, 1986) required by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA). Additional site data were compiled during the preparation of the Site Characterization Plan (SCP) (DOE, 1988a). This early site suitability evaluation has considered information that was used in preparing both-documents, along with recent information obtained since the EA and SCP were published. This body of information is referred to in this report as ``current information`` or ``available evidence.``

Younker, J.L.; Andrews, W.B.; Fasano, G.A.; Herrington, C.C.; Mattson, S.R.; Murray, R.C. [Science Applications International Corp., Las Vegas, NV (United States); Ballou, L.B.; Revelli, M.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Ducharme, A.R.; Shephard, L.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dudley, W.W.; Hoxie, D.T. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Herbst, R.J.; Patera, E.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Judd, B.R. [Decision Analysis Co., Portola Valley, CA (United States); Docka, J.A.; Rickertsen, L.D. [Weston Technical Associates, Washington, DC (United States)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

A multiphase constitutive modeling framework for unsaturated soil behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a framework for constitutive modeling of unsaturated soils that has the embedded elements of lower scale grain to grain contacts. Continuum models developed from this framework will possess two different phases idealizing the solid grains and their interactions. As a consequence, two different constitutive relationships, corresponding to the grain to grain contact and bulk behavior, co-exist in a constitutive model and govern the response of the model. To be specific, grain to grain sliding under dry or wet condition is idealized and appears as a simple contact law embedded in a continuum framework. There is no need to define plastic strain, as this quantity naturally emerges at the continuum scale as the consequence of frictional sliding at the lower scale. In addition, the effective stress can be naturally worked out from the grain to grain contact law embedded in the model without being subjected to any interpretation. This, in our opinion, is a closer representation of unsaturated soil behavior, compared to existing continuum approaches that map everything onto a single stress-strain relationship. In this paper, the framework is presented in its simplest form that takes into account sliding on a single orientation. Grain to grain contact law with capillary effects is used for the demonstration of the concept, and the technical details behind it. Generalization of the framework for better representation of unsaturated soil behavior will also be sketched out.

Giang D. Nguyen; Yixiang Gan

2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

246

Yucca Mountain Project Document Suspension, OAS-M-08-07 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Yucca Mountain Project Document Suspension, OAS-M-08-07 Yucca Mountain Project Document Suspension, OAS-M-08-07 Yucca Mountain Project Document Suspension, OAS-M-08-07 The Department or Energy's Office of Civilian Radioaztivc Waste Management (OCRWM) is preparing to obtain a license from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to construct a permanent repository at Yucca Mountain for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel. In December 2005, OCRWM identified design process inadequacies and suspended the appro\lal of new7 documents 'important to waste isolation' or safety analysis that were subject to quality assurance procedures. Waste isolation refers to limiting radioactive exposure to the public after the waste is placed in the repository; while safety refers to limiting exposure prior to

247

Word images as policy instruments: Lessons from the Yucca Mountain Controversey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study is described which explores word images which have developed about nuclear issues by Nevadans. The study is based on results of a survey conducted regarding issues related to the Yucca Mountain repository.

Conary, J.S.; Soden, D.L.; Carns, D.E.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Yucca Mountain - U.S. Department of Energy's Response to the...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Response to the Motion for RecusalDisqualification Yucca Mountain - U.S. Department of Energy's Response to the Motion for RecusalDisqualification Brief filed before the Nuclear...

249

Yucca Mountain Project Document Suspension, OAS-M-08-07 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Yucca Mountain Project Document Suspension, OAS-M-08-07 Yucca Mountain Project Document Suspension, OAS-M-08-07 Yucca Mountain Project Document Suspension, OAS-M-08-07 The Department or Energy's Office of Civilian Radioaztivc Waste Management (OCRWM) is preparing to obtain a license from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to construct a permanent repository at Yucca Mountain for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel. In December 2005, OCRWM identified design process inadequacies and suspended the appro\lal of new7 documents 'important to waste isolation' or safety analysis that were subject to quality assurance procedures. Waste isolation refers to limiting radioactive exposure to the public after the waste is placed in the repository; while safety refers to limiting exposure prior to

250

Statement from Ward Sproat on Yucca Mountain, Director of the Office of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ward Sproat on Yucca Mountain, Director of the Ward Sproat on Yucca Mountain, Director of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Statement from Ward Sproat on Yucca Mountain, Director of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management December 12, 2007 - 4:44pm Addthis "We are pleased with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) Pre-license Application Presiding Officer Board's ruling today to uphold DOE's Licensing Support Network (LSN) certification. This enables DOE to move forward as planned and to submit a high quality license application for the Yucca Mountain repository to the NRC by no later than June 30, 2008. DOE has made electronically available on the NRC's LSN over 3.5 million documents, estimated to exceed 30 million pages. Through the LSN, the public can view scientific data, geologic and engineering studies, and

251

Yucca Mountain - U.S. Department of Energy's Reply to the Responses to the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy's Reply to the Responses U.S. Department of Energy's Reply to the Responses to the Motion to Withdraw Yucca Mountain - U.S. Department of Energy's Reply to the Responses to the Motion to Withdraw Department of Energy's reply brief in support of its motion to withdraw its license application to construct a high-level waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada; administrative proceeding before the NRC's Atomic Safety and Licensing Board. Yucca Mountain - U.S. Department of Energy's Reply to the Responses to the Motion to Withdraw More Documents & Publications U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY'S REPLY BRIEF IN SUPPORT OF REVIEW AND REVERSAL OF THE BOARD'S RULING ON THE MOTION TO WITHDRAW Yucca Mountain - U.S. Department of Energy's Brief in Support of Review and Reversal of the Board's Ruling on the Motion to Withdraw

252

DOE Does Not Oppose Petitions to Intervene in Yucca Mountain NRC Proceeding  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Does Not Oppose Petitions to Intervene in Yucca Mountain NRC DOE Does Not Oppose Petitions to Intervene in Yucca Mountain NRC Proceeding DOE Does Not Oppose Petitions to Intervene in Yucca Mountain NRC Proceeding March 30, 2010 - 9:57am Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy yesterday filed with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission a response to Petitions to Intervene filed by several parties seeking to oppose the Department's motion to withdraw its license application for a nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. DOE said it is confident that its motion to withdraw the application is lawful, but that it believes the petitioning parties should be allowed to present their views to the NRC. It thus did not oppose the motions to intervene, and proposed a schedule for resolving the dispute over the Department's motion to withdraw the application. The parties seeking to intervene are

253

Yucca Mountain Biological Resources Monitoring Program; Progress report, October 1992--December 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is required by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of (as amended in 1987) to study and characterize the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a potential geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste. During site characterization, the DOE will conduct a variety of geotechnical, geochemical, geological, and hydrological studies to determine the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a potential repository. To ensure that site characterization activities do not adversely affect the environment at Yucca Mountain, a program has been implemented to monitor and mitigate potential impacts and ensure activities comply with applicable environmental regulations. This report describes the activities and accomplishments of EG&G Energy Measurements, Inc. (EG&G/EM) from October 1992 through December 1993 for six program areas within the Terrestrial Ecosystem component of the environmental program for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP): Site Characterization Effects, Desert Tortoises (Gopherus agassizii), Habitat Reclamation, Monitoring and Mitigation, Radiological Monitoring, and Biological Support.

NONE

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Public Interaction and Educational Outreach on the Yucca Mountain Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In July 2002, the U.S. Congress approved Yucca Mountain in Nevada as the nation's first long-term geologic repository site for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. This major milestone for the country's high-level radioactive waste disposal program comes after more than twenty years of scientific study and intense public interaction and outreach. This paper describes public interaction and outreach challenges faced by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Yucca Mountain Project in the past and what additional communication strategies may be instituted following the July 2002 approval by the U.S. Congress to develop the site as the nation's first long-term geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The DOE public involvement activities were driven by two federal regulations--the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) of 1982, as amended. The NEPA required that DOE hold public hearings at key points in the development of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and the NWPA required the agency to conduct public hearings in the vicinity of the site prior to making a recommendation regarding the site's suitability. The NWPA also provided a roadmap for how DOE would interact with affected units of government, which include the state of Nevada and the counties surrounding the site. Because the Department anticipated and later received much public interest in this high-profile project, the agency decided to go beyond regulatory-required public involvement activities and created a broad-based program that implemented far-reaching public interaction and outreach tactics. Over the last two decades, DOE informed, educated, and engaged a myriad of interested local, national, and international parties using various traditional and innovative approaches. The Yucca Mountain Project's intensive public affairs initiatives were instrumental in involving the public, which in turn resulted in thousands of comments on various aspects of the program. These comments were considered in the development of the EIS and weighed in the Secretary of Energy's decision to recommend the site.

A. Benson; Y. Riding

2002-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

255

MISTY ECHO Tunnel Dynamics Experiment--Data report: Volume 1; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect

Tunnel damage resulting from seismic loading is an important issue for the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository. The tunnel dynamics experiment was designed to obtain and document ground motions, permanent displacements, observable changes in fracture patterns, and visible damage at ground motion levels of interest to the Yucca Mountain Project. Even though the maximum free-field loading on this tunnel was 28 g, the damage observed was minor. Fielding details, data obtained, and supporting documentation are reported.

Phillips, J.S.; Luke, B.A.; Long, J.W.; Lee, J.G.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

MISTY ECHO tunnel dynamics experiment data report; Volume 2, Appendices: Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect

Tunnel damage resulting from seismic loading is an important issue for the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository. The tunnel dynamics experiment was designed to obtain and document ground motions, permanent displacements, observable changes in fracture patterns, and visible damage at ground motion levels of interest to the Yucca Mountain Project. Even though the maximum free-field loading on this tunnel was 28 g, the damage observed was minor. Fielding details, data obtained, and supporting documentation are reported.

Phillips, J.S.; Luke, B.A.; Long, J.W.; Lee, J.G.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Alternative Approaches to Assessing the Performance and Suitability of Yucca Mountain for Spent Fuel Disposal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) model has been applied to the candidate spent fuel and high level radioactive waste (HLW) disposal site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Building on earlier work, this report details recent modifications to EPRI's TSPA Integrated Multiple Assumptions and Release Code (IMARC), as applied to Yucca Mountain. The report includes performance analyses using IMARC as well as additional analyses and input to provide greater insight. The report also provides recommendat...

1998-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

258

Thermal analysis of Yucca Mountain commercial high-level waste packages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermal performance of commercial high-level waste packages was evaluated on a preliminary basis for the candidate Yucca Mountain repository site. The purpose of this study is to provide an estimate for waste package component temperatures as a function of isolation time in tuff. Several recommendations are made concerning the additional information and modeling needed to evaluate the thermal performance of the Yucca Mountain repository system.

Altenhofen, M.K. [Altenhofen (M.K.), Richland, WA (United States); Eslinger, P.W. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Evaluation of a Spent Fuel Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada: 2004 Progress Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Following completion of the site characterization and site recommendation phases, the Department of Energy (DOE) is moving to prepare and submit a license application to initiate construction of the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. This report provides background on how the project arrived at this juncture in its history and detailed information on EPRI's Yucca Mountain-related activities during calendar year 2004. The report summarizes EPRI work completed and in progress on evaluation of igneous c...

2004-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

260

Technology Zones (Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Virginia’s 26 designated Technology Zones offer tax relief in the form of abatements, credits, deductions, deferrals, exemptions, or rebates. Local governments may designate technology zones to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unsaturated zone yucca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Geologic and hydrologic investigations of a potential nuclear waste disposal site at Yucca Mountain, southern Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Yucca Mountain in southern Nye County, Nevada, has been selected by the United States Department of Energy as one of three potential sites for the nation`s first high-level nuclear waste repository. Its deep water table, closed-basin ground-water flow, potentially favorable host rock, and sparse population have made the Yucca Mountain area a viable candidate during the search for a nuclear waste disposal site. Yucca Mountain, however, lies within the southern Great Basin, a region of known contemporary tectonism and young volcanic activity, and the characterization of tectonism and volcanism remains as a fundamental problem for the Yucca Mountain site. The United States Geological Survey has been conducting extensive studies to evaluate the geologic setting of Yucca Mountain, as well as the timing and rates of tectonic and volcanic activity in the region. A workshop was convened by the Geologic Survey in Denver, Colorado, on August 19, 20, and 21, 1985, to review the scientific progress and direction of these studies. Considerable debate resulted. This collection of papers represents the results of some of the studies presented at the workshop, but by no means covers all of the scientific results and viewpoints presented. Rather, the volume is meant to serve as a progress report on some of the studies within the Geological Survey`s continuing research program toward characterizing the tectonic framework of Yucca Mountain. Individual papers were processed separately for the data base.

Carr, M.D.; Yount, J.C. (eds.)

1988-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

262

Summary report on the geochemistry of Yucca Mountain and environs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report gives a detailed description of work at Los Alamos that will help resolve geochemical issues pertinent to siting a high-level nuclear waste repository in tuff at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. It is necessary to understand the properties and setting of the host tuff because this rock provides the first natural barrier to migration of waste elements from a repository. The geochemistry of tuff is being investigated with particular emphasis on retardation processes. This report addresses the various aspects of sorption by tuff, physical and chemical makeup of tuff, diffusion processes, tuff/groundwater chemistry, waste element chemistry under expected repository conditions, transport processes involved in porous and fracture flow, and geochemical and transport modeling.

Daniels, W.R.; Wolfsberg, K.; Rundberg, R.S.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Degradation Modes of Alloy 22 in Yucca Mountain Repository Conditions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The nuclear waste package design for Yucca Mountain (Nevada, USA), in its current configuration, consists of a double wall cylindrical container fabricated using a highly corrosion resistant Ni-based Alloy 22 for the outer barrier and type 316 stainless steel for the inner structural vessel. A mailbox-shaped drip shield fabricated primarily using Ti Grade 7 will cover the waste packages. The environmental degradation of the relevant materials have been extensively studied and modeled for over ten years. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art understanding of the degradation modes of Alloy 22 (N06022) due to its interaction with the predicted in-drift mountain conditions including temperature and types of electrolytes. Subjects discussed include thermal aging and phase stability, dry oxidation, general and localized corrosion, stress corrosion cracking and hydrogen induced cracking.

Hua, F; Gordon, G M; Mon, K G; Rebak, R B

2005-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

264

DEGRADATION MODES OF ALLOY 22 IN YUCCA MOUNTAIN REPOSITORY CONDITIONS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The nuclear waste package design for Yucca Mountain (Nevada, USA), in its current configuration, consists of a double wall cylindrical container fabricated using a highly corrosion resistant Ni-based Alloy 22 for the outer barrier and type 316 stainless steel for the inner structural vessel. A mailbox-shaped drip shield fabricated primarily using Ti Grade 7 will cover the waste packages. The environmental degradation of the relevant materials have been extensively studied and modeled for over ten years. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art understanding of the degradation modes of Alloy 22 (N06022) due to its interaction with the predicted in-drift mountain conditions including temperature and types of electrolytes. Subjects discussed include thermal aging and phase stability, dry oxidation, general and localized corrosion, stress corrosion cracking and hydrogen induced cracking.

F. Hua; G.M. Gordon; R.B. Rebak

2005-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

265

Evaluation of the Proposed High-Level Radioactive Waste Repository at Yucca Mountain Using Total System Performance Assessment: Phase 6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A successful license application for the candidate spent-fuel and high-level waste repository at Yucca Mountain depends on a robust demonstration of long-term safety. This report presents EPRI's evaluation of, and makes a case for, the suitability of the Yucca Mountain repository using a Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). The report discusses factors that make the Yucca Mountain repository system suitable for continued development and initiation of the licensing process. Information in this Phas...

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

266

Effects of dry fractures on matrix diffusion in unsaturated fractured rocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Moridis, G. and Q. Hu, Radionuclide transport models underAn important factor in radionuclide retardation? J. Geophys.and G. Y. Bussod, Radionuclide transport in the unsaturated

Seol, Yongkoo; Liu, Hui Hai; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Total System Performance Assessment Code (TOSPAC); Volume 2, User`s guide: Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TOSPAC is a computer program that calculates partially saturated groundwater flow with the transport of water-soluble contaminants. TOSPAC Version 1 is restricted to calculations involving one-dimensional, vertical columns of one or more media. TOSPAC was developed to help answer questions surrounding the burial of toxic wastes in arid regions. Burial of wastes in arid regions is attractive because of generally low population densities and little groundwater flow, in the unsaturated zone, to disturb the waste. TOSPAC helps to quantify groundwater flow and the spread of contamination, offering an idea of what could happen in the distant future. Figure 1.1 illustrates the problem TOSPAC was designed to investigate. For groundwater flow, TOSPAC can provide saturations, velocities, and and travel tunes for water in the rock matrix or the fractures in the unsaturated zone. TOSPAC can determine how hydrologic conditions vary when the rate of infiltration changes. For contaminant transport, TOSPAC can compute how much of a contaminant is dissolved in the water and how it is distributed. TOSPAC can determine how fast the solute is moving and the shape of the concentration front. And TOSPAC can be used to investigate how much of the contaminant remains in the inventory of a repository, how much is adsorbed onto the soil or rock matrix, and how much reaches the water table. Effective use of TOSPAC requires knowledge in a number of diverse disciplines, including real groundwater flow and transport, the mathematical models of groundwater flow and transport, real-world data required for the models, and the numerical solution of differential equations. Equally important is a realization of the limitations intrinsic to a computer model of complex physical phenomena. This User`s Guide not only describes the mechanics of executing TOSPAC on a computer, but also examines these other topics.

Gauthier, J.H.; Dudley, A.L; Skinner, L.H. [Spectra Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wilson, M.L.; Peters, R.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of compacted sand-kaolin mixtures  

SciTech Connect

The unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of compacted sand-kaolin mixtures containing 0, 5, 10, and 30% kaolin (by dry weight) is measured for matric suctions, {psi}{sub m} < {approximately} 6.0 m. The measured unsaturated hydraulic conductivity (k{sub m}) values are compared with predicted unsaturated hydraulic conductivity (k{sub p}) values using the Brooks-Corey-Burdine and van Genuchten-Mualem relative hydraulic conductivity functions. In general, the accuracy of k{sub p} decreases with an increase in kaolin content or an increase in {psi}{sub m}. In addition, k{sub m} tends to be underpredicted for kaolin contents of 10 and 30% at relatively high suctions (1.0 m {le} {psi}{sub m} {le} 6.0 m) and overpredicted for kaolin contents of 0 and 5% at relatively low suctions (0.1 m {le} {psi}{sub m} < 1.0 m). For a given kaolin content and {psi}{sub m}, k{sub p} based on the Brooks-Corey-Burdine function tends to be more accurate than k{sub m} based on the van Genuchten-Mualem function. Finally, for 1.0 m {le} {psi}{sub m} {le} 6.0 m, k{sub p} based on analysis using the maximum volumetric water content ({theta}{sub m}) attained under steady-state flow conditions typically is more accurate than k{sub p} based on analysis using the saturated volumetric water content, {theta}{sub s}, where {theta}{sub m} {approximately} 84--90% of {theta}{sub s} in this study.

Chiu, T.F. [Genesis Group, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Shackelford, C.D. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Flow dynamics and solute transport in unsaturated rock fractures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rock fractures play an important role in flow and contaminant transport in fractured aquifers, production of oil from petroleum reservoirs, and steam generation from geothermal reservoirs. In this dissertation, phenomenological aspects of flow in unsaturated fractures were studied in visualization experiments conducted on a transparent replica of a natural, rough-walled rock fracture for inlet conditions of constant pressure and flow rate over a range of angles of inclination. The experiments demonstrated that infiltrating liquid proceeds through unsaturated rock fractures along non-uniform, localized preferential flow paths. Even in the presence of constant boundary conditions, intermittent flow was a persistent flow feature observed, where portions of the flow channel underwent cycles of snapping and reforming. Two modes of intermittent flow were observed, the pulsating blob mode and the rivulet snapping mode. A conceptual model for the rivulet snapping mode was proposed and examined using idealized, variable-aperture fractures. The frequency of intermittent flow events was measured in several experiments and related to the capillary and Bond numbers to characterize this flow behavior.

Su, G. W.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Solute spreading in nonstationary flows in bounded, heterogeneous unsaturated-saturated media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

three cases: transport in a mean gravity-dominated flow, in an unsaturated flow with a water table in nonstationary flows in bounded, heterogeneous unsaturated-saturated media, Water Resour. Res., 39(3), 1049, doi et al., 1991; Jury and Scotter, 1994; Harter and Yeh, 1996a, 1996b]. [3] In most of these models

Lu, Zhiming

271

Expert judgment in assessing radwaste risks: What Nevadans should know about Yucca Mountain; [Final report  

SciTech Connect

For phenomena characterized by accurate and largely complete data, quantitative risk assessment (QRA) provides extraordinarily valuable and objective information. However, with phenomena for which the data, models, or probabilities are incomplete or uncertain, QRA may be less useful and more questionable, because its conclusions are typically empirically and theoretically underdetermined. In the face of empirical or theoretical underdetermination, scientists often are forced to make a number of methodological value judgments and inferences about how to estimate and evaluate the associated risks. The purpose of this project is to evaluate instances of methodological value judgments and invalid or imprecise inferences that have occurred in the QRA done for the proposed Yucca Mountain high-level radioactive waste facility. We shall show (1) that questionable methodological value judgments and inferences have occurred in some Yucca Mountain QRA`S; (2) that questionable judgments and inferences, similar to those in the Yucca Mountain studies, have occurred in previous QRA`s done for other radiation-related facilities and have likely caused earlier QRA`s to err in specific ways; and (3) that, because the value judgments and problems associated with some Yucca Mountain QRA`s include repetitions of similar difficulties in earlier studies, therefore the QRA conclusions of some Yucca Mountain analyses are, at best, uncertain.

Shrader-Frechette, K. [University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Preclosure seismic hazards and their impact on site suitability of Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an overview of the preclosure seismic hazards and the influence of these hazards on determining the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a national high-level nuclear-waste repository. Geologic data, engineering analyses, and regulatory guidelines must be examined collectively to assess this suitability. An environmental assessment for Yucca Mountain, written in 1986, compiled and evaluated the existing tectonic data and presented arguments to satisfy, in part, the regulatory requirements that must be met if the Yucca Mountain site is to become a national waste repository. Analyses have been performed in the past five years that better quantify the local seismic hazards and the possibility that these hazards could lead to release of radionuclides to the environment. The results from these analyses increase the confidence in the ability of Yucca Mountain and the facilities that may be built there to function satisfactorily in their role as a waste repository. Uncertainties remain, however, primarily in the input parameters and boundary conditions for the models that were used to complete the analyses. These models must be validated and uncertainties reduced before Yucca Mountain can qualify as a viable high-level nuclear waste repository.

Gibson, J.D.

1992-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

273

Sequential evaluation of the potential geologic repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the changes that are planned for the characterization program at Yucca Mountain due to budget changes. Yucca Mountain is the only site being studied in the US for a geologic repository. Funding for the site characterization program at Yucca Mountain program was cut by roughly one half from the 1994 projected budget to complete three major milestones. These project milestones included: (1) a time-phased determination of site suitability, and if a positive finding, (2) completion of an Environmental Impact Statement, and (3) preparation of a License Application to the US NRC to authorize repository construction. In reaction, Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project has shifted from parallel development of these milestones to a sequenced approach with the site suitability evaluation being replaced with a management assessment. Changes to the regulatory structure for the disposal program are under consideration by DOE and the NRC. The possibility for NRC and Doe to develop a site-specific regulatory structure follows from the National Energy Policy Act of 1992 that authorized the US EPA to develop a site specific environmental standard for Yucca Mountain.

Bjerstedt, T.W.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

274

Major results of geophysical investigations at Yucca Mountain and vicinity, southern Nevada  

SciTech Connect

In the consideration of Yucca Mountain as a possible site for storing high level nuclear waste, a number of geologic concerns have been suggested for study by the National Academy of Sciences which include: (1) natural geologic and geochemical barriers, (2) possible future fluctuations in the water table that might flood a mined underground repository, (3) tectonic stability, and (4) considerations of shaking such as might be caused by nearby earthquakes or possible volcanic eruptions. This volume represents the third part of an overall plan of geophysical investigation of Yucca Mountain, preceded by the Site Characterization Plan (SCP; dated 1988) and the report referred to as the Geophysical White Paper, Phase 1, entitled Status of Data, Major Results, and Plans for Geophysical Activities, Yucca Mountain Project (Oliver and others, 1990). The SCP necessarily contained uncertainty about applicability and accuracy of methods then untried in the Yucca Mountain volcano-tectonic setting, and the White Paper, Phase 1, focused on summarization of survey coverage, data quality, and applicability of results. For the most part, it did not present data or interpretation. The important distinction of the current volume lies in presentation of data, results, and interpretations of selected geophysical methods used in characterization activities at Yucca Mountain. Chapters are included on the following: gravity investigations; magnetic investigations; regional magnetotelluric investigations; seismic refraction investigations; seismic reflection investigations; teleseismic investigations; regional thermal setting; stress measurements; and integration of methods and conclusions. 8 refs., 60 figs., 2 tabs.

Oliver, H.W.; Ponce, D.A. [eds.] [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hunter, W.C. [ed.] [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States). Yucca Mountain Project Branch

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

275

Mass transport of volatile organic compounds between the saturated and vadose zones. Master`s thesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) dissolved in the saturated zone are transported into the vadose zone primarily by gaseous phase diffusion. If the saturated zone is remediated, VOCs present in the vadose zone may become a secondary source of contamination for the groundwater. The amount of VOCs that remain in the vadose zone is dependent on site hydrology, soil properties, and the chemical properties of the contaminants. The purpose of this study was to determine what conditions caused VOC concentrations in the vadose zone to significantly recontaminate the saturated zone. A one-dimensional numerical model was developed to investigate the transport of a VOC, trichioroethylene, between the saturated and vadose zones under a variety of conditions. The model featured steady-state unsaturated water flow and transient contaminant transport. Transport mechanisms included aqueous phase advection-dispersion and gaseous phase diffusion. Partitioning between the water, gas, and soil compartments were modeled as equilibrium processes. Sensitivity analyses were performed on several variables including soil type (homogeneous and heterogeneous profiles), water infiltration rate and vadose zone depth. Results indicated that recontamination was most significant rate, and vadose zone depth. Results indicated that recontamination was most significant in the presence of heterogeneous soils, low infiltration rates and deep vadose zones.

Harner, M.S.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Analyzing Unsatirated Flow Patterns in Fractured Rock Using an Integrated Modeling Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characterizing percolation patterns in unsaturated fractured rock has posed a greater challenge to modeling investigations than comparable saturated zone studies, because of the heterogeneous nature of unsaturated media and the great number of variables impacting unsaturated flow. This paper presents an integrated modeling methodology for quantitatively characterizing percolation patterns in the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a proposed underground repository site for storing high-level radioactive waste. The modeling approach integrates a wide variety of moisture, pneumatic, thermal, and isotopic geochemical field data into a comprehensive three-dimensional numerical model for modeling analyses. It takes into account the coupled processes of fluid and heat flow and chemical isotopic transport in Yucca Mountain's highly heterogeneous, unsaturated fractured tuffs. Modeling results are examined against different types of field-measured data and then used to evaluate different hydrogeological conceptualizations and their results of flow patterns in the unsaturated zone. In particular, this model provides a much clearer understanding of percolation patterns and flow behavior through the unsaturated zone, both crucial issues in assessing repository performance. The integrated approach for quantifying Yucca Mountain's flow system is demonstrated to provide a practical modeling tool for characterizing flow and transport processes in complex subsurface systems.

Y.S. Wu; G. Lu; K. Zhang; L. Pan; G.S. Bodvarsson

2006-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

277

Dry Transfer Facility #1 - Ventilation Confinement Zoning Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this analysis is to establish the preliminary Ventilation Confinement Zone (VCZ) for the Dry Transfer Facility (DTF). The results of this document is used to determine the air quantities for each VCZ that will eventually be reflected in the development of the Ventilation Flow Diagrams. The calculations contained in this document were developed by D and E/Mechanical-HVAC and are intended solely for the use of the D and E/Mechanical-HVAC department in its work regarding the HVAC system for the Dry Transfer Facility. Yucca Mountain Project personnel from the D and E/Mechanical-HVAC department should be consulted before use of the calculation for purposes other than those stated herein or used by individuals other than authorized personnel in D and E/Mechanical-HVAC department.

K.D. Draper

2005-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

278

Enterprise Zone Program (Illinois)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Enterprise Zone Program provides eligible businesses that relocate or expand to a designated zone with tax incentives such as: 1) an investment tax credit; 2) a job tax credit for each job...

279

MODIFIED ZONE METHOD CALCULATOR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Zone Method is recommended for R-value calculations in steel stud walls by the 1997 ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals ASHRAE 1997. The Modified Zone Method is similar to the...

280

Reinvestment Zones (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Reinvestment Zones a local economic development tool used by municipalities and counties throughout the state of Texas. These zones can be created for the purpose of granting local businesses ad...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unsaturated zone yucca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Going Beyond 10,000 Years at Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On July 9, 2004, the U.S. Court of Appeals (1) issued a ruling that denied all challenges, except one, in a set of lawsuits against the federal government’s Yucca Mountain (YM) nuclear waste repository project. The successful challenge, brought by the State of Nevada, argued that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) had deviated from recommendations of the National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) (2) by limiting the regulatory compliance time to 10,000 years. Subsequently, the EPA has announced that it will not appeal and instead will revise the standard (3). Here we address several major questions that must be considered in formulating this revised standard. In 1992 Congress passed the Energy Policy Act, directing the EPA to promulgate sitespecific standards for YM “based upon and consistent with the findings and recommendations ” of a NAS review. This review (4) generated recommendations generally consistent with the standard that EPA subsequently established (5). However, important differences remained in the recommendations and justification for the compliance period. EPA chose a 15 mrem per year dose limit with the same 10,000-yearperiod for compliance assessment (6) as used previously for the Waste Isolation Pilot

P. F. Peterson; W. E. Kastenberg; M. Corradini

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project: Technical Data Catalog quarterly supplement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The March 21, 1993, Department of Energy (DOE)/Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Site-Specific Procedural Agreement for Geologic Repository Site Investigation and Characterization Program requires the DOE to develop and maintain a catalog of data which will be updated and provided to the NRC at least quarterly. This catalog is to include a description of the data; the time (date), place, and method of acquisition; and where it may be examined. The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) Technical Data Catalog is published and distributed in accordance with the requirements of the Site-Specific Agreement. The YMP Technical Data Catalog is a report based on reference information contained in the YMP Automated Technical Data Tracking System (ATDT). The reference information is provided by Participants for data acquired or developed in support of the YMP. The Technical Data Catalog is updated quarterly and published in the month following the end of each quarter. A complete revision to the Catalog is published at the end of each fiscal year. Supplements to the end-of-year edition are published each quarter. These supplements provide information related to new data items not included in previous quarterly updates and data items affected by changes to previously published reference information. The Technical Data Catalog, dated September 30, 1993, should be retained as the baseline document for the supplements until the end-of-year revision is published and distributed in October 1994.

NONE

1994-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

283

Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project technical data catalog: Quarterly supplement  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE)/Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Site-Specific Procedural Agreement for Geologic Repository Site Investigation and Characterization Program requires the DOE to develop and maintain a catalog of data which will be updated and provided to the NRC at least quarterly. This catalog is to include a description of the data; the time (date), place, and method of acquisition; and where the data may be examined. The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) Technical Data Catalog is published and distributed-in accordance with the requirements of the Site-Specific Agreement. The YMP Technical Data Catalog is a report based on reference information contained in the YMP Automated Technical Data Tracking System (ATDT). The reference information is provided by Participants for data acquired or developed in support of the YMP. The Technical Data Catalog is updated quarterly and distributed in the month following the end of each quarter. A complete revision to the catalog is published at the end of each fiscal year. Supplements to the end-of-year edition are published each quarter. These supplements provide information related to new data items not included in previous quarterly updates and data items affected by changes to previously published reference information. The Technical Data Catalog, dated September 30, 1994, should be retained as the baseline document for the supplements until the end-of-year revision is published and distributed in October 1995.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

284

Effects of actinide burning on waste disposal at Yucca Mountain  

SciTech Connect

Release rates of 15 radionuclides from waste packages expected to result from partitioning and transmutation of Light-Water Reactor (LWR) and Actinide-Burning Liquid-Metal Reactor (ALMR) spent fuel are calculated and compared to release rates from standard LWR spent fuel packages. The release rates are input to a model for radionuclide transport from the proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain to the water table. Discharge rates at the water table are calculated and used in a model for transport to the accessible environment, defined to be five kilometers from the repository edge. Concentrations and dose rates at the accessible environment from spent fuel and wastes from reprocessing, with partitioning and transmutation, are calculated. Partitioning and transmutation of LWR and ALMR spent fuel reduces the inventories of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium and curium in the high-level waste by factors of 40 to 500. However, because release rates of all of the actinides except curium are limited by solubility and are independent of package inventory, they are not reduced correspondingly. Only for curium is the repository release rate much lower for reprocessing wastes.

Hirschfelder, J. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States)

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Two Dimensional Polyamides Prepared From Unsaturated Carboxylic Acids And Amines.  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A polyamide and a process for preparing the polyamide are disclosed. The process comprises reacting in a reaction mixture a monomer selected from unsaturated carboxylic acids, esters of unsaturated carboxylic acids, anhydrides of unsaturated carboxylic acids, and mixtures thereof, and a first amine to form an intermediate reaction product in the reaction mixture, wherein the first amine is selected from RR.sub.1 NH, RNH.sub.2, RR.sub.1 NH.sub.2.sup.+, RNH.sub.3.sup.+ and mixtures thereof, wherein R and R.sub.1 can be the same or different and each contain between about 1 and 50 carbon atoms and are optionally substituted with heteroatoms oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, and phosphorus and combinations thereof, and reacting the intermediate reaction product and a second amine to form a polyamide, wherein the second amine is selected from R.sub.2 R.sub.3 NH, R.sub.2 NH.sub.2, R.sub.2 R.sub.3 NH.sub.2.sup.+, R.sub.2 NH.sub.3.sup.+ and mixtures thereof wherein R.sub.2 and R.sub.3 can be the same or different and each contain between about 1 and 50 carbon atoms and are optionally substituted with heteroatoms oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, and phosphorus and combinations thereof, wherein multiple of the R, R.sub.1, R.sub.2, and R.sub.3 are in vertically aligned spaced relationship along a backbone formed by the polyamide. In one version of the invention, the monomer is selected from maleic anhydride, maleic acid esters, and mixtures thereof. In another version of the invention, the first amine is an alkylamine, such as tetradecylamine, and the second amine is a polyalkylene polyamine, such as pentaethylenehexamine. In yet another version of the invention, the first amine and the second amine are olefinic or acetylenic amines, such as the reaction products of an alkyldiamine and an acetylenic carboxylic acid. The first amine and the second amine may be the same or different depending on the desired polyamide polymer structure.

McDonald, William F. (Utica, OH); Huang, Zhi Heng (East Lansing, MI); Wright, Stacy C. (Lansing, MI); Danzig, Morris (Northbrook, IL); Taylor, Andrew C. (Ann Arbor, MI)

2002-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

286

Yucca Mountain site characteriztion project bibliography. Progress Report, 1994--1995  

SciTech Connect

Following a reorganization of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management in 1990, the Yucca Mountain Project was renamed Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. The title of this bibliography was also changed to Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Bibliography. Prior to August 5, 1988, this project was called the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations. This bibliography contains information on this ongoing project which was added to the Department of Energy`s Energy Science and Technology Database from January 1, 1994, through December 31, 1995. The bibliography is categorized by principal project participating organization. Participant-sponsored subcontractor reports, papers, and articles are included in the sponsoring organization`s list. Another section contains information about publications on the Energy Science and Technology database which were not sponsored by the project but have some relevance to it.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project bibliography, January--June 1995. Supplement 4, Add.3: An update  

SciTech Connect

Following a reorganization of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management in 1990, the Yucca Mountain Project was renamed Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. The title of this bibliography was also changed to Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Bibliography. Prior to August 5, 1988, this project was called the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations. This bibliography contains information on this ongoing project that was added to the Department of Energy`s Energy Science and Technology Database from January 1, 1995, through June 30, 1995. The bibliography is categorized by principal project participating organization. Participant-sponsored subcontractor reports, papers, and articles are included in the sponsoring organization`s list. Another section contains information about publications on the Energy Science and Technology Database that were not sponsored by the project but have some relevance to it.

Stephan, P.M. [ed.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Bibliography, July--December 1994: An update  

SciTech Connect

Following a reorganization of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management in 1990, the Yucca Mountain Project was renamed Yucca Mountain Site Charactrization Project. The title of this bibliography was also changed to Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Bibliography. Prior to August 5, 1988, this project was called the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations. This bibliography contains information on this ongoing project that was added to the Department of Energy`s Science and Technology Database from July 1, 1994 through December 31, 1994. The bibliography is categorized by principal project participating organization. Participant-sponsored subcontractor reports, papers, and articles are included in the sponsoring organization`s list. Another section contains information about publications on the Energy Science and Technology Database that were not sponsored by the project but have some relevance to it.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Three dimensional visualization in support of Yucca Mountain Site characterization activities  

SciTech Connect

An understanding of the geologic and hydrologic environment for the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, NV is a critical component of site characterization activities. Conventional methods allow visualization of geologic data in only two or two and a half dimensions. Recent advances in computer workstation hardware and software now make it possible to create interactive three dimensional visualizations. Visualization software has been used to create preliminary two-, two-and-a-half-, and three-dimensional visualizations of Yucca Mountain structure and stratigraphy. The three dimensional models can also display lithologically dependent or independent parametric data. Yucca Mountain site characterization studies that will be supported by this capability include structural, lithologic, and hydrologic modeling, and repository design.

Brickey, D.W.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Bibliography, January--June 1993. An update: Supplement 4, Addendum 1  

SciTech Connect

Following a reorganization of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management in 1990, the Yucca Mountain Project was renamed Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. The title of this bibliography was also changed to Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Bibliography. Prior to August 5, 1988, this project was called the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations. This bibliography contains information on this ongoing project that was added to the Department of Energy`s Energy Science and Technology Database from January 1, 1994 through June 30, 1994. The bibliography is categorized by principal project participating organization. Participant-sponsored subcontractor reports, papers,and articles are included in the sponsoring organization`s list. Another section contains information about publications on the Energy Science and Technology Database that were not sponsored by the project but have some relevance to it.

Stephan, P.M. [ed.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Geohydrologic data and models of Rainier Mesa and their implications to Yucca Mountain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The geohydrologic data collected at Rainier Mesa provide the only extensive observations in tunnels presently available on flow and transport in tuff units similar to those of a potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. This information can, therefore, be of great value in planning the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) testing in underground drifts at Yucca Mountain. In this paper, we compare the geohydrologic characteristics of tuff units of these two sites and summarize the hydrochemical data indicating the presence of nearly meteoric water in Rainier Mesa tunnels. A simple analytic model is used to evaluate the possibility of propagating transient pulses of water along fractures or faults through the Paintbrush nonwelded tuff unit to reach the tunnel beds below. The results suggest that fast flow could occur without significant mixing between meteoric fracture water and matrix pore water. The implications of these findings on planning for the ESF Calico Hills study at Yucca Mountain are discussed.

Wang, J.S.Y.; Cook, N.G.W.; Wollenberg, H.A.; Carnahan, C.L.; Javandel, I.; Tsang, C.F.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Status of data, major results, and plans for geophysical activities, Yucca Mountain Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes past and planned geophysical activities associated with the Yucca Mountain Project and is intended to serve as a starting point for integration of geophysical activities. This report relates past results to site characterization plans, as presented in the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Plan (SCP). This report discusses seismic exploration, potential field methods, geoelectrical methods, teleseismic data collection and velocity structural modeling, and remote sensing. This report discusses surface-based, airborne, borehole, surface-to-borehole, crosshole, and Exploratory Shaft Facility-related activities. The data described in this paper, and the publications discussed, have been selected based on several considerations; location with respect to Yucca Mountain, whether the success or failure of geophysical data is important to future activities, elucidation of features of interest, and judgment as to the likelihood that the method will produce information that is important for site characterization. 65 refs., 19 figs., 12 tabs.

Oliver, H.W. [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA); Hardin, E.L. [Science Applications International Corp., Las Vegas, NV (USA); Nelson, P.H. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (USA)] [eds.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Site characterization progress report: Yucca Mountain, Nevada, October 1, 1992--March 31, 1993, No. 8  

SciTech Connect

In accordance with requirements of Section 113(b)(3) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended, and 10 CFR 60.18(g), the US Department of Energy has prepared this report on the progress of site characterization activities at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for the period October 1, 1992, through March 31, 1993. This report is the eighth in a series issued at intervals of approximately six months during site characterization of Yucca Mountain as a possible site for a geologic repository for the permanent disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Also included in this report are activities such as public outreach and international programs that are not formally part of the site characterization process. Information on these activities is provided to report on all aspects of the Yucca Mountain studies.

NONE

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Site characterization progress report: Yucca Mountain, Nevada, April 1, 1993--September 30, 1993, No. 9  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In accordance with requirements of Section 113(b)(3) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended, and 10 CFR 60.18(g), the U.S. Department of Energy has prepared this report on the progress of site characterization activities at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for the period April 1, 1993, through September 30, 1993. This report is the ninth in a series issued at intervals of approximately six months during site characterization of Yucca Mountain as a possible site for a geologic repository for the permanent disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Also included in this report are activities such as public outreach and international programs that are not formally part of the site characterization process. Information on these activities is provided to report on all aspects of the Yucca Mountain studies.

NONE

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

ASHRAE Climate Zones | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ASHRAE Climate Zones Jump to: navigation, search Subtype A Subtype B Subtype C Climate Zone Number 1 Zone 1A Zone 1B NA Climate Zone Number 2 Zone 2A Zone 2B NA Climate Zone...

296

SITE-SCALE SATURATED ZONE TRANSPORT  

SciTech Connect

This work provides a site-scale transport model for calculating radionuclide transport in the saturated zone (SZ) at Yucca Mountain, for use in the abstractions model in support of ''Total System Performance Assessment for License Application'' (TSPA-LA). The purpose of this model report is to provide documentation for the components of the site-scale SZ transport model in accordance with administrative procedure AP-SIII.10Q, Models. The initial documentation of this model report was conducted under the ''Technical Work Plan For: Saturated Zone Flow and Transport Modeling and Testing'' (BSC 2003 [DIRS 163965]). The model report has been revised in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan For: Natural System--Saturated Zone Analysis and Model Report Integration'', Section 2.1.1.4 (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171421]) to incorporate Regulatory Integration Team comments. All activities listed in the technical work plan that are appropriate to the transport model are documented in this report and are described in Section 2.1.1.4 (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171421]). This report documents: (1) the advection-dispersion transport model including matrix diffusion (Sections 6.3 and 6.4); (2) a description and validation of the transport model (Sections 6.3 and 7); (3) the numerical methods for simulating radionuclide transport (Section 6.4); (4) the parameters (sorption coefficient, Kd ) and their uncertainty distributions used for modeling radionuclide sorption (Appendices A and C); (5) the parameters used for modeling colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport (Table 4-1, Section 6.4.2.6, and Appendix B); and (6) alternative conceptual models and their dispositions (Section 6.6). The intended use of this model is to simulate transport in saturated fractured porous rock (double porosity) and alluvium. The particle-tracking method of simulating radionuclide transport is incorporated in the finite-volume heat and mass transfer numerical analysis (FEHM) computer code, (FEHM V2.20, STN: 10086-2.20-00) (LANL 2003 [DIRS 161725]) and is described in Section 6.4 of this report. FEHM is a three-dimensional (3-D), finite-volume, finite-element, heat and mass flow-and-transport code. This report documents the features and capabilities of the site-scale transport model for calculating radionuclide transport in the SZ at Yucca Mountain in support of the TSPA-LA. Correlative flow-model calculations using FEHM are carried out and documented in the model report ''Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow Model'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170037]). The velocity fields are calculated by the flow model independent of the transport processes and supplied as a part of the output package from the flow model, which is then used as inputs to the transport model. Several SZ analysis model reports provide information and data needed as feed-ins for this report, and this report in turn provides technical product outputs that feed into other SZ reports. The details of inputs to the site-scale transport model are provided in Section 4.

S. KELLER

2004-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

297

TSPA 1991: An initial total-system performance assessment for Yucca Mountain; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes an assessment of the long-term performance of a repository system that contains deeply buried highly radioactive waste; the system is assumed to be located at the potential site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The study includes an identification of features, events, and processes that might affect the potential repository, a construction of scenarios based on this identification, a selection of models describing these scenarios (including abstraction of appropriate models from detailed models), a selection of probability distributions for the parameters in the models, a stochastic calculation of radionuclide releases for the scenarios, and a derivation of complementary cumulative distribution functions (CCDFs) for the releases. Releases and CCDFs are calculated for four categories of scenarios: aqueous flow (modeling primarily the existing conditions at the site, with allowances for climate change), gaseous flow, basaltic igneous activity, and human intrusion. The study shows that models of complex processes can be abstracted into more simplified representations that preserve the understanding of the processes and produce results consistent with those of more complex models.

Barnard, R.W.; Wilson, M.L.; Dockery, H.A.; Kaplan, P.G.; Eaton, R.R.; Bingham, F.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gauthier, J.H.; Robey, T.H. [Spectra Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Microsoft Word - IG-0708 -Yucca Rpt- FINAL Nov 10-05.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

F F U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Inspections and Special Inquiries Inspection Report Quality Assurance Weaknesses in the Review of Yucca Mountain Electronic Mail for Relevancy to the Licensing Process DOE/IG-0708 November 2005 QUALITY ASSURANCE WEAKNESSES IN THE REVIEW OF YUCCA MOUNTAIN ELECTRONIC MAIL FOR RELEVANCY TO THE LICENSING PROCESS TABLE OF CONTENTS OVERVIEW Introduction and Objectives...................................... 1 Observations and Conclusions.................................. 2 DETAILS OF FINDINGS Review of E-mails for Inclusion in the LSN.................. 4 Possible Conditions Adverse to Quality...................... 6

299

Yucca Mountain, Nevada - A Proposed Geologic Repository for High-Level Radioactive Waste (Volume 1) Introduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Yucca Mountain in Nevada represents the proposed solution to what has been a lengthy national effort to dispose of high-level radioactive waste, waste which must be isolated from the biosphere for tens of thousands of years. This chapter reviews the background of that national effort and includes some discussion of international work in order to provide a more complete framework for the problem of waste disposal. Other chapters provide the regional geologic setting, the geology of the Yucca Mountain site, the tectonics, and climate (past, present, and future). These last two chapters are integral to prediction of long-term waste isolation.

R.A. Levich; J.S. Stuckless

2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

300

Integrated Yucca Mountain Safety Case and Supporting Analysis: EPRI's Phase 7 Performance Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After approval of the Yucca Mountain Site Recommendation by the President and Congress in 2001, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) entered the construction pre-license application phase with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). A successful license application for the proposed spent fuel and high level waste repository at Yucca Mountain depends on a robust demonstration of long-term safety. It also depends on prioritizing the work left to do in a stepwise manner consistent with the particular p...

2002-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unsaturated zone yucca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Independent Probabilistic Volcanic Hazard Analysis (PVHA) for the Yucca Mountain Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A deep geologic repository at Yucca Mountain has been proposed for the disposal of commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) and other nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste from defense and nuclear weapons programs. On June 3, 2008, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) submitted a license application to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for repository construction. The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (as amended) directed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to promulgate a Yucca ...

2008-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

302

Los Alamos National Laboratory Yucca Mountain Project Publications (1979-1996)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This over-350 title publication list reflects the accomplishments of Los Alamos Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project researchers, who, since 1979, have been conducting multidisciplinary research to help determine if Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is a suitable site for a high-level waste repository. The titles can be accessed in two ways: by year, beginning with 1996 and working back to 1979, and by subject area: mineralogy/petrology/geology, volcanism, radionuclide solubility/ground-water chemistry; radionuclide sorption and transport; modeling/validation/field studies; summary/status reports, and quality assurance.

Ruhala, E.R.; Klein, S.H. [comps.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Construction features of the exploratory shaft at Yucca Mountain  

SciTech Connect

The Exploratory Shaft (ES) at Yucca Mountain is planned to be constructed during 1985 and 1986 as part of the detailed site characterization for one of three sites which may be selected as candidates for location of a high-level radioactive waste repository. Conventional mining methods will be used for the shaft sinking phase of the ES project. The ES will be comprised of surface support facilities, a 1480-ft-deep circular shaft lined with concrete to a finished inside diameter of 12 ft, lateral excavations and test installations extending up to 200 ft from the shaft, and long lateral borings extending up to 2300 ft from the shaft. The estimated time for sinking the shaft to a total depth of about 1480 ft and completing the lateral excavations and borings is about two years. The major underground development planned for the primary test level at a depth of 1200 ft consists of the equivalent of 1150 ft of 15- by 15-ft drift. The total volume of rock to be removed from the shaft proper and the lateral excavations totals about 1/2 million cubic feet. Construction equipment for the shaft and underground excavation phases consists of conventional mine hoisting equipment, shot hole and rock bolt drilling jumbos, mucking machines, and hauling machines. The desire to maintain relatively uniform and even walls in selected shaft and drift intervals will require that controlled blasting techniques be employed. Certain lateral boring operations associated with tests to be conducted in the underground development may pose some unusual problems or require specialized equipment. One of the operations is boring and lining a 30-in.-diam by 600-ft-long horizontal hole with a boring machine being developed under the direction of Sandia National Laboratories. Another special operation is coring long lateral holes (500 to 2000 ft) with minimum use of liquid circulating fluids. 8 figures.

Adair, G.W.; Fiore, J.N.

1984-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

304

UPDATE TO THE YUCCA MOUNTAIN REPOSITORY LICENSE APPLICATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this letter is to transmit the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) first update to the Yucca Mountain Repository LA, which meets the requirements of 10 CFR § 63.22(c) to update the application on notification of the appointment of an Atomic Safety and Licensing Board. DOE initially transmitted its LA for construction authorization to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on June 3, 2008. In accordance with 10 CFR § 63.22(e), DOE certifies that this revision reflects the updated LA as of October 16, 2008. Changes made to this revision were determined not to be significant and did not impact the conclusions of the LA. The update was initiated soon after the docketing of the LA by the NRC in anticipation of notification of the appointment of an Atomic Safety and Licensing Board. Due to the lengthy process required to maintain configuration control between the paper version and the electronic version, and the time required to print the paper version, DOE is submitting the update prepared as of that time. Enclosed are optical storage media which contain: 1) the first update of the LA, with revised sections clearly identified as Revision 1, and text and figure changes noted with marginal change bars; and 2) updates to the primary reference documents to the LA, affecting 36 of the original 196 references. In addition, enclosed in paper format are: 1) a detailed listing of the contents of the optical storage media submitted with this letter; 2) a summary of the specific LA changes that have been made, including the sections revised and a description of each change; and 3) copies of the individual LA pages affected by changes since the June 3, 2008, submittal. The updates to the primary reference

Michael F. Weber

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Secondary plant succession on disturbed sites at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a study of secondary plant succession on disturbed sites created during initial site investigations in the late 1970s and early 1980s at Yucca Mountain, NV. Specific study objectives were to determine the rate and success of secondary plant succession, identify plant species found in disturbances that may be suitable for site-specific reclamation, and to identify environmental variables that influence succession on disturbed sites. During 1991 and 1992, fifty seven disturbed sites were located. Vegetation parameters, disturbance characteristics and environmental variables were measured at each site. Disturbed site vegetation parameters were compared to that of undisturbed sites to determine the status of disturbed site plant succession. Vegetation on disturbed sites, after an average of ten years, was different from undisturbed areas. Ambrosia dumosa, Chrysothamnus teretifolius, Hymenoclea salsola, Gutierrezia sarothrae, Atriplex confertifolia, Atriplex canescens, and Stephanomeria pauciflora were the most dominant species across all disturbed sites. With the exception of A. dumosa, these species were generally minor components of the undisturbed vegetation. Elevation, soil compaction, soil potassium, and amounts of sand and gravel in the soil were found to be significant environmental variables influencing the species composition and abundance of perennial plants on disturbed sites. The recovery rate for disturbed site secondary succession was estimated. Using a linear function (which would represent optimal conditions), the recovery rate for perennial plant cover, regardless of which species comprised the cover, was estimated to be 20 years. However, when a logarithmic function (which would represent probable conditions) was used, the recovery rate was estimated to be 845 years. Recommendations for future studies and site-specific reclamation of disturbances are presented.

Angerer, J.P.; Ostler, W.K.; Gabbert, W.D.; Schultz, B.W.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Structure and electronic properties of saturated and unsaturated gallium nitride nanotubes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The atomic and electronic structures of saturated and unsaturated GaN nanotubes along the [001] direction with (100) lateral facets are studied using first-principles calculations. Atomic relaxation of nanotubes shows that appreciable distortion occurs in the unsaturated nanotubes. All the nanotubes considered, including saturated and unsaturated ones, exhibit semiconducting, with a direct band gap. Surface states arisen from the threefold-coordinated N and Ga atoms at the lateral facets exist inside the bulk-like band gap. When the nanotubes saturated with hydrogen, these dangling bond bands are removed from the band gap, but the band gap decreases with increasing the wall thickness of the nanotubes.

Wang, Zhiguo; Wang, Shengjie; Li, Jingbo; Gao, Fei; Weber, William J.

2009-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

307

Completion Report for the Well ER-6-2 Site Corrective Action Unit 97: Yucca Flat - Climax Mine  

SciTech Connect

Well ER-6-2 and its satellite hole, Well ER-6-2 No.1, were drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. Well ER-6-2 was drilled in two stages in 1993 and 1994; the satellite hole, Well ER-6-2 No.1 was drilled nearby in 1993 but was abandoned. The wells were drilled as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program for the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine Corrective Action Unit Number 97, in the northeastern portion of the Nevada Test Site. The wells are located in Yucca Flat, within Area 6 of the Nevada Test Site. The wells provided information regarding the radiological and hydrogeological environment in a potentially down-gradient position from tests conducted in northern and central Yucca Flat. Construction of Well ER-6-2 began with a 1.2-meter-diameter surface conductor hole, which was drilled and cased off to a depth of 30.8 meters below the surface. A 50.8-centimeter diameter surface hole was then rotary drilled to the depth of 578.5 meters and cased off to the depth of 530.4 meters. The hole diameter was then reduced to 27.0 centimeters, and the borehole was advanced to a temporary depth of 611.4 meters. The borehole was conventionally cored to a total depth of 1,045 meters with a diameter of 14.0 centimeters. Borehole sloughing required cementing and re-drilling of several zones. The open-hole completion accesses the lower carbonate aquifer, the CP thrust fault, and the upper clastic confining unit. A fluid level depth of 543.2 meters was most recently measured in the open borehole in September 2007. No radionuclides were encountered during drilling. The satellite hole Well ER-6-2 No.1 was drilled approximately 15.2 meters north of Well ER-6-2 on the same drill pad. This was planned to be used as an observation well during future hydrologic testing at Well ER-6-2; however, the satellite hole was abandoned at the depth of 399 meters due to stuck drill pipe, and was subsequently cemented to the surface. Detailed lithologic descriptions with stratigraphic assignments in this report are based on composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3 meters, cores taken between the depths of 619.3 and 1,042.4 meters, and geophysical log data. Stratigraphic assignments within the Paleozoic section are based on paleontological analyses. The well was collared in alluvium and at 30.8 meters penetrated Paleozoic carbonate rocks. These consisted of dolostone with minor shale and limestone of the Bonanza King Formation, and limestone with minor quartzite, sandstone, and dolostone assigned to the Guilmette Formation. The borehole reached total depth in a shale unit assigned to the Chainman Shale. The units below the Bonanza King Formation are overturned due to faulting and folding and, therefore, are stratigraphically upside-down.

NSTec Environmental Management

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Seismicity in the Vicinity of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for the Period October 1, 2004 to September 30, 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes earthquake activity within approximately 65 km of Yucca Mountain site during the October 1, 2004 to September 30, 2006 time period (FY05-06). The FY05-06 earthquake activity will be compared with the historical and more recent period of seismic activity in the Yucca Mountain region. The relationship between the distribution of seismicity and active faults, historical patterns of activity, and rates of earthquakes (number of events and their magnitudes) are important components in the assessment of the seismic hazard for the Yucca Mountain site. Since October 1992 the University of Nevada has compiled a catalog of earthquakes in the Yucca Mountain area. Seismicity reports have identified notable earthquake activity, provided interpretations of the seismotectonics of the region, and documented changes in the character of earthquake activity based on nearly 30 years of site-characterization monitoring. Data from stations in the seismic network in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain is collected and managed at the Nevada Seismological Laboratory (NSL) at the University of Nevada Reno (UNR). Earthquake events are systematically identified and cataloged under Implementing Procedures developed in compliance with the Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE) Quality Assurance Program. The earthquake catalog for FY05-06 in the Yucca Mountain region submitted to the Yucca Mountain Technical Data Management System (TDMS) forms the basis of this report.

Smith, Ken

2007-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

309

Microbial Impacts to the Near-Field Environment Geochemistry (MING): A Model for Estimating Microbial Communities in Repository Drifts at Yucca Mountain  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geochemical and microbiological modeling was performed to evaluate the potential quantities and impact of microorganisms on the geochemistry of the area adjacent to and within nuclear waste packages in the proposed repository drifts at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The microbial growth results from the introduction of water, ground support, and waste package materials into the deep unsaturated rock. The simulations, which spanned one million years, were accomplished using a newly developed computer code, Microbial Impacts to the Near-Field Environment Geochemistry (MING). MING uses environmental thresholds for limiting microbial growth to temperatures below 120 C and above relative humidities of 90 percent in repository drifts. Once these thresholds are met, MING expands upon a mass balance and thermodynamic approach proposed by McKinley and others (1997), by using kinetic rates to supply constituents from design materials and constituent fluxes including solubilized rock components into the drift, to perform two separate mass-balance calculations as a function of time. The first (nutrient limit) assesses the available nutrients (C, N, P and S) and calculates how many microorganisms can be produced based on a microorganism stoichiometry of C{sub 160}(H{sub 280}O{sub 80})N{sub 30}P{sub 2}S. The second (energy limit) calculates the energy available from optimally combined redox couples for the temperature, and pH at that time. This optimization maximizes those reactions that produce > 15kJ/mol (limit on useable energy) using an iterative linear optimization technique. The final available energy value is converted to microbial mass at a rate of 1 kg of biomass (dry weight) for every 64 MJ of energy. These two values (nutrient limit and energy limit) are then compared and the smaller value represents the number of microorganisms that can be produced over a specified time. MING can also be adapted to investigate other problems of interest as the model can be used in saturated and unsaturated environments and in laboratory situations to establish microbial growth limitations. Other projected uses include investigations of contaminated locations where monitored natural attenuation or engineered bioremediation could be employed.

D.M. Jolley; T.F. Ehrhorn; J. Horn

2002-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

310

Testing for fault activity at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, using independent GPS results from the BARGEN network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that will not support nesting Mountain Plovers. Included in these areas is a hilly section of yucca and sagebrushPOTENTAIL HABITAT FOR MOUNTAIN PLOVERS ON COLORADO SPRINGS UTILITIES PROPERTY A Report to Colorado Delivery Fort Collins, Colorado 80523-8002 #12;INTRODUCTION The Mountain Plover (Charadrius montanus

Blewitt, Geoffrey

311

Environmental assessment: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada; Volume 3  

SciTech Connect

In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The site is in the Great Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. To determine their suitability, the Yucca Mountain site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE`s General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations were reported in draft environmental assessments (EAs), which were issued for public review and comment. After considering the comments received on the draft EAs, the DOE prepared the final EAs. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Yucca Mountain site is not disqualified under the guidelines. The DOE has also found that it is suitable for site characterization because the evidence does not support a conclusion that the site will not be able to meet each of the qualifying conditions specified in the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Yucca Mountain site as one of five sites suitable for characterization.

NONE

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Environmental assessment: Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada Research and Development Area, Nevada; Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The site is in the Great Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. To determine their suitability, the Yucca Mountain site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE`s General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations were reported in draft environmental assessments (EAs), which were issued for public review and comment. After considering the comments received on the draft EAs, the DOE prepared the final EAs. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Yucca Mountain site is not disqualified under the guidelines. The DOE has also found that is is suitable for site characterization because the evidence does not support a conclusion that the site will not be able to meet each of the qualifying conditions specified in the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Yucca Mountain site as one of five sites suitable for characterization.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Analysis of Fracture in Cores from the Tuff Confining Unit beneath Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

The role fractures play in the movement of groundwater through zeolitic tuffs that form the tuff confining unit (TCU) beneath Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, is poorly known. This is an important uncertainty, because beneath most of Yucca Flat the TCU lies between the sources of radionuclide contaminants produced by historic underground nuclear testing and the regional carbonate aquifer. To gain a better understanding of the role fractures play in the movement of groundwater and radionuclides through the TCU beneath Yucca Flat, a fracture analysis focusing on hydraulic properties was performed on conventional cores from four vertical exploratory holes in Area 7 of Yucca Flat that fully penetrate the TCU. The results of this study indicate that the TCU is poorly fractured. Fracture density for all fractures is 0.27 fractures per vertical meter of core. For open fractures, or those observed to have some aperture, the density is only 0.06 fractures per vertical meter of core. Open fractures are characterized by apertures ranging from 0.1 to 10 millimeter, and averaging 1.1 millimeter. Aperture typically occurs as small isolated openings along the fracture, accounting for only 10 percent of the fracture volume, the rest being completely healed by secondary minerals. Zeolite is the most common secondary mineral occurring in 48 percent of the fractures observed.

Lance Prothro

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Environmental assessment: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada; Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high- level radioactive waste. The site is in the Great Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. To determine their suitability, the Yucca Mountain site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE`s General Guideline for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations were reported in draft environmental assessments (EA), which were issued for public review and comment. After considering the comments received on the draft EAs, the DOE prepared the final EAs. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE found that the Yucca Mountain site is not disqualified under the guidelines. The DOE has also found that it is suitable for site characterization because the evidence does not support a conclusion that the site will not be able to meet each of the qualifying conditions specified in the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Yucca Mountain site as of five sites suitable for characterization.

NONE

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

DOE`s Yucca Mountain studies: What are they? Why are they being done?  

SciTech Connect

This booklet is about the disposal of high-level nuclear waste in the United States. It is intended for readers who do not have a technical background. It discusses why scientists and engineers think high-level nuclear waste may be disposed of safely underground. It also describes why Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is being studied and provides basic information about those studies.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Geothermal: Educational Zone  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Educational Zone Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About...

317

Renaissance Zones (North Dakota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Renaissance Zones allow qualifying businesses and individuals to claim one or more tax incentives for purchasing, leasing, or making improvements to real property located in a North Dakota...

318

Analysis of pumping-induced unsaturated regions beneath a perennial river  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the period over which water can be produced at a particulardesaturated and water could no longer be produced at a rateis unsaturated, but water can still be produced at a rate of

Su, G.W.; Jasperse, J.; Seymour, D.; Constantz, J.; Zhou, Q.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Site characterization progress report: Yucca Mountain, Nevada, April 1, 1992--September 30, 1992, Number 7  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In accordance with section 113(b)(3) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended (NWPA), the Department has prepared the seventh in a series of reports on the progress of site characterization at the Yucca Mountain candidate site. The Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program made significant progress during the reporting period at the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. Several important advances were made in the surface-based testing program including: initiation of borehole drilling utilizing the new, state-of-the-art LM-300 drill rig which employs dry drilling and coring techniques; neutron access borehole drilling to evaluate infiltration processes; excavations to aid geologic mapping; and trenching in Midway Valley to study Quaternary faulting. A Floodplain Assessment and Statement of Findings was published in the Federal Register which concluded there would be no significant impact nor cumulative impacts on floodplains resulting from Exploratory Studies Facility activities. The National Academy of Sciences` National Research Council released its report entitled ``Ground Water at Yucca Mountain: How High Can It Rise?`` which concluded that none of the evidence cited as proof of groundwater upwelling in and around Yucca Mountain could be reasonably attributed to that process and that significant water table excursions to the repository design level are not shown by the geologic record. The June 29, 1992, earthquake near Yucca Mountain provided scientists with a wealth of information relevant to understanding the neotectonics of the area and the geometry of faults at depth. Early findings suggest that accelerations recorded were well within proposed design limits for the surface waste handling facilities.

NONE

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Burnup Credit Approach Used in the Yucca Mountain License Application  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy has submitted a license application (LA) for construction authorization of a deep geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The license application is currently under review by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This paper will describe the methodology and approach used in the LA to address the issue of criticality and the role of burnup credit during the postclosure period. The most significant and effective measures for prevention of criticality in the repository include multiple redundant barriers that act to isolate fissionable material from water (which can act as a moderator, corrosive agent, and transporter of fissile material); inherent geometry of waste package internals and waste forms; presence of fixed neutron absorbers in waste package internals; and fuel burnup for commercial spent nuclear fuel. A probabilistic approach has been used to screen criticality from the total system performance assessment. Within the probabilistic approach, criticality is considered an event, and the total probability of a criticality event occurring within 10,000 years of disposal is calculated and compared against the regulatory criterion. The total probability of criticality includes contributions associated with both internal (within waste packages) and external (external to waste packages) criticality for each of the initiating events that could lead to waste package breach. The occurrence of and conditions necessary for criticality in the repository have been thoroughly evaluated using a comprehensive range of parameter distributions. A simplified design-basis modeling approach has been used to evaluate the probability of criticality by using numerous significant and conservative assumptions. Burnup credit is used only for evaluations of in-package configurations and uses a combination of conservative and bounding modeling approximations to ensure conservatism. This paper will review the NRC regulatory criteria relevant to postclosure criticality, explain the role of criticality within the overall repository performance assessment, describe the strategy for preventing criticality via design features and waste form properties, and discuss the numerous considerations relevant to criticality and burnup credit for spent nuclear fuel disposed of in a geologic repository, with emphasis on the burnup credit approach and analyses.

Scaglione, John M [ORNL; Wagner, John C [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unsaturated zone yucca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Electrokinetic removal of uranium from contaminated, unsaturated soils  

SciTech Connect

Electrokinetic remediation of uranium-contaminated soil was studied in a series of laboratory-scale experiments in test cells with identical geometry using quartz sand at approximately 10 percent moisture content. Uranium, when present in the soil system as an anionic complex, could be migrated through unsaturated soil using electrokinetics. The distance that the uranium migrated in the test cell was dependent upon the initial molar ratio of citrate to uranium used. Over 50 percent of the uranium was recovered from the test cells using the citrate and carbonate complexing agents over of period of 15 days. Soil analyses showed that the uranium remaining in the test cells had been mobilized and ultimately would have been extracted. Uranium extraction exceeded 90 percent in an experiment that was operated for 37 days. Over 70 percent of the uranium was removed from a Hanford waste sample over a 55 day operating period. Citrate and carbonate ligand utilization ratios required for removing 50 percent of the uranium from the uranium-contaminated sand systems were approximately 230 moles ligand per mole uranium and 1320 moles ligand per mole uranium for the waste. Modifying the operating conditions to increasing the residence time of the complexants is expected to improved the utilization efficiency of the complexing agent.

Booher, W.F. [IT Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lindgren, E.R.; Brady, P.V. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

The effect of fuel type in unsaturated spent fuel tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two well-characterized types of spent nuclear fuel (ATM-103 and ATM-106) were tested under simulated unsaturated conditions with simulated groundwater at 90{degree}C. The actinides present in the leachate were measured after periods of approximately 60, 120, and 275 days. The vessels were acid stripped after 120 and 275 days. Both colloidal and soluble actinide species were detected in the leachates which had pHs ranging from 4 to 7. Alpha spectroscopy studies of filtered and unfiltered leachates showed that large amounts of actinides may be bound in colloids. The uranium phases identified in the colloids were schoepite and soddyite. The actinide release behavior of the two fuels appears to be different. The ATM-106 fuel began to release actinides later than the ATM-103 fuel, but after 275 days, it had released more. The amount of americium released from the two fuels was a higher percentage of the maximum amount of americium present than was the percentage of the simultaneous amount of uranium released.

Finn, P.A.; Gong, M.; Bates, J.K.; Emery, J.W.; Hoh, J.C.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Moisture content and unsaturated conditions in UMTRA project radon barriers  

SciTech Connect

A typical Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal facility consists of uranium tailings and other contaminated materials covered by a three to six foot thick radon barrier and six inches of filter sand, overlain by one foot of erosion-protection riprap. To comply with the proposed US Environmental Protection Agency groundwater protection standards applicable to the UMTRA Project, groundwater concentration limits of hazardous constitutents cannot be exceeded at the point of compliance, which is the downgradient limit of the waste management area. The typical radon barrier has a saturated hydraulic conductivity of approximately 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} centimeters per second (cm/s). Long-term seepage rates from a disposal facility with an unsaturated radon barrier may permit the concentration limits to be met at the point of compliance. Field studies were undertaken to measure the percent saturation and the relation of percent saturation to soil tension, and to predict the hydraulic conductivity as a function of percent saturation in radon barriers at three UMTRA Project disposal facilities that have been completed for up to two years. Presently typical covers have been completed at the Shiprock, Clive, and Burrell sites, and they are planned or under construction at the Ambrosia Lake, Green River, Lakeview, Mexican Hat, Slick Rock, and Tuba City sites. 2 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Finite - difference modeling of the Yucca Mountain, Nevada Area: a study of the regional water table gradients based on hydraulic conductivity contrasts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Nevada Yucca Mountain site is being investigated to determine if it is a suitable site for the construction of a high-level nuclear waste repository. A feature of concern north of the selected site is an abrupt rise in the water table. This high gradient of 0.15 is flanked to the north by a moderate gradient of 0.015 and to the south by a very small gradient of 0.0001. Since the mechanisms creating this feature have the potential to cause changes in the position and configuration of the water table, they must be understood so risk analysis of the site may be performed. The three distinct gradient regions found at the site may be related to the Cenozoic volcanics, the Paleozoic clastic aquitard, and the Paleozoic carbonates. The large hydraulic gradient regionally corresponds with the northern limit of the Paleozoic carbonates, at the contact of the Eleana Formation, a Paleozoic aquitard. This study investigates, using finite difference modeling, the relationship between the steep hydraulic gradient and hydraulic conductivity contrasts. The site was modeled with flow boundaries to investigate the effects of variable gradient input to the flow balance calculation. A model was run with differential volcanic hydraulic conductivity zones with regulated flow into the carbonates. Constant head boundaries were implemented in models to investigate the effect of both a confined and open carbonate zone and with vertical barriers above the argillite/carbonate contact. The results of the study found that vertical and horizontal hydraulic conductivity contrasts do not fully account for the steep gradients, although the vertical contrasts marginally increase the gradient from horizontal contrasts. The confined carbonate zone model produced results that do not correlate with field data. The vertical barrier model did successfully reproduce steep gradients with gradient steepness related to flow restriction. Through the use of flow boundaries the steep gradient was reproduced successfully with a contrast of 0.8 orders of magnitude by allowing flow into the carbonate zone.

Davidson, Timothy Ross

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Assessment of Incident-Free Transport for Transport of Spent Nuclear Fuel to Yucca Mountain Using RADTRAN 5.5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report evaluates the incident-free radiological impacts associated with the transportation of spent nuclear fuel to the proposed Yucca Mountain repository using the RADTRAN 5.5 computer code developed by Sandia National Laboratories.

2005-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

326

Program on Technology Innovation: Effects of Seismicity and Rockfall on Long-Term Performance of the Yucca Mountain Repository  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the effort to obtain regulatory approval for construction, it is necessary to estimate the effects due to seismic activity and rockfall on long-term performance of the candidate high level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Previously, EPRI analyzed the consequences of a single seismic event (EPRI report 1011812, September 2005). The present report is the latest of a series of independent EPRI assessments of Yucca Mountain project-related activities....

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

327

Program on Technology Innovation: Treatment of Colloid-Facilitated Transport for Yucca Mountain Total System Performance Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has evaluated the potential importance of colloid-aided radionuclide transport from the candidate high level radioactive waste (HLW) and spent nuclear fuel repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. EPRI has been conducting independent assessments of the total system performance of Yucca Mountain since 1989. The purpose of this report is to provide a succinct summary of EPRI's independent evaluation of the importance of radionuclide transport via colloids. EPRI concludes th...

2006-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

328

Evaluation of the Candidate High-Level Radioactive Waste Repository at Yucca Mountain Using Total System Performance Assessment: Phase 5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A successful license application for the candidate spent-fuel and high level waste (HLW) repository at Yucca Mountain depends on a robust demonstration of long-term safety. This report presents EPRI's independent review to identify any conservatisms in the U.S. Depawrtment of Energy's (DOE's) Phase 5 Yucca Mountain Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). The review specifically identifies key facility components, makes recommendations regarding technical development work priorities, and evaluates ove...

2000-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

329

Decreasing Slip Rates From12.8 Ma to Present on the Solitario Canyon Fault at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solitario Canyon fault, which bounds the west side of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is the closest fault with Quaternary offset adjacent to the proposed spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste repository. Dip-slip offset between 12.8 and 10.7 Ma is determined from lithostratigraphic displacement in boreholes USW H-3 and USW WT-7, drilled in the footwall and hanging wall, respectively. The base of the 12.8-Ma Topopah Spring Tuff is interpreted to have 463.3 m of separation across the fault, an average dip slip rate of 0.036 mm/yr. Previous researchers identified a geothermal system active from 11.5 to 10.0 Ma with peak activity at 10.7 Ma that resulted in pervasive alteration of vitric rock to zeolitic minerals where the rocks were in the ground-water saturated zone. The contact between vitric (V) and pervasively zeolitic (Z) rocks cuts across the lithostratigraphic section and offset of this V-Z boundary can be used to measure slip rates between 12.8 and 10.7 Ma. In H-3, the V-Z boundary is 138.4 m below the base of the vitric, densely welded subzone of the Topopah Spring Tuff (Tptpv3). In WT-7, although the V-Z boundary is identified at the base of the Tptpv3, borehole video, cuttings, and geophysical log data indicate the Tptpv3 has well-developed zeolitic alteration along fractures, and this implies 19.5 m of the total thickness of Tptpv3 (and probably additional overlying crystallized rocks) also were in the saturated zone by 10.7 Ma. The V-Z relations across the Solitario Canyon fault in H-3 and WT-7 indicate a minimum of 157.9 m of separation before 10.7 Ma, which is 34.1 percent of the total slip of the Topopah Spring Tuff, and a minimum dip slip rate of 0.075 mm/yr from 12.8 to 10.7 Ma. These data are consistent with the broader structural history of the area near Yucca Mountain. Previous workers used angular unconformities, tilting of structural blocks, and paleomagnetic data to constrain the main period of extensional faulting between 12.7 and 8.5 Ma. Paleoseismic studies in Quaternary deposits documented slip rates on the Solitario Canyon fault from 0.01 to 0.02 mm/yr since 0.077 and 0.20 Ma. The decrease of extensional activity slip rates data on the Solitario Canyon fault provide evidence of decreasing tectonic activity from the middle Miocene to present.

D. Buesch

2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

330

Vadose Zone Transport Field Study: Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

From FY 2000 through FY 2003, a series of vadose zone transport field experiments were conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project Science and Technology Project, now known as the Remediation and Closure Science Project, and managed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The series of experiments included two major field campaigns, one at a 299-E24-11 injection test site near PUREX and a second at a clastic dike site off Army Loop Road. The goals of these experiments were to improve our understanding of vadose zone transport processes; to develop data sets to validate and calibrate vadose zone flow and transport models; and to identify advanced monitoring techniques useful for evaluating flow-and-transport mechanisms and delineating contaminant plumes in the vadose zone at the Hanford Site. This report summarizes the key findings from the field studies and demonstrates how data collected from these studies are being used to improve conceptual models and develop numerical models of flow and transport in Hanford’s vadose zone. Results of these tests have led to a better understanding of the vadose zone. Fine-scale geologic heterogeneities, including grain fabric and lamination, were observed to have a strong effect on the large-scale behavior of contaminant plumes, primarily through increased lateral spreading resulting from anisotropy. Conceptual models have been updated to include lateral spreading and numerical models of unsaturated flow and transport have revised accordingly. A new robust model based on the concept of a connectivity tensor was developed to describe saturation-dependent anisotropy in strongly heterogeneous soils and has been incorporated into PNNL’s Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases (STOMP) simulator. Application to field-scale transport problems have led to a better understanding plume behavior at a number of sites where lateral spreading may have dominated waste migration (e.g. BC Cribs and Trenches). The improved models have been also coupled with inverse models and newly-developed parameter scaling techniques to allow estimation of field-scale and effective transport parameters for the vadose zone. The development and utility of pedotransfer functions for describing fine-scale hydrogeochemical heterogeneity and for incorporating this heterogeneity into reactive transport models was explored. An approach based on grain-size statistics appears feasible and has been used to describe heterogeneity in hydraulic properties and sorption properties, such as the cation exchange capacity and the specific surface area of Hanford sediments. This work has also led to the development of inverse modeling capabilities for time-dependent, subsurface, reactive transport with transient flow fields using an automated optimization algorithm. In addition, a number of geophysical techniques investigated for their potential to provide detailed information on the subtle changes in lithology and bedding surfaces; plume delineation, leak detection. High-resolution resistivity is now being used for detecting saline plumes at several waste sites at Hanford, including tank farms. Results from the field studies and associated analysis have appeared in more than 46 publications generated over the past 4 years. These publications include test plans and status reports, in addition to numerous technical notes and peer reviewed papers.

Ward, Andy L.; Conrad, Mark E.; Daily, William D.; Fink, James B.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Gee, Glendon W.; Hoversten, Gary M.; Keller, Jason M.; Majer, Ernest L.; Murray, Christopher J.; White, Mark D.; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Zhang, Z. F.

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

331

Recommendation by the Secretary of Energy Regarding the Suitability of the Yucca Mountain Site for a Repository Under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Recommendation by the Secretary of Energy Regarding the Suitability of the Yucca Mountain Site for a Repository Under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982

332

ReproducedfromVadoseZoneJournal.PublishedbySoilScienceSocietyofAmerica.Allcopyrightsreserved. Analytical Solutions for Vertical Flow in Unsaturated, Rooted Soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analytical solutions may be divided into two classes;describe the distribution of pressure head, water for the hydraulic ner, 1958; Warrick, 1975; Lomen and Warrick, 1978; Sri- conductivity and water content as function of the pressure head are vastava and Yeh, 1991; Basha, 2000; Chen et al., 2003), exponential, (ii) the initial

Lu, Zhiming

333

Development Opportunity Zone Credit  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Development Opportunity Zone Credits incent new and expanding businesses in the Cities of Beloit, Janesville and Kenosha by providing non-refundable tax credits to assist with the creation and...

334

Keystone Opportunity Zones (Pennsylvania)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Keystone Opportunity Zones allows businesses located within designated areas to qualify for a tax exemption, deduction, credit, or abatement of state and local taxes such as sales and use tax,...

335

Deep Vadose Zone  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Mission of the Deep Vadose Zone Applied Field Research Initiative is to protect water resources across the DOE complex over the long-term by developing effective solutions to solve DOE’s most...

336

Queen Anne's County- Solar Zoning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Queen Anne's County zoning code allows for ground mounted solar arrays in areas zoned as "open space," "agricultural," and "countryside" districts.

337

Microsoft Word - STATEMENT OF GREGORY H. FRIEDMAN _April 5 2005_--Yucca.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BEFORE THE U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES COMMITTEE ON GOVERNMENT REFORM SUBCOMMITTEE ON THE FEDERAL WORKFORCE AND AGENCY ORGANIZATION FOR RELEASE ON DELIVERY 10:00 a.m., Tuesday, April 5, 2005 1 Mr. Chairman and members of the Subcommittee, I am pleased to be here today to testify regarding recent allegations of misconduct involving documents associated with the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. Disposal of the Nation's high-level nuclear waste and spent nuclear fuel is one of the most sensitive and complex challenges facing the U.S. Government. Under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, as amended in 1987, the Yucca Mountain site in the State of Nevada is the only site in the United States to be evaluated for this purpose. The Act established a

338

DOE to Send Proposed Yucca Mountain Legislation to Congress | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 6, 2007 - 10:28am March 6, 2007 - 10:28am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman announced today he will send to the U.S. Congress a legislative proposal to enhance the nation's ability to manage and dispose of commercial spent nuclear fuel and Defense high-level radioactive waste. "This legislative proposal reflects the Administration's strong commitment to advancing the development of the Yucca Mountain repository, while seeking to provide stability, clarity and predictability in moving the project forward," Secretary Bodman said. "Nuclear power is a clean, reliable domestic source of energy that currently represents approximately 20 percent of the nation's energy supply. The Yucca Mountain repository is critical to the nation's current and future energy and national security

339

Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada Research and Development Area, Nevada: Volume 9, Index  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This site characterization plan (SCP) has been developed for the candidate repository site at Yucca Mountain in the State of Nevada. The SCP includes a description of the Yucca Mountain site (Chapters 1-5), a conceptual design for the repository (Chapter 6), a description of the packaging to be used for the waste to be emplaced in the repository (Chapter 7), and a description of the planned site characterization activities (Chapter 8). The schedules and milestones presented in Sections 8.3 and 8.5 of the SCP were developed to be consistent with the June 1988 draft Amendment to the DOE`s Mission Plan for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. The five month delay in the scheduled start of exploratory shaft construction that was announced recently is not reflected in these schedules.

NONE

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Audit of Management of the Site Characterization Program at Yucca Mountain, IG-0366  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5, 1995 5, 1995 IG-1 INFORMATION: "Audit of Management of the Site Characterization Program at Yucca Mountain" The Secretary BACKGROUND: The Department of Energy (Department) is responsible for establishing an underground repository to store high-level nuclear waste. In accordance with the amended Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, the Department began characterization of the Yucca Mountain site to assess the feasibility of safely storing spent fuel and high-level waste for 10,000 years. Site characterization was originally scheduled to be completed in 1995. Subsequently, the Secretary of Energy changed the plan completion date to 2001. The purpose of our audit was to determine if the Department is making adequate progress in

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unsaturated zone yucca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Site characterization progress report, Yucca Mountain, Nevada: Number 19, April 1, 1998--September 30, 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nineteenth semiannual report of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) summarizes activities during the period from April 1, 1998, through September 30, 1998. Project activities are aimed at evaluating Yucca Mountain as a potential location for permanent geologic disposal of nuclear materials, as directed by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended (NWPA). The progress report documents activities this period that contribute to completing the Project`s near-term programmatic and statutory objectives. These objectives include completing the Viability Assessment, the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), a possible US Department of Energy (DOE) Secretarial Site Recommendation to the President, and, if the site is suitable, submittal of a license application to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Project work this period continued to be concentrated in three integrated activities: site characterization, engineering design and construction, and performance assessment. Accomplishments this period and their relation to near-term objectives are briefly summarized.

Not Available

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Surface-discharging hydrothermal systems at Yucca Mountain: Examining the evidence  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper discusses exposures of altered rock that have been thought to form by recent discharge of water from depth. They were examined to address a concern that hydrothermal processes could compromise the isolation capability of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Suspected hot-spring and hydrothermal-vent deposits are more likely the products of infiltration of meteoric water into newly deposited and still-hot pyroclastic flows >12 Myr ago.

Levy, S.S.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Potential Igneous Processes Relevant to the Yucca Mountain Repository: Extrusive-Release Scenario: Analysis and Implications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is moving to prepare and submit a license application to initiate construction of the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. As part of the application, the DOE must provide estimates of the dose risk to a local population caused by low probability igneous eruptions that may occur through the repository after closure. To date, published estimates of such dose risks have included a large number of conservative assumptions such that it appears as if igneous eruptions provide ...

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

EPRI Yucca Mountain Total System Performance Assessment Code (IMARC) Version 10  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1989, EPRI has been conducting independent assessments of the proposed deep geologic repository for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high level radioactive waste (HLW) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. EPRI pioneered application of the total system performance assessment (TSPA) approach for evaluating performance of geologic repository systems on a probabilistic basis. Along the way, EPRI developed the Integrated Multiple Assumptions and Release Code (IMARC) as its primary analytical tool for ...

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

345

Long-Term Climate Modeling and Hydrological Response to Climate Cycles in the Yucca Mountain Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate and its influence on hydrological conditions are important considerations in the evaluation of the Yucca Mountain (YM) site as a geologic repository for disposal of U.S. commercial spent nuclear fuel and defense high level radioactive wastes. This report updates previous EPRI studies (reports 1013445 and 1015045), which produced a quantitative and paleo-climate-calibrated/verified model of how climate, infiltration, and YM flow properties might appear in the future. The studies also supported ass...

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

346

Program on Technology Innovation: EPRI Yucca Mountain Spent Fuel Repository Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is moving to prepare and submit a license application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to initiate construction of a geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for the storage of spent nuclear fuel and high level radioactive waste. Throughout the nearly 20-year history of the project, EPRI has performed independent assessments of technical and scientific issues considered important to eventual repository licensing. This report presents background on the overal...

2007-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

347

Independent management and financial review, Yucca Mountain Project, Nevada. Final report, Appendix  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (Public Law 97-425), as amended by Public Law 100-203, December 22, 1987, established the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) within the Department of Energy (DOE), and directed the Office to investigate a site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, to determine if this site is suitable for the construction of a repository for the disposal of high level nuclear waste. Work on site characterization has been under way for several years. Thus far, about $1.47 billion have been spent on Yucca Mountain programs. This work has been funded by Congressional appropriations from a Nuclear Waste Fund to which contributions have been made by electric utility ratepayers through electric utilities generating power from nuclear power stations. The Secretary of Energy and the Governor of the State of Nevada have appointed one person each to a panel to oversee an objective, independent financial and management evaluation of the Yucca Mountain Project. The Requirements for the work will include an analysis of (1) the Yucca Mountain financial and, contract management techniques and controls; (2) Project schedules and credibility of the proposed milestones; (3) Project organizational effectiveness and internal planning processes, and (4) adequacy of funding levels and funding priorities, including the cost of infrastructure and scientific studies. The recipient will provide monthly progress report and the following reports/documents will be presented as deliverables under the contract: (1) Financial and Contract Management Preliminary Report; (2) Project Scheduling Preliminary Report; (3)Project Organizational Effectiveness Preliminary Report; (4) Project Funding Levels and Funding Priorities Preliminary Report; and (5) Final Report.

1995-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

348

Age of Unstable Landforms in the Yucca Mountain Region and Implications for Past Ground Motions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A deep geologic repository at Yucca Mountain has been proposed for the disposal of commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) as well as other nuclear fuel and high level radioactive waste from defense and nuclear weapons programs. The proposed repository site lies within the Basin and Range province, a region subject to seismic activity. As seismic hazard is considered an important risk driver for the repository, the determination of bounding ground motion magnitudes and frequencies described in this report i...

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

349

Program on Technology Innovation: EPRI Yucca Mountain Spent Fuel Repository Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is moving to prepare and submit a license application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to initiate construction of a geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for the storage of spent nuclear fuel and high level radioactive waste. Throughout the more than 20-year history of the project, EPRI has performed independent assessments of technical and scientific issues considered important to eventual repository licensing. This report presents background on the ove...

2006-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

350

Program on Technology Innovation: Evaluation of a Spent Fuel Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is moving to prepare and submit a license application to initiate construction of a geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for the storage of spent nuclear fuel and high level radioactive waste. Throughout the more than 20-year history of the project, EPRI has performed independent assessments of technical and scientific issues that are considered important to the eventual licensing of the repository. This report provides background on the overall project and d...

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Geology of the USW SD-7 Drill Hole, Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

i SAND96-1474 Distribution Unlimited Release Category UC-814 Printed September 1996 Geology of the USW SD-7 Drill Hole Yucca Mountain, Nevada Christopher A. Rautman Geohydrology Department Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 Dale A. Engstrom Spectra Research Institute Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 Abstract The USW SD-7 drill hole is one of several holes drilled under Site Characterization Plan Study 8.3.1.4.3.1, also known as the Systematic Drilling Program, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy characterization program at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The Yucca Mountain site has been proposed as the potential location of a repository for high-level nuclear waste. The SD-7 drill hole is located near the southern end of the potential repository area and immediately to the west of the Main Test Level drift of the Exploratory Studies Facility. The hole is not far from the junction of the Main Test Level drift and the proposed South Ramp decline. Drill hole USW SD-7...

Rautman And Engstrom; C. A. Rautman; D. A. Engstrom; Christopher A. Rautman; Dale A. Engstrom

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Paleoseismic investigations of Stagecoach Road fault, southeastern Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of paleoseismic investigations at two trenches (SCR-T1 and SCR-T3) excavated across the Stagecoach Road (SCR) fault at the southeastern margin of Yucca Mountain. The results of these studies are based on detailed mapping or logging of geologic and structural relationships exposed in trench walls, combined with descriptions of lithologic units, associated soils, and fault-related deformation. The ages of trench deposits are determined directly from geochronologic dating of selected units and soils, supplemented by stratigraphic and soil correlations with other surficial deposits in the Yucca Mountain area. The time boundaries used in this report for subdivision of the Quaternary period are listed in a table. These data and interpretations are used to identify the number, amounts, timing, and approximately lengths of late to middle Quaternary (less than 200 ka) surface-faulting events associated with paleoearthquakes at the trench sites. This displacement history forms the basis for calculating paleoearthquake recurrence intervals and fault-slip rates for the Stagecoach Road fault and allows comparison with fault behavior on other Quaternary faults at or near Yucca Mountain.

Menges, C.M.; Oswald, J.A.; Coe, J.A.; Lundstrom, S.C.; Paces, J.B.; Mahan, S.A.; Widmann, B.; Murray, M.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Independent Analysis of Seismicity and Rock fall Scenarios for the Yucca Mountain Repository  

SciTech Connect

Yucca Mountain is located in the somewhat seismically active Basin and Range province. Future seismic activity is identified by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the US National Academy of Sciences as a key scenario for safety assessment of a proposed repository at Yucca Mountain. As part of its on-going program of conducting independent analyses of scientific and technical issues that could be important to the licensing of the Yucca Mountain repository, EPRI has conducted an analysis of the combined scenarios of seismic activity and stability of emplacement drifts with respect to the long-term repository safety. In this paper we present the results of 3D finite element simulations of both static and dynamic loading of a degraded waste package. For the static case, the expected maximum static load is determined by utilizing relationships between cave height and the bulking factor. A static load representing 30 meters of broken rock was simulated using the finite element model. For the dynamic case, block size and velocity data from the most recent Drift Degradation AMR are used. Based on this, a rock block with a volume of 3.11 m{sup 3} and with an impact velocity of 4.81 m/s was simulated using the finite element model. In both cases, the results indicate that the waste package remains intact. (authors)

Apted, M.J. [Monitor Scientific, 3900 S. Wadsworth Blvd., Denver, CO 80235 (United States); Kemeny, J.M. [University of Arizona, Dept. Mining and Geological Engineering, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Martin, C.D. [University of Alberta, Dept. Civil and Environmental Engineering, Edmonton, AB T6G 2W2 (Canada); James, R.J. [Anatech Corp., 5435 Oberlin Dr., San Diego, CA 92121 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project bibliography, 1992--1994. Supplement 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Following a reorganization of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management in 1990, the Yucca Mountain Project was renamed Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. The title of this bibliography was also changed to Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Bibliography. Prior to August 5, 1988, this project was called the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations. This bibliography contains information on this ongoing project that was added to the Department of Energy`s Energy Science and Technology Database from January 1, 1992, through December 31, 1993. The bibliography is categorized by principal project participating organization. Participant-sponsored subcontractor reports, papers, and articles are included in the sponsoring organization`s list. Another section contains information about publications on the Energy Science and Technology Database that were not sponsored by the project but have some relevance to it. Earlier information on this project can be found in the first bibliography DOE/TIC-3406, which covers 1977--1985, and its three supplements DOE/OSTI-3406(Suppl.1), DOE/OSTI-3406(Suppl.2), and DOE/OSTI-3406(Suppl.3), which cover information obtained during 1986--1987, 1988--1989, and 1990--1991, respectively. All entries in the bibliographies are searchable online on the NNW database file. This file can be accessed through the Integrated Technical Information System (ITIS) of the US Department of Energy (DOE).

NONE

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Colloid-Facilitated Transport of Radionuclides Through The Vadose Zone  

SciTech Connect

The main purpose of this project was to advance the basic scientific understanding of colloid and colloid-facilitated Cs transport of radionuclides in the vadose zone. We focused our research on the hydrological and geochemical conditions beneath the leadking waste tanks at the USDOE Hanford reservation. Specific objectives were (1) to determine the lability and thermodynamic stability of colloidal materials, which form after reacting Hanford sediments with simulated Hanford Tank Waste, (2) to characterize the interactions between colloidal particles and contaminants, i.e., Cs and Eu, (3) to determine the potential of Hanford sediments for in situe mobilization of colloids, (4) to evaluate colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport through sediments under unsaturated flow, (5) to implement colloid-facilitated contaminant transport mechanisms into a transport model, and (6) to improve conceptual characterization of colloid-contaminant-soil interactions and colloid-facilitated transport for clean-up procedures and long-term risk assessment.

Markus Flury; James B. Harsh; John F. McCarthy' Peter C. Lichtner; John M. Zachara

2007-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

356

A Conductivity Relationship for Steady-state Unsaturated Flow Processes under Optimal Flow Conditions  

SciTech Connect

Optimality principles have been used for investigating physical processes in different areas. This work attempts to apply an optimal principle (that water flow resistance is minimized on global scale) to steady-state unsaturated flow processes. Based on the calculus of variations, we show that under optimal conditions, hydraulic conductivity for steady-state unsaturated flow is proportional to a power function of the magnitude of water flux. This relationship is consistent with an intuitive expectation that for an optimal water flow system, locations where relatively large water fluxes occur should correspond to relatively small resistance (or large conductance). Similar results were also obtained for hydraulic structures in river basins and tree leaves, as reported in other studies. Consistence of this theoretical result with observed fingering-flow behavior in unsaturated soils and an existing model is also demonstrated.

Liu, H. H.

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

357

Recent developments in the techniques of controlling and measuring suction in unsaturated soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The difficulty of measuring and controlling suction in unsaturated soils is one of the reasons why the development of the mechanics of unsaturated soils has not been as advanced as that of saturated soils. However, significant developments have been carried out in the last decade in this regard. In this paper, a re-view of some developments carried out in the techniques of controlling suction by using the axis translation, the osmotic method and the vapour control technique is presented. The paper also deals with some recent de-velopments in the direct measurement of suction by using high capacity tensiometers and in the measurement of high suction by using high range psychrometers. The recent progresses made in these techniques have been significant and will certainly help further experimental investigation of the hydromechanical behaviour of un-saturated soils.

Delage, Pierre; Tarantino, Alessandro

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Integrated Strategy to Address Hanford’s Deep Vadose Zone Remediation Challenges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A vast majority of Hanford’s remaining in-ground contaminants reside in the vadose zone of the Central Plateau, where reprocessing operations occurred. The vadose zone is comprised of about 75 meters of water-unsaturated sediments above groundwater. These contaminants have, and continue to release into groundwater that discharges to the Columbia River. If left untreated, these contaminants could remain a threat for centuries. Much of this contamination resides deep in the vadose zone, below the effective depth of tradition surface remedy influence. In 2008, the Department of Energy initiated deep vadose zone treatability testing to seek remedies for technetium-99 and uranium contamination. These tests include the application of desiccation for technetium-99 and reactive gas technologies for uranium. To complement these efforts, the Department of Energy has initiated a “defense-in-depth” approach to address the unique challenges for characterization and remediation of the deep vadose zone. This defense-in-depth approach will implement multiple approaches to understand and control contaminant flux from the deep vadose zone to the groundwater. Among these approaches is an increased investment in science and technology solutions to resolve deep vadose zone challenges including characterization, prediction, remediation, and monitoring.

Triplett, Mark B.; Freshley, Mark D.; Truex, Michael J.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Gerdes, Kurt D.; Charboneau, Briant L.; Morse, John G.; Lober, Robert W.; Chronister, Glen B.

2010-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

359

YUCCA MOUNTAIN PROJECT RECOMMENDATION BY THE SECRETARY OF ENERGY REGARDING THE SUITABILITY OF THE YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE FOR A REPOSITORY UNDER THE NUCLEAR WASTE POLICY ACT OF 1982  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For more than half a century, since nuclear science helped us win World War II and ring in the Atomic Age, scientists have known that !he Nation would need a secure, permanent facility in which to dispose of radioactive wastes. Twenty years ago, when Congress adopted the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA or ''the Act''), it recognized the overwhelming consensus in the scientific community that the best option for such a facility would be a deep underground repository. Fifteen years ago, Congress directed the Secretary of Energy to investigate and recommend to the President whether such a repository could be located safely at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Since then, our country has spent billions of dollars and millions of hours of research endeavoring to answer this question. I have carefully reviewed the product of this study. In my judgment, it constitutes sound science and shows that a safe repository can be sited there. I also believe that compelling national interests counsel in favor of proceeding with this project. Accordingly, consistent with my responsibilities under the NWPA, today I am recommending that Yucca Mountain be developed as the site for an underground repository for spent fuel and other radioactive wastes. The first consideration in my decision was whether the Yucca Mountain site will safeguard the health and safety of the people, in Nevada and across the country, and will be effective in containing at minimum risk the material it is designed to hold. Substantial evidence shows that it will. Yucca Mountain is far and away the most thoroughly researched site of its kind in the world. It is a geologically stable site, in a closed groundwater basin, isolated on thousands of acres of Federal land, and farther from any metropolitan area than the great majority of less secure, temporary nuclear waste storage sites that exist in the country today. This point bears emphasis. We are not confronting a hypothetical problem. We have a staggering amount of radioactive waste in this country--nearly 100,000,000 gallons of high-level nuclear waste and more than 40,000 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel with more created every day. Our choice is not between, on the one hand, a disposal site with costs and risks held to a minimum, and, on the other, a magic disposal system with no costs or risks at all. Instead, the real choice is between a single secure site, deep under the ground at Yucca Mountain, or making do with what we have now or some variant of it--131 aging surface sites, scattered across 39 states. Every one of those sites was built on the assumption that it would be temporary. As time goes by. every one is closer to the limit of its safe life span. And every one is at least a potential security risk--safe for today, but a question mark in decades to come.

NA

2002-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

360

The following changes to the EIA in the Yucca Mountain Rule Docket (A-95-12, V-B-2) were made in this document to correct typographical and other minor errors in the text.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Testing for fault activity at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, using independent GPS results from the BARGEN June 2006; published 19 July 2006. [1] Data from BARGEN GPS stations around Yucca Mountain (YM) have at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, using independent GPS results from the BARGEN network, Geophys. Res. Lett., 33

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unsaturated zone yucca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Statement of Charles G. Groat Director, U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Depa...rce and Agency Organization, On The Yucca Mountain Project, April 5, 2005 Congressional Testimony, 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in 1992 by the National Academy Press in a report titled Ground Water at Yucca Mountain--How High Can of affiliation with the Yucca Mountain Project, and their lack of previous involvement in evaluating Mr meeting in which fluid inclusion evidence for and against future hydrothermal upwelling at Yucca Mountain

362

Dialogs by Jerry Szymanski regarding the Yucca Mountain controversy from December, 1990 to March, 1991. Volume 1, Special report No. 9  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document contains dialogs from December, 1990 to March, 1991 by Jerry Szymanski regarding the Yucca Mountain controversy. These dialogs involve the dispute about the origin of carbonate deposits at Yucca Mountain; whether pedogenic in origin or a result of episodic upwellings of ground water.

Szymanski, J.; Livingston, D.E.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

United States Environmental Protection Agency | Office of Air and Radiation (6608J) | EPA 402-F-05-028 | October 2005 www.epa.gov/radiation/yucca  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

United States Environmental Protection Agency | Office of Air and Radiation (6608J) | EPA 402-F-05-028 | October 2005 www.epa.gov/radiation/yucca EPA Yucca Mountain Fact Sheet #4: Agency Roles in the Approval agencies involved in the approval and potential construction of the facility. National Academy of Sciences

364

Numerical Simulation of Inter-basin Groundwater Flow into Northern Yucca Flat, Nevada National Security Site, Using the Death Valley Regional Flow System Model  

SciTech Connect

Models of groundwater flow for the Yucca Flat area of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) are under development by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for corrective action investigations of the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine Corrective Action Unit (CAU). One important aspect of these models is the quantity of inter-basin groundwater flow from regional systems to the north. This component of flow, together with its uncertainty, must be properly accounted for in the CAU flow models to provide a defensible regional framework for calculations of radionuclide transport that will support determinations of the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine contaminant boundary. Because characterizing flow boundary conditions in northern Yucca Flat requires evaluation to a higher level of detail than the scale of the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine CAU model can efficiently provide, a study more focused on this aspect of the model was required.

Pohlmann Karl,Ye Ming

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Subduction Zone | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Subduction Zone Subduction Zone Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Subduction Zone Dictionary.png Subduction Zone: A tectonic process in which one tectonic plate is forced beneath another and sinks into the mantle as the plates converge Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Tectonic Settings List of tectonic settings known to host modern geothermal systems: Extensional Tectonics Subduction Zone Rift Zone Hot Spot Non-Tectonic Strike-Slip A classic cartoon illustrating a typical simplified subduction zone. http://www.columbia.edu/~vjd1/subd_zone_basic.htm Subduction zones occur where one tectonic plate is pulled under another. Most often the subducting plate is oceanic crust and contains many hydrous minerals. As the oceanic plate subducts it dewaters into the mantle,

366

A Darcian integral approximation to interblock hydraulic conductivity means in vertical infiltration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: Yucca Mountain tuff, elliptic boundary value problem, numerical method, piecewise steady-state flow, simulation model, unsaturated flow

Donald L. Baker

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Lithium Ion Solvation: Amine and Unsaturated Hydrocarbon Solvates of Lithium Hexamethyldisilazide (LiHMDS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lithium Ion Solvation: Amine and Unsaturated Hydrocarbon Solvates of Lithium Hexamethyldisilazide, and 13C NMR spectroscopic studies of 6Li-15N labeled lithium hexamethyldisilazide ([6Li,15N]- Li ligand structure and lithium amide aggregation state is a complex and sensitive function of amine alkyl

Collum, David B.

368

Lithium Diisopropylamide-Mediated Reactions of Imines, Unsaturated Esters, Epoxides, and Aryl Carbamates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lithium Diisopropylamide-Mediated Reactions of Imines, Unsaturated Esters, Epoxides, and Aryl: Several reactions mediated by lithium diisopropylamide (LDA) with added hexamethylphos- phoramide (HMPA, and selectivities of organolithium reactions.1 A preponderance of what is known about solvation of lithium ions

Collum, David B.

369

Dissipative particle dynamics simulation of fluid motion through an unsaturated fracture and fracture junction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multiphase fluid motion in unsaturated fractures and fracture networks involves complicated fluid dynamics, which is difficult to model using grid-based continuum methods. In this paper, the application of dissipative particle dynamics (DPD), a relatively ... Keywords: Dissipative particle dynamics (DPD), Fracture, Fracture flow, Smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), Weight functions

Moubin Liu; Paul Meakin; Hai Huang

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Colloid Facilitated Transport of Radioactive Cations in the Vadose Zone: Field Experiments Oak Ridge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overarching goal of this study was to improve understanding of colloid-facilitated transport of radioactive cations through unsaturated soils and sediments. We conducted a suite of laboratory experiments and field experiments on the vadose-zone transport of colloids, organic matter, and associated contaminants of interest to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The laboratory and field experiments, together with transport modeling, were designed to accomplish the following detailed objectives: 1. Evaluation of the relative importance of inorganic colloids and organic matter to the facilitation of radioactive cation transport in the vadose zone; 2. Assessment of the role of adsorption and desorption kinetics in the facilitated transport of radioactive cations in the vadose zone; 3. Examination of the effects of rainfall and infiltration dynamics and in the facilitated transport of radioactive cations through the vadose zone; 4. Exploration of the role of soil heterogeneity and preferential flow paths (e.g., macropores) on the facilitated transport of radioactive cations in the vadose zone; 5. Development of a mathematical model of facilitated transport of contaminants in the vadose zone that accurately incorporates pore-scale and column-scale processes with the practicality of predicting transport with readily available parameters.

James E. Saiers

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

371

Accommodation Zone | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Accommodation Zone Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Accommodation Zone Dictionary.png Accommodation Zone: Accommodation zones occur at fault intersections consisting of belts of interlocking, oppositely dipping normal faults. Multiple subsurface fault intersections in these zones are a favorable host for geothermal activity. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Controlling Structures List of controlling structures typically associated with geothermal systems: Major Normal Fault Termination of a Major Normal Fault Stepover or Relay Ramp in Normal Fault Zones

372

Areal power density: A preliminary examination of underground heat transfer in a potential Yucca Mountain repository and recommendations for thermal design approaches; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect

The design of the potential Yucca Mountain repository is subject to many thermal goals related to the compliance of the site with federal regulations. This report summarizes a series of sensitivity studies that determined the expected temperatures near the potential repository. These sensitivity studies were used to establish an efficient loading scheme for the spent fuel canisters and a maximum areal power density based strictly on thermal goals. Given the current knowledge of the site, a design-basis areal power density of 80 kW/acre can be justified based on thermal goals only. Further analyses to investigate the impacts of this design-basis APD on mechanical and operational aspects of the potential repository must be undertaken before a final decision is made.

Hertel, E.S. Jr.; Ryder, E.E.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Report of the Peer Review Panel on the early site suitability evaluation of the Potential Repository Site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Yucca mountain Site Characterization Project Office (YMPO) assigned Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), the Technical and Management Support Services (T&MSS) contractor to the YmPo, the task of conducting an Early Site Suitability Evaluation (ESSE) of the Yucca mountain site as a potential site for a high-level radioactive waste repository. First, the assignment called for the development of a method to evaluate a single site against the DOE General Guidelines for Recommendation of Sites for Nuclear Waste Repositories, 10 CFR Part 960. Then, using this method, an evaluation team, the ESSE Core Team, of senior YMP scientists, engineers, and technical experts, evaluated new information obtained about the site since publication of the final Environmental Assessment (DOE, 1986) to determine if new suitability/unsuitability findings could be recommended. Finally, the Core Team identified further information and analyses needed to make final determinations for each of the guidelines. As part of the task, an independent peer review of the ESSE report has been conducted. Expertise was solicited that covered the entire spectrum of siting guidelines in 10 CFR Part 960 in order to provide a complete, in-depth critical review of the data evaluated and cited in the ESSE report, the methods used to evaluate the data, and the conclusions and recommendations offered by the report. Fourteen nationally recognized technical experts (Table 2) served on the Peer Review Panel. The comments from the Panel and the responses prepared by the ESSE Core Team, documented on formal Comment Response Forms, constitute the body of this document.

NONE

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Geothermal evaluation and analysis of the Yucca Mountain Repository, Nevada; Final report, July 1, 1989--December 31, 1989  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the final report on the geothermal analysis and evaluation for the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, for the period of July 1, 1989 to December 31, 1989. Heat flow values were derived by measuring the thermal conductivities of samples taken from selected exploratory wells. Temperature gradients are recorded from the same wells. By using computer generated contour maps of the area, another interpretation of the heat-flow can be derived. Results of the mapping do not coincide with the past observations of the data. Another method used to evaluate the heat-flow of Yucca Mountain was to compare the temperature-depth relationship of the area. (MB)

NONE

1989-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

375

Physical processes and effects of magmatism in the Yucca Mountain region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes initial studies related to the effects of volcanism on performance of the proposed Yucca Mountain radioactive waste repository, and to the general processes of magmatism in the Yucca Mountain region. Volcanism or igneous activity can affect the repository performance by ejection of waste onto the earth`s surface (eruptive effects), or by subsurface effects of hydrothermal processes and altered hydrology if an intrusion occurs within the repository block. Initial, conservative calculations of the volume of waste that might be erupted during a small-volume basaltic eruption (such as those which occurred in the Yucca Mountain region) indicate that regulatory limits might be exceeded. Current efforts to refine these calculations, based upon field studies at analog sites, are described. Studies of subsurface effects are just beginning, and are currently focused on field studies of intrusion properties and contact metamorphism at deeply eroded analog sites. General processes of magmatism are important for providing a physical basis for predictions of future volcanic activity. Initial studies have focused on modeling basaltic magma chambers in conjunction with petrographic and geochemical studies. An example of the thermal-fluid dynamic evolution of a small basaltic sill is described, based on numerical simulation. Quantification of eruption conditions can provide valuable information on the overall magmatic system. We are developing quantitative methods for mapping pyroclastic facies of small basaltic centers and, in combination with two-phase hydrodynamic simulation, using this information to estimate eruption conditions. Examples of such hydrodynamic simulations are presented, along with comparison to an historical eruption in Hawaii.

Valentine, G.A.; Crowe, B.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Perry, F.V. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, New Mexico (USA). Dept. of Geology

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

376

Information-Sharing Protocol for the Transportation of Radioactive Waste to Yucca Mountain  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Preliminary Draft for Review Only Preliminary Draft for Review Only Information-Sharing for Transportation of Radioactive Waste to Yucca Mountain Office of Logistics Management Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management U. S. Department of Energy Preliminary Draft July 2007 1 Preliminary Draft for Review Only TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION...........................................................................3 1.1 Background ....................................................................................................... 3 1.2 Document Origin and Structure...................................................................... 4 1.3 Information Sharing with Department of Homeland Security..................... 4 2.0 DISCUSSION OF TERMS ..................................................................................

377

Yucca Mountain Waste Package Closure System Robotic Welding and Inspection System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Waste Package Closure System (WPCS), for the closure of radioactive waste in canisters for permanent storage of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level waste in the Yucca Mountain Repository was designed, fabricated, and successfully demonstrated at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). This article focuses on the robotic hardware and tools necessary to remotely weld and inspect the closure lid welds. The system was operated remotely and designed for use in a radiation field, due to the SNF contained in the waste packages being closed.

C. I. Nichol; D. P. Pace; E. D. Larsen; T. R. McJunkin; D. E. Clark; M. L. Clark; K. L. Skinner; A. D. Watkins; H. B. Smartt

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Communicating A Controversial and Complex Project to the Public: Yucca Mountain Tours - Real and Virtual Communication  

SciTech Connect

Since 1983, under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended (42 U.S.C. 10101 et seq.), the U.S. Department of Energy (the Department) has been investigating a site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, to determine whether it is suitable for development as the nation's first repository for permanent geologic disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. By far, the largest quantity of waste destined for geologic disposal is spent nuclear fuel from 118 commercial nuclear power reactors at 72 power plant sites and 1 commercial storage site across the United States. Currently, 104 of these reactors are still in operation and generate about 20 percent of the country's electricity. Under standard contracts that DOE executed with the utilities, DOE is to accept spent nuclear fuel from the utilities for disposal. Until that happens, the utilities must safely store their spent nuclear fuel in compliance with Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations. As of December 1998, commercial spent nuclear fuel containing approximately 38,500 metric tons of heavy metal (MTHM) was stored in 33 states. The balance of the waste destined for geologic disposal in a repository is Department-owned spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The Department's spent nuclear fuel includes naval spent nuclear fuel and irradiated fuel from weapons production, domestic research reactors, and foreign research reactors. For disposal in a geologic repository, high-level radioactive waste would be processed into a solid glass form and placed into approximately 20,000 canisters. No liquid or hazardous wastes regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 would be disposed of in a geologic repository. The difficulty in siting new facilities, particularly those designed as nuclear or nuclear-related facilities, is well documented. In this context, national boundaries are not significant distinguishing barriers. As one publication observed, ''Environmental activists, local residents and governmental officials are protesting proposed waste facilities from Taiwan to Texas''. Here in Nevada, Yucca Mountain is no exception. The Department's study of the Yucca Mountain site for possible development as a permanent repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste has been criticized by many, for many reasons. The Yucca Mountain Project is both controversial and complex--a fact that makes communication with the public a challenge.

A.B. Benson; P.V. Nelson; M. d' Ouville

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Simulated effects of potential withdrawals from wells near Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The effects of potential future withdrawals from wells J-12, J-13, and UE-25c {number_sign}3 on the ground-water flow system in the area surrounding Yucca Mountain, Nevada, were simulated by using an existing (1997) three-dimensional regional ground-water flow model. The 1997 regional model was modified only to include changes at the pumped wells. Two steady-state simulations (baseline and predictive) were conducted to estimate changes in water level and changes in ground-water outflow from Jackass Flats, where the pumped wells are located, south to the Amargosa Desert.

Tucce, Patrick; Faunt, Claudia C.

1999-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

380

Potential Igneous Processes Relevant to the Yucca Mountain Repository: Intrusive-Release Scenario  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is moving to prepare and submit a license application to initiate construction of the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. As part of the application, the DOE must provide estimates of the dose risk to a local population caused by low-probability intrusions of volcanic magma that may occur into the repository after closure. To date, published estimates of such dose risks have included a large number of conservative assumptions such that it appears as if the igneous intrus...

2005-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unsaturated zone yucca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Site characterization progress report: Yucca Mountain, Nevada, October 1, 1990--March 31, 1991; Number 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In accordance with the requirements of Section 113 (b) (3) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended (NWPA), the US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this report on the progress of site characterization activities at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for the period October 1, 1990, through March 31, 1991. This report is the fourth in a series of reports that are issued at intervals of approximately six months during site characterization. The report covers a number of initiatives to improve the effectiveness of the site characterization program, and covers continued efforts related to preparatory activities, Study Plans, and performance assessment.

NONE

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Site environmental report for calendar year 1994, Yucca Mountain Site, Nye County, Nevada.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization office has established an environmental program to ensure that facilities are operated in order to protect, maintain, and restore environmental quality, minimize potential threats to the environment and the public, and comply with environmental policies and US DOE orders. The status of the environmental program has been summarized in this annual report to characterize performance, confirm compliance with environmental requirements, and highlight significant programs and efforts during CY 1994. Monitoring, archaeology, groundwater, ecosystems, tortoise conservation, waste minimization, etc., are covered.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Engineered barrier system and waste package design concepts for a potential geologic repository at Yucca Mountain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We are using an iterative process to develop preliminary concept descriptions for the Engineered Barrier System and waste-package components for the potential geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. The process allows multiple design concepts to be developed subject to major constraints, requirements, and assumptions. Involved in the highly interactive and interdependent steps of the process are technical specialists in engineering, metallic and nonmetallic materials, chemistry, geomechanics, hydrology, and geochemistry. We have developed preliminary design concepts that satisfy both technical and nontechnical (e.g., programmatic or policy) requirements.

Short, D.W.; Ruffner, D.J.; Jardine, L.J.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Strategic Basis for License Application Planning for a Potential Yucca Mountain Repository  

SciTech Connect

If Yucca Mountain, Nevada is designated as the site for development of a geologic repository for disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste, the Department of Energy (DOE) must obtain Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approval first for repository construction, then for an operating license, and, eventually, for repository closure and decommissioning. The licensing criteria defined in Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 63 (10 CFR Part 63) establish the basis for these NRC decisions. Submittal of a license application (LA) to the NRC for authorization to construct a repository at the Yucca Mountain site is, at this point, only a potential future action by the DOE. The policy process defined in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA), as amended, for recommendation and designation of Yucca Mountain as a repository site makes it difficult to predict whether or when the site might be designated. The DOE may only submit a LA to the NRC if the site designation takes effect. In spite of this uncertainty, the DOE must take prudent and appropriate action now, and over the next several years, to prepare for development and timely submittal of a LA. This is particularly true given the need for the DOE to develop, load, and certify the operation of its electronic information system to provide access to its relevant records as part of the licensing support network (LSN) in compliance with NRC requirements six months prior to LA submittal. The DOE must also develop a LA, which is a substantially different document from those developed to support a Site Recommendation (SR) decision. The LA must satisfy NRC licensing criteria and content requirements, and address the acceptance criteria defined by the NRC in its forthcoming Yucca Mountain Review Plan (YMRP). The content of the LA must be adequate to facilitate NRC acceptance and docketing for review, and the LA and its supporting documents must provide the documented basis for the NR C findings required for a construction authorization. The LA must also support a licensing proceeding before an Atomic Safety and Licensing Board panel prior to NRC action on any decision to authorize construction. The DOE has established a strategic basis for planning that is intended to provide the framework for development of an integrated plan for activities leading to preparation and submittal of a LA.

Newberry, C. M.; Brocoum, S. J.; Gamble, R. P.; Murray, R. C.; Cline, M.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

385

Cost-Effective Cementitious Material Compatible with Yucca Mountain Repository Geochemistry  

SciTech Connect

The current plans for the Yucca Mountain (YM) repository project (YMP) use steel structures to stabilize the disposal drifts and connecting tunnels that are collectively over 100 kilometers in length. The potential exist to reduce the underground construction cost by 100s of millions of dollars and improve the repository's performance. These economic and engineering goals can be achieved by using the appropriate cementitious materials to build out these tunnels. This report describes the required properties of YM compatible cements and reviews the literature that proves the efficacy of this approach. This report also describes a comprehensive program to develop and test materials for a suite of underground construction technologies.

Dole, LR

2004-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

386

A Summary of Properties Used to Evaluate INEEL Calcine Disposal in the Yucca Mountain Repository  

SciTech Connect

To support evaluations of the direct disposal of Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory calcines to the repository at Yucca Mountain, an evaluation of the performance of the calcine in the repository environment must be performed. This type of evaluation demonstrates, through computer modeling and analysis, the impact the calcine would have on the ability of the repository to perform its function of containment of materials during the repository lifetime. This report discusses parameters that were used in the scoping evaluation conducted in FY 2003. It provides nominal values for the parameters, with explanation of the source of the values, and how the values were modified for use in repository analysis activities.

Dahl, C.A.

2003-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

387

Building Technologies Office: Climate Zones  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Zones to Climate Zones to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Climate Zones on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Climate Zones on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Climate Zones on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Climate Zones on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Climate Zones on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Climate Zones on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Research Innovations Research Tools Building Science Education Climate-Specific Guidance Solution Center Partnerships Meetings Publications Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Challenge Home Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals

388

Rift Zone | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rift Zone Rift Zone Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Rift Zone Dictionary.png Rift Zone: A divergent plate boundary within a continent Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Tectonic Settings List of tectonic settings known to host modern geothermal systems: Extensional Tectonics Subduction Zone Rift Zone Hot Spot Non-Tectonic Strike-Slip The Rio Grande Rift exemplifies rift zone tectonics - increased volcanic activity and the formation of graben structures (reference: science-art.com) Rift valleys occur at divergent plate boundaries, resulting in large graben structures and increased volcanism. The East African Rift is an example of a continental rift zone with increased volcanism, while the Atlantic's spreading Mid-Ocean Ridge is host to an enormous amount of geothermal

389

The Enterprise Zone (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Enterprise Zone offers tax incentives to business expanding their workforce by 5% at facilities in designated enterprise zones. The tax credit is equal to 50% of the annual wages paid to a new...

390

Radiant zone heated particulate filter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter including an upstream end for receiving exhaust gas and a downstream end. A radiant zoned heater includes N zones, where N is an integer greater than one, wherein each of the N zones includes M sub-zones, where M is an integer greater than or equal to one. A control module selectively activates at least a selected one of the N zones to initiate regeneration in downstream portions of the PM filter from the one of the N zones, restricts exhaust gas flow in a portion of the PM filter that corresponds to the selected one of the N zones, and deactivates non-selected ones of the N zones.

Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI

2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

391

Uncertainty and Sensitivity of Contaminant Travel Times from the Upgradient Nevada Test Site to the Yucca Mountain Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, has been proposed by the U.S. Department of Energy as the nation’s first permanent geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and highlevel radioactive waste. In this study, the potential for groundwater advective pathways from underground nuclear testing areas on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) to intercept the subsurface of the proposed land withdrawal area for the repository is investigated. The timeframe for advective travel and its uncertainty for possible radionuclide movement along these flow pathways is estimated as a result of effective-porosity value uncertainty for the hydrogeologic units (HGUs) along the flow paths. Furthermore, sensitivity analysis is conducted to determine the most influential HGUs on the advective radionuclide travel times from the NTS to the YM area. Groundwater pathways are obtained using the particle tracking package MODPATH and flow results from the Death Valley regional groundwater flow system (DVRFS) model developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Effectiveporosity values for HGUs along these pathways are one of several parameters that determine possible radionuclide travel times between the NTS and proposed YM withdrawal areas. Values and uncertainties of HGU porosities are quantified through evaluation of existing site effective-porosity data and expert professional judgment and are incorporated in the model through Monte Carlo simulations to estimate mean travel times and uncertainties. The simulations are based on two steady-state flow scenarios, the pre-pumping (the initial stress period of the DVRFS model), and the 1998 pumping (assuming steady-state conditions resulting from pumping in the last stress period of the DVRFS model) scenarios for the purpose of long-term prediction and monitoring. The pumping scenario accounts for groundwater withdrawal activities in the Amargosa Desert and other areas downgradient of YM. Considering each detonation in a clustered region around Pahute Mesa (in the NTS operational areas 18, 19, 20, and 30) under the water table as a particle, those particles from the saturated zone detonations were tracked forward using MODPATH to identify hydraulically downgradient groundwater discharge zones and to determine the particles from which detonations will intercept the proposed YM withdrawal area. Out of the 71 detonations in the saturated zone, the flowpaths from 23 of the 71 detonations will intercept the proposed YM withdrawal area under the pre-pumping scenario. For the 1998 pumping scenario, the flowpaths from 55 of the 71 detonations will intercept the proposed YM withdrawal area. Three different effective-porosity data sets compiled in support of regional models of groundwater flow and contaminant transport developed for the NTS and the proposed YM repository are used. The results illustrate that mean minimum travel time from underground nuclear testing areas on the NTS to the proposed YM repository area can vary from just over 700 to nearly 700,000 years, depending on the locations of the underground detonations, the pumping scenarios considered, and the effective-porosity value distributions used. Groundwater pumping scenarios are found to significantly impact minimum particle travel time from the NTS to the YM area by altering flowpath geometry. Pumping also attracts many more additional groundwater flowpaths from the NTS to the YM area. The sensitivity analysis further illustrates that for both the pre-pumping and 1998 pumping scenarios, the uncertainties in effective-porosity values for five of the 27 HGUs considered account for well over 90 percent of the effective-porosity-related travel time uncertainties for the flowpaths having the shortest mean travel times to YM.

J. Zhu; K. Pohlmann; J. Chapman; C. Russell; R.W.H. Carroll; D. Shafer

2009-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

392

On-sample water content measurement for a complete local monitoring in triaxial testing of unsaturated soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To provide a complete local monitoring of the state of an unsaturated soil sample during triaxial testing, a local water content measurement device was adapted to a triaxial device comprising the measurement of local displacements (Hall effect transducers) and suction (High capacity transducer). Water content was locally monitored by means of a resistivity probe. The water content/resistivity calibration curves of an intact natural unsaturated loess from Northern France extracted by block sampling at two depths (1 and 3.3 m) were carefully determined, showing good accuracy and repeatability. The validity of two models giving the resistivity of unsaturated soils with respect to their water content was examined.

Munoz-Castelblanco, José; Pereira, Jean-Michel; Cui, Yu-Jun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Petrology and geochemistry of samples from bed-contact zones in Tunnel Bed 5, U12g-Tunnel, Nevada Test Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the detailed geologic characterization of samples of bed-contact zones and surrounding nonwelded bedded tuffs, both within Tunnel Bed 5, that are exposed in the G-Tunnel complex beneath Rainier Mesa on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Original planning studies treated the bed-contact zones in Tunnel Bed 5 as simple planar surfaces of relatively high permeability. Detailed characterization, however, indicates that these zones have a finite thickness, are depositional in origin, vary considerably over short vertical and horizontal distances, and are internally complex. Fluid flow in a sequence of nonwelded zeolitized ash-flow or bedded tuffs and thin intervening reworked zones appears to be a porous-medium phenomenon, regardless of the presence of layering. There are no consistent differences in either bulk composition or detailed mineralogy between bedded tuffs and bed-contact zones in Tunnel Bed 5. Although the original bulk composition of Tunnel Bed 5 was probably peralkaline, extensive zeolitization has resulted in a present peraluminous bulk composition of both bedded tuffs and bed-contact zones. The major zeolite present, clinoptilolite, is intermediate (Ca:K:Na = 26:35:39) and effectively uniform in composition. This composition is similar to that of clinoptilolite from the tuffaceous beds of Calico Hills above the static water level in hole USW G-1, but somewhat different from that reported for zeolites from below the static water level in USW G-2. Tunnel Bed 5 also contains abundant hydrous manganese oxides. The similarity in composition of the clinoptilolites from Tunnel Bed 5 and those above the static water level at Yucca Mountain indicates that many of the results of nuclide-migration experiments in Tunnel Bed 5 would be transferrable to zeolitized nonwelded tuffs above the static water level at Yucca Mountain.

Connolly, J.R.; Keil, K.; Mansker, W.L.; Allen, C.C.; Husler, J.; Lowy, R.; Fortney, D.R.; Lappin, A.R.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Advanced Conceptual Models for Unsaturated and Two-Phase Flow in Fractured Rock  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was initiated in FY03. As of December 2003, we have accomplished the following: (1) We conducted a more detailed evaluation of the preliminary experiments used to develop our investigative approach. In those experiments, water was invaded at a variety of flow rates into an air-filled, two dimensional analog fracture network. Results demonstrated the critical control that fracture intersections place on two-phase flow in fracture networks. At low flows, capillary and gravitational forces combined to create a narrow pulsing flow structure that spanned the system vertically. At higher flows, viscous forces acted to remove the pulsation; however, the flow structure remained narrow. The intersections acted to impose a narrow ''slender ladder'' structure on the flowing phase that did not expand with depth, but instead remained focused. A manuscript documenting this effort has been published in Water Resources Research [Glass et al., 2003a]. (2) We initiated a collaborative relationship with a research group at Seoul National University. This group, which is led by Dr. Kang-Kun Lee is also using a combined experimental numerical approach to consider DNAPL migration in fracture networks. They are particularly interested in the influence of ambient groundwater flows, making their work complementary to ours. The first fruit of that collaboration is an article demonstrating that modification of an Invasion Percolation algorithm to include gravity and the first-order effects of viscous forces shows good agreement with physical experiments in a simplistic fracture network. Results were published in Geophysical Research Letters [Ji et al., 2003a]. (3) We carried out an extensive review of models for fracture networks. These include models developed from observations of networks on outcrops at several scales and stochastic models that are prevalent in the literature from the 1980s to very recent developments. The results of this review were included as par t of a review paper co-authored by Rajaram, which was submitted to Reviews in Geophysics [Molz et al., in press]. (4) We prepared a manuscript based on previous work that will be used to support the development of our new conceptual model(s) for transport in fractured rock. Eight experiments were conducted to evaluate the repeatability of flow under nearly identical conditions and to characterize general patterns in flow behavior. Collected data revealed that flow generally converged to a single fracture in the bottom row of blocks. Periods of pathway switching were observed to be more common than periods with steady, constant flow pathways. We noted the importance of fracture intersections for integrating uniform flow and discharging a ''fluid cascade'', where water advances rapidly to the next capillary barrier creating a stop and start advance of water through the network. The results of this simple experiment suggest that the interaction of multiple fracture intersections in a network creates flow behavior not generally recognized in popular conceptual and numerical models. A manuscript documenting this effort has been accepted for publication in Vadose Zone Journal [Wood et al., 2003]. (5) Slender transport pathways have been found in laboratory and field experiments within unsaturated fractured rock. We considered the simulation of such structures with a Modified form of Invasion Percolation (MIP). Results show that slender pathways form in fracture networks for a wide range of expected conditions, can be maintained when subsequent matrix imbibition is imposed, and may arise even in the context of primarily matrix flow due to the action of fractures as barriers to inter-matrix block transport. A manuscript documenting this effort has been submitted to Geophysical Research Letters [Glass et al., 2003b].

Rajaram, Harihar

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

CO2 Emissions - Panama Canal Zone  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Panama Canal Zone Graphics CO2 Emissions from Panama Canal Zone Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Panama Canal Zone...

396

Transition Zone Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transition Zone Geothermal Region (Redirected from Transition Zone) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Transition Zone Geothermal Region edit Details...

397

Geology of the USW SD-12 Drill Hole, Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

i SAND96-1368 Distribution Unlimited Release Category UC-814 Printed November 1996 Geology of the USW SD-12 Drill Hole Yucca Mountain, Nevada Christopher A. Rautman Geohydrology Department Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1324 Dale A. Engstrom Spectra Research Institute Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 Abstract Drill hole USW SD-12 is one of several holes drilled under Site Characterization Plan Study 8.3.1.4.3.1, also known as the "Systematic Drilling Program," as part of the U.S. Department of Energy characterization program at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, which has been proposed as the potential location of a repository for high-level nuclear waste. The SD-12 drill hole is located in the central part of the potential repository area, immediately to the west of the Main Test Level drift of the Exploratory Studies Facility and slightly south of midway between the North Ramp and planned South Ramp declines. Drill hole USW SD-12 is 2166.3 ft (660.26 m) deep, and th...

Christopher Rautman Dale; Christopher A. Rautman; Dale A. Engstrom; Dale A. Engstrom

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Geology of the USW SD-9 Drill Hole, Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

i SAND96-2030 Distribution Unlimited Release Category UC-814 Printed October 1996 Geology of the USW SD-9 Drill Hole, Yucca Mountain, Nevada Dale A. Engstrom Spectra Research Institute Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 Christopher A. Rautman Geohydrology Department Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 Abstract Drill hole USW SD-9 is one of several holes drilled under Site Characterization Plan Study 8.3.1.4.3.1, also known as the "Systematic Drilling Program," as part of the U.S. Department of Energy characterization program at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, which has been proposed as the potential location of a repository for high-level nuclear waste. The SD-9 drill hole is located in the northern part of the potential repository area, immediately to the west of the Main Test Level drift of Exploratory Studies Facility and south of the North Ramp decline. Drill hole USW SD-9 is 2223.1 ft (677.57 m) deep, and the core recovered essentially complete sections of ash-flow t...

Dale Engstrom And; Dale A. Engstrom; Dale A. Engstrom; Christopher A. Rautman; Christopher A. Rautman

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Site characterization progress report: Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Number 15, April 1--September 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

During the second half of fiscal year 1996, activities at the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (Project) supported the objectives of the revised Program Plan released this period by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management of the US Department of Energy (Department). Outlined in the revised plan is a focused, integrated program of site characterization, design, engineering, environmental, and performance assessment activities that will achieve key Program and statutory objectives. The plan will result in the development of a license application for repository construction at Yucca Mountain, if the site is found suitable. Activities this period focused on two of the three near-term objectives of the revised plan: updating in 1997 the regulatory framework for determining the suitability of the site for the proposed repository concept and providing information for a 1998 viability assessment of continuing toward the licensing of a repository. The Project has also developed a new design approach that uses the advanced conceptual design published during the last reporting period as a base for developing a design that will support the viability assessment. The initial construction phase of the Thermal Testing Facility was completed and the first phase of the in situ heater tests began on schedule. In addition, phase-one construction was completed for the first of two alcoves that will provide access to the Ghost Dance fault.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Characterizing the Evolution of the In-Drift Environment in a Proposed Yucca Mountain Repository  

SciTech Connect

This presentation provides a high-level summary of the approach taken to achieve a conceptual understanding of the chemical environments likely to exist in the proposed Yucca Mountain repository after the permanent closure of the facility. That conceptual understanding was then made quantitative through laboratory and modeling studies. This summary gives an overview of the in-drift chemical environment modeling that was needed to evaluate a Yucca Mountain repository: it describes the geological, hydrological, and geochemical aspects of the chemistry of water contacting engineered barriers and includes a summary of the technical basis that supports the integration of this information into the total system performance assessment. In addition, it presents a description of some of the most important data and processes influencing the in-drift environment, and describes how data and parameter uncertainty are propagated through the modeling. Sources of data include: (1) external studies regarding climate changes; (2) site-specific studies of the structure of the mountain and the properties of its rock layers; (3) properties of dust in the mountain and investigations of the potential for deliquescence on that dust to create solutions above the boiling point of water; (4) obtaining thermal data from a comprehensive thermal test addressing coupled processes; and (5) modeling the evolution of the in-drift environment at several scales. Model validation is also briefly addressed.

Dr. Abraham Van Luik

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unsaturated zone yucca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Site characterization plan overview: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada Research and Development Area, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

To help the public better understand both the SCP and the site characterization program, the DOE has prepared this overview and the SCP Public Handbook. The overview presents summaries of selected topics covered in the SCP; it is not a substitute for the SCP. The organization of the overview is similar to that of the SCP itself, with brief descriptions of the Yucca Mountain site, the repository, and the containers in which the waste would be packaged, followed by a discussion of the characterization program to be carried out at the Yucca Mountain site. This overview is intended primarily for those persons who want to understand the general scope and basis of the site-characterization program, the activities to be conducted, and the facilities to be constructed without spending the time necessary to become familiar with all of the technical details presented in the SCP. For the readers of the SCP, the overview will be useful as a general guide to the plan. The SCP Public Handbook is a short document that contains brief descriptions of the SCP process and the contents of the SCP. It also explains how the public can submit comments on the SCP and lists the libraries and reading rooms at which the SCP is available. 9 refs., 18 tabs.

NONE

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Experiment and analysis comparison in support of the Yucca Mountain Project  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories, as a participant in the Yucca Mountain Project, administered by the Nevada Operations Office of the US Department of Energy, is in the process of evaluating a proposed site for geologic disposal of high-level nuclear wastes in the volcanic tuffs at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. In a repository, loads will be imposed on the rock mass as a result of excavation of the openings and heating of the rock by the nuclear waste. In an attempt to gain a better understanding of the thermal, mechanical, and thermomechanical response of fractured tuff, a series of experiments have been performed, and measurements have been taken in the welded and nonwelded tuffs at the G-Tunnel underground test facility at Rainier Mesa, Nevada. Comparisons between measured and calculated data of the G-Tunnel High-Pressure Flatjack Development Experiment are presented in this investigation. Calculated results were obtained from two dimensional finite element analysis using a recently developed compliant-joint rock-mass model. The purpose of this work was to assess the predictive capability of the model based on limited material property data for the G-Tunnel welded tuff. The results of this evaluation are discussed.

Chen, E.P.; Bauer, S.J.; Costin, L.S.; Hansen, F.D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Exploratory Shaft Seismic Design Basis Working Group report; Yucca Mountain Project  

SciTech Connect

This report was prepared for the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP), which is managed by the US Department of Energy. The participants in the YMP are investigating the suitability of a site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for construction of a repository for high-level radioactive waste. An exploratory shaft facility (ESF) will be constructed to permit site characterization. The major components of the ESF are two shafts that will be used to provide access to the underground test areas for men, utilities, and ventilation. If a repository is constructed at the site, the exploratory shafts will be converted for use as intake ventilation shafts. In the context of both underground nuclear explosions (conducted at the nearby Nevada Test Site) and earthquakes, the report contains discussions of faulting potential at the site, control motions at depth, material properties of the different rock layers relevant to seismic design, the strain tensor for each of the waveforms along the shaft liners, and the method for combining the different strain components along the shaft liners. The report also describes analytic methods, assumptions used to ensure conservatism, and uncertainties in the data. The analyses show that none of the shafts` structures, systems, or components are important to public radiological safety; therefore, the shafts need only be designed to ensure worker safety, and the report recommends seismic design parameters appropriate for this purpose. 31 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

Subramanian, C.V. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA); King, J.L. [Science Applications International Corp., Las Vegas, NV (USA); Perkins, D.M. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (USA); Mudd, R.W. [Fenix and Scisson, Inc., Tulsa, OK (USA); Richardson, A.M. [Parsons, Brinckerhoff, Quade and Douglas, Inc., San Francisco, CA (USA); Calovini, J.C. [Holmes and Narver, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (USA); Van Eeckhout, E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA); Emerson, D.O. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Yucca Mountain program summary of research and technical review activities, July 1988--June 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Desert Research Institute (DRI), through its Water Resources Center (WRC), since 1984 has supported the State of Nevada Nuclear Waste Project Office`s activities related to the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). This effort is directed at providing the State Office with an unbiased evaluation of the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) investigations performed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The overall objective is to determine independently whether or not the site meets the performance criteria defined by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 and amendments for isolating and containing the wastes during emplacement and the proposed life of the repository. A particularly important area of concern with the proposed repository is the site`s hydrology. The faculty of the DRI have long been involved with research throughout the State and have particular expertise in groundwater studies related to radionuclide migration and hydrologic safety of underground nuclear testing by DOE and predecessor agencies. In addition, we utilize laboratory personnel for chemical and isotopic analyses in both of the DRI-WMC water chemistry laboratories.

NONE

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Site characterization progress report: Yucca Mountain, Nevada, October 1, 1993--March 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

This report is the tenth in a series issued at intervals of approximately six months during site characterization of Yucca Mountain as a possible site for a geologic repository for the permanent disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Also included in this report are descriptions of activities such as public outreach and international programs that are not formally part of the site characterization process. Information on these activities is provided to report on all aspects of the Yucca Mountain studies. The Executive Summary is intended to provide a summary of major decisions, activities, accomplishments, and issues of interest during the reporting period. Chapter 1, Introduction, provides background information to assist the reader in understanding the current status of the program. Chapter 2 provides specific detailed discussions of activities conducted during the current reporting period and has two major divisions. Section 2.1, Preparatory Activities, provides information on select preparatory activities necessary to conduct site characterization and design activities. Sections 2.2 through 2.8 provide specific details on studies and activities conducted during the reporting period and follow the original structure of the Department`s 1988 Site Characterization Plan. Chapter 3 contains the current summary schedule, while Chapter 4 provides a description of the program outreach, including activities during the reporting period, in both the international program and public outreach. Chapter 5 presents an epilogue of significant events that occurred after the end of the reporting period.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Liquid zone seal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A seal assembly that provides a means for establishing multiple pressure zones within a system. The seal assembly combines a plate extending from the inner wall of a housing or inner enclosure that intersects with and is immersed in the fluid contained in a well formed in a tray contained within the enclosure. The fluid is a low vapor pressure oil, chemically inert and oxidation resistant. The use of a fluid as the sealing component provides a seal that is self-healing and mechanically robust not subject to normal mechanical wear, breakage, and formation of cracks or pinholes and decouples external mechanical vibrations from internal structural members.

Klebanoff, Leonard E. (Dublin, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Faulting in the Yucca Mountain region: Critical review and analyses of tectonic data from the central Basin and Range  

SciTech Connect

Yucca Mountain, Nevada, has been proposed as the potential site for a high-level waste (HLW) repository. The tectonic setting of Yucca Mountain presents several potential hazards for a proposed repository, such as potential for earthquake seismicity, fault disruption, basaltic volcanism, magma channeling along pre-existing faults, and faults and fractures that may serve as barriers or conduits for groundwater flow. Characterization of geologic structures and tectonic processes will be necessary to assess compliance with regulatory requirements for the proposed high level waste repository. In this report, we specifically investigate fault slip, seismicity, contemporary stain, and fault-slip potential in the Yucca Mountain region with regard to Key Technical Uncertainties outlined in the License Application Review Plan (Sections 3.2.1.5 through 3.2.1.9 and 3.2.2.8). These investigations center on (i) alternative methods of determining the slip history of the Bare Mountain Fault, (ii) cluster analysis of historic earthquakes, (iii) crustal strain determinations from Global Positioning System measurements, and (iv) three-dimensional slip-tendency analysis. The goal of this work is to assess uncertainties associated with neotectonic data sets critical to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses` ability to provide prelicensing guidance and perform license application review with respect to the proposed HLW repository at Yucca Mountain.

Ferrill, D.A.; Stirewalt, G.L.; Henderson, D.B.; Stamatakos, J.; Morris, A.P.; Spivey, K.H. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses; Wernicke, B.P. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). Div. of Geological and Planetary Sciences

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Lipid Oxidation PathwaysChapter 3 Competitive Oxidation between a-Tocopherol and Unsaturated Fatty Acids at Thermoxidation Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lipid Oxidation Pathways Chapter 3 Competitive Oxidation between a-Tocopherol and Unsaturated Fatty Acids at Thermoxidation Conditions Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Downloadable pd

409

Models for Unsaturated Hydraulic Conductivity Based on Truncated Lognormal Pore-size Distributions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a closed-form three-parameter model for unsaturated hydraulic conductivity associated with a three-parameter lognormal model of moisture retention, which is based on lognormal grainsize distribution. The derivation of the model is made possible by a slight modification to the theory of Mualem. We extend the three-parameter lognormal distribution to a four-parameter model that also truncates the pore size distribution at a minimum pore radius. We then develop the corresponding four-parameter model for moisture retention and the associated closed-form expression for unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. The four-parameter model is fitted to experimental data, similar to the models of Kosugi and van Genuchten. The proposed four-parameter model retains the physical basis of Kosugi's model, while improving fit to observed data especially when simultaneously fitting pressure-saturation and pressure-conductivity data.

Malama, Bwalya

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Climate Zone 5C | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Zone 5C Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard consisting of Climate Zone Number 5 and Climate Zone Subtype C. Climate Zone...

411

Data report for the 1983 seismic-refraction experiment at Yucca Mountain, Beatty and vicinity, southwestern Nevada  

SciTech Connect

In June 1983, the US Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a seismic-refraction survey in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain and Beatty, Nevada to better define the P(compressional)-wave velocity structure of the upper crust in this area. This experiment is part of continuing seismic investigations in the region of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) by the USGS on behalf of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation Project (NNWSI) to aid in determining the feasibility of the proposed nuclear waste disposal site at Yucca Mountin. The 1983 seismic-refraction survey consisted of ten individual explosions at nine shotpoints, recorded by two deployments of 120 portable seismographs constituting North-South and East-West profiles (Plate 1). The North-South profile extended 45 kilometers along the western flank of Yucca Mountain. Recorder station spacing averaged 0.40 km, and seven shots spaced 8 km apart were fired. The East-West profile extended 60 km from Yucca Mountain west through Fluorspar Canyon and Titus Canyon to the floor of Death Valley, California. Recorder station spacing averaged 0.40 km to 0.60 km and three shots were fired at Yucca Mountain, near Beatty, and at the Death Valley boundary. This report includes record sections from the ten shotpoints (Plates 2-11), a list of siesmograph locations (Appendix A), a list of shotpoint locations and shot times, DKDAT data files and Tape Grade Code (Appendix B), and a list of first-arrival traveltime picks (Appendix C). Detailed interpretation of these data will be published in a subsequent report.

Sutton, V.D.

1984-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

412

Optimality and Conductivity for Water Flow: From Landscapes, to Unsaturated Soils, to Plant Leaves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optimality principles have been widely used in many areas. Based on an optimality principle that any flow field will tend toward a minimum in the energy dissipation rate, this work shows that there exists a unified form of conductivity relationship for three different flow systems: landscapes, unsaturated soils and plant leaves. The conductivity, the ratio of water flux to energy gradient, is a power function of water flux although the power value is system dependent. This relationship indicates that to minimize energy dissipation rate for a whole system, water flow has a small resistance (or a large conductivity) at a location of large water flux. Empirical evidence supports validity of the relationship for landscape and unsaturated soils (under gravity dominated conditions). Numerical simulation results also show that the relationship can capture the key features of hydraulic structure for a plant leaf, although more studies are needed to further confirm its validity. Especially, it is of interest that according to this relationship, hydraulic conductivity for gravity-dominated unsaturated flow, unlike that defined in the classic theories, depends on not only capillary pressure (or saturation), but also the water flux. Use of the optimality principle allows for determining useful results that are applicable to a broad range of areas involving highly non-linear processes and may not be possible to obtain from classic theories describing water flow processes.

Liu, H.H.

2012-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

413

Conservation Laws for Coupled Hydro-mechanical Processes in Unsaturated Porous Media: Theory and Implementation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We develop conservation laws for coupled hydro-mechanical processes in unsaturated porous media using three-phase continuum mixture theory. From the first law of thermodynamics, we identify energy-conjugate variables for constitutive modeling at macroscopic scale. Energy conjugate expressions identified relate a certain measure of effective stress to the deformation of the solid matrix, the degree of saturation to the matrix suction, the pressure in each constituent phase to the corresponding intrinsic volume change of this phase, and the seepage forces to the corresponding pressure gradients. We then develop strong and weak forms of boundary-value problems relevant for 3D finite element modeling of coupled hydro-mechanical processes in unsaturated porous media. The paper highlights a 3D numerical example illustrating the advances in the solution of large-scale coupled finite element systems, as well as the challenges in developing more predictive tools satisfying the basic conservation laws and the observed constitutive responses for unsaturated porous materials.

Borja, R I; White, J A

2010-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

414

Breathing zone air sampler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sampling apparatus is provided which comprises a sampler for sampling air in the breathing zone of a wearer of the apparatus and a support for the sampler preferably in the form of a pair of eyeglasses. The sampler comprises a sampling assembly supported on the frame of the eyeglasses and including a pair of sample transport tubes which are suspended, in use, centrally of the frame so as to be disposed on opposite sides of the nose of the wearer and which each include an inlet therein that, in use, is disposed adjacent to a respective nostril of the nose of the wearer. A filter holder connected to sample transport tubes supports a removable filter for filtering out particulate material in the air sampled by the apparatus. The sample apparatus is connected to a pump for drawing air into the apparatus through the tube inlets so that the air passes through the filter.

Tobin, John (Bethel Park, PA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Characterization, propagation and analysis of aleatory and epistemic uncertainty in the 2008 performance assessment for the proposed repository for high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2008 performance assessment (PA) for the proposed repository for high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, illustrates the conceptual structure of risk assessments for complex systems. The 2008 YM PA is based on the following three ...

Clifford W. Hansen; Jon C. Helton; Cédric J. Sallaberry

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Western Renewable Energy Zones (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation summarizes recent developments and trends pertaining to competitive renewable energy zones, transmission planning and the integration of renewable generation resources.

Hein, J.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

DOE Solar Decathlon: Comfort Zone  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Decathlon Comfort Zone Contest, teams design their houses to keep temperature and humidity steady, uniform, and comfortable. Full points are awarded for maintaining narrow...

418

Interfacial Transition Zone Bibliography Database  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Saito, M., and Kawamura, M., Effect of Fly Ash and Slag on the Interfacial Zone Between Cement and Aggregate , in ACI SP 114: Fly Ash, Silica ...

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

419

Program on Technology Innovation: Effects of Multiple Seismic Events and Rockfall on Long-Term Performance of the Yucca Mountain Re pository  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the effort to obtain regulatory approval for construction, it is necessary to estimate the effects due to seismic activity and rockfall on long-term performance of the candidate high level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Previously, EPRI analyzed the consequences of a single seismic event (EPRI report 1011812, September 2005). The present report is the latest of a series of independent EPRI assessments of Yucca Mountain project-related activities....

2006-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

420

DOE to Send Proposed Yucca Mountain Legislation to Congress | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

April 4, 2006 - 10:03am April 4, 2006 - 10:03am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today announced that on Wednesday, April 5, he will send to the U.S. Congress a legislative proposal to enhance the nation's ability to manage and dispose of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Submission of this legislation fulfills a commitment contained in President Bush's Fiscal Year 2007 budget. "We need to ensure a strong and diversified energy mix to fuel our nation's economy, and nuclear power is an important component of that mix," Secretary Bodman said. "In order to expand our nuclear generating capacity, we need a safe, permanent, geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel at Yucca Mountain. This proposed legislation will help provide

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421

A floristic survey of Yucca Mountain and vicinity, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

A survey of the vascular flora of Yucca Mountain and vicinity, Nye County, Nevada, was conducted from March to June 1994, and from March to October 1995. An annotated checklist of recorded taxa was compiled. Voucher plant specimens were collected and accessioned into the Herbarium at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Collection data accompanying these specimens were entered into that herbarium`s electronic data base. Combined results from this survey and the works of other investigators reveal the presence of a total of 375 specific and intraspecific taxa within the area these allocated to 179 genera and 54 families. No taxon currently listed as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act was encountered during this study. Several candidate species for listing under this Act were present, and distributional data for these were recorded. No change in the status of these candidate species is recommended as the result of this study.

Niles, W.E.; Leary, P.J.; Holland, J.S.; Landau, F.H.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Natural Analoges as a Check of Predicted Drift Stability at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Calculations made by the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project as part of the licensing of a proposed geologic repository (in southwestern Nevada) for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste, predict that emplacement tunnels will remain open with little collapse long after ground support has disintegrated. This conclusion includes the effects of anticipated seismic events. Natural analogues cannot provide a quantitative test of this conclusion, but they can provide a reasonableness test by examining the natural and anthropogenic examples of stability of subterranean openings. Available data from a variety of sources, combined with limited observations by the author, show that natural underground openings tend to resist collapse for millions of years and that anthropogenic subterranean openings have remained open from before recorded history through today. This stability is true even in seismically active areas. In fact, the archaeological record is heavily skewed toward preservation of underground structures relative to those found at the surface.

J. Stuckless

2006-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

423

Yucca Mountain transportation routes: Preliminary characterization and risk analysis; Volume 1, Research report  

SciTech Connect

In this study, rail and highway routes which may be used for shipments of high-level nuclear waste to a proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada are characterized. This characterization facilitates three types of impact analysis: comparative study, limited worst-case assessment, and more sophisticated probabilistic risk assessment techniques. Data for relative and absolute impact measures are provided to support comparisons of routes based on selected characteristics. A worst-case scenario assessment is included to determine potentially critical and most likely places for accidents or incidents to occur. The assessment facilitated by the data in this study is limited because impact measures are restricted to the identification of potential areas or persons affected. No attempt is made to quantify the magnitude of these impacts. Most likely locations for accidents to occur are determined relative to other locations within the scope of this study. Independent factors and historical trends used to identify these likely locations are only proxies for accident probability.

Souleyrette, R.R. II; Sathisan, S.K.; di Bartolo, R. [Nevada Univ., Las Vegas, NV (United States). Transportation Research Center

1991-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

424

MRS system study for the repository: Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project; Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), has initiated a waste management system study to identify the impacts of the presence or absence of a monitored retrievable storage facility (hereinafter referred to as ``MRS``) on system costs and program schedules. To support this study, life-cycle cost estimates and construction schedules have been prepared for the surface and underground facilities and operations geologic nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. Nine different operating scenarios (cases) have been identified by OCRWM for inclusion in this study. For each case, the following items are determined: the repository design and construction costs, operating costs, closure and decommissioning costs, required staffing, construction schedules, uncertainties associated with the costs and schedules, and shipping cask and disposal container throughputs. This document contains A-D.

Sinagra, T.A. [Bechtel National, Inc., San Francisco, CA (USA); Harig, R. [Parsons, Brinckerhoff, Quade and Douglas, Inc., San Francisco, CA (USA)

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Potential {sup 14}CO{sub 2} releases from spent fuel containers at Yucca Mountain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential release of gaseous {sup 14}CO{sub 2} from small perforations in spent fuel containers has been evaluated as a function of temperature, hole size, effective porosity of corrosion products within the hole, and time, based on the waste package design parameters and environmental conditions described in the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Report (SCP). The SCP does not specify initial fill gas (argon) pressure and temperature. It is shown that, if significant {sup 14}C oxidation takes place during the initial, inert-gas phase, an incentive exists to initially underpressurize the containers. This will avoid large, spiked releases of gaseous {sup 14}CO{sub 2} and will result in delayed, smaller, and more uniform release rates over time. Therefore larger size perforations could be tolerated while meeting the applicable regulations. 16 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Pescatore, C.; Sullivan, T.M.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z