Sample records for unresolved safety issue

  1. Evaluation of station blackout accidents at nuclear power plants: Technical findings related to unresolved safety issue A-44: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ''Station Blackout,'' which is the complete loss of alternating current (AC) electrical power in a nuclear power plant, has been designated as Unresolved Safety Issue A-44. Because many safety systems required for reactor core decay heat removal and containment heat removal depend on AC power, the consequences of a station blackout could be severe. This report documents the findings of technical studies performed as part of the program to resolve this issue. The important factors analyzed include: the fequency of loss of offsite power; the probability that emergency or onsite AC power supplies would be unavailable; the capability and reliability of decay heat removal systems independent of AC power; and the likelihood that offsite power would be restored before systems that cannot operate for extended periods without AC power fail, thus resulting in core damage. This report also addresses effects of different designs, locations, and operational features on the estimated frequency of core damage resulting from station blackout events.

  2. Methodology for evaluation of insulation-debris effects. Containment emergency sump performance-unresolved safety issue A-43

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wysocki, J.; Kolbe, R.

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The postulated failure of high energy piping within a light water reactor containment has raised safety questions related to the generation of insulation debris, the migration of such debris to the containment emergency sump screens and the potential for severe screen blockages. High, or total, screen blockages could result in impairment of the long term RHR recirculation systems. Debris considerations are an integral part of the unresolved Safety Issue A-43, Containment Emergency Sump Performance. This report develops calculational methods and debris transport models which can be used for estimating the quantities of debris that might be generated by a LOCA, the transport of such debris, methods for estimating screen blockages and attendant pressure losses. Five operating plants were analyzed using this debris evaluation methodology. These calculations show the dependency on plant containment layout, sump location and design, and types and quantities of insulation employed. 9 figures, 6 tables.

  3. Safety Issues Chemical Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Robert E.

    Safety Issues · Chemical Storage ·Store in compatible containers that are in good condition to store separately. #12;Safety Issues · Flammable liquid storage -Store bulk quantities in flammable storage cabinets -UL approved Flammable Storage Refrigerators are required for cold storage · Provide

  4. Module Safety Issues (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wohlgemuth, J.

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Description of how to make PV modules so that they are less likely to turn into safety hazards. Making modules inherently safer with minimum additional cost is the preferred approach for PV. Safety starts with module design to ensure redundancy within the electrical circuitry to minimize open circuits and proper mounting instructions to prevent installation related ground faults. Module manufacturers must control the raw materials and processes to ensure that that every module is built like those qualified through the safety tests. This is the reason behind the QA task force effort to develop a 'Guideline for PV Module Manufacturing QA'. Periodic accelerated stress testing of production products is critical to validate the safety of the product. Combining safer PV modules with better systems designs is the ultimate goal. This should be especially true for PV arrays on buildings. Use of lower voltage dc circuits - AC modules, DC-DC converters. Use of arc detectors and interrupters to detect arcs and open the circuits to extinguish the arcs.

  5. Hydrogen Safety Issues Compared to Safety Issues with Methane and Propane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, Michael A.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Issues with Methane and Propane Michael A. Green LawrenceSAFETY ISSUES WITH METHANE AND PROPANE M. A. Green Lawrencehydrogen. Methane and propane are commonly used by ordinary

  6. Unresolved issues for the disposal of remote-handled transuranic waste in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silva, M.K.; Neill, R.H.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is to dispose of 176,000 cubic meters of transuranic (TRU) waste generated by the defense activities of the US Government. The envisioned inventory contains approximately 6 million cubic feet of contact-handled transuranic (CH TRU) waste and 250,000 cubic feet of remote handled transuranic (RH TRU) waste. CH TRU emits less than 0.2 rem/hr at the container surface. Of the 250,000 cubic feet of RH TRU waste, 5% by volume can emit up to 1,000 rem/hr at the container surface. The remainder of RH TRU waste must emit less than 100 rem/hr. These are major unresolved problems with the intended disposal of RH TRU waste in the WIPP. (1) The WIPP design requires the canisters of RH TRU waste to be emplaced in the walls (ribs) of each repository room. Each room will then be filled with drums of CH TRU waste. However, the RH TRU waste will not be available for shipment and disposal until after several rooms have already been filled with drums of CH TRU waste. RH TRU disposal capacity will be loss for each room that is first filled with CH TRU waste. (2) Complete RH TRU waste characterization data will not be available for performance assessment because the facilities needed for waste handling, waste treatment, waste packaging, and waste characterization do not yet exist. (3) The DOE does not have a transportation cask for RH TRU waste certified by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). These issues are discussed along with possible solutions and consequences from these solutions. 46 refs.

  7. Open Issues in the Development of Safety Standards for Compressed...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Issues in the Development of Safety Standards for Compressed Hydrogen Storage at SAE-International Open Issues in the Development of Safety Standards for Compressed Hydrogen...

  8. Systems Issues in Nuclear Reactor Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Systems Issues in Nuclear Reactor Safety Commissioner George ApostolakisCommissioner George Apostolakis U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission CmrApostolakis@nrc.gov MIT SDM Conference on Systems Thinking, source, and special nuclear materials to ensure adequate protection of public health and safety, 3

  9. Key Practical Issues in Strengthening Safety Culture, INSAG-15

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Key Pratical Issues in Strengthening Safety Culture, INSAG-15. A report by the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Gorup, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 2002.

  10. Nuclear Safety Enforcement Letter issued to Sandia Corporation...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Enforcement Letter issued to Sandia Corporation Nuclear Safety Enforcement Letter issued to Sandia Corporation 9222014 Enforcement Letter, Sandia Corporation, September 22, 2014...

  11. Dust Combustion Safety Issues for Fusion Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. C. Cadwallader

    2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of a safety research task to identify the safety issues and phenomenology of metallic dust fires and explosions that are postulated for fusion experiments. There are a variety of metal dusts that are created by plasma erosion and disruptions within the plasma chamber, as well as normal industrial dusts generated in the more conventional equipment in the balance of plant. For fusion, in-vessel dusts are generally mixtures of several elements; that is, the constituent elements in alloys and the variety of elements used for in-vessel materials. For example, in-vessel dust could be composed of beryllium from a first wall coating, tungsten from a divertor plate, copper from a plasma heating antenna or diagnostic, and perhaps some iron and chromium from the steel vessel wall or titanium and vanadium from the vessel wall. Each of these elements has its own unique combustion characteristics, and mixtures of elements must be evaluated for the mixture’s combustion properties. Issues of particle size, dust temperature, and presence of other combustible materials (i.e., deuterium and tritium) also affect combustion in air. Combustion in other gases has also been investigated to determine if there are safety concerns with “inert” atmospheres, such as nitrogen. Several coolants have also been reviewed to determine if coolant breach into the plasma chamber would enhance the combustion threat; for example, in-vessel steam from a water coolant breach will react with metal dust. The results of this review are presented here.

  12. TA-53 UNREVIEWED SAFETY ISSUE SCREENING AND DETERMINATION PROCESS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 UNREVIEWED SAFETY ISSUE SCREENING AND DETERMINATION PROCESS TRAINING WORKSHEET CT-TA53-FRM-505-R00 102011 Page 1 of 3 LA-UR-12-10162 TRAINEE NAME: Z NUMBER: GROUP: PURPOSE AND...

  13. Safety Issues with Hydrogen as a Vehicle Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cadwallader, Lee Charles; Herring, James Stephen

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is an initial effort to identify and evaluate safety issues associated with the use of hydrogen as a vehicle fuel in automobiles. Several forms of hydrogen have been considered: gas, liquid, slush, and hydrides. The safety issues have been discussed, beginning with properties of hydrogen and the phenomenology of hydrogen combustion. Safety-related operating experiences with hydrogen vehicles have been summarized to identify concerns that must be addressed in future design activities and to support probabilistic risk assessment. Also, applicable codes, standards, and regulations pertaining to hydrogen usage and refueling have been identified and are briefly discussed. This report serves as a safety foundation for any future hydrogen safety work, such as a safety analysis or a probabilistic risk assessment.

  14. Safety Issues with Hydrogen as a Vehicle Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. C. Cadwallader; J. S. Herring

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is an initial effort to identify and evaluate safety issues associated with the use of hydrogen as a vehicle fuel in automobiles. Several forms of hydrogen have been considered: gas, liquid, slush, and hydrides. The safety issues have been discussed, beginning with properties of hydrogen and the phenomenology of hydrogen combustion. Safety-related operating experiences with hydrogen vehicles have been summarized to identify concerns that must be addressed in future design activities and to support probabilistic risk assessment. Also, applicable codes, standards, and regulations pertaining to hydrogen usage and refueling have been identified and are briefly discussed. This report serves as a safety foundation for any future hydrogen safety work, such as a safety analysis or a probabilistic risk assessment.

  15. Chemical Hazards and Safety Issues in Fusion Safety Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cadwallader, L.C. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (United States)

    2003-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiological inventory releases have dominated accident consequences for fusion; these consequences are important to analyze and are generally the most severe result of a fusion facility accident event. However, the advent of, or plan for, large-scale usage of some toxic materials poses the additional hazard of chemical exposure from an accident event. Examples of toxic chemicals are beryllium for magnetic fusion and fluorine for laser fusion. Therefore, chemical exposure consequences must also be addressed in fusion safety assessment. This paper provides guidance for fusion safety analysis. US Department of Energy (DOE) chemical safety assessment practices for workers and the public are reviewed. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has published some guidance on public exposure to releases of mixtures of chemicals, this guidance has been used to create an initial guideline for treating mixed radiological and toxicological releases in fusion; for example, tritiated hazardous dust from a tokamak vacuum vessel. There is no convenient means to judge the hazard severity of exposure to mixed materials. The chemical fate of mixed material constituents must be reviewed to determine if there is a separate or combined radiological and toxicological carcinogenesis, or if other health threats exist with radiological carcinogenesis. Recommendations are made for fusion facility chemical safety evaluation and safety guidance for protecting the public from chemical releases, since such levels are not specifically identified in the DOE fusion safety standard.

  16. Safety Research and Outreach IN THIS ISSUE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on rural highways United Arab Emirates project addresses crash investigation and reporting Prominent SAFETY Despite the vastly different cultures between the United Arab Emirates and the United States the United States now have strong data to support the undertaking of a relatively low-cost measure to improve

  17. Safety Issues for High Temperature Gas Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risk Informed Safety Profile #12;LEVELS OF DEFENCE IN DEPTH (From INSAG-10) Control, limiting (reactivity insertion) ­ Loss of Load ­ Rod Ejection (more significant in block reactors) ­ Failure of reactor effects and chemical attack on graphite · Blow down loads and timing of accident event sequences

  18. Thermal reactor safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information is presented concerning new trends in licensing; seismic considerations and system structural behavior; TMI-2 risk assessment and thermal hydraulics; statistical assessment of potential accidents and verification of computational methods; issues with respect to improved safety; human factors in nuclear power plant operation; diagnostics and activities in support of recovery; LOCA transient analysis; unresolved safety issues and other safety considerations; and fission product transport.

  19. Comments on a paper tilted `The sea transport of vitrified high-level radioactive wastes: Unresolved safety issues`

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sprung, J.L.; McConnell, P.E.; Nigrey, P.J.; Ammerman, D.J. [and others

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cited paper estimates the consequences that might occur should a purpose-built ship transporting Vitrified High Level Waste (VHLW) be involved in a severe collision that causes the VHLW canisters in one Type-B package to spill onto the floor of a major ocean fishing region. Release of radioactivity from VHLW glass logs, failure of elastomer cask seals, failure of VHLW canisters due to stress corrosion cracking (SCC), and the probabilities of the hypothesized accident scenario, of catastrophic cask failure, and of cask recovery from the sea are all discussed.

  20. ISV safety, processing, and starter path issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hilliard, D K; Kindle, C H [comps.

    1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerous experiments and studies related to safety concerns in the in situ vitrification (ISV) process have been conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Topics of interest include (1) combustible inclusions, (2) sealed containers, (3) radiant heat surge, (4) electrical shock, (5) general risk analysis, and (6) Pu criticality. The data and analyses are those used for the initial ISV development and subsequent improvement; the majority was performed in 1987 or earlier. The purpose of this report is to document these analyses for reference purposes; knowledge gained more recently is, or will be, incorporated in other documents. 33 refs., 1 fig., 9 tabs.

  1. Nuclear Plant/Hydrogen Plant Safety: Issues and Approaches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven R. Sherman

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy, through its agents the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project and the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative, is working on developing the technologies to enable the large scale production of hydrogen using nuclear power. A very important consideration in the design of a co-located and connected nuclear plant/hydrogen plant facility is safety. This study provides an overview of the safety issues associated with a combined plant and discusses approaches for categorizing, quantifying, and addressing the safety risks.

  2. Thermally-related safety issues associated with thermal batteries.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guidotti, Ronald Armand

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal batteries can experience thermal runaway under certain usage conditions. This can lead to safety issues for personnel and cause damage to associated test equipment if the battery thermally self destructs. This report discusses a number of thermal and design related issues that can lead to catastrophic destruction of thermal batteries under certain conditions. Contributing factors are identified and mitigating actions are presented to minimize or prevent undesirable thermal runaway.

  3. Characterization strategy report for the organic safety issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goheen, S.C.; Campbell, J.A.; Fryxell, G.E. [and others

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a logical approach to resolving potential safety issues resulting from the presence of organic components in hanford tank wastes. The approach uses a structured logic diagram (SLD) to provide a pathway for quantifying organic safety issue risk. The scope of the report is limited to selected organics (i.e., solvents and complexants) that were added to the tanks and their degradation products. The greatest concern is the potential exothermic reactions that can occur between these components and oxidants, such as sodium nitrate, that are present in the waste tanks. The organic safety issue is described in a conceptual model that depicts key modes of failure-event reaction processes in tank systems and phase domains (domains are regions of the tank that have similar contents) that are depicted with the SLD. Applying this approach to quantify risk requires knowing the composition and distribution of the organic and inorganic components to determine (1) how much energy the waste would release in the various domains, (2) the toxicity of the region associated with a disruptive event, and (3) the probability of an initiating reaction. Five different characterization options are described, each providing a different level of quality in calculating the risks involved with organic safety issues. Recommendations include processing existing data through the SLD to estimate risk, developing models needed to link more complex characterization information for the purpose of estimating risk, and examining correlations between the characterization approaches for optimizing information quality while minimizing cost in estimating risk.

  4. Project plan for resolution of the organic waste tank safety issues at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meacham, J.E.

    1996-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-year project plan for the Organic Safety Project has been developed with the objective of resolving the organic safety issues associated with the High Level Waste (HLW) in Hanford`s single-shell tanks (SSTS) and double-shell tanks (DSTs). The objective of the Organic Safety Project is to ensure safe interim storage until retrieval for pretreatment and disposal operations begins, and to resolve the organic safety issues by September 2001. Since the initial identification of organics as a tank waste safety issue, progress has been made in understanding the specific aspects of organic waste combustibility, and in developing and implementing activities to resolve the organic safety issues.

  5. Status report on resolution of Waste Tank Safety Issues at the Hanford Site. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dukelow, G.T.; Hanson, G.A. [Los Alamos Technical Associates, Inc., Kennewick, WA (United States)

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide and update the status of activities supporting the resolution of waste tank safety issues and system deficiencies at the Hanford Site. This report provides: (1) background information on safety issues and system deficiencies; (2) a description of the Tank Waste Remediation System and the process for managing safety issues and system deficiencies; (3) changes in safety issue description, prioritization, and schedules; and (4) a summary of the status, plans, order of magnitude, cost, and schedule for resolving safety issues and system deficiencies.

  6. HTGR Dust Safety Issues and Needs for Research and Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul W. Humrickhouse

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a summary of high temperature gas-cooled reactor dust safety issues. It draws upon a literature review and the proceedings of the Very High Temperature Reactor Dust Assessment Meeting held in Rockville, MD in March 2011 to identify and prioritize the phenomena and issues that characterize the effect of carbonaceous dust on high temperature reactor safety. It reflects the work and input of approximately 40 participants from the U.S. Department of Energy and its National Labs, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, industry, academia, and international nuclear research organizations on the topics of dust generation and characterization, transport, fission product interactions, and chemical reactions. The meeting was organized by the Idaho National Laboratory under the auspices of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project, with support from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Information gleaned from the report and related meetings will be used to enhance the fuel, graphite, and methods technical program plans that guide research and development under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project. Based on meeting discussions and presentations, major research and development needs include: generating adsorption isotherms for fission products that display an affinity for dust, investigating the formation and properties of carbonaceous crust on the inside of high temperature reactor coolant pipes, and confirming the predominant source of dust as abrasion between fuel spheres and the fuel handling system.

  7. Identification and Resolution of Safety Issues for the Advanced Integral Type PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Woong Sik; Jo, Jong Chull; Yune, Young Gill; Kim, Hho Jung [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, 19 Kusung-dong, Yusung-ku, Taejon, 305-338 (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the interim results of a study on the identification and resolution of safety issues for the AIPWR licensing. The safety issues discussed in this paper include (1) policy issues for which decision-makings are needed for the procedural requirements of licensing system in the regulatory policy point of view, (2) technical issues for which either development of new requirements or amendment of some existing requirements is needed, or (3) other technical issues for which safety verifications are required. The study covers (a) the assessment of applicability of the issues identified from the previous studies to the case of the AIPWR, (b) identification of safety issues through analysis of the international experiences in the design and licensing of advanced reactors, and technical review of the AIPWR design, and (c) development of the resolutions of safety issues, and application of the resolutions to the amendment of regulatory requirements and the licensing review of the AIPWR. As the results of this study, a total of twenty eight safety issues was identified: fourteen issues from the previous studies, including the establishment of design safety goals; four issues from the foreign practices and experiences, including the risk-informed licensing; and ten issues by the AIPWR design review, including reliability of passive safety systems. Ten issues of them have been already resolved and the succeeding study is under way to resolve the remaining ones. (authors)

  8. Regulatory Safety Issues in the Structural Design Criteria of ASME Section III Subsection NH and for Very High Temperatures for VHTR & GEN IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William J. O’Donnell; Donald S. Griffin

    2007-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this task is to identify issues relevant to ASME Section III, Subsection NH [1], and related Code Cases that must be resolved for licensing purposes for VHTGRs (Very High Temperature Gas Reactor concepts such as those of PBMR, Areva, and GA); and to identify the material models, design criteria, and analysis methods that need to be added to the ASME Code to cover the unresolved safety issues. Subsection NH was originally developed to provide structural design criteria and limits for elevated-temperature design of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) systems and some gas-cooled systems. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and its Advisory Committee for Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) reviewed the design limits and procedures in the process of reviewing the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) for a construction permit in the late 1970s and early 1980s, and identified issues that needed resolution. In the years since then, the NRC and various contractors have evaluated the applicability of the ASME Code and Code Cases to high-temperature reactor designs such as the VHTGRs, and identified issues that need to be resolved to provide a regulatory basis for licensing. This Report describes: (1) NRC and ACRS safety concerns raised during the licensing process of CRBR , (2) how some of these issues are addressed by the current Subsection NH of the ASME Code; and (3) the material models, design criteria, and analysis methods that need to be added to the ASME Code and Code Cases to cover unresolved regulatory issues for very high temperature service.

  9. Peak Travel, Peak Car and the Future of Mobility: Evidence, Unresolved...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Travel, Peak Car and the Future of Mobility: Evidence, Unresolved Issues, Policy Implications, and a Research Agenda Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Peak...

  10. Guidelines for nuclear power plant safety issue prioritization information development. Supplement 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, W.B.; Gallucci, R.H.V.; Konzek, G.J.; Heaberlin, S.W.; Fecht, B.A.; Allen, C.H.; Allen, R.D.; Bickford, W.E., Carbaugh, E.H.; Lewis, J.R.

    1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the third in a series of reports to document the use of a methodology developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory to calculate, for prioritization purposes, the risk, dose and cost impacts of implementing resolutions to reactor safety issues (NUREG/CR-2800, Andrews et al. 1983). This report contains results of issue-specific analyses for 31 issues. Each issue was considered within the constraints of available information as of summer 1983, and two staff-weeks of labor. The results are referenced, as one consideration in setting priorities for reactor safety issues, in NUREG-0933, A Prioritization of Generic Safety Issues.

  11. Guidelines for nuclear power plant safety issue prioritization information development. Supplement 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tabatabai, A.S.; Fecht, B.A.; Powers, T.B.; Bickford, W.E.; Andrews, W.B.; Gallucci, R.H.V.; Bian, S.H.; Daling, P.M.; Eschbach, E.J.; Allen, C.H.

    1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the fifth in a series of reports to document the use of a methodology developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory to calculate, for prioritization purposes, the risk, dose and cost impacts of implementing resolutions to reactor safety issues (NUREG/CR-2800, Andrews et al. 1983). This report contains results of issue-specific analyses for 23 issues. Each issue was considered within the constraints of available information as of winter 1986, and two staff-weeks of labor. The results are referenced, as one consideration in setting priorities for reactor safety issues, in NUREG-0933, ''A Prioritization of Generic Safety Issues.''

  12. Guidelines for nuclear-power-plant safety-issue-prioritization information development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, W.B.; Gallucci, R.H.V.; Heaberlin, S.W.; Bickford, W.E.; Konzek, G.J.; Strenge, D.L.; Smith, R.I.; Weakley, S.A.

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed a methodology, with examples, to calculate - to an approximation serviceable for prioritization purposes - the risk, dose and cost impacts of implementing resolutions to reactor safety issues. This report is an applications guide to issue-specific calculations. A description of the approach, mathematical models, worksheets and step-by-step examples are provided. Analysis using this method is intended to provide comparable results for many issues at a cost of two staff-weeks per issue. Results will be used by the NRC to support decisions related to issue priorities in allocation of resources to complete safety issue resolutions.

  13. Guidelines for nuclear power plant safety issue prioritization information development. Supplement 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daling, P.M.; Lavender, J.C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the sixth in a series of reports to document the development and use of a methodology developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to calculate, for prioritization purposes, the risk, dose, and cost impacts of implementing potential resolutions to reactor safety issues (see NUREG/CR-2800, Andrews, et al., 1983). This report contains the results of issue-specific analyses for 34 generic issues. Each issue was considered within the constraints of available information at the time the issues were examined and approximately 2 staff-weeks of labor. The results are referenced as one consideration in NUREG-0933, A Prioritization of Generic Safety Issues (Emrit, et al., 1983).

  14. Chemistry Safety Notes Volume 1, Issue 2 December 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Ting

    by the Chemistry Dept. Safety Committee, written & edited by Debbie Decker, Safety Mgr. EH&S Inspections EH extinguisher, there's a green tag with the fire marshal stamp on one side. On the reverse, there's a list

  15. accident safety issues: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cell Phones and Eye Glasses: Place cell phones (accessories and battery) and eyeglasses batteries, and refrigerants. Contact Environmental Health and Safety for proper...

  16. aviation safety issues: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cell Phones and Eye Glasses: Place cell phones (accessories and battery) and eyeglasses batteries, and refrigerants. Contact Environmental Health and Safety for proper...

  17. Personnel Grounding and Safety: Issues and Solutions Related to Servicing Optical Fiber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Personnel Grounding and Safety: Issues and Solutions Related to Servicing Optical Fiber Telecommunication Circuits in Optical Ground Wire (OPGW) Final Project Report Power Systems Engineering Research to Servicing Optical Fiber Telecommunication Circuits in Optical Ground Wire (OPGW) Final Project Report

  18. Progress in resolving Hanford Site high-level waste tank safety issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babad, H.; Eberlein, S.J.; Johnson, G.D.; Meacham, J.E.; Osborne, J.W.; Payne, M.A.; Turner, D.A.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interim storage of alkaline, high-level radioactive waste, from two generations of spent fuel reprocessing and waste management activities, has resulted in the accumulation of 238 million liters of waste in Hanford Site single and double-shell tanks. Before the 1990`s, the stored waste was believed to be: (1) chemically unreactive under its existing storage conditions and plausible accident scenarios; and (2) chemically stable. This paradigm was proven incorrect when detailed evaluation of tank contents and behavior revealed a number of safety issues and that the waste was generating flammable and noxious gases. In 1990, the Waste Tank Safety Program was formed to focus on identifying safety issues and resolving the ferrocyanide, flammable gas, organic, high heat, noxious vapor, and criticality issues. The tanks of concern were placed on Watch Lists by safety issue. This paper summarizes recent progress toward resolving Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tank safety issues, including modeling, and analyses, laboratory experiments, monitoring upgrades, mitigation equipment, and developing a strategy to screen tanks for safety issues.

  19. An update on environmental, health and safety issues of interest to the photovoltaic industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moskowitz, P.D.; Viren, J.; Fthenakis, V.M.

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is growing interest in the environmental, health, and safety issues related to new photovoltaic technologies as they approach commercialization. Such issues include potential toxicity of II--VI compounds; the impacts of new environmental regulations on module manufacturers; and, the need for recycling of spent modules and manufacturing wastes. This paper will review these topics. 20 refs.

  20. Queen's University Environmental Health & Safety Date Issued: Page No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abolmaesumi, Purang

    of accidental chemical reactions and exposure resulting from the improper storage of hazardous chemicals - R.S.O. 1990 Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS) ­ Regulation 860 Hazardous to the chemicals you are using. Know the properties and safety protocols before beginning any work with chemicals

  1. Questioned, Unresolved, and Potentially Unallowable Costs Incurred...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Special Report Questioned, Unresolved and Potentially Unallowable Costs Incurred by Los Alamos National Laboratory during Fiscal Years 2008 and 2009 OAS-L-12-04 April 2012...

  2. A review of occupational safety and health issues relevant to the environmental restoration program: Selected case histories and associated issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lesperance, A.M.; Siegel, M.R.; McKinney, M.D.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a study conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to determine the impact of occupational safety and health (OSH) issues on the environmental restoration process at US Department of Energy sites. PNL selected three remediation projects to study: (1) the 618-9 Burial Ground Expedited Removal Action at the Hanford Site, (2) the Chemical Consolidation Interim Response Action at the Weldon Spring Site, (3) and the 200 West Area Carbon Tetrachloride Expedited Removal Action and VOC-Arid Integration Demonstration at the Hanford Site. The first two case studies involve sites where a remediation activity has been complete. The third case study involves a remediation activity in its early stages of development. This study identifies OSH issues related to actual cleanup, time, documentation, training, and technology development. These issues need to be considered by DOE before making long-term planning efforts. Section 4.0 of this report describes recommendations for addressing these issues.

  3. International Symposium on Fusion Nuclear Technology (ISFNT-5) SAFETY ISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH MOBILIZED ACTIVATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    International Symposium on Fusion Nuclear Technology (ISFNT-5) SAFETY ISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH MOBILIZED ACTIVATION PRODUCTS IN SELECTED APEX DESIGNS K. A. McCarthy, D. A. Petti, R. L. Moore, and B. J. In this paper we concentrate on mobilization of first wall materials during ingress events, and provide guidance

  4. BIOFUELS FOR TRANSPORT IN THE 21st WHY FIRE SAFETY IS A REAL ISSUE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    BIOFUELS FOR TRANSPORT IN THE 21st CENTURY: WHY FIRE SAFETY IS A REAL ISSUE Guy Marlair1 , Patricia's), with thé new century venue we are assisting of a booming industry regarding biofuels of biofuels for transport. This contribution is a fîrst output from a National research program named

  5. Differing Professional Opinions Manual for Technical Issues Involving Environment, Safety, and Health

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual establishes a differing professional opinion (DPO) policy to a Department of Energy (DOE) Differing Professional Opinion (DPO) Process to encourage and facilitate dialogue and resolution on DPOs from employees for technical issues involving environment, safety, and health. Does not cancel other directives. Canceled by DOE O 442.2.

  6. Inherent safety advantages of carbide fuel systems and technical issues regarding natural convection in LMRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barthold, W.P. [Barthold and Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The scope of work is to summarize inherent safety advantages that are unique to the use of a carbide based fuel system and to summarize the technical issues regarding natural convection flow in LMFBR cores. As discussed in this report, carbide fuel provides the designer with far greater flexibility than oxide fuel. Carbide fuel systems can be designed to eliminate major accident initiators. They turn quantitative advantages into a qualitative advantage. The author proposed to LANL a series of core design and component concepts that would greatly enhance the safety of carbide over oxide systems. This report cites a series of safety advantages which potentially exist for a carbide fuel system. Natural convection issues have not been given much attention in the past. Only during the last few years has this issue been addressed in some detail. Despite claims to the contrary by some of the LMR contractors, the author does not think that the natural convection phenomena is fully understood. Some of the approximations made in natural convection transient analyses have probably a greater impact on calculated transient temperatures than the effects under investigation. Only integral in-pile experimental data and single assembly out-of-pile detailed data are available for comparisons with analytical models and correlations. Especially for derated cores, the natural convection capability of a LMR should be far superior to that of a LWR. The author ranks the natural convection capability of the LMR as the most important inherent safety feature.

  7. Safety Issues

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited ReleaseWelcome ton nSafeguards

  8. Safety and licensing issues that are being addressed by the Power Burst Facility test programs. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCardell, R.K.; MacDonald, P.E.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an overview of the results of the experimental program being conducted in the Power Burst Facility and the relationship of these results to certain safety and licensing issues. The safety issues that were addressed by the Power-Cooling-Mismatch, Reactivity Initiated Accident, and Loss of Coolant Accident tests, which comprised the original test program in the Power Burst Facility, are discussed. The resolution of these safety issues based on the results of the thirty-six tests performed to date, is presented. The future resolution of safety issues identified in the new Power Burst Facility test program which consists of tests which simulate BWR and PWR operational transients, anticipated transients without scram, and severe fuel damage accidents, is described.

  9. Environmental, health and safety issues related to commercializing CuInSe{sub 2}-based photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eberspacher, C. [UNISUN, Newbury Park, CA (United States); Fthenakis, V.M.; Moskowtiz, P.D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photovoltaics technology is rapidly evolving towards a new generation of low-cost thin film technologies. One of the most promising materials in this new generation is copper indium selenide (CuInSe{sub 2} or CIS). As with any new material, successful commercialization of CIS photovoltaic (PV) technology will require attention to environmental, health and safety issues, including consideration of the sources, usage, and end-of-product-life disposal and/or recycling of the constituent materials. This work focuses on three specific environmental, health and safety (EH and S) issues related to CIS PV: (1) economics are analyzed to determine their impact on materials use and re-use; (2) Federal and California State environmental disposal and waste handling regulations are analyzed to evaluate their impact on PV module manufacturing and end-of-life module handling; and (3) the logistics and economics of product recycling and waste disposal by industries with comparable EH and S issues are examined to quantify the corresponding options available for handling, disposing of and/or recycling manufacturing by-products and end-of-life modules.

  10. CANDU reactors, their regulation in Canada, and the identification of relevant NRC safety issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charak, I.; Kier, P.H. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomic Energy of Canada, Limited (AECL) and its subsidiary in the US, are considering submitting the CANDU 3 design for standard design certification under 10 CFR Part 52. CANDU reactors are pressurized heavy water power reactors. They have some substantially different safety responses and safety systems than the LWRs that the commercial power reactor licensing regulations of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) have been developed to deal with. In this report, the authors discuss the basic design characteristics of CANDU reactors, specifically of the CANDU 3 where possible, and some safety-related consequences of these characteristics. The authors also discuss the Canadian regulatory provisions, and the CANDU safety systems that have evolved to satisfy the Canadian regulatory requirements as of December 1992. Finally, the authors identify NRC regulations, mainly in 10 CFR Parts 50 and 100, with issues for CANDU 3 reactor designs. In all, eleven such regulatory issues are identified. They are: (1) the ATWS rule ({section}50.62); (2) station blackout ({section}50.63); (3) conformance with Standard Review Plan (SRP); (4) appropriateness of the source term ({section}50.34(f) and {section}100.11); (5) applicability of reactor coolant pressure boundary (RCPB) requirements ({section}50.55a, etc); (6) ECCS acceptance criteria ({section}50.46)(b); (7) combustible gas control ({section}50.44, etc); (8) power coefficient of reactivity (GDC 11); (9) seismic design (Part 100); (10) environmental impacts of the fuel cycle ({section}51.51); and (11) (standards {section}50.55a).

  11. Current status of environmental, health, and safety issues of lithium ion electric vehicle batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vimmerstedt, L.J.; Ring, S.; Hammel, C.J.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The lithium ion system considered in this report uses lithium intercalation compounds as both positive and negative electrodes and has an organic liquid electrolyte. Oxides of nickel, cobalt, and manganese are used in the positive electrode, and carbon is used in the negative electrode. This report presents health and safety issues, environmental issues, and shipping requirements for lithium ion electric vehicle (EV) batteries. A lithium-based electrochemical system can, in theory, achieve higher energy density than systems using other elements. The lithium ion system is less reactive and more reliable than present lithium metal systems and has possible performance advantages over some lithium solid polymer electrolyte batteries. However, the possibility of electrolyte spills could be a disadvantage of a liquid electrolyte system compared to a solid electrolyte. The lithium ion system is a developing technology, so there is some uncertainty regarding which materials will be used in an EV-sized battery. This report reviews the materials presented in the open literature within the context of health and safety issues, considering intrinsic material hazards, mitigation of material hazards, and safety testing. Some possible lithium ion battery materials are toxic, carcinogenic, or could undergo chemical reactions that produce hazardous heat or gases. Toxic materials include lithium compounds, nickel compounds, arsenic compounds, and dimethoxyethane. Carcinogenic materials include nickel compounds, arsenic compounds, and (possibly) cobalt compounds, copper, and polypropylene. Lithiated negative electrode materials could be reactive. However, because information about the exact compounds that will be used in future batteries is proprietary, ongoing research will determine which specific hazards will apply.

  12. Final Review of Safety Assessment Issues at Savannah River Site, August 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Napier, Bruce A.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Bixler, Nathan E.

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    At the request of Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS) management, a review team composed of experts in atmospheric transport modeling for environmental radiation dose assessment convened at the Savannah River Site (SRS) on August 29-30, 2011. Though the meeting was prompted initially by suspected issues related to the treatment of surface roughness inherent in the SRS meteorological dataset and its treatment in the MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System Version 2 (MACCS2), various topical areas were discussed that are relevant to performing safety assessments at SRS; this final report addresses these topical areas.

  13. Safety issues in fabricating mixed oxide fuel using surplus weapons plutonium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buksa, J.; Badwan, F.; Barr, M.; Motley, F.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an assessment of the safety issues and implications of fabricating mixed oxide (MOX) fuel using surplus weapons plutonium. The basis for this assessment is the research done at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in identifying and resolving the technical issues surrounding the production of PuO{sub 2} feed, removal of gallium from the PuO{sub 2} feed, the fabrication of test fuel, and the work done at the LANL plutonium processing facility. The use of plutonium in MOX fuel has been successfully demonstrated in Europe, where the experience has been almost exclusively with plutonium separated from commercial spent nuclear fuel. This experience in safely operating MOX fuel fabrication facilities directly applies to the fabrication and irradiation of MOX fuel made from surplus weapons plutonium. Consequently, this paper focuses on the technical difference between plutonium from surplus weapons, and light-water reactor recycled plutonium. Preliminary assessments and research lead to the conclusion that no new process or product safety concerns will arise from using surplus weapons plutonium in MOX fuel.

  14. Current status of environmental, health, and safety issues of electrochemical capacitors for advanced vehicle applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vimmerstedt, L.J.; Hammel, C.J.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrochemical capacitors are a candidate for traction power assists in hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). Other advanced automotive applications, while not the primary focus of current development efforts, are also possible. These include load leveling high-energy batteries, power conditioning electronics, electrically hated catalysts, electric power steering, and engine starter power. Higher power and longer cycle life are expected for electrochemical capacitors than for batteries. Evaluation of environmental, health, and safety (EH and S) issues of electrochemical capacitors is an essential part of the development and commercialization of electrochemical capacitors for advanced vehicles. This report provides an initial EH and S assessment. This report presents electrochemical capacitor electrochemistry, materials selection, intrinsic material hazards, mitigation of those hazards, environmental requirements, pollution control options, and shipping requirements. Most of the information available for this assessment pertains to commercial devices intended for application outside the advanced vehicle market and to experiment or prototype devices. Electrochemical capacitors for power assists in HEVs are not produced commercially now. Therefore, materials for advanced vehicle electrochemical capacitors may change, and so would the corresponding EH and S issues. Although changes are possible, this report describes issues for likely electrochemical capacitor designs.

  15. Assessment of environmental health and safety issues associated with the commercialization of unconventional gas recovery: Tight Western Sands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riedel, E.F.; Cowan, C.E.; McLaughlin, T.J.

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of a study to identify and evaluate potential public health and safety problems and the potential environmental impacts from recovery of natural gas from Tight Western Sands are reported. A brief discussion of economic and technical constraints to development of this resource is also presented to place the environmental and safety issues in perspective. A description of the resource base, recovery techniques, and possible environmental effects associated with tight gas sands is presented.

  16. Current status of environmental, health, and safety issues of lithium polymer electric vehicle batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corbus, D.; Hammel, C.J.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lithium solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) batteries are being investigated by researchers worldwide as a possible energy source for future electric vehicles (EVs). One of the main reasons for interest in lithium SPE battery systems is the potential safety features they offer as compared to lithium battery systems using inorganic and organic liquid electrolytes. However, the development of lithium SPE batteries is still in its infancy, and the technology is not envisioned to be ready for commercialization for several years. Because the research and development (R&D) of lithium SPE battery technology is of a highly competitive nature, with many companies both in the United States and abroad pursuing R&D efforts, much of the information concerning specific developments of lithium SPE battery technology is proprietary. This report is based on information available only through the open literature (i.e., information available through library searches). Furthermore, whereas R&D activities for lithium SPE cells have focused on a number of different chemistries, for both electrodes and electrolytes, this report examines the general environmental, health, and safety (EH&S) issues common to many lithium SPE chemistries. However, EH&S issues for specific lithium SPE cell chemistries are discussed when sufficient information exists. Although lithium batteries that do not have a SPE are also being considered for EV applications, this report focuses only on those lithium battery technologies that utilize the SPE technology. The lithium SPE battery technologies considered in this report may contain metallic lithium or nonmetallic lithium compounds (e.g., lithium intercalated carbons) in the negative electrode.

  17. Environmental Health & Safety Policy Manual Issue Date: 4/23/2010 Updated: 4/23/2014 Policy # EHS-400.09

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmental Health & Safety Policy Manual Issue Date: 4/23/2010 Updated: 4/23/2014 Policy # EHS-400.09 Executive Committee for Environmental Health and Safety Charter 1.0 PURPOSE: The Executive for Environmental Health and Safety shall: · Assess prior year accomplishments and coming year goals

  18. Assessment of enriched uranium storage safety issues at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is an assessment of the technical safety issues pertaining to the storage of EU at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The purpose of the assessment is to serve as the basis for defining the technical standards for storage of EU at Y-12. A formal assessment of the Y-12 materials acceptance criteria for EU is currently being conducted by a task force cochaired by B. G. Eddy of DOE Oak Ridge Operations and S. 0. Cox of Y-12 Defense Programs. The mission of this technical assessment for storage is obviously dependent on results of the acceptance assessment. Clearly, the two efforts require coordination to avoid inconsistencies. In addition, both these Assessments must be consistent with the Environmental Assessment for EU storage at Y-12.1 Both the Storage Assessment and the Criteria for Acceptance must take cognizance of the fact that a portion of the EU to be submitted for storage in the future is expected to be derived from foreign sources and to include previously irradiated uranium containing significant levels of transuranics, radioactive daughter products, and unstable uranium isotopes that do not occur in the EU stream of the DOE weapons complex. National security considerations may dictate that these materials be accepted despite the fact that they fail to conform to the Acceptance Criteria. This document will attempt to address the complexities inherent in this situation.

  19. Reactor safety issues resolved by the 2D/3D Program. International Agreement Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Damerell, P.S.; Simons, J.W. [eds.] [MPR Associates, Inc., Washington, DC (United States)

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2D/3D Program studied multidimensional thermal-hydraulics in a PWR core and primary system during the end-of-blowdown and post-blowdown phases of a large-break LOCA (LBLOCA), and during selected small-break LOCA (SBLOCA) transients. The program included tests at the Cylindrical Core Test Facility (CCTF), the Slab Core Test Facility (SCTF), and the Upper Plenum Test Facility (UPTF), and computer analyses using TRAC. Tests at CCTF investigated core thermal-hydraulics and overall system behavior while tests at SCTF concentrated on multidimensional core thermal-hydraulics. The UPTF tests investigated two-phase flow behavior in the downcomer, upper plenum, tie plate region, and primary loops. TRAC analyses evaluated thermal-hydraulic behavior throughout the primary system in tests as well as in PWRs. This report summarizes the test and analysis results in each of the main areas where improved information was obtained in the 2D/3D Program. The discussion is organized in terms of the reactor safety issues investigated.

  20. Pantex Plant final safety analysis report, Zone 4 magazines. Staging or interim storage for nuclear weapons and components: Issue D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Safety Analysis Report (SAR) contains a detailed description and evaluation of the significant environmental, safety, and health (ES&H) issues associated with the operations of the Pantex Plant modified-Richmond and steel arch construction (SAC) magazines in Zone 4. It provides (1) an overall description of the magazines, the Pantex Plant, and its surroundings; (2) a systematic evaluations of the hazards that could occur as a result of the operations performed in these magazines; (3) descriptions and analyses of the adequacy of the measures taken to eliminate, control, or mitigate the identified hazards; and (4) analyses of potential accidents and their associated risks.

  1. Signatures of Planets in Spatially Unresolved Disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Moro-Martin; S. Wolf; R. Malhotra

    2005-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Main sequence stars are commonly surrounded by debris disks, composed of cold dust continuously replenished by a reservoir of undetected dust-producing planetesimals. In a planetary system with a belt of planetesimals (like the Solar System's Kuiper Belt) and one or more interior giant planets, the trapping of dust particles in the mean motion resonances with the planets can create structure in the dust disk, as the particles accumulate at certain semimajor axes. Sufficiently massive planets may also scatter and eject dust particles out of a planetary system, creating a dust depleted region inside the orbit of the planet. In anticipation of future observations of spatially unresolved debris disks with the Spitzer Space Telescope, we are interested in studying how the structure carved by planets affects the shape of the disk's spectral energy distribution (SED), and consequently if the SED can be used to infer the presence of planets. We numerically calculate the equilibrium spatial density distributions and SEDs of dust disks originated by a belt of planetesimals in the presence of interior giant planets in different planetary configurations, and for a representative sample of chemical compositions. The dynamical models are necessary to estimate the enhancement of particles near the mean motion resonances with the planets, and to determine how many particles drift inside the planet's orbit. Based on the SEDs and predicted $\\it{Spitzer}$ colors we discuss what types of planetary systems can be distinguishable from one another and the main parameter degeneracies in the model SEDs.

  2. Environmental, health, and safety issues of sodium-sulfur batteries for electric and hybrid vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammel, C.J.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines the shipping regulations that govern the shipment of dangerous goods. Since the elemental sodium contained in both sodium-sulfur and sodium-metal-chloride batteries is classified as a dangerous good, and is listed on both the national and international hazardous materials listings, both national and international regulatory processes are considered in this report The interrelationships as well as the differences between the two processes are highlighted. It is important to note that the transport regulatory processes examined in this report are reviewed within the context of assessing the necessary steps needed to provide for the domestic and international transport of sodium-beta batteries. The need for such an assessment was determined by the Shipping Sub-Working Group (SSWG) of the EV Battery Readiness Working Group (Working Group), created in 1990. The Working Group was created to examine the regulatory issues pertaining to in-vehicle safety, shipping, and recycling of sodium-sulfur batteries, each of which is addressed by a sub-working group. The mission of the SSWG is to establish basic provisions that will ensure the safe and efficient transport of sodium-beta batteries. To support that end, a proposal to the UN Committee of Experts was prepared by the SSWG, with the goal of obtaining a proper shipping name and UN number for sodium-beta batteries and to establish the basic transport requirements for such batteries (see the appendix for the proposal as submitted). It is emphasized that because batteries are large articles containing elemental sodium and, in some cases, sulfur, there is no existing UN entry under which they can be classified and for which modal transport requirements, such as the use of packaging appropriate for such large articles, are provided for. It is for this reason that a specific UN entry for sodium-beta batteries is considered essential.

  3. Environmental, health, and safety issues of fuel cells in transportation. Volume 1: Phosphoric acid fuel-cell buses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ring, S.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) chartered the Phosphoric Acid Fuel-Cell (PAFC) Bus Program to demonstrate the feasibility of fuel cells in heavy-duty transportation systems. As part of this program, PAFC- powered buses are being built to meet transit industry design and performance standards. Test-bed bus-1 (TBB-1) was designed in 1993 and integrated in March 1994. TBB-2 and TBB-3 are under construction and should be integrated in early 1995. In 1987 Phase I of the program began with the development and testing of two conceptual system designs- liquid- and air-cooled systems. The liquid-cooled PAFC system was chosen to continue, through a competitive award, into Phase H, beginning in 1991. Three hybrid buses, which combine fuel-cell and battery technologies, were designed during Phase III. After completing Phase II, DOE plans a comprehensive performance testing program (Phase HI) to verify that the buses meet stringent transit industry requirements. The Phase III study will evaluate the PAFC bus and compare it to a conventional diesel bus. This NREL study assesses the environmental, health, and safety (EH&S) issues that may affect the commercialization of the PAFC bus. Because safety is a critical factor for consumer acceptance of new transportation-based technologies the study focuses on these issues. The study examines health and safety together because they are integrally related. In addition, this report briefly discusses two environmental issues that are of concern to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The first issue involves a surge battery used by the PAFC bus that contains hazardous constituents. The second issue concerns the regulated air emissions produced during operation of the PAFC bus.

  4. Secretary of Energy Ernest J. Moniz and Deputy Secretary Daniel B. Poneman issue Personal Commitment to Health and Safety of DOE employees

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Secretary of Energy Ernest J. Moniz and Deputy Secretary Daniel B. Poneman recently issued a joint Memorandum, entitled Personal Commitment to Health and Safety through Leadership, Employee Engagement, and Organizational Learning.

  5. Regulatory analysis for the resolution of Generic Safety Issue 29: Bolting degradation or failure in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, T.Y.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Generic Safety Issue (GSI)-29 deals with staff concerns about public risk due to degradation or failure of safety-related bolting in nuclear power plants. The issue was initiated in November 1982. Value-impact studies of a mandatory program on safety-related bolting for operating plants were inconclusive: therefore, additional regulatory requirements for operating plants could not be justified in accordance with provisions of 10 CFR 50.109. In addition, based on operating experience with bolting in both nuclear and conventional power plants, the actions already taken through bulletins, generic letters, and information notices, and the industry-proposed actions, the staff concluded that a sufficient technical basis exists for the resolution of GSI-29. The staff further concluded that leakage of bolted pressure joints is possible but catastrophic failure of a reactor coolant pressure boundary joint that will lead to significant accident sequences is highly unlikely. For future plants, it was concluded that a new Standard Review Plant section should be developed to codify existing bolting requirements and industry-developed initiatives. 9 refs., 1 tab.

  6. Regulatory aspects of oncology drug safety evaluation: Past practice, current issues, and the challenge of new drugs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenfeldt, Hans, E-mail: hans.rosenfeldt@fda.hhs.go [Division of Drug Oncology Products, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver Spring MD, 20993 (United States); Kropp, Timothy; Benson, Kimberly [Division of Drug Oncology Products, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver Spring MD, 20993 (United States); Ricci, M. Stacey [Division of Biologic Oncology Products, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver Spring MD, 20993 (United States); McGuinn, W. David; Verbois, S. Leigh [Division of Drug Oncology Products, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver Spring MD, 20993 (United States)

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The drug development of new anti-cancer agents is streamlined in response to the urgency of bringing effective drugs to market for patients with limited life expectancy. FDA's regulation of oncology drugs has evolved from the practices set forth in Arnold Lehman's seminal work published in the 1950s through the current drafting of a new International Conference on Harmonization of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH) safety guidance for anti-cancer drug nonclinical evaluations. The ICH combines the efforts of the regulatory authorities of Europe, Japan, and the United States and the pharmaceutical industry from these three regions to streamline the scientific and technical aspects of drug development. The recent development of new oncology drug classes with novel mechanisms of action has improved survival rates for some cancers but also brings new challenges for safety evaluation. Here we present the legacy of Lehman and colleagues in the context of past and present oncology drug development practices and focus on some of the current issues at the center of an evolving harmonization process that will generate a new safety guidance for oncology drugs, ICH S9. The purpose of this new guidance will be to facilitate oncology drug development on a global scale by standardizing regional safety requirements.

  7. Preliminary Review of Safety Assessment Issues at Savannah River Site, August 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Napier, Bruce A.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Bixler, Nathan E.

    2011-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    At the request of Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS) management, a review team composed of experts in atmospheric transport modeling for environmental radiation dose assessment convened at the Savannah River Site (SRS) on August 29-30, 2011. Several issues were presented at the meeting for discussion. This is a short summary that is organized in accordance with the primary issues discussed, which is not necessarily a chronological record. Issues include: SRS Meteorological Data and its Use in MACCS2; Deposition Velocities for Particles; Deposition Velocities for Tritium; MACCS2 Dispersion Coefficients; Use of Low Surface Roughness in Open Areas; Adequacy of Meteorological Tower and Instrumentation; Displacement Height; and Validity of MACCS2 Calculations at Close-in Distances. A longer report will be issued at a later date that expands upon these topics and recommendations.

  8. Differing Professional Opinions for Technical Issues Involving Environment, Safety and Health

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order establishes the DOE Differing Professional Opinion process for employees to raise technical concerns related to environment, safety, and health which cannot be resolved using routine processes. Cancels DOE P 442.1 and DOE M 442.1-1.

  9. Experimental Study and Computational Simulations of Key Pebble Bed Thermo-mechanics Issues for Design and Safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tokuhiro, Akira; Potirniche, Gabriel; Cogliati, Joshua; Ougouag, Abderrafi

    2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental and computational study, consisting of modeling and simulation (M&S), of key thermal-mechanical issues affecting the design and safety of pebble-bed (PB) reactors was conducted. The objective was to broaden understanding and experimentally validate thermal-mechanic phenomena of nuclear grade graphite, specifically, spheres in frictional contact as anticipated in the bed under reactor relevant pressures and temperatures. The contact generates graphite dust particulates that can subsequently be transported into the flowing gaseous coolent. Under postulated depressurization transients and with the potential for leaked fission products to be adsorbed onto graphite 'dust', there is the potential for fission products to escape from the primary volume. This is a design safety concern. Furthermore, earlier safety assessment identified the distinct possibility for the dispersed dust to combust in contact with air if sufficient conditions are met. Both of these phenomena were noted as important to design review and containing uncertainty to warrant study. The team designed and conducted two separate effects tests to study and benchmark the potential dust-generation rate, as well as study the conditions under which a dust explosion may occure in a standardized, instrumented explosion chamber.

  10. Issue

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 Investigation Peer ReviewIronNuclear Physics »ImpactIssue

  11. Standard for developing and issuing DOE safety guides and implementation guides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This standard establishes the style, format, content, and process for preparing and issuing DOE guides. It is intended for use by all DOE components, including contractors. The DOE guides provide information on DOE`s expectations on meeting the provisions of rules, orders, notices, manuals, immediate action directives, and regulatory standards (requirements documents) or policies.

  12. Waste compatibility safety issues and final results for tank 241-T-110 push mode samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nuzum, J.L.

    1997-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the final laboratory report for Tank 241-T-110. Push mode core segments were removed from risers 2 and 6 between January 29, 1997, and February 7, 1997. Segments were received and extruded at 222-S Laboratory. Analyses were performed in accordance with Tank 241-T-110 Push Mode Core Sampling and analysis Plan (TSAP) and Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO). None of the subsamples submitted for total alpha activity (AT) or differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analyses exceeded the notification limits stated in DQO.

  13. H2 Safety Snapshot - Vol. 2, Issue 1, Nov. 2010 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGrid Integration0-1 MarchH-Tank FarmRefuel H-PrizeH2 Safety

  14. Evaluation of special safety issues associated with handling the Three Mile Island Unit 2 core debris

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henrie, J.O.; Appel, J.N.

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document reports the results of recent tests and analyses evaluating safety concerns relating to Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) core debris pyrophoricity, radiolytic hydrogen and oxygen, and the potential for steam generation in shipping canisters during a fire. Recommendations drawn from these results include the following: (1) hydrogen-oxygen recombiners should be installed in each core debris canister, (2) water should be removed from each canister by drip drying (no vacuum pumping is required), (3) the maximum weight of the loaded, dewatered canisters and the minimum volume of gas/vapor in each canister should be controlled and measured by weighting before and after dewatering, (4) a cover gas of approximately two atmospheres of argon should be added to each canister, (5) each canister should be weighed and pressure checked prior to shipping, (6) the shipping cask should be designed to limit the temperature of the canister contents after the standard hypothetical accident (fire) such that the design pressure of the canister/cask will not be exceeded, (7) provisions should be made for canister venting during long-term storage and for cask venting in the event of an overpressure condition resulting from an ''extended'' fire, and (8) some pyrophoricity testing of samples taken during defueling should be conducted to assure adequate safety-related information during canister opening.

  15. Reentry safety for the Topaz II Space Reactor: Issues and analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connell, L.W.; Trost, L.C.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the reentry safety analyses conducted for the TOPAZ II Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program (NEPSTP). Scoping calculations were performed on the reentry aerothermal breakup and ground footprint of reactor core debris. The calculations were used to assess the risks associated with radiologically cold reentry accidents and to determine if constraints should be placed on the core configuration for such accidents. Three risk factors were considered: inadvertent criticality upon reentry impact, atmospheric dispersal of U-235 fuel, and the Special Nuclear Material Safeguards risks. Results indicate that the risks associated with cold reentry are very low regardless of the core configuration. Core configuration constraints were therefore not established for radiologically cold reentry accidents.

  16. Interim qualitative risk assessment for an LNG refueling station and review of relevant safety issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siu, N.; Herring, S.; Cadwallader, L.; Reece, W.; Byers, J.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a qualitative assessment of the public and worker risk involved with the operation of a liquefied natural (LNG) vehicle refueling facility. This study includes facility maintenance and operations, tanker truck delivers and end-use vehicle fueling; it does not treat the risks of LNG vehicles on roadways. Accident initiating events are identified by using a Master Logic Diagram, a Failure Modes and Effects analysis and historical operating experiences. The event trees were drawn to depict possible sequences of mitigating events following the initiating events. The phenomenology of LNG and other vehicle fuels is discussed to characterize the hazard posed by LNG usage. Based on the risk modeling and analysis, recommendations are given to improve the safety of LNG refueling stations in the areas of procedures and training, station design, and the dissemination of best practice information throughout the LNG community.

  17. Qualitative Risk Assessment for an LNG Refueling Station and Review of Relevant Safety Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siu, N.; Herring, J.S.; Cadwallader, L.; Reece, W.; Byers, J.

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a qualitative assessment of the public and worker risk involved with the operation of a liquefied natural gas (LNG) vehicle refueling facility. This study includes facility maintenance and operations, tank truck deliveries, and end-use vehicle fueling; it does not treat the risks of LNG vehicles on roadways. Accident initiating events are identified by using a Master Logic Diagram, a Failure Modes and Effects Analysis, and historical operating experiences. The event trees were drawn to depict possible sequences of mitigating events following the initiating events. The phenomenology of LNG and other vehicle fuels is discussed to characterize the hazard posed by LNG usage. Based on the risk modeling and analysis, recommendations are given to improve the safety of LNG refueling stations in the areas of procedures and training, station design, and the dissemination of ``best practice`` information throughout the LNG community.

  18. Decision making under uncertainty: An investigation into the application of formal decision-making methods to safety issue decisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bohn, M P [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the NRC-sponsored program to study the implications of Generic Issue 57, Effects of Fire Protection System Actuation on Safety-Related Equipment,'' a subtask was performed to evaluate the applicability of formal decision analysis methods to generic issues cost/benefit-type decisions and to apply these methods to the GI-57 results. In this report, the numerical results obtained from the analysis of three plants (two PWRs and one BWR) as developed in the technical resolution program for GI-57 were studied. For each plant, these results included a calculation of the person-REM averted due to various accident scenarios and various proposed modifications to mitigate the accident scenarios identified. These results were recomputed to break out the benefit in terms of contributions due to random event scenarios, fire event scenarios, and seismic event scenarios. Furthermore, the benefits associated with risk (in terms of person-REM) averted from earthquakes at three different seismic ground motion levels were separately considered. Given this data, formal decision methodologies involving decision trees, value functions, and utility functions were applied to this basic data. It is shown that the formal decision methodology can be applied at several different levels. Examples are given in which the decision between several retrofits is changed from that resulting from a simple cost/benefit-ratio criterion by virtue of the decision-makinger's expressed (and assumed) preferences.

  19. Biological Safety

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE's Biological Safety Program provides a forum for the exchange of best practices, lessons learned, and guidance in the area of biological safety. This content is supported by the Biosurety Executive Team. The Biosurety Executive Team is a DOE-chartered group. The DOE Office of Worker Safety and Health Policy provides administrative support for this group. The group identifies biological safety-related issues of concern to the DOE and pursues solutions to issues identified.

  20. REQUEST TO USE A UNIVERSITY MOTORIZED VEHICLE FORM Issued By: Risk & Safety 20 Oct 2009 REQUEST TO USE A UNIVERSITY MOTORIZED VEHICLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolch, Tobias

    REQUEST TO USE A UNIVERSITY MOTORIZED VEHICLE FORM Issued By: Risk & Safety 20 Oct 2009 REQUEST TO USE A UNIVERSITY MOTORIZED VEHICLE INSTRUCTIONS: Complete form, attach a photocopy of your drivers University Vehicle License Plate# ____________currently under the control of the Department

  1. Environmental, health, and safety issues of sodium-sulfur batteries for electric and hybrid vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corbus, D.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recycling and disposal of spent sodium-sulfur (Na/S) batteries are important issues that must be addressed as part of the commercialization process of Na/S battery-powered electric vehicles. The use of Na/S batteries in electric vehicles will result in significant environmental benefits, and the disposal of spent batteries should not detract from those benefits. In the United States, waste disposal is regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Understanding these regulations will help in selecting recycling and disposal processes for Na/S batteries that are environmentally acceptable and cost effective. Treatment processes for spent Na/S battery wastes are in the beginning stages of development, so a final evaluation of the impact of RCRA regulations on these treatment processes is not possible. The objectives of tills report on battery recycling and disposal are as follows: Provide an overview of RCRA regulations and requirements as they apply to Na/S battery recycling and disposal so that battery developers can understand what is required of them to comply with these regulations; Analyze existing RCRA regulations for recycling and disposal and anticipated trends in these regulations and perform a preliminary regulatory analysis for potential battery disposal and recycling processes. This report assumes that long-term Na/S battery disposal processes will be capable of handling large quantities of spent batteries. The term disposal includes treatment processes that may incorporate recycling of battery constituents. The environmental regulations analyzed in this report are limited to US regulations. This report gives an overview of RCRA and discusses RCRA regulations governing Na/S battery disposal and a preliminary regulatory analysis for Na/S battery disposal.

  2. LASER SAFETY POLICY MANUAL ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & SAFETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houston, Paul L.

    LASER SAFETY POLICY MANUAL ISSUED BY ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & SAFETY OFFICE OF RADIOLOGICAL SAFETY and GEORGIA TECH LASER SAFETY COMMITTEE July 1, 2010 Revised July 31, 2012 #12;Laser Safety Program 1-1 #12;Laser Safety Policy Manual TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. POLICY AND SCOPE

  3. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This Order establishes facility and programmatic safety requirements for Department of Energy facilities, which includes nuclear and explosives safety design criteria, fire protection, criticality safety, natural phenomena hazards mitigation, and the System Engineer Program. Cancels DOE O 420.1A. DOE O 420.1B Chg 1 issued 4-19-10.

  4. New probability table treatment in MCNP for unresolved resonances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, L.L. [Carter M.C. Analysis, Richland, WA (United States); Little, R.C.; Hendricks, J.S.; MacFarlane, R.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An upgrade for MCNP has been implemented to sample the neutron cross sections in the unresolved resonance range using probability tables. These probability tables are generated with the cross section processor code NJOY, by using the evaluated statistical information about the resonances to calculate cumulative probability distribution functions for the microscopic total cross section. The elastic, fission, and radiative capture cross sections are also tabulated as the average values of each of these partials conditional upon the value of the total. This paper summarizes how the probability tables are utilized in this MCNP upgrade and compares this treatment with the approximate smooth treatment for some example problems.

  5. Interpreting the unresolved intensity of cosmologically redshifted line radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Switzer, Eric R; Masui, Kiyoshi W; Pen, Ue-Li; Voytek, Tabitha C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intensity mapping experiments survey the spectrum of diffuse line radiation rather than detect individual objects at high signal-to-noise. Spectral maps of unresolved atomic and molecular line radiation contain three-dimensional information about the density and environments of emitting gas, and efficiently probe cosmological volumes out to high redshift. Intensity mapping survey volumes also contain all other sources of radiation at the frequencies of interest. Continuum foregrounds are typically ~10^2-10^3 times brighter than the cosmological signal. The instrumental response to bright foregrounds will produce new spectral degrees of freedom that are not known in advance, nor necessarily spectrally smooth. The intrinsic spectra of foregrounds may also not be well-known in advance. We describe a general class of quadratic estimators to analyze data from single-dish intensity mapping experiments, and determine contaminated spectral modes from the data itself. The key attribute of foregrounds is not that they ...

  6. Contribution of unresolved point sources to the galactic diffuse emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sabrina Casanova; Brenda L. Dingus

    2006-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The detection by the HESS atmospheric Cherenkov telescope of fifteen new sources from the Galactic plane makes it possible to estimate the contribution of unresolved point sources like those detected by HESS to the diffuse Galactic emission measured by EGRET and recently at higher energies by the Milagro Collaboration. Assuming that HESS sources have all the same intrinsic luminosity, the contribution of this new source population can account for most of the Milagro $\\gamma$-ray emission at TeV energies and between 10 and 20 per cent of EGRET diffuse Galactic $\\gamma$-ray emission for energies bigger than 10 GeV. Also, by combining the HESS and the Milagro results, constraints can be put on the distribution and the luminosities of gamma ray emitters in the Galaxy.

  7. Contribution of unresolved point sources to the galactic diffuse emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casanova, S; Casanova, Sabrina; Dingus, Brenda L.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The detection by the HESS atmospheric Cherenkov telescope of fifteen new sources from the Galactic plane makes it possible to estimate the contribution of unresolved point sources like those detected by HESS to the diffuse Galactic emission measured by EGRET and recently at higher energies by the Milagro Collaboration. Assuming that HESS sources have all the same intrinsic luminosity, the contribution of this new source population can account for most of the Milagro $\\gamma$-ray emission at TeV energies and between 10 and 20 per cent of EGRET diffuse Galactic $\\gamma$-ray emission for energies bigger than 10 GeV. Also, by combining the HESS and the Milagro results, constraints can be put on the distribution and the luminosities of gamma ray emitters in the Galaxy.

  8. Assessment of environmental health and safety issues associated with the commercialization of unconventional gas recovery: methane from coal seams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ethridge, L.J.; Cowan, C.E.; Riedel, E.F.

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Potential public health and safety problems and the potential environmental impacts from the recovery of gas from coalbeds are identified and examined. The technology of methane recovery is described and economic and legal barriers to production are discussed. (ACR)

  9. Regulatory analysis for the resolution of generic issue 57: Effects of Fire Protection System Actuation on Safety-Related Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woods, H.W.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Actuation of Fire Protection Systems (FPS) in Nuclear Power Plants have resulted in adverse interactions with equipment important to safety. Precursor operational experience has shown that 37% of all FPS actuations damaged some equipment, and 20% of all FPS actuations have resulted in a plant transient and reactor trip. On an average 0.17 FPS actuations per reactor year have been experienced in nuclear power plants in this country. This report presents the regulatory analysis for GI-57, ``Effects of Fire Protection System Actuation on Safety-Related Equipment``. The risk reduction estimates, cost/benefit analyses, and other insights gained during this effort have shown that implementation of the recommendations contained in this report can significantly reduce risk, and that these improvements can be warranted in accordance with the backfit rule, 10 CFR 50.109(a)(3). However, plant specific analyses are required in order to identify such improvements. Generic analyses can not serve to identify improvements that could be warranted for individual, specific plants. Plant specific analyses of the type needed for this purpose are underway as part of the Individual Plant Examination of External Events (IPEEE) program.

  10. CMB Maps at 0.5 Degree Resolution II: Unresolved Features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Kogut; G. Hinshaw; C. L. Bennett

    1994-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    High-contrast peaks in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy can appear as unresolved sources to observers. We fit simulated CMB maps generated with a cold dark matter model to a set of unresolved features at instrumental resolution 0.5 degrees to 1.5 degrees and present the integral density per steradian n(>|T|) of unresolved features brighter than threshold temperature |T|. A typical medium-scale experiment observing 0.001 sr at 0.5 degree resolution would expect to observe one unresolved feature brighter than 85 \\muK after convolution with the beam profile, with less than 5% probability to observe a source brighter than 150 \\muK. Increasing the power-law index of primordial density perturbations n from 1 to 1.5 raises these temperature limits |T| by a factor of 2. The results are only weakly dependent on the assumed values of the Hubble constant and baryon density.

  11. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation.

  12. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation.

  13. TWRS safety program plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calderon, L.M., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Management of Nuclear Safety, Industrial Safety, Industrial Hygiene, and Fire Protection programs, functions, and field support resources for Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS) has, until recently, been centralized in TWRS Safety, under the Emergency, Safety, and Quality organization. Industrial hygiene technician services were also provided to support operational needs related to safety basis compliance. Due to WHC decentralization of safety and reengineering efforts in West Tank Farms, staffing and safety responsibilities have been transferred to the facilities. Under the new structure, safety personnel for TWRS are assigned directly to East Tank Farms, West Tank Farms, and a core Safety Group in TWRS Engineering. The Characterization Project Operations (CPO) safety organization will remain in tact as it currently exists. Personnel assigned to East Tank Farms, West Tank Farms, and CPO will perform facility-specific or project-specific duties and provide field implementation of programs. Those assigned to the core group will focus on activities having a TWRS-wide or programmatic focus. Hanford-wide activities will be the responsibility of the Safety Center of Expertise. In order to ensure an effective and consistent safety program for TWRS under the new organization program functions, goals, organizational structure, roles, responsibilities, and path forward must be clearly established. The purpose of the TWRS Safety Program Plan is to define the overall safety program, responsibilities, relationships, and communication linkages for safety personnel under the new structure. In addition, issues associated with reorganization transition are addressed, including training, project ownership, records management, and dissemination of equipment. For the purpose of this document ``TWRS Safety`` refers to all safety professionals and technicians (Industrial Safety, Industrial Hygiene, Fire Protection, and Nuclear Safety) within the TWRS organization, regardless of their location in the organization.

  14. Office Of Worker Safety And Health Assistance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Worker Safety and Health Assistance supports program and line organizations in the identification and resolution of worker safety and health issues and management concerns utilizing a corporate issues management process for crosscutting issues providing technical support for organizational specific issues and concerns.

  15. Spectropolarimetric diagnostics of unresolved magnetic fields in the quiet solar photosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shchukina, Nataliya

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A few years before the Hinode space telescope was launched, an investigation based on the Hanle effect in atomic and molecular lines indicated that the bulk of the quiet solar photosphere is significantly magnetized, due to the ubiquitous presence of an unresolved magnetic field with an average strength = 130 G. It was pointed out also that this "hidden" field must be much stronger in the intergranular regions of solar surface convection than in the granular regions, and it was suggested that this unresolved magnetic field could perhaps provide the clue for understanding how the outer solar atmosphere is energized. In fact, the ensuing magnetic energy density is so significant that the energy flux estimated using the typical value of 1 km/s for the convective velocity (thinking in rising magnetic loops) or the Alfven speed (thinking in Alfven waves generated by magnetic reconnection) turns out to be substantially larger than that required to balance the chromospheric energy losses. Here we present a brief re...

  16. pamphlet04.doc SAFETY INFORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    to emergencies such as fire, chemical spill, electrical outage, communication system failure, etc. 2. RESEARCH Drugs 8 Communication Systems 9 Compliance Issues 10 Compressed Gas Cylinders 11 Electrical Safety 12 Electrical Power Failure 13 Emergency Procedures 14 Fire Safety 15 Hazard Reporting 16 Laser Safety 17

  17. The Role of the Engineered Barrier System in Safety Cases for Geological Radioactive Waste Repoitories: An NEA Initiaive in Co-Operations with the EC, Process Issues and Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.G. Bennett; A.J. Hooper; S. Voinis; H. Umeki; A.V. Luik; J. Alonso

    2006-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Integration Group for the Safety Case (IGSC) of the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Radioactive Waste Management Committee in co-operation with the European Commission (EC) is conducting a project to develop a greater understanding of how to achieve the necessary integration for successful design, construction, testing, modeling, and assessment of engineered barrier systems. The project also seeks to clarify the role that the EBS plays in assuring the overall safety of a repository. A framework for the EBS Project is provided by a series of workshops that allow discussion of the wide range of activities necessary for the design, assessment and optimization of the EBS, and the integration of this information into the safety case. The topics of this series of workshops have been planned so that the EBS project will work progressively through the main aspects comprising one cycle of the design and optimization process. This paper seeks to communicate key results from the EBS project to a wider audience. The paper focuses on two topics discussed at the workshops: process issues and the role of modeling.

  18. NNSA issues Preliminary Notice of Violation to National Security...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    NNSA issues Preliminary Notice of Violation to National Security Technologies, LLC, for Nuclear Safety Violations, Fact Sheet NNSA issues Preliminary Notice of Violation to...

  19. Quality Assurance Exchange January 2007, Volume 3 Issue 1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Quality Assurance Exchange January 2007, Volume 3 Issue 1 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Corporate Safety Analysis

  20. Quality Assurance Exchange Setpebmer 2007, Volume 3 Issue 3

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Quality Assurance Exchange Setpebmer 2007, Volume 3 Issue 3 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Corporate Safety Analysis

  1. Quality Assurance Exchange August 2007, Volume 3 Issue 2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Quality Assurance Exchange August 2007, Volume 3 Issue 2 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Corporate Safety Analysis

  2. An unresolved X-ray source inside the supernova remnant RCW 86

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacco Vink; Fabrizio Bocchino; Francesco Damiani; Jelle S. Kaastra

    2000-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the discovery of an unresolved X-ray source inside the supernova remnant G315.4-2.3 (RCW 86). The source is located 7' to the Southwest of the geometrical centre and may be close to the actual explosion centre of the supernova, which makes this a candidate for the stellar remnant associated with RCW 86. However, the presence of a possible optical counterpart with $V \\sim 14$ at 3" from the X-ray position and evidence for long term variability means that the source is probably an active star. A better X-ray position and better X-ray spectroscopy along with an identification of the optical source are needed to exclude the X-ray source as a neutron star candidate.

  3. Introduction to theory and analysis of resolved (and unresolved) neutron resonances via SAMMY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, N.M.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutron cross-section data are important for two distinct purposes: first, they provide insight into the nature of matter, thus assisting in the understanding of fundamental physics; second, they are needed for practical applications (e.g., for calculating when and how a reactor will become critical, or how much shielding is needed for storage of nuclear materials, and for medical applications). Neutron cross section data in the resolved-resonance region are generally obtained by time-of-flight experiments, which must be carefully analyzed if they are to be properly understood and utilized. In this paper, important features of the analysis process are discussed, with emphasis on the particular technique used in the analysis code SAMMY. Other features of the code are also described; these include such topics as calculation of group cross sections (including covariance matrices), generation and fitting of integral quantities, and extensions into the unresolved-resonance region and higher-energy regions.

  4. Average Neutron Total Cross Sections in the Unresolved Energy Range From ORELA High Resolutio Transmission Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derrien, H

    2004-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Average values of the neutron total cross sections of {sup 233}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, and {sup 239}Pu have been obtained in the unresolved resonance energy range from high-resolution transmission measurements performed at ORELA in the past two decades. The cross sections were generated by correcting the effective total cross sections for the self-shielding effects due to the resonance structure of the data. The self-shielding factors were found by calculating the effective and true cross sections with the computer code SAMMY for the same Doppler and resolution conditions as for the transmission measurements, using an appropriate set of resonance parameters. Our results are compared to results of previous measurements and to the current ENDF/B-VI data.

  5. High redshift AGNs and HI reionisation: limits from the unresolved X-ray background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haardt, Francesco

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The rapidly declining population of bright quasars at z~3 appears to make an increasingly small contribution to the ionising background at the HI Lyman limit. It is then generally though that massive stars in (pre-)galactic systems may provide the additional ionising flux needed to complete HI reionisation by z>6. A galaxy dominated background, however, may require that the escape fraction of Lyman continuum radiation from high redshift galaxies is as high as 10%, a value somewhat at odds with (admittedly scarce) observational constraints. High escape fractions from dwarf galaxies have been advocated, or, alternatively, a so-far undetected (or barely detected) population of unobscured, high-redshift faint AGNs. Here we question the latter hypothesis, and show that such sources, to be consistent with the measured level of the unresolved X-ray background at z=0, can provide a fraction of the HII filling factor not larger than 13% by z=6. The fraction rises to 10%.

  6. RESEARCH SAFETY RADIATION SAFETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Communications Manager (951) 827-6303 janette.ducut@ucr.edu Beiwei Tu, MS, CIH, CSP Safety and Industrial Hygiene

  7. Protecting Health and Safety in Education Abroad

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Protecting Health and Safety in Education Abroad Faculty and Staff Handbook #12;1 Office of people on campus and beyond CSU to ensure your health and safety. This CSU team serves you before, during . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 In-Country Health and Safety Health and Safety Issues

  8. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Safety and Ecology Corporation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Safety and Ecology Corporation - EA-2005-03 Preliminary Notice of Violation, Safety and Ecology Corporation - EA-2005-03 June 14, 2005 Issued to Safety and Ecology Corporation...

  9. Accounting for model error due to unresolved scales within ensemble Kalman filtering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis Mitchell; Alberto Carrassi

    2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a method to account for model error due to unresolved scales in the context of the ensemble transform Kalman filter (ETKF). The approach extends to this class of algorithms the deterministic model error formulation recently explored for variational schemes and extended Kalman filter. The model error statistic required in the analysis update is estimated using historical reanalysis increments and a suitable model error evolution law. Two different versions of the method are described; a time-constant model error treatment where the same model error statistical description is time-invariant, and a time-varying treatment where the assumed model error statistics is randomly sampled at each analysis step. We compare both methods with the standard method of dealing with model error through inflation and localization, and illustrate our results with numerical simulations on a low order nonlinear system exhibiting chaotic dynamics. The results show that the filter skill is significantly improved through the proposed model error treatments, and that both methods require far less parameter tuning than the standard approach. Furthermore, the proposed approach is simple to implement within a pre-existing ensemble based scheme. The general implications for the use of the proposed approach in the framework of square-root filters such as the ETKF are also discussed.

  10. Deriving physical parameters of unresolved star clusters III. Application to M31 PHAT clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Meulenaer, Philippe; Mineikis, Tadas; Vansevi?ius, Vladas

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study is the third of a series that investigates the degeneracy and stochasticity problems present in the determination of physical parameters such as age, mass, extinction, and metallicity of partially resolved or unresolved star cluster populations situated in external galaxies when using broad-band photometry. This work tests the derivation of parameters of artificial star clusters using models with fixed and free metallicity for the WFC3+ACS photometric system. Then the method is applied to derive parameters of a sample of 203 star clusters in the Andromeda galaxy observed with the HST. Following Papers I \\& II, the star cluster parameters are derived using a large grid of stochastic models that are compared to the observed cluster broad-band integrated WFC3+ACS magnitudes. We derive the age, mass, and extinction of the sample of M31 star clusters with one fixed metallicity in agreement with previous studies. Using artificial tests we demonstrate the ability of the WFC3+ACS photometric system to ...

  11. Regulatory analysis for the resolution of Generic Safety Issue 105: Interfacing system loss-of-coolant accident in light-water reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An interfacing systems loss of coolant accident (ISLOCA) involves failure or improper operation of pressure isolation valves (PIVs) that compose the boundary between the reactor coolant system and low-pressure rated systems. Some ISLOCAs can bypass containment and result in direct release of fission products to the environment. A cost/benefit evaluation, using three PWR analyses, calculated the benefit of two potential modifications to the plants. Alternative 1 is improved plant operations to optimize the operator`s performance and reduce human error probabilities. Alternative 2 adds pressure sensing devices, cabling, and instrumentation between two PIVs to provide operators with continuous monitoring of the first PIV. These two alternatives were evaluated for the base case plants (Case 1) and for each plant, assuming the plants had a particular auxiliary building design in which severe flooding would be a problem if an ISLOCA occurred. The auxiliary building design (Case 2) was selected from a survey that revealed a number of designs with features that provided less than optimal resistance to ECCS equipment loss caused by a ISLOCA-induced environment. The results were judged not to provide sufficient basis for generic requirements. It was concluded that the most viable course of action to resolve Generic Issue 105 is licensee participation in individual plant examinations (IPEs).

  12. ISSUES MANAGEMENT PROGRAM MANUAL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gravois, Melanie

    2007-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Issues Management Program encompasses the continuous monitoring of work programs, performance and safety to promptly identify issues to determine their risk and significance, their causes, and to identify and effectively implement corrective actions to ensure successful resolution and prevent the same or similar problems from occurring. This document describes the LBNL Issues Management Program and prescribes the process for issues identification, tracking, resolution, closure, validation, and effectiveness of corrective actions. Issues that are governed by this program include program and performance deficiencies or nonconformances that may be identified through employee discovery, internal or external oversight assessment findings, suggested process improvements and associated actions that require formal corrective action. Issues may also be identified in and/or may result in Root Cause Analysis (RCA) reports, Price Anderson Amendment Act (PAAA) reports, Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) reports, Accident Investigation reports, assessment reports, and External Oversight reports. The scope of these issues may include issues of both high and low significance as well as adverse conditions that meet the reporting requirements of the University of California (UC) Assurance Plan for LBNL or other reporting entities (e.g., U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Department of Energy). Issues that are found as a result of a walk-around or workspace inspection that can be immediately corrected or fixed are exempt from the requirements of this document.

  13. Environmental, health, and safety issues of sodium-sulfur batteries for electric and hybrid vehicles. Volume 2, Battery recycling and disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corbus, D.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recycling and disposal of spent sodium-sulfur (Na/S) batteries are important issues that must be addressed as part of the commercialization process of Na/S battery-powered electric vehicles. The use of Na/S batteries in electric vehicles will result in significant environmental benefits, and the disposal of spent batteries should not detract from those benefits. In the United States, waste disposal is regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Understanding these regulations will help in selecting recycling and disposal processes for Na/S batteries that are environmentally acceptable and cost effective. Treatment processes for spent Na/S battery wastes are in the beginning stages of development, so a final evaluation of the impact of RCRA regulations on these treatment processes is not possible. The objectives of tills report on battery recycling and disposal are as follows: Provide an overview of RCRA regulations and requirements as they apply to Na/S battery recycling and disposal so that battery developers can understand what is required of them to comply with these regulations; Analyze existing RCRA regulations for recycling and disposal and anticipated trends in these regulations and perform a preliminary regulatory analysis for potential battery disposal and recycling processes. This report assumes that long-term Na/S battery disposal processes will be capable of handling large quantities of spent batteries. The term disposal includes treatment processes that may incorporate recycling of battery constituents. The environmental regulations analyzed in this report are limited to US regulations. This report gives an overview of RCRA and discusses RCRA regulations governing Na/S battery disposal and a preliminary regulatory analysis for Na/S battery disposal.

  14. Distribution of unresolvable anisotropic microstructures revealed in visibility-contrast images using x-ray Talbot interferometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yashiro, Wataru; Harasse, Sebastien; Kawabata, Katsuyuki; Kuwabara, Hiroaki; Yamazaki, Takashi; Momose, Atsushi [Department of Advanced Materials Science, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, the University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan)

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray Talbot interferometry has been widely used as a technique for x-ray phase imaging and tomography. We propose a method using this interferometry for mapping distribution of parameters characterizing anisotropic microstructures, which are typically of the order of {mu}m in size and cannot be resolved by the imaging system, in a sample. The method uses reduction in fringe visibility, which is caused by such unresolvable microstructures, in moire images obtained using an interferometer. We applied the method to a chloroprene rubber sponge sample, which exhibited uniaxial anisotropy of reduced visibility. We measured the dependencies of reduced visibility on both the Talbot order and the orientation of the sample and obtained maps of three parameters and their anisotropies that characterize the unresolvable anisotropic microstructures in the sample. The maps indicated that the anisotropy of the sample's visibility contrast mainly originated from the anisotropy of the microstructure elements' average size. Our method directly provides structural information on unresolvable microstructures in real space, which is only accessible through the ultra-small-angle x-ray scattering measurements in reciprocal space, and is expected to be broadly applied to material, biological, and medical sciences.

  15. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this Order is to establish facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation. The Order has Change 1 dated 11-16-95, Change 2 dated 10-24-96, and the latest Change 3 dated 11-22-00 incorporated. The latest change satisfies a commitment made to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) in response to DNFSB recommendation 97-2, Criticality Safety.

  16. Department of Pesticide Worker Health and Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Danh

    6/6/2012 1 Cal/EPA Department of Pesticide Regulation Worker Health and Safety Branch Industrial Hygiene Services Health and Safety Issues and Case Studies For Fumigants Harvard R. Fong, CIH Senior Industrial Hygienist California Department of Pesticide Regulation Worker Health and Safety Branch Industrial

  17. Occupational Safety Review of High Technology Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee Cadwallader

    2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains reviews of operating experiences, selected accident events, and industrial safety performance indicators that document the performance of the major US DOE magnetic fusion experiments and particle accelerators. These data are useful to form a basis for the occupational safety level at matured research facilities with known sets of safety rules and regulations. Some of the issues discussed are radiation safety, electromagnetic energy exposure events, and some of the more widespread issues of working at height, equipment fires, confined space work, electrical work, and other industrial hazards. Nuclear power plant industrial safety data are also included for comparison.

  18. Issues in Numerical Simulation of Fire Suppression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tieszen, S.R.; Lopez, A.R.

    1999-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper outlines general physical and computational issues associated with performing numerical simulation of fire suppression. Fire suppression encompasses a broad range of chemistry and physics over a large range of time and length scales. The authors discuss the dominant physical/chemical processes important to fire suppression that must be captured by a fire suppression model to be of engineering usefulness. First-principles solutions are not possible due to computational limitations, even with the new generation of tera-flop computers. A basic strategy combining computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation techniques with sub-grid model approximations for processes that have length scales unresolvable by gridding is presented.

  19. Introduction to LNG vehicle safety. Topical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bratvold, D.; Friedman, D.; Chernoff, H.; Farkhondehpay, D.; Comay, C.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Basic information on the characteristics of liquefied natural gas (LNG) is assembled in this report to provide an overview of safety issues and practices for the use of LNG vehicles. This document is intended for those planning or considering the use of LNG vehicles, including vehicle fleet owners and operators, public transit officials and boards, local fire and safety officials, manufacturers and distributors, and gas industry officials. Safety issues and mitigation measures that should be considered for candidate LNG vehicle projects are addressed.

  20. A SUB-GRID VOLUME-OF-FLUIDS (VOF) MODEL FOR MIXING IN RESOLVED SCALE AND IN UNRESOLVED SCALE COMPUTATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VOLD, ERIK L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; SCANNAPIECO, TONY J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A sub-grid mix model based on a volume-of-fluids (VOF) representation is described for computational simulations of the transient mixing between reactive fluids, in which the atomically mixed components enter into the reactivity. The multi-fluid model allows each fluid species to have independent values for density, energy, pressure and temperature, as well as independent velocities and volume fractions. Fluid volume fractions are further divided into mix components to represent their 'mixedness' for more accurate prediction of reactivity. Time dependent conversion from unmixed volume fractions (denoted cf) to atomically mixed (af) fluids by diffusive processes is represented in resolved scale simulations with the volume fractions (cf, af mix). In unresolved scale simulations, the transition to atomically mixed materials begins with a conversion from unmixed material to a sub-grid volume fraction (pf). This fraction represents the unresolved small scales in the fluids, heterogeneously mixed by turbulent or multi-phase mixing processes, and this fraction then proceeds in a second step to the atomically mixed fraction by diffusion (cf, pf, af mix). Species velocities are evaluated with a species drift flux, {rho}{sub i}u{sub di} = {rho}{sub i}(u{sub i}-u), used to describe the fluid mixing sources in several closure options. A simple example of mixing fluids during 'interfacial deceleration mixing with a small amount of diffusion illustrates the generation of atomically mixed fluids in two cases, for resolved scale simulations and for unresolved scale simulations. Application to reactive mixing, including Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF), is planned for future work.

  1. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The order establishes facility and programmatic safety requirements for nuclear and explosives safety design criteria, fire protection, criticality safety, natural phenomena hazards (NPH) mitigation, and the System Engineer Program.Chg 1 incorporates the use of DOE-STD-1189-2008, Integration of Safety into the Design Process, mandatory for Hazard Category 1, 2 and 3 nuclear facilities. Cancels DOE O 420.1A.

  2. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation. Cancels DOE 5480.7A, DOE 5480.24, DOE 5480.28 and Division 13 of DOE 6430.1A. Canceled by DOE O 420.1A.

  3. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order establishes facility and programmatic safety requirements for DOE and NNSA for nuclear safety design criteria, fire protection, criticality safety, natural phenomena hazards (NPH) mitigation, and System Engineer Program. Cancels DOE O 420.1B, DOE G 420.1-2 and DOE G 420.1-3.

  4. www.nasa.gov WSTF SAFETY AND HEALTH CAPABILITIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Evaluation Contract (NTEC). The disciplines include system safety, industrial hygiene, industrial safety) Safety & Mission Assurance (S&MA) offices support all WSTF test activities and general industrial safety consultation to managers and supervisors on matters concerning industrial and test issues. They assist

  5. NNSA issues Preliminary Notice of Violation to National Security...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Fact Sheet NNSA issues Preliminary Notice of Violation to National Security Technologies, LLC, for Nuclear Safety Violations On August 22, 2011, the National Nuclear Security...

  6. Safety evaluation of interim stabilization of non-stabilized single-shell watch list tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stahl, S.M.

    1994-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The report provides a summation of the status of safety issues associated with interim stabilization of Watch List SSTs (organic, ferrocyanide, and flammable gas), as extracted from recent safety analyses, including the Tank Farms Accelerated Safety Analysis efforts.

  7. New Research Further Strengthens Evidence of the Benefits of the Health Care Safety Net

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dow, William H.; Roby, Dylan H. `; Kominski, Gerald; Jacobs, Ken

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    expanding ISSUE BRIEF New Research Further Strengthens Evidence of the Benefits of the Health Care Safety Net

  8. Health and safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snyder, K. (Mine Safety and Health Administration (US))

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article discusses health and safety in coal mines and the primary issues in this area during 1989. Particular attention is given to the employment figures as well as the fatality statistics. According to this article, employment was up during 1989 to approximately 164,000 workers as compared to 136,000 in 1969. Attention is also given to dealing with coal mining regulations as well as a crackdown on illegal operators in the industry.

  9. 2011 Annual Criticality Safety Program Performance Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrea Hoffman

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2011 review of the INL Criticality Safety Program has determined that the program is robust and effective. The review was prepared for, and fulfills Contract Data Requirements List (CDRL) item H.20, 'Annual Criticality Safety Program performance summary that includes the status of assessments, issues, corrective actions, infractions, requirements management, training, and programmatic support.' This performance summary addresses the status of these important elements of the INL Criticality Safety Program. Assessments - Assessments in 2011 were planned and scheduled. The scheduled assessments included a Criticality Safety Program Effectiveness Review, Criticality Control Area Inspections, a Protection of Controlled Unclassified Information Inspection, an Assessment of Criticality Safety SQA, and this management assessment of the Criticality Safety Program. All of the assessments were completed with the exception of the 'Effectiveness Review' for SSPSF, which was delayed due to emerging work. Although minor issues were identified in the assessments, no issues or combination of issues indicated that the INL Criticality Safety Program was ineffective. The identification of issues demonstrates the importance of an assessment program to the overall health and effectiveness of the INL Criticality Safety Program. Issues and Corrective Actions - There are relatively few criticality safety related issues in the Laboratory ICAMS system. Most were identified by Criticality Safety Program assessments. No issues indicate ineffectiveness in the INL Criticality Safety Program. All of the issues are being worked and there are no imminent criticality concerns. Infractions - There was one criticality safety related violation in 2011. On January 18, 2011, it was discovered that a fuel plate bundle in the Nuclear Materials Inspection and Storage (NMIS) facility exceeded the fissionable mass limit, resulting in a technical safety requirement (TSR) violation. The TSR limits fuel plate bundles to 1085 grams U-235, which is the maximum loading of an ATR fuel element. The overloaded fuel plate bundle contained 1097 grams U-235 and was assembled under an 1100 gram U-235 limit in 1982. In 2003, the limit was reduced to 1085 grams citing a new criticality safety evaluation for ATR fuel elements. The fuel plate bundle inventories were not checked for compliance prior to implementing the reduced limit. A subsequent review of the NMIS inventory did not identify further violations. Requirements Management - The INL Criticality Safety program is organized and well documented. The source requirements for the INL Criticality Safety Program are from 10 CFR 830.204, DOE Order 420.1B, Chapter III, 'Nuclear Criticality Safety,' ANSI/ANS 8-series Industry Standards, and DOE Standards. These source requirements are documented in LRD-18001, 'INL Criticality Safety Program Requirements Manual.' The majority of the criticality safety source requirements are contained in DOE Order 420.1B because it invokes all of the ANSI/ANS 8-Series Standards. DOE Order 420.1B also invokes several DOE Standards, including DOE-STD-3007, 'Guidelines for Preparing Criticality Safety Evaluations at Department of Energy Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities.' DOE Order 420.1B contains requirements for DOE 'Heads of Field Elements' to approve the criticality safety program and specific elements of the program, namely, the qualification of criticality staff and the method for preparing criticality safety evaluations. This was accomplished by the approval of SAR-400, 'INL Standardized Nuclear Safety Basis Manual,' Chapter 6, 'Prevention of Inadvertent Criticality.' Chapter 6 of SAR-400 contains sufficient detail and/or reference to the specific DOE and contractor documents that adequately describe the INL Criticality Safety Program per the elements specified in DOE Order 420.1B. The Safety Evaluation Report for SAR-400 specifically recognizes that the approval of SAR-400 approves the INL Criticality Safety Program. No new source requirements were released in 2011. A revision to LRD-18001 is

  10. Normalization of Process Safety Metrics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Mengtian

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    , for this research, the number of process safety incidents is not available; since all the companies just started recording process safety incidents after API RP 745 was issued. Therefore, the most similar reported indicator-operational oil spills is used... for lagging metrics testing as a proper substitute. The major related data was obtained for this section as follows: • Process and environmental incidents (operational oil spills) • Total oil production volume • Total natural gas production volume • Total...

  11. INTEGRATED SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM SAFETY CULTURE IMPROVEMENT INITIATIVE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MCDONALD JA JR

    2009-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) identified safety culture as one of their top Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) related priorities. A team was formed to address this issue. The team identified a consensus set of safety culture principles, along with implementation practices that could be used by DOE, NNSA, and their contractors. Documented improvement tools were identified and communicated to contractors participating in a year long pilot project. After a year, lessons learned will be collected and a path forward determined. The goal of this effort was to achieve improved safety and mission performance through ISMS continuous improvement. The focus of ISMS improvement was safety culture improvement building on operating experience from similar industries such as the domestic and international commercial nuclear and chemical industry.

  12. Office of Enterprise Assessments Targeted Review of the Safety...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Diagram PIR Periodic Issue Report PISA Potential Inadequate Safety Analysis PM Preventive Maintenance PO Purchase Order QA Quality Assurance QL Quality Level RI...

  13. Towards a library of synthetic galaxy spectra and preliminary results of classification and parametrization of unresolved galaxies for Gaia - II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsalmantza, P; Rocca-Volmerange, B; Bailer-Jones, C A L; Kontizas, E; Bellas-Velidis, I; Livanou, E; Korakitis, R; Dapergolas, A; Vallenari, A; Fioc, M

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is the second in a series, implementing a classification system for Gaia observations of unresolved galaxies. Our goals are to determine spectral classes and estimate intrinsic astrophysical parameters via synthetic templates. Here we describe (1) a new extended library of synthetic galaxy spectra, (2) its comparison with various observations, and (3) first results of classification and parametrization experiments using simulated Gaia spectrophotometry of this library. Using the PEGASE.2 code, based on galaxy evolution models that take account of metallicity evolution, extinction correction, and emission lines (with stellar spectra based on the BaSeL library), we improved our first library and extended it to cover the domain of most of the SDSS catalogue. We produce an extended library of 28885 synthetic galaxy spectra at zero redshift covering four general Hubble types of galaxies, over the wavelength range between 250 and 1050 nm at a sampling of 1 nm or less. The library is also produced for 4 r...

  14. Towards a library of synthetic galaxy spectra and preliminary results of classification and parametrization of unresolved galaxies for Gaia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsalmantza, P; Bailer-Jones, C A L; Rocca-Volmerange, B; Korakitis, R; Kontizas, E; Livanou, E; Dapergolas, A; Bellas-Velidis, I; Vallenari, A; Fioc, M

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aims:The Gaia astrometric survey mission will, as a consequence of its scanning law, obtain low resolution optical (3300-1000 nm) spectrophotometry of several million unresolved galaxies brighter than V=22. We present the first steps in a project to design and implement a classification system for these data. The goal is both to determine morphological classes and to estimate intrinsic astrophysical parameters via synthetic templates. Here we describe (1) a new library of synthetic galaxy spectra, and (2) first results of classification and parametrization experiments using simulated Gaia spectrophotometry of this library. Methods:We have created a large grid of synthetic galaxy spectra using the PEGASE.2 code, which is based on galaxy evolution models that take into account metallicity evolution, extinction correction, emission lines (with stellar spectra based on the BaSeL library). Our classification and regression models are Support Vector Machines (SVMs), which are kernel-based nonlinear estimators. Resu...

  15. Spectroscopic Analysis of the DAB White Dwarf PG 1115+166: An Unresolved DA + DB Degenerate Binary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Bergeron; James Liebert

    2001-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A spectroscopic analysis of the DAB white dwarf PG 1115+166 is presented. The observed hydrogen and helium line profiles are shown to be incompatible with model spectra calculated under the assumption of homogeneous or stratified chemical compositions. In contrast, an excellent fit to the optical spectrum of PG 1115+166 can be achieved if the object is interpreted as an unresolved double degenerate composed of a hydrogen-line DA star and a helium-line DB star. The atmospheric parameters obtained from the best fit are Teff=22,090 K and log g=8.12 for the DA star, Teff=16,210 K and log g=8.19 for the DB star. This binary interpretation is consistent with the results recently reported by Burleigh et al. that PG 1115+166 also exhibits radial velocity variations. The implications of this discovery with respect to the DAB spectral class are discussed.

  16. Setting clear expectations for safety basis development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MORENO, M.R.

    2003-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE-RL has set clear expectations for a cost-effective approach for achieving compliance with the Nuclear Safety Management requirements (10 CFR 830, Nuclear Safety Rule) which will ensure long-term benefit to Hanford. To facilitate implementation of these expectations, tools were developed to streamline and standardize safety analysis and safety document development resulting in a shorter and more predictable DOE approval cycle. A Hanford Safety Analysis and Risk Assessment Handbook (SARAH) was issued to standardized methodologies for development of safety analyses. A Microsoft Excel spreadsheet (RADIDOSE) was issued for the evaluation of radiological consequences for accident scenarios often postulated for Hanford. A standard Site Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) detailing the safety management programs was issued for use as a means of compliance with a majority of 3009 Standard chapters. An in-process review was developed between DOE and the Contractor to facilitate DOE approval and provide early course correction. As a result of setting expectations and providing safety analysis tools, the four Hanford Site waste management nuclear facilities were able to integrate into one Master Waste Management Documented Safety Analysis (WM-DSA).

  17. Secretarial Policy Statement on Nanoscale Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The safety of its employees, the public, and the environment is the Department's number one priority. This policy statement is issued to establish a framework for working safely with nanomaterials.

  18. Safety assured financial evaluation of maintenance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erguina, Vera

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Management decisions in complex industrial facilities usually consider both the economic and environmental aspects of the plant's performance. For nuclear power plants (NPPs), safety is also a very substantial issue. The objectives...

  19. WOMEN'S CAMPUS SAFETY GRANT TERMS OF REFERENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is a Presidential standing committee established to address women's safety issues on campus, and in so doing, but are not successful in the February round, will be permitted to stand for the second round. Applications that miss

  20. Physical forcing and physical/biochemical variability of the Mediterranean Sea: a review of unresolved issues and directions for future research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rizzoli, Paola M.

    This paper is the outcome of a workshop held in Rome in November 2011 on the occasion of the 25th anniversary of the POEM (Physical Oceanography of the Eastern Mediterranean) program. In the workshop discussions, a number ...

  1. ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY GENERAL SAFETY MANUAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maroncelli, Mark

    ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY GENERAL SAFETY MANUAL May 10, 2002 #12;i Acknowledgements Environmental Health and Safety gratefully acknowledges the assistance provided by the University Safety Council extremely helpful. #12;ii Environmental Health and Safety General Safety Manual Table of Contents Section

  2. Safety Bulletin

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    in the documented safety analysis. BACKGROUND On March 11 , 2011 , the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station in Japan was damaged by a magnitude 9.0 earthquake and the...

  3. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2002-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish facility safety requirements for the Department of Energy, including National Nuclear Security Administration. Cancels DOE O 420.1. Canceled by DOE O 420.1B.

  4. Conventional Facilities Chapter 11: Environment, Safety and Health 11-1 NSLS-II Preliminary Design Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    Analysis 4. Fire Protection 5. Pressure Safety 6. Industrial Hygiene 7. Other ES&H Issues This document Program a) Fire protection b) Pressure safety c) Industrial hygiene d) Biological safety e) Electrical

  5. Safety review advisor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boshers, J.A.; Alguindigue, I.E.; Uhrig, R.E. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Burnett, C.G. (Tennessee Valley Authority, Knoxville, TN (USA))

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The University of Tennessee's Nuclear Engineering Department, in cooperation with the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), is evaluating the feasibility of utilizing an expert system to aid in 10CFR50.59 evaluations. This paper discusses the history of 10CFR50.59 reviews, and details the development approach used in the construction of a prototype Safety Review Advisor (SRA). The goals for this expert system prototype are to (1) aid the engineer in the evaluation process by directing his attention to the appropriate critical issues, (2) increase the efficiency, consistency, and thoroughness of the evaluation process, and (3) provide a foundation of appropriate Safety Analysis Report (SAR) references for the reviewer. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Toolbox Safety Talk Ladder Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    Health & Safety for recordkeeping. Slips, trips, and falls constitute the majority of general industry and construction worker injuries. Falls cause 15% of all accidental deaths, and are second only to motor vehicle

  7. The Canadian Centre for Health and Safety in Agriculture (CCHSA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    The Canadian Centre for Health and Safety in Agriculture (CCHSA) Building on 20 years of leadership in agricultural safety and rural health issues, CCHSA has evolved into a national centre of excellence in agricultural safety, rural health, research, delivery of training programs and knowledge translation

  8. Toolbox Safety Talk Welding & Metal Work Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    Toolbox Safety Talk Welding & Metal Work Safety Environmental Health & Safety Facilities Safety or harmful emission giving metals. Welding Safety When welding outside of a designated welding booth, ensure injury. Avoid welding on materials such as galvanized or stainless steel in order to minimize toxic fume

  9. Chapter 13 Employee Health and Safety 13.04 Safety Committees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    compliance in hazardous waste management, environmental permits and other issues related to chemical safety involving use of hazardous biological materials including recombinant DNA for compliance with NIH guidelines and tuberculosis prevention are areas of special concern. Contacts can be made with these committees or with safety

  10. Nuclear Safety Regulatory Framework

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    overall Nuclear Safety Policy & ESH Goals Safety Basis Review and Approval In the DOE governance model, contractors responsible for the facility develop the safety basis and...

  11. Gas Pipeline Safety (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This section establishes the Pipeline Safety Division within the Utility Regulatory Commission to administer federal pipeline safety standards and establish minimum state safety standards for...

  12. Hydrogen Safety

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This 2-page fact sheet, intended for a non-technical audience, explains the basic properties of hydrogen and provides an overview of issues related to the safe use of hydrogen as an energy carrier.

  13. Tank safety screening data quality objective. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, J.W.

    1995-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tank Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO) will be used to classify 149 single shell tanks and 28 double shell tanks containing high-level radioactive waste into safety categories for safety issues dealing with the presence of ferrocyanide, organics, flammable gases, and criticality. Decision rules used to classify a tank as ``safe`` or ``not safe`` are presented. Primary and secondary decision variables used for safety status classification are discussed. The number and type of samples required are presented. A tabular identification of each analyte to be measured to support the safety classification, the analytical method to be used, the type of sample, the decision threshold for each analyte that would, if violated, place the tank on the safety issue watch list, and the assumed (desired) analytical uncertainty are provided. This is a living document that should be evaluated for updates on a semiannual basis. Evaluation areas consist of: identification of tanks that have been added or deleted from the specific safety issue watch lists, changes in primary and secondary decision variables, changes in decision rules used for the safety status classification, and changes in analytical requirements. This document directly supports all safety issue specific DQOs and additional characterization DQO efforts associated with pretreatment and retrieval. Additionally, information obtained during implementation can assist in resolving assumptions for revised safety strategies, and in addition, obtaining information which will support the determination of error tolerances, confidence levels, and optimization schemes for later revised safety strategy documentation.

  14. Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    To ensure timely collection, reporting, analysis, and dissemination of information on environment, safety, and health issues as required by law or regulations or as needed to ensure that the Department of Energy (DOE) and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) are kept fully informed on a timely basis about events that could adversely affect the health and safety of the public or the workers, the environment, the intended purpose of DOE facilities, or the credibility of the Department. Cancels DOE O 210.1, DOE O 231.1, and DOE O 232.1A. Canceled by DOE O 232.2.

  15. Towards a library of synthetic galaxy spectra and preliminary results of classification and parametrization of unresolved galaxies for Gaia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Tsalmantza; M. Kontizas; C. A. L. Bailer-Jones; B. Rocca-Volmerange; R. Korakitis; E. Kontizas; E. Livanou; A. Dapergolas; I. Bellas-Velidis; A. Vallenari; M. Fioc

    2007-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Aims:The Gaia astrometric survey mission will, as a consequence of its scanning law, obtain low resolution optical (330-1000 nm) spectrophotometry of several million unresolved galaxies brighter than V=22. We present the first steps in a project to design and implement a classification system for these data. The goal is both to determine morphological classes and to estimate intrinsic astrophysical parameters via synthetic templates. Here we describe (1) a new library of synthetic galaxy spectra, and (2) first results of classification and parametrization experiments using simulated Gaia spectrophotometry of this library. Methods:We have created a large grid of synthetic galaxy spectra using the PEGASE.2 code, which is based on galaxy evolution models that take into account metallicity evolution, extinction correction, emission lines (with stellar spectra based on the BaSeL library). Our classification and regression models are Support Vector Machines (SVMs), which are kernel-based nonlinear estimators. Results:We produce a basic library of about 4000 zero redshift galaxy spectra covering the main Hubble types over wavelength range 250 to 1050 nm at a sampling of 1 nm or less. It is computed on a regular grid of four key astrophysical parameters for each type and for intermediate random values of the same parameters. An extended library reproduces this at a series of redshifts. Initial results from the SVM classifiers and parametrizers are promising, indicating that Hubble types can be reliably predicted and several parameters estimated with low bias and variance. Comparing the colours of our synthetic library with Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectra we find good agreement over the full range of Hubble types and parameters.

  16. Open Issues

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding access toTest and Evaluation |quasicrystals65Open Issues Open

  17. NEW ISSUE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Saleshttp://www.fnal.gov/directorate/nalcal/nalcal02_07_05_files/nalcal.gif Directorate1, Issue 23 NETL NEVIS- 97 'FASTER NEVIS-

  18. All Issues

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP7-0973ManagedStrategic|Aljazeera story on rareAll Issues All

  19. Issues in microwave power systems engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickinson, R.M. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). Jet Propulsion Lab.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The key issues in microwave power system engineering are beam safety, frequency allocation, and affordability. These major issues are presented, discussed, and suggestions for resolving them are offered. The issue of beam safety can be captured in the phrase ``Fear of Frying.`` Can a properly engineered beamed power safety system allay the public perception of microwave radiation dangers? Openness, visibility, and education may be keys to resolving this issue satisfactorily. ``Not in my Spectrum`` is a phrase that is frequently encountered in connection with the issue of where can the microwave power beam frequency be located. International cooperation may provide a part of the solution to this issue. ``Wow, that much?`` is a phrase encountered when dealing with the issue of economic affordability of large beamed power systems. A phased engineering approach for multiple uses even during construction is presented to aid in garnering revenue during the system build phase. Also, dual mode dc-RF converters are encouraged for bi-directional power flow utility and economies of scale in production.

  20. Laser Safety Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    use Integrated Safety Management here at the lab to reduce risk and work to improve the quality and safety of the work? #12;Integrated Safety Management Use (greater in size than wavelength) #12;Integrated Safety Management Remember, we

  1. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE-STD-1104 contains the Department's method and criteria for reviewing and approving nuclear facility's documented safety analysis (DSA). This review and approval formally document the basis for DOE, concluding that a facility can be operated safely in a manner that adequately protects workers, the public, and the environment. Therefore, it is appropriate to formally require implementation of the review methodology and criteria contained in DOE-STD-1104.

  2. Safety valve

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bergman, Ulf C. (Malmoe, SE)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The safety valve contains a resilient gland to be held between a valve seat and a valve member and is secured to the valve member by a sleeve surrounding the end of the valve member adjacent to the valve seat. The sleeve is movable relative to the valve member through a limited axial distance and a gap exists between said valve member and said sleeve.

  3. MSS 1.1 Corrective Action/Issue Management 4/13/2000

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The objective of this surveillance is to verify that contractor personnel are effectively managing environment, safety, and health issues.  The activities included in this surveillance help the...

  4. System Design and the Safety Basis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellingson, Darrel

    2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this paper is to present the Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC (BJC) Lessons Learned for system design as it relates to safety basis documentation. BJC has had to reconcile incomplete or outdated system description information with current facility safety basis for a number of situations in recent months. This paper has relevance in multiple topical areas including documented safety analysis, decontamination & decommissioning (D&D), safety basis (SB) implementation, safety and design integration, potential inadequacy of the safety analysis (PISA), technical safety requirements (TSR), and unreviewed safety questions. BJC learned that nuclear safety compliance relies on adequate and well documented system design information. A number of PIS As and TSR violations occurred due to inadequate or erroneous system design information. As a corrective action, BJC assessed the occurrences caused by systems design-safety basis interface problems. Safety systems reviewed included the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Fluorination System, K-1065 fire alarm system, and the K-25 Radiation Criticality Accident Alarm System. The conclusion was that an inadequate knowledge of system design could result in continuous non-compliance issues relating to nuclear safety. This was especially true with older facilities that lacked current as-built drawings coupled with the loss of 'historical knowledge' as personnel retired or moved on in their careers. Walkdown of systems and the updating of drawings are imperative for nuclear safety compliance. System design integration with safety basis has relevance in the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. This paper presents the BJC Lessons Learned in this area. It will be of benefit to DOE contractors that manage and operate an aging population of nuclear facilities.

  5. Welcome to this Issue

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Welcome National Security Science Latest Issue:December 2014 All Issues submit Welcome to this Issue An introduction by Craig Leasure - Principal Associate Director, Weapons...

  6. Environment, Safety and Health Reporting

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To ensure timely collection, reporting, analysis, and dissemination of information on environment, safety, and health issues as required by law or regulations or as needed to ensure that the Department of Energy (DOE) and National Nuclear Security Administration are kept fully informed on a timely basis about events that could adversely affect the health and safety of the public or the workers, the environment, the intended purpose of DOE facilities, or the credibility of the Department. Cancels DOE O 210.1, DOE O 231.1, DOE O 232.1A. Canceled by DOE O 231.1B. DOE O 231.1B cancels all portions pertaining to environment, safety, and health reporting. Occurrence reporting and processing of operations information provisions remain in effect until January 1, 2012.

  7. Safety Share from National Safety Council

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Slide Presentation by Joe Yanek, Fluor Government Group. National Safety Council Safety Share. The Campbell Institute is the “Environmental, Health and Safety (EHS) Center of Excellence” at the National Safety Council and provides a Forum for Leaders in EHS to exchange ideas and collaborate across industry sectors and organizational types.

  8. Reactor Safety Research: Semiannual report, January-June 1986: Reactor Safety Research Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories is conducting, under USNRC sponsorship, phenomenological research related to the safety of commercial nuclear power reactors. The research includes experiments to simulate the phenomenology of accident conditions and the development of analytical models, verified by experiment, which can be used to predict reactor and safety systems performance behavior under abnormal conditions. The objective of this work is to provide NRC requisite data bases and analytical methods to (1) identify and define safety issues, (2) understand the progression of risk-significant accident sequences, and (3) conduct safety assessments. The collective NRC-sponsored effort at Sandia National Laboratories is directed at enhancing the technology base supporting licensing decisions.

  9. Fifty years of progress in reactor safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okrent, D. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper chronicles the major watershed occurrences in the evaluation of current reactor safety principles and concepts. The author covers such issues as the development of siting criteria in the early 1960s, development and design of engineered safety features and emergency cooling systems (ECCS), core meltdown scenarios, anticipated transients without scram (ATWS) issues, WASH-1400 Reactor Safety study employing probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) approaches, early PRAs conducted, development of safety goals in the 1980s, and reliability of AC power. Perhaps three of the most significant events related to operating reactors that occurred near the end of the 50-yr period were recognition of the problems of aging, completion of the NUREG-1150 study, and the development of a program on severe accident management.

  10. Quality Assurance Exchange April 2009, Volume 5 Issue 1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Quality Assurance ExchangeA pril 2009, Volume 5 Issue 1 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Quality Assurance Policy and Assistance IN THE SPOTLIGHT: GEORGE DETSIS, PROGRAM MANAGER Analytical Services Program Office of Corporate Safety Programs

  11. Delivering safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, N.D.; Spooner, K.G.; Walkden, P. [British Nuclear Group Ltd, Daresbury, Warrington (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the United Kingdom there have been significant recent changes to the management of civil nuclear liabilities. With the formation in April 2005 of the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA), ownership of the civil nuclear licensed sites in the UK, including the Magnox Reactor Stations, passed to this new organisation. The NDAs mission is to seek acceleration of the nuclear clean up programme and deliver increased value for money and, consequently, are driving their contractors to seek more innovative ways of performing work. British Nuclear Group manages the UK Magnox stations under contract to the NDA. This paper summarises the approach being taken within its Reactor Sites business to work with suppliers to enhance working arrangements at sites, improve the delivery of decommissioning programmes and deliver improvements in safety and environmental performance. The UK Magnox stations are 1. generation gas-graphite reactors, constructed in the 1950's and 1960's. Two stations are currently still operating, three are shut-down undergoing defueling and the other five are being decommissioned. Despite the distractions of industry restructuring, an uncompromising policy of demanding improved performance in conjunction with improved safety and environmental standards has been adopted. Over the past 5 years, this policy has resulted in step-changes in performance at Reactor Sites, with increased electrical output and accelerated defueling and decommissioning. The improvements in performance have been mirrored by improvements in safety (DACR of 0 at 5 sites); environmental standards (reductions in energy and water consumption, increased waste recycling) and the overall health of the workforce (20% reduction in sickness absence). These achievements have, in turn, been recognised by external bodies, resulting in several awards, including: the world's first ISRS and IERS level 10 awards (Sizewell, 2006), the NUMEX plant maintenance award (Bradwell, 2006), numerous RoSPA awards at site and sector level and nomination, at Company level, for the RoSPA George Earle trophy for outstanding performance in Health and Safety (Reactor Sites, 2006). After 'setting the scene' and describing the challenges that the company has had to respond to, the paper explains how these improvements have been delivered. Specifically it explains the process that has been followed and the parts played by sites and suppliers to deliver improved performance. With the experience of already having transitioned several Magnox stations from operations to defueling and then to decommissioning, the paper describes the valuable experience that has been gained in achieving an optimum change process and maintaining momentum. (authors)

  12. Safety, Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements RecentlyElectronicResourcesjobsJuly throughR EMaterialsSafety, Security

  13. Status of Safety and Environmental Activities in the US Fusion Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David A. Petti; Susana Reyes; Lee C. Cadwallader; Jeffery F. Latkowski

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an overview of recent safety efforts in both magnetic and inertial fusion energy. Safety has been a part of fusion design and operations since the inception of fusion research. Safety research and safety design support have been provided for a variety of experiments in both the magnetic and inertial fusion programs. The main safety issues are reviewed, some recent safety highlights are discussed and the programmatic impacts that safety research has had are presented. Future directions in the safety and environmental area are proposed.

  14. Status of Safety and Environmental Activities in the U.S. Fusion Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petti, D.A. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (United States); Reyes, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (United States); Cadwallader, L.C. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (United States); Latkowski, J.F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (United States)

    2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an overview of recent safety efforts in both magnetic and inertial fusion energy. Safety has been a part of fusion design and operations since the inception of fusion research. Safety research and safety design support have been provided for a variety of experiments in both the magnetic and inertial fusion programs. The main safety issues are reviewed, some recent safety highlights are discussed and the programmatic impacts that safety research has had are presented. Future directions in the safety and environmental area are proposed.

  15. Status of Safety and Environmental Activities in the US Fusion Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petti, D A; Reyes, S; Cadwallader, L C; Latkowski, J F

    2004-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an overview of recent safety efforts in both magnetic and inertial fusion energy. Safety has been a part of fusion design and operations since the inception of fusion research. Safety research and safety design support have been provided for a variety of experiments in both the magnetic and inertial fusion programs. The main safety issues are reviewed, some recent safety highlights are discussed and the programmatic impacts that safety research has had are presented. Future directions in the safety and environmental area are proposed.

  16. Risk Assessment in Support of DOE Nuclear Safety, Risk Information Notice, June 2010

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On August 12, 2009, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board(DNFSB) issued Recommendation 2009?1, Risk Assessment Methodologies at Defense Nuclear Facilities. Thisrecommendation focused on the...

  17. CRAD, Nuclear Safety Delegations for Documented Safety Analysis...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Safety Delegations for Documented Safety Analysis Approval - January 8, 2015 (EA CRAD 31-09, Rev. 0) CRAD, Nuclear Safety Delegations for Documented Safety Analysis Approval -...

  18. IN THIS ISSUE... Energy Management Welcomes Two

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webb, Peter

    July 2003 IN THIS ISSUE... Energy Management Welcomes Two Sign Shop Employees Embark on Adventure U of M Solar Car Team Takes Second July Safety Team HR Assignments Brief Moves to E-mail Format Only reorganization, the Business and Application Support Unit has been reduced to four staff members. Grant Clavelle

  19. Acceptable NSLS Safety Documentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Acceptable NSLS Safety Documentation Print NSLS users who have completed NSLS Safety Module must present a copy of one of the following documents to receive ALS 1001: Safety at the...

  20. achieve product safety: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that are adaptively secure under a standard assumption 29 1Page ofProduct Code: 051000 Revision: 5 07 MAR 2002Issued: 7 Material Safety Data Sheet Materials Science Websites...

  1. A semiotic analysis of biotechnology and food safety photographs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norwood, Jennifer Lynn

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This study evaluated photographs used in Time, Newsweek, and U.S. News and World Report in stories about biotechnology and food safety issues from the years 2000 and 2001. This study implemented a semiotic methodology to ...

  2. EA-0915: Waste Tank Safety Program Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to resolve waste tank safety issues at the Hanford Site near the City of Richland, Washington, and to reduce the risks associated with...

  3. RADIATION SAFETY TRAINING MANUAL Radiation Safety Office

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibille, Etienne

    protection and the potential risks of ionizing radiation. Radiation Safety Office personnel provide.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 II. OVERVIEW OF REGULATIONS, PROTECTION STANDARDS, AND RADIATION SAFETY ORGANIZATION.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 V. BASIC RADIATION PROTECTION PRINCIPLES

  4. Accelerator Facility Safety Implementation Guide for DOE Order (0) 420.2C, Safety of Accelerator Facilities

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The revision will address implementation of roles and responsibilities, improve operational efficiency using operating experience, and clarify the use of program requirements such as the Unreviewed Safety Issue and Accelerator Readiness Review.

  5. Dam Safety (Pennsylvania)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection's Division of Dam Safety provides for the regulation and safety of dams and reservoirs throughout the Commonwealth in order to protect the...

  6. Pipeline Safety (Pennsylvania)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Pennsylvania legislature has empowered the Public Utility Commission to direct and enforce safety standards for pipeline facilities and to regulate safety practices of certificated utilities...

  7. SHSD Manager Safety Engineering Group Manager

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Safety, Machine Shop Safety, Tier I Program, Traffic Safety S. Moss: Nuclear Criticality Safety G. Shepherd: Explosives Safety, Facility Authorization Basis, Nuclear Safety R. Travis: Readiness Evaluations

  8. Environmental Health and Safety Fire and Life Safety Laboratory Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmental Health and Safety Fire and Life Safety Laboratory Assessment PI or environmental concerns were identified. B. Items of safety or environmental concerns were identified. C. Uncorrected repeated safety or environmental items were identified. Safety Equipment # Compliance Items

  9. HANFORD SAFETY ANALYSIS & RISK ASSESSMENT HANDBOOK (SARAH)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    EVANS, C B

    2004-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Hanford Safety Analysis and Risk Assessment Handbook (SARAH) is to support the development of safety basis documentation for Hazard Category 2 and 3 (HC-2 and 3) U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities to meet the requirements of 10 CFR 830, ''Nuclear Safety Management''. Subpart B, ''Safety Basis Requirements.'' Consistent with DOE-STD-3009-94, Change Notice 2, ''Preparation Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses'' (STD-3009), and DOE-STD-3011-2002, ''Guidance for Preparation of Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) Documents'' (STD-3011), the Hanford SARAH describes methodology for performing a safety analysis leading to development of a Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) and derivation of Technical Safety Requirements (TSR), and provides the information necessary to ensure a consistently rigorous approach that meets DOE expectations. The DSA and TSR documents, together with the DOE-issued Safety Evaluation Report (SER), are the basic components of facility safety basis documentation. For HC-2 or 3 nuclear facilities in long-term surveillance and maintenance (S&M), for decommissioning activities, where source term has been eliminated to the point that only low-level, residual fixed contamination is present, or for environmental remediation activities outside of a facility structure, DOE-STD-1120-98, ''Integration of Environment, Safety, and Health into Facility Disposition Activities'' (STD-1120), may serve as the basis for the DSA. HC-2 and 3 environmental remediation sites also are subject to the hazard analysis methodologies of this standard.

  10. NSPWG-recommended safety requirements and guidelines for SEI nuclear propulsion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, A.C.; Sawyer, J.C. Jr.; Bari, R.A.; Brown, N.W.; Cullingford, H.S.; Hardy, A.C.; Lee, J.H.; Mcculloch, W.H.; Niederauer, G.F.; Remp, K. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States) NASA, Washington (United States) Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States) General Electric Co., San Jose, CA (United States) NASA, Johnson Space Center, Houston, Tn (United States) L

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An interagency Nuclear Safety Policy Working Group (NSPWG) was chartered to recommend nuclear safety policy, requirements, and guidelines for the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) nuclear propulsion program to facilitate the implementation of mission planning and conceptual design studies. The NSPWG developed a top-level policy to provide the guiding principles for the development and implementation of the nuclear propulsion safety program and the development of safety functional requirements. In addition, the NSPWG reviewed safety issues for nuclear propulsion and recommended top-level safety requirements and guidelines to address these issues. Safety requirements were developed for reactor start-up, inadvertent criticality, radiological release and exposure, disposal, entry, and safeguards. Guidelines were recommended for risk/reliability, operational safety, flight trajectory and mission abort, space debris and meteoroids, and ground test safety. In this paper the specific requirements and guidelines will be discussed. 9 refs.

  11. NSPWG-recommended safety requirements and guidelines for SEI nuclear propulsion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, A.C.; Lee, J.H.; McCulloch, W.H. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Sawyer, J.C. Jr. (National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC (United States)); Bari, R.A. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Brown, N.W. (General Electric Co., San Jose, CA (United States)); Cullingford, H.S.; Hardy, A.C. (National Aeronautics and Space Administ

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An Interagency Nuclear Safety Policy Working Group (NSPWG) was chartered to recommend nuclear safety policy, requirements, and guidelines for the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) nuclear propulsion program to facilitate the implementation of mission planning and conceptual design studies. The NSPWG developed a top- level policy to provide the guiding principles for the development and implementation of the nuclear propulsion safety program and the development of Safety Functional Requirements. In addition the NSPWG reviewed safety issues for nuclear propulsion and recommended top-level safety requirements and guidelines to address these issues. Safety requirements were developed for reactor start-up, inadvertent criticality, radiological release and exposure, disposal, entry, and safeguards. Guidelines were recommended for risk/reliability, operational safety, flight trajectory and mission abort, space debris and meteoroids, and ground test safety. In this paper the specific requirements and guidelines will be discussed.

  12. NSPWG-recommended safety requirements and guidelines for SEI nuclear propulsion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, A.C.; Lee, J.H.; McCulloch, W.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sawyer, J.C. Jr. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC (United States); Bari, R.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Brown, N.W. [General Electric Co., San Jose, CA (United States); Cullingford, H.S.; Hardy, A.C. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Houston, TX (United States). Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center; Niederauer, G.F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Remp, K. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH (United States). Lewis Research Center; Rice, J.W. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sholtis, J.A. [Department of the Air Force, Kirtland AFB, NM (United States)

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An Interagency Nuclear Safety Policy Working Group (NSPWG) was chartered to recommend nuclear safety policy, requirements, and guidelines for the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) nuclear propulsion program to facilitate the implementation of mission planning and conceptual design studies. The NSPWG developed a top- level policy to provide the guiding principles for the development and implementation of the nuclear propulsion safety program and the development of Safety Functional Requirements. In addition the NSPWG reviewed safety issues for nuclear propulsion and recommended top-level safety requirements and guidelines to address these issues. Safety requirements were developed for reactor start-up, inadvertent criticality, radiological release and exposure, disposal, entry, and safeguards. Guidelines were recommended for risk/reliability, operational safety, flight trajectory and mission abort, space debris and meteoroids, and ground test safety. In this paper the specific requirements and guidelines will be discussed.

  13. Good housekeeping: Safety and order in the scientific laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sims, B. H. (Benjamin H.)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory safety might not seem, at first, to be very profoundly related to scientific knowledge. Of course safety is a relatively trivial issue in many scientific settings, especially in comparison to the kind of safety concerns found, say, at a construction site or a chemical plant. However, as scientific work has come to involve more exotic chemicals, biological organisms, and forms of radiation, and generally become more industrial in character, safety has become more of a concern. This has occurred alongside a general expansion of government regulation of workplace safety during the 20thc entury, and a recent trend toward extending work lace safety efforts to new kinds of work, including administrative and professional tasks. As a result of these trends, scientists find that they are increasingly being held responsible for following safety regulations in their re{approx}earc

  14. Reactor Safety Research: Semiannual report, July-December 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories is conducting, under USNRC sponsorship, phenomenological research related to the safety of commercial nuclear power reactors. The research includes experiments to simulate the phenomenology of the accident conditions and the development of analytical models, verified by experiment, which can be used to predict reactor and safety systems performance and behavior under abnormal conditions. The objective of this work is to provide NRC requisite data bases and analytical methods to (1) identify and define safety issues, (2) understand the progression of risk-significant accident sequences, and (3) conduct safety assessments. The collective NRC-sponsored effort at Sandia National Laboratories is directed at enhancing the tehcnology base supporting licensing decisions.

  15. Agricultural Issues Center AIC Issues Brief

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrara, Katherine W.

    Number 36 March 2010 Agricultural Issues Center AIC Issues Brief California International Agriculture Exports in 2008 In 2008, the value of California agriculture exports reached an all time high AIC estimates of the international agricultural exports for 2008, and provides revisions for 2007

  16. Coal Mine Safety Act (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act is the primary legislation pertaining to coal mine safety in Virginia. It contains information on safety rules, safety standards and required certifications for mine workers, prohibited...

  17. Nuclear Safety Research and Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nuclear Safety Research and Development Proposal Review and Prioritization Process and Criteria Nuclear Safety Research and Development Program Office of Nuclear Safety Office of...

  18. Modular HTGR Safety Basis and Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas Hicks

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be a licensed commercial high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) capable of producing electricity and/or high temperature process heat for industrial markets supporting a range of end-user applications. The NGNP Project has adopted the 10 CFR 52 Combined License (COL) process, as recommended in the NGNP Licensing Strategy - A Report to Congress, dated August 2008, as the foundation for the NGNP licensing strategy [DOE/NRC 2008]. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensing of the NGNP plant utilizing this process will demonstrate the efficacy for licensing future HTGRs for commercial industrial applications. This information paper is one in a series of submittals that address key generic issues of the priority licensing topics as part of the process for establishing HTGR regulatory requirements. This information paper provides a summary level introduction to HTGR history, public safety objectives, inherent and passive safety features, radionuclide release barriers, functional safety approach, and risk-informed safety approach. The information in this paper is intended to further the understanding of the modular HTGR safety approach with the NRC staff and public stakeholders. The NGNP project does not expect to receive comments on this information paper because other white papers are addressing key generic issues of the priority licensing topics in greater detail.

  19. Magnetic Field Safety Magnetic Field Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    Magnetic Field Safety Training #12;Magnetic Field Safety Strong Magnetic Fields exist around energized magnets. High magnetic fields alone are a recognized hazard only for personnel with certain medical conditions such as pacemakers, magnetic implants, or embedded shrapnel. In addition, high magnetic

  20. Retort abandonment: issues and research needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, J.P.; Persoff, P.; Wagner, P.; Peterson, E.J.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper has identified key issues in retort abandonment and has addressed research needs. Retort abandonment for vertical modified in-situ (VMIS) shale oil recovery is an environmentally sensitive research area that has received recognition only within the past five years. Thus, experimental data and information are, in general, limited. In addition, there is presently a wide spectrum of unresolved issues that range from basic problem definition to technical details of potential control technologies. This situation is compounded by the scale of the problem and the absence of a commercial industry. The problems involve large numbers and will require engineering on a gigantic scale. Abandoned retorts are large - up to 700 feet deep and several hundred feet in cross section. They will exist in huge blocks, several square miles in area, which are inaccessible at several thousand feet below the surface. The processes that will ultimately be used to extract the oil are undefined. The technology is in transition, and representative samples of materials have not been available for research. Research efforts in this area have concentrated on basic studies on the nature and magnitude of environmental problems resulting from VMIS oil extraction. These investigations have used laboratory reactors to generate spent shales and modeling studies to predict water quality and hydrologic impacts. The technology for retort abandonment is just now being developed, using engineering analyses to identify promising environmental control options and laboratory and modeling studies to determine feasibility. We expect that, as the environmental problems are better defined and understood, conventional control technologies will prove to be adaptable to a majority of the problems associated with this new process and that laboratory and modeling research on the problem definition will be refocused on technology development and field experiments.

  1. Office of Nuclear Safety

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Nuclear Safety establishes nuclear safety requirements and expectations for the Department to ensure protection of workers and the public from the hazards associated with nuclear operations with all Department operations.

  2. Pipeline Safety Rule (Tennessee)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Pipeline Safety Rule simply states, "The Minimum Federal Safety Standards for the transportation of natural and other gas by pipeline (Title 49, Chapter 1, Part 192) as published in the Federal...

  3. Dam Safety Program (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Dam Safety Division within the Department of the Environment is responsible for administering a dam safety program to regulate the construction, operation, and maintenance of dams to prevent...

  4. Dam Safety (Delaware)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Delaware Dam Safety Law was adopted in 2004 and provides the framework for proper design, construction, operation, maintenance, and inspection of dams in the interest of public health, safety,...

  5. PUREX Deactivation Health and Safety documentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dodd, E.N. III

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the PUREX Deactivation Project is to establish a passively safe and environmentally secure configuration of PUREX at the Hanford Site, and to preserve that configuration for a 10-year horizon. The 10-year horizon is used to predict future maintenance requirements and represents they typical time duration expended to define, authorize, and initiate the follow-on Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) activities. This document was prepared to increase attention to worker safety issues during the deactivation project and, as such, identifies the documentation and programs associated with PUREX Deactivation Health and Safety.

  6. Integrating Safety Issues in Optimizing Solvent Selection and Process Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patel, Suhani Jitendra

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    ICAS-ProCAMD, and consequence models were integrated into Aspen Plus simulator using a calculator sheet. Upon integrating flammable and toxic hazard modeling, solvents such as 5-nonanone, 2-nonanone and 5-methyl-2-hexanone provide inherently safer...

  7. Overview of Indian Hydrogen Program and Key Safety Issues of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Power Plants * Targets up to 2020 SIAM 6 * Prototypes Programs in India * Prototypes * IC Engine based devices * Hydrogen fuelled motorcycles, three wheeler & Small Cars O i P j t...

  8. Chemistry Safety Notes Volume 2, Issue 6 October 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Ting

    will be available for haz mat drop off from 10AM to 2PM daily from October 21st until November 3rd . The advantage of taking advantage of this program is that you don't have to label materials as hazardous waste. Please do label materials as best you can. If you are disposing samples or weird unknowns, try to give

  9. H2 Safety Snapshot - Vol. 2, Issue 1, Nov. 2010

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGrid Integration0-1 MarchH-Tank FarmRefuel H-Prize

  10. H2 Safety Snapshot - Vol. 2, Issue 2, July 2011

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGrid Integration0-1 MarchH-Tank FarmRefuel H-PrizeH2

  11. Nuclear Explosive Safety Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual provides supplemental details to support the requirements of DOE O 452.2D, Nuclear Explosive Safety.

  12. DOE handbook electrical safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrical Safety Handbook presents the Department of Energy (DOE) safety standards for DOE field offices or facilities involved in the use of electrical energy. It has been prepared to provide a uniform set of electrical safety guidance and information for DOE installations to effect a reduction or elimination of risks associated with the use of electrical energy. The objectives of this handbook are to enhance electrical safety awareness and mitigate electrical hazards to employees, the public, and the environment.

  13. Electrical safety guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electrical Safety Guidelines prescribes the DOE safety standards for DOE field offices or facilities involved in the use of electrical energy. It has been prepared to provide a uniform set of electrical safety standards and guidance for DOE installations in order to affect a reduction or elimination of risks associated with the use of electrical energy. The objectives of these guidelines are to enhance electrical safety awareness and mitigate electrical hazards to employees, the public, and the environment.

  14. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) project Integrated Safety Management System phase I and II Verification Review Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CARTER, R.P.

    1999-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) commits to accomplishing its mission safely. To ensure this objective is met, DOE issued DOE P 450.4, Safety Management System Policy, and incorporated safety management into the DOE Acquisition Regulations ([DEAR] 48 CFR 970.5204-2 and 90.5204-78). Integrated Safety Management (ISM) requires contractors to integrate safety into management and work practices at all levels so that missions are achieved while protecting the public, the worker, and the environment. The contractor is required to describe the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) to be used to implement the safety performance objective.

  15. Seismic Analysis Issues in Design Certification Applications for New Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miranda, M.; Morante, R.; Xu, J.

    2011-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The licensing framework established by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission under Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR) Part 52, “Licenses, Certifications, and Approvals for Nuclear Power Plants,” provides requirements for standard design certifications (DCs) and combined license (COL) applications. The intent of this process is the early reso- lution of safety issues at the DC application stage. Subsequent COL applications may incorporate a DC by reference. Thus, the COL review will not reconsider safety issues resolved during the DC process. However, a COL application that incorporates a DC by reference must demonstrate that relevant site-specific de- sign parameters are within the bounds postulated by the DC, and any departures from the DC need to be justified. This paper provides an overview of several seismic analysis issues encountered during a review of recent DC applications under the 10 CFR Part 52 process, in which the authors have participated as part of the safety review effort.

  16. Department of Environmental Health & Safety Emergency Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Toole, Alice J.

    Management Fire & Life Safety Industrial Hygiene Laboratory Safety Occupational & General Safety Management Environmental Management Fire & Life Safety Industrial Hygiene Laboratory Safety Occupational Values A Note from the Director Environmental Management Fire & Life Safety Lab Safety & Industrial

  17. Environmental Health & Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmental Health & Safety Sub Department Name 480 Oak Rd, Stanford, CA 94305 T 650.723.0448 F 650.725.3468 DEPUTY DIRECTOR, ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY Exempt, Full-Time (100% FTE) Posted May 1, 2014 The Department of Environmental Health and Safety (EH&S) at Stanford University seeks

  18. Earth Sciences Safety Handbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Report of Earth Sciences Departmental Safety Committee 2011 - 12 5 Chemical Safety 21 - 22 Chemical Waste Assessment Hire Vehicle Checklist Department Driving Protocol: Bullard vehicles 38 - 48 Electrical Safety 24 and outside adjacent to areas which present a particular fire hazard. Persons wishing to smoke are asked to do

  19. Earth Sciences Safety Handbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Report of Earth Sciences Departmental Safety Committee 2012 - 13 5 Chemical Safety 21 - 22 Chemical Waste Assessment Hire Vehicle Checklist Department Driving Protocol: Bullard vehicles 38 - 48 Electrical Safety 24 and outside adjacent to areas which present a particular fire hazard. Persons wishing to smoke are asked to do

  20. September 2013 Laboratory Safety Manual Section 7 -Safety Training

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilcock, William

    September 2013 Laboratory Safety Manual Section 7 - Safety Training UW Environmental Health and Safety Page 7-1 Section 7 - Safety Training Contents A. SAFETY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS ......................................................7-1 B. EH&S SAFETY TRAINING AND RECORDS ..............................................7-1 C

  1. Center for Intermodal Transportation Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Center for Intermodal Transportation Safety and Security Panagiotis Scarlatos, Ph.D., Director Transportation Safety and Security #12;Center for Intermodal Transportation Safety and Security Partners #12 evacuations · Tracking systems for hazardous materials Center for Intermodal Transportation Safety

  2. Safety Manual Prepared by the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    -3113 Emergency maintenance to report a water leak, electrical outage, non-working fume hood, etc. after normal Radiation and Laser Safety 19 Laser Safety 21 Compressed Gas and Cryogenic Safety 22 Electrical Safety 24

  3. Front Burner- Issue 14

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Cybersecurity Front Burner Issue No. 14 addresses the 2013 National Cybersecurity Awareness Month (NCSAM) Campaign and Phishing Scams.

  4. Front Burner- Issue 15

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Cybersecurity Front Burner Issue No. 15 addresses the DOE eSCRM Program and Secure Online Shopping.

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: Transportation Safety

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experimental Testing Phenomenological Modeling Risk and Safety Assessment Cyber-Based Vulnerability Assessments Uncertainty Analysis Transportation Safety Fire Science Human...

  6. Total Cross Section Measurements of Highly Enriched Isotopic Mo in the Resolved and Unresolved Energy Regions R.M. Bahran, A.M. Daskalakis, B.J. McDermott, E.J. Blain and Y. Danon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    Total Cross Section Measurements of Highly Enriched Isotopic Mo in the Resolved and Unresolved providing an evacuated pathway for the neutrons to travel. Isotopically-enriche advanced fuel [1,2]. High resolution neutron time-of-flight transmission measurements on highly enriched

  7. Total safety: A new safety culture to integrate nuclear safety and operational safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saji, G. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Murphy, G.A. [ed.

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The creation of a complete and thorough safety culture is proposed for the purpose of providing additional assurance about nuclear safety and improving the performance of nuclear power plants. The safety philosophy developed a combination of the former hardware-oriented nuclear safety approach and recent operational safety concepts. The improvement of the latter, after TMI-2 and Chernobyl, has been proven very effective in reducing the total risk associated with nuclear power plants. The first part of this article introduces a {open_quotes}total safety{close_quotes} concept. This extends the concept of {open_quotes}nuclear safety{close_quotes} and makes it closer to the public perception of safety. This concept is defined by means of a taxonomy of total safety. The second part of the article shows that total safety can be achieved by integrating it into a modern quality assurance (QA) system since it is tailored to make implementation into a framework of QA easier. The author believes that the outstanding success experienced by various industries as a result of introducing the modern QA system should lead to its application for ensuring the safety and performance of nuclear facilities. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Health and safety plan for operations performed for the Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trippet, W.A. II (IT Corp., (United States)); Reneau, M.; Morton, S.L. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document constitutes the generic health and safety plan for the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP). It addresses the health and safety requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA); Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) 29 CFR 1910.120 standard; and EG G Idaho, Inc. This plan is a guide to individuals who must complete a health and safety plan for a task performed for the EPR. It contains a task specific addendum that, when completed, specifically addresses task specific health and safety issues. This health and safety plan reduces the time it takes to write a task specific health and safety plan by providing discussions of requirements, guidance on where specific information is located, and specific topics in the Addendum that must be discussed at a task level. This format encourages a complete task specific health and safety plan and a standard for all health and safety plans written for ERP.

  9. Fusion safety program Annual report, Fiscal year 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Longhurst, G.R.; Cadwallader, L.C.; Carmack, W.J. [and others

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the major activities of the Fusion Safety Program in FY-95. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is the designated lead laboratory, and Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company is the prime contractor for this program. The Fusion Safety Program was initiated in 1979. Activities are conducted at the INEL, at other DOE laboratories, and at other institutions. Among the technical areas covered in this report are tritium safety, beryllium safety, chemical reactions and activation product release, safety aspects of fusion magnet systems, plasma disruptions, risk assessment failure rate database development, and safety code development and application to fusion safety issues. Most of this work has been done in support of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Also included in the report are summaries of the safety and environmental studies performed by the Fusion Safety Program for the Tokamak Physics Experiment and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor and the technical support for commercial fusion facility conceptual design studies. A final activity described is work to develop DOE Technical Standards for Safety of Fusion Test Facilities.

  10. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Safety Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following provides a summary of the specific issues addressed in this FY-95 Annual Update as they relate to the CH TRU safety bases: Executive Summary; Site Characteristics; Principal Design and Safety Criteria; Facility Design and Operation; Hazards and Accident Analysis; Derivation of Technical Safety Requirements; Radiological and Hazardous Material Protection; Institutional Programs; Quality Assurance; and Decontamination and Decommissioning. The System Design Descriptions`` (SDDS) for the WIPP were reviewed and incorporated into Chapter 3, Principal Design and Safety Criteria and Chapter 4, Facility Design and Operation. This provides the most currently available final engineering design information on waste emplacement operations throughout the disposal phase up to the point of permanent closure. Also, the criteria which define the TRU waste to be accepted for disposal at the WIPP facility were summarized in Chapter 3 based on the WAC for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant.`` This Safety Analysis Report (SAR) documents the safety analyses that develop and evaluate the adequacy of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Contact-Handled Transuranic Wastes (WIPP CH TRU) safety bases necessary to ensure the safety of workers, the public and the environment from the hazards posed by WIPP waste handling and emplacement operations during the disposal phase and hazards associated with the decommissioning and decontamination phase. The analyses of the hazards associated with the long-term (10,000 year) disposal of TRU and TRU mixed waste, and demonstration of compliance with the requirements of 40 CFR 191, Subpart B and 40 CFR 268.6 will be addressed in detail in the WIPP Final Certification Application scheduled for submittal in October 1996 (40 CFR 191) and the No-Migration Variance Petition (40 CFR 268.6) scheduled for submittal in June 1996. Section 5.4, Long-Term Waste Isolation Assessment summarizes the current status of the assessment.

  11. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Graywater Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melton, Rebecca; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    irrigation and decr,ease the amount of wastewater entering sewers or onsite wastewater treatment systems. Onsite wastewater treatment systems However, homeowners who irrigate their lawns with graywater need to understand the risks and safety issues.... Residential wastewater can be classified as either blackwater (sew- age containing fecal matter or food wastes) or graywater. If graywater is collected separately from blackwater, it can be dispersed as irrigation water with less treatment than...

  12. A CROSS-MATCH OF 2MASS AND SDSS. II. PECULIAR L DWARFS, UNRESOLVED BINARIES, AND THE SPACE DENSITY OF T DWARF SECONDARIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geissler, Kerstin; Metchev, Stanimir [Department of Physics and Astronomy, State University of New York, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3800 (United States); Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Berriman, G. Bruce [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, MC 100-22, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91225 (United States); Looper, Dagny, E-mail: geissler@astro.sunysb.edu [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the completion of a program to cross-correlate the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 1 (SDSS DR1) and Two-Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) Point Source Catalog in search for extremely red L and T dwarfs. The program was initiated by Metchev and collaborators, who presented the findings on all newly identified T dwarfs in SDSS DR1 and estimated the space density of isolated T0-T8 dwarfs in the solar neighborhood. In the current work, we present most of the L dwarf discoveries. Our red-sensitive (z - J {>=} 2.75 mag) cross-match proves to be efficient in detecting peculiarly red L dwarfs, adding two new ones, including one of the reddest known L dwarfs. Our search also nets a new peculiarly blue L7 dwarf and, surprisingly, two M8 dwarfs. We further broaden our analysis to detect unresolved binary L or T dwarfs through spectral template fitting to all L and T dwarfs presented here and in the earlier work by Metchev and collaborators. We identify nine probable binaries, six of which are new and eight harbor likely T dwarf secondaries. We combine this result with current knowledge of the mass ratio distribution and frequency of substellar companions to estimate an overall space density of 0.005-0.05 pc{sup -3} for individual T0-T8 dwarfs.

  13. Annual Report To Congress. Department of Energy Activities Relating to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, Calendar Year 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2004-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (Department) submits an Annual Report to Congress each year detailing the Department’s activities relating to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board), which provides advice and recommendations to the Secretary of Energy (Secretary) regarding public health and safety issues at the Department’s defense nuclear facilities. In 2003, the Department continued ongoing activities to resolve issues identified by the Board in formal recommendations and correspondence, staff issue reports pertaining to Department facilities, and public meetings and briefings. Additionally, the Department is implementing several key safety initiatives to address and prevent safety issues: safety culture and review of the Columbia accident investigation; risk reduction through stabilization of excess nuclear materials; the Facility Representative Program; independent oversight and performance assurance; the Federal Technical Capability Program (FTCP); executive safety initiatives; and quality assurance activities. The following summarizes the key activities addressed in this Annual Report.

  14. Early warning systems: An economic approach to dam safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, B.D. [National Weather Service Colorado River Basin Forecasting Center, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An early warning system can provide a relatively low-cost method for addressing dam safety issues. Bureau of Reclamation engineers have developed a systematic approach for designing warning systems while effectively balancing safety and economic concerns. Rather than addressing the dam itself, the system addresses the embayment and those meteorological/hydrological factors affecting the embayment. Characteristics of the mathematical model developed are addressed in this paper.

  15. Hydrogen Technologies Safety Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rivkin, C.; Burgess, R.; Buttner, W.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this guide is to provide basic background information on hydrogen technologies. It is intended to provide project developers, code officials, and other interested parties the background information to be able to put hydrogen safety in context. For example, code officials reviewing permit applications for hydrogen projects will get an understanding of the industrial history of hydrogen, basic safety concerns, and safety requirements.

  16. Front Burner- Issue 13

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Cybersecurity Front Burner Issue No. 13 contained a message from the Associate Chief Information Officer (ACIO) for Cybersecurity as well as a listing of recommended cybersecurity practices.

  17. Front Burner- Issue 18

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Cybersecurity Front Burner Issue No. 18 addresses keeping kids safe on the Internet, cyber crime, and DOE Cyber awareness and training initiatives.

  18. Interconnect Issues in NE

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers interconnect issues in the Northeast and is given at the Spring 2010 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting in Providence, Rhode Island.

  19. ISSUES MANAGEMENT PROGRAM MANUAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gravois, Melanie

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LBNL/PUB-5519 (1), Rev. 032 ISSUES MANAGEMENT PROGRAM MANUAL LBNL/PUB-5519 (1), Rev.Berkeley National Laboratory LBNL/PUB-5519 (1), Rev. 0

  20. Front Burner- Issue 16

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Cybersecurity Front Burner Issue No. 16 addresses Malware, the Worst Passwords of 2013, and the Flat Stanley and Stop.Think.Connect. Campaign.

  1. Aviation Management and Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish a policy framework that will ensure safety, efficiency and effectiveness of government or contractor aviation operations. Cancels DOE O 440.2B.

  2. Dam Safety Program (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Dam safety in Florida is a shared responsibility among the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP), the regional water management districts, the United States Army Corps of Engineers ...

  3. Battery Safety Testing

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Battery Safety Testing Christopher J. Orendorff, Leigh Anna M. Steele, Josh Lamb, and Scott Spangler Sandia National Laboratories 2014 Energy Storage Annual Merit Review...

  4. BNL | ATF Laser Safety

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    be continuously escorted by someone who has such training: The training consists of an eye exam, BNL general laser safety lecture, and formal ATF laser familiarization. Untrained...

  5. Coiled Tubing Safety Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crow, W.

    1999-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This document addresses safety concerns regarding the use of coiled tubing as it pertains to the preservation of personnel, environment and the wellbore.

  6. Safety Hazards of Batteries

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Safety Hazards of Batteries Battery technology is at the heart of much of our technological revolution. One of the most prevalent rechargeable batteries in use today is the...

  7. Pipeline Safety (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Public Service Commission has the authority enact regulations pertaining to pipeline safety. These regulations address pipeline monitoring, inspections, enforcement, and penalties.

  8. Intrastate Pipeline Safety (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations provide standards for gas and liquid pipeline maintenance and operating procedures, per the Federal Hazardous Liquid and Natural Gas Pipeline Safety Acts, and give the...

  9. Pipeline Safety (South Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The South Dakota Pipeline Safety Program, administered by the Public Utilities Commission, is responsible for regulating hazardous gas intrastate pipelines. Relevant legislation and regulations...

  10. Gas Safety Law (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This law authorizes the establishment of rules and regulations covering the design, fabrication, installation, inspection, testing and safety standards for installation, operation and maintenance...

  11. DOE Explosives Safety Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual describes DOE's explosives safety requirements applicable to operations involving the development, testing, handling, and processing of explosives or assemblies containing explosives.

  12. SAFEGUARDS AND SECURITY INTEGRATION WITH SAFETY ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hearn, J; James Lightner, J

    2007-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this paper is to share the Savannah River Site lessons learned on Safeguards and Security (S&S) program integration with K-Area Complex (KAC) safety basis. The KAC Documented Safety Analysis (DSA), is managed by the Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC), and the S&S program, managed by Wackenhut Services, Incorporated--Savannah River Site (WSI-SRS). WSRC and WSI-SRS developed a contractual arrangement to recognize WSI-SRS requirements in the KAC safety analysis. Design Basis Threat 2003 (DBT03) security upgrades required physical modifications and operational changes which included the availability of weapons which could potentially impact the facility safety analysis. The KAC DSA did not previously require explicit linkage to the S&S program to satisfy the safety analysis. WSI-SRS have contractual requirements with the Department of Energy (DOE) which are separate from WSRC contract requirements. The lessons learned will include a discussion on planning, analysis, approval of the controls and implementation issues.

  13. Savannah River Site K-Reactor Probabilistic Safety Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandyberry, M.D.; Bailey, R.T.; Baker, W.H.; Kearnaghan, D.P.; O`Kula, K.R.; Wittman, R.S.; Woody, N.D. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Amos, C.N.; Weingardt, J.J. [Science Applications International Corp. (United States)

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report gives the results of a Savannah River Site (SRS) K-Reactor Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA). Measures of adverse consequences to health and safety resulting from representations of severe accidents in SRS reactors are presented. In addition, the report gives a summary of the methods employed to represent these accidents and to assess the resultant consequences. The report is issued to provide useful information to the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) on the risk of operation of SRS reactors, for insights into severe accident phenomena that contribute to this risk, and in support of improved bases for other DOE programs in Heavy Water Reactor safety.

  14. Management of National Nuclear Power Programs for assured safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connolly, T.J. (ed.)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Topics discussed in this report include: nuclear utility organization; before the Florida Public Service Commission in re: St. Lucie Unit No. 2 cost recovery; nuclear reliability improvement and safety operations; nuclear utility management; training of nuclear facility personnel; US experience in key areas of nuclear safety; the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission - function and process; regulatory considerations of the risk of nuclear power plants; overview of the processes of reliability and risk management; management significance of risk analysis; international and domestic institutional issues for peaceful nuclear uses; the role of the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO); and nuclear safety activities of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

  15. Technical safety requirements for the Auxiliary Hot Cell Facility (AHCF).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seylar, Roland F.

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs) identify the operational conditions, boundaries, and administrative controls for the safe operation of the Auxiliary Hot Cell Facility (AHCF) at Sandia National Laboratories, in compliance with 10 CFR 830, 'Nuclear Safety Management.' The bases for the TSRs are established in the AHCF Documented Safety Analysis (DSA), which was issued in compliance with 10 CFR 830, Subpart B, 'Safety Basis Requirements.' The AHCF Limiting Conditions of Operation (LCOs) apply only to the ventilation system, the high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters, and the inventory. Surveillance Requirements (SRs) apply to the ventilation system, HEPA filters, and associated monitoring equipment; to certain passive design features; and to the inventory. No Safety Limits are necessary, because the AHCF is a Hazard Category 3 nuclear facility.

  16. in this issue Visualising

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    in this issue Visualising Evolutionary Search Spaces James McDermott Unshackling Evolution Nick just published new Master or PhD theses, if you want to let our community know how your workshop) that you wish to advertise, just drop me an email. In this issue we have a new article by James Mc

  17. Occupational Hygiene & Chemical Safety Division Department of Environmental Health & Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machel, Hans

    Occupational Hygiene & Chemical Safety Division Department of Environmental Health & Safety Risk all connections and fittings prior to start of anesthesia. Carefully pour Isoflurane from Environmental Health & Safety before re-entering the laboratory. REFERENCES 1. Procedure

  18. Sandia Energy - Risk and Safety Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Risk and Safety Assessment Home Stationary Power Nuclear Fuel Cycle Nuclear Energy Safety Technologies Risk and Safety Assessment Risk and Safety AssessmentTara...

  19. Office of Nuclear Facility Safety Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Nuclear Facility Safety Programs establishes nuclear safety requirements related to safety management programs that are essential to the safety of DOE nuclear facilities.

  20. Facility Safety - DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Change, Safety, The order establishes facility and programmatic safety requirements for nuclear and explosives safety design criteria, fire protection, criticality safety,...

  1. Integrated Safety Management Policy

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The policy establishes DOE's expectation for safety, including integrated safety management that will enable the Department’s mission goals to be accomplished efficiently while ensuring safe operations at all departmental facilities and activities. Cancels DOE P 411.1, DOE P 441.1, DOE P 450.2A, DOE P 450.4, and DOE P 450.7

  2. SECURITY AND FIRE SAFETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    ANNUAL SECURITY AND FIRE SAFETY REPORT 2014 #12;2 Boise State University 2014 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report From the Vice President for Campus Operations and General Counsel At Boise State University, we are committed to providing a safe and secure environment for students, staff

  3. Safety of Accelerator Facilities

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish accelerator-specific safety requirements which, when supplemented by other applicable safety and health requirements, will serve to prevent injuries and illnesses associated with Department of Energy (DOE) or National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) accelerator operations. Cancels DOE O 420.2A. Certified 5-13-08. Canceled by DOE O 420.2C.

  4. Safety of Accelerator Facilities

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The order defines accelerators and establishes accelerator specific safety requirements and approval authorities which, when supplemented by other applicable safety and health requirements, promote safe operations to ensure protection of workers, the public, and the environment. Cancels DOE O 420.2B.

  5. Safety of Accelerator Facilities

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish accelerator-specific safety requirements which, when supplemented by other applicable safety and health requirements, will serve to prevent injuries and illnesses associated with Department of Energy (DOE) or National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) accelerator operations. Cancels DOE O 420.2. Canceled by DOE O 420.2B.

  6. K Basin safety analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porten, D.R.; Crowe, R.D.

    1994-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this accident safety analysis is to document in detail, analyses whose results were reported in summary form in the K Basins Safety Analysis Report WHC-SD-SNF-SAR-001. The safety analysis addressed the potential for release of radioactive and non-radioactive hazardous material located in the K Basins and their supporting facilities. The safety analysis covers the hazards associated with normal K Basin fuel storage and handling operations, fuel encapsulation, sludge encapsulation, and canister clean-up and disposal. After a review of the Criticality Safety Evaluation of the K Basin activities, the following postulated events were evaluated: Crane failure and casks dropped into loadout pit; Design basis earthquake; Hypothetical loss of basin water accident analysis; Combustion of uranium fuel following dryout; Crane failure and cask dropped onto floor of transfer area; Spent ion exchange shipment for burial; Hydrogen deflagration in ion exchange modules and filters; Release of Chlorine; Power availability and reliability; and Ashfall.

  7. Occupational Hygiene & Chemical Safety Division Department of Environmental Health & Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machel, Hans

    Occupational Hygiene & Chemical Safety Division Department of Environmental Health & Safety Risk (most common ­ personal hygiene very important); d) storage ­ leaks; and e) waste ­ storage and disposal

  8. CRAD, Facility Safety- Nuclear Facility Safety Basis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) that can be used for assessment of a contractor's Nuclear Facility Safety Basis.

  9. CRAD, Facility Safety- Technical Safety Requirements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) that can be used for assessment of a contractor's Technical Safety Requirments (TSA).

  10. COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program Medical Center - T: 212-305-0303 F: 212 Psychiatric Institute Radiation Safety Office (Please complete this form within 24 hours and send a copy to your supervisor and The Radiation Safety Office) Your Name

  11. Normalization of Process Safety Metrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Mengtian

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    and organizational risks, there is an emerging need to evaluate the process safety implementation across an organization through measurements. Thus, the process safety metric is applied as a powerful tool that measures safety activities, status, and performance...

  12. Use of Administrative Controls for Specific Safety Functions, 10/21/03.

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On December 11,2002, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board issued Recommendation 2002-3. Recommendation 2002-3 noted concerns about the lack of rigor and quality assurance accorded some...

  13. Memorandum, Personal Commitment to Health and Safety through Leadership, Employee Engagement, and Organizational Learning

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Secretary of Energy Ernest J. Moniz and Deputy Secretary Daniel B. Poneman recently issued a joint Memorandum, entitled Personal Commitment to Health and Safety through Leadership, Employee Engagement, and Organizational Learning.

  14. Southern Enclave Issue 41

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ISSUE 41 SPRING 1995 Crossing the Jundland Wastes: The Last Trek A Journey Through Star Wars Fandom's Golden Age .Maggie Nowakowska Issue 15116, September 1983 When the fmal issue of Jundland Wastes appears at the end of summer 1983, fans have... remain in place-at least throughout Luke and Leia's lifetimes. For the first time, fans begin to wonder if SW fandom will continue past the release of ROTJ. Once the story is resolved, they ask, will fans still be interested in SW? Without...

  15. Environmental Health and Safety Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Fire Safety, Radiation Safety and Hazardous Materials Facility are at other locations on campus Training Requirements If you work with: · Biological Materials · Chemical Agents · Radiological Materials

  16. Safety Culture in Nuclear Installations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    IAEA-TECDOC-1329 Safety Culture in Nuclear Installations, Guidance for use in the Enhancement of Safety Culture, International Atomic Energy Agency IAEA, December 2002.

  17. Industrial Safety | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    such as machine guarding, personal protective equipment (PPE), electrical safety, accident prevention and investigation, building design and code review, fire safety, and...

  18. Gordon wins NNSA Safety Professional

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in electrical safety at the Laboratory and across the DOE complex," said Industrial Hygiene and Safety manager Theresa Cull. "I am very pleased that NNSA has recognized Lloyd's...

  19. Developed 2007 _____________________________ Environment, Health, & Safety _________ __________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisen, Michael

    _________ __________________ Training Program EHS 300~ Fiber optic Safety Course Syllabus Subject Category: Industrial Hygiene Course Alignment EH&S Website: Industrial Hygiene/Laser Safety Group - http

  20. Proceedings of the international meeting on thermal nuclear reactor safety. Vol. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Separate abstracts are included for each of the papers presented concerning current issues in nuclear power plant safety; national programs in nuclear power plant safety; radiological source terms; probabilistic risk assessment methods and techniques; non LOCA and small-break-LOCA transients; safety goals; pressurized thermal shocks; applications of reliability and risk methods to probabilistic risk assessment; human factors and man-machine interface; and data bases and special applications.

  1. Lyapunov-Based Distributed Control of the Safety Factor Profile in a Tokamak Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Lyapunov-Based Distributed Control of the Safety Factor Profile in a Tokamak Plasma Federico safety-factor profile in a tokamak plasma. Using relevant physical models and simplifying assumptions within a tokamak plasma is a key issue to achieve (and maintain) in a safe manner high

  2. UCSD POLICY AND PROCEDURE MANUAL SECTION 516-14 PAGE 1 ENVIRONMENT, HEALTH & SAFETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aluwihare, Lihini

    /10/2011 Supersedes: 5/1/1998 Issuing Office: Environment, Health & Safety HAZARDOUS WASTE AND MATERIAL MANAGEMENT I for chemical, high hazard, radioactive, and biological wastes. Personnel safety, requirements of the law Materials storage and Hazardous Waste disposal shall be in accordance with procedures established

  3. French Guidelines for Structural Safety of Gravity Dams in a Semi-probabilistic Format

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    French Guidelines for Structural Safety of Gravity Dams in a Semi-probabilistic Format Paul Royet1 the French Committee on Dams and Reservoirs ­ FrCOLD - issued provisional guidelines for structural safety of gravity dams. It was the first attempt to produce a semi-probabilistic limit-state method for the design

  4. Cogeneration Operational Issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, M.

    operations. Other operational issues also include utility transmission planning, generation planning and fuel mix decisions. All of these operational problems have an impact on the ratepayer in regard to quality of electric service and future rates. Both...

  5. Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Pengcheng

    Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for X-ray Users for Physics 461 & 462 Protocol Title: Basic Radiation Safety Training for X-ray Users Drafted By: Chris Millsaps, RSS Reviewers: ZB, TU, GS Purpose: To provide basic radiation safety training to the users of x-ray producing

  6. Safety Criteria and Safety Lifecycle for Artificial Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Tim

    Safety Criteria and Safety Lifecycle for Artificial Neural Networks Zeshan Kurd, Tim Kelly and Jim. The paper also presents a safety lifecycle for artificial neural networks. This lifecycle focuses, knowledge. INTRODUCTION Artificial neural networks (ANNs) are used in many safety-related applications

  7. Report on the handling of safety information concerning flammable gases and ferrocyanide at the Hanford waste tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses concerns safety issues, and management at Hanford Tank Farm. Concerns center on the issue of flammable gas generation which could ignite, and on possible exothermic reactions of ferrocyanide compounds which were added to single shell tanks in the 1950's. It is believed that information concerning these issues has been mis-handled and the problems poorly managed. (CBS)

  8. A semiotic analysis of biotechnology and food safety photographs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norwood, Jennifer Lynn

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This study evaluated photographs used in Time, Newsweek, and U.S. News and World Report in stories about biotechnology and food safety issues from the years 2000 and 2001. This study implemented a semiotic methodology to determine if the messages...

  9. Resources Referenced 4/18/2012 Laboratory Safety Colloquium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    fire. The issue at UCLA was a lack of job-specific training, not general lab safety training. Grasgreen Claims Act seeking to recover for injuries he sustained in a laboratory explosion. This lays out what grad student injured when a beaker full of mercury perchlorate hydrate caused an explosion. Martino

  10. Office of River Protection Integrated Safety Management System Description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CLARK, D.L.

    1999-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Revision O was never issued. Finding safe and environmentally sound methods of storage and disposal of 54 million gallons of highly radioactive waste contained in 177 underground tanks is the largest challenge of Hanford cleanup. TWRS was established in 1991 and continues to integrate all aspects of the treatment and management of the high-level radioactive waste tanks. In fiscal Year 1997, program objectives were advanced in a number of areas. RL TWRS refocused the program toward retrieving, treating, and immobilizing the tank wastes, while maintaining safety as first priority. Moving from a mode of storing the wastes to getting the waste out of the tanks will provide the greatest cleanup return on the investment and eliminate costly mortgage continuance. There were a number of safety-related achievements in FY1997. The first high priority safety issue was resolved with the removal of 16 tanks from the ''Wyden Watch List''. The list, brought forward by Senator Ron Wyden of Oregon, identified various Hanford safety issues needing attention. One of these issues was ferrocyanide, a chemical present in 24 tanks. Although ferrocyanide can ignite at high temperature, analysis found that the chemical has decomposed into harmless compounds and is no longer a concern.

  11. Laser Safety Management Policy Statement ............................................................................................................1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidson, Fordyce A.

    Laser Safety Management Policy Statement...........................................................2 Laser Users.............................................................................................................2 Unit Laser Safety Officer (ULSO

  12. East Carolina University ENVIRONMENTAL SAFETY COMMITTEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as workers' compensation, accident prevention, industrial hygiene, occupational safety, fire and life safety

  13. Aviation Management and Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish a policy framework that will ensure safety, efficiency and effectiveness of government or contractor aviation operations. Cancels DOE O 440.2B. Admin Chg 1, dated 6-22-11, cancels DOE O 440.2C.

  14. Carbon Monoxide Safety Tips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Bryan W.; Garcia, Monica L.

    1999-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Protect yourself and your family from the deadly effects of carbon monoxide--a colorless, odorless poisonous gas. This publication describes the warning signs of carbon monoxide exposure and includes a home safety checklist....

  15. Dam Safety Regulation (Mississippi)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of the Dam Safety Regulation is to ensure that all dams constructed in the state of Mississippi are permitted and thus do not potentially harm wildlife, water supplies and property. ...

  16. High Voltage Safety Act

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of the High Voltage Safety Act is to prevent injury to persons and property and interruptions of utility service resulting from accidental or inadvertent contact with high-voltage...

  17. Packaging and Transportation Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials andor modal transport. Cancels DOE 1540.2 and DOE 5480.3

  18. Packaging and Transportation Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of Department of Energy (DOE) offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport. Canceled by DOE 460.1A

  19. Packaging and Transportation Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of Department of Energy (DOE) offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport. Cancels DOE O 460.1.

  20. Promulgating Nuclear Safety Requirements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Applies to all Nuclear Safety Requirements Adopted by the Department to Govern the Conduct of its Nuclear Activities. Cancels DOE P 410.1. Canceled by DOE N 251.85.

  1. Reliability and Safety

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE solar reliability and safety research and development (R&D) focuses on testing photovoltaic (PV) modules, inverters, and systems for long-term performance, and helping investors, consumers,...

  2. Nuclear Explosive Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This Department of Energy (DOE) Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive safety (NES) elements of DOE O 452.1E, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program, or successor directive, for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations (NEOs).

  3. Nuclear Explosive Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive safety (NES) elements of DOE O 452.1E, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program, for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations (NEOs).

  4. Complete Experiment Safety Documentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Safety Sheet If you did not submit a General User Proposal, you must submit an ESS one month prior to arrival at the ALS. 2. Biological, Radioactive, and Hazardous...

  5. Dam Safety (North Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    North Carolina Administrative Code Title 15A, Subchapter 2K lays out further regulations for the design, approval, construction, maintenance, and inspection of dams to ensure public safety and...

  6. Safety | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Safety Argonne National Laboratory and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) are very concerned about the well-being of all employees. Students at the undergraduate and graduate...

  7. Safety in Buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheon, N. B.

    Building codes are essentially sets of safety regulations in respect of structure, fire, and health. They were originally developed in response to frequently demonstrated hazards of structural collapse, catastrophic fires, ...

  8. Nuclear Safety (Pennsylvania)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Nuclear Safety Division conducts a comprehensive nuclear power plant oversight review program of the nine reactors at the five nuclear power sites in Pennsylvania. It also monitors the...

  9. Nuclear Explosive Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The directive provides supplemental details to support the requirements of DOE O 452.2C, Nuclear Explosive Safety, dated 6-12-06. Canceled by DOE M 452.2-1A.

  10. Safety Basis Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.J. Garrett

    2002-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the internal Integrated Safety Management Assessment verification process, it was determined that there was a lack of documentation that summarizes the safety basis of the current Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) site characterization activities. It was noted that a safety basis would make it possible to establish a technically justifiable graded approach to the implementation of the requirements identified in the Standards/Requirements Identification Document. The Standards/Requirements Identification Documents commit a facility to compliance with specific requirements and, together with the hazard baseline documentation, provide a technical basis for ensuring that the public and workers are protected. This Safety Basis Report has been developed to establish and document the safety basis of the current site characterization activities, establish and document the hazard baseline, and provide the technical basis for identifying structures, systems, and components (SSCs) that perform functions necessary to protect the public, the worker, and the environment from hazards unique to the YMP site characterization activities. This technical basis for identifying SSCs serves as a grading process for the implementation of programs such as Conduct of Operations (DOE Order 5480.19) and the Suspect/Counterfeit Items Program. In addition, this report provides a consolidated summary of the hazards analyses processes developed to support the design, construction, and operation of the YMP site characterization facilities and, therefore, provides a tool for evaluating the safety impacts of changes to the design and operation of the YMP site characterization activities.

  11. Radiation Safety Annual Refresher Training

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    Radiation Safety Annual Refresher Training Radiation Protection Division Department of Environmental Health & Safety #12;Topics in Radiation Safety (applicable RPD Manual sections indicated) User;Topics in Radiation Safety (applicable RPD Manual sections indicated) User and Non-user topics Types

  12. Toolbox Safety Talk Lead Awareness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    Toolbox Safety Talk Lead Awareness Environmental Health & Safety Facilities Safety & Health Section Health & Safety for recordkeeping. Lead based paint is commonly found in homes built before 1978 and many industrial paints today still contain lead. Lead overexposure is one of the leading causes of workplace

  13. School of Forest Safety Training

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Andrew

    ) · Laboratories: ­ Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) for chemicals ­ Chemical hygiene plan (CHP) manual

  14. Radioisotope thermoelectric generator reliability and safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, R.; Klein, J.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are numerous occasions when a planetary mission requires energy in remote areas of the solar system. Anytime power is required much beyond Mars or the Asteroid Belts, solar power is not an option. The radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) was developed for such a mission requirement. It is a relatively small and lightweight power source that can produce power under adverse conditions. Just this type of source has become the backbone of the power system for far outer plant exploration. Voyagers I and II are utilizing RTGs, which will soon power the Galileo spacecraft to Jupiter and the Ulysses spacecraft to study the solar poles. The paper discusses RTG operation including thermoelectric design, converter design, general-purpose heat source; RTG reliability including design, testing, experience, and launch approval; and RTG safety issues and methods of ensuring safety.

  15. Safety and Nonsafety Communications and Interactions in International Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kisner, Roger A [ORNL; Mullens, James Allen [ORNL; Wilson, Thomas L [ORNL; Wood, Richard Thomas [ORNL; Korsah, Kofi [ORNL; Qualls, A L [ORNL; Muhlheim, Michael David [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Loebl, Andy [ORNL

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current industry and NRC guidance documents such as IEEE 7-4.3.2, Reg. Guide 1.152, and IEEE 603 do not sufficiently define a level of detail for evaluating interdivisional communications independence. The NRC seeks to establish criteria for safety systems communications that can be uniformly applied in evaluation of a variety of safety system designs. This report focuses strictly on communication issues related to data sent between safety systems and between safety and nonsafety systems. Further, the report does not provide design guidance for communication systems nor present detailed failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) results for existing designs. This letter report describes communications between safety and nonsafety systems in nuclear power plants outside the United States. A limited study of international nuclear power plants was conducted to ascertain important communication implementations that might have bearing on systems proposed for licensing in the United States. This report provides that following information: 1.communications types and structures used in a representative set of international nuclear power reactors, and 2.communications issues derived from standards and other source documents relevant to safety and nonsafety communications. Topics that are discussed include the following: communication among redundant safety divisions, communications between safety divisions and nonsafety systems, control of safety equipment from a nonsafety workstation, and connection of nonsafety programming, maintenance, and test equipment to redundant safety divisions during operation. Information for this report was obtained through publicly available sources such as published papers and presentations. No proprietary information is represented.

  16. Safety Assessment of PowerBeam Flywheel Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Starbuck, J Michael [ORNL; Hansen, James Gerald [ORNL

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The greatest technical challenge facing the developer of vehicular flywheel systems is the issue of safety. The PowerBeam flywheel system concept, developed by HyKinesys Inc., employs a pair of high aspect ratio, counter-rotating flywheels to provide surge power for hybrid vehicle applications. The PowerBeam approach to safety is to design flywheels conservatively so as to avoid full rotor burst failure modes. A conservative point design was sized for use in a mid-size sedan such as a Chevrolet Malibu. The PowerBeam rotor rims were designed with a steel tube covered by a carbon fiber reinforced composite tube. ORNL conducted rotor design analyses using both nested ring and finite element analysis design codes. The safety factor of the composite material was 7, while that of the steel was greater than 3. The design exceeded the PNGV recommendation for a safety factor of at least 4 for composite material to prevent flywheel burst.

  17. Transactions of the nineteenth water reactor safety information meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, A.J. (comp.)

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains summaries of papers on reactor safety research to be presented at the 19th Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel in Bethesda, Maryland, October 28--30, 1991. The summaries briefly describe the programs and results of nuclear safety research sponsored by the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, USNRC. Summaries of invited papers concerning nuclear safety issues from US government laboratories, the electric utilities, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the nuclear industry, and from the governments and industry in Europe and Japan are also included. The summaries have been compiled in one report to provide a basis for meaningful discussion and information exchange during the course of the meeting, and are given in the order of their presentation in each session. The individual summaries have been cataloged separately.

  18. Software reliability and safety in nuclear reactor protection systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence, J.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Planning the development, use and regulation of computer systems in nuclear reactor protection systems in such a way as to enhance reliability and safety is a complex issue. This report is one of a series of reports from the Computer Safety and Reliability Group, Lawrence Livermore that investigates different aspects of computer software in reactor National Laboratory, that investigates different aspects of computer software in reactor protection systems. There are two central themes in the report, First, software considerations cannot be fully understood in isolation from computer hardware and application considerations. Second, the process of engineering reliability and safety into a computer system requires activities to be carried out throughout the software life cycle. The report discusses the many activities that can be carried out during the software life cycle to improve the safety and reliability of the resulting product. The viewpoint is primarily that of the assessor, or auditor.

  19. The Fix Issue 11

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiple Contributors

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -Anne Hartwick "Untangled" by Monica Rose Kiesel "Muderward Tag Version I" "Muderward Tag Version II" "Gift from the Sea" by B.N. Fish "Dum Vivimus, Vivamus" by Jennet Morgan "Sands of Time" by Leah Starsky "Foolish Dreams, Futile Hopes" by Elizabeth Lowry... "Distant Snores" by Paula Smith "Exile to Freedom, Chapter 3" by Martha J. Bonds "A Place in the Sun, Part I" by Lynna Bright SVE THE FIX is $5 per issue or $20 for a 3 issue subscription. Order from Carol Davis, 5 Paca Place, Rockville, MD 20852...

  20. Missing Links Issue 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiple Contributors

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of newcomers (to our zines), Angelika and Barb. Lots of art this issue! And we noted it seems to be a bit of a Blair issue, art­ wise, this time around. That doesn't mean we don't have beautiful picrures of His Jimness, but Blair just hogged the limelight... to the forefront of his brain at the worst times. "/ gave you 8 place to live, / found you a job. " Blair closed the laptop with a slap. He glanced at the dis­ sertation lying accusingly next to the gray computer. Jim had apologized in the only way he could...

  1. 3742SPACE ISSUES AND RESOLUTION PROCEDURE Space issue or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page 1 3742SPACE ISSUES AND RESOLUTION PROCEDURE Space issue or conflict identified Do any of the strategies mitigate issue/conflict Complete Conflict Resolution Form Submit form to Space Management Office Space Management Office conduct issue/conflict analysis Space Management Office document possible

  2. Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Laser Safety

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000ConsumptionInnovationEnvironment, Safety andBerkeley LabERPEHS

  3. DOE explosives safety manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) policy requires that all DOE activities be conducted in a manner that protects the safety of the public and provides a safe and healthful workplace for employees. DOE has also prescribed that all personnel be protected in any explosives operation undertaken. The level of safety provided shall be at least equivalent to that of the best industrial practice. The risk of death or serious injury shall be limited to the lowest practicable minimum. DOE and contractors shall continually review their explosives operations with the aim of achieving further refinements and improvements in safety practices and protective features. This manual describes the Department's explosive safety requirements applicable to operations involving the development, testing, handling, and processing of explosives or assemblies containing explosives. It is intended to reflect the state-of-the-art in explosives safety. In addition, it is essential that applicable criteria and requirements for implementing this policy be readily available and known to those responsible for conducting DOE programs.

  4. Dragonchoice Issue 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Upton, Faye

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    rider in the Weyr who has issues with L’dro’s leadership, Kamen,” said C’mine. “You’re just the one who’s best placed to do something about it.” “And if Valonna can be brought round too…” C’los slapped his hands suddenly together. “We get L...

  5. Environmental Compliance Issue Coordination

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1993-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish the Department of Energy (DOE) requirements for coordination of significant environmental compliance issues to ensure timely development and consistent application of Departmental environmental policy and guidance. Cancels DOE O 5400.2. Para. 5a(2) and 5a(7) canceled by DOE O 231.1.

  6. of Colorado's Special Issue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Report on the Health of Colorado's Forests Special Issue 2005 Aspen Forests #12;2005 Report the ecology and management of the state's aspen forests and provides an expanded insect and disease update in the management of Colorado's trademark aspen forests. Many of the state's aspen stands are reaching the end

  7. Audit Report The Procurement of Safety Class/Safety-Significant Items at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy operates several nuclear facilities at its Savannah River Site, and several additional facilities are under construction. This includes the National Nuclear Security Administration's Tritium Extraction Facility (TEF) which is designated to help maintain the reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MOX Facility) is being constructed to manufacture commercial nuclear reactor fuel assemblies from weapon-grade plutonium oxide and depleted uranium. The Interim Salt Processing (ISP) project, managed by the Office of Environmental Management, will treat radioactive waste. The Department has committed to procuring products and services for nuclear-related activities that meet or exceed recognized quality assurance standards. Such standards help to ensure the safety and performance of these facilities. To that end, it issued Departmental Order 414.1C, Quality Assurance (QA Order). The QA Order requires the application of Quality Assurance Requirements for Nuclear Facility Applications (NQA-1) for nuclear-related activities. The NQA-1 standard provides requirements and guidelines for the establishment and execution of quality assurance programs during the siting, design, construction, operation, and decommissioning of nuclear facilities. These requirements, promulgated by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, must be applied to 'safety-class' and 'safety-significant' structures, systems and components (SSCs). Safety-class SSCs are defined as those necessary to prevent exposure off site and to protect the public. Safety-significant SSCs are those whose failure could irreversibly impact worker safety such as a fatality, serious injury, or significant radiological or chemical exposure. Due to the importance of protecting the public, workers, and environment, we initiated an audit to determine whether the Department of Energy procured safety-class and safety-significant SSCs that met NQA-1 standards at the Savannah River Site. Our review disclosed that the Department had procured and installed safety-class and safety-significant SSCs that did not meet NQA-1 quality standards. Specifically, we identified multiple instances in which critical components did not meet required quality and safety standards. For example: (1) Three structural components were procured and installed by the prime contractor at Savannah River during construction of the MOX Facility that did not meet the technical specifications for items relied on for safety. These substandard items necessitated costly and time consuming remedial action to, among other things, ensure that nonconforming materials and equipment would function within safety margins; (2) In six instances, items used in the construction of TEF failed to satisfy quality standards. In one of these situations, operating procedures had to be modified to ensure that the problem item did not compromise safety; and (3) Finally, at the ISP, one component that did not meet quality standards was procured. The failure of the item could have resulted in a spill of up to 15,000 gallons of high-level radioactive waste. Based on an extensive examination of relevant internal controls and procurement practices, we concluded that these failures were attributable to inadequate attention to quality assurance at Savannah River. Simply put, Departmental controls were not adequate to prevent and/or detect quality assurance problems. For example, Federal and prime contractor officials did not expressly require that subcontractors or lower-tiered vendors comply with quality assurance requirements. Additionally, management did not effectively communicate quality assurance concerns between the several Departmental program elements operating at Savannah River. The procurement and installation of these nonconforming components resulted in cost increases. For example, as of October 2008, the MOX Facility had incurred costs of more than $680,000 due to problems associated with the procurement of $11 million of nonconforming safety-class reinforcing steel.

  8. Measure Guideline: Combustion Safety for Natural Draft Appliances Through Appliance Zone Isolation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzgerald, J.; Bohac, D.

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This measure guideline covers how to assess and carry out the isolation of natural draft combustion appliances from the conditioned space of low-rise residential buildings. It deals with combustion appliances located either within the living space in enclosed closets or side rooms or outside the living space in an adjacent area like an attic or garage. This subset of houses does not require comprehensive combustion safety tests and simplified prescriptive procedures can be used to address safety concerns. This allows residential energy retrofit contractors inexperienced in advanced combustion safety testing to effectively address combustion safety issues and allow energy retrofits including tightening and changes to distribution and ventilation systems to proceed.

  9. Seismic Safety Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eagling, D.G. (ed.)

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This guide provides managers with practical guidelines for administering a comprehensive earthquake safety program. The Guide is comprehensive with respect to earthquakes in that it covers the most important aspects of natural hazards, site planning, evaluation and rehabilitation of existing buildings, design of new facilities, operational safety, emergency planning, special considerations related to shielding blocks, non-structural elements, lifelines, fire protection and emergency facilities. Management of risk and liabilities is also covered. Nuclear facilities per se are not dealt with specifically. The principles covered also apply generally to nuclear facilities but the design and construction of such structures are subject to special regulations and legal controls.

  10. Safety for Users

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited ReleaseWelcome ton nSafeguardsUpdates >-SafetySafety

  11. Safety in Numbers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements RecentlyElectronicResourcesjobsJuly throughR EMaterials (CRM)SafetySafety

  12. Safety aspects of EB melting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hainz, L.C. [Hainz Engineering Services, Inc., Albany, OR (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron Beam melting technology, along with other vacuum metallurgical technologies, requires special attention to safety involving operation and maintenance of the EB furnace and systems. Although the EB industry has been relatively accident free, the importance of safety awareness and compliance becomes increasingly important. It is very important to provide a safe work environment for employees and economically important to protect the equipment from damage and potential downtime. Safety and accident prevention directly affects overhead costs by keeping accident insurance rates at a minimum. Routine safety requirements will be reviewed and safety aspects requiring extra attention will be addressed. Safety improvements and experiences of furnace users will be shared as examples.

  13. Issues in Purchasing and Maintaining Intrinsic Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PETTIT,RICHARD B.; JAEGER,KLAUS; EHRLICH,CHARLES D.

    2000-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Intrinsic standards are widely used in the metrology community because they realize the best level uncertainty for many metrology parameters. For some intrinsic standards, recommended practices have been developed to assist metrologists in the selection of equipment and the development of appropriate procedures in order to realize the intrinsic standard. As with the addition of any new standard, the metrology laboratory should consider the pros and cons relative to their needs before purchasing the standard so that the laboratory obtains the maximum benefit from setting up and maintaining these standards. While the specific issues that need to be addressed depend upon the specific intrinsic standard and the level of realization, general issues that should be considered include ensuring that the intrinsic standard is compatible with the laboratory environment, that the standard is compatible with the current and future workload, and whether additional support standards will be required in order to properly maintain the intrinsic standard. When intrinsic standards are used to realize the best level of uncertainty for a specific metrology parameter, they usually require critical and important maintenance activities. These activities can including training of staff in the system operation, as well as safety procedures; performing periodic characterization measurements to ensure proper system operation; carrying out periodic intercomparisons with similar intrinsic standards so that proper operation is demonstrated; and maintaining control or trend charts of system performance. This paper has summarized many of these important issues and therefore should be beneficial to any laboratory that is considering the purchase of an intrinsic standard.

  14. IDIC Issue 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muir, Lynette

    spealdng. No-one is to make a move that will en- . danger the safety of shipTs personnel,lf he ordered. IlNor is there to be aDy attempt to resoue IVlr Spook or myself. You have the oon, IVlr Scott.!l The three Orions closed in round the manaoled.... II ITWhat?11 Kirk looked blank a moment then grasped her meaning and sagged dOl'll, bending his knees slightly and turning' to face the screen so that his face could be seen clearly. Spock activated the reverse viewer, ?so that the Romulans...

  15. Plant maintenance and plant life extension issue, 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

    2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of the March-April issue is on plant maintenance and plant life extension. Major articles/reports in this issue include: Three proposed COLs expected in 2007, by Dale E. Klein, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Delivering behaviors that our customers value, by Jack Allen, Westinghouse Electric Company; Facilitating high-level and fuel waste disposal technologies, by Malcolm Gray, IAEA, Austria; Plant life management and long-term operation, by Pal Kovacs, OECD-NEA, France; Measuring control rod position, by R. Taymanov, K. Sapozhnikova, I. Druzhinin, D.I. Mendeleyev, Institue for Metrology, Russia; and, 'Modernization' means higher safety, by Svetlana Genova, Kozluduy NPP plc, Bulgaria.

  16. Nuclear Safety Information Dashboard | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Nuclear Safety Information Dashboard Nuclear Safety Information Dashboard The Nuclear Safety Information (NSI) Dashboard provides a new user interface to the Occurrence Reporting...

  17. Safety Interlocks Group - Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Info APS Safety Page ESH Safety Manual Safety Interlocks Systems ACIS PSS FEEPS BLEPS UPS Division Links APS Organization Chart Beamlines Directory APS Engineering Support...

  18. Nuclear Explosive Safety Manual - DOE Directives, Delegations...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1A Admin Chg 1, Nuclear Explosive Safety Manual by Carl Sykes Functional areas: Administrative Change, Defense Nuclear Facility Safety and Health Requirement, Nuclear Safety,...

  19. Materials integration issues for high performance fusion power systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, D. L.

    1998-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the primary requirements for the development of fusion as an energy source is the qualification of materials for the frost wall/blanket system that will provide high performance and exhibit favorable safety and environmental features. Both economic competitiveness and the environmental attractiveness of fusion will be strongly influenced by the materials constraints. A key aspect is the development of a compatible combination of materials for the various functions of structure, tritium breeding, coolant, neutron multiplication and other special requirements for a specific system. This paper presents an overview of key materials integration issues for high performance fusion power systems. Issues such as: chemical compatibility of structure and coolant, hydrogen/tritium interactions with the plasma facing/structure/breeder materials, thermomechanical constraints associated with coolant/structure, thermal-hydraulic requirements, and safety/environmental considerations from a systems viewpoint are presented. The major materials interactions for leading blanket concepts are discussed.

  20. Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Pengcheng

    Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for Sealed Source Users for Physics 461 Protocol Title: Training for Sealed Source Users Drafted By: Chris Millsaps, RSS Reviewers: ZB, TU, GS Purpose: To provide basic radiation safety training to the users of sealed sources located

  1. SAFETY PROCEDURE & GUIDELINES SUBJECT: Health and Safety Training

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinnamon, Gordon J.

    SAFETY PROCEDURE & GUIDELINES SUBJECT: Health and Safety Training APPLIES TO: All Departments that the health and safety training program is effective and is in compliance with the applicable federal for conducting training Establish who is responsible for determining the level and type of training required

  2. Radiation Safety Manual Dec 2012 Page 1 RADIATION SAFETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grishok, Alla

    of External and Internal Doses E. Reports and Notices to Workers Chapter VII: Radiation ProtectionRadiation Safety Manual ­ Dec 2012 Page 1 RADIATION SAFETY MANUAL For Columbia University NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital New York State Psychiatric Institute Barnard College December 2012 #12;Radiation Safety Manual

  3. Safety and Security What do Safety/Security work with?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Safety and Security on campus #12;Agenda · What do Safety/Security work with? · If something happens · Opening hours · Remember · Website · How to find us #12;The Section for Safety and Security work with; · Security revolving work environment · Handle locks, keys, alarms, surveillance · Responsible

  4. Software Safety Tutorial Status Update 1 Software Safety Tutorial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, Jeff

    Software Safety Tutorial Status Update 1 Software Safety Tutorial (Status Update) Jeff Tian, tian@engr.smu.edu CSE, SMU, Dallas, TX 75275 Topics · Project Overview · Software Safety Overview · Project Tasks competency for real-time software engineers. · Project team: Jeff Tian (SMU): Basics of SSE D.T. Huynh

  5. Safety Lifecycle for Developing Safety Critical Artificial Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Tim

    Safety Lifecycle for Developing Safety Critical Artificial Neural Networks Zeshan Kurd, Tim Kelly.kelly}@cs.york.ac.uk Abstract. Artificial neural networks are employed in many areas of industry such as medicine and defence a safety lifecycle for artificial neural networks. The lifecycle fo- cuses on managing behaviour

  6. Interphase Issue 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiple Contributors

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    '? 0; ia M his issue cledicated to MKRY MKNCHESTER / 6& INTERPHASE 4, a Star Trek fanzine, is edited by Connie Faddis 5731 Kentucky Ave. Pittsburgh PA 15232 Because of some adult-interest materials, this fanzine will not knowingly be sold... Mularski Becca Oroukin Celeste Henkel Mary Ann Bentz Monica Miller PRINTING Copy Cat, Inc. Forbes Ave. Pittsburgh, PA Copyright (c) May 1977 by Connie Faddis, for the contributors. INTERPHASE is an amateur publication, produced solely...

  7. JPRS report proliferation issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1991-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains foreign media information on issues related to worldwide proliferation and transfer activities in nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons, including delivery systems and the transfer of weapons relevant technologies. The following locations are included: (1) South Africa, Namibia; (2) China; (3) South Korea, Australia, Indonesia, Japan, Philippines; (4) Yugoslavia; (5) Brazil, Argentina, Cuba; (6) India, Libya, Pakistan; (7) Soviet Union; and (8) France, Germany, Netherlands.

  8. JPRS report proliferation issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1991-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains foreign media information on issues related to worldwide proliferation and transfer activities in nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons, including delivery systems and the transfer of weapons relevant technologies. The following locations are included: (1) South Africa; (2) China; (3) North and South Korea, Japan; (4) Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia; (5) Argentina, Brazil; (6) India, Iran, Israel, Pakistan, Libya, Iraq, Egypt; (7) Soviet Union; and (8) Belgium, Germany, United Kingdom, Netherlands, France.

  9. Issue Development sheet Example

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ISSUE DEVELOPMENT SHEET INFORMATION ONLY The information provided below indicates that a potential concern for finding has been identified. Please provide any objective evidence you may have that could either alleviate the concern or eliminate the finding. If no objective evidence is available/can be provided by the end of this audit (at the scheduled end of field work), this information will be included in the audit report and reported as a concern or an audit finding as appropriate.

  10. Local Safety Committee Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    Minutes Local Safety Committee Name of Committee Engineering Worksite Mailing Address & Postal Code. Ventilation fume hoods V. Bendig and FMD report that an uninterrupted power supply will be attached to the ventilation control panel the week of Dec. 9. Action: T. Zintel and L. Harder will conduct a test the first

  11. Integrated Safety Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The order ensures that DOE/NNSA, systematically integrates safety into management and work practices at all levels, so that missions are accomplished efficiently while protecting the workers, the public, and the environment. Cancels DOE M 450.4-1 and DOE M 411.1-1C

  12. Nuclear Explosive Safety Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This Department of Energy (DOE) Manual provides supplemental details on selected topics to support the requirements of DOE O 452.2D, Nuclear Explosive Safety, dated 4/14/09. Cancels DOE M 452.2-1. Admin Chg 1, dated 7-10-13, cancels DOE M 452.2-1A.

  13. Safety & Environmental Protection Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glasgow, University of

    of care in waste storage and disposal is available on Safety and Environmental Protection Service's (SEPS sustainably and to protect the environment and, in line with this, recycles waste wherever practicable to biological properties). In addition some activities produce radioactive waste. Radioactive waste

  14. Packaging and Transportation Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport. Cancels DOE O 460.1A. Canceled by DOE O 460.1C.

  15. DOE Explosives Safety Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Manual describes the Departments explosive safety requirements applicable to operations involving the development, testing, handling, and processing of explosives or assemblies containing explosives. Cancels DOE M 440.1-1. Canceled by DOE O 440.1B Chg 1.

  16. Packaging and Transportation Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The order establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of DOE, including NNSA, offsite shipments and onsite transfers of radioactive and other hazardous materials and for modal transportation. Cancels DOE O 460.1B, 5-14-10

  17. Nuclear Explosive Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The directive establishes specific nuclear explosive safety (NES) program requirements to implement the DOE NES standards and other NES criteria for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations. Cancels DOE O 452.2B. Canceled by DOE O 452.2D.

  18. Nuclear Explosive Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive safety elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program, for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations. Cancels DOE O 452.2C. Admin Chg 1, 7-10-13

  19. Nuclear Explosive Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This Department of Energy (DOE) Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive safety (NES) elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program, for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations (NEOs). Cancels DOE O 452.2C. Admin Chg 1, dated 7-10-13, cancels DOE O 452.2D.

  20. Reactor safety method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vachon, Lawrence J. (Clairton, PA)

    1980-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to safety means for preventing a gas cooled nuclear reactor from attaining criticality prior to start up in the event the reactor core is immersed in hydrogenous liquid. This is accomplished by coating the inside surface of the reactor coolant channels with a neutral absorbing material that will vaporize at the reactor's operating temperature.

  1. Nuclear Explosive Safety Evaluation Processes

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual provides supplemental details to support the nuclear explosive safety evaluation requirement of DOE O 452.2D, Nuclear Explosive Safety. Does not cancel other directives. Admin Chg 1, 7-10-13.

  2. Gas Pipeline Safety (West Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Gas Pipeline Safety Section of the Engineering Division is responsible for the application and enforcement of pipeline safety regulations under Chapter 24B of the West Virginia Code and 49 U.S...

  3. Nuclear Engineering Nuclear Criticality Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    development, Nuclear Operations Division (NOD) waste management and storage activities and other laboratoryNuclear Engineering Nuclear Criticality Safety The Nuclear Engineering Division (NE) of Argonne National Laboratory is experienced in performing criticality safety and shielding evaluations for nuclear

  4. COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program Medical Center - T: 212-305-0303 F: 212: _______________ * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * Radiation Safety Office Approval: ______________________ Date: ________________________ Waste containers in place: Yes ___ No ___ Radiation signage on door: Yes ___ No ___ Room monitoring: Dates

  5. Radiation Safety (Revised March 2010)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    to Workers; Inspections 27 10 CFR Part 20Standards for Protection Against Radiation 28 10 CFR Part 35Radiation Safety Manual (Revised March 2010) Updated December 2012 Stanford University, Stanford California #12; #12; Radiation Safety Manual (Revised March 2010) Updated

  6. ANNUAL SECURITY FIRE SAFETY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANNUAL SECURITY AND FIRE SAFETY REPORT OCTOBER 1, 2013 DARTMOUTH COLLEGE http://www.dartmouth.edu/~security/ #12;1 Table of Contents MESSAGE FROM THE DIRECTOR OF SAFETY AND SECURITY................................................................................................................................................................... 7 ANNUAL SECURITY REPORT

  7. TUFTS UNIVERSITY LASER SAFETY PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dennett, Daniel

    with laser safety regulations promulgated by state, federal, and local agencies. The LSO administers and Maximum Permissible Exposures 12 X. Electrical Hazards 12 XI. General Safety Procedures 13 XII. Laser

  8. FLUOR HANFORD SAFETY MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GARVIN, L J; JENSEN, M A

    2004-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes safety management programs used within the scope of the ''Project Hanford Management Contract''. The document has been developed to meet the format and content requirements of DOE-STD-3009-94, ''Preparation Guide for US. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses''. This document provides summary descriptions of Fluor Hanford safety management programs, which Fluor Hanford nuclear facilities may reference and incorporate into their safety basis when producing facility- or activity-specific documented safety analyses (DSA). Facility- or activity-specific DSAs will identify any variances to the safety management programs described in this document and any specific attributes of these safety management programs that are important for controlling potentially hazardous conditions. In addition, facility- or activity-specific DSAs may identify unique additions to the safety management programs that are needed to control potentially hazardous conditions.

  9. Tank farm health and safety plan. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mickle, G.D.

    1995-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This Tank Farm Health and Safety Plan (HASP) for the conduct of all operations and work activities at the Hanford Site 200 Area Tank Farms is provided in order to minimize health and safety risks to workers and other onsite personnel. The HASP accomplishes this objective by establishing requirements, providing general guidelines, and conveying farm and facility-specific hazard communication information. The HASP, in conjunction with the job-specific information required by the HASP, is provided also as a reference for use during the planning of work activities at the tank farms. This HASP applies to Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), other prime contractors to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and subcontractors to WHC who may be involved in tank farm work activities. This plan is intended to be both a requirements document and a useful reference to aid tank farm workers in understanding the safety and health issues that are encountered in routine and nonroutine work activities. The HASP defines the health and safety responsibilities of personnel working at the tank farms. It has been prepared in recognition of and is consistent with National Institute of Safety and Health (NIOSH), and Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)/Unlimited State Coast Guard (USCG)/U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Occupational Safety and Health Guidance Manual for Hazardous Waste Site Activities (NIOSH 1985); WHC-CM-4-3, Industrial Safety Manual, Volume 4, {open_quotes}Health and Safety Programs for Hazardous Waste Operations;{close_quotes} 29 CFR 1910.120, Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response; WHC-CM-1-1, Management Policies; and WHC-CM-1-3, Management Requirements and Procedures. When differences in governing regulations or policies exist, the more stringent requirements shall apply until the discrepancy can be resolved.

  10. Corporate Functional Management Evaluation of the LLNL Radiation Safety Organization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sygitowicz, L S

    2008-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A Corporate Assess, Improve, and Modernize review was conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to evaluate the LLNL Radiation Safety Program and recommend actions to address the conditions identified in the Internal Assessment conducted July 23-25, 2007. This review confirms the findings of the Internal Assessment of the Institutional Radiation Safety Program (RSP) including the noted deficiencies and vulnerabilities to be valid. The actions recommended are a result of interviews with about 35 individuals representing senior management through the technician level. The deficiencies identified in the LLNL Internal Assessment of the Institutional Radiation Safety Program were discussed with Radiation Safety personnel team leads, customers of Radiation Safety Program, DOE Livermore site office, and senior ES&H management. There are significant issues with the RSP. LLNL RSP is not an integrated, cohesive, consistently implemented program with a single authority that has the clear roll and responsibility and authority to assure radiological operations at LLNL are conducted in a safe and compliant manner. There is no institutional commitment to address the deficiencies that are identified in the internal assessment. Some of these deficiencies have been previously identified and corrective actions have not been taken or are ineffective in addressing the issues. Serious funding and staffing issues have prevented addressing previously identified issues in the Radiation Calibration Laboratory, Internal Dosimetry, Bioassay Laboratory, and the Whole Body Counter. There is a lack of technical basis documentation for the Radiation Calibration Laboratory and an inadequate QA plan that does not specify standards of work. The Radiation Safety Program lack rigor and consistency across all supported programs. The implementation of DOE Standard 1098-99 Radiological Control can be used as a tool to establish this consistency across LLNL. The establishment of a site wide ALARA Committee and administrative control levels would focus attention on improved processes. Currently LLNL issues dosimeters to a large number of employees and visitors that do not enter areas requiring dosimetry. This includes 25,000 visitor TLDs per year. Dosimeters should be issued to only those personnel who enter areas where dosimetry is required.

  11. CONSTRUCTION SAFETY MANUAL ADMINISTRATIVE POLICIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowles, David William

    Revised 06/10 10.1 Subcontractor Safety Policy 10.2 Scope 10.2.1 General 10.2.2 Department of Energy 10 the integration of safety management into all construction processes. Project managers, construction managers.7 Engineered Protective Systems 10.8 Procurement of Hazardous Material 10.9 Safety Training and Education 10

  12. Toolbox Safety Talk Heat Stress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    Toolbox Safety Talk Heat Stress Environmental Health & Safety Facilities Safety & Health Section for inducing heat stress. When the body is unable to cool itself by sweating, several heat-induced illnesses Stress · Know signs/symptoms of heat-related illnesses; monitor yourself and coworkers. · Block out

  13. COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program Medical Center - T: 212-305-0303 F: 212-305-0318 rso-clinical@columbia by more than 50 percent. #12;COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program Medical Center - T: 212 ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ #12;COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program Medical Center - T: 212-305-0303 F: 212-305-0318 rso-clinical@columbia

  14. Health and Safety Training Reciprocity

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes a policy for reciprocity of employee health and safety training among DOE entities responsible for employee health and safety at DOE sites and facilities to increase efficiency and effectiveness of Departmental operations while meeting established health and safety requirements. Does not cancel other directives.

  15. Events Beyond Design Safety Basis Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Safety Alert provides information on a safety concern related to the identification and mitigation of events that may fall outside those analyzed in the documented safety analysis. [Safety Bulletin 2011-01

  16. No Issue Left Behind: Reducing Information Overload in Issue Tracking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Godfrey, Michael W.

    No Issue Left Behind: Reducing Information Overload in Issue Tracking Olga Baysal DIRO Université Science University of Waterloo Waterloo, ON, Canada migod@uwaterloo.ca ABSTRACT Modern software issue-tracking tasks. Categories and Subject Descriptors D.2.2 [Software Engineering]: Design Tools

  17. An assessment of criticality safety at the Department of Energy Rocky Flats Plant, Golden, Colorado, July--September 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattson, Roger J.

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a report on the 1989 independent Criticality Safety Assessment of the Rocky Flats Plant, primarily in response to public concerns that nuclear criticality accidents involving plutonium may have occurred at this nuclear weapon component fabrication and processing plant. The report evaluates environmental issues, fissile material storage practices, ventilation system problem areas, and criticality safety practices. While no evidence of a criticality accident was found, several recommendations are made for criticality safety improvements. 9 tabs.

  18. Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Rail Routing Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Rail Routing Presentation made by Kevin...

  19. Independent Oversight Focused Safety Management Evaluation, Idaho...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Focused Safety Management Evaluation, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory - January 2001 Independent Oversight Focused Safety Management Evaluation, Idaho...

  20. Unreviewed Safety Question Determination - Processing Waste in...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Unreviewed Safety Question Determination - Processing Waste in the Waste Characterization Glovebox Unreviewed Safety Question Determination - Processing Waste in the Waste...

  1. The Front Lines of Patient Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soloveichik, David

    patient safety · Incident Reporting · Root Cause Analysis · FMEA · Culture of Patient Safety Survey

  2. Special Issue on Human Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nijholt, Anton

    The seven articles in this special issue focus on human computing. Most focus on two challenging issues in human computing, namely, machine analysis of human behavior in group interactions and context-sensitive modeling.

  3. Interstat issue 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the ENTERPRISE, but not females? Just what IS wrong with Lt. Mary Sue — her sex? or her success? I've read some excellent stories tagged with this label and can't figure out why I'm not supposed to enjoy them. Anyone care to elucidate? Re ST vs SW: I thought SW... be received by the 15th of the month for consideration in the next issue CONTRIBUTING STAFF: Kay Johnson "Rumors". Michele Arvizu..."There's something I've been..." Melinda Shreve..."Insight". PRODUCTION ASSISTANT: Jackie Edwards ******** STAFF ARTISTS: M...

  4. Nightlight Issue 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiple Contributors

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    opened, the bitter words spilled out. "Well, what the hell am I supposed to think? Since all this started, every time I've tried to tell you what I'm thinking, or find out what you feel, you shut me off with some superficial bullshit. 'Don't analyze...; a lot has changed in the world and a lot has changed in fandom. There are some new writers and artists here who weren't around when the first issue was published, and some names from the first NIGHTLIGHT don't reappear. Yet despite any changes, we've...

  5. Grip Issue 51

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiple Contributors

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Just rest, Mrs. McCoy." The doctor turned to McCoy and hinted that they should to to the other room. "This is serious, isn't it?" McCoy asked. The other doctor stammered, "Ebola." McCoy smiled. "Is that all? I was afraid it was something incurable." "I... get access to the ship's comuters, I can't tell how come he can't talk." Kirk mouthed a curse. McCoy grinned. "I understood that." He sovered. "The planet issued a challege to us before we beamed down, remember? 'Defeat the undefeatable, and you...

  6. Still Flying Issue 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the missing episodes before he com- piled this wonderful elegy to our Big Damn Heroes as I think he would have enjoyed consid- ering certain themes and issues brought forward in Heart of Gold, Trash and The Message. In particular, I feel that his views... (tbc) How Much? ?15 (includes ticket, teas and coffees, screening, and free entrance in the raffle) INTERESTED? Email Mireilleisis2003@yahoo.co.uk for more details. Be part of the BIG DAMN BROWNCOATS!! 14 Compare and Contrast #1...

  7. Southern Enclave Issue 19 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for any assistance. ART CREDITS Judith Low -- Mastheads Carol Peters -- 37, 42, 50 Danaline Bryant -- 38 Melanie Guttierrez -- 44 Sandi Jones -- 53 A Personal Statement Equal space will be offered for replies. ?Editor's note: I do not know either... it together. Melanie Gutterriez of New Orleans is putting her considerable talent and imagination to work on the cover. I invite SOUTHERN ENCLAVE's readers to check us out for themselves and make up their own minds. The issue will cost $2.00 and the first...

  8. Southern Enclave Issue 22 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    right to place such a burden on Luke? LET T E R I N D E X Tim Blaes Catherine Churko ? Sarah Cohen Deborah Kittle ? Cheryl Pryor ? Maggie Nowakowska Pat Nussman Melanie Rawn ? Marti Schuller ? Dr. Mary Urhausen Ming Wathne Matthew Whitney..., 48, 50 Thanks to Carol Peters, Melanie Rawn, and the many others who sent newspaper clippings for this issue. SOUTHERN ENCLAVE is a non-profit amateur publica tion, is published quarterly by Falcon Press and is (c) 1989 by Cheree T. Cargill...

  9. Interstat Issue 23

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    111111111111111111111f111fG111111111111111111111 INTERSTAT is a means of fan communication...a forum of views wl reflects and distributes the musings of STAR TREK fandom. The publishers strongly believe in infinite diversity and the dignity of persons. Within... failed to live up to those standards. But we did try. And learned. The twenty-three issues of INTERSTAT to date are a history of the range and direction of fandom. They are a chronology of who we were and who we are becoming. They are a mosaic of views, a...

  10. Collins Mausoleum Issue 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escobar, Joe; Hamell, Geoffrey A.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to infringe upon any of the copyrights held by Dan Curtis Productions. All creative works published here are copyrighted by the original artists and writers. Requests for possible future issues and email may be sent to quentincollinsii... Century. While she still had moments of what might be taken for humanity, she was as self-absorbed as ever. She claimed to love him, and on some level, Barnabas believed she did. Her love reminded him of his father?s adoration of his treasured...

  11. Pastaklan Vesla Issue 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiple Contributors

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bo KclCendrick- .6, 1-0, 19 Allan Andress- 25t^L Ginnio Reynolds- 3^i 36, 4-3 No trades for other fanzines Kathy. Bushman.* 29 Peggy Barilla- 55, 56 Steve Barnes- 73, 84, 93 CAB - Bacovcr Horta Press Issue ;"*5 Rhubarb Publication.../\\ M A?TD TH5?T THERE'S. ? . 1 - ' > ?-^WW I II i,ijw" I Friends t We cano^up with this idea and we organized it and we bought the supplies and wo typed it and we glued it together and wo printed it and we collated7 w&at we printed and...

  12. Safety First Safety Last Safety Always Summer in Minnesota means high humidity and sunny, hot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Safety First Safety Last Safety Always Summer in Minnesota means high humidity and sunny, hot days. · Heat stroke is life threatening! Symptoms include high body temperature, red and dry skin, rapid before you get thirsty. Adequate fluid intake is the biggest key. Cool (not ice cold) water is the best

  13. Transmission Issues Policy Steering Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Business Practices CommitteesTeams Joint Operating Committee Transmission Issues Policy Steering Committee Customer Training Interconnection Notices Rates Standards of...

  14. Nuclear reactor safety device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hutter, Ernest (Wilmette, IL)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A safety device is disclosed for use in a nuclear reactor for axially repositioning a control rod with respect to the reactor core in the event of an upward thermal excursion. Such safety device comprises a laminated helical ribbon configured as a tube-like helical coil having contiguous helical turns with slidably abutting edges. The helical coil is disclosed as a portion of a drive member connected axially to the control rod. The laminated ribbon is formed of outer and inner laminae. The material of the outer lamina has a greater thermal coefficient of expansion than the material of the inner lamina. In the event of an upward thermal excursion, the laminated helical coil curls inwardly to a smaller diameter. Such inward curling causes the total length of the helical coil to increase by a substantial increment, so that the control rod is axially repositioned by a corresponding amount to reduce the power output of the reactor.

  15. Mars mission safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buden, D. (EG G Idaho, Idaho Falls (USA))

    1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Precautions that need to be taken to assure safety on a manned Mars mission with nuclear thermal propulsion are briefly considered. What has been learned from the 1955 SNAP-10A operation of a nuclear reactor in space and from the Rover/NERVA project is reviewed. The ways that radiation hazards can be dealt with at various stages of a Mars mission are examined.

  16. EDITORIAL HPJ SPECIAL ISSUE INTRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farfan, E.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioecology is the study of the fate and transport and potential effects of radionuclides and associated contaminants in the environment. In short, it is the science that describes the fundamental connection between environmental health and human health risks. As such, radioecology can and has provided the credible, consistent and defensible basis for the successful and cost-effective environmental cleanup and closure of nuclear production and waste sites. In addition, radioecology also provides the technical basis for making timely and reliable decisions on cleanup in the aftermath of nuclear incidents such as Chernobyl and Fukushima. The 1986 Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) accident resulted in catastrophic health, social, and economic consequences in many countries, predominantly, Ukraine, Belarus, and Russia. The extent of radioactive contamination, levels and forms of contamination, and diversity of the ecosystems affected by the accident did not have any precedent and provided unique opportunities for environmental scientists around the world. Following the natural course of their development, populations of species and their communities found themselves in conditions of chronic radiation exposure that exceeded the natural background by factors of hundreds and thousands. Anything similar would have been extremely difficult if not impossible to recreate in a scientific laboratory. Consequently, since the first few years after the accident, many teams of scientists have visited the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone (ChEZ). The knowledge gained by studying the consequences of this accident has tremendous importance. The concept of an international research and technical center to address the problems involving nuclear and radiological accidents became a reality with the establishment of the International Chernobyl Center (ICC). In May 1995, the US and Ukraine signed a Protocol of Intent on establishment of the ICC, and the government of Ukraine appealed to the international scientific community to support ICC and join its activities (Chernobyl Center 2006). In December 1995, a memorandum of understanding (MOU) on the ChNPP closure was signed by the government of Ukraine, all of the G7 governments, and the European Commission. The ICC foundation was considered critical to ensure the safe decommissioning of the ChNPP reactor units and improvement of the safety of the Chernobyl Containment Shelter. On the 10th anniversary of the Chernobyl accident (26 April 1996), Mr. Viktor Yushchenko, the President of Ukraine, issued a decree to establish the Chernobyl Center for Nuclear Safety, Radioactive Waste and Radioecology (Chernobyl Center). On the same day, a MOU involving the US participation in Chernobyl Center activities was signed by the US and Ukraine (Chernobyl Center 2006). In July 1998, the US and Ukraine signed an agreement to establish the International Radioecology Laboratory (IRL) as part of the Chernobyl Center. The creation of IRL was a logical continuation of previous programs to conduct scientific research in radioecology and provide Ukraine and the rest of the world with the necessary infrastructure and scientific basis to conduct research in radioecology, radiobiology, dosimetry, and environmental protection in the ChEZ (Chernobyl Center 2006). A recent collaborative effort with IRL has been implemented through a project titled 'Long-term impacts from radiation/contamination within the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone' (Farfan et al. 2008; Gerdes et al. 2009; Marra et al. 2010). This collaboration had the following objectives: (1) Assess the long-term impacts to the environment from radiation exposure within the ChEZ; (2) Provide information on remediation guidelines and ecological risk assessment within radioactively contaminated territories based on the results of long-term field monitoring, analytical measurements, and numerical modeling of soils and groundwater radioactive contamination; and (3) Recommend the development and testing of effective cleanup technologies to reduce environmental and health risks. Based o

  17. Progress in Addressing DNFSB Recommendation 2002-1 Issues: Improving Accident Analysis Software Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VINCENT, ANDREW

    2005-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 2002-1 (''Quality Assurance for Safety-Related Software'') identified a number of quality assurance issues on the use of software in Department of Energy (DOE) facilities for analyzing hazards, and designing and operating controls to prevent or mitigate potential accidents. Over the last year, DOE has begun several processes and programs as part of the Implementation Plan commitments, and in particular, has made significant progress in addressing several sets of issues particularly important in the application of software for performing hazard and accident analysis. The work discussed here demonstrates that through these actions, Software Quality Assurance (SQA) guidance and software tools are available that can be used to improve resulting safety analysis. Specifically, five of the primary actions corresponding to the commitments made in the Implementation Plan to Recommendation 2002-1 are identified and discussed in this paper. Included are the web-based DOE SQA Knowledge Portal and the Central Registry, guidance and gap analysis reports, electronic bulletin board and discussion forum, and a DOE safety software guide. These SQA products can benefit DOE safety contractors in the development of hazard and accident analysis by precluding inappropriate software applications and utilizing best practices when incorporating software results to safety basis documentation. The improvement actions discussed here mark a beginning to establishing stronger, standard-compliant programs, practices, and processes in SQA among safety software users, managers, and reviewers throughout the DOE Complex. Additional effort is needed, however, particularly in: (1) processes to add new software applications to the DOE Safety Software Toolbox; (2) improving the effectiveness of software issue communication; and (3) promoting a safety software quality assurance culture.

  18. Safety study application guide. Safety Analysis Report Update Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., (Energy Systems) is committed to performing and documenting safety analyses for facilities it manages for the Department of Energy (DOE). Included are analyses of existing facilities done under the aegis of the Safety Analysis Report Upgrade Program, and analyses of new and modified facilities. A graded approach is used wherein the level of analysis and documentation for each facility is commensurate with the magnitude of the hazard(s), the complexity of the facility and the stage of the facility life cycle. Safety analysis reports (SARs) for hazard Category 1 and 2 facilities are usually detailed and extensive because these categories are associated with public health and safety risk. SARs for Category 3 are normally much less extensive because the risk to public health and safety is slight. At Energy Systems, safety studies are the name given to SARs for Category 3 (formerly {open_quotes}low{close_quotes}) facilities. Safety studies are the appropriate instrument when on-site risks are limited to irreversible consequences to a few people, and off-site consequences are limited to reversible consequences to a few people. This application guide provides detailed instructions for performing safety studies that meet the requirements of DOE Orders 5480.22, {open_quotes}Technical Safety Requirements,{close_quotes} and 5480.23, {open_quotes}Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports.{close_quotes} A seven-chapter format has been adopted for safety studies. This format allows for discussion of all the items required by DOE Order 5480.23 and for the discussions to be readily traceable to the listing in the order. The chapter titles are: (1) Introduction and Summary, (2) Site, (3) Facility Description, (4) Safety Basis, (5) Hazardous Material Management, (6) Management, Organization, and Institutional Safety Provisions, and (7) Accident Analysis.

  19. The unique safety challenges of space reactor systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lanes, S.J. (Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)); Marshall, A.C. (Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Compact reactor systems can provide high levels of power for extended periods in space environments. Their relatively low mass and their ability to operate independently of their proximity to the sun make reactor power systems high desirable for many civilian and military space missions. The US Department of Energy is developing reactor system technologies to provide electrical power for space applications. In addition, reactors are now being considered to provide thermal power to a hydrogen propellant for nuclear thermal rocketry. Space reactor safety issues differ from commercial reactor issues, in some areas, because of very different operating requirements and environments. Accidents similar to those postulated for commercial reactors must be considered for space reactors during their operational phase. Safety strategies will need to be established that account for the consequences of the loss of essential power.

  20. Health and safety plan for operations performed for the Environmental Restoration Program. Task, OU 1-03 and OU 4-10 Track 2 investigations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trippet, W.A. II [IT Corp., (United States); Reneau, M.; Morton, S.L. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document constitutes the generic health and safety plan for the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP). It addresses the health and safety requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA); Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) 29 CFR 1910.120 standard; and EG&G Idaho, Inc. This plan is a guide to individuals who must complete a health and safety plan for a task performed for the EPR. It contains a task specific addendum that, when completed, specifically addresses task specific health and safety issues. This health and safety plan reduces the time it takes to write a task specific health and safety plan by providing discussions of requirements, guidance on where specific information is located, and specific topics in the Addendum that must be discussed at a task level. This format encourages a complete task specific health and safety plan and a standard for all health and safety plans written for ERP.

  1. K basins interim remedial action health and safety plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DAY, P.T.

    1999-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The K Basins Interim Remedial Action Health and Safety Plan addresses the requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), as they apply to the CERCLA work that will take place at the K East and K West Basins. The provisions of this plan become effective on the date the US Environmental Protection Agency issues the Record of Decision for the K Basins Interim Remedial Action, currently planned in late August 1999.

  2. National Synchrotron Light Source safety-analysis report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batchelor, K. (ed.)

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document covers all of the safety issues relating to the design and operation of the storage rings and injection system of the National Synchrotron Light Source. The building systems for fire protection, access and egress are described together with air and other gaseous control or venting systems. Details of shielding against prompt bremstrahlung radiation and synchrotron radiation are described and the administrative requirements to be satisfied for operation of a beam line at the facility are given.

  3. Capacity planning in a transitional economy: What issues? Which models?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mubayi, V.; Leigh, R.W. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Bright, R.N. [Anylec Research, Inc., Bayport, NY (United States)

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is devoted to an exploration of the important issues facing the Russian power generation system and its evolution in the foreseeable future and the kinds of modeling approaches that capture those issues. These issues include, for example, (1) trade-offs between investments in upgrading and refurbishment of existing thermal (fossil-fired) capacity and safety enhancements in existing nuclear capacity versus investment in new capacity, (2) trade-offs between investment in completing unfinished (under construction) projects based on their original design versus investment in new capacity with improved design, (3) incorporation of demand-side management options (investments in enhancing end-use efficiency, for example) within the planning framework, (4) consideration of the spatial dimensions of system planning including investments in upgrading electric transmission networks or fuel shipment networks and incorporating hydroelectric generation, (5) incorporation of environmental constraints and (6) assessment of uncertainty and evaluation of downside risk. Models for exploring these issues include low power shutdown (LPS) which are computationally very efficient, though approximate, and can be used to perform extensive sensitivity analyses to more complex models which can provide more detailed answers but are computationally cumbersome and can only deal with limited issues. The paper discusses which models can usefully treat a wide range of issues within the priorities facing decision makers in the Russian power sector and integrate the results with investment decisions in the wider economy.

  4. Interstat Issue 10 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I N T E R S T A T M a ile d fro m : 1 3 9 2 4 J e f f e r s o n C i r c l e O m aha, N ebraska 68137 If the 010 follows y o u r n a m e , y o u r s ub e x pires with this issue. F irst C lass fill August, 1978 #10 A monthly STAR TREK publication... ones are down through technological advances. Are we ready for Arthur Clarke yet? Danielle DuBois Mr. Mike Bubrick (If?7) , you have asked the R.R.//1 question why some editors don't mail their zines on Waterloo, Que time. I think I have some possible...

  5. Uncertainty and sampling issues in tank characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liebetrau, A.M.; Pulsipher, B.A.; Kashporenko, D.M. [and others

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A defensible characterization strategy must recognize that uncertainties are inherent in any measurement or estimate of interest and must employ statistical methods for quantifying and managing those uncertainties. Estimates of risk and therefore key decisions must incorporate knowledge about uncertainty. This report focuses statistical methods that should be employed to ensure confident decision making and appropriate management of uncertainty. Sampling is a major source of uncertainty that deserves special consideration in the tank characterization strategy. The question of whether sampling will ever provide the reliable information needed to resolve safety issues is explored. The issue of sample representativeness must be resolved before sample information is reliable. Representativeness is a relative term but can be defined in terms of bias and precision. Currently, precision can be quantified and managed through an effective sampling and statistical analysis program. Quantifying bias is more difficult and is not being addressed under the current sampling strategies. Bias could be bounded by (1) employing new sampling methods that can obtain samples from other areas in the tanks, (2) putting in new risers on some worst case tanks and comparing the results from existing risers with new risers, or (3) sampling tanks through risers under which no disturbance or activity has previously occurred. With some bound on bias and estimates of precision, various sampling strategies could be determined and shown to be either cost-effective or infeasible.

  6. U.S. risk management can reduce regulation, enhance safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willke, T.L. [Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States); Shires, T.M.; Cowgill, R.M. [Radian International LLC, Austin, TX (United States); Selig, B.J. [Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection and Insurance Co., CT (United States)

    1997-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The only way to slow the spiraling costs of new prescriptive pipeline regulations is to develop an effective risk-management program, one that will focus on the highest priority safety issues not minimum compliance with regulation. If applied systematically and rigorously, risk management can help pipeline operators focus on safety issues specific to their own systems. These operators have a greater understanding of the condition of their systems and what it takes to keep them operating safely. This knowledge, along with the flexibility inherent in the US approach to risk management, can lead to a more effective use of resources devoted to pipeline safety. When an accident occurs, data generated in a risk-management program will provide a mechanism for understanding the causes of an incident. Such information can also direct future efforts toward the most effective actions to ensure that similar incidents are unlikely to occur again. The paper discusses two incidents, an oil products pipeline rupture in Washington, DC and a natural gas pipeline rupture in Edison, NJ. Current regulations for gas pipelines, the US approach to risk management, implementation, performance measurement, accident prevention, and issues to be resolved are discussed.

  7. Policies,Safety&U Annual Security and Fire Safety Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dongwon

    ................................................................................ 5 ABOUT THE PENN STATE HARRISBURG SAFETY AND POLICE SERVICES ..... 5 Role, Authority, and Training .................................................................... 7 SECURITY OF and ACCESS TO PENN STATE HARRISBURG FACILITIES ........ 8 Special Considerations

  8. Lawn Maintenance Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, David

    2005-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    debris and noise. ? Allow the engine to cool before returning it to a storage shed. ? Turn the power off and disconnect the spark plug wire before cleaning, inspecting, adjusting or repairing the cutting blade. Lawn Maintenance Safety ? Don?t run a... as possible to avoid being hit by passing vehicles. ? Never leave an electric- or gas-powered edger plugged in or running while unattended. ? Unplug or turn off an electric or gas-powered edger before inspecting, cleaning, adjusting or replacing the blade...

  9. Perspectives on reactor safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haskin, F.E. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering; Camp, A.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) maintains a technical training center at Chattanooga, Tennessee to provide appropriate training to both new and experienced NRC employees. This document describes a one-week course in reactor, safety concepts. The course consists of five modules: (1) historical perspective; (2) accident sequences; (3) accident progression in the reactor vessel; (4) containment characteristics and design bases; and (5) source terms and offsite consequences. The course text is accompanied by slides and videos during the actual presentation of the course.

  10. Complete Safety Training

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting theCommercialization and Innovation2010 2010AboutComplete Safety Training

  11. Complete Safety Training

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting theCommercialization and Innovation2010 2010AboutComplete Safety

  12. Nuclear Safety Regulatory Framework

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in ManyDepartment of Energy NorthBDepartment of Energy Nuclear Safety

  13. Safety for Users

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited ReleaseWelcome ton nSafeguardsUpdates >-Safety for

  14. Safety for Users

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited ReleaseWelcome ton nSafeguardsUpdates >-Safety

  15. Safety | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited ReleaseWelcome ton nSafeguardsUpdatesis the FirstSafety

  16. Sandia Energy - Transportation Safety

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol Home DistributionTransportation Safety Home Stationary Power Nuclear Fuel Cycle

  17. Integrated Safety Management Policy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,39732on ArmedManufacturing | DepartmentINTEGRATED SAFETY MANAGEMENT

  18. Safety for Users

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Press ReleasesIn theTreatmentSRSSafety The NuclearSafety for

  19. Safety for Users

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Press ReleasesIn theTreatmentSRSSafety The NuclearSafety for

  20. Complete Safety Training

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would like submit the followingthMeasurements |CompetitiveComplete Safety

  1. SSRL Safety Office Memo

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements RecentlyElectronicResourcesjobsJuly throughR E Q U E N C4Safety Office SSO

  2. Safety Staff Contact Information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements RecentlyElectronicResourcesjobsJuly throughR EMaterials (CRM) | U.S.Safety

  3. Safety for Users

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements RecentlyElectronicResourcesjobsJuly throughR EMaterials (CRM)Safety for

  4. Safety for Users

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements RecentlyElectronicResourcesjobsJuly throughR EMaterials (CRM)Safety

  5. ARM - ARM Safety Policy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearchSOLICITATIONIMODI FICATION OF CONTRACTOperationsYearSafety Policy About

  6. Health & Safety

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cn SunnybankD.jpgHanford LEED&soilASTI-SORTIHealth & Safety Health

  7. Material Safety Data Sheet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighand Retrievals from a New 183-GHzMAR Os2010Material Safety Data Sheet

  8. Nuclear explosive safety study process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear explosives by their design and intended use require collocation of high explosives and fissile material. The design agencies are responsible for designing safety into the nuclear explosive and processes involving the nuclear explosive. The methodology for ensuring safety consists of independent review processes that include the national laboratories, Operations Offices, Headquarters, and responsible Area Offices and operating contractors with expertise in nuclear explosive safety. A NES Study is an evaluation of the adequacy of positive measures to minimize the possibility of an inadvertent or deliberate unauthorized nuclear detonation, high explosive detonation or deflagration, fire, or fissile material dispersal from the pit. The Nuclear Explosive Safety Study Group (NESSG) evaluates nuclear explosive operations against the Nuclear Explosive Safety Standards specified in DOE O 452.2 using systematic evaluation techniques. These Safety Standards must be satisfied for nuclear explosive operations.

  9. Preliminary evaluation of environmental issues on the use of peat as an energy source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, R.; Richardson, S.; Walters, A.; Boesch, L.; Thomson, W.; Irons, J.

    1980-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A study to characterize the environmental issues, that would arise from an extensive peat utilization program has been initiated. The objectives of this preliminary report are to: identify the environmental issues and potential problems; examine the significance of issues in the geographical regions where peat use could be developed; and establish a methodology by which issues can be resolved or clarified through future coordinated private, state, and federal programs. An overview of peat development including discussions on conversion technologies, extraction and harvesting procedures, and land reclamation is presented. Environmental concerns are in the areas of water resources and quality, air quality, health and safety issues, solid waste management, and land reclamation. The general environmental issues, resource availability, and attitudes associated with potential peat development in ten states, containing an estimated 90 percent of US peat resources were described. The ten states reviewed are Alaska, Minnesota, Michigan, Maine, North and South Carolina, Wisconsin, New York, Florida, and Louisiana. (DMC)

  10. Skid-Steer Loader Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, David

    2005-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    -steer loaders have been used in the construc- tion and landscaping industry for years. They are also common on dairy, beef and swine operations. Unlike conventional tractors, these compact and maneuverable machines allow farmers to enter narrow alleyways... the automatic safety switches. Machine Safeguards Using and maintaining manufacturer-installed safety devices will eliminate many skid-loader injuries and fatalities. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations and industry standards...

  11. Homeland Security Issues for Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McClure, J. D.; Fisher, D.; Fenter, T.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    more aware of safety, security, and protecting property and people should similar incidents occur in the future. The initial steps in facility protection are identifying potential threats and evaluating the condition of existing building infrastructure...

  12. Radiation Safety Work Control Form

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation Safety Work Control Form (see instructions on pg-3) Rev. May 2014 Area: Form : Date: Preliminary Applicability Screen: (a) Will closing the beam line injection stoppers...

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: Hydrogen Safety

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen Safety Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production On June 13, 2014, in SNL maintains the equipment, experts, and partnerships required to develop technology for solar...

  14. APS Safety Guidelines for Beamlines

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Safety Guidelines for Beamlines Accident Investigations LOM Shop Usage User Shop Access - Policies and Procedures User Shop Orientation User Shop Authorization Certification Form...

  15. APS Experiment Safety Review Board

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    participates in project reviews as requested, recommends laser safety policy, reviews accident investigation conclusions, and evaluates plans to protect personnel where laser...

  16. Fermilab | Traffic Safety at Fermilab |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Submit a SuggestionQuestion Fermilab traffic rules (FESHM 9010) Fermilab traffic accident statistics Traffic safety awareness training Resources Texting While Driving...

  17. Natural Gas Pipeline Safety (Kansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This article states minimum safety standards for the transportation of natural gas by pipeline and reporting requirements for operators of pipelines.

  18. Lessons Learned from Safety Events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiner, Steven C.; Fassbender, Linda L.

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hydrogen Incident Reporting and Lessons Learned website (www.h2incidents.org) was launched in 2006 as a database-driven resource for sharing lessons learned from hydrogen-related safety events to raise safety awareness and encourage knowledge-sharing. The development of this database, its first uses and subsequent enhancements have been described at the Second and Third International Conferences on Hydrogen Safety. [1,2] Since 2009, continuing work has not only highlighted the value of safety lessons learned, but enhanced how the database provides access to another safety knowledge tool, Hydrogen Safety Best Practices (http://h2bestpractices.org). Collaborations with the International Energy Agency (IEA) Hydrogen Implementing Agreement (HIA) Task 19 – Hydrogen Safety and others have enabled the database to capture safety event learnings from around the world. This paper updates recent progress, highlights the new “Lessons Learned Corner” as one means for knowledge-sharing and examines the broader potential for collecting, analyzing and using safety event information.

  19. The safety implications of emerging software paradigms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suski, G.J.; Persons, W.L.; Johnson, G.L.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper addresses some of the emerging software paradigms that may be used in developing safety-critical software applications. Paradigms considered in this paper include knowledge-based systems, neural networks, genetic algorithms, and fuzzy systems. It presents one view of the software verification and validation activities that should be associated with each paradigm. The paper begins with a discussion of the historical evolution of software verification and validation. Next, a comparison is made between the verification and validation processes used for conventional and emerging software systems. Several verification and validation issues for the emerging paradigms are discussed and some specific research topics are identified. This work is relevant for monitoring and control at nuclear power plants.

  20. Electronic Safety Resource Tools – Supporting Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Commercialization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barilo, Nick F.

    2014-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Hydrogen Safety Program conducted a planning session in Los Angeles, CA on April 1, 2014 to consider what electronic safety tools would benefit the next phase of hydrogen and fuel cell commercialization. A diverse, 20-person team led by an experienced facilitator considered the question as it applied to the eight most relevant user groups. The results and subsequent evaluation activities revealed several possible resource tools that could greatly benefit users. The tool identified as having the greatest potential for impact is a hydrogen safety portal, which can be the central location for integrating and disseminating safety information (including most of the tools identified in this report). Such a tool can provide credible and reliable information from a trustworthy source. Other impactful tools identified include a codes and standards wizard to guide users through a series of questions relating to application and specific features of the requirements; a scenario-based virtual reality training for first responders; peer networking tools to bring users from focused groups together to discuss and collaborate on hydrogen safety issues; and a focused tool for training inspectors. Table ES.1 provides results of the planning session, including proposed new tools and changes to existing tools.

  1. Safety-Oriented Design of Component Assemblies using Safety Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for upgrades at a later stage of the system life cycle. Thus, support for rigorous, compositional analysis from-based development. Keywords: Component-based system development, safety, component assemblies, safety interfaces as a promising approach for developing complex software systems by composing smaller indepen- dently developed

  2. General Safety Office of Environmental Health and Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    General Safety Web Manual Office of Environmental Health and Safety April 2010 #12;#12;Contents Emergency Telephone Numbers and Procedures............................(Click for web link) - How to Report............................................(Click for web link) - Chancellor - Vice Chancellors - Department Heads - Supervisors, Foreman and Managers

  3. Safety and Health Policy and Procedure Manual Biological Safety Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saidak, Filip

    Biological Safety Association (ABSA) best practices as well as all federal, state, and local regulations. IISafety and Health Policy and Procedure Manual Biological Safety Manual Section 280 INDEX I. Policy space suitable for work being conducted · Under the Office of Research Compliance, establish and manage

  4. National Transportation Safety Board Office of Aviation Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    NWS and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Advisory Circular "Aviation Weather Services", AC 00 Electronics Engineer Federal Aviation Administration 1 UTC ­ is an abbreviation for Coordinated Universal Time1 National Transportation Safety Board Office of Aviation Safety Washington, D.C. 20594

  5. EDITORIAL HPJ SPECIAL ISSUE DEDICATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farfan, E.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This issue is dedicated to the heroes and professionals who helped protect the world from nuclear disasters and to those who were displaced by these catastrophes.

  6. Smart-Grid Security Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khurana, Himanshu; Hadley, Mark D.; Lu, Ning; Frincke, Deborah A.

    2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    TITLE: Smart-Grid Security Issues (Editorial Material, English) IEEE SECURITY & PRIVACY 8 (1). JAN-FEB 2010. p.81-85 IEEE COMPUTER SOC, LOS ALAMITOS

  7. System 80+{trademark} Standard Design: CESSAR design certification. Volume 17: Amendment I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This report, entitled Combustion Engineering Standard Safety Analysis Report -- Design Certification (CESSAR-DC), has been prepared in support of the industry effort to standardize nuclear plant designs. These volumes describes the Combustion Engineering, Inc. System 80+{trademark} Standard Design. This Volume 17 provides Appendix A of this report, closure of unresolved and Genetic Safety Issues.

  8. Quarterly report on the Ferrocyanide Safety Program for the period ending June 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meacham, J.E.; Cash, R.J.; Dukelow, G.T.

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the thirteenth quarterly report on the progress of activities addressing the Ferrocyanide Safety Issue associated With Hanford site high-level radioactive waste tanks. Progress in the Ferrocyanide Safety Program is reviewed, including work addressing the six parts of Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 90-7 (FR 1990). All work activities are described in the revised program plan (Borsheim et al. 1993), and this report follows the same format presented there. A summary of the key events occurring this quarter is presented in Section 1.2. More detailed discussions of progress are located in Sections 3.0 and 4.0.

  9. LASER SAFETY MANUAL 2014 RICE UNIVERSITY 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natelson, Douglas

    LASER SAFETY MANUAL 2014 RICE UNIVERSITY 1 Rice University Laser Safety Manual Environmental Health and Safety MS 123 P.O. Box 1892 Houston, TX 77251-1892 January 2014 #12;LASER SAFETY MANUAL 2014 RICE UNIVERSITY 2 Introduction The objective of the Rice University Laser Safety program is to assist all levels

  10. LASER SAFETY COMMITTEE CHARTER November, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowles, David William

    LASER SAFETY COMMITTEE CHARTER November, 2005 Function The Safety Review Committee (SRC) performs-committees to address specific health and safety matters. The Laser Safety Committee (LSC) is one of the SRC expert sub-committees. The Laser SafetyCommittee recommends policies and practices regarding the conduct and regulatory compliance

  11. LASER SAFETY MANUAL POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yuanlin

    LASER SAFETY MANUAL POLICIES AND PROCEDURES FOR LASER SAFETY AT TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY LUBBOCK, TEXAS September 2002 #12;V-1 TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY LASER SAFETY MANUAL TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION I ­ MANAGEMENT OF LASER LICENSE Introduction A. Laser Safety Program I - 1 B. Radiation Laser Safety Committee I

  12. Advanced Test Reactor Critical Facility safety analysis report five year currency review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Napper, P.R.; Carpenter, W.R.; Garner, R.W.

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By DOE-ID Order 5481.1A, a five year currency review is required of the Safety Analysis Reports of all ID or ID contractor operations having hazards of a type and magnitude not routinely encountered and/or accepted by the public. In keeping with this order, a currency review has been performed of the Advanced Test Reactor Critical Facility (ADTRC) Safety Analysis Report (SAR), Issue 003, 1990. The objectives of this currency review were to: evaluate the content, completeness, clarity of presentation and compliance with NRC Regulatory Guides and DOE Orders, etc., and evaluate the technical content of the SAR, particularly the Technical Specifications, and to evaluate the safety of continued operation of the ATRC. The reviewers concluded that although improvements may be needed in the overall content, clarity, and demonstration of compliance with current orders and regulations, the safety of the ATRC is in no way compromised and no unreviewed safety questions were identified. 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Criticality Safety Basics for INL Emergency Responders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valerie L. Putman

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a modular self-study guide about criticality safety principles for Idaho National Laboratory emergency responders. This guide provides basic criticality safety information for people who, in response to an emergency, might enter an area that contains much fissionable (or fissile) material. The information should help responders understand unique factors that might be important in responding to a criticality accident or in preventing a criticality accident while responding to a different emergency.

    This study guide specifically supplements web-based training for firefighters (0INL1226) and includes information for other Idaho National Laboratory first responders. However, the guide audience also includes other first responders such as radiological control personnel.

    For interested readers, this guide includes clearly marked additional information that will not be included on tests. The additional information includes historical examples (Been there. Done that.), as well as facts and more in-depth information (Did you know …).

    INL criticality safety personnel revise this guide as needed to reflect program changes, user requests, and better information. Revision 0, issued May 2007, established the basic text. Revision 1 incorporates operation, program, and training changes implemented since 2007. Revision 1 increases focus on first responders because later responders are more likely to have more assistance and guidance from facility personnel and subject matter experts. Revision 1 also completely reorganized the training to better emphasize physical concepts behind the criticality controls that help keep emergency responders safe. The changes are based on and consistent with changes made to course 0INL1226.

  14. Institutional implications of establishing safety goals for nuclear power plants. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, F.A.; Hooper, R.L.

    1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project is to anticipate and address institutional problems that may arise from the adoption of NRC's proposed Policy Statement on Safety Goals for Nuclear Power Plants. The report emphasizes one particular category of institutional problems: the possible use of safety goals as a basis for legal challenges to NRC actions, and the resolution of such challenges by the courts. Three types of legal issues are identified and analyzed. These are, first, general legal issues such as access to the legal system, burden of proof, and standard of proof. Second is the particular formulation of goals. Involved here are such questions as sustainable rationale, definitions, avoided issues, vagueness of time and space details, and degree of conservatism. Implementation brings up the third set of issues which include interpretation and application, linkage to probabilistic risk assessment, consequences as compared to events, and the use of results.

  15. Health and Safety Handbook UPDATED: June 27, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, Subrata

    .......................................................................................................5 Material Safety Data Sheets/ Chemical Inventories

  16. IMPORTANCE OF SAFETY CULTURE ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spitalnik, J.

    2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Safety Management has lately been considered by some Nuclear Regulatory agencies as the tool on which to concentrate their efforts to implement modern regulation structures, because Safety Culture was said to be difficult to monitor. However, Safety Culture can be assessed and monitored even if it is problematical to make Safety Culture the object of regulation. This paper stresses the feasibility and importance of Safety Culture Assessment based on self-assessment applications performed in several nuclear organizations in Latin America. Reasons and ownership for assessing Safety Culture are discussed, and relevant aspects considered for setting up and programming such an assessment are shown. Basic principles that were taken into account, as well as financial and human resources used in actual self-assessments are reviewed, including the importance of adequate statistical analyses and the necessity of proper feed-back of results. The setting up of action plans to enhance Safety Culture is the final step of the assessment program that once implemented will enable to establish a Safety Culture monitoring process within the organization.

  17. Nuclear Explosive Safety Evaluation Processes

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual provides supplemental details to support the nuclear explosive safety (NES) evaluation requirement of Department of Energy (DOE) Order (O) 452.2D, Nuclear Explosive Safety, dated 4/14/09. Admin Chg 1, dated 7-10-13, cancels DOE M 452.2-2.

  18. Physics Safety Induction OCTOBER 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobar, Michael

    Physics Safety Induction OCTOBER 2012 FACULTY OF SCIENCES #12;The University of Western Australia · Be safe · Report anything unsafe #12;The University of Western Australia Physics Occupational Safety Sharma ­ ICRAR · Nikita Kostylev ­ Student Representative #12;The University of Western Australia School

  19. Environmental Health and Safety Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    Environmental Health and Safety Assessment Program Manual 7/15/2013 #12;Environmental Health/26/2013. The most recent version of this document is available electronically at: http://sp.ehs.cornell.edu/env/general-environmental-management/environmental.........................................................................................................................4 #12;Environmental Health and Safety Assessment Program Manual Approved by: (Barb English) Last

  20. ANNUAL SECURITY & FIRE SAFETY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    ANNUAL SECURITY & FIRE SAFETY REPORT 2014 A guide to policies, procedures, practices, and programs implemented to keep students, faculty, and staff safe and facilities secure. www.montana.edu/reports/security.pdf #12;Inside this Report 2014 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report for Reporting Year 2013

  1. FAQS Qualification Card – Criticality Safety

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A key element for the Department’s Technical Qualification Programs is a set of common Functional Area Qualification Standards (FAQS) and associated Job Task Analyses (JTA). These standards are developed for various functional areas of responsibility in the Department, including oversight of safety management programs identified as hazard controls in Documented Safety Analyses (DSA).

  2. University of Pittsburgh Safety Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibille, Etienne

    and the reaction vessel is a glass vial, flask or bottle; H2 Rx conducted with a H-Cube Continuous is a glass flask or bottle contained within a Parr shaker or comparable equipment. 2.3 Level 3 ­ H2 Rx blast rooms, and removing reaction vessels. 4.2 Safety goggles or safety glasses with side impact

  3. _____________________________ Environment, Health, & Safety _________ __________________ Training Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for LBNL guests and employees. All employees of the lab, participating guests, students and subcontractors at LBNL. Course Objectives: · Acknowledge the policies and programs applicable to electrical safety at LBNL. · Define roles and responsibilities related to electrical safety at LBNL. · Recognize Stop Work

  4. LASER SAFETY POLICY Policy Statement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    LASER SAFETY POLICY Policy Statement Each department that acquires or operates lasers for use in the university's Laser Safety Manual. Reason for Policy/Purpose If improperly used or controlled, lasers can produce multiple injuries, including burns, blindness, and electrocution. This policy and the university

  5. Nuclear Reactor Safety Design Criteria

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1993-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The order establishes nuclear safety criteria applicable to the design, fabrication, construction, testing, and performance requirements of nuclear reactor facilities and safety class structures, systems, and components (SSCs) within these facilities. Cancels paragraphs 8a and 8b of DOE 5480.6. Cancels DOE O 5480.6 in part. Certified 11-18-10.

  6. Nuclear reactor safety device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hutter, E.

    1983-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A safety device is described for use in a nuclear reactor for axially repositioning a control rod with respect to the reactor core in the event of a thermal excursion. It comprises a laminated strip helically configured to form a tube, said tube being in operative relation to said control rod. The laminated strip is formed of at least two materials having different thermal coefficients of expansion, and is helically configured such that the material forming the outer lamina of the tube has a greater thermal coefficient of expansion than the material forming the inner lamina of said tube. In the event of a thermal excursion the laminated strip will tend to curl inwardly so that said tube will increase in length, whereby as said tube increases in length it exerts a force on said control rod to axially reposition said control rod with respect to said core.

  7. Electrical safety device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    White, David B. (Greenock, PA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrical safety device for use in power tools that is designed to automatically discontinue operation of the power tool upon physical contact of the tool with a concealed conductive material. A step down transformer is used to supply the operating power for a disconnect relay and a reset relay. When physical contact is made between the power tool and the conductive material, an electrical circuit through the disconnect relay is completed and the operation of the power tool is automatically interrupted. Once the contact between the tool and conductive material is broken, the power tool can be quickly and easily reactivated by a reset push button activating the reset relay. A remote reset is provided for convenience and efficiency of operation.

  8. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF DEVELOPMENT ISSUES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF DEVELOPMENT ISSUES VOL. 4 · No. 2 December 2005 CONTENTS Jeffrey D. Sachs-97 and the Bulgarian currency board 95 #12;#12;International Journal of Development Issues Vol. 4, No. 2 (2005) 1 Science, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. #12;J.D. Sachs /International Journal

  9. Formal Management Review of the Safety Basis Calculations Noncompliance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Altenbach, T J

    2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In Reference 1, LLNL identified a failure to adequately implement an institutional commitment concerning administrative requirements governing the documentation of Safety Basis calculations supporting the Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) process for LLNL Hazard Category 2 and Category 3 nuclear facilities. The AB Section has discovered that the administrative requirements of AB procedure AB-006, 'Safety Basis Calculation Procedure for Category 2 and 3 Nuclear Facilities', have not been uniformly or consistently applied in the preparation of Safety Basis calculations for LLNL Hazard Category 2 and 3 Nuclear Facilities. The SEP Associated Director has directed the AB Section to initiate a formal management review of the issue that includes, but is not necessarily limited to the following topics: (1) the basis establishing Ab-006 as a required internal procedure for Safety Basis calculations; (2) how requirements for Safety Basis calculations flow down in the institutional DSA process; (3) the extent to which affected Laboratory organizations have explicitly complied with the requirements of Procedure AB-006; (4) what alternative approaches LLNL organizations has used for Safety Basis calculations and how these alternate approaches compare with Procedure AB-006 requirements; and (5) how to reconcile Safety Basis calculations that were performed before Procedure AB-006 came into existence (i.e., August 2001). The management review2 also includes an extent-of-condition evaluation to determine how widespread the discovered issue is throughout Laboratory organizations responsible for operating nuclear facilities, and to determine if implementation of AB procedures other than AB-006 has been similarly affected. In Reference 2, Corrective Action 1 was established whereby the SEP Directorate will develop a plan for performing a formal management review of the discovered condition, including an extent-of condition evaluation. In Reference 3, a plan was provided to prepare a formal management review, satisfying Corrective Action 1. An AB-006 Working Group was formed,led by the AB Section, with representatives from the Nuclear Materials Technology Program (NMTP), the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) Division, and the Packaging and Transportation Safety (PATS) Program. The key action of this management review was for Working Group members to conduct an assessment of all safety basis calculations referenced in their respective DSAs. Those assessments were tasked to provide the following information: (1) list which safety basis calculations correctly follow AB-006 and therefore require no additional documentation; (2) identify and list which safety basis calculations do not strictly follow AB-006, these include NMTP Engineering Notes, Engineering Safety Notes, and calculations by organizations external to the nuclear facilities (such as Plant Engineering), subcontractor calculations, and other internally generated calculations. Each of these will be reviewed and listed on a memorandum with the facility manager's (or designee's) signature accepting that calculation for use in the DSA. If any of these calculations are lacking the signature of a technical reviewer, they must also be reviewed for technical content and that review documented per AB-006.

  10. Health, Safety, and Environment Division

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wade, C [comp.] [comp.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary responsibility of the Health, Safety, and Environmental (HSE) Division at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is to provide comprehensive occupational health and safety programs, waste processing, and environmental protection. These activities are designed to protect the worker, the public, and the environment. Meeting these responsibilities requires expertise in many disciplines, including radiation protection, industrial hygiene, safety, occupational medicine, environmental science and engineering, analytical chemistry, epidemiology, and waste management. New and challenging health, safety, and environmental problems occasionally arise from the diverse research and development work of the Laboratory, and research programs in HSE Division often stem from these applied needs. These programs continue but are also extended, as needed, to study specific problems for the Department of Energy. The results of these programs help develop better practices in occupational health and safety, radiation protection, and environmental science.

  11. Page 1Laser Safety Training Laser Institute of America Laser Safety Laser Institute of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Page 1Laser Safety Training © Laser Institute of America 1 Laser Safety © Laser Institute of America Laser Safety: Hazards, Bioeffects, and Control Measures Laser Institute of America Gus Anibarro Education Manager 2Laser Safety © Laser Institute of America Laser Safety Overview Laser Safety Accidents

  12. Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Panel annual report, Fiscal year 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Fiscal Year 1992, the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Panel (``the Panel``) handled 38 proceedings. The cases addressed issues in the construction, operation, and maintenance of commercial nuclear power reactors and other activities requiring a license from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This reports sets out the Panel`s caseload during the year and summarizes, highlights, and analyzes how the wide-ranging issues raised in those proceedings were addressed by the Panel`s judges and licensing boards.

  13. B PLANT DOCUMENTED SAFETY ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DODD, E.N.; KERR, N.R.

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the documented safety analysis (DSA) and Central Plateau Remediation Project (CP) requirements that apply to surveillance and maintenance (S&M) activities at the 221-B Canyon Building and ancillary support structures (B Plant). The document replaces BHI-010582, Documented Safety Analysis for the B-Plant Facility. The B Plant is non-operational, deactivated and undergoing long term S&M prior to decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). This DSA is compliant with 10 CFR 830, Nuclear Safety Management, Subpart B, ''Safety Basis Requirements.'' The DSA was developed in accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) standard DOE-STD-1120-98, Integration of Environment, Safety, and Health into Facility Disposition Activities (DOE 1998) per Table 2 of 10 CFR 830 Appendix A, DOE Richland Operation Office (RL) direction (02-ABD-0053, Fluor Hanford Nuclear Safety Basis Strategy and Criteria) for facilities in long term S&M, and RL Direction (02-ABD-0091, ''FHI Nuclear Safety Expectations for Nuclear Facilities in Surveillance and Maintenance''). A crosswalk was prepared to identify potential inconsistencies between the previous B Plant safety analysis and DOE-STD-1120-98 guidance. In general, the safety analysis met the criteria of DOE-STD-1120-98. Some format and content changes have been made, including incorporating recent facility modifications and updating the evaluation guidelines and control selection criteria in accordance with RL direction (02-ABD-0053). The facility fire hazard analysis (FHA) and Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) are appended to this DSA as an aid to the users, to minimize editorial redundancy, and to provide an efficient basis for update.

  14. Corporate Analysis of DOE Safety Performance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security (EHSS), Office of Analysis develops analysis tools and performance dashboards, and conducts analysis of DOE safety performance corporately and on a variety of specific environment, safety and health topics.

  15. DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & SAFETY CHEMICAL HYGIENE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & SAFETY CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN #12, 2014 #12;University of Delaware Department of Environmental Health & Safety Chemical Hygiene) #12;University of Delaware Department of Environmental Health & Safety Chemical Hygiene Plan

  16. Pipeline Safety Program Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    programs prepared by pipeline operators in accordance with Federal pipeline safety regulations, grounding, and interference, · environmentally sensitive areas, · federal pipeline safety regulationsPipeline Safety Program Oak Ridge National Laboratory managed by UT-Battelle, LLC for the U

  17. Table of Organization Environmental Health & Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    Safety Continues Page 3 Lauren Kelly Manager Hazardous Materials June, 2014 James Kaznosky, Senior Research Safety Lauren Kelly Manager Hazardous Materials Radioactive Waste (only) Hazardous Materials Assistant Physicist Vacant Assistant Physicist 2 #12;Environmental Safety/Hazardous Materials Management

  18. Helpful links for materials transport, safety, etc.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Helpful links for materials transport, safety, etc. relating to experiment safety at the APS. Internal Reference Material: Transporting Hazardous Materials "Natural" radioactivity...

  19. Office of Worker Safety and Health Policy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Worker Safety and Health Policy establishes Departmental expectations for worker safety and health through the development of rules, directives and guidance.

  20. RADIATION SAFETY MANUAL POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yuanlin

    RADIATION SAFETY MANUAL POLICIES AND PROCEDURES FOR RADIATION PROTECTION AT TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY................................................................................................................I-1 B. Radiation Protection Program...............................................................................I-3 D. Radiation Safety Management

  1. BNL | CFN Operations Safety Awareness (COSA) Training

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CFN Operations Safety Awareness (COSA) Training All users at the CFN must complete the CFN Operations Safety Awareness (COSA) Training before they can access the facilities. COSA...

  2. Hazardous Material Transportation Safety (South Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation authorizes the Division of Highway Safety, in the Department of Public Safety, to promulgate regulations pertaining to the safe transportation of hazardous materials by a motor...

  3. Safety and Security Enfrocment Process Overview

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    are to enhance and protect worker safety and health, nuclear safety, and classified information security by fostering a culture that seeks to attain and sustain compliance...

  4. Safety and Security Enforcement Process Overview

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    SAFETY AND SECURITY ENFORCEMENT PROCESS OVERVIEW August 2012 OFFICE OF ENFORCEMENT AND OVERSIGHT OFFICE OF HEALTH, SAFETY AND SECURITY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AUGUST 2012 DOE...

  5. CFN Ops Plan | Experimental Safety Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experimental Safety Committee The CFN Experimental Safety Committee will consist of the members listed below. Additional SME's from the lab support divisions will be added as...

  6. Nuclear Explosive Safety Evaluation Processes - DOE Directives...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Admin Chg 1, Nuclear Explosive Safety Evaluation Processes by Carl Sykes Functional areas: Administrative Change, Defense Nuclear Facility Safety and Health Requirement, Defense...

  7. Interdisciplinary: Industrial Hygienist/Safety Engineer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position is located in the Office of Worker Safety and Health Assessments that conducts assessments to provide critical feedback and objective information on occupational safety and health...

  8. Integration Issues of Cells into Battery Packs for Plug-in and Hybrid Electric Vehicles: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pesaran, A. A.; Kim, G. H.; Keyser, M.

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main barriers to increased market share of hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and commercialization of plug-in HEVs are the cost, safety, and life of lithium ion batteries. Significant effort is being directed to address these issues for lithium ion cells. However, even the best cells may not perform as well when integrated into packs for vehicles because of the environment in which vehicles operate. This paper discusses mechanical, electrical, and thermal integration issues and vehicle interface issues that could impact the cost, life, and safety of the system. It also compares the advantages and disadvantages of using many small cells versus a few large cells and using prismatic cells versus cylindrical cells.

  9. CCB Laboratory Safety Orientation Checklist Laboratory Safety Training Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Eric

    ) Location and use of hazardous waste accumulation areas Location of Safety Data hazardous materials, equipment, or processes that pertain to the research program and meeting area Location of fire extinguishers and closest pull station Location

  10. International trade and waste and fuel managment issue, 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

    2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of the January-February issue is on international trade and waste and fuel managment. Major articles/reports in this issue include: New plants with high safety and availability, by Bill Poirier, Westinghouse Electric Company; Increased reliability and competitiveness, by Russell E. Stachowski, GE Energy, Nuclear; Fuel for long-term supply of nuclear power, by Kumiaki Moriya, Hitachi, Ltd., Japan; Super high burnup fuel, By Noboru Itagaki and Tamotsu Murata, Nuclear Fuel Industries LTD., Japan; Zero fuel failures by 2010, by Tom Patten, AREVA NP Inc.; Decommissioning opportunities in the UK, by David Brown and William Thorn, US Department of Commerce; Industry's three challenges, by Dale E. Klein, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission; and, A step ahead of the current ABWR's, compiled by Claire Zurek, GE Energy.

  11. Digital upgrade issues and the evolving regulatory environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meininger, R. D. [CHAR Services, Inc., 400 E. Main St., Annville, PA 17003 (United States)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper deals with the qualification of an Instrumentation and Control (I and C) upgrade for Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) in the plant, focusing on the interpretation of the NRC Regulatory Guide 1.180 Revision 1, 'Guidelines for Evaluating Electromagnetic and Radio-Frequency Interference in Safety-Related Instrumentation and Control Systems.' Options presented by Reg. Guide 1.180 are discussed along with alternative EMC Guidelines being used by nuclear power plants. Problems commonly encountered during the EMC qualification process are discussed and suggestions presented on how to deal with these common problems. Also included is a discussion of an emerging issue of how to address the issue of EMC of replacement discrete modules or printer circuit (PC) boards in a system that was either previously qualified or never qualified for EMC. (authors)

  12. Reactor Safety Research Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edler, S. K.

    1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) from January 1 through March 31, 1981, for the Division of Reactor Safety Research within the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision-making regarding pipeto- pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Core thermal models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-ofcoolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation, severe fuel damage, and postaccident coolability tests for the ESSOR reactor Super Sara Test Program, Ispra, Italy; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

  13. Reactor Safety Research Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dotson, CW

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest laboratory from October 1 through December 31, 1979, for the Division of Reactor Safety Research within the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Evaluation of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibilty of determining structural graphite strength, evaluating the feasibilty of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the remaining integrity of pressurized water reactor steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Test assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include the loss-of-coolant accident simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; the fuel rod deformation and post-accident coolability tests for the ESSOR Test Reactor Program, lspra, Italy; the blowdown and reflood tests in the test facility at Cadarache, France; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and the experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

  14. CRITICALITY SAFETY CONTROLS AND THE SAFETY BASIS AT PFP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kessler, S

    2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    With the implementation of DOE Order 420.1B, Facility Safety, and DOE-STD-3007-2007, 'Guidelines for Preparing Criticality Safety Evaluations at Department of Energy Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities', a new requirement was imposed that all criticality safety controls be evaluated for inclusion in the facility Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) and that the evaluation process be documented in the site Criticality Safety Program Description Document (CSPDD). At the Hanford site in Washington State the CSPDD, HNF-31695, 'General Description of the FH Criticality Safety Program', requires each facility develop a linking document called a Criticality Control Review (CCR) to document performance of these evaluations. Chapter 5, Appendix 5B of HNF-7098, Criticality Safety Program, provided an example of a format for a CCR that could be used in lieu of each facility developing its own CCR. Since the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) is presently undergoing Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D), new procedures are being developed for cleanout of equipment and systems that have not been operated in years. Existing Criticality Safety Evaluations (CSE) are revised, or new ones written, to develop the controls required to support D&D activities. Other Hanford facilities, including PFP, had difficulty using the basic CCR out of HNF-7098 when first implemented. Interpretation of the new guidelines indicated that many of the controls needed to be elevated to TSR level controls. Criterion 2 of the standard, requiring that the consequence of a criticality be examined for establishing the classification of a control, was not addressed. Upon in-depth review by PFP Criticality Safety staff, it was not clear that the programmatic interpretation of criterion 8C could be applied at PFP. Therefore, the PFP Criticality Safety staff decided to write their own CCR. The PFP CCR provides additional guidance for the evaluation team to use by clarifying the evaluation criteria in DOE-STD-3007-2007. In reviewing documents used in classifying controls for Nuclear Safety, it was noted that DOE-HDBK-1188, 'Glossary of Environment, Health, and Safety Terms', defines an Administrative Control (AC) in terms that are different than typically used in Criticality Safety. As part of this CCR, a new term, Criticality Administrative Control (CAC) was defined to clarify the difference between an AC used for criticality safety and an AC used for nuclear safety. In Nuclear Safety terms, an AC is a provision relating to organization and management, procedures, recordkeeping, assessment, and reporting necessary to ensure safe operation of a facility. A CAC was defined as an administrative control derived in a criticality safety analysis that is implemented to ensure double contingency. According to criterion 2 of Section IV, 'Linkage to the Documented Safety Analysis', of DOESTD-3007-2007, the consequence of a criticality should be examined for the purposes of classifying the significance of a control or component. HNF-PRO-700, 'Safety Basis Development', provides control selection criteria based on consequence and risk that may be used in the development of a Criticality Safety Evaluation (CSE) to establish the classification of a component as a design feature, as safety class or safety significant, i.e., an Engineered Safety Feature (ESF), or as equipment important to safety; or merely provides defense-in-depth. Similar logic is applied to the CACs. Criterion 8C of DOE-STD-3007-2007, as written, added to the confusion of using the basic CCR from HNF-7098. The PFP CCR attempts to clarify this criterion by revising it to say 'Programmatic commitments or general references to control philosophy (e.g., mass control or spacing control or concentration control as an overall control strategy for the process without specific quantification of individual limits) is included in the PFP DSA'. Table 1 shows the PFP methodology for evaluating CACs. This evaluation process has been in use since February of 2008 and has proven to be simple and effective. Each control identified i

  15. Future Fuels: Issues and Opportunities

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    R Y S L E R G R O U P Fuel Quality Issues * Cetane * Lubricity * Aromatics * Sulfur * Biodiesel - adequate quality standards needed * GTL, CTL, and BTL -- The Future 9142005 2 C...

  16. Modelling a Car Safety Controller in Road Tunnels using Hybrid Petri Nets A. Bobbio[1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horváth, András

    Modelling a Car Safety Controller in Road Tunnels using Hybrid Petri Nets A. Bobbio[1] , M this specific issue and proposes a hybrid modeling approach based on fluid Petri nets (FPN). An FPN is used that FPN is a valid paradigm to model the dynamics of a car in a detailed way. 1 Introduction In the last

  17. Modifying locally the safety profile to improve the confinement of magnetic field lines in tokamak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Modifying locally the safety profile to improve the confinement of magnetic field lines in tokamak of those (m, n) mode amplitudes. A practical implementation in tokamak plasmas should involve electron tokamak plasmas is one of the critically important issues for the achievement of a viable fusion reactor

  18. Component Failure Behaviour: Patterns and Reuse in Automated System Safety Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Trees and Failure Modes and Effects Analyses (FMEAs) can be automatically derived from a topological of failure patterns in conjunction with automated fault tree and FMEA synthesis algorithms can help on safety is universal, the issue is perhaps more urgent in the automotive industry which currently

  19. SafeCert 2008 Model-Based Safety-Cases for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    characterisations. From this, open research issues are derived. Keywords: Safety case, model-based, structured approaches exist: Leveson et al. [7] describe an FTA-like approach to examine Ada programs, while Giese et al hazards to determine how much of a threat they pose, i.e. the severity and likelihood of potential

  20. Free Issues Subscribe to BW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Xiaodong

    & DESIGN Home Page Architecture Brand Equity Auto Design Game Room SMALLBIZ Smart Answers Success Stories Commentaries and Market news. Financial Software Guide Compare Small Business Financial Software. Download Wildstrom: Tech Maven AUTOS Home Page Auto Reviews Classic Cars Car Care & Safety Hybrids INNOVATION