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Sample records for unr au ccny

  1. Rationalization of Au concentration and distribution in AuNi...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Rationalization of Au concentration and distribution in AuNi@Pt core-shell nanoparticles for oxygen reduction reaction Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become ...

  2. Magnetoresistance of Au films

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, D. L.; Song, X. H.; Zhang, X; Zhang, Xiaoguang

    2014-01-01

    Measurement of the magnetoresistance (MR) of Au films as a function of temperature and film thickness reveals a strong dependence on grain size distribution and clear violation of the Kohler s rule. Using a model of random resistor network, we show that this result can be explained if the MR arises entirely from inhomogeneity due to grain boundary scattering and thermal activation of grain boundary atoms.

  3. AU Organization Chart | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AU Organization Chart AU Organization Chart AU Organization Chart: December 22, 2015 PDF icon AU Organization Chart: December 22, 2015 More Documents & Publications FTCP Senior Technical Safety Manager (STSM) Status Report USW Health Safety and Environment Conference - HSS Workshop Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy.

  4. Interpretation of the first data on central Au+Au collisions at (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Interpretation of the first data on central Au+Au collisions at Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Interpretation of the first data on central Au+Au collisions at We compare three semimicroscopic theories to the first data on particle production in central Au+Au collisions taken at RHIC by the PHOBOS Collaboration as well as to existing data on central Pb+Pb collisions taken at the SPS by the NA49 Collaboration. The Linear Extrapolation of Ultrarelativistic

  5. Rationalization of Au concentration and distribution in AuNi@Pt core-shell

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    nanoparticles for oxygen reduction reaction (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Rationalization of Au concentration and distribution in AuNi@Pt core-shell nanoparticles for oxygen reduction reaction Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on September 18, 2016 Title: Rationalization of Au concentration and distribution in AuNi@Pt core-shell nanoparticles for oxygen reduction reaction Improving the activity and stability of Pt-based core-shell

  6. Au-Pt heteroaggregate dendritic nanostructures and Au-Pt alloy nanoparticles and their use as catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eichhorn, Bryan W. (University Park, MD); Zhou, Shenghu (Greenbelt, MD); Jackson, Gregory Scott (University Park, MD)

    2011-10-18

    Au--Pt heteroaggregate dendritic nanostructures and AuPt alloy nanoparticles, and their use as anodic catalysts in fuel cells.

  7. RHIC Au beam in Run 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, S. Y.

    2014-09-15

    Au beam at the RHIC ramp in run 2014 is reviewed together with the run 2011 and run 2012. Observed bunch length and longitudinal emittance are compared with the IBS simulations. The IBS growth rate of the longitudinal emittance in run 2014 is similar to run 2011, and both are larger than run 2012. This is explained by the large transverse emittance at high intensity observed in run 2012, but not in run 2014. The big improvement of the AGS ramping in run 2014 might be related to this change. The importance of the injector intensity improvement in run 2014 is emphasized, which gives rise to the initial luminosity improvement of 50% in run 2014, compared with the previous Au-Au run 2011. In addition, a modified IBS model, which is calibrated using the RHIC Au runs from 9.8 GeV/n to 100 GeV/n, is presented and used in the study.

  8. Suppression of Upsilon production in d + Au and Au + Au collisions at root s(NN) = 200 GeV (vol 735, pg 127, 2014)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Gliske, S.; Krueger, K.; Spinka, H. M.; Underwood, D.G.

    2014-07-30

    We report measurements of ? meson production in p + p, d +Au, and Au+Aucollisions using the STAR detector at RHIC. We compare the ? yield to the measured cross section in p + p collisions in order to quantify any modifications of the yield in cold nuclear matter using d +Au data and in hot nuclear matter using Au+Au data separated into three centrality classes. Our p +p measurement is based on three times the statistics of our previous result. We obtain a nuclear modification factor for ? (1S + 2S + 3S) in the rapidity range |y| < 1 in d + Aucollisions of RdAu = 0.79 0.24(stat.) 0.03(syst.) 0.10(p + p syst.). A comparison with models including shadowing and initial state parton energy loss indicates the presence of additional cold-nuclear matter suppression. Similarly, in the top 10% most-central Au + Au collisions, we measure a nuclear modification factor of R AA = 0.49 0.1(stat.) 0.02(syst.) 0.06(p + p syst.), which is a larger suppression factor than that seen in cold nuclear matter. Our results are consistent with complete suppression of excited-state ? mesons in Au + Aucollisions. The additional suppression in Au + Au is consistent with the level expected in model calculations that include the presence of a hot, deconfined QuarkGluon Plasma. However, understanding the suppression seen in d + Au is still needed before any definitive statements about the nature of the suppression in Au + Au can be made.

  9. Microsoft Word - AU Funtional Area Points of Contact by Office...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Functional Area Points of Contact Listing by AU Office Director Page 1 of 11 Integrated ... Area Points of Contact Listing by AU Office Director Page 2 of 11 COMSEC ...

  10. From the ternary Eu(Au/In)2 and EuAu4(Au/In)2 with remarkable Au/In distributions to a new structure type: The gold-rich Eu5Au16(Au/In)6 structure

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Steinberg, Simon; Card, Nathan; Mudring, Anja -Verena

    2015-08-13

    The ternary Eu(Au/In)2 (EuAu0.46In1.54(2)) (I), EuAu4(Au/In)2 (EuAu4+xIn2–x with x = 0.75(2) (II), 0.93(2), and 1.03(2)), and Eu5Au16(Au/In)6 (Eu5Au17.29In4.71(3)) (III) have been synthesized, and their structures were characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. I and II crystallize with the CeCu2-type (Pearson Symbol oI12; Imma; Z = 4; a = 4.9018(4) Å; b = 7.8237(5) Å; c = 8.4457(5) Å) and the YbAl4Mo2-type (tI14; I4/mmm; Z = 2; a = 7.1612(7) Å; c = 5.5268(7) Å) and exhibit significant Au/In disorder. I is composed of an Au/In-mixed diamond-related host lattice encapsulating Eu atoms, while the structure of II features ribbons of distorted, squaredmore » Au8 prisms enclosing Eu, Au, and In atoms. Combination of these structural motifs leads to a new structure type as observed for Eu5Au16(Au/In)6 (Eu5Au17.29In4.71(3)) (oS108; Cmcm; Z = 4; a = 7.2283(4) Å; b = 9.0499(6) Å; c = 34.619(2) Å), which formally represents a one-dimensional intergrowth of the series EuAu2–“EuAu4In2”. The site preferences of the disordered Au/In positions in II were investigated for different hypothetical “EuAu4(Au/In)2” models using the projector-augmented wave method and indicate that these structures attempt to optimize the frequencies of the heteroatomic Au–In contacts. Furthermore, a chemical bonding analysis on two “EuAu5In” and “EuAu4In2” models employed the TB-LMTO-ASA method and reveals that the subtle interplay between the local atomic environments and the bond energies determines the structural and site preferences for these systems.« less

  11. Synthesis, structure, and bonding in K12Au21Sn4. A polar intermetallic compound with dense Au20 and open AuSn4 layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Bin; Kim, Sung-Jin; Miller, Gordon J.; and Corbett, John D.

    2009-10-29

    The new phase K{sub 12}Au{sub 21}Sn{sub 4} has been synthesized by direct reaction of the elements at elevated temperatures. Single crystal X-ray diffraction established its orthorhombic structure, space group Pmmn (No. 59), a = 12.162(2); b = 18.058(4); c = 8.657(2) {angstrom}, V = 1901.3(7) {angstrom}{sup 3}, and Z = 2. The structure consists of infinite puckered sheets of vertex-sharing gold tetrahedra (Au{sub 20}) that are tied together by thin layers of alternating four-bonded-Sn and -Au atoms (AuSn{sub 4}). Remarkably, the dense but electron-poorer blocks of Au tetrahedra coexist with more open and saturated Au-Sn layers, which are fragments of a zinc blende type structure that maximize tetrahedral heteroatomic bonding outside of the network of gold tetrahedra. LMTO band structure calculations reveal metallic properties and a pseudogap at 256 valence electrons per formula unit, only three electrons fewer than in the title compound and at a point at which strong Au-Sn bonding is optimized. Additionally, the tight coordination of the Au framework atoms by K plays an important bonding role: each Au tetrahedra has 10 K neighbors and each K atom has 8-12 Au contacts. The appreciably different role of the p element Sn in this structure from that in the triel members in K{sub 3}Au{sub 5}In and Rb{sub 2}Au{sub 3}Tl appears to arise from its higher electron count which leads to better p-bonding (valence electron concentrations = 1.32 versus 1.22).

  12. Collision-spike sputtering of Au nanoparticles

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sandoval, Luis; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2015-08-06

    Ion irradiation of nanoparticles leads to enhanced sputter yields if the nanoparticle size is of the order of the ion penetration depth. While this feature is reasonably well understood for collision-cascade sputtering, we explore it in the regime of collision-spike sputtering using molecular-dynamics simulation. For this specific case of 200-keV Xe bombardment of Au particles, we show that collision spikes lead to abundant sputtering with an average yield of 397 ± 121 atoms compared to only 116 ± 48 atoms for a bulk Au target. Only around 31% of the impact energy remains in the nanoparticles after impact; the remaindermore » is transported away by the transmitted projectile and the ejecta. The sputter yield of supported nanoparticles is estimated to be around 80% of that of free nanoparticles due to the suppression of forward sputtering.« less

  13. OPERATION OF THE RHIC AU ION SOURCE.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STESKI,D.B.; ALESSI,J.; BENJAMIN,J.; CARLSON,C.; MANNI,M.; THIEBERGER,P.; WIPLICH,M.

    2001-09-02

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is beginning its second year of operation. A cesium sputter ion source injecting into a tandem Van de Graaff provides the gold ions for RHIC. The ion source is operated in the pulsed beam mode and produces a 500{micro}sec long pulse of Au{sup -} with a peak intensity of 290pA at the entrance of the tandem. After acceleration in the tandem and post stripping, this results in a beam of Au{sup +32} with an intensity of 80e{micro}A and an energy of 182MeV. Over the last several years, a series of improvements have been made to increase the intensity of the pulsed beam from the ion source. Details of the source performance and improvements will be presented. In addition, an effort is under way to provide other beam species for RHIC collisions.

  14. The electrical and mechanical properties of Au-V and Au-V{sub 2}O{sub 5}

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    thin films for wear-resistant RF MEMS switches (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: The electrical and mechanical properties of Au-V and Au-V{sub 2}O{sub 5} thin films for wear-resistant RF MEMS switches Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The electrical and mechanical properties of Au-V and Au-V{sub 2}O{sub 5} thin films for wear-resistant RF MEMS switches To explore alternatives to the use of pure Au in Ohmic contact RF microelectromechanical switches, we have

  15. Simulation of Electric Field in Semi Insulating Au/CdTe/Au Detector under Flux

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franc, J.; James, R.; Grill, R.; Kubat, J.; Belas, E.; Hoschl, P.; Moravec, P.; Praus, P.

    2009-08-02

    We report our simulations on the profile of the electric field in semi insulating CdTe and CdZnTe with Au contacts under radiation flux. The type of the space charge and electric field distribution in the Au/CdTe/Au structure is at high fluxes result of a combined influence of charge formed due to band bending at the electrodes and from photo generated carriers, which are trapped at deep levels. Simultaneous solution of drift-diffusion and Poisson equations is used for the calculation. We show, that the space charge originating from trapped photo-carriers starts to dominate at fluxes 10{sup 15}-10{sup 16}cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}, when the influence of contacts starts to be negligible.

  16. DOElAU62350-43

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    DOElAU62350-43 REV. 2 BASELINE RISK ASSESSMENT OF GROUND WATER CONTAMINATION AT THE MONUMENT VALLEY URANIUM MILL TAILINGS SITE CANE VALLEY, ARIZONA March 1996 INTENDED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE This report has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available in paper copy and microfiche Number of pages in this report: 160 DOE and DOE contractors can obtain copies of this report from: Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (61 5) 576-8401 This report is

  17. RHIC performance for FY2011 Au+Au heavy ion run

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marr, G.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blackler, I.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Butler, J.; Carlson, C.; Connolly, R.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, K.A.; Fedotov, A.V.; Fischer, W.; Fu, W.; Gardner, C.J.; Gassner, D.M.; Glenn, J.W.; Gu, X.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Huang, H.; Ingrassia, P.F.; Jamilkowski, J.P.; Kling, N.; Lafky, M.; Laster, J.S.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; Mapes, M.; Marusic, A.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.J.; Minty, M.G.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Naylor, C.; Nemesure, S.; Polizzo, S.; Ptitsyn, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Sampson, P.; Sandberg, J.; Schoefer, V.; Schultheiss, C.; Severino, F.; Shrey, T.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Tepikian, S.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.E.; VanKuik, B.; Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Zaltsman, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-09-04

    Following the Fiscal Year (FY) 2010 (Run-10) Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) Au+Au run, RHIC experiment upgrades sought to improve detector capabilities. In turn, accelerator improvements were made to improve the luminosity available to the experiments for this run (Run-11). These improvements included: a redesign of the stochastic cooling systems for improved reliability; a relocation of 'common' RF cavities to alleviate intensity limits due to beam loading; and an improved usage of feedback systems to control orbit, tune and coupling during energy ramps as well as while colliding at top energy. We present an overview of changes to the Collider and review the performance of the collider with respect to instantaneous and integrated luminosity goals. At the conclusion of the FY 2011 polarized proton run, preparations for heavy ion run proceeded on April 18, with Au+Au collisions continuing through June 28. Our standard operations at 100 GeV/nucleon beam energy was bracketed by two shorter periods of collisions at lower energies (9.8 and 13.5 GeV/nucleon), continuing a previously established program of low and medium energy runs. Table 1 summarizes our history of heavy ion operations at RHIC.

  18. Preparations for p-Au run in 2015

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, C.

    2014-12-31

    The p-Au particle collision is a unique category of collision runs. This is resulted from the different charge mass ratio of the proton and fully stripped Au ion (1 vs.79/197). The p-Au run requires a special acceleration ramp, and movement of a number of beam components as required by the beam trajectories. The DX magnets will be moved for the first time in the history of RHIC. In this note, the planning and preparations for p-Au run will be presented.

  19. Identification of Au–S complexes on Au(100)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Walen, Holly; Liu, Da -Jiang; Oh, Junepyo; Yang, Hyun Jin; Kim, Yousoo; Thiel, P. A.

    2016-01-25

    In this study, using a combination of scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we have identified a set of related Au–S complexes that form on Au(100), when sulfur adsorbs and lifts the hexagonal surface reconstruction. The predominant complex is diamond-shaped with stoichiometry Au4S5. All of the complexes can be regarded as combinations of S–Au–S subunits. The complexes exist within, or at the edges of, p(2 × 2) sulfur islands that cover the unreconstructed Au regions, and are observed throughout the range of S coverage examined in this study, 0.009 to 0.12 monolayers. A qualitative model is developedmore » which incorporates competitive formation of complexes, Au rafts, and p(2 × 2) sulfur islands, as Au atoms are released by the surface structure transformation.« less

  20. Sideward flow in Au+Au collisions between 2A and 8A GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, H.; Ajitanand, N.N.; Alexander, J.; Anderson, M.; Best, D.; Brady, F.P.; Case, T.; Caskey, W.; Cebra, D.; Chance, J.; Cole, B.; Crowe, K.; Das, A.; Draper, J.; Gilkes, M.; Gushue, S.; Heffner, M.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Huo, L.; Justice, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kintner, J.; Klay, J.; Krofcheck, D.; Lacey, R.; Lisa, M.A.; Liu, Y.M.; McGrath, R.; Milosevich, Z.; Odyniec, G.; Olson, D.; Panitkin, S.Y.; Porile, N.; Rai, G.; Ritter, H.G.; Romero, J.; Scharenberg, R.; Schroeder, L.S.; Srivastava, B.; Stone, N.T.B.; Symons, T.J.M.; Wang, S.; Whitfield, J.; Wienold, T.; Witt, R.; Wood, L.; Yang, X.; Zhang, W.N.; Zhang, Y.; E895 Collaboration

    2000-04-05

    Using the large acceptance Time Projection Chamber of experiment E895 at Brookhaven, measurements of collective sideward flow in Au + Au collisions at beam energies of 2A, 4A, 6A, and 8A GeV are presented in the form of in-plane transverse momentum

  1. Elliptic flow: transition from out-of-plane to in-plane emissionin Au + Au collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinkenburg, C.; Ajitanand, N.N.; Alexander, J.M.; Anderson, M.; Best, D.; Brady, F.P.; Case, T.; Caskey, W.; Cebra, D.; Chance, J.L.; Chung, P.; Cole, B.; Crowe, K.; Das, A.C.; Draper, J.E.; Elmaani, A.; Gilkes, M.L.; Gushue, S.; Heffner, M.; Hirsch, A.S.; Hjort, E.L.; Huo,L.; Justice, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kintner, J.C.; Klay, J.; Krofcheck, D.; Lacey, R.A.; Lauret, J.; Law, C.; Lisa, M.A.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.M.; McGrath, R.; Milosevich, Z.; Odyniec, G.; Olson, D.L.; Panitkin, S.Y.; Porile, N.T.; Rai, G.; Ritter, H.G.; Romero, J.L.; Scharenberg, R.P.; Schroeder, L.; Srivastava, B.; Stone, N.T.B.; Symons,T.J.M.; Whitfield, J.; Wienold, T.; Witt, R.; Wood, L.; Zhang, W.N.; E895Collaboration; Danielewicz, P.; Gossiaux, P.B.

    1999-07-31

    We have measured the proton elliptic flow excitation function for the Au+Au system spanning the beam energy range (2-8)A GeV. The excitation function shows a transition from negative to positive elliptic flow at a beam energy, Etr {approx} 4A GeV. Detailed comparisons with calculations from a relativistic Boltzmann equation are presented. The comparisons suggest a softening of the nuclear equation of state from a stiff form (K {approx} 380 MeV) at low beam energies (Ebeam < 2A GeV) to a softer form (K {approx} 210 MeV) at higher energies ( Ebeam < 4A GeV) where the calculated baryon density rho {approx} 4 rho 0.

  2. CO Oxidation mechanism on CeO2-supported Au nanoclusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim H. Y.; Henkelman, G.

    2013-09-08

    To reveal the richer chemistry of CO oxidation by CeO2 supported Au Nanoclusters(NCs)/Nanoparticles, we design Au13 and Au12 supported on a flat and a stepped-CeO2 model (Au/CeO2) and study various kinds of CO oxidation mechanisms at the Au-CeO2 interface and the Au NC as well.

  3. Observation of D0 meson nuclear modifications in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; et al

    2014-09-30

    We report the first measurement of charmed-hadron (D0) production via the hadronic decay channel (D0→K-+π+) in Au+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV with the STAR experiment. The charm production cross section per nucleon-nucleon collision at midrapidity scales with the number of binary collisions, Nbin, from p+p to central Au+Au collisions. The D0 meson yields in central Au+Aucollisions are strongly suppressed compared to those in p+p scaled by Nbin, for transverse momenta pT>3 GeV/c, demonstrating significant energy loss of charm quarks in the hot and dense medium. An enhancement at intermediate pT is also observed. Model calculations including strong charm-medium interactions andmore » coalescence hadronization describe our measurements.« less

  4. Observation of D0 meson nuclear modifications in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; et al

    2014-09-30

    We report the first measurement of charmed-hadron (D0) production via the hadronic decay channel (D0→K-+π+) in Au+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV with the STAR experiment. The charm production cross section per nucleon-nucleon collision at midrapidity scales with the number of binary collisions, Nbin, from p+p to central Au+Au collisions. The D0 meson yields in central Au+Aucollisions are strongly suppressed compared to those in p+p scaled by Nbin, for transverse momenta pT>3 GeV/c, demonstrating significant energy loss of charm quarks in the hot and dense medium. An enhancement at intermediate pT is also observed. Model calculations including strong charm-medium interactions andmore »coalescence hadronization describe our measurements.« less

  5. Corrigendum to Suppression of ? production in d+Au and Au+Au collisions at ? SNN = 200 GeV" [Phys. Lett. B 735 (2014) 127-137

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-04-01

    We report measurements of ? meson production in p + p, d + Au, and Au+Au collisions using the STAR detector at RHIC. We compare the ? yield to the measured cross section in p + p collisions in order to quantify any modifications of the yield in cold nuclear matter using d + Au data and in hot nuclear matter using Au+Au data separated into three centrality classes. Our p + p measurement is based on three times the statistics of our previous result. We obtain a nuclear modification factor for Upsilon (1S + 2S + 3S) in the rapidity range |y| < 1 in d + Au collisions of RdAu = 0.79 0.24(stat.) 0.03(syst.) 0.10(p + p syst.). A comparison with models including shadowing and initial state parton energy loss indicates the presence of additional cold-nuclear matter suppression. Similarly, in the top 10% most-central Au + Au collisions, we measure a nuclear modification factor of R AA = 0.49 0.1(stat.) 0.02(syst.) 0.06(p + p syst.), which is a larger suppression factor than that seen in cold nuclear matter. Our results are consistent with complete suppression of excited-state Upsilon mesons in Au + Au collisions. The additional suppression in Au + Au is consistent with the level expected in model calculations that include the presence of a hot, deconfined QuarkGluon Plasma. However, understanding the suppression seen in d + Au is still needed before any definitive statements about the nature of the suppression in Au + Au can be made.

  6. Corrigendum to “Suppression of Υ production in d+Au and Au+Au collisions at √ SNN = 200 GeV" [Phys. Lett. B 735 (2014) 127-137

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-04-01

    We report measurements of Υ meson production in p + p, d + Au, and Au+Au collisions using the STAR detector at RHIC. We compare the Υ yield to the measured cross section in p + p collisions in order to quantify any modifications of the yield in cold nuclear matter using d + Au data and in hot nuclear matter using Au+Au data separated into three centrality classes. Our p + p measurement is based on three times the statistics of our previous result. We obtain a nuclear modification factor for Upsilon (1S + 2S + 3S) in themore » rapidity range |y| < 1 in d + Au collisions of RdAu = 0.79 ± 0.24(stat.) ± 0.03(syst.) ± 0.10(p + p syst.). A comparison with models including shadowing and initial state parton energy loss indicates the presence of additional cold-nuclear matter suppression. Similarly, in the top 10% most-central Au + Au collisions, we measure a nuclear modification factor of R AA = 0.49 ±0.1(stat.) ±0.02(syst.) ±0.06(p + p syst.), which is a larger suppression factor than that seen in cold nuclear matter. Our results are consistent with complete suppression of excited-state Upsilon mesons in Au + Au collisions. The additional suppression in Au + Au is consistent with the level expected in model calculations that include the presence of a hot, deconfined Quark–Gluon Plasma. However, understanding the suppression seen in d + Au is still needed before any definitive statements about the nature of the suppression in Au + Au can be made.« less

  7. Corrigendum to “Suppression of Υ production in d+Au and Au+Au collisions at √ SNN = 200 GeV" [Phys. Lett. B 735 (2014) 127-137

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-04-01

    We report measurements of Υ meson production in p + p, d + Au, and Au+Au collisions using the STAR detector at RHIC. We compare the Υ yield to the measured cross section in p + p collisions in order to quantify any modifications of the yield in cold nuclear matter using d + Au data and in hot nuclear matter using Au+Au data separated into three centrality classes. Our p + p measurement is based on three times the statistics of our previous result. We obtain a nuclear modification factor for Upsilon (1S + 2S + 3S) in themore »rapidity range |y| dAu = 0.79 ± 0.24(stat.) ± 0.03(syst.) ± 0.10(p + p syst.). A comparison with models including shadowing and initial state parton energy loss indicates the presence of additional cold-nuclear matter suppression. Similarly, in the top 10% most-central Au + Au collisions, we measure a nuclear modification factor of R AA = 0.49 ±0.1(stat.) ±0.02(syst.) ±0.06(p + p syst.), which is a larger suppression factor than that seen in cold nuclear matter. Our results are consistent with complete suppression of excited-state Upsilon mesons in Au + Au collisions. The additional suppression in Au + Au is consistent with the level expected in model calculations that include the presence of a hot, deconfined Quark–Gluon Plasma. However, understanding the suppression seen in d + Au is still needed before any definitive statements about the nature of the suppression in Au + Au can be made.« less

  8. Graphene-Au Nanoparticles Composite-Based Electrochemical Aptamer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biosensors (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Graphene-Au Nanoparticles Composite-Based Electrochemical Aptamer Biosensors Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Graphene-Au Nanoparticles Composite-Based Electrochemical Aptamer Biosensors Authors: Guo, Shaojun [1] + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory [Los Alamos National Laboratory Publication Date: 2014-03-27 OSTI Identifier: 1126641 Report Number(s): LA-UR-13-28234 DOE Contract Number: AC52-06NA25396

  9. Graphene-Au Nanoparticles Composite-Based Electrochemical Aptamer

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Biosensors (Conference) | SciTech Connect Graphene-Au Nanoparticles Composite-Based Electrochemical Aptamer Biosensors Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Graphene-Au Nanoparticles Composite-Based Electrochemical Aptamer Biosensors Authors: Guo, Shaojun [1] + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory [Los Alamos National Laboratory Publication Date: 2014-03-27 OSTI Identifier: 1126641 Report Number(s): LA-UR-13-28234 DOE Contract Number: AC52-06NA25396 Resource Type:

  10. Exploiting Intrinsic Triangular Geometry in Relativistic He 3 + Au

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Collisions to Disentangle Medium Properties (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Exploiting Intrinsic Triangular Geometry in Relativistic He 3 + Au Collisions to Disentangle Medium Properties Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Exploiting Intrinsic Triangular Geometry in Relativistic He 3 + Au Collisions to Disentangle Medium Properties Authors: Nagle, J. L. ; Adare, A. ; Beckman, S. ; Koblesky, T. ; Koop, J. Orjuela ; McGlinchey, D. ; Romatschke, P. ; Carlson, J. ; Lynn, J. E. ;

  11. Graphene-Au Nanoparticles Composite-Based Electrochemical Aptamer

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Biosensors (Conference) | SciTech Connect Graphene-Au Nanoparticles Composite-Based Electrochemical Aptamer Biosensors Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Graphene-Au Nanoparticles Composite-Based Electrochemical Aptamer Biosensors × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information

  12. RHIC PERFORMANCE DURING THE FY10 200 GeV Au+Au HEAVY ION RUN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, K.A.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.; Bruno, D.; Carlson, C.; Connolly, R.; de Maria, R.; DOttavio, T.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Fu, W.; Gardner, C.; Gassner, D.; Glenn, J.W.; Hao, Y.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Huang, H.; Laster, J.; Lee, R.; Litvinenko, V.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Oerter, B.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsyn, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Russo, T.; Sampson, P.; Sandberg, J.; Satogata, T.; Severino, F.; Schoefer, V.; Schultheiss, C.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Tepikian, S.; Theisen, C.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Zaltsman, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2010-05-23

    Since the last successful RHIC Au+Au run in 2007 (Run-7), the RHIC experiments have made numerous detector improvements and upgrades. In order to benefit from the enhanced detector capabilities and to increase the yield of rare events in the acquired heavy ion data a significant increase in luminosity is essential. In Run-7 RHIC achieved an average store luminosity of = 12 x 10{sup 26} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} by operating with 103 bunches (out of 111 possible), and by squeezing to {beta}* = 0.85 m. This year, Run-10, we achieved = 20 x 10{sup 26} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, which put us an order of magnitude above the RHIC design luminosity. To reach these luminosity levels we decreased {beta}* to 0.75 m, operated with 111 bunches per ring, and reduced longitudinal and transverse emittances by means of bunched-beam stochastic cooling. In addition we introduced a lattice to suppress intra-beam scattering (IBS) in both RHIC rings, upgraded the RF control system, and separated transition crossing times in the two rings. We present an overview of the changes and the results of Run-10 performance.

  13. Azimuthal anisotophy in U + U and Au + Au collisions at RHIC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-11-24

    Collisions between prolate uranium nuclei are used to study how particle production and azimuthal anisotropies depend on initial geometry in heavy-ion collisions. We report the two- and four-particle cumulants, v2{2} and v2{4}, for charged hadrons from U+U collisions at √SNN = 193 GeV and Au+Au collisions at √SNN = 200 GeV. Nearly fully overlapping collisions are selected based on the energy deposited by spectators in zero degree calorimeters (ZDCs). Within this sample, the observed dependence of v2{2} on multiplicity demonstrates that ZDC information combined with multiplicity can preferentially select different overlap configurations in U+U collisions. As a result, we alsomore » show that v2 vs multiplicity can be better described by models, such as gluon saturation or quark participant models, that eliminate the dependence of the multiplicity on the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions.« less

  14. Azimuthal anisotophy in U + U and Au + Au collisions at RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-11-24

    Collisions between prolate uranium nuclei are used to study how particle production and azimuthal anisotropies depend on initial geometry in heavy-ion collisions. We report the two- and four-particle cumulants, v2{2} and v2{4}, for charged hadrons from U+U collisions at √SNN = 193 GeV and Au+Au collisions at √SNN = 200 GeV. Nearly fully overlapping collisions are selected based on the energy deposited by spectators in zero degree calorimeters (ZDCs). Within this sample, the observed dependence of v2{2} on multiplicity demonstrates that ZDC information combined with multiplicity can preferentially select different overlap configurations in U+U collisions. As a result, we also show that v2 vs multiplicity can be better described by models, such as gluon saturation or quark participant models, that eliminate the dependence of the multiplicity on the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions.

  15. Measurement of J/? Azimuthal Anisotropy in Au+Au Collisions at ?sNN=200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; et al

    2013-08-02

    The measurement of J/? azimuthal anisotropy is presented as a function of transverse momentum for different centralities in Au+Au collisions at ?sNN>/sub>=200 GeV. The measured J/? elliptic flow is consistent with zero within errors for transverse momentum between 2 and 10 GeV/c. Our measurement suggests that J/? particles with relatively large transverse momenta are not dominantly produced by coalescence from thermalized charm quarks, when comparing to model calculations.

  16. Measurement of J/? Azimuthal Anisotropy in Au+Au Collisions at ?sNN=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Banerjee, A.; Barnovska, Z.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bruna, E.; Bltmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Caldern de la Barca Snchez, M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chung, P.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Dhamija, S.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Ding, F.; Dion, A.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Fersch, R. G.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Gliske, S.; Grebenyuk, O. G.; Grosnick, D.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hajkova, O.; Hamed, A.; Han, L-X.; Harris, J. W.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jena, C.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lima, L. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Lu, Y.; Luo, X.; Luszczak, A.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Madagodagettige Don, D. M. M. D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mitrovski, M. K.; Mohammed, Y.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Munhoz, M. G.; Mustafa, M. K.; Naglis, M.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nogach, L. V.; Novak, J.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Oliveira, R. A. N.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Powell, C. B.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandacz, A.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, B.; Schmitz, N.; Schuster, T. R.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; deSouza, U. G.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Videbk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, W.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Xue, L.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I-K.; Zawisza, M.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.

    2013-08-02

    The measurement of J/? azimuthal anisotropy is presented as a function of transverse momentum for different centralities in Au+Au collisions at ?sNN>/sub>=200 GeV. The measured J/? elliptic flow is consistent with zero within errors for transverse momentum between 2 and 10 GeV/c. Our measurement suggests that J/? particles with relatively large transverse momenta are not dominantly produced by coalescence from thermalized charm quarks, when comparing to model calculations.

  17. AU Functional Area Points of Contact by Office Directors | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy AU Functional Area Points of Contact by Office Directors AU Functional Area Points of Contact by Office Directors AU functional area points of contact listing and contact information by AU Office Director (April 2015) PDF icon AU Functional Area Points of Contact by Office Directors - April 2015 More Documents & Publications Memorandum, Safeguards & Security Policy Panels - February 15, 2008 FAQS Sponsors and Recognized Experts Classification CommuniQué - Year: 2012

  18. Rationalization of Au concentration and distribution in AuNi@Pt core-shell nanoparticles for oxygen reduction reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    An, Wei; Liu, Ping

    2015-09-18

    Improving the activity and stability of Pt-based coreshell nanocatalysts for proton exchange membrane fuel cells while lowering Pt loading has been one of the big challenges in electrocatalysis. Here, using density functional theory, we report the effect of adding Au as the third element to enhance the durability and activity of Ni@Pt coreshell nanoparticles (NPs) during the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Our results show that the durability and activity of a Ni@Pt NP can be finely tuned by controlling Au concentration and distribution. For a NiAu@Pt NP, the durability can be greatly promoted by thermodynamically favorable segregation of Au to replace the Pt atoms at vertex, edge, and (100) facets on the shell, while still keeping the ORR activity on the active Pt(111) shell as high as that of Ni@Pt nanoparticles. Such behavior strongly depends on a direct interaction with the Ni interlayer. The results not only highlight the importance of interplay between surface strain on the shell and the interlayershell interaction in determining the durability and activity but also provide guidance on how to maximize the usage of Au to optimize the performance of coreshell (Pt) nanoparticles. As a result, such understanding has allowed us to discover a novel NiAu@Pt nanocatalyst for the ORR.

  19. Heterojunction metal-oxide-metal Au-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-Au single nanowire device for spintronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reddy, K. M. Punnoose, Alex; Hanna, Charles; Padture, Nitin P.

    2015-05-07

    In this report, we present the synthesis of heterojunction magnetite nanowires in alumina template and describe magnetic and electrical properties from a single nanowire device for spintronics applications. Heterojunction Au-Fe-Au nanowire arrays were electrodeposited in porous aluminum oxide templates, and an extensive and controlled heat treatment process converted Fe segment to nanocrystalline cubic magnetite phase with well-defined Au-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} interfaces as confirmed by the transmission electron microscopy. Magnetic measurements revealed Verwey transition shoulder around 120 K and a room temperature coercive field of 90 Oe. Current–voltage (I-V) characteristics of a single Au-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-Au nanowire have exhibited Ohmic behavior. Anomalous positive magnetoresistance of about 0.5% is observed on a single nanowire, which is attributed to the high spin polarization in nanowire device with pure Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} phase and nanocontact barrier. This work demonstrates the ability to preserve the pristine Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and well defined electrode contact metal (Au)–magnetite interface, which helps in attaining high spin polarized current.

  20. Rationalization of Au concentration and distribution in AuNi@Pt core-shell nanoparticles for oxygen reduction reaction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    An, Wei; Liu, Ping

    2015-09-18

    Improving the activity and stability of Pt-based core–shell nanocatalysts for proton exchange membrane fuel cells while lowering Pt loading has been one of the big challenges in electrocatalysis. Here, using density functional theory, we report the effect of adding Au as the third element to enhance the durability and activity of Ni@Pt core–shell nanoparticles (NPs) during the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Our results show that the durability and activity of a Ni@Pt NP can be finely tuned by controlling Au concentration and distribution. For a NiAu@Pt NP, the durability can be greatly promoted by thermodynamically favorable segregation of Au tomore » replace the Pt atoms at vertex, edge, and (100) facets on the shell, while still keeping the ORR activity on the active Pt(111) shell as high as that of Ni@Pt nanoparticles. Such behavior strongly depends on a direct interaction with the Ni interlayer. The results not only highlight the importance of interplay between surface strain on the shell and the interlayer–shell interaction in determining the durability and activity but also provide guidance on how to maximize the usage of Au to optimize the performance of core–shell (Pt) nanoparticles. As a result, such understanding has allowed us to discover a novel NiAu@Pt nanocatalyst for the ORR.« less

  1. Formation, Migration, and Reactivity of Au CO Complexes on Gold Surfaces

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Jun; McEntee, Monica; Tang, Wenjie; Neurock, Matthew; Baddorf, Arthur P.; Maksymovych, Petro; Yates, Jr, John T.

    2016-01-12

    Here, we report experimental as well as theoretical evidence that suggests Au CO complex formation upon the exposure of CO to active sites (step edges and threading dislocations) on a Au(111) surface. Room-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission infrared spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations point to Au CO complex formation and migration. Room-temperature STM of the Au(111) surface at CO pressures in the range from 10^ 8 to 10^ 4 Torr (dosage up to 10^6 langmuir) indicates Au atom extraction from dislocation sites of the herringbone reconstruction, mobile Au CO complex formation and diffusion, and Aumore » adatom cluster formation on both elbows and step edges on the Au surface. The formation and mobility of the Au CO complex result from the reduced Au Au bonding at elbows and step edges leading to stronger Au CO bonding and to the formation of a more positively charged CO (CO +) on Au. These studies indicate that the mobile Au CO complex is involved in the Au nanoparticle formation and reactivity, and that the positive charge on CO increases due to the stronger adsorption of CO at Au sites with lower coordination numbers.« less

  2. AuRu/AC as an effective catalyst for hydrogenation reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villa, Alberto; Chan-Thaw, Carine E.; Campisi, Sebastiano; Bianchi, Claudia L.; Wang, Di; Kotula, Paul G.; Kbel, Christian; Prati, Laura

    2015-03-23

    AuRu bimetallic catalysts have been prepared by sequential deposition of Au on Ru or vice versa obtaining different nanostructures: when Ru has been deposited on Au, a AucoreRushell has been observed, whereas the deposition of Au on Ru leads to a bimetallic phase with Ru enrichment on the surface. In the latter case, the unexpected Ru enrichment could be attributed to the weak adhesion of Ru on the carbon support, thus allowing Ru particles to diffuse on Au particles. Both structures result very active in catalysing the liquid phase hydrogenolysis of glycerol and levulinic acid but the activity, the selectivity and the stability depend on the structure of the bimetallic nanoparticles. Ru@Au/AC coreshell structure mostly behaved as the monometallic Ru, whereas the presence of bimetallic AuRu phase in Au@Ru/AC provides a great beneficial effect on both activity and stability.

  3. Low frequency noise in the unstable contact region of Au-to-Au microcontact for microelectromechanical system switches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qiu, Haodong; Wang, Hong; Ke, Feixiang

    2014-06-23

    The noise behavior of Au-to-Au microcontact for microelectromechanical system switches has been experimentally studied in the unstable contact region. The results suggest that the electrical conduction remains nonmetallic at the initial stage during contact formation due to the existence of alien films, and traps in the alien layer located at the contact interface could play an important role in determining the conduction noise. The conduction fluctuation induced by electron trapping-detrapping associated with the hydrocarbon layer is found to be an intrinsic noise source contributing to the low frequency noise in the unstable contact region.

  4. Dielectron Azimuthal Anisotropy at mid-rapidity in Au+Au collisions at root s=200GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.

    2014-12-11

    We report on the first measurement of the azimuthal anisotropy (v₂) of dielectrons (e⁺e⁻ pairs) at mid-rapidity from √(sNN)=200 GeV Au + Au collisions with the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), presented as a function of transverse momentum (pT) for different invariant-mass regions. In the mass region Meeee<2.9GeV/c², the measured dielectron v₂ is consistent, within experimental uncertainties, with that from the cc¯ contributions.

  5. ΛΛ correlation function in Au + Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-01-12

    In this study, we present ΛΛ correlation measurements in heavy-ion collisions for Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV using the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC). The Lednický-Lyuboshitz analytical model has been used to fit the data to obtain a source size, a scattering length and an effective range. Implications of the measurement of the ΛΛ correlation function and interaction parameters for di-hyperon searches are discussed.

  6. AuRu/AC as an effective catalyst for hydrogenation reactions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Villa, Alberto; Chan-Thaw, Carine E.; Campisi, Sebastiano; Bianchi, Claudia L.; Wang, Di; Kotula, Paul G.; Kübel, Christian; Prati, Laura

    2015-03-23

    AuRu bimetallic catalysts have been prepared by sequential deposition of Au on Ru or vice versa obtaining different nanostructures: when Ru has been deposited on Au, a Aucore–Rushell has been observed, whereas the deposition of Au on Ru leads to a bimetallic phase with Ru enrichment on the surface. In the latter case, the unexpected Ru enrichment could be attributed to the weak adhesion of Ru on the carbon support, thus allowing Ru particles to diffuse on Au particles. Both structures result very active in catalysing the liquid phase hydrogenolysis of glycerol and levulinic acid but the activity, the selectivitymore » and the stability depend on the structure of the bimetallic nanoparticles. Ru@Au/AC core–shell structure mostly behaved as the monometallic Ru, whereas the presence of bimetallic AuRu phase in Au@Ru/AC provides a great beneficial effect on both activity and stability.« less

  7. Gold-rich R3Au7Sn3: Establishing the interdependence between...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Gold-rich R3Au7Sn3: Establishing the interdependence between electronic features and ... This content will become publicly available on May 18, 2016 Title: Gold-rich R3Au7Sn3: ...

  8. Observation of dynamic water microadsorption on Au surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Xiaokang, E-mail: xiaokang.huang@tqs.com; Gupta, Gaurav; Gao, Weixiang; Tran, Van; Nguyen, Bang; McCormick, Eric; Cui, Yongjie; Yang, Yinbao; Hall, Craig; Isom, Harold [TriQuint Semiconductor, Inc., 500 W Renner Road, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Experimental and theoretical research on water wettability, adsorption, and condensation on solid surfaces has been ongoing for many decades because of the availability of new materials, new detection and measurement techniques, novel applications, and different scales of dimensions. Au is a metal of special interest because it is chemically inert, has a high surface energy, is highly conductive, and has a relatively high melting point. It has wide applications in semiconductor integrated circuitry, microelectromechanical systems, microfluidics, biochips, jewelry, coinage, and even dental restoration. Therefore, its surface condition, wettability, wear resistance, lubrication, and friction attract a lot of attention from both scientists and engineers. In this paper, the authors experimentally investigated Au{sub 2}O{sub 3} growth, wettability, roughness, and adsorption utilizing atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, reflectance spectrometry, and contact angle measurement. Samples were made using a GaAs substrate. Utilizing a super-hydrophilic Au surface and the proper surface conditions of the surrounding GaAs, dynamic microadsorption of water on the Au surface was observed in a clean room environment. The Au surface area can be as small as 12??m{sup 2}. The adsorbed water was collected by the GaAs groove structure and then redistributed around the structure. A model was developed to qualitatively describe the dynamic microadsorption process. The effective adsorption rate was estimated by modeling and experimental data. Devices for moisture collection and a liquid channel can be made by properly arranging the wettabilities or contact angles of different materials. These novel devices will be very useful in microfluid applications or biochips.

  9. Growth of Long Range Forward-Backward Multiplicity Correlations with Centrality in Au+Au Collisions at sqrt sNN = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

    2010-07-05

    Forward-backward multiplicity correlation strengths have been measured with the STAR detector for Au+Au and p+p collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. Strong short and long range correlations (LRC) are seen in central Au+Au collisions. The magnitude of these correlations decrease with decreasing centrality until only short range correlations are observed in peripheral Au+Au collisions. Both the Dual Parton Model (DPM) and the Color Glass Condensate (CGC) predict the existence of the long range correlations. In the DPM the fluctuation in the number of elementary (parton) inelastic collisions produces the LRC. In the CGC longitudinal color flux tubes generate the LRC. The data is in qualitative agreement with the predictions from the DPM and indicates the presence of multiple parton interactions.

  10. Local spectroscopy of a kondo impurity: Co on Au(111)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madhavan, V.; Chen, W.; Jamneala, T.; Crommie, M.F.; Wingreen, N.S.

    2001-07-15

    We present a detailed study of the local electronic properties of the Kondo system formed from cobalt adatoms deposited onto Au(111) at a temperature of 6.6 K. Cryogenic scanning-tunneling spectroscopy was used to observe impurity-induced resonances at the Fermi energy and at the Au(111) surface-state band edge. The line shape of the Fermi-energy resonance, identified as a Kondo resonance, is observed to vary with lateral position from the impurity center and with impurity binding position on the reconstructed Au(111) surface. Little vertical dependence is seen in the resonance line shape for positions above the center of the impurity. Interaction effects between Kondo impurities are observed to remain small as cobalt coverage is increased up to 1 ML on the gold surface. The Kondo resonance is shown theoretically to be a member of a general class of Fano resonances arising from the interaction of a discrete impurity state with a conduction-electron continuum. The asymmetric line shape of the resonance thus reflects quantum interference between the d orbital and continuum conduction electron channels, as well as their coupling to the STM tip.

  11. Dielectron Azimuthal Anisotropy at mid-rapidity in Au+Au collisions at root s=200GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamczyk, L.; STAR Collaboration

    2014-12-01

    We report on the first measurement of the azimuthal anisotropy (v?) of dielectrons (e?e? pairs) at mid-rapidity from ?(sNN)=200 GeV Au + Au collisions with the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), presented as a function of transverse momentum (pT) for different invariant-mass regions. In the mass region Mee<1.1 GeV/c the dielectron v? measurements are found to be consistent with expectations from ??,?,?, and ? decay contributions. In the mass region 1.1ee<2.9GeV/c, the measured dielectron v? is consistent, within experimental uncertainties, with that from the cc contributions.

  12. Dielectron Azimuthal Anisotropy at mid-rapidity in Au+Au collisions at root s=200GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.

    2014-12-11

    We report on the first measurement of the azimuthal anisotropy (v₂) of dielectrons (e⁺e⁻ pairs) at mid-rapidity from √(sNN)=200 GeV Au + Au collisions with the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), presented as a function of transverse momentum (pT) for different invariant-mass regions. In the mass region Mee<1.1 GeV/c² the dielectron v₂ measurements are found to be consistent with expectations from π⁰,η,ω, and Φ decay contributions. In the mass region 1.1ee<2.9GeV/c², the measured dielectron v₂ is consistent, within experimental uncertainties, with that from the cc¯ contributions.

  13. Dielectron Azimuthal Anisotropy at mid-rapidity in Au+Au collisions at root s=200GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamczyk, L.

    2014-12-11

    We report on the first measurement of the azimuthal anisotropy (v₂) of dielectrons (e⁺e⁻ pairs) at mid-rapidity from √(sNN)=200 GeV Au + Au collisions with the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), presented as a function of transverse momentum (pT) for different invariant-mass regions. In the mass region Mee<1.1 GeV/c² the dielectron v₂ measurements are found to be consistent with expectations from π⁰,η,ω, and Φ decay contributions. In the mass region 1.1ee<2.9GeV/c², the measured dielectron v₂ is consistent, within experimental uncertainties, with that from the cc¯ contributions.

  14. Formation of Pd/Au Nanostructures from Pd Nanowires via Galvanic Replacement Reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teng,X.; Wang, Q.; Liu, P.; Han, W.; Frenkel, A.; Wen, W.; Marinkovic, N.; Hanson, J.; Rodriguez, J.

    2008-01-01

    Bimetallic nanostructures with non-random metal atoms distribution are very important for various applications. To synthesize such structures via benign wet chemistry approach remains challenging. This paper reports a synthesis of a Au/Pd alloy nanostructure through the galvanic replacement reaction between Pd ultrathin nanowires (2.4 {+-} 0.2 nm in width, over 30 nm in length) and AuCl3 in toluene. Both morphological and structural changes were monitored during the reaction up to 10 h. Continuous changes of chemical composition and crystalline structure from Pd nanowires to Pd68Au32 and Pd45Au55 alloys, and to Au nanoparticles were observed. More interestingly, by using combined techniques such as high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS), UV-vis absorption, and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, we found the formation of Pd68Au32 non-random alloy with Au-rich core and Pd-rich shell, and random Pd45Au55 alloy with uniformly mixed Pd and Au atom inside the nanoparticles, respectively. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicated that alkylamine will strongly stabilize Pd to the surface, resulting in diffusion of Au atoms into the core region to form a non-random alloy. We believe such benign synthetic techniques can also enable the large scale preparation of various types of non-random alloys for several technically important catalysis applications.

  15. Structural and phonon transmission study of Ge-Au-Ge eutectically bonded interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knowlton, W.B. |

    1995-07-01

    This thesis presents a structural analysis and phonon transparency investigation of the Ge-Au-Ge eutectic bond interface. Interface development was intended to maximize the interfacial ballistic phonon transparency to enhance the detection of the dark matter candidate WIMPs. The process which was developed provides an interface which produces minimal stress, low amounts of impurities, and insures Ge lattice continuity through the interface. For initial Au thicknesses of greater than 1,000 {angstrom} Au per substrate side, eutectic epitaxial growth resulted in a Au dendritic structure with 95% cross sectional and 90% planar Au interfacial area coverages. In sections in which Ge bridged the interface, lattice continuity across the interface was apparent. Epitaxial solidification of the eutectic interface with initial Au thicknesses < 500 A per substrate side produced Au agglomerations thereby reducing the Au planar interfacial area coverage to as little as 30%. The mechanism for Au coalescence was attributed to lateral diffusion of Ge and Au in the liquid phase during solidification. Phonon transmission studies were performed on eutectic interfaces with initial Au thicknesses of 1,000 {angstrom}, 500 {angstrom}, and 300 {angstrom} per substrate side. Phonon imaging of eutectically bonded samples with initial Au thicknesses of 300 {angstrom}/side revealed reproducible interfacial percent phonon transmissions from 60% to 70%. Line scan phonon imaging verified the results. Phonon propagation TOF spectra distinctly showed the predominant phonon propagation mode was ballistic. This was substantiated by phonon focusing effects apparent in the phonon imaging data. The degree of interface transparency to phonons and resulting phonon propagation modes correlate with the structure of the interface following eutectic solidification. Structural studies of samples with initial Au thickness of 1,000 {angstrom}/side appear to correspond with the phonon transmission study.

  16. Supported Au-CuO Catalysts for Low Temperature CO Oxidation | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Supported Au-CuO Catalysts for Low Temperature CO Oxidation Supported Au-CuO Catalysts for Low Temperature CO Oxidation Catalytic properties of Au-CuOx/SiO2 are investigated in removing pollutants from simulated automotive exhaust to meet an increasing demand for high emissions control at low temperatures. PDF icon p-02_bauer.pdf More Documents & Publications Low Temperature Emission Control Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Low Temperature Emission Control to Enable

  17. Identification of {gamma} rays from {sup 172}Au and {alpha} decays of {sup 172}Au, {sup 168}Ir, and {sup 164}Re

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadinia, B.; Cederwall, B.; Andgren, K.; Baeck, T.; Johnson, A.; Khaplanov, A.; Wyss, R.; Page, R. D.; Grahn, T.; Paul, E. S.; Sandzelius, M.; Scholey, C.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jakobsson, U.; Jones, P. M.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, J.; Ketelhut, S.; Leino, M.; Nyman, M.

    2009-12-15

    The very neutron deficient odd-odd nucleus {sup 172}Au was studied in reactions of 342 and 348 MeV {sup 78}Kr beams with an isotopically enriched {sup 96}Ru target. The {alpha} decays previously reported for {sup 172}Au were confirmed and the decay chain extended down to {sup 152}Tm through the discovery of a new {alpha}-decaying state in {sup 164}Re[E{sub {alpha}}=5623(10) keV; t{sub 1/2}=864{sub -110}{sup +150} ms; b{sub {alpha}}=3(1)%]. Fine structure in these {alpha} decays of {sup 172}Au and {sup 168}Ir were identified. A new {alpha}-decaying state was also observed and assigned as the ground state in {sup 172}Au[E{sub {alpha}}=6762(10) keV; t{sub 1/2}=22{sub -5}{sup +6} ms]. This decay chain was also correlated down to {sup 152}Tm through previously reported {alpha} decays. Prompt {gamma} rays from excited states in {sup 172}Au have been identified using the recoil-decay tagging technique. The partial level scheme constructed for {sup 172}Au indicates that it has an irregular structure. Possible configurations of the {alpha}-decaying states in {sup 172}Au are discussed in terms of the systematics of nuclei in this region and total Routhian surface calculations.

  18. 328Post shot analysis of plasma conditions of Au Spheres illuminated...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: 328Post shot analysis of plasma conditions of Au Spheres illuminated by the URLLE Omega laser, as measured via Thomson scattering Citation Details In-Document Search...

  19. 328Post shot analysis of plasma conditions of Au Spheres illuminated...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Au Spheres illuminated by the URLLE Omega laser, as measured via Thomson scattering ... Subject: 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUMM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS Word Cloud More Like This ...

  20. Gold-rich R3Au7Sn3: Establishing the interdependence between electronic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    features and physical properties (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Gold-rich R3Au7Sn3: Establishing the interdependence between electronic features and physical properties Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on May 18, 2016 Title: Gold-rich R3Au7Sn3: Establishing the interdependence between electronic features and physical properties Two new polar intermetallic compounds Y3Au7Sn3 (I) and Gd3Au7Sn3 (II) have been synthesized and their structures

  1. The effect of Au and Ni doping on the heavy fermion state of the Kondo

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    lattice antiferromagnet CePtZn (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect The effect of Au and Ni doping on the heavy fermion state of the Kondo lattice antiferromagnet CePtZn Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The effect of Au and Ni doping on the heavy fermion state of the Kondo lattice antiferromagnet CePtZn We have probed the effect of doping CePtZn with Au and Ni and also investigated in detail the magnetic behavior of the iso-structural CeAuZn. A magnetic ground state is observed in

  2. Examination of charge transfer in Au/YSZ for high-temperature optical gas sensing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baltrus, John P.; Ohodnicki, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    Au-nanoparticle incorporated oxide thin film materials demonstrate significant promise as functionalsensor materials for high temperature optical gas sensing in severe environments relevant for fossil andnuclear based power generation. The Au/yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) system has been extensivelystudied in the literature and serves as a model system for fundamental investigations that seek to betterunderstand the mechanistic origin of the plasmonic gas sensing response. In this work, X-ray photoelec-tron spectroscopy techniques are applied to Au/YSZ films in an attempt to provide further experimentalevidence for a proposed sensing mechanism involving a change in free carrier density of Au nanoparticles due to charge transfer.

  3. Microwave Synthesis of Au?Rh Core?Shell Nanoparticles and Implications...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Microwave Synthesis of Au?Rh Core?Shell Nanoparticles and Implications of the Shell Thickness in Hydrogenation Catalysis Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Microwave ...

  4. Identified Hadron Compositions in p+p and Au+Au Collisions at High Transverse Momenta at ?(sNN)=200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anderson, B. D.; Anson, C. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; et al

    2012-02-14

    We report transverse momentum (pT?15 GeV/c) spectra of ?, K, p, p?, K0S, and ?? at midrapidity in p+p and Au+Au collisions at ?(sNN)=200 GeV. Perturbative QCD calculations are consistent with ? spectra in p+p collisions but do not reproduce K and p(p?) spectra. The observed decreasing antiparticle-to-particle ratios with increasing pT provide experimental evidence for varying quark and gluon jet contributions to high-pT hadron yields. The relative hadron abundances in Au+Au at pT ? 8 GeV/c are measured to be similar to the p+p results, despite the expected Casimir effect for parton energy loss.

  5. Identified Hadron Compositions in p+p and Au+Au Collisions at High Transverse Momenta at √(sNN)=200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anderson, B. D.; Anson, C. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; et al

    2012-02-14

    We report transverse momentum (pT≤15 GeV/c) spectra of π±, K±, p, p̄, K0S, and ρ⁰ at midrapidity in p+p and Au+Au collisions at √(sNN)=200 GeV. Perturbative QCD calculations are consistent with π± spectra in p+p collisions but do not reproduce K and p(p̄) spectra. The observed decreasing antiparticle-to-particle ratios with increasing pT provide experimental evidence for varying quark and gluon jet contributions to high-pT hadron yields. The relative hadron abundances in Au+Au at pT ≳ 8 GeV/c are measured to be similar to the p+p results, despite the expected Casimir effect for parton energy loss.

  6. Mechanism of ternary breakup in the reaction {sup 197}Au+{sup 197}Au at 15A MeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tian Junlong; Wu Xizhen; Li Zhuxia; Zhao Kai; Zhang Yingxun; Li Xian; Yan Shiwei

    2010-11-15

    The mechanism of the ternary breakup of the very heavy system {sup 197}Au+{sup 197}Au at an energy of 15A MeV has been studied by using the improved quantum molecular dynamics model. The calculation results reproduce the characteristic features in ternary breakup events explored in a series of experiments; i.e., the masses of three fragments are comparable in size and the very fast, nearly collinear breakup of the colliding system is dominant in the ternary breakup events. Further, the evolution of the time scales of different ternary reaction modes and the behavior of mass distributions of three fragments with impact parameters are studied. The time evolution of the configurations of the composite reaction systems is also studied. We find that for most of the ternary breakup events with the features found in the experiments, the configuration of the composite system has two-preformed-neck shape. The study shows that those ternary breakup events having the characteristic features found in the experiments happen at relatively small impact parameter reactions, but not at peripheral reactions. The ternary breakup reaction at peripheral reactions belongs to binary breakup with a neck emission.

  7. Thermal nature of charmonium transverse momentum spectra from Au-Au collisions at the highest energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akkelin, S. V.; Sinyukov, Yu. M.; Braun-Munzinger, P.

    2010-03-15

    We analyze the transverse momentum distribution of J/psi mesons produced in Au+Au collisions at the top RHIC energy within a blast-wave model that accounts for a possible inhomogeneity of the charmonium distribution and/or flow fluctuations. The results imply that the transverse momentum spectra of J/psi, phi, and OMEGA hadrons measured at the RHIC can be described well if kinetic freeze-out takes place just after chemical freeze-out for these particles.

  8. Multifunctional hybrid Fe2O3-Au nanoparticles for efficient plasmonic heating

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Murph, Simona E. Hunyadi; Larsen, George K.; Lascola, Robert J.

    2016-02-20

    We describe the synthesis and properties of multifunctional Fe2O3-Au nanoparticles produced by a wet chemical approach and investigate their photothermal properties using laser irradiation. Here, the composite Fe2O3-Au nanoparticles retain the properties of both materials, creating a multifunctional structure with excellent magnetic and plasmonic properties.

  9. Interface Reactions and Electrical Characteristics of Au/GaSb Contacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. Ehsani; R.J. Gutmann; G.W. Charache

    2000-07-07

    The reaction of Au with GaSb occurs at a relatively low temperature (100 C). Upon annealing, a AuSb{sub 2} compound and several Au-Ga phases are produced. Phase transitions occur toward higher Ga concentration with increasing annealing temperatures. Furthermore, the depth of the contact also increases with increased annealing temperature. They found that the AuSb{sub 2} compound forms on the GaSb surface, with the compound crystal partially ordered with respect to the substrate. The transition of Schottky- to ohmic-contact behavior in Au/n-type GaSb occurs simultaneously with the formation of the AuGa compound at about a 250 C annealing temperature. This ohmic contact forms without the segregation of dopants at the metallic compound/GaSb interface. Therefore it is postulated that transition from Schottky- to ohmic-contact behavior is obtained through a series of tunneling transitions of electrons through defects in the depletion region in the Au/n-type GaSb contacts. Contact resistivities of 6-7 x 10{sup -6} {Omega}-cm{sup 2} were obtained with the annealing temperature between 300 and 350 C for 30 seconds. In Au/p-type GaSb contacts, the resistivity was independent of the annealing temperature. This suggested that the carrier transport in p-type contact dominated by thermionic emission.

  10. The low-temperature form of calcium gold stannide, CaAuSn

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Qisheng; Corbett, John D.

    2014-07-19

    The EuAuGe-type CaAuSn phase has been synthesized and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis reveals that it has an orthorhombic symmetry (space group Imm2), with a = 4.5261 (7) , b = 7.1356 (11) and c = 7.8147 (11) . The structure features puckered layers that are connected by homoatomic Au-Au and Sn-Sn interlayer bonds. This structure is one of the two parent structures of its high-temperature polymorph (ca 873 K), which is an intergrowth structure of the EuAuGe- and SrMgSi-type structures in a 2:3 ratio.

  11. Nanoscale mapping of plasmon and exciton in ZnO tetrapods coupled with Au nanoparticles

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bertoni, Giovanni; Fabbri, Filippo; Villani, Marco; Lazzarini, Laura; Turner, Stuart; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Calestani, Davide; Gradečak, Silvija; Zappettini, Andrea; Salviati, Giancarlo

    2016-01-12

    Metallic nanoparticles can be used to enhance optical absorption or emission in semiconductors, thanks to a strong interaction of collective excitations of free charges (plasmons) with electromagnetic fields. Herein we present direct imaging at the nanoscale of plasmon-exciton coupling in Au/ZnO nanostructures by combining scanning transmission electron energy loss and cathodoluminescence spectroscopy and mapping. The Au nanoparticles (~30 nm in diameter) are grown in-situ on ZnO nanotetrapods by means of a photochemical process without the need of binding agents or capping molecules, resulting in clean interfaces. Interestingly, the Au plasmon resonance is localized at the Au/vacuum interface, rather than presentingmore » an isotropic distribution around the nanoparticle. Moreover, on the contrary, a localization of the ZnO signal has been observed inside the Au nanoparticle, as also confirmed by numerical simulations.« less

  12. Nuclear matter effects on J/? production in asymmetric Cu+Au collisions at ?SNN=200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.

    2014-12-18

    We report on J/? production from asymmetric Cu+Au heavy-ion collisions at ?sNN =200 GeV at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at both forward (Cu-going direction) and backward (Au-going direction) rapidities. The nuclear modification of J/? yields in Cu+Au collisions in the Au-going direction is found to be comparable to that in Au+Au collisions when plotted as a function of the number of participating nucleons. In the Cu-going direction, J/? production shows a stronger suppression. This difference is comparable in magnitude and has the same sign as the difference expected from shadowing effects due to stronger low-x gluon suppression in themorelarger Au nucleus. The relative suppression is opposite to that expected from hot nuclear matter dissociation, since a higher energy density is expected in the Au-going direction.less

  13. Measurements of dielectron production in Au + Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV from the STAR experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; et al

    2015-08-24

    We report on measurements of dielectron (e⁺e⁻) production in Au+Au collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 200 GeV per nucleon-nucleon pair using the STAR detector at RHIC. Systematic measurements of the dielectron yield as a function of transverse momentum (pT) and collision centrality show an enhancement compared to a cocktail simulation of hadronic sources in the low invariant-mass region (Mee < 1GeV/c2). This enhancement cannot be reproduced by the ρ-meson vacuum spectral function. In minimum-bias collisions, in the invariant-mass range of 0.30 – 0.76GeV/c², integrated over the full pT acceptance, the enhancement factor is 1.76±0.06(stat.)±0.26(sys.)±0.29(cocktail). The enhancement factor exhibits weakmore » centrality and pT dependence in STAR's accessible kinematic regions, while the excess yield in this invariant-mass region as a function of the number of participating nucleons follows a power-law shape with a power of 1.44±0.10. Models that assume an in-medium broadening of the ρ-meson spectral function consistently describe the observed excess in these measurements. In addition, we report on measurements of ω- and Φ-meson production through their e⁺e⁻ decay channel. These measurements show good agreement with Tsallis blast-wave model predictions, as well as, in the case of the Φ meson, results through its K⁺K⁻ decay channel. In the intermediate invariant-mass region (1.1 < Mee < 3GeV/c²), we investigate the spectral shapes from different collision centralities. Physics implications for possible in-medium modification of charmed hadron production and other physics sources are discussed.« less

  14. Effects of the proximity of Au nanoparticles on magnetic and transport properties of LSMO ultrathin layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brivio, S.; Magen Dominguez, Cesar; Sidorenko, A; Petti, D.; Cantoni, M.; Finazzi, M; Ciccacci, F; Renzi, R; Varela del Arco, Maria; Picozzi, S.; Bertacco, R.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of the proximity of Au nanoparticles on the transport and magnetic properties of ultrathin La2/3Sr1/3MnO3 (LSMO) films has been investigated. We find a huge increase of the resistivity of the manganite (by four orders of magnitude for a Au nominal thickness of 2 nm), which is accompanied by a strong decrease of the Curie temperature. A combined scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy (STEM-EELS) analysis shows that interfaces are coherent and atomically sharp, and that the structural quality is very high. On the other end, a strong reduction of the Mn oxidation state is seen upon Au capping. NMR data show a strong attenuation of the double exchange signal upon formation of Au nanoparticles. Ab-initio calculations indicate a negligible influence of Au on LSMO at an ideal interface, with the LSMO surface magnetic and electronic properties essentially unchanged upon creation of the Au/LSMO interface. In view of these calculations, the experimental results cannot be explained in terms of purely electrostatic effects induced by the proximity of a noble metal. Here we propose that the main driving force underlying the observed change in physical properties is the high reactivity of Au nanoparticles which can locally pump oxygen from the manganite, thus favouring a phase separation ensuing from O inhomogeneity which deteriorates the transport and electrical properties.

  15. Glycerol Hydrogenolysis on Carbon-Supported PtRu and AuRu Bimetallic Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maris,E.; Ketchie, W.; Murayama, M.; Davis, R.

    2007-01-01

    Bimetallic PtRu and AuRu catalysts were prepared by a surface redox method in which Pt or Au was deposited onto the surface of carbon-supported Ru nanoparticles with an average diameter of 2-3 nm. Characterization by H2 chemisorption, analytical TEM, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Ru K-edge, Pt LIII-edge, and Au LIII-edge confirmed that Pt and Au were successfully deposited onto Ru without disrupting the Ru particles. Depression of the ethane hydrogenolysis rate over Ru after addition of Au provided further evidence of successful deposition. The bimetallic particles were subsequently evaluated in the aqueous-phase hydrogenolysis of glycerol at 473 K and 40 bar H2 at neutral and elevated pH. Although monometallic Pt and Ru exhibited different activities and selectivities to products, the bimetallic PtRu catalyst functioned more like Ru. A similar result was obtained for the AuRu bimetallic catalyst. The PtRu catalyst appeared to be stable under the aqueous-phase reaction conditions, whereas the AuRu catalyst was altered by the harsh conditions. Gold appeared to migrate off the Ru and agglomerate on the carbon during the reaction in liquid water.

  16. MeV Au Ion Irradiation in Silicon and Nanocrystalline Zirconia Film Deposited on Silicon Substrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Yongqin; Zhang, Yanwen; Zhu, Zihua; Edmondson, Philip D.; Weber, William J.

    2012-09-01

    Nanocrystalline zirconia (ZrO2) film with thickness of 305 nm deposited on a silicon substrate was irradiated with 2 MeV Au ions to different fluences at different temperatures. The implanted ion profiles were measured by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and simulated using the stopping and range of ions inmatter (SRIM) code, respectively. The experimental results show that a large fraction of the incident Au ions penetrates through the ZrO2 film and are deposited into the Si substrate. At the interface of ZrO2 and Si, a sudden decrease of Au concentration is observed due to the much larger scattering cross section of Au in ZrO2 than in Si. The depth profile of the Au ions is measured in both the ZrO2 films and the Si substrates, and the results show that the Au distribution profiles do not exhibit a dependence on irradiation temperature. The local Au concentration increases proportionally with the irradiation fluence, suggesting that no thermal or irradiation-induced redistribution of the implanted Au ions. However, the Au concentration in the ZrO2 films, as determined by SIMS, is considerably lower than that predicted by the SRIM results, and the penetration depth from the SIMS measurements is much deeper than that from the SRIM predictions. These observations can be explained by an overestimation of the electronic stopping power, used in the SRIM program, for heavy incident ions in light targets. Over-estimation of the heavy-ion electronic stopping power may lead to errors in local dose calculation and underestimation of the projected range of slow heavy ions in targets that contain light elements. A quick estimate based on a reduced target density may be used to compensate the overestimation of the electronic stopping power in the SRIM program to provide better ion profile prediction.

  17. MeV Au Ion Irradiation in Silicon and Nanocrystalline Zirconia Film Deposited on Silicon Substrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Yongqin; Zhang, Yanwen; Zhu, Zihua; Edmondson, Dr. Philip; Weber, William J

    2012-01-01

    Nanocrystalline zirconia (ZrO2) film with thickness of 305 nm deposited on a silicon substrate was irradiated with 2 MeV Au ions to different fluences at different temperatures. The implanted ion profiles were measured by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and simulated using the stopping and range of ions in matter (SRIM) code, respectively. The experimental results show that a large fraction of the incident Au ions penetrates through the ZrO2 film and are deposited into the Si substrate. At the interface of ZrO2 and Si, a sudden decrease of Au concentration is observed due to the much larger scattering cross section of Au in ZrO2 than in Si. The depth profile of the Au ions is measured in both the ZrO2 films and the Si substrates, and the results show that the Au distribution profiles do not exhibit a dependence on irradiation temperature. The local Au concentration increases proportionally with the irradiation fluence, suggesting that no thermal or irradiation-induced redistribution of the implanted Au ions. However, the Au concentration in the ZrO2 films, as determined by SIMS, is considerably lower than that predicted by the SRIM results, and the penetration depth from the SIMS measurements is much deeper than that from the SRIM predictions. These observations can be explained by an overestimation of the electronic stopping power, used in the SRIM program, for heavy incident ions in light targets. Overestimation of the heavy-ion electronic stopping power may lead to errors in local dose calculation and underestimation of the projected range of slow heavy ions in targets that contain light elements. A quick estimate based on a reduced target density may be used to compensate the overestimation of the electronic stopping power in the SRIM program to provide better ion profile prediction.

  18. Enhanced efficiency of graphene-silicon Schottky junction solar cells by doping with Au nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, X.; Zhang, X. W. Yin, Z. G.; Meng, J. H.; Gao, H. L.; Zhang, L. Q.; Zhao, Y. J.; Wang, H. L.

    2014-11-03

    We have reported a method to enhance the performance of graphene-Si (Gr/Si) Schottky junction solar cells by introducing Au nanoparticles (NPs) onto the monolayer graphene and few-layer graphene. The electron transfer between Au NPs and graphene leads to the increased work function and enhanced electrical conductivity of graphene, resulting in a remarkable improvement of device efficiency. By optimizing the initial thickness of Au layers, the power conversion efficiency of Gr/Si solar cells can be increased by more than three times, with a maximum value of 7.34%. These results show a route for fabricating efficient and stable Gr/Si solar cells.

  19. High-frequency signal transmission through single-atom contacts of Au and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Pt (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect High-frequency signal transmission through single-atom contacts of Au and Pt Citation Details In-Document Search Title: High-frequency signal transmission through single-atom contacts of Au and Pt Signal transmission through atom-sized contacts of Au and Pt has been studied at room temperature for frequencies from 9 kHz to 1 GHz and for conductances (1-10)G{sub 0} (G≡2e{sup 2}/h is the quantum unit of conductance). We measured the frequency spectrum

  20. Growth and characterization of AuN films through the pulsed arc technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devia, A. Castillo, H.A.; Benavides, V.J.; Arango, Y.C.; Quintero, J.H.

    2008-02-15

    AuN films were produced through the PAPVD (Plasma Assisted Physics Vapor Deposition) method, using the pulsed arc technique in a mono-vaporizer noncommercial system, which consists of a chamber with two faced electrodes, and a power controlled system. In order to obtain the films, an Au Target with 99% purity and stainless steel 304 were used as target and substrate respectively. Nitrogen was injected in gaseous phase at 2.3 mbar pressure, and a discharge of 160 V was performed, supplied by the power controlled source. Au4f and N1s narrow spectra were analyzed using XPS (X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy)

  1. CO Oxidation at the Interface of Au Nanoclusters and the Stepped-CeO2(111) Surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim H. Y.; Henkelman, G.

    2013-01-14

    To reveal the richer chemistry of CO oxidation by CeO2 supported Au Nanoclusters NCs)/Nanoparticles, we design a Au12 supported on a stepped-CeO2 model (Au/CeO2-step) and study various kinds of CO oxidation mechanisms at the interface of the Au/CeO2-step: oxygen spillover from the CeO2 to the Au NCs;2 CO oxidation by the O2 bound to the Au-Ce3+ interface;3 and CO oxidation by the Mars-van Krevelen (M-vK) mechanism.4 DFT+U calculations show that lattice oxygen at the CeO2 step edge oxidizes CO bound to Au NCs by the M-vK mechanism. CO2 desorption determines the rate of CO oxidation and the vacancy formation energy (Evac) is a reactivity descriptor for CO oxidation. The maximum Evac that insures spontaneous CO2 production is higher for the Au/CeO2-step than the Au/CeO2-surface suggesting that the CeO2-step is a better supporting material than the CeO2-surface for CO oxidation by the Au/CeO2. Our results also suggest that for CO oxidation by Au NCs supported on nano- or meso-structured CeO2, which is the case of industrial catalysts, the M-vK mechanism accounts for a large portion of the total activity.

  2. Efficient electrocatalytic conversion of CO.sub.2 to CO using ligand-protected Au.sub.25 clusters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kauffman, Douglas; Matranga, Christopher; Qian, Huifeng; Jin, Rongchao; Alfonso, Dominic R.

    2015-09-22

    An apparatus and method for CO.sub.2 reduction using an Au.sub.25 electrode. The Au.sub.25 electrode is comprised of ligand-protected Au.sub.25 having a structure comprising an icosahedral core of 13 atoms surrounded by a shell of six semi-ring structures bonded to the core of 13 atoms, where each semi-ring structure is typically --SR--Au--SR--Au--SR or --SeR--Au--SeR--Au--SeR. The 12 semi-ring gold atoms within the six semi-ring structures are stellated on 12 of the 20 faces of the icosahedron of the Au.sub.13 core, and organic ligand --SR or --SeR groups are bonded to the Au.sub.13 core with sulfur or selenium atoms. The Au.sub.25 electrode and a counter-electrode are in contact with an electrolyte comprising CO.sub.2 and H+, and a potential of at least -0.1 volts is applied from the Au.sub.25 electrode to the counter-electrode.

  3. Systematic study of azimuthal anisotropy in Cu + Cu and Au + Au collisions at √sNN = 62.4 and 200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.

    2015-09-23

    We have studied the dependence of azimuthal anisotropy v2 for inclusive and identified charged hadrons in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions on collision energy, species, and centrality. The values of v2 as a function of transverse momentum pT and centrality in Au+Au collisions at √sNN=200 and 62.4 GeV are the same within uncertainties. However, in Cu+Cu collisions we observe a decrease in v2 values as the collision energy is reduced from 200 to 62.4 GeV. The decrease is larger in the more peripheral collisions. By examining both Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions we find that v2 depends both on eccentricity and themore » number of participants, Npart. We observe that v2 divided by eccentricity (ε) monotonically increases with Npart and scales as N1/3part. Thus, the Cu+Cu data at 62.4 GeV falls below the other scaled v2 data. For identified hadrons, v2 divided by the number of constituent quarks nq is independent of hadron species as a function of transverse kinetic energy KET=mT–m between 0.1T/nq<1 GeV. Combining all of the above scaling and normalizations, we observe a near-universal scaling, with the exception of the Cu+Cu data at 62.4 GeV, of v2/(nq∙ε∙N1/3part) vs KET/nq for all measured particles.« less

  4. Gold-rich R3Au7Sn3: Establishing the interdependence between electronic features and physical properties

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Provino, Alessia; Steinberg, Simon; Smetana, Volodymyr; Kulkarni, Ruta; Dhar, Sudesh K.; Manfrinetti, Pietro; Mudring, Anja -Verena

    2015-05-18

    Two new polar intermetallic compounds Y3Au7Sn3 (I) and Gd3Au7Sn3 (II) have been synthesized and their structures have been determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction (P63/m; Z = 2, a = 8.148(1)/8.185(3), and c = 9.394(2)/9.415(3) for I/II, respectively). They can formally be assigned to the Cu10Sn3 type and consist of parallel slabs of Sn centered, edge-sharing trigonal Au6 antiprisms connected through R3 (R = Y, Gd) triangles. Additional Au atoms reside in the centres of trigonal Au6 prisms forming Au@Au6 clusters with Au–Au distances of 2.906–2.960 Å, while the R–R contacts in the R3 groups are considerably larger than themore » sums of their metallic radii. These exclusive structural arrangements provide alluring systems to study the synergism between strongly correlated systems, particularly, those in the structure of (II), and extensive polar intermetallic contacts, which has been inspected by measurements of the magnetic properties, heat capacities and electrical conductivities of both compounds. Gd3Au7Sn3 shows an antiferromagnetic ordering at 13 K, while Y3Au7Sn3 is a Pauli paramagnet and a downward curvature in its electrical resistivity at about 1.9 K points to a superconducting transition. DFT-based band structure calculations on R3Au7Sn3 (R = Y, Gd) account for the results of the conductivity measurements and different spin ordering models of (II) provide conclusive hints about its magnetic structure. As a result, chemical bonding analyses of both compounds indicate that the vast majority of bonding originates from the heteroatomic Au–Gd and Au–Sn interactions, while homoatomic Au–Au bonding is evident within the Au@Au6 clusters.« less

  5. Photoactivation experiment on {sup 197}Au and its implications for the dipole strength in heavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nair, C.; Erhard, M.; Junghans, A. R.; Bemmerer, D.; Beyer, R.; Klug, J.; Kosev, K.; Rusev, G.; Schilling, K. D.; Schwengner, R.; Wagner, A.; Grosse, E.

    2008-11-15

    The {sup 197}Au({gamma},n) reaction is used as an activation standard for photodisintegration studies on astrophysically relevant nuclei. At the bremsstrahlung facility of the superconducting electron accelerator ELBE (Electron Linear accelerator of high Brilliance and low Emittance) of Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, photoactivation measurements on {sup 197}Au have been performed with bremsstrahlung endpoint energies from 8.0 to 15.5 MeV. The measured activation yield is compared with previous experiments as well as with calculations using Hauser-Feshbach statistical models. It is shown that the experimental data are best described by a two-Lorentzian parametrization with taking the axial deformation of {sup 197}Au into account. The experimental {sup 197}Au({gamma},n) reaction yield measured at ELBE via the photoactivation method is found to be consistent with previous experimental data using photon scattering or neutron detection methods.

  6. Effect of growth temperature on ballistic electron transport through the Au/Si(001) interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eckes, M. W.; Friend, B. E.; Stollenwerk, A. J.

    2014-04-28

    Ballistic electron emission spectroscopy was used to investigate electron transport through Au/Si(001) Schottky diodes grown at 35?C and 22?C. Aside from a decreased Schottky height, this small increase in temperature introduced an energy dependent scattering component, which was absent in the samples grown at 22?C. These differences may be attributed to the increased amount of Au-Si intermixing at the interface. Despite the non-epitaxial nature of the growth technique, strong evidence was found in both sets of samples that indicated the presence of a forward-focused current subject to some degree of parallel momentum conservation at the interface. This evidence was present in all samples grown at 35?C, but was only observed in those samples grown at 22?C when the Au films were 10?nm or thicker. This sensitivity to growth temperature could account for discrepancies in previous studies on Au/Si(001)

  7. Measurement of J/ψ Azimuthal Anisotropy in Au+Au Collisions at √sNN=200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; et al

    2013-08-02

    The measurement of J/ψ azimuthal anisotropy is presented as a function of transverse momentum for different centralities in Au+Au collisions at √sNN>/sub>=200 GeV. The measured J/ψ elliptic flow is consistent with zero within errors for transverse momentum between 2 and 10 GeV/c. Our measurement suggests that J/ψ particles with relatively large transverse momenta are not dominantly produced by coalescence from thermalized charm quarks, when comparing to model calculations.

  8. Plexciton Dynamics: Exciton-Plasmon Coupling in a J-Aggregate-Au Nanoshell

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Complex Provides a Mechanism for Nonlinearity (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Plexciton Dynamics: Exciton-Plasmon Coupling in a J-Aggregate-Au Nanoshell Complex Provides a Mechanism for Nonlinearity Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Plexciton Dynamics: Exciton-Plasmon Coupling in a J-Aggregate-Au Nanoshell Complex Provides a Mechanism for Nonlinearity Coherently coupled plasmons and excitons give rise to new optical excitations- plexcitons - due to the strong

  9. 328Post shot analysis of plasma conditions of Au Spheres illuminated by the

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    URLLE Omega laser, as measured via Thomson scattering (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: 328Post shot analysis of plasma conditions of Au Spheres illuminated by the URLLE Omega laser, as measured via Thomson scattering Citation Details In-Document Search Title: 328Post shot analysis of plasma conditions of Au Spheres illuminated by the URLLE Omega laser, as measured via Thomson scattering Authors: Rosen, M D ; Ross, J S ; Scott, H A ; Landen, N ; Dewald, E ; Froula, D ; May, M ;

  10. Memorandum, AU-1 Clarification on the Drug Testing Custody and Control Form

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Department of Energy Contractors | Department of Energy AU-1 Clarification on the Drug Testing Custody and Control Form for Department of Energy Contractors Memorandum, AU-1 Clarification on the Drug Testing Custody and Control Form for Department of Energy Contractors May 20, 2015 Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations part 707 (10 CFR part 707), Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE Sites, applies to DOE contractors and contains the drug testing requirements for their programs.10 CFR

  11. Disassembly of hot nuclear matter formed in Au-induced reactions near the Fermi energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delis, D.N.

    1993-09-01

    Complex fragment emission has been studied in the 60 MeV/A {sup 197}Au + {sup 12}C, {sup 27}Al, {sup 51}V, {sup nat}Cu, and {sup 197}Au reactions. Velocity spectra, angular distributions and cross sections have been constructed for each target from the inclusive data. Coincidence data including 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-fold events have also been examined. Furthermore neutron multiplicity distributions have been obtained for the above reactions by utilizing a novel neutron calorimetric approach.

  12. Theoretical study of Ag- and Au-filled skutterudites. | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Theoretical study of Ag- and Au-filled skutterudites. Theoretical study of Ag- and Au-filled skutterudites. Uses ab initio atomistic DFT modeling as implemented in VASP to determine theoretical values of thermoelectric properties for Ag-filled skutterudites. PDF icon stoica.pdf More Documents & Publications Thermoelectric Generator Development for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Recent Progress in the Development of N-type Skutterudites Advanced Thermoelectric Materials and

  13. Bond-bending isomerism of Au2I3-: Competition between covalent bonding and aurophilicity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Wan -Lu; Liu, Hong -Tao; Jian, Tian; Lopez, Gary V.; Piazza, Zachary A.; Huang, Dao -Ling; Chen, Teng -Teng; Su, Jing; Yang, Ping; Chen, Xin; et al

    2015-10-13

    We report a joint photoelectron spectroscopy and theoretical investigation of the gaseous Au2I3– cluster, which is found to exhibit two types of isomers due to competition between Au–I covalent bonding and Au–Au aurophilic interactions. The covalent bonding favors a bent IAuIAuI– structure with an obtuse Au–I–Au angle (100.7°), while aurophilic interactions pull the two Au atoms much closer, leading to an acutely bent structure (72.0°) with an Au–Au distance of 3.08 Å. The two isomers are separated by a small barrier and are nearly degenerate with the obtuse isomer being slightly more stable. At low temperature, only the obtuse isomermore » is observed; distinct experimental evidence is observed for the co-existence of a combination of isomers with both acute and obtuse bending angles at room temperature. As a result, the two bond-bending isomers of Au2I3– reveal a unique example of one molecule being able to oscillate between different structures as a result of two competing chemical forces.« less

  14. Stability of Surface and Subsurface Hydrogen on and in Au/Ni Near-Surface Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Celik, Fuat E.; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2015-10-01

    Periodic, self-consistent DFT-GGA (PW91) calculations were used to study the interaction of hydrogen atoms with the (111) surfaces of substitutional near-surface alloys (NSAs) of Au and Ni with different surface layer compositions and different arrangements of Au atoms in the surface layer. The effect of hydrogen adsorption on the surface and in the first and second subsurface layers of the NSAs was studied. Increasing the Au content in the surface layer weakens hydrogen binding on the surface, but strengthens subsurface binding, suggesting that the distribution of surface and subsurface hydrogen will be different than that on pure Ni(111). While the metal composition of the surface layer has an effect on the binding energy of hydrogen on NSA surfaces, the local composition of the binding site has a stronger effect. For example, fcc hollow sites consisting of three Ni atoms bind H nearly as strongly as on Ni(111), and fcc sites consisting of three Au atoms bind H nearly as weakly as on Au(111). Sites with one or two Au atoms show intermediate binding energies. The preference of hydrogen for three-fold Ni hollow sites alters the relative stabilities of different surface metal atom arrangements, and may provide a driving force for adsorbate-induced surface rearrangement.

  15. Nucleon-gold collisions at 200A GeV using tagged d + Au interactions in the PHOBOS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Back, B. B.; Nouicer, R.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Becker, B.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A; Stienberg, P.; Ioradnova, A.; et al

    2015-09-23

    Forward calorimetry in the PHOBOS detector has been used to study charged hadron production in d+Au, p+Au, and n+Au collisions at √sNN =200GeV. The forward proton calorimeter detectors are described and a procedure for determining collision centrality with these detectors is detailed. The deposition of energy by deuteron spectator nucleons in the forward calorimeters is used to identify p+Au and n+Au collisions in the data. A weighted combination of the yield of p+Au and n+Au is constructed to build a reference for Au+Au collisions that better matches the isospin composition of the gold nucleus. The pT and centrality dependence ofmore » the yield of this improved reference system is found to match that of d+Au. The shape of the charged-particle transverse momentum distribution is observed to extrapolate smoothly from p+p¯ to central d+Au as a function of the charged-particle pseudorapidity density. The asymmetry of positively and negatively charged hadron production in p+Au is compared to that of n+Au. No significant asymmetry is observed at midrapidity. In conclusion, these studies augment recent results from experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider and BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider facilities to give a more complete description of particle production in p+A and d+A collisions, essential for the understanding the medium produced in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions.« less

  16. Nucleon-gold collisions at 200A GeV using tagged d + Au interactions in the PHOBOS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Back, B. B.; Nouicer, R.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Becker, B.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A; Stienberg, P.; Ioradnova, A.; Pak, R.; Sukhanov, A.

    2015-09-23

    Forward calorimetry in the PHOBOS detector has been used to study charged hadron production in d+Au, p+Au, and n+Au collisions at √sNN =200GeV. The forward proton calorimeter detectors are described and a procedure for determining collision centrality with these detectors is detailed. The deposition of energy by deuteron spectator nucleons in the forward calorimeters is used to identify p+Au and n+Au collisions in the data. A weighted combination of the yield of p+Au and n+Au is constructed to build a reference for Au+Au collisions that better matches the isospin composition of the gold nucleus. The pT and centrality dependence of the yield of this improved reference system is found to match that of d+Au. The shape of the charged-particle transverse momentum distribution is observed to extrapolate smoothly from p+p¯ to central d+Au as a function of the charged-particle pseudorapidity density. The asymmetry of positively and negatively charged hadron production in p+Au is compared to that of n+Au. No significant asymmetry is observed at midrapidity. In conclusion, these studies augment recent results from experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider and BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider facilities to give a more complete description of particle production in p+A and d+A collisions, essential for the understanding the medium produced in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions.

  17. Energy dependence of Kπ, pπ and Kp fluctuations in Au+Au collisions from √sNN=7.7 to 200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-08-07

    A search for the quantum chromodynamics (QCD) critical point was performed by the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, using dynamical fluctuations of unlike particle pairs. Heavy ion collisions were studied over a large range of collision energies with homogeneous acceptance and excellent particle identification, covering a significant range in the QCD phase diagram where a critical point may be located. Dynamical Kπ, pπ, and Kp fluctuations as measured by the STAR experiment in central 0–5% Au+Au collisions from center-of-mass collision energies √sNN=7.7 to 200 GeV are presented. The observable νdyn was used to quantify the magnitude ofmore »the dynamical fluctuations in event-by-event measurements of the Kπ, pπ, and Kp pairs. The energy dependences of these fluctuations from central 0–5% Au+Au collisions all demonstrate a smooth evolution with collision energy.« less

  18. Measurement of Υ(1S + 2S +3S) production in p + p and Au + Au collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}=200\\) GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Ta'ani, H.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; et al

    2015-02-24

    Measurements of bottomonium production in heavy-ion and p+p collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are presented. The inclusive yield of the three Υ states, Υ(1S + 2S + 3S), was measured in the PHENIX experiment via electron-positron decay pairs at midrapidity for Au+Au and p+p collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}=200\\) GeV. The Υ(1S + 2S + 3S) → e⁺e⁻ differential cross section at midrapidity was found to be Beedσ/dy = 108 ± 38 (stat) ± 15 (syst) ± 11 (luminosity) pb in p+p collisions. The nuclear modification factor in the 30% most central Au+Au collisions indicates a suppression of themore »total Υ state yield relative to the extrapolation from p+p collision data. Thus, the suppression is consistent with measurements at higher energies by the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider.« less

  19. Measurement of Υ(1S + 2S +3S) production in p + p and Au + Au collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}=200\\) GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Ta'ani, H.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; et al

    2015-02-24

    Measurements of bottomonium production in heavy-ion and p+p collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are presented. The inclusive yield of the three Υ states, Υ(1S + 2S + 3S), was measured in the PHENIX experiment via electron-positron decay pairs at midrapidity for Au+Au and p+p collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}=200\\) GeV. The Υ(1S + 2S + 3S) → e⁺e⁻ differential cross section at midrapidity was found to be Beedσ/dy = 108 ± 38 (stat) ± 15 (syst) ± 11 (luminosity) pb in p+p collisions. The nuclear modification factor in the 30% most central Au+Au collisions indicates a suppression of themore » total Υ state yield relative to the extrapolation from p+p collision data. Thus, the suppression is consistent with measurements at higher energies by the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider.« less

  20. Energy dependence of Kπ, pπ and Kp fluctuations in Au+Au collisions from √sNN=7.7 to 200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-08-07

    A search for the quantum chromodynamics (QCD) critical point was performed by the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, using dynamical fluctuations of unlike particle pairs. Heavy ion collisions were studied over a large range of collision energies with homogeneous acceptance and excellent particle identification, covering a significant range in the QCD phase diagram where a critical point may be located. Dynamical Kπ, pπ, and Kp fluctuations as measured by the STAR experiment in central 0–5% Au+Au collisions from center-of-mass collision energies √sNN=7.7 to 200 GeV are presented. The observable νdyn was used to quantify the magnitude ofmore » the dynamical fluctuations in event-by-event measurements of the Kπ, pπ, and Kp pairs. The energy dependences of these fluctuations from central 0–5% Au+Au collisions all demonstrate a smooth evolution with collision energy.« less

  1. Initial eccentricity in deformed {sup 197}Au+{sup 197}Au and {sup 238}U+{sup 238}U collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Filip, Peter; Lednicky, Richard; Masui, Hiroshi; Xu Nu

    2009-11-15

    Initial eccentricity and eccentricity fluctuations of the interaction volume created in relativistic collisions of deformed {sup 197}Au and {sup 238}U nuclei are studied using optical and Monte Carlo (MC) Glauber simulations. It is found that the nonsphericity noticeably influences the average eccentricity in central collisions, and eccentricity fluctuations are enhanced from deformation. Quantitative results are obtained for Au+Au and U+U collisions at energy {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV.

  2. Efficient H{sub 2} production over Au/graphene/TiO{sub 2} induced by surface plasmon resonance of Au and band-gap excitation of TiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Yang; Yu, Hongtao; Wang, Hua; Chen, Shuo; Quan, Xie

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: Both surface plasmon resonance and band-gap excitation were used for H{sub 2} production. Au/Gr/TiO{sub 2} composite photocatalyst was synthesized. Au/Gr/TiO{sub 2} exhibited enhancement of light absorption and charge separation. H{sub 2} production rate of Au/Gr/TiO{sub 2} was about 2 times as high as that of Au/TiO{sub 2}. - Abstract: H{sub 2} production over Au/Gr/TiO{sub 2} composite photocatalyst induced by surface plasmon resonance of Au and band-gap excitation of TiO{sub 2} using graphene (Gr) as an electron acceptor has been investigated. Electron paramagnetic resonance study indicated that, in this composite, Gr collected electrons not only from Au with surface plasmon resonance but also from TiO{sub 2} with band-gap excitation. Surface photovoltage and UVvis absorption measurements revealed that compared with Au/TiO{sub 2}, Au/Gr/TiO{sub 2} displayed more effective photogenerated charge separation and higher optical absorption. Benefiting from these advantages, the H{sub 2} production rate of Au/Gr/TiO{sub 2} composite with Gr content of 1.0 wt% and Au content of 2.0 wt% was about 2 times as high as that of Au/TiO{sub 2}. This work represents an important step toward the efficient application of both surface plasmon resonance and band-gap excitation on the way to converting solar light into chemical energy.

  3. Controlled growth and multi-photon luminescence of hexagonal arrays of Au nanoparticles on anodic aluminum oxide templates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Jianbo; Yu Ying; Peng Xiaoniu; Yang Zhongjian; Zhou Li; Zhou Zhangkai

    2012-06-15

    Au nanoparticles were deposited onto anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) templates by using a rotating sputtering technique. Interestingly, hexagonal arrays of Au nanoparticles were obtained at an appropriate rotating rate and deposition time. Strong three-photon luminescence was observed from the hexagonally arrayed Au nanoparticles, which is attributed to the strong enhancements of local electromagnetic fields at both excitation and emission wavelengths. Our findings provide a new method to prepare Au nanoparticle arrays with large field enhancements and could have prospective applications in plasmonic nanodevices, such as surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrates, and biosensors.

  4. Spin correlations and electron transport in MnBi:Au films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kharel, P.; Skomski, R.; Sellmyer, D. J.

    2011-04-01

    The structural, magnetic, and electron transport properties of Mn{sub 55-x}Au{sub x}Bi{sub 45} (x = 0, 4.5) thin films prepared by magnetron sputtering have been investigated. The magnetization of the MnBi films decreases and the coercivity increases due to Au doping. The temperature dependence of resistivity between 2 to 300 K shows that the films are metallic but the 4.5% Au-doped film shows a Kondo behavior with resistance minimum at 10.2 K. The magnetoresistance is anisotropic and the positive transverse magnetoresistance is significantly enhanced (16.3% at 70 kOe) by Au doping. We interpret these data in terms of a model in which Au atoms preferentially substitute for Mn atoms on the Mn lattice, and some Mn atoms are displaced to interstitial sites in the NiAs structure. These interstitial Mn atoms are coupled antiferromagnetically to the Mn atoms on the original Mn lattice leading to the large decrease in magnetization, Kondo effect, and the positive magnetoresistance.

  5. INTERSTELLAR PICK-UP IONS OBSERVED BETWEEN 11 AND 22 AU BY NEW HORIZONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randol, B. M.; McComas, D. J.; Schwadron, N. A.

    2013-05-10

    We report new observations by the Solar Wind Around Pluto instrument on the New Horizons spacecraft, which measures energy per charge (E/q) spectra of solar wind and interstellar pick-up ions (PUIs) between 11 AU and 22 AU from the Sun. The data provide an unprecedented look at PUIs as there have been very few measurements of PUIs beyond 10 AU. We analyzed the PUI part of the spectra by comparing them to the classic Vasyliunas and Siscoe PUI model. Our analysis indicates that PUIs are usually well-described by this distribution. We derive parameters relevant to PUI studies, such as the ionization rate normalized to 1 AU. Our result for the average ionization rate between 11 and 12 AU agrees with an independently derived average value found during the same time. Later, we find a general increase in the ionization rate, which is consistent with the increase in solar activity. We also calculate the PUI thermal pressure, which appears to be roughly consistent with previous results. Through fitting of the solar wind proton peaks in our spectra, we derive solar wind thermal pressures. Based on our analysis, we predict a ratio of PUI thermal pressure to solar wind thermal pressure just inside the termination shock to be between 100 and >1000.

  6. TUNING OF SIZE AND SHAPE OF AU-PT NANOCATALYST FOR DIRECT METHANOL FUEL CELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murph, S.

    2011-04-20

    In this paper, we report the precise control of the size, shape and surface morphology of Au-Pt nanocatalysts (cubes, blocks, octahedrons and dogbones) synthesized via a seed-mediated approach. Gold 'seeds' of different aspect ratios (1 to 4.2), grown by a silver-assisted approach, were used as templates for high-yield production of novel Au-Pt nanocatalysts at a low temperature (40 C). Characterization by electron microscopy (SEM, TEM, HRTEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), UV-Vis spectroscopy, zeta-potential (surface charge), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) were used to better understand their physico-chemical properties, preferred reactivities and underlying nanoparticle growth mechanism. A rotating disk electrode was used to evaluate the Au-Pt nanocatalysts electrochemical performance in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) of direct methanol fuel cells. The results indicate the Au-Pt dogbones are partially and in some cases completely unaffected by methanol poisoning during the evaluation of the ORR. The ORR performance of the octahedron particles in the absence of MeOH is superior to that of the Au-Pt dogbones and Pt-black, however its performance is affected by the presence of MeOH.

  7. Mechanical and Electrical Performance of Thermally Stable Au-ZnO films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoeppner, Rachel L.; Goeke, Ronald S.; Moody, Neville R.; Bahr, David F.

    2015-03-28

    The mechanical properties, thermal stability, and electrical performance of AuZnO composite thin films are determined in this work. The co-deposition of ZnO with Au via physical vapor deposition leads to grain refinement over that of pure Au; the addition of 0.1 vol.% ZnO reduces the as-grown grain size by over 30%. The hardness of the as-grown films doubles with 2% ZnO, from 1.8 to 3.6 GPa as measured by nanoindentation. Films with ZnO additions greater than 0.5% show no significant grain growth after annealing at 350 C, while pure gold and smaller additions do exhibit grain growth and subsequent mechanical softening. Films with 1% and 2% ZnO show a decrease of approximately 50% in electrical resistivity and no change in hardness after annealing. A model accounting for both changes in the interface structure between dispersed ZnO particles and the Au matrix captures the changes in mechanical and electrical resistivity. Furthermore, the addition of 12% ZnO co-deposited with Au provides a method to create mechanically hard and thermally stable films with a resistivity less than 80 n?-m. Our results complement previous studies of other alloying systems, suggesting oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) gold shows a desirable hardnessresistivity relationship that is relatively independent of the particular ODS chemistry.

  8. Systematic study of charged-pion and kaon femtoscopy in Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.

    2015-09-23

    We present a systematic study of charged pion and kaon interferometry in Au+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV. The kaon mean source radii are found to be larger than pion radii in the outward and longitudinal directions for the same transverse mass; this difference increases for more central collisions. The azimuthal-angle dependence of the radii was measured with respect to the second-order event plane and similar oscillations of the source radii were found for pions and kaons. Hydrodynamic models qualitatively describe the similar oscillations of the mean source radii for pions and kaons, but they do not fully describe the transverse-massmore »dependence of the oscillations.« less

  9. Systematic study of charged-pion and kaon femtoscopy in Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.

    2015-09-23

    We present a systematic study of charged pion and kaon interferometry in Au+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV. The kaon mean source radii are found to be larger than pion radii in the outward and longitudinal directions for the same transverse mass; this difference increases for more central collisions. The azimuthal-angle dependence of the radii was measured with respect to the second-order event plane and similar oscillations of the source radii were found for pions and kaons. Hydrodynamic models qualitatively describe the similar oscillations of the mean source radii for pions and kaons, but they do not fully describe the transverse-massmore » dependence of the oscillations.« less

  10. Systematic study of charged-pion and kaon femtoscopy in Au+Au collisions at ?sNN = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adare, A.

    2015-09-23

    We present a systematic study of charged pion and kaon interferometry in Au+Au collisions at ?sNN=200 GeV. The kaon mean source radii are found to be larger than pion radii in the outward and longitudinal directions for the same transverse mass; this difference increases for more central collisions. The azimuthal-angle dependence of the radii was measured with respect to the second-order event plane and similar oscillations of the source radii were found for pions and kaons. Hydrodynamic models qualitatively describe the similar oscillations of the mean source radii for pions and kaons, but they do not fully describe the transverse-mass dependence of the oscillations.

  11. Photoconductive response of a single Au nanorod coupled to LaAlO{sub

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    3}/SrTiO{sub 3} nanowires (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Photoconductive response of a single Au nanorod coupled to LaAlO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} nanowires Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Photoconductive response of a single Au nanorod coupled to LaAlO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} nanowires Terahertz (THz) spectroscopy is an important tool that provides resonant access to free carrier motion, molecular rotation, lattice vibrations, excitonic, spin, and other degrees of freedom. Current

  12. High-frequency signal transmission through single-atom contacts of Au and Pt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aoyama, Shodai; Kurokawa, Shu; Sakai, Akira

    2015-03-23

    Signal transmission through atom-sized contacts of Au and Pt has been studied at room temperature for frequencies from 9 kHz to 1 GHz and for conductances (1?10)G{sub 0} (G?2e{sup 2}/h is the quantum unit of conductance). We measured the frequency spectrum of S parameter S{sub 21}=|S{sub 21}|e{sup i?} and found ??0 up to 1?GHz for all contacts irrespective of their conductance. Our observations directly prove that the atom-sized contacts of Au and Pt, including their single-atom contacts, behave as a pure resistance in the RF regime.

  13. Photo-induced wettability of TiO{sub 2} film with Au buffer layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purkayastha, Debarun Dhar; Sangani, L. D. Varma; Krishna, M. Ghanashyam; Madhurima, V.

    2014-04-24

    The effect of thickness of Au buffer layer (15-25 nm) between TiO{sub 2} film and substrate on the wettability of TiO{sub 2} films is reported. TiO{sub 2} films grown on Au buffer layer have a higher contact angle of 96-;100 as compared to 47.6o for the film grown without buffer layer. The transition from hydrophobicity to hydrophilicity under UV irradiation occurs within 10 min. for the buffer layered films whereas it is almost 30 min. for the film grown without buffer layer. The enhanced photo induced hydrophilicity is shown to be surface energy driven.

  14. Density Functional Study of Au-n110(n = 3-5) Clusters on Relaxed Graphite

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Surfaces (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Density Functional Study of Au-n110(n = 3-5) Clusters on Relaxed Graphite Surfaces Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Density Functional Study of Au-n110(n = 3-5) Clusters on Relaxed Graphite Surfaces No abstract prepared. Authors: Wang, Guan M. ; BelBruno, Joseph J. ; Kenny, Steven D. ; Smith, Roger Publication Date: 2005-02-10 OSTI Identifier: 15011649 DOE Contract Number: AC05-76RL01830 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation:

  15. Protein Viability on Au Nanoparticles during an Electrospray and Electrostatic-Force-Directed Assembly Process

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mao, Shun; Lu, Ganhua; Yu, Kehan; Chen, Junhong

    2010-01-01

    We study the protein viability on Au nanoparticles during an electrospray and electrostatic-force-directed assembly process, through which Au nanoparticle-antibody conjugates are assembled onto the surface of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to fabricate carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (CNTFET) biosensors. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and field-effect transistor (FET) measurements have been used to investigate the antibody activity after the nanoparticle assembly. Upon the introduction of matching antigens, the colored reaction from the ELISA and the change in the electrical characteristic of the CNTFET device confirm that the antibody activity is preserved during the assembly process.

  16. Experimental evidences of a large extrinsic spin Hall effect in AuW alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laczkowski, P.; Rojas-Sánchez, J.-C.

    2014-04-07

    We report an experimental study of a gold-tungsten alloy (7 at. % W concentration in Au host) displaying remarkable properties for spintronics applications using both magneto-transport in lateral spin valve devices and spin-pumping with inverse spin Hall effect experiments. A very large spin Hall angle of about 10% is consistently found using both techniques with the reliable spin diffusion length of 2 nm estimated by the spin sink experiments in the lateral spin valves. With its chemical stability, high resistivity, and small induced damping, this AuW alloy may find applications in the nearest future.

  17. LAKESHORE AVON BR ANT-EDEN ALD EN-LANC ASTER AU BURN W SH ELDON

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    81 § ¨ ¦ 81 LAKESHORE AVON BR ANT-EDEN ALD EN-LANC ASTER AU BURN W SH ELDON CALEDONIA HURON C REEK LEIC EST ER COL DEN ASH FORD INDIAN FALLS LAWTONS SAR DINIA RPD-037 -2 GLENWOOD PU LASKI PAVILION CON CORD COL LINS N ELM A ORC HARD PARK-H AMBU RG DANLEY CORNERS ST ILLWAT ER CHAFF EE-ARCAD E FAYETT E-WATERLOO LAKEVIEW JAVA SEN EC A W ELLER Y AU RORA E ZOAR BU FFALO TIOGA SILVER LAKE AKR ON ROM E RAT HBON E ALM A BET HANY WYOMING ULYSSES BR ANCH W SAN DY CREEK COL LINS BLOOMFIELD E LEBANON

  18. PdAgAu alloy with high resistance to corrosion by H{sub 2}S

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braun, Fernando; Miller, James B.; Gellman, Andrew J.; Tarditi, Ana M.; Fleutot, Benoit; Petro, Kondratyuk, Cornaglia, Laura M

    2012-12-01

    PdAgAu alloy films were prepared on porous stainless steel supports by sequential electroless deposition. Two specific compositions, Pd{sub 83}Ag{sub 2}Au{sub 15} and Pd{sub 74}Ag{sub 14}Au{sub 12}, were studied for their sulfur tolerance. The alloys and a reference Pd foil were exposed to 1000 H{sub 2}S/H{sub 2} at 623 K for periods of 3 and 30 hours. The microstructure, morphology and bulk composition of both nonexposed and H{sub 2}S-exposed samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). XRD and SEM analysis revealed time-dependent growth of a bulk Pd{sub 4}S phase on the Pd foil during H{sub 2}S exposure. In contrast, the PdAgAu ternary alloys displayed the same FCC structure before and after H{sub 2}S exposure. In agreement with the XRD and SEM results, sulfur was not detected in the bulk of either ternary alloy samples by EDS, even after 30 hours of H{sub 2}S exposure. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) depth profiles were acquired for both PdAgAu alloys after 3 and 30 hours of exposure to characterize sulfur contamination near their surfaces. Very low S 2p and S 2s XPS signals were observed at the top-surfaces of the PdAgAu alloys, and those signals disappeared before the etch depth reached ~ 10 nm, even for samples exposed to H{sub 2}S for 30 hours. The depth profile analyses also revealed silver and gold segregation to the surface of the alloys; preferential location of Au on the alloys surface may be related to their resistance to bulk sulfide formation. In preliminary tests, a PdAgAu alloy membrane displayed higher initial H{sub 2} permeability than a similarly prepared pure Pd sample and, consistent with resistance to bulk sulfide formation, lower permeability loss in H{sub 2}S than pure Pd.

  19. Heavy-quark production and elliptic flow in Au+Au collisions at √sNN=62.4 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.

    2015-04-28

    In this study, we present measurements of electrons and positrons from the semileptonic decays of heavy-flavor hadrons at midrapidity (|y|< 0.35) in Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 62.4 GeV. The data were collected in 2010 by the PHENIX experiment that included the new hadron-blind detector. The invariant yield of electrons from heavy-flavor decays is measured as a function of transverse momentum in the range 1 < peT < 5 GeV/c. The invariant yield per binary collision is slightly enhanced above the p+p reference in Au+Au 0%–20%, 20%–40%, and 40%–60% centralities at a comparable level. At this low beam energy thismore » may be a result of the interplay between initial-state Cronin effects, final-state flow, and energy loss in medium. The v₂ of electrons from heavy-flavor decays is nonzero when averaged between 1.3 < peT < 2.5 GeV/c for 0%–40% centrality collisions at √sNN = 62.4 GeV. For 20%–40% centrality collisions, the v₂ at √sNN = 62.4 GeV is smaller than that for heavy-flavor decays at √sNN = 200 GeV. The v₂ of the electrons from heavy-flavor decay at the lower beam energy is also smaller than v₂ for pions. Both results indicate that the heavy-quarks interact with the medium formed in these collisions, but they may not be at the same level of thermalization with the medium as observed at √sNN = 200 GeV.« less

  20. Heavy-quark production and elliptic flow in Au+Au collisions at ?sNN=62.4 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adare, A.

    2015-04-28

    In this study, we present measurements of electrons and positrons from the semileptonic decays of heavy-flavor hadrons at midrapidity (|y|< 0.35) in Au+Au collisions at ?sNN = 62.4 GeV. The data were collected in 2010 by the PHENIX experiment that included the new hadron-blind detector. The invariant yield of electrons from heavy-flavor decays is measured as a function of transverse momentum in the range 1 < peT < 5 GeV/c. The invariant yield per binary collision is slightly enhanced above the p+p reference in Au+Au 0%20%, 20%40%, and 40%60% centralities at a comparable level. At this low beam energy this may be a result of the interplay between initial-state Cronin effects, final-state flow, and energy loss in medium. The v? of electrons from heavy-flavor decays is nonzero when averaged between 1.3 < peT < 2.5 GeV/c for 0%40% centrality collisions at ?sNN = 62.4 GeV. For 20%40% centrality collisions, the v? at ?sNN = 62.4 GeV is smaller than that for heavy-flavor decays at ?sNN = 200 GeV. The v? of the electrons from heavy-flavor decay at the lower beam energy is also smaller than v? for pions. Both results indicate that the heavy-quarks interact with the medium formed in these collisions, but they may not be at the same level of thermalization with the medium as observed at ?sNN = 200 GeV.

  1. An X-ray Absorption Fine Structure study of Au adsorbed onto the non-metabolizing cells of two soil bacterial species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Zhen; Kenney, Janice P.L.; Fein, Jeremy B.; Bunker, Bruce A.

    2015-02-09

    Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial cells can remove Au from Au(III)-chloride solutions, and the extent of removal is strongly pH dependent. In order to determine the removal mechanisms, X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) spectroscopy experiments were conducted on non-metabolizing biomass of Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas putida with fixed Au(III) concentrations over a range of bacterial concentrations and pH values. X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) data on both bacterial species indicate that more than 90% of the Au atoms on the bacterial cell walls were reduced to Au(I). In contrast to what has been observed for Au(III) interaction with metabolizing bacterial cells, no Au(0) or Au-Au nearest neighbors were observed in our experimental systems. All of the removed Au was present as adsorbed bacterial surface complexes. For both species, the XAFS data suggest that although Au-chloride-hydroxide aqueous complexes dominate the speciation of Au in solution, Au on the bacterial cell wall is characterized predominantly by binding of Au atoms to sulfhydryl functional groups and amine and/or carboxyl functional groups, and the relative importance of the sulfhydryl groups increases with increasing pH and with decreasing Au loading. The XAFS data for both microorganism species suggest that adsorption is the first step in the formation of Au nanoparticles by bacteria, and the results enhance our ability to account for the behavior of Au in bacteria-bearing geologic systems.

  2. Nuclear matter effects on J/? production in asymmetric Cu + Au collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}} = 200\\) GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Alexander, J.; Alfred, M.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Asano, H.; Atomssa, E. T.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Bai, X.; Bandara, N. S.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Baumgart, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Beaumier, M.; Beckman, S.; Belmont, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bing, X.; Black, D.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Butsyk, S.; Campbell, S.; Chen, C. -H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choi, S.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Cronin, N.; Crossette, N.; Csand, M.; Csrg?, T.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; DeBlasio, K.; Dehmelt, K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Ding, L.; Dion, A.; Do, J. H.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; D'Orazio, L.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Feege, N.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fukao, Y.; Gainey, K.; Gal, C.; Gallus, P.; Garg, P.; Garishvili, A.; Garishvili, I.; Ge, H.; Giordano, F.; Glenn, A.; Gong, X.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gu, Y.; Gunji, T.; Guragain, H.; Hachiya, T.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Han, S. Y.; Hanks, J.; Hasegawa, S.; Hashimoto, K.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hollis, R. S.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Hoshino, T.; Huang, J.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Imazu, Y.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Isinhue, A.; Ivanishchev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Jeon, S. J.; Jezghani, M.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, E.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kamin, J.; Kanda, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kapustinsky, J.; Kawall, D.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Key, J. A.; Khachatryan, V.; Khandai, P. K.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kihara, K.; Kijima, K. M.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E. -J.; Kim, H. -J.; Kim, M.; Kim, Y. -J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kistenev, E.; Klatsky, J.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Koblesky, T.; Kofarago, M.; Komkov, B.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kotov, D.; Krizek, F.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, G. H.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S. H.; Leitch, M. J.; Leitgab, M.; Lewis, B.; Li, X.; Lim, S. H.; Liu, M. X.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Maruyama, T.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Meles, A.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Miller, A. J.; Milov, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J. T.; Miyasaka, S.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Montuenga, P.; Moon, T.; Morrison, D. P.; Moskowitz, M.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Mwai, A.; Nagae, T.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakagomi, H.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nattrass, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nihashi, M.; Niida, T.; Nouicer, R.; Novak, T.; Novitzky, N.; Nyanin, A. S.; O'Brien, E.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oide, H.; Okada, K.; Orjuela Koop, J. D.; Oskarsson, A.; Ozaki, H.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, S.; Park, S. K.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, L.; Patel, M.; Peng, J. -C.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perera, G. D. N.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Perry, J.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pinson, R.; Pisani, R. P.; Purschke, M. L.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reynolds, D.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Riveli, N.; Roach, D.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rowan, Z.; Rubin, J. G.; Ryu, M. S.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sako, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, S.; Sawada, S.; Schaefer, B.; Schmoll, B. K.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Sen, A.; Seto, R.; Sett, P.; Sexton, A.; Sharma, D.; Shaver, A.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T. -A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Skolnik, M.; Slune?ka, M.; Solano, S.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Soumya, M.; Sourikova, I. V.; Stankus, P. W.; Steinberg, P.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Stone, M. R.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sumita, T.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.; Takahara, A.; Taketani, A.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tennant, E.; Timilsina, A.; Todoroki, T.; Tomek, M.; Torii, H.; Towell, M.; Towell, R.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vargyas, M.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vrtesi, R.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.

    2014-12-18

    We report on J/? production from asymmetric Cu+Au heavy-ion collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}} = 200\\) GeV at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at both forward (Cu-going direction) and backward (Au-going direction) rapidities. The nuclear modification of J/? yields in Cu+Au collisions in the Au-going direction is found to be comparable to that in Au+Au collisions when plotted as a function of the number of participating nucleons. In the Cu-going direction, J/? production shows a stronger suppression. This difference is comparable in magnitude and has the same sign as the difference expected from shadowing effects due to stronger low-x gluon suppression in the larger Au nucleus. Thus, the relative suppression is opposite to that expected from hot nuclear matter dissociation, since a higher energy density is expected in the Au-going direction.

  3. Plasmon-enhanced reverse water gas shift reaction over oxide supported Au catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Upadhye, AA; Ro, I; Zeng, X; Kim, HJ; Tejedor, I; Anderson, MA; Dumesic, JA; Huber, GW

    2015-01-01

    We show that localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) can enhance the catalytic activities of different oxide-supported Au catalysts for the reverse water gas shift (RWGS) reaction. Oxide-supported Au catalysts showed 30 to 1300% higher activity for RWGS under visible light compared to dark conditions. Au/TiO2 catalyst prepared by the deposition-precipitation (DP) method with 3.5 nm average Au particle size showed the highest activity for the RWGS reaction. Visible light is converted into chemical energy for this reaction with up to a 5% overall efficiency. A shift in the apparent activation energy (from 47 kJ mol(-1) in dark to 35 kJ mol(-1) in light) and apparent reaction order with respect to CO2 (from 0.5 in dark to 1.0 in light) occurs due to the LSPR. Our kinetic results indicate that the LSPR increases the rate of either the hydroxyl hydrogenation or carboxyl decomposition more than any other steps in the reaction network.

  4. Mechanical and Electrical Performance of Thermally Stable Au-ZnO films

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Schoeppner, Rachel L.; Goeke, Ronald S.; Moody, Neville R.; Bahr, David F.

    2015-03-28

    The mechanical properties, thermal stability, and electrical performance of Au–ZnO composite thin films are determined in this work. The co-deposition of ZnO with Au via physical vapor deposition leads to grain refinement over that of pure Au; the addition of 0.1 vol.% ZnO reduces the as-grown grain size by over 30%. The hardness of the as-grown films doubles with 2% ZnO, from 1.8 to 3.6 GPa as measured by nanoindentation. Films with ZnO additions greater than 0.5% show no significant grain growth after annealing at 350 °C, while pure gold and smaller additions do exhibit grain growth and subsequent mechanicalmore » softening. Films with 1% and 2% ZnO show a decrease of approximately 50% in electrical resistivity and no change in hardness after annealing. A model accounting for both changes in the interface structure between dispersed ZnO particles and the Au matrix captures the changes in mechanical and electrical resistivity. Furthermore, the addition of 1–2% ZnO co-deposited with Au provides a method to create mechanically hard and thermally stable films with a resistivity less than 80 nΩ-m. Our results complement previous studies of other alloying systems, suggesting oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) gold shows a desirable hardness–resistivity relationship that is relatively independent of the particular ODS chemistry.« less

  5. Yields of photoneutron reactions on {sup 197}Au nuclei in the giant-dipole-resonance region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belyshev, S. S.; Ermakov, A. N.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Kurilik, A. S.; Stopani, K. A.; Troschiev, S. Yu.

    2011-11-15

    Yields of photonuclear reactions on 197Au nuclei were measured in a beam of bremsstrahlung photons, the endpoint energy of the bremsstrahlung spectrum being 29.1 MeV. These measurements were performed by means of the gamma-activation procedure. The results obtained in this way were compared with the results of earlier experiments and theoretical calculations.

  6. Thermal stability of bimetallic Au/Fe nanoparticles in silica matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pannu, Compesh Singh, Udai B. Hooda, Sonu Kabiraj, D. Avasthi, D. K.

    2014-04-24

    Thin silica film containing Au and Fe bimetallic nanoparticles were prepared by atom beam cosputtering. The samples were annealed at different temperatures from 400 to 800 C to study the thermal stability of bimetallic nanoparticles using X ray diffraction. It is observed that at 800 C strong structural rearrangement took place leading to thermal decomposition of bimetallic nanoparticles.

  7. Magnetic doping of the golden cage cluster M@Au16¯ (M=Fe,Co,Ni) (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Magnetic doping of the golden cage cluster M@Au16¯ (M=Fe,Co,Ni) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Magnetic doping of the golden cage cluster M@Au16¯ (M=Fe,Co,Ni) Structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of the golden cage doped with a transition-metal atom, M@Au16¯ (M=Fe,Co,Ni), are investigated using trapped ion electron diffraction, photoelectron spectroscopy, and density-functional theory. The best agreement to experiment is obtained for

  8. Energy dependence of Kπ, pπ and Kp fluctuations in Au+Au collisions from √sNN=7.7 to 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-08-07

    A search for the quantum chromodynamics (QCD) critical point was performed by the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, using dynamical fluctuations of unlike particle pairs. Heavy ion collisions were studied over a large range of collision energies with homogeneous acceptance and excellent particle identification, covering a significant range in the QCD phase diagram where a critical point may be located. Dynamical Kπ, pπ, and Kp fluctuations as measured by the STAR experiment in central 0–5% Au+Au collisions from center-of-mass collision energies √sNN=7.7 to 200 GeV are presented. The observable νdyn was used to quantify the magnitude of the dynamical fluctuations in event-by-event measurements of the Kπ, pπ, and Kp pairs. The energy dependences of these fluctuations from central 0–5% Au+Au collisions all demonstrate a smooth evolution with collision energy.

  9. Centrality dependence of low-momentum direct-photon production in Au+Au collisions at ?sNN = 200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.

    2015-06-05

    The PHENIX experiment at RHIC has measured the centrality dependence of the direct photon yield from Au+Au collisions at ?sNN = 200 GeV down to pT = 0.4 GeV/c. Photons are detected via photon conversions to e?e? pairs and an improved technique is applied that minimizes the systematic uncertainties that usually limit direct photon measurements, in particular at low pT . We find an excess of direct photons above the Ncoll-scaled yield measured in p+p collisions. This excess yield is well described by an exponential distribution with an inverse slope of about 240 MeV/c in the pT range from 0.62.0moreGeV/c. While the shape of the pT distribution is independent of centrality within the experimental uncertainties, the yield increases rapidly with increasing centrality, scaling approximately with N ? part, where ? = 1.380.03(stat)0.07(syst).less

  10. Centrality dependence of low-momentum direct-photon production in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Ta'ani, H.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; et al

    2015-06-05

    The PHENIX experiment at RHIC has measured the centrality dependence of the direct photon yield from Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV down to pT = 0.4 GeV/c. Photons are detected via photon conversions to e⁺e⁻ pairs and an improved technique is applied that minimizes the systematic uncertainties that usually limit direct photon measurements, in particular at low pT . We find an excess of direct photons above the Ncoll-scaled yield measured in p+p collisions. This excess yield is well described by an exponential distribution with an inverse slope of about 240 MeV/c in the pT range from 0.6–2.0more »GeV/c. In this study, while the shape of the pT distribution is independent of centrality within the experimental uncertainties, the yield increases rapidly with increasing centrality, scaling approximately with N α part, where α = 1.38±0.03(stat)±0.07(syst).« less

  11. Charged-to-neutral correlation at forward rapidity in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; et al

    2015-03-20

    Event-by-event fluctuations of the ratio of inclusive charged to photon multiplicities at forward rapidity in Au+Au collision at √sNN=200 GeV have been studied. Dominant contribution to such fluctuations is expected to come from correlated production of charged and neutral pions. We search for evidences of dynamical fluctuations of different physical origins. Observables constructed out of moments of multiplicities are used as measures of fluctuations. Mixed events and model calculations are used as baselines. Results are compared to the dynamical net-charge fluctuations measured in the same acceptance. A non-zero statistically significant signal of dynamical fluctuations is observed in excess to themore »model prediction when charged particles and photons are measured in the same acceptance. Thus, we find that, unlike dynamical net-charge fluctuation, charge-neutral fluctuation is not dominated by correlation due to particle decay. Results are compared to the expectations based on the generic production mechanism of pions due to isospin symmetry, for which no significant (« less

  12. Centrality dependence of low-momentum direct-photon production in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Ta'ani, H.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; et al

    2015-06-05

    The PHENIX experiment at RHIC has measured the centrality dependence of the direct photon yield from Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV down to pT = 0.4 GeV/c. Photons are detected via photon conversions to e⁺e⁻ pairs and an improved technique is applied that minimizes the systematic uncertainties that usually limit direct photon measurements, in particular at low pT . We find an excess of direct photons above the Ncoll-scaled yield measured in p+p collisions. This excess yield is well described by an exponential distribution with an inverse slope of about 240 MeV/c in the pT range from 0.6–2.0more » GeV/c. In this study, while the shape of the pT distribution is independent of centrality within the experimental uncertainties, the yield increases rapidly with increasing centrality, scaling approximately with N α part, where α = 1.38±0.03(stat)±0.07(syst).« less

  13. Charged-to-neutral correlation at forward rapidity in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; et al

    2015-03-20

    Event-by-event fluctuations of the ratio of inclusive charged to photon multiplicities at forward rapidity in Au+Au collision at √sNN=200 GeV have been studied. Dominant contribution to such fluctuations is expected to come from correlated production of charged and neutral pions. We search for evidences of dynamical fluctuations of different physical origins. Observables constructed out of moments of multiplicities are used as measures of fluctuations. Mixed events and model calculations are used as baselines. Results are compared to the dynamical net-charge fluctuations measured in the same acceptance. A non-zero statistically significant signal of dynamical fluctuations is observed in excess to themore » model prediction when charged particles and photons are measured in the same acceptance. Thus, we find that, unlike dynamical net-charge fluctuation, charge-neutral fluctuation is not dominated by correlation due to particle decay. Results are compared to the expectations based on the generic production mechanism of pions due to isospin symmetry, for which no significant (< 1%) deviation is observed.« less

  14. The adsorption and reaction of vinyl acetate on Au/Pd(100) alloy surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Zhenjun [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Calaza, Florencia C [ORNL; Tysoe, Wilfred [University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

    2012-01-01

    The surface chemistry of vinyl acetate monomer (VAM) is studied on Au/Pd(100) alloys as a function of alloy composition using temperature-programmed desorption and reflection adsorption infrared spectroscopy. VAM adsorbs weakly on isolated palladium sites on the alloy with a heat of adsorption of ~55 kJ/mol, with the plane of the VAM adsorbed close to parallel to the surface. The majority of the VAM adsorbed on isolated sites desorbs molecularly with only a small portion decomposing. At lower gold coverages (below ~0.5 ML of gold), where palladium palladium bridge sites are present, VAM binds to the surface in a distorted geometry via a rehybridized vinyl group. A larger proportion of this VAM decomposes and this reaction is initiated by C\\O bond scission in the VAM to form adsorbed acetate and vinyl species. The implication of this surface chemistry for VAM synthesis on Au/Pd(100) alloys is discussed.

  15. Self-organization of S adatoms on Au(111): ?3R30 rows at low coverage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walen, Holly; Liu, Da -Jiang; Oh, Junepyo; Lim, Hyunseob; Evans, J. W.; Kim, Yousoo; Thiel, P. A.

    2015-07-06

    Using scanning tunneling microscopy, we observe an adlayer structure that is dominated by short rows of S atoms, on unreconstructed regions of a Au(111) surface. This structure forms upon adsorption of low S coverage (less than 0.1 monolayer) on a fully reconstructed cleansurface at 300 K, then cooling to 5 K for observation. The rows adopt one of three orientations that are rotated by 30 from the close-packed directions of the Au(111) substrate, and adjacent S atoms in the rows are separated by ?3 times the surface lattice constant, a. Monte Carlo simulations are performed on lattice-gas models, we derived using a limited cluster expansion based on density functional theory energetics. Furthermore, models which include long-range pairwise interactions (extending to 5a), plus selected trio interactions, successfully reproduce the linear rows of S atoms at reasonable temperatures.

  16. Surface Plasmon Excitation via Au Nanoparticles in CdSe Semiconductor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pradhan, A. K.; Konda, R. B.; Mundle, R.; Mustafa, H.; Bamiduro, O.; Roy, U. N.; Cui, Y.; Burger, A.

    2008-10-23

    We present experimental evidence for the large Raman and photoluminescence enhancement in CdSe semiconductor films grown on Si and glass substrates due to excitation of surface plasmon resonances in proximate gold metal nanoparticles deposited on the surface of CdSe film. Heterojunction diodes containing n-CdSe on p-Si semiconductor were fabricated and the surface of the diodes was in situ coated with Au nanoparticles using the ultra-high vacuum pulsed-laser deposition technique. A significant enhancement of the photocurrent was obtained in CdSe/p-Si containing Au nanoparticles on the surface compared to CdSe/p-Si due to the enhanced photo-absorption within the semiconductor by the phenomenon of surface plasmon resonance. These observations suggest a variety of approaches for improving the performance of devices such as photodetectors, photovoltaic, and related devices, including biosensors.

  17. The (111) Surface of NaAu2. Structure, Composition, and Stability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwolek, Emma J.; Widmer, Roland; Grning, Oliver; Deniz, Okan; Walen, Holly; Yuen, Chad D.; Huang, Wenyu; Schlagel, Deborah L.; Wallingford, Mark; Thiel, Patricia A.

    2014-12-17

    The (111) surface of single-crystal NaAu2 is a model for catalytically active, powdered NaAu2. We prepare and characterize this surface with a broad suite of techniques. Preparation in ultrahigh vacuum consists of the traditional approach of ion bombardment (to remove impurities) and thermal annealing (to restore surface order). Both of these steps cause loss of sodium (Na), and repeated treatments eventually trigger conversion of the surface and near-surface regions to crystalline gold. The bulk has a limited ability to repopulate the surface Na. Under conditions where Na depletion is minimized, electron diffraction patterns are consistent with the bulk-terminated structure, and scanning tunneling microscopy reveals mesa-like features with lateral dimensions of a few tens of nanometers. The tops of the mesas do not possess fine structure characteristic of a periodic lattice, suggesting that the surface layer is disordered under the conditions of these experiments.

  18. Radio observations reveal a smooth circumstellar environment around the extraordinary type Ib supernova 2012au

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamble, Atish; Soderberg, Alicia M.; Margutti, Raffaella; Milisavljevic, Dan; Chakraborti, Sayan; Dittmann, Jason; Drout, Maria; Sanders, Nathan; Chomiuk, Laura; Medvedev, Mikhail; Chevalier, Roger; Chugai, Nikolai; Fransson, Claes; Nakar, Ehud

    2014-12-10

    We present extensive radio and X-ray observations of SN 2012au, an energetic, radio-luminous supernova of Type Ib that exhibits multi-wavelength properties bridging subsets of hydrogen-poor superluminous supernovae, hypernovae, and normal core-collapse supernovae. The observations closely follow models of synchrotron emission from a shock-heated circumburst medium that has a wind density profile (??r {sup 2}). We infer a sub-relativistic velocity for the shock wave v ? 0.2 c and a radius of r ? 1.4 10{sup 16}cm at 25 days after the estimated date of explosion. For a wind velocity of 1000 km s{sup 1}, we determine the mass-loss rate of the progenitor to be M-dot =3.610{sup ?6} M{sub ?} yr{sup ?1}, consistent with the estimates from X-ray observations. We estimate the total internal energy of the radio-emitting material to be E ? 10{sup 47} erg, which is intermediate to SN 1998bw and SN 2002ap. The evolution of the radio light curve of SN 2012au is in agreement with its interaction with a smoothly distributed circumburst medium and the absence of stellar shells ejected from previous outbursts out to r ? 10{sup 17} cm from the supernova site. We conclude that the bright radio emission from SN 2012au was not dissimilar from other core-collapse supernovae despite its extraordinary optical properties, and that the evolution of the SN 2012au progenitor star was relatively quiet, marked with a steady mass loss, during the final years preceding explosion.

  19. Plasmonic Based Sensing Using an Array of Au-Metal Oxide Thin Films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joy, N.; Rogers, Phillip H.; Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Carpenter, Michael A.

    2012-12-04

    An optical plasmonic-based sensing array has been developed and tested for the selective and sensitive detection of H2, CO, and NO2 at a temperature of 500C in an oxygen-containing background. The three element sensing array used Au nanoparticles embedded in separate thin films of yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ), CeO2, and TiO2. A peak in the absorbance spectrum due to a localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) on the Au nanoparticles was monitored for each film during gas exposures and showed a blue shift in the peak positions for the reducing gases, H2 and CO, and a red shift for the oxidizing gas NO2. A more in-depth look at the sensing response was performed using the multivariate methods of principal component analysis (PCA) analysis and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) on data from across the entire absorbance spectrum range. Qualitative results from both methods showed good separation between the three analytes for both the full array and the Au-TiO2 sample. Quantification of LDA cluster separation using the Mahalanobis distance showed better cluster separation for the array, but there were some instances with the lowest concentrations where the single Au-TiO2 film had better separation than the array. A second method to quantify cluster separation in LDA space was developed using multidimensional volume analysis of the individual cluster volume, overlapped cluster volume and empty volume between clusters. Compared to the individual sensing elements, the array showed less cluster overlap, smaller cluster volumes, and more space between clusters, all of which were expected for improved separability between the analytes.

  20. Periodicity, Electronic Structures, and Bonding of Gold Tetrahalides [AuX4](-) (X = F, CI, Br, I, At, Uus)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Wan-Lu; Li, Yong; Xu, Congqiao; Wang, Xue B.; Vorpagel, Erich R.; Li, Jun

    2015-12-07

    Systematic theoretical and experimental investigations have been performed to understand the periodicity and electronic structures of trivalent-gold halides using gold tetrahalides [AuX4]⁻ anions (X = F, Cl, Br, I, At, Uus). The [AuX4]⁻ (X = Cl, Br, I) anions were produced in gas phase and their negative-ion photoelectron spectra were obtained, which exhibited rich and well-resolved spectral peaks. We calculated the adiabatic as well as vertical electron detachment energies using density functional methods with scalar and spin-orbit coupling relativistic effects. The simulated photoelectron spectra based on these calculations are in good agreement with the experimental spectra. Our results show that the trivalent Au(III) oxidation state becomes progressively less stable while Au(I) is preferred when the halides become heavier along the Period Table. This trend reveals that the oxidation state of metals in complexes can be manipulated through ligand design

  1. Au impact on GaAs epitaxial growth on GaAs (111){sub B} substrates in molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liao, Zhi-Ming; Chen, Zhi-Gang; Xu, Hong-Yi; Guo, Ya-Nan; Sun, Wen; Zhang, Zhi; Yang, Lei; Lu, Zhen-Yu; Chen, Ping-Ping; Lu, Wei; Zou, Jin; Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Queensland 4072

    2013-02-11

    GaAs growth behaviour under the presence of Au nanoparticles on GaAs {l_brace}111{r_brace}{sub B} substrate is investigated using electron microscopy. It has been found that, during annealing, enhanced Ga surface diffusion towards Au nanoparticles leads to the GaAs epitaxial growth into {l_brace}113{r_brace}{sub B} faceted triangular pyramids under Au nanoparticles, governed by the thermodynamic growth, while during conventional GaAs growth, growth kinetics dominates, resulting in the flatted triangular pyramids at high temperature and the epitaxial nanowires growth at relatively low temperature. This study provides an insight of Au nanoparticle impact on GaAs growth, which is critical for understanding the formation mechanisms of semiconductor nanowires.

  2. Visible light plasmonic heating of Au-ZnO for the catalytic reduction of CO2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Congjun; Ranasingha, Oshadha; Natesakhawat, Sittichai; Ohodnicki, Paul R.; Andio, Mark; Lewis, James P.; Matranga, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Plasmonic excitation of Au nanoparticles attached to the surface of ZnO catalysts using low power 532 nm laser illumination leads to significant heating of the catalyst and the conversion of CO2 and H2 reactants to CH4 and CO products. Temperature-calibrated Raman spectra of ZnO phonons show that intensity-dependent plasmonic excitation can controllably heat Au–ZnO from 30 to ~600 °C and simultaneously tune the CH4 : CO product ratio. The laser induced heating and resulting CH4 : CO product distribution agrees well with predictions from thermodynamic models and temperature-programmed reaction experiments indicating that the reaction is a thermally driven process resultingmore » from the plasmonic heating of the Au-ZnO. The apparent quantum yield for CO2 conversion under continuous wave (cw) 532 nm laser illumination is 0.030%. The Au-ZnO catalysts are robust and remain active after repeated laser exposure and cycling. The light intensity required to initiate CO2 reduction is low ( ~2.5 x 105 W m-2) and achievable with solar concentrators. Our results illustrate the viability of plasmonic heating approaches for CO2 utilization and other practical thermal catalytic applications.« less

  3. LOCAL INTERSTELLAR HYDROGEN'S DISAPPEARANCE AT 1 AU: FOUR YEARS OF IBEX IN THE RISING SOLAR CYCLE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saul, Lukas; Rodriguez, Diego; Scheer, Juergen; Wurz, Peter; Bzowski, Maciej; Kubiak, Marzena; Sokol, Justina; Fuselier, Stephen; McComas, Dave; Moebius, Eberhard

    2013-04-20

    NASA's Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) mission has recently opened a new window on the interstellar medium (ISM) by imaging neutral atoms. One ''bright'' feature in the sky is the interstellar wind flowing into the solar system. Composed of remnants of stellar explosions as well as primordial gas and plasma, the ISM is by no means uniform. The interaction of the local ISM with the solar wind shapes our heliospheric environment with hydrogen being the dominant component of the very local ISM. In this paper, we report on direct sampling of the neutral hydrogen of the local ISM over four years of IBEX observations. The hydrogen wind observed at 1 AU has decreased and nearly disappeared as the solar activity has increased over the last four years; the signal at 1 AU has dropped off in 2012 by a factor of {approx}8 to near background levels. The longitudinal offset has also increased with time presumably due to greater radiation pressure deflecting the interstellar wind. We present longitudinal and latitudinal arrival direction measurements of the bulk flow as measured over four years beginning at near solar minimum conditions. The H distribution we observe at 1 AU is expected to be different from that outside the heliopause due to ionization, photon pressure, gravity, and filtration by interactions with heliospheric plasma populations. These observations provide an important benchmark for modeling of the global heliospheric interaction. Based on these observations we suggest a further course of scientific action to observe neutral hydrogen over a full solar cycle with IBEX.

  4. Growth of Single- and Bilayer ZnO on Au(111) and Interaction with Copper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Xingyi; Yao, Kun; Sun, Keju; Li, Wei-Xue; Lee, Junseok; Matranga, Christopher

    2013-05-30

    The stoichiometric single- and bi-layer ZnO(0001) have been prepared by reactive deposition of Zn on Au(111) and studied in detail with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy, and density functional theory calculations. Both single- and bi-layer ZnO(0001) adopt a planar, graphite-like structure similar to freestanding ZnO(0001) due to the weak van der Waals interactions dominating their adhesion with the Au(111) substrate. At higher temperature, the single-layer ZnO(0001) converts gradually to bi-layer ZnO(0001) due to the twice stronger interaction between two ZnO layers than the interfacial adhesion of ZnO with Au substrate. It is found that Cu atoms on the surface of bi-layer ZnO(0001) are mobile with a diffusion barrier of 0.31 eV, and likely to agglomerate and form nanosized particles at low coverages; while Cu atoms tend to penetrate a single layer of ZnO(0001) with a barrier of 0.10 eV, resulting in a Cu free surface.

  5. In situ Formation of Highly Conducting Covalent Au-C Contacts for Single-Molecule Junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Z.L.; Hybertsen, M.; Skouta, R.; Vazquez, H.; Widawsky, J.R.; Schneebeli, S.; Chen, W.; Breslow, R.; Venkataraman, L.

    2011-06-01

    Charge transport across metal-molecule interfaces has an important role in organic electronics. Typically, chemical link groups such as thiols or amines are used to bind organic molecules to metal electrodes in single-molecule circuits, with these groups controlling both the physical structure and the electronic coupling at the interface. Direct metal-carbon coupling has been shown through C60, benzene and {pi}-stacked benzene but ideally the carbon backbone of the molecule should be covalently bonded to the electrode without intervening link groups. Here, we demonstrate a method to create junctions with such contacts. Trimethyl tin (SnMe{sub 3})-terminated polymethylene chains are used to form single-molecule junctions with a break-junction technique. Gold atoms at the electrode displace the SnMe{sub 3} linkers, leading to the formation of direct Au-C bonded single-molecule junctions with a conductance that is {approx}100 times larger than analogous alkanes with most other terminations. The conductance of these Au-C bonded alkanes decreases exponentially with molecular length, with a decay constant of 0.97 per methylene, consistent with a non-resonant transport mechanism. Control experiments and ab initio calculations show that high conductances are achieved because a covalent Au-C sigma ({sigma}) bond is formed. This offers a new method for making reproducible and highly conducting metal-organic contacts.

  6. Structural Changes in Self-Catalyzed Adsorption of Carbon Monoxide on 1,4-Phenylene Diisocyanide Modified Au(111)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kestell, John; Boscoboinik, J. Anibal; Cheng, Lanxia; Garvey, Michael; Bennett, Dennis W.; Tysoe, Wilfred T.

    2015-07-23

    The self-accelerated adsorption of CO on 1,4-phenylene diisocyanide (PDI)-derived oligomers on Au(111) is explored by reflectionabsorption infrared spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy. PDI incorporates gold adatoms from the Au(111) surface to form one-dimensional (AuPDI)n chains that can also connect between gold nanoparticles on mica to form a conductive pathway between them. CO adsorption occurs in two stages; it first adsorbs adjacent to the oligomers that move to optimize CO adsorption. Further CO exposure induces PDI decoordination to form AuPDI adatom complexes thereby causing the conductivity of a PDI-linked gold nanoparticle array on mica to decrease to act as a chemically drive molecular switch. This simple system enables the adsorption process to be explored in detail. DFT calculations reveal that both the (AuPDI)n oligomer chain and the AuPDI adatom complex are stabilized by coadsorbed CO. A kinetic foot-in-the-door model is proposed in which fluctuations in PDI coordination allow CO to diffuse into the gap between gold adatoms to prevent the PDI from reattaching, thereby allowing additional CO to adsorb, to provide kinetic model for allosteric CO adsorption on PDI-covered gold.

  7. Exchange bias effect in Au-Fe3O4 dumbbell nanoparticles induced by the charge transfer from gold

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Feygenson, Mikhail; Bauer, John C; Gai, Zheng; Marques, Carlos; Aronson, Meigan C.; Teng, Xiaowei; Su, Dong; Stanic, Vesna; Urban, Volker S; Kevin, Beyer; et al

    2015-08-10

    We have studied the origin of the exchange bias effect in the Au-Fe3O4 dumbbell nanoparticles in two samples with different sizes of the Au seed nanoparticles (4.1 and 2.7 nm) and same size of Fe3O4 nanoparticles (9.8 nm). The magnetization, small-angle neutron scattering, synchrotron x-ray diffraction and scanning transmission electron microscope measurements determined the antiferromagnetic FeO wüstite phase within Fe3O4 nanoparticles, originating at the interface with the Au nanoparticles. The interface between antiferromagnetic FeO and ferrimagnetic Fe3O4 is giving rise to the exchange bias effect. The strength of the exchange bias fields depends on the interfacial area and lattice mismatchmore » between both phases. We propose that the charge transfer from the Au nanoparticles is responsible for a partial reduction of the Fe3O4 into FeO phase at the interface with Au nanoparticles. The Au-O bonds are formed across the interface to accommodate an excess of oxygen released during the reduction of magnetite.« less

  8. Structure, stability, and electronic property of carbon-doped gold clusters Au{sub n}C{sup ?} (n = 110): A density functional theory study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Li-Li; Liu, Yi-Rong; Huang, Teng; Jiang, Shuai; Wen, Hui; Gai, Yan-Bo; Zhang, Wei-Jun E-mail: wjzhang@aiofm.ac.cn; Huang, Wei E-mail: wjzhang@aiofm.ac.cn; School of Environmental Science and Optoelectronic Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026

    2013-12-28

    The equilibrium geometric structures, relative stabilities, and electronic properties of Au{sub n}C{sup ?} and Au{sub n+1}{sup ?} (n = 110) clusters are systematically investigated using density functional theory with hyper-generalized gradient approximation. The optimized geometries show that one Au atom capped on Au{sub n?1}C{sup ?} clusters is a dominant growth pattern for Au{sub n}C{sup ?} clusters. In contrast to Au{sub n+1}{sup ?} clusters, Au{sub n}C{sup ?} clusters are most stable in a quasi-planar or three-dimensional structure because C doping induces the local non-planarity while the rest of the structure continues to grow in a planar mode, resulting in an overall non-2D configuration. The relative stability calculations show that the impurity C atom can significantly enhance the thermodynamic stability of pure gold clusters. Moreover, the effect of C atom on the Au{sub n}{sup ?} host decreases with the increase of cluster size. The HOMO-LUMO gap curves show that the interaction of the C atom with Au{sub n}{sup ?} clusters improves the chemical stability of pure gold clusters, except for Au{sub 3}{sup ?} and Au{sub 4}{sup ?} clusters. In addition, a natural population analysis shows that the charges in corresponding Au{sub n}C{sup ?} clusters transfer from the Au{sub n}{sup ?} host to the C atom. Meanwhile, a natural electronic configuration analysis also shows that the charges mainly transfer between the 2s and 2p orbitals within the C atom.

  9. THE INNER COMA OF COMET C/2012 S1 (ISON) AT 0.53 AU AND 0.35 AU FROM THE SUN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonev, Boncho P.; Villanueva, Geronimo L.; Paganini, Lucas; DiSanti, Michal A.; Gibb, Erika L.; Mumma, Michael J.

    2014-11-20

    Using long-slit spectroscopy at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility, we extracted H{sub 2}O production rates and spatial profiles of gas rotational temperature and molecular column abundance in comet C/2012 S1 ISON, observed at heliocentric distances of 0.53 and 0.35AU. These measurements uniquely probed the physical environment in the inner collisional coma of this comet during its first (and last) approach to the Sun since being emplaced in the Oort Cloud some 4.5 billion years ago. Our observations revealed a comet evolving on various timescales, both over hours and days. At 0.35AU, ISON showed a considerable decrease in water production rate in less than 2hr, likely declining from a major outburst. Our measured temperature spatial distributions reflect the competition between the processes that cause heating and cooling in the coma, and also provide insight about the prevalent mechanism(s) of releasing gas-phase H{sub 2}O. The observed temperatures suggest that the comet was likely ejecting icy material continuously, which sublimated in the coma and heated the ambient gas, augmenting fast H-atoms produced by H{sub 2}O photolysis. ISON adds to the very limited sample of comets for which spatial-spectral studies of water temperatures have been conducted. These studies are now feasible and can be extended to comets having a variety of gas production rates. Continued synergy of such observations with both space missions like Rosetta and with physical models is strongly encouraged in order to gain a deeper understanding of the processes in the inner collisional zone of the cometary coma.

  10. Characterization of one-dimensional molecular chains of 4,4'-biphenyl diisocyanide on Au(111) by scanning tunneling microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhou, Jing; Li, Yan; Zahl, Percy; Sutter, Peter; Stacchiola, Dario J.; White, Michael G.

    2015-03-14

    The morphology and electronic structure of vapor deposited 4,4'-biphenyldiisocyanide (BPDI) on a Au(111) surface were investigated using variable-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). When deposited at room temperature, BPDI molecules form one-dimensional molecular chains similar to that recently observed for the structurally related 1,4-phenyl diisocyanide (PDI). Compared to PDI, the longer periodicity for the BPDI molecular chains is consistent with the addition of a second phenyl ring and supports a structural model in which the BPDI molecules lie parallel to the surface and interconnected by Au-adatoms. The molecular chains are mostly aligned along the [110] direction of the Au(111) substrate, butmore » exhibit frequent changes in angle that are consistent with directions between fcc and hcp three-fold hollow sites. Dispersion-corrected density functional theory calculations for one-dimensional chains of BPDI molecules bound end-to-end via their isocyanide groups to Au-adatoms reproduce the observed periodicity of the chains and show that this morphology is energetically favored over upright binding with one free –NC group. The spatially resolved conductance (dI/dV) map for BPDI on Au(111) exhibits a feature centered at -0.67 eV below the Fermi level which are delocalized along the chain with maxima at the Au-adatom and biphenyl positions. This occupied resonant feature is close to that previously observed for the PDI in both photoemission and conductance measurements and is attributed to an occupied interfacial state resulting from BPDI-Au interactions« less

  11. Hydrothermal synthesis of coral-like Au/ZnO catalyst and photocatalytic degradation of Orange II dye

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, P.K.; Lee, G.J.; Davies, S.H.; Masten, S.J.; Amutha, R.; Wu, J.J.

    2013-06-01

    Highlights: ? Coral-like Au/ZnO was successfully prepared using green synthetic method. ? Gold nanoparticles were deposited on the ZnO structure using NaBH{sub 4} and ?-D-glucose. ? Coral-like Au/ZnO exhibited superior photocatalytic activity to degrade Orange II. - Abstract: A porous coral-like zinc oxide (c-ZnO) photocatalyst was synthesized by the hydrothermal method. The coral-like structure was obtained by precipitating Zn{sub 4}(CO{sub 3})(OH){sub 6}H{sub 2}O (ZnCH), which forms nanosheets that aggregate together to form microspheres with the coral-like structure. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies indicate that after heating at 550 C the ZnCH microspheres can be converted to ZnO microspheres with a morphology similar to that of ZnCH microspheres. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) shows this conversion takes place at approximately 260 C. A simple electrostatic self-assembly method has been employed to uniformly disperse Au nanoparticles (1 wt.%) on the ZnO surface. In this procedure ?-D-glucose was used to stabilize the Au nanoparticles. Scanning electron microscope images indicate that the diameter of coral-like ZnO microspheres (c-ZnO) is about 8 ?m. X-ray diffraction reveals that the ZnO is highly crystalline with a wurtzite structure and the Au metallic particles have an average size of about 13 nm. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) studies have confirmed the presence of ZnO and also showed that the Au is present in the metallic state. The photocatalytic degradation of Orange II dye, with either ultraviolet or visible light, is faster on Au/c-ZnO than on c-ZnO.

  12. Top-emission Si-based phosphor organic light emitting diode with Au doped ultrathin n-Si film anode and bottom Al mirror

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Y. Z.; Xu, W. J.; Ran, G. Z. [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Qin, G. G. [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Key Lab of Semiconductor Materials, CAS, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2009-07-20

    We report a highly efficient top-emission Si-based phosphor organic light emitting diode (PhOLED) with an ultrathin polycrystalline n-Si:Au film anode and a bottom Al mirror. This anode is formed by magnetron sputtering followed by Ni induced crystallization and then Au diffusion. By optimizing the thickness of the n-Si:Au film anode, the Au diffusion temperature, and the other parameters of the PhOLED, the highest current and power efficiencies of the n-Si:Au film anode PhOLED reached 85{+-}9 cd/A and 80{+-}8 lm/W, respectively, corresponding to an external quantum efficiency of 21{+-}2% and a power conversion efficiency of 15{+-}2%, respectively, which are about 60% and 110% higher than those of the indium tin oxide anode counterpart and 70% and 50% higher than those of the bulk n{sup +}-Si:Au anode counterpart, respectively.

  13. EXPLORING INTERMEDIATE (5-40 AU) SCALES AROUND AB AURIGAE WITH THE PALOMAR FIBER NULLER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khn, J.; Mennesson, B.; Liewer, K.; Martin, S.; Loya, F.; Serabyn, E.; Millan-gabet, R.

    2015-02-10

    We report on recent K{sub s} -band interferometric observations of the young pre-main-sequence star AB Aurigae obtained with the Palomar Fiber Nuller (PFN). Reaching a contrast of a few 10{sup 4} inside a field of view extending from 35 to 275 mas (5-40 AU at AB Aur's distance), the PFN is able to explore angular scales that are intermediate between those accessed by coronagraphic imaging and long baseline interferometry. This intermediate region is of special interest given that many young stellar objects are believed to harbor extended halos at such angular scales. Using destructive interference (nulling) between two sub-apertures of the Palomar 200 inch telescope and rotating the telescope pupil, we measured a resolved circumstellar excess at all probed azimuth angles. The astrophysical null measured over the full rotation is fairly constant, with a mean value of 1.52%, and a slight additional azimuthal modulation of 0.2%. The isotropic astrophysical null is indicative of circumstellar emission dominated by an azimuthally extended source, possibly a halo, or one or more rings of dust, accounting for several percent of the total K{sub s}-band flux. The modest azimuthal variation may be explained by some skewness or anisotropy of the spatially extended source, e.g., an elliptical or spiral geometry, or clumping, but it could also be due to the presence of a point source located at a separation of ?120 mas (17 AU) with ?6 10{sup 3} of the stellar flux. We combine our results with previous Infrared Optical Telescope Array observations of AB Aur at H band, and demonstrate that a dust ring located at ?30 mas (4.3 AU) represents the best-fitting model to explain both sets of visibilities. We are also able to test a few previously hypothesized models of the incoherent component evident at longer interferometric baselines.

  14. The Correlation of Stress-State and Nano-Mechanical Properties in Au

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HOUSTON,JACK E.; JARAUSCH,K.F.; KIELY,J.D.; RUSSELL,P.E.

    1999-10-07

    A dependence of elastic response on the stress-state of a thin film has been demonstrated using the interfacial force microscope (IFM). Indentation response was measured as a function of the applied biaxial stress-state for 100 nm thick Au films. An increase in measured elastic modulus with applied compressive stress, and a decrease with applied tensile stress was observed. Measurements of elastic modulus before and after applying stress were identical indicating that the observed change in response is not due to a permanent change in film properties.

  15. Tailoring characteristic thermal stability of Ni-Au binary nanocrystals via structure and composition engineering: theoretical insights into structural evolution and atomic inter-diffusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Bangquan; Wang, Hailong; Xing, Guozhong; Wang, Rongming E-mail: rmwang@ustb.edu.cn

    2014-11-15

    We report on the structural evolution and atomic inter-diffusion characteristics of the bimetallic Ni-Au nanocrystals (NCs) by molecular dynamics simulations studies. Our results reveal that the thermal stability dynamics of Ni-Au NCs strongly depends on the atomic configurations. By engineering the structural construction with Ni:Au = 1:1 atomic composition, compared with core-shell Au@Ni and alloy NCs, the melting point of core-shell Ni@Au NCs is significantly enhanced up to 1215 K. Unexpectedly, with atomic ratio of Au:Ni= 1:9, the melting process initiates from the atoms in the shell of Ni@Au and alloy NCs, while starts from the core of Au@Ni NCs. The corresponding features and evolution process of structural motifs, mixing and segregation are illustrated via a series of dynamic simulations videos. Moreover, our results revealed that the face centered cubic phase Au{sub 0.75}Ni{sub 0.25} favorably stabilizes in NCs form but does not exist in the bulk counterpart, which elucidates the anomalies of previously reported experimental results on such bimetallic NCs.

  16. Angular distribution and recoil effect for 1 MeV Au+ ions through a Si3N4 thin foil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Ke; Zhu, Zihua; Manandhar, Sandeep; Liu, Jia; Chen, Chien-Hung; Shutthanandan, Vaithiyalingam; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Weber, William J; Zhang, Yanwen

    2014-01-01

    The Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter (SRIM) code has been widely used to predict nuclear stopping power and angular distribution of ion-solid collisions. However, experimental validation of the predictions is insufficient for slow heavy ions in nonmetallic compounds. In this work, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) is applied to determine the angular distribution of 1 MeV Au ions after penetrating a Si3N4 foil with a thickness of ~100 nm. The exiting Au ions are collected by a Si wafer located ~14 mm behind the Si3N4 foil, and the resulting 2-dimensional distribution of Au ions on the Si wafer is measured by ToF-SIMS. The SRIM-predicted angular distribution of Au ions through the Si3N4 thin foil is compared with the measured results, indicating that SRIM slightly overestimates the nuclear stopping power by up to 10%. In addition, thickness reduction of the suspended Si3N4 foils induced by 1 MeV Au ion irradiation is observed with an average loss rate of ~107 atom/ion.

  17. System size dependence of cluster properties from two-particle angular correlations in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at sq root(s{sub NN})=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alver, B.; Ballintijn, M.; Busza, W.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Henderson, C.; Kane, J. L.; Kulinich, P.; Li, W.; Loizides, C.; Reed, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Nieuwenhuizen, G. J. van; Vaurynovich, S. S.; Verdier, R.; Veres, G. I.; Wenger, E.; Wyslouch, B.; Back, B. B.

    2010-02-15

    We present results on two-particle angular correlations in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at a center-of-mass energy per nucleon pair of 200 GeV over a broad range of pseudorapidity (eta) and azimuthal angle (phi) values as a function of collision centrality. The PHOBOS detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has a uniquely large angular coverage for inclusive charged particles, which allows for the study of correlations on both long- and short-range scales. A complex two-dimensional correlation structure in {Delta}{eta} and {Delta}{phi} emerges, which is interpreted in the context of a cluster model. The effective cluster size and decay width are extracted from the two-particle pseudorapidity correlation functions. The effective cluster size found in semicentral Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions is comparable to that found in proton-proton collisions but a nontrivial decrease in size with increasing centrality is observed. Moreover, a comparison of results from Cu+Cu versus Au+Au collisions shows an interesting scaling of the effective cluster size with the measured fraction of total cross section (which is related to the ratio of the impact parameter to the nuclear radius, b/2R), suggesting a geometric origin. Further analysis for pairs from restricted azimuthal regions shows that the effective cluster size at {Delta}{phi}{approx}180 deg. drops more rapidly toward central collisions than the size at {Delta}{phi}{approx}0 deg. The effect of limited {eta} acceptance on the cluster parameters is also addressed, and a correction is applied to present cluster parameters for full {eta} coverage, leading to much larger effective cluster sizes and widths than previously noted in the literature. These results should provide insight into the hot and dense medium created in heavy ion collisions.

  18. Oxidation of palladium on Au(111) and ZnO(0001) supports

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lallo, J.; Tenney, S. A.; Kramer, A.; Sutter, P.; Batzill, M.

    2014-10-21

    The oxidation of supported Pd-deposits on Au(111) and ZnO(0001) single crystals has been studied by x- ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). Oxidation has been carried out ex-situ in a high-pressure cell with subsequent vacuum-transfer and characterization by XPS in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV), as well as using in-situ characterization by synchrotron based near-ambient pressure XPS. On Au(111) alloying of Pd with the substrate competes with oxidation and only sufficiently thick Pd films have been found to oxidize. For Pd on ZnO the oxidation conditions depend on the amount of deposited Pd. Thicker Pd deposits behave similar to bulk Pd, while thinner filmsmore » oxidize already at lower temperatures. Interestingly, for very small amounts of Pd, in-situ XPS shows full oxidation at room temperature and at less than 0.6 mbar O₂ pressure. This indicates a lowering of the kinetic barriers for oxidation of very small supported Pd-clusters. The formed oxide is, however, not stable in UHV and a slow reduction is observed. The instability of this oxide indicates that the Pd-oxide formed at the interface to ZnO may have different chemical properties compared to bulk PdO or surface oxides on Pd.« less

  19. Oxidation of palladium on Au(111) and ZnO(0001) supports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lallo, J.; Tenney, S. A.; Kramer, A.; Sutter, P.; Batzill, M.

    2014-10-21

    The oxidation of supported Pd-deposits on Au(111) and ZnO(0001) single crystals has been studied by x- ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). Oxidation has been carried out ex-situ in a high-pressure cell with subsequent vacuum-transfer and characterization by XPS in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV), as well as using in-situ characterization by synchrotron based near-ambient pressure XPS. On Au(111) alloying of Pd with the substrate competes with oxidation and only sufficiently thick Pd films have been found to oxidize. For Pd on ZnO the oxidation conditions depend on the amount of deposited Pd. Thicker Pd deposits behave similar to bulk Pd, while thinner films oxidize already at lower temperatures. Interestingly, for very small amounts of Pd, in-situ XPS shows full oxidation at room temperature and at less than 0.6 mbar O? pressure. This indicates a lowering of the kinetic barriers for oxidation of very small supported Pd-clusters. The formed oxide is, however, not stable in UHV and a slow reduction is observed. The instability of this oxide indicates that the Pd-oxide formed at the interface to ZnO may have different chemical properties compared to bulk PdO or surface oxides on Pd.

  20. The (111) Surface of NaAu2. Structure, Composition, and Stability

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kwolek, Emma J.; Widmer, Roland; Gröning, Oliver; Deniz, Okan; Walen, Holly; Yuen, Chad D.; Huang, Wenyu; Schlagel, Deborah L.; Wallingford, Mark; Thiel, Patricia A.

    2014-12-17

    The (111) surface of single-crystal NaAu2 is a model for catalytically active, powdered NaAu2. We prepare and characterize this surface with a broad suite of techniques. Preparation in ultrahigh vacuum consists of the traditional approach of ion bombardment (to remove impurities) and thermal annealing (to restore surface order). Both of these steps cause loss of sodium (Na), and repeated treatments eventually trigger conversion of the surface and near-surface regions to crystalline gold. The bulk has a limited ability to repopulate the surface Na. Under conditions where Na depletion is minimized, electron diffraction patterns are consistent with the bulk-terminated structure, andmore » scanning tunneling microscopy reveals mesa-like features with lateral dimensions of a few tens of nanometers. The tops of the mesas do not possess fine structure characteristic of a periodic lattice, suggesting that the surface layer is disordered under the conditions of these experiments.« less

  1. OBSERVATIONS OF ISOTROPIC INTERSTELLAR PICK-UP IONS AT 11 AND 17 AU FROM NEW HORIZONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randol, B. M.; McComas, D. J.; Elliott, H. A.; Gosling, J. T.; Schwadron, N. A.

    2012-08-10

    We report new observations by the Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) instrument on the New Horizons spacecraft of an energy-per-charge (E/q) spectrum of interstellar pick-up ions (PUIs) from an unprecedented heliocentric distance of 17 AU. This E/q spectrum is fit well by an isotropic PUI distribution function combined with the detailed response of the SWAP instrument. In contrast to earlier work, we are also able to fit an isotropic PUI model to an E/q spectrum measured by SWAP at 11.3 AU by explicitly including two additional effects. These are (1) the E/q-dependent geometric factor of SWAP, which increases with decreasing E/q owing to effects associated with the post-acceleration of particles exiting the electrostatic analyzer portion of the instrument; and (2) a solar wind distribution, the model spectrum of which contributes significantly to the low-E/q part of the overall model owing, presumably, to secondary particles produced within the instrument.

  2. Ab initio study of MXe{sub n}{sup +} (M=Cu, Ag, and Au; n=1,2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Xinying; Cao Xue

    2008-02-15

    The equilibrium geometries, vibrational frequencies, dissociation energies, and populations of the title species were studied at Hartree-Fock (HF), second-order Moeller-Plesset (MP2), and coupled-cluster singles-doubles (triples) [CCSD(T)] levels. The electron correlation effects and relativistic effects on the geometry and stability were investigated at the CCSD(T) level. Both effects stabilize title species. The populations analyses show that M-Xe bonding is dominated by electrostatic interactions and the best theoretical estimate of the dissociation energies are 1.104 and 2.260 eV for AuXe{sup +} and AuXe{sub 2}{sup +}, respectively. The Cu and Ag are weakly bonded to Xe compared to Au.

  3. Au133(SPh-tBu)52 Nanomolecules: X-ray Crystallography, Optical, Electrochemical, and Theoretical Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dass, Amala; Theivendran, Shevanuja; Nimmala, Praneeth Reddy; Kumara, Chanaka; Jupally, Vijay Reddy; Fortunelli, Alessandro; Sementa, Luca; Barcaro, Giovanni; Zuo, Xiaobing; Noll, Bruce C.

    2015-04-15

    Crystal structure determination has revolutionized modern science in biology, chemistry, and physics. However, the difficulty in obtaining periodic crystal lattices which are needed for X-ray crystal analysis has hindered the determination of atomic structure in nanomaterials, known as the nanostructure problem. Here, by using rigid and bulky ligands, we have overcome this limitation and successfully solved the X-ray crystallographic structure of the largest reported thiolated gold nanomolecule, Au133S52. The total composition, Au133(SPh-tBu)52, was verified using high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The experimental and simulated optical spectra show an emergent surface plasmon resonance that is more pronounced than in the slightly larger Au144(SCH2CH2Ph)60. Theoretical analysis indicates that the presence of rigid and bulky ligands is the key to the successful crystal formation.

  4. Adsorption and switching properties of a N-benzylideneaniline based molecular switch on a Au(111) surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ovari, Laszlo; Luo, Ying; Haag, Rainer; Leyssner, Felix; Tegeder, Petra; Wolf, Martin

    2010-07-28

    High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy has been employed to analyze the adsorption geometry and the photoisomerization ability of the molecular switch carboxy-benzylideneaniline (CBA) adsorbed on Au(111). CBA on Au(111) adopts a planar (trans) configuration in the first monolayer (ML) as well as for higher coverages (up to 6 ML), in contrast to the strongly nonplanar geometry of the molecule in solution. Illumination with UV light of CBA in direct contact with the Au(111) surface ({<=}1 ML) caused no changes in the vibrational structure, whereas at higher coverages (>1 ML) pronounced modifications of vibrational features were observed, which we assign to a trans{yields}cis isomerization. Thermal activation induced the back reaction to trans-CBA. We propose that the photoisomerization is driven by a direct (intramolecular) electronic excitation of the adsorbed CBA molecules in the second ML (and above) analogous to CBA in the liquid phase.

  5. The Golden Crown: A Single Au Atom that Boosts the CO Oxidation Catalyzed by a Palladium Cluster on Titania Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jin; Alexandrova, Anastassia N.

    2013-07-18

    We show that at the subnano scale, the catalytic properties of surface-supported clusters can be majorly impacted by strategic doping and the choice for the supporting surface. This is a first-principles investigation of CO oxidation catalyzed by two subnanoclusters, Pd4Au and Pd5, deposited on rutile TiO2(110) surfaces. The titania surface was found to participate in the reaction directly via providing additional reaction pathways. The bimetallic cluster Pd4Au shows enhanced catalytic activity, whereas the monometallic Pd5 is poisoned and deactivated in the presence of CO and oxygen, and this trend is reversed from that in the gas phase.

  6. Microsoft Word - AU Funtional Area Points of Contact by Office Directors- Rev 1 04-28-15

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Functional Area Points of Contact Listing by AU Office Director Page 1 of 11 Integrated AU-1.2, -10, -20, -50 - August 21, 2014 Function/Subject Director Email Phone Accident Investigations Andy Lawrence Andrew.lawrence@hq.doe.gov (202) 586-6740 Administrative Review (Clearance eligibility determinations) Robert Lingan Robert.lingan@hq.doe.gov (202) 586-1461 Annual Report to Congress on Special Nuclear Material Robert Lingan Robert.lingan@hq.doe.gov (202) 586-1461 Annual Site Environmental

  7. Nuclear matter effects on J/ψ production in asymmetric Cu + Au collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}} = 200\\) GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Alexander, J.; Alfred, M.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; et al

    2014-12-18

    We report on J/ψ production from asymmetric Cu+Au heavy-ion collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}} = 200\\) GeV at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at both forward (Cu-going direction) and backward (Au-going direction) rapidities. The nuclear modification of J/ψ yields in Cu+Au collisions in the Au-going direction is found to be comparable to that in Au+Au collisions when plotted as a function of the number of participating nucleons. In the Cu-going direction, J/ψ production shows a stronger suppression. This difference is comparable in magnitude and has the same sign as the difference expected from shadowing effects due to stronger low-x gluon suppression inmore » the larger Au nucleus. Thus, the relative suppression is opposite to that expected from hot nuclear matter dissociation, since a higher energy density is expected in the Au-going direction.« less

  8. Gold-rich R3Au7Sn3: Establishing the interdependence between electronic features and physical properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Provino, Alessia; Steinberg, Simon; Smetana, Volodymyr; Kulkarni, Ruta; Dhar, Sudesh K.; Manfrinetti, Pietro; Mudring, Anja -Verena

    2015-05-18

    Two new polar intermetallic compounds Y3Au7Sn3 (I) and Gd3Au7Sn3 (II) have been synthesized and their structures have been determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction (P63/m; Z = 2, a = 8.148(1)/8.185(3), and c = 9.394(2)/9.415(3) for I/II, respectively). They can formally be assigned to the Cu10Sn3 type and consist of parallel slabs of Sn centered, edge-sharing trigonal Au6 antiprisms connected through R3 (R = Y, Gd) triangles. Additional Au atoms reside in the centres of trigonal Au6 prisms forming Au@Au6 clusters with Au–Au distances of 2.906–2.960 Å, while the R–R contacts in the R3 groups are considerably larger than the sums of their metallic radii. These exclusive structural arrangements provide alluring systems to study the synergism between strongly correlated systems, particularly, those in the structure of (II), and extensive polar intermetallic contacts, which has been inspected by measurements of the magnetic properties, heat capacities and electrical conductivities of both compounds. Gd3Au7Sn3 shows an antiferromagnetic ordering at 13 K, while Y3Au7Sn3 is a Pauli paramagnet and a downward curvature in its electrical resistivity at about 1.9 K points to a superconducting transition. DFT-based band structure calculations on R3Au7Sn3 (R = Y, Gd) account for the results of the conductivity measurements and different spin ordering models of (II) provide conclusive hints about its magnetic structure. As a result, chemical bonding analyses of both compounds indicate that the vast majority of bonding originates from the heteroatomic Au–Gd and Au–Sn interactions, while homoatomic Au–Au bonding is evident within the Au@Au6 clusters.

  9. Voyager 2 observations of plasmas and flows out to 104 AU

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richardson, J. D.; Decker, R. B. E-mail: robert.decker@apljhu.edu

    2014-09-10

    Voyager 2 has crossed through 20 AU of the heliosheath; assuming the same heliosheath thickness as at Voyager 1, it is now two-thirds of the way to the heliopause. The plasma data are generally of good quality, although the increasing flow angle of the plasma makes analysis more difficult. The average plasma speed has remained constant but the flow angles have increased to almost 60 in the RT plane and to almost 30 in the RN plane. The average density and thermal speed have been constant since a density increase observed in 2011. Comparison of V2 plasma flows derived from plasma science experiment (PLS) data and Low Energy Charged Particle (LECP) proton anisotropies give good agreement except when heavy ion contributions or non-convective proton anisotropies are observed in the LECP data.

  10. Six-dimensional quantum dynamics study for the dissociative adsorption of HCl on Au(111) surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Tianhui; Fu, Bina; Zhang, Dong H.

    2013-11-14

    The six-dimensional quantum dynamics calculations for the dissociative chemisorption of HCl on Au(111) are carried out using the time-dependent wave-packet approach, based on an accurate PES which was recently developed by neural network fitting to density functional theory energy points. The influence of vibrational excitation and rotational orientation of HCl on the reactivity is investigated by calculating the exact six-dimensional dissociation probabilities, as well as the four-dimensional fixed-site dissociation probabilities. The vibrational excitation of HCl enhances the reactivity and the helicopter orientation yields higher dissociation probability than the cartwheel orientation. A new interesting site-averaged effect is found for the title molecule-surface system that one can essentially reproduce the six-dimensional dissociation probability by averaging the four-dimensional dissociation probabilities over 25 fixed sites.

  11. Assembly/Disassembly of DNA-Au Nanoparticles: A Strategy of Intervention

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lim, I-Im S.; Wang, Lingyan; Chandrachud, Uma; Gal, Susannah; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2008-01-01

    This report describes the viability of a strategy for manipulating the assembly/disassembly processes of DNA-Au nanoparticles by molecular intervention. Using the temperature-induced assembly and disassembly processes of DNAs and gold nanoparticles as a model system, the introduction of a molecular recognition probe is demonstrated to lead to the intervention of the assembly/disassembly processes depending on its specific biorecognition. This process can be detected by monitoring the change in the optical properties of gold nanoparticles and their DNA assemblies. Implications of the preliminary results to exploration of the resulting nanostructures for fine-tuning of the interfacial reactivities in DNA-based bioassays and biomaterialmore » engineering are also discussed.« less

  12. Random telegraph signals by alkanethiol-protected Au nanoparticles in chemically assembled single-electron transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kano, Shinya; Azuma, Yasuo; Tanaka, Daisuke; Sakamoto, Masanori; Teranishi, Toshiharu; Smith, Luke W.; Smith, Charles G.; Majima, Yutaka

    2013-12-14

    We have studied random telegraph signals (RTSs) in a chemically assembled single-electron transistor (SET) at temperatures as low as 300 mK. The RTSs in the chemically assembled SET were investigated by measuring the sourcedrain current, using a histogram of the RTS dwell time, and calculating the power spectrum density of the drain currenttime characteristics. It was found that the dwell time of the RTS was dependent on the drain voltage of the SET, but was independent of the gate voltage. Considering the spatial structure of the chemically assembled SET, the origin of the RTS is attributed to the trapped charges on an alkanethiol-protected Au nanoparticle positioned near the SET. These results are important as they will help to realize stable chemically assembled SETs in practical applications.

  13. Exploring the activity of a novel Au/TiC(001) model catalyst towards CO and CO2 hydrogenation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Asara, Gian Giacomo; Ricart, Josep M.; Rodriguez, Jose A.; Illas, Francesc

    2015-02-02

    Small metallic nanoparticles supported on transition metal carbides exhibit an unexpected high activity towards a series of chemical reactions. In particular, the Au/TiC system has proven to be an excellent catalyst for SO2 decomposition, thiophene hydrodesulfurization, O2 and H2 dissociation and the water gas shift reaction. Recent studies have shown that Au/TiC is a very good catalyst for the reverse water–gas shift (CO2 + H2 → CO + H2O) and CO2 hydrogenation to methanol. The present work further expands the range of applicability of this novel type of systems by exploring the catalytic activity of Au/TiC towards the hydrogenation ofmore » CO or CO2 with periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations on model systems. Hydrogen dissociates easily on Au/TiC but direct hydrogenation of CO to methanol is hindered by very high activation barriers implying that, on this model catalyst, methanol production from CO2 involves the hydrogenation of a HOCO-like intermediate. Thus, when dealing with mixtures of syngas (CO/CO2/H2/H2O), CO could be transformed into CO2 through the water gas shift reaction with subsequent hydrogenation of CO2 to methanol.« less

  14. Visible light plasmonic heating of Au-ZnO for the catalytic reduction of CO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Congjun; Ranasingha, Oshadha; Natesakhawat, Sittichai; Ohodnicki, Paul R.; Ohodnicki, Andio, Mark; Lewis, James; P Matranga, Christopher

    2013-05-01

    Plasmonic excitation of Au nanoparticles attached to the surface of ZnO catalysts using low power 532 nm laser illumination leads to significant heating of the catalyst and the conversion of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} reactants to CH{sub 4} and CO products. Temperature-calibrated Raman spectra of ZnO phonons show that intensity-dependent plasmonic excitation can controllably heat AuZnO from 30 to #1;~600 {degrees}#3;C and simultaneously tune the CH{sub 4} : CO product ratio. The laser induced heating and resulting CH{sub 4} : CO product distribution agrees well with predictions from thermodynamic models and temperatureprogrammed reaction experiments indicating that the reaction is a thermally driven process resulting from the plasmonic heating of the AuZnO. The apparent quantum yield for CO{sub 2} conversion under continuous wave (cw) 532 nm laser illumination is 0.030%. The AuZnO catalysts are robust and remain active after repeated laser exposure and cycling. The light intensity required to initiate CO{sub 2} reduction is low (#1;~2.5 x#4; 10{sup 5} W m{sup #5;-2}) and achievable with solar concentrators. Our results illustrate the viability of plasmonic heating approaches for CO{sub 2} utilization and other practical thermal catalytic applications.

  15. Interstaple Dithiol Cross-Linking in Au(25)(SR)(18) Nanomolecules: A Combined Mass Spectrometric and Computational Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Deen; Dass, Amala; Tschumper, Gregory; Mattern, Daniell; Van Dornshuld, Eric; Kota, Rajesh; Jupally, Vijay

    2011-01-01

    A systematic study of cross-linking chemistry of the Au{sub 25}(SR){sub 18} nanomolecule by dithiols of varying chain length, HS-(CH2)n-SH where n = 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6, is presented here. Monothiolated Au{sub 25} has six [RSAuSRAuSR] staple motifs on its surface, and MALDI mass spectrometry data of the ligand exchanged clusters show that propane (C3) and butane (C4) dithiols have ideal chain lengths for interstaple cross-linking and that up to six C3 or C4 dithiols can be facilely exchanged onto the cluster surface. Propanedithiol predominately exchanges with two monothiols at a time, making cross-linking bridges, while butanedithiol can exchange with either one or two monothiols at a time. The extent of cross-linking can be controlled by the Au{sub 25}(SR){sub 18} to dithiol ratio, the reaction time of ligand exchange, or the addition of a hydrophobic tail to the dithiol. MALDI MS suggests that during ethane (C2) dithiol exchange, two ethanedithiols become connected by a disulfide bond; this result is supported by density functional theory (DFT) prediction of the optimal chain length for the intrastaple coupling. Both optical absorption spectroscopy and DFT computations show that the electronic structure of the Au{sub 25} nanomolecule retains its main features after exchange of up to eight monothiol ligands.

  16. Inter-staple Dithiol Crosslinking in Au25(SR)18 Nanomolecules: A Combined Mass Spectrometric and Computational Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dass, Amala; Jiang, Deen; Jupally, Vijay; Kota, Rajesh; Mattern, Daniell; Tschumper, Gregory; Van Dornshuld, Eric

    2011-01-01

    A systematic study of cross-linking chemistry of the Au{sub 25}(SR){sub 18} nanomolecule by dithiols of varying chain length, HS-(CH{sub 2}){sub n}-SH where n = 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6, is presented here. Monothiolated Au{sub 25} has six [RSAuSRAuSR] staple motifs on its surface, and MALDI mass spectrometry data of the ligand exchanged clusters show that propane (C3) and butane (C4) dithiols have ideal chain lengths for interstaple cross-linking and that up to six C3 or C4 dithiols can be facilely exchanged onto the cluster surface. Propanedithiol predominately exchanges with two monothiols at a time, making cross-linking bridges, while butanedithiol can exchange with either one or two monothiols at a time. The extent of cross-linking can be controlled by the Au{sub 25}(SR){sub 18} to dithiol ratio, the reaction time of ligand exchange, or the addition of a hydrophobic tail to the dithiol. MALDI MS suggests that during ethane (C2) dithiol exchange, two ethanedithiols become connected by a disulfide bond; this result is supported by density functional theory (DFT) prediction of the optimal chain length for the intrastaple coupling. Both optical absorption spectroscopy and DFT computations show that the electronic structure of the Au{sub 25} nanomolecule retains its main features after exchange of up to eight monothiol ligands.

  17. MAKE SUPER-EARTHS, NOT JUPITERS: ACCRETING NEBULAR GAS ONTO SOLID CORES AT 0.1AU AND BEYOND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Eve J.; Chiang, Eugene; Ormel, Chris W. E-mail: echiang@astro.berkeley.edu

    2014-12-20

    Close-in super-Earths having radii 1-4 R {sub ?} may possess hydrogen atmospheres comprising a few percent by mass of their rocky cores. We determine the conditions under which such atmospheres can be accreted by cores from their parent circumstellar disks. Accretion from the nebula is problematic because it is too efficient: we find that 10 M {sub ?} cores embedded in solar metallicity disks tend to undergo runaway gas accretion and explode into Jupiters, irrespective of orbital location. The threat of runaway is especially dire at ?0.1AU, where solids may coagulate on timescales orders of magnitude shorter than gas clearing times; thus nascent atmospheres on close-in orbits are unlikely to be supported against collapse by planetesimal accretion. The time to runaway accretion is well approximated by the cooling time of the atmosphere's innermost convective zone, whose extent is controlled by where H{sub 2} dissociates. Insofar as the temperatures characterizing H{sub 2} dissociation are universal, timescales for core instability tend not to vary with orbital distanceand to be alarmingly short for 10 M {sub ?} cores. Nevertheless, in the thicket of parameter space, we identify two scenarios, not mutually exclusive, that can reproduce the preponderance of percent-by-mass atmospheres for super-Earths at ?0.1AU, while still ensuring the formation of Jupiters at ? 1AU. Scenario (a): planets form in disks with dust-to-gas ratios that range from ?20 solar at 0.1AU to ?2 solar at 5AU. Scenario (b): the final assembly of super-Earth cores from mergers of proto-coresa process that completes quickly at ?0.1AU once begunis delayed by gas dynamical friction until just before disk gas dissipates completely. Both scenarios predict that the occurrence rate for super-Earths versus orbital distance, and the corresponding rate for Jupiters, should trend in opposite directions, as the former population is transformed into the latter: as gas giants become more frequent from ?1 to 10AU, super-Earths should become more rare.

  18. Nanoscale Au-In alloy-oxide core-shell particles as electrocatalysts for efficient hydroquinone detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutter, E.; Tong, X.; Medina-Plaza, C.; Rodriguez-Mendez, M. L.; Sutter, P.

    2015-10-09

    The presence of hydroquinone (HQ), a phenol ubiquitous in nature and widely used in industry, needs to be monitored because of its toxicity to the environment. Here we demonstrate efficient detection of HQ using simple, fast, and noninvasive electrochemical measurements on indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes modified with nanoparticles comprising bimetallic Au–In cores and mixed Au–In oxide shells. Whereas bare ITO electrodes show very low activity for the detection of HQ, their modification with Au–In core–shell nanoparticles induces a pronounced shift of the oxidation peak to lower potentials, i.e., facilitated oxidation. The response of the different electrodes was correlated with the initial composition of the bimetallic nanoparticle cores, which in turn determined the amount of Au and In stabilized on the surface of the amorphous Au–In oxide shells available for the electrochemical reaction. While adding core–shell nanostructures with different compositions of the alloy core facilitates the electrocatalytic (reduction-) oxidation of HQ, the activity is highest for particles with AuIn cores (i.e., a Au:In ratio of 1). This optimal system is found to follow a single pathway, the two-electron oxidation of the quinone–hydroquinone couple, which gives rise to high oxidation peaks and is most effective in facilitating the electrode-to-analyte charge transfer and thus detection. The limits of detection (LOD) decreased when increasing the amount of Au exposed on the surface of the amorphous Au–In oxide shells. As a result the LODs were in the range of 10–5 – 10–6 M and were lower than those obtained using bulk Au.

  19. Nanoscale Au-In alloy-oxide core-shell particles as electrocatalysts for efficient hydroquinone detection

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sutter, E.; Tong, X.; Medina-Plaza, C.; Rodriguez-Mendez, M. L.; Sutter, P.

    2015-10-09

    The presence of hydroquinone (HQ), a phenol ubiquitous in nature and widely used in industry, needs to be monitored because of its toxicity to the environment. Here we demonstrate efficient detection of HQ using simple, fast, and noninvasive electrochemical measurements on indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes modified with nanoparticles comprising bimetallic Au–In cores and mixed Au–In oxide shells. Whereas bare ITO electrodes show very low activity for the detection of HQ, their modification with Au–In core–shell nanoparticles induces a pronounced shift of the oxidation peak to lower potentials, i.e., facilitated oxidation. The response of the different electrodes was correlated withmore » the initial composition of the bimetallic nanoparticle cores, which in turn determined the amount of Au and In stabilized on the surface of the amorphous Au–In oxide shells available for the electrochemical reaction. While adding core–shell nanostructures with different compositions of the alloy core facilitates the electrocatalytic (reduction-) oxidation of HQ, the activity is highest for particles with AuIn cores (i.e., a Au:In ratio of 1). This optimal system is found to follow a single pathway, the two-electron oxidation of the quinone–hydroquinone couple, which gives rise to high oxidation peaks and is most effective in facilitating the electrode-to-analyte charge transfer and thus detection. The limits of detection (LOD) decreased when increasing the amount of Au exposed on the surface of the amorphous Au–In oxide shells. As a result the LODs were in the range of 10–5 – 10–6 M and were lower than those obtained using bulk Au.« less

  20. Thermoelectric Properties of Au- Containing Type-I Clathrates Ba8AuxGa16-3xGe30+2x

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye, Zuxin; Cho, Jung Young; Tessema, Misle M.; Salvador, James R.; Waldo, Richard A.; Yang, Jihui; Wang, Hsin; Cai, Wei; Kirkham, Melanie J; Yang, Jiong; Zhang, Wenqing

    2014-01-01

    Type I clathrates, with compositions based on Ba8Ga16Ge30, are a class of promising thermoelectric materials due to their intrinsically low thermal conductivity. It has been demonstrated previously that the thermoelectric performance can be improved by transition metal substitution of the framework atoms. In this study, the effects of Au substitution for Ga/Ge on thermal and electrical transport properties of type I clathrate compounds have been investigated. Polycrystalline samples with a large range of Au content have been synthesized using conventional solid state techniques with the actual compositions of resulting materials approximately following Zintl-Klemm rules. The charge carrier type changes from electrons (n) to holes (p) as the Au content increases. The Seebeck coefficient (S) and power factor (S2/ where is the electrical resistivity) were improved by Au substitution and the resulting overall thermoelectric properties were enhanced by Au substitution with a thermoelectric figure of merit ZT ~ 0.63 at temperature T = 740 K for the composition Ba8Au5.47Ge39.96. The results presented herein show that Au-containing type I clathrates are promising p-type thermoelectric materials for high temperature applications.

  1. Nanochannel-Directed Growth of One-Dimensional Multi-Segment Heterojunctions of Metallic Au1-xGex and Semiconducting Ge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Xiangdong; Meng, Guowen; Qin, Shengyong; Xu, Qiaoling; Chu, Zhaoqin; Zhu, Xiaoguang; Kong, Mingguang; Li, An-Ping

    2012-01-01

    We report on the synthesis of multi-segment nanowire (NW) junctions of Au{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x} and Ge inside the nanochannels of porous anodic aluminum oxide template. The one-dimensional heterostructures are grown with a low-temperature chemical vapor deposition process, assisted by electrodeposited Au nanowires (AuNWs). The Au-catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid growth process occurs simultaneously in multiple locations along the nanochannel, which leads to multi-segment Au{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x}/Ge heterojunctions. The structures of the as-grown hybrid NWs, analyzed by using transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy elemental mapping, show clear compositional modulation with variable modulation period and controllable junction numbers. Remarkably, both GeNW and Au{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x}NW segments are single crystalline with abrupt interfaces and good crystallographic coherences. The electronic and transport properties of individual NW junctions are measured by using a multi-probe scanning tunneling microscope, which confirms the semiconducting nature of Ge segments and the metallic behavior of Au{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x} segments, respectively. The high yield of multiple segment NW junctions of a metal-semiconductor can facilitate the applications in nanoelectronics and optoelectronics that harness multiple functionalities of heterointerfaces.

  2. Cation-poor complex metallic alloys in Ba(Eu)AuAl(Ga) systems: Identifying the keys that control structural arrangements and atom distributions at the atomic level

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smetana, Volodymyr; Steinberg, Simon; Mudryk, Yaroslav; Pecharsky, Vitalij; Miller, Gordon J.; Mudring, Anja -Verena

    2015-10-19

    Four complex intermetallic compounds BaAu6xGa6y (x = 1, y = 0.9) (I), BaAu6xAl6y (x = 0.9, y = 0.6) (II), EuAu6.2Ga5.8 (III), and EuAu6.1Al5.9 (IV) have been synthesized, and their structures and homogeneity ranges have been determined by single crystal and powder X-ray diffraction. Whereas I and II originate from the NaZn13-type structure (cF104112, Fm3C), III (tP52, P4/nbm) is derived from the tetragonal Ce2Ni17Si9-type, and IV (oP104, Pbcm) crystallizes in a new orthorhombic structure type. Both I and II feature formally anionic networks with completely mixed site occupation by Au and triel (Tr = Al, Ga) atoms, while a successive decrease of local symmetry from the parental structures of I and II to III and, ultimately, to IV correlates with increasing separation of Au and Tr on individual crystallographic sites. Density functional theory-based calculations were employed to determine the crystallographic site preferences of Au and the respective triel element to elucidate reasons for the atom distribution (coloring scheme). Chemical bonding analyses for two different EuAu6Tr6 models reveal maximization of the number of heteroatomic AuTr bonds as the driving force for atom organization. The Fermi levels fall in broad pseudogaps for both models allowing some electronic flexibility. Spin-polarized band structure calculations on the EuAu6Tr6 models hint to singlet ground states for europium and long-range magnetic coupling for both EuAu6.2Ga5.8 (III) and EuAu6.1Al5.9 (IV). This is substantiated by experimental evidence because both compounds show nearly identical magnetic behavior with ferromagnetic transitions at TC = 6 K and net magnetic moments of 7.35 ?B/f.u. at 2 K. As a result, the effective moments of 8.3 ?B/f.u., determined from CurieWeiss fits, point to divalent oxidation states for europium in both III and IV.

  3. Effect of microwave irradiation on the resistance of Au-TiB{sub x}-Ge-Au-n-n{sup +}-n{sup ++}-GaAs(InP) ohmic contacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belyaev, A. E.; Sachenko, A. V.; Boltovets, N. S. Ivanov, V. N.; Konakova, R. V. Kudryk, Ya. Ya.; Matveeva, L. A.; Milenin, V. V.; Novitskii, S. V.; Sheremet, V. N.

    2012-04-15

    Temperature dependences of the contact resistivity {rho}{sub c} of Au-TiB{sub x}-Ge-Au-n-n{sup +}-n{sup ++}(GaAs)-InP ohmic contacts before and after short-term (10 s) microwave treatment have been studied both experimentally and theoretically. It is shown that {rho}{sub c} can decrease after microwave treatment in the entire temperature range of {rho}{sub c} measurements (100-400 K). Good agreement between the theoretical and experimental {rho}{sub c}(T) curves is attained and interpreted on the assumption that the dislocation density in the semiconductor near-surface region is varied as a result of microwave radiation.

  4. Significant in-medium {eta}{sup '} mass reduction in {radical}(s{sub NN}) = 200 GeV Au+Au collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vertesi, R.; Sziklai, J.; Csoergo, T.

    2011-05-15

    In high-energy heavy ion collisions a hot and dense medium is formed, where the U{sub A}(1) or chiral symmetry may temporarily be restored. As a consequence, the mass of the {eta}{sup '}(958) mesons may be reduced to its quark model value, and the abundance of {eta}{sup '} mesons at low p{sub T} may be enhanced by more than a factor of 10. The intercept parameter {lambda}{sub *} of the charged pion Bose Einstein correlations provides a sensitive observable of the possibly enhanced {eta}{sup '} abundance. We have analyzed {lambda}{sub *}(m{sub T}) data from {radical}(s{sub N{sub N}})=200 GeV central Au+Au reactions measured at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), using extensive Monte Carlo simulations based on six popular models for hadronic multiplicities. Based on the combined STAR and PHENIX data set, and on various systematic investigations of resonance multiplicities and model parameters, we conclude that in {radical}(s{sub N{sub N}})=200 GeV central Au+Au reactions the mass of the {eta}{sup '} meson is reduced by {Delta}m{sub {eta}}{sup '*}>200 MeV, at the 99.9% confidence level in the considered model class. Such a significant {eta}{sup '} mass modification may indicate the restoration of the U{sub A}(1) symmetry in a hot and dense hadronic matter and the return of the ninth ''prodigal'' Goldstone boson. A similar analysis of NA44 S+Pb data at top CERN Super Proton Synchroton (SPS) energies showed no significant in-medium {eta}{sup '} mass modification.

  5. Self-organization of S adatoms on Au(111): √3R30° rows at low coverage

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Walen, Holly; Liu, Da -Jiang; Oh, Junepyo; Lim, Hyunseob; Evans, J. W.; Kim, Yousoo; Thiel, P. A.

    2015-07-06

    Using scanning tunneling microscopy, we observe an adlayer structure that is dominated by short rows of S atoms, on unreconstructed regions of a Au(111) surface. This structure forms upon adsorption of low S coverage (less than 0.1 monolayer) on a fully reconstructed cleansurface at 300 K, then cooling to 5 K for observation. The rows adopt one of three orientations that are rotated by 30° from the close-packed directions of the Au(111) substrate, and adjacent S atoms in the rows are separated by √3 times the surface lattice constant, a. Monte Carlo simulations are performed on lattice-gas models, we derivedmore » using a limited cluster expansion based on density functional theory energetics. Furthermore, models which include long-range pairwise interactions (extending to 5a), plus selected trio interactions, successfully reproduce the linear rows of S atoms at reasonable temperatures.« less

  6. Magnetic switching behaviors of orbital states with different magnetic quantum numbers in Au/Fe/MgO multilayer system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suzuki, Kosuke Takubo, Shota; Kato, Tadashi; Yamazoe, Masatoshi; Hoshi, Kazushi; Sakurai, Hiroshi; Homma, Yoshiya; Itou, Masayoshi; Sakurai, Yoshiharu

    2014-08-18

    A spin specific magnetic hysteresis (SSMH) curve and an orbital specific magnetic hysteresis (OSMH) curve are obtained for Fe/Au/Fe/MgO multilayers by magnetic Compton scattering and SQUID magnetometer measurements. The SSMH curve with each contribution of magnetic quantum number |m| = 0, 1, and 2 states is obtained by decomposition analyses of magnetic Compton profiles. Residual magnetization is observed for the SSMH curve with magnetic quantum number |m| = 0, 2 and the OSMH curve. Although the SQUID magnetometer measurements do not show perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) in the present Fe/Au/Fe/MgO multilayer film, the SSMH curve with magnetic quantum number |m| = 0, 2 and OSMH curve show switching behaviors of PMA.

  7. Surface plasmon dispersion engineering via double-metallic AU/AG layers for nitride light-emitting diodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tansu, Nelson; Zhao, Hongping; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Guangyu

    2014-04-01

    A double-metallic deposition process is used whereby adjacent layers of different metals are deposited on a substrate. The surface plasmon frequency of a base layer of a first metal is tuned by the surface plasmon frequency of a second layer of a second metal formed thereon. The amount of tuning is dependent upon the thickness of the metallic layers, and thus tuning can be achieved by varying the thicknesses of one or both of the metallic layers. In a preferred embodiment directed to enhanced LED technology in the green spectrum regime, a double-metallic Au/Ag layer comprising a base layer of gold (Au) followed by a second layer of silver (Ag) formed thereon is deposited on top of InGaN/GaN quantum wells (QWs) on a sapphire/GaN substrate.

  8. Six-dimensional quantum dynamics study for the dissociative adsorption of DCl on Au(111) surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Tianhui; Fu, Bina, E-mail: bina@dicp.ac.cn, E-mail: zhangdh@dicp.ac.cn; Zhang, Dong H., E-mail: bina@dicp.ac.cn, E-mail: zhangdh@dicp.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics and Center for Theoretical Computational Chemistry, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2014-04-14

    We carried out six-dimensional quantum dynamics calculations for the dissociative adsorption of deuterium chloride (DCl) on Au(111) surface using the initial state-selected time-dependent wave packet approach. The four-dimensional dissociation probabilities are also obtained with the center of mass of DCl fixed at various sites. These calculations were all performed based on an accurate potential energy surface recently constructed by neural network fitting to density function theory energy points. The origin of the extremely small dissociation probability for DCl/HCl (v=0, j=0) fixed at the top site compared to other fixed sites is elucidated in this study. The influence of vibrational excitation and rotational orientation of DCl on the reactivity was investigated by calculating six-dimensional dissociation probabilities. The vibrational excitation of DCl enhances the reactivity substantially and the helicopter orientation yields higher dissociation probability than the cartwheel orientation. The site-averaged dissociation probability over 25 fixed sites obtained from four-dimensional quantum dynamics calculations can accurately reproduce the six-dimensional dissociation probability.

  9. Understanding the Kondo resonance in the d-CoPc/Au(111) adsorption system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yu; Zheng, Xiao Li, Bin; Yang, Jinlong

    2014-08-28

    By combining the density functional theory (DFT) and a hierarchical equations of motion (HEOM) approach, we investigate the Kondo phenomena in a composite system consisting of a dehydrogenated cobalt phthalocyanine molecule (d-CoPc) adsorbed on an Au(111) surface. DFT calculations are performed to determine the ground-state geometric and electronic structures of the adsorption system. It is found that the singly occupied d{sub z{sup 2}} orbital of Co forms a localized spin, which could be screened by the substrate conduction electrons. This screening leads to the prominent Kondo features as observed in the scanning tunneling microscopy experiments. We then employ the HEOM approach to characterize the Kondo correlations of the adsorption system. The calculated temperature-dependent differential conductance spectra and the predicted Kondo temperature agree well with the experiments, and the universal Kondo scaling behavior is correctly reproduced. This work thus provides important insights into the relevant experiments, and it also highlights the applicability of the combined DFT+HEOM approach to the studies of strongly correlated condensed matter systems.

  10. Electronic structure and conductivity of nanocomposite metal (Au,Ag,Cu,Mo)-containing amorphous carbon films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Endrino, Jose L.; Horwat, David; Gago, Raul; Andersson, Joakim; Liu, Y.S.; Guo, Jinghua; Anders, Andre

    2008-05-14

    In this work, we study the influence of the incorporation of different metals (Me = Au, Ag, Cu, Mo) on the electronic structure of amorphous carbon (a-C:Me) films. The films were produced at room temperature using a novel pulsed dual-cathode arc deposition technique. Compositional analysis was performed with secondary neutral mass spectroscopy whereas X-ray diffraction was used to identify the formation of metal nanoclusters in the carbon matrix. The metal content incorporated in the nanocomposite films induces a drastic increase in the conductivity, in parallel with a decrease in the band gap corrected from Urbach energy. The electronic structure as a function of the Me content has been monitored by x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) at the C K-edge. XANES showed that the C host matrix has a dominant graphitic character and that it is not affected significantly by the incorporation of metal impurities, except for the case of Mo, where the modifications in the lineshape spectra indicated the formation of a carbide phase. Subtle modifications of the spectral lineshape are discussed in terms of nanocomposite formation.

  11. Φ meson production in d+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adare, A.

    2015-10-19

    The PHENIX Collaboration has measured Φ meson production in d+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV using the dimuon and dielectron decay channels. The Φ meson is measured in the forward (backward) d-going (Au-going) direction, 1.2 < y < 2.2 (–2.2 < y < –1.2) in the transverse-momentum (pT) range from 1–7 GeV/c and at midrapidity |y|<0.35 in the pT range below 7 GeV/c. The Φ meson invariant yields and nuclear-modification factors as a function of pT, rapidity, and centrality are reported. An enhancement of Φ meson production is observed in the Au-going direction, while suppression is seen in the d-going direction, and no modification is observed at midrapidity relative to the yield in p+p collisions scaled by the number of binary collisions. As a result, similar behavior was previously observed for inclusive charged hadrons and open heavy flavor, indicating similar cold-nuclear-matter effects.

  12. Φ meson production in d+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.

    2015-10-19

    The PHENIX Collaboration has measured Φ meson production in d+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV using the dimuon and dielectron decay channels. The Φ meson is measured in the forward (backward) d-going (Au-going) direction, 1.2 T) range from 1–7 GeV/c and at midrapidity |y|T range below 7 GeV/c. The Φ meson invariant yields and nuclear-modification factors as a function of pT, rapidity, and centrality are reported. An enhancement of Φ meson production is observed in the Au-going direction, while suppression is seen in the d-going direction,more »and no modification is observed at midrapidity relative to the yield in p+p collisions scaled by the number of binary collisions. As a result, similar behavior was previously observed for inclusive charged hadrons and open heavy flavor, indicating similar cold-nuclear-matter effects.« less

  13. Φ meson production in d+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.

    2015-10-19

    The PHENIX Collaboration has measured Φ meson production in d+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV using the dimuon and dielectron decay channels. The Φ meson is measured in the forward (backward) d-going (Au-going) direction, 1.2 < y < 2.2 (–2.2 < y < –1.2) in the transverse-momentum (pT) range from 1–7 GeV/c and at midrapidity |y|<0.35 in the pT range below 7 GeV/c. The Φ meson invariant yields and nuclear-modification factors as a function of pT, rapidity, and centrality are reported. An enhancement of Φ meson production is observed in the Au-going direction, while suppression is seen in the d-going direction,more » and no modification is observed at midrapidity relative to the yield in p+p collisions scaled by the number of binary collisions. As a result, similar behavior was previously observed for inclusive charged hadrons and open heavy flavor, indicating similar cold-nuclear-matter effects.« less

  14. The effects of fabrication and annealing on the structure and hydrogen permeation of Pd-Au binary alloy membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gade, Sabina K; Payzant, E Andrew; Park, Helen J; Thoen, Paul M; Way, J. Douglas

    2009-01-01

    The addition of gold to palladium membranes produces many desirable effects for hydrogen purification, including improved tolerance of sulfur compounds, reduction in hydride phase formation, and, for certain compositions, improved hydrogen permeability. The focus of this work is to determine if sequential plating can be used to produce self-supported alloy membranes with equivalent properties to membranes produced by conventional metallurgical techniques such as cold-working. Sequential electroplating and electroless plating were used to produce freestanding planar Pd-Au membranes with Au contents ranging from 0 to 20 wt%, consisting of Au layers on both sides of a pure Pd core. Membranes were characterized by single-gas permeation measurements, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS), and high temperature, controlled-atmosphere XRD (HTXRD). Sequentially plated foils tested without any prior annealing had significantly lower H2 permeabilities than either measured or literature values for homogeneous foils of equivalent composition. This effect appears to be due to the formation of stable gold-enriched surface layers. Pretreatment of membranes to 1023 K created membranes with hydrogen permeabilities equivalent to literature values, despite the fact that trace amounts of surface gold remained detectable with XRD.

  15. The effect of Au and Ni doping on the heavy fermion state of the Kondo lattice antiferromagnet CePtZn

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dhar, S. K.; Aoki, Y.; Suemitsu, B.; Miyazaki, R.; Provino, A.; Manfrinetti, P.

    2014-05-07

    We have probed the effect of doping CePtZn with Au and Ni and also investigated in detail the magnetic behavior of the iso-structural CeAuZn. A magnetic ground state is observed in both CePt{sub 0.9}Au{sub 0.1}Zn and CePt{sub 0.9}Ni{sub 0.1}Zn with T{sub N}?=?2.1 and 1.1?K and the coefficient of the linear term of electronic heat capacity ??=?0.34 and 0.9?J/mol K{sup 2}, respectively. The corresponding values for CePtZn are 1.7?K and 0.6?J/mol K{sup 2}. The altered values of T{sub N} and ? show that the electronic correlations in CePtZn are affected by doping with Au and Ni. CeAuZn orders magnetically near 1.7?K and its electrical resistivity shows a normal metallic behavior. Together with a ? of 0.022?J/mol K{sup 2} the data indicate a weak 4f-conduction electron hybridization in CeAuZn characteristic of normal trivalent cerium based systems.

  16. Exchange bias effect in Au-Fe3O4 dumbbell nanoparticles induced by the charge transfer from gold

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feygenson, Mikhail; Bauer, John C; Gai, Zheng; Marques, Carlos; Aronson, Meigan C.; Teng, Xiaowei; Su, Dong; Stanic, Vesna; Urban, Volker S; Kevin, Beyer; Dai, Sheng

    2015-08-10

    We have studied the origin of the exchange bias effect in the Au-Fe3O4 dumbbell nanoparticles in two samples with different sizes of the Au seed nanoparticles (4.1 and 2.7 nm) and same size of Fe3O4 nanoparticles (9.8 nm). The magnetization, small-angle neutron scattering, synchrotron x-ray diffraction and scanning transmission electron microscope measurements determined the antiferromagnetic FeO wstite phase within Fe3O4 nanoparticles, originating at the interface with the Au nanoparticles. The interface between antiferromagnetic FeO and ferrimagnetic Fe3O4 is giving rise to the exchange bias effect. The strength of the exchange bias fields depends on the interfacial area and lattice mismatch between both phases. We propose that the charge transfer from the Au nanoparticles is responsible for a partial reduction of the Fe3O4 into FeO phase at the interface with Au nanoparticles. The Au-O bonds are formed across the interface to accommodate an excess of oxygen released during the reduction of magnetite.

  17. Shape transformation of bimetallic Au–Pd core–shell nanocubes to multilayered Au–Pd–Au core–shell hexagonal platelets

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bhattarai, Nabraj; Prozorov, Tanya

    2015-11-05

    Transformation of metallic or bimetallic (BM) nanoparticles (NPs) from one shape to another desired shape is of importance to nanoscience and nanotechnology, where new morphologies of NPs lead to enhancement of their exploitable properties. In this report, we present the shape transformation of Au octahedral NPs to Au–Pd core–shell nanocubes, followed by their transformation to nanostars and finally to multilayered Au–Pd–Au core–shell hexagonal platelets in the presence of T30 DNA. The weaker binding affinity of T30 DNA directs the growth to favor the formation of lower energy {111} facets, changing the morphology from nanocubes to nanostar. The nanostars, exhibiting unusualmore » intermediate morphologies, are comprised two sets of shell layers and have Au core, Pd intermediate shell, and Au outer shell. Similarly, the hexagonal platelets, which also have Au core and inner Pd shell, are encased in an external gold shell. As a result, the formation of multilayered Au–Pd–Au core–shell hexagonal platelets from Au–Pd core–shell nanocubes via the multilayered nanostars is monitored using scanning/transmission electron microscopy analysis.« less

  18. Evidence for Low-Intensity D-D Reaction as a Result of Exothermic Deuterium Desorption from Au/Pd/PdO:D Heterostructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipson, A.G.; Lyakhov, B.F.; Roussetski, A.S.; Akimoto, T.; Mizuno, T.; Asami, N.; Shimada, R.; Miyashita, S.; Takahashi, A.

    2000-09-15

    Low-intensity nuclear emissions (neutrons and charged particles) due to exothermic deuterium desorption from Au/Pd/PdO heterostructure loaded with deuterium by electrolysis have been studied by NE213 neutron detection as well as SSB and CR-39 charged-particle detectors in low-background conditions with large statistics. Similar measurements were performed with the Au/Pd/PdO:H heterostructure as a control. It has been established that in experiments with the Au/Pd/PdO:D system, the excessive 2.45-MeV neutrons and 3.0-MeV protons are better detected than with the Au/Pd/PdO:H system, where those detection rates for n and p did not exceed the cosmic background level. The levels of neutron and proton emissions for 40- to 60-{mu}m-thick samples are found to be close to one another and after subtracting background (Au/Pd/PdO:H count rate) consist of I{sub n} = (19 {+-} 2).10{sup -3} n/s and I{sub p} (4.0 {+-} 1.0).10{sup -3} p/s in a 4{pi} solid angle, respectively. These yields of D-D reaction products in Au/Pd/PdO heterostructure comply with the mean D-D reaction rate of {lambda}{sub dd} {approx} 10{sup -23}s{sup -1} per D-D pair.

  19. PARTICLE ACCELERATION AT QUASI-PARALLEL SHOCK WAVES: THEORY AND OBSERVATIONS AT 1 AU

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neergaard Parker, L.; Zank, G. P.

    2012-09-20

    In this paper, we describe a theoretical model for accelerating an arbitrary upstream particle distribution. Only those particles that exceed a prescribed injection energy, E{sub inj}, are accelerated via the diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) mechanism, also known as first-order Fermi acceleration. We identify a set of quasi-parallel shocks at 1 AU and use the observed solar wind particle distribution information to construct our upstream distribution, which is then accelerated diffusively at the shock, assuming the observed shock parameters. The injection energy for particles to be accelerated diffusively at a quasi-parallel shock is discussed theoretically. By using the observed upstream solar wind distribution function and the observed shock parameters, we can compute the injection energy that matches the observed downstream accelerated particle spectrum. Like the previous studies of van Nes et al., Lario et al., and Ho et al., this analysis focuses on the acceleration of protons only via the first-order Fermi acceleration mechanism. However, our primary focus is on quasi-parallel shocks and the injection mechanism in the context of DSA with a background thermal solar wind modeled as a Maxwellian or kappa distribution. Our approach allows for a direct test of injection at interplanetary shocks. It has been proposed that an additional seed population of energetic particles is needed to explain the accelerated particle distribution downstream of quasi-parallel shocks. This conclusion is based typically on studies that address the acceleration of heavy ions primarily and do not characterize the injection of protons alone using the DSA mechanism. Through comparisons of Maxwellian and kappa upstream distributions, we find that DSA with injection directly from a thermal Maxwellian distribution, or weak departures therefrom, for protons is responsible for energetic solar particle events associated with quasi-parallel shocks.

  20. ELECTRON HEAT FLUX IN THE SOLAR WIND: ARE WE OBSERVING THE COLLISIONAL LIMIT IN THE 1 AU DATA?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landi, S.; Matteini, L.; Pantellini, F.

    2014-07-20

    Using statistically significant data at 1AU, it has recently been shown (Bale et al.) that in the solar wind, when the Knudsen number K {sub T} (the ratio between the electron mean free path and the electron temperature scale height) drops below about 0.3, the electron heat flux q intensity rapidly approaches the classical collisional Spitzer-Hrm limit. Using a fully kinetic model including the effect of Coulomb collisions and the expansion of the solar wind with heliocentric distance, we observe that the heat flux strength does indeed approach the collisional value for Knudsen numbers smaller than about 0.3 in very good agreement with the observations. However, closer inspection of the heat flux properties, such as its variation with the heliocentric distance and its dependence on the plasma parameters, shows that for Knudsen numbers between 0.02 and 0.3 the heat flux is not conveniently described by the Spitzer-Hrm formula. We conclude that even though observations at 1 AU seem to indicate that the electron heat flux intensity approaches the collisional limit when the Knudsen drops below ?0.3, the collisional limit is not a generally valid closure for a Knudsen larger than 0.01. Moreover, the good agreement between the heat flux from our model and the heat flux from solar wind measurements in the high-Knudsen number regime seems to indicate that the heat flux at 1AU is not constrained by electromagnetic instabilities as both wave-particle and wave-wave interactions are neglected in our calculations.

  1. INTERPLANETARY PROPAGATION OF SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE HEAVY IONS OBSERVED AT 1 AU AND THE ROLE OF ENERGY SCALING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, G. M.; Haggerty, D. K.; Li, G.; Zank, G. P.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Desai, M. I.

    2012-12-20

    We have studied {approx}0.3 to >100 MeV nucleon{sup -1} H, He, O, and Fe in 17 large western hemisphere solar energetic particle events (SEP) to examine whether the often observed decrease of Fe/O during the rise phase is due to mixing of separate SEP particle populations, or is an interplanetary transport effect. Our earlier study showed that the decrease in Fe/O nearly disappeared if Fe and O were compared at energies where the two species interplanetary diffusion coefficient were equal, and therefore their kinetic energy nucleon{sup -1} was different by typically a factor {approx}2 ({sup e}nergy scaling{sup )}. Using an interplanetary transport model that includes effects of focusing, convection, adiabatic deceleration, and pitch angle scattering we have fit the particle spectral forms and intensity profiles over a broad range of conditions where the 1 AU intensities were reasonably well connected to the source and not obviously dominated by local shock effects. The transport parameters we derive are similar to earlier studies. Our model follows individual particles with a Monte Carlo calculation, making it possible to determine many properties and effects of the transport. We find that the energy scaling feature is preserved, and that the model is reasonably successful at fitting the magnitude and duration of the Fe/O ratio decrease. This along with successfully fitting the observed decrease of the O/He ratio leads us to conclude that this feature is best understood as a transport effect. Although the effects of transport, in particular adiabatic deceleration, are very significant below a few MeV nucleon{sup -1}, the spectral break observed in these events at 1 AU is only somewhat modified by transport, and so the commonly observed spectral breaks must be present at injection. For scattering mean free paths of the order of 0.1 AU adiabatic deceleration is so large below {approx}200 keV nucleon{sup -1} that ions starting with such energies at injection are cooled sufficiently as to be unobservable at 1 AU. Because of the complicating factors of different spectral break energies for different elements, it appears that SEP abundances determined below the break are least susceptible to systematic distortions.

  2. Temperature dependence of the photo-induced inverse spin Hall effect in Au/InP hybrid structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khamari, Shailesh K. Porwal, S.; Dixit, V. K.; Sharma, T. K.

    2014-01-27

    Photo-induced Inverse Spin Hall Effect (ISHE) measurements on Au/InP hybrid structures are performed over a temperature range of 45 to 300?K. Dependence of the spin current density on the degree of circular polarization and also on the angle of incidence of laser beam confirms the ISHE origin of measured signal. The magnitude of ISHE increases with sample cooling. A numerical model based on the spin relaxation of non-equilibrium spin-polarized electrons is proposed for predicting the temperature dependence of ISHE. Our results indicate that the proposed device can be used as a spin photodetector over a wide temperature range.

  3. Structural characterization of metastable hcp-Ni thin films epitaxially grown on Au(100) single-crystal underlayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohtake, Mitsuru; Tanaka, Takahiro; Futamoto, Masaaki; Kirino, Fumiyoshi

    2010-05-15

    Ni(1120) epitaxial thin films with hcp structure were prepared on Au(100) single-crystal underlayers at 100 deg. C by ultra high vacuum molecular beam epitaxy. The detailed film structure is studied by in situ reflection high energy electron diffraction, x-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. The hcp-Ni film consists of two types of variants whose c-axes are rotated around the film normal by 90 deg. each other. An atomically sharp boundary is recognized between the film and the underlayer, where misfit dislocations are introduced. Presence of such dislocations seems to relieve the strain caused by the lattice mismatch between the film and the underlayer.

  4. Centrality-dependent direct photon p{sub t} spectra in Au+Au collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) energy {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Fuming; Zhu Yan; Hirano, Tetsufumi; Werner, Klaus

    2009-01-15

    We calculate the centrality dependence of transverse momentum (p{sub t}) spectra for direct photons in Au+Au collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) energy {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV, based on a realistic data-constrained (3+1)-dimensional hydrodynamic description of the expanding hot and dense matter, a reasonable treatment of the propagation of partons and their energy loss in the fluid, and a systematic study of the main sources of direct photons. The resultant p{sub t} spectra agree with recent PHENIX data in a broad p{sub t} range. The competition among the different direct photon sources is investigated at various centralities. Parton energy loss in the plasma is considered for photons from fragmentation and jet-photon conversion, which causes about 40% decrease in the total contribution. In the high p{sub t} region, the observed R{sub AA} of photons is centrality independent at the accuracy of 5% based on a realistic treatment of energy loss. We also link the different behavior of R{sub AA} for central and peripheral collisions, in the low p{sub t} region, to the fact that the plasma in central collisions is hotter than that in peripheral ones.

  5. Determination of redox reaction rates and orders by in situ liquid cell electron microscopy of Pd and Au solution growth

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sutter, Eli A.; Sutter, Peter W.

    2014-11-19

    In-situ liquid cell transmission and scanning transmission electron microscopy (TEM/STEM) experiments are important as they provide direct insight into processes in liquids, such as solution growth of nanoparticles among others. In liquid cell TEM/STEM redox reaction experiments the hydrated electrons e⁻aq created by the electron beam are responsible for the reduction of metal-ion complexes. Here we investigate the rate equation of redox reactions involving reduction by e⁻aq generated by the electron beam during in-situ liquid TEM/STEM. Specifically we consider the growth of Pd on Au seeds in aqueous solutions containing Pd-chloro complexes. From the quantification of the rate of Pdmore » deposition at different electron beam currents and as a function of distance from a stationary, nanometer-sized exciting beam, we determine that the reaction is first order with respect to the concentration of hydrated electrons, [e⁻aq]. In addition, by comparing Pd- and Au-deposition, we further demonstrate that measurements of the local deposition rate on nanoparticles in the solution via real-time imaging can be used to measure not only [e⁻aq] but also the rate of reduction of a metal-ion complex to zero-valent metal atoms in solution.« less

  6. Determination of redox reaction rates and orders by in situ liquid cell electron microscopy of Pd and Au solution growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutter, Eli A.; Sutter, Peter W.

    2014-11-19

    In-situ liquid cell transmission and scanning transmission electron microscopy (TEM/STEM) experiments are important as they provide direct insight into processes in liquids, such as solution growth of nanoparticles among others. In liquid cell TEM/STEM redox reaction experiments the hydrated electrons e?aq created by the electron beam are responsible for the reduction of metal-ion complexes. Here we investigate the rate equation of redox reactions involving reduction by e?aq generated by the electron beam during in-situ liquid TEM/STEM. Specifically we consider the growth of Pd on Au seeds in aqueous solutions containing Pd-chloro complexes. From the quantification of the rate of Pd deposition at different electron beam currents and as a function of distance from a stationary, nanometer-sized exciting beam, we determine that the reaction is first order with respect to the concentration of hydrated electrons, [e?aq]. In addition, by comparing Pd- and Au-deposition, we further demonstrate that measurements of the local deposition rate on nanoparticles in the solution via real-time imaging can be used to measure not only [e?aq] but also the rate of reduction of a metal-ion complex to zero-valent metal atoms in solution.

  7. Structural Changes in Self-Catalyzed Adsorption of Carbon Monoxide on 1,4-Phenylene Diisocyanide Modified Au(111)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kestell, John; Boscoboinik, J. Anibal; Cheng, Lanxia; Garvey, Michael; Bennett, Dennis W.; Tysoe, Wilfred T.

    2015-07-23

    The self-accelerated adsorption of CO on 1,4-phenylene diisocyanide (PDI)-derived oligomers on Au(111) is explored by reflection–absorption infrared spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy. PDI incorporates gold adatoms from the Au(111) surface to form one-dimensional —(Au–PDI)n— chains that can also connect between gold nanoparticles on mica to form a conductive pathway between them. CO adsorption occurs in two stages; it first adsorbs adjacent to the oligomers that move to optimize CO adsorption. Further CO exposure induces PDI decoordination to form Au–PDI adatom complexes thereby causing the conductivity of a PDI-linked gold nanoparticle array on mica to decrease to act as a chemicallymore » drive molecular switch. This simple system enables the adsorption process to be explored in detail. DFT calculations reveal that both the —(Au–PDI)n— oligomer chain and the Au–PDI adatom complex are stabilized by coadsorbed CO. A kinetic “foot-in-the-door” model is proposed in which fluctuations in PDI coordination allow CO to diffuse into the gap between gold adatoms to prevent the PDI from reattaching, thereby allowing additional CO to adsorb, to provide kinetic model for allosteric CO adsorption on PDI-covered gold.« less

  8. Exceptional enhancement of H{sub 2} production in alkaline environment over plasmonic Au/TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst under visible light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meng, Xianguang; Liu, Guigao; Yu, Qing; Wang, Tao; Chang, Kun; Li, Peng; Liu, Lequan E-mail: Lequan.Liu@tju.edu.cn; Ye, Jinhua E-mail: Lequan.Liu@tju.edu.cn

    2015-10-01

    A reaction environment modulation strategy was employed to promote the H{sub 2} production over plasmonic Au/semiconductor composites. It is shown that the fast consumption of the holes in plasmonic Au nanoparticles by methanol in alkaline reaction environment remarkably increases H{sub 2} generation rate under visible light. The photocatalytic reaction is mainly driven by the interband transition of plasmonic Au nanoparticles, and the apparent quantum efficiency of plasmon-assisted H{sub 2} production at pH 14 reaches 6% at 420 nm. The reaction environment control provides a simple and effective way for the highly efficient solar fuel production from biomass reforming through plasmonic photocatalysis in future.

  9. Sulfur Tolerant Pd/Cu and Pd/Au Alloy Membranes for H2 Separation with High Pressure CO2 for Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yi Hua Ma; Natalie Pomerantz; Chao-Huang Chen

    2008-09-30

    The effect of H{sub 2}S poisoning on Pd, Pd/Cu, and Pd/Au alloy composite membranes prepared by the electroless deposition method on porous Inconel supports was investigated to provide a fundamental understanding of the durability and preparation of sulfur tolerant membranes. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) studies showed that the exposure of pure Pd to 50 ppm H{sub 2}S/H{sub 2} mixtures caused bulk sulfide formation at lower temperatures and surface sulfide formation at higher temperatures. Lower temperatures, longer exposure times, and higher H{sub 2}S concentrations resulted in a higher degree of sulfidation. In a Pd membrane, the bulk sulfide formation caused a drastic irrecoverable H{sub 2} permeance decline and an irreparable loss in selectivity. Pd/Cu and Pd/Au alloy membranes exhibited permeance declines due to surface sulfide formation upon exposure to 50 ppm H{sub 2}S/H{sub 2} gas mixtures. However in contrast to the pure Pd membrane, the permeances of the Pd/Cu and Pd/Au alloy membranes were mostly recovered in pure H{sub 2} and the selectivity of the Pd alloy layers remained essentially intact throughout the characterization in H{sub 2}, He and H{sub 2}S/H{sub 2} mixtures which lasted several thousand hours. The amount of irreversible sulfur poisoning decreased with increasing temperature due to the exothermicity of H{sub 2}S adsorption. Longer exposure times increased the amount of irreversible poisoning of the Pd/Cu membrane but not the Pd/Au membrane. Pd/Au coupon studies of the galvanic displacement method showed that higher Au{sup 3+} concentrations, lower pH values, higher bath temperatures and stirring the bath at a rate of 200 rpm yielded faster displacement rates, more uniform depositions, and a higher Au content within the layers. While 400 C was found to be sufficient to form a Pd/Au alloy on the surface, high temperature X-ray diffraction (HTXRD) studies showed that even after annealing between 500-600 C, the Pd/Cu alloys could have part or all of the surface in the less sulfur resistant {beta} phase.

  10. Project Profile: A Novel Storage Method for CSP Plants Allowing Operation at High Temperature

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    City College of New York (CCNY), under the Thermal Storage FOA, is developing and testing a novel thermal storage method that allows operation at very high temperatures.

  11. Control of domain wall pinning by localised focused Ga {sup +} ion irradiation on Au capped NiFe nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burn, D. M. Atkinson, D.

    2014-10-28

    Understanding domain wall pinning and propagation in nanowires are important for future spintronics and nanoparticle manipulation technologies. Here, the effects of microscopic local modification of the magnetic properties, induced by focused-ion-beam intermixing, in NiFe/Au bilayer nanowires on the pinning behavior of domain walls was investigated. The effects of irradiation dose and the length of the irradiated features were investigated experimentally. The results are considered in the context of detailed quasi-static micromagnetic simulations, where the ion-induced modification was represented as a local reduction of the saturation magnetization. Simulations show that domain wall pinning behavior depends on the magnitude of the magnetization change, the length of the modified region, and the domain wall structure. Comparative analysis indicates that reduced saturation magnetisation is not solely responsible for the experimentally observed pinning behavior.

  12. Structure-activity relationship of Au-ZrO2 catalyst on formation of hydroxyl groups and its influence on CO oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karwacki, Christopher J; Ganesh, Panchapakesan; Kent, P. R. C.; Gordon, Wesley O; Peterson, Gregory W; Niu, Jun Jie; Gogotsi, Yury G.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of changes in morphology and surface hydroxyl species upon thermal treatment of zirconia on the oxidation activity of Au/ZrO2 catalyst was studied. We observed using transmission Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy progressive changes in the presence of monodentate (type I), bidentate (type II) and hydrogen bridged species (type III) for each of the thermally treated (85 to 500 C) supports consisting of bare zirconia and Au/ZrO2 catalysts. Furthermore, structural changes in zirconia were accompanied by an increase in crystal size (7 to 58 nm) and contraction of the supports porosity (SSA 532 to 7 m2 g 1) with increasing thermal treatment. Deposition of gold nanoparticles under similar preparation conditions on different thermally treated zirconia resulted in changes in the mean gold cluster size, ranging from 3.7 to 5.6 nm. Changes in the surface hydroxyl species, support structure and size of the gold centers are important parameters responsible for the observed decrease (>90%) in CO conversion activity for the Au/ZrO2 catalysts. Density functional theory calculations provide evidence of increased CO binding to Au nanoclusters in the presence of surface hydroxyls on zirconia, which increases charge transfer at the perimeter of the gold nanocluster on zirconia support. This further helps in reducing a model CO-oxidation reaction barrier in the presence of surface hydroxyls. This work demonstrates the need to understand the structure activity relationship of both the support and active particles for the design of catalytic materials.

  13. Structure-Activity Relationship of Au/ZrO2 Catalyst on Formation of Hydroxyl Groups and Its Influence on CO Oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karwacki, Christopher J; Ganesh, Panchapakesan; Gordon, Wesley O; Peterson, Gregory W; Niu, Jun Jie; Gogotsi, Yury G.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of changes in morphology and surface hydroxyl species upon thermal treatment of zirconia on the oxidation activity of Au/ZrO2 catalyst was studied. We observed using transmission fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy progressive changes in the presence of monodentate (type I), bidentate (type II) and hydrogen bridged species (type III) for each of the thermally treated (85 to 500 C) supports consisting of bare zirconia and Au/ZrO2 catalysts. Furthermore, structural changes in zirconia were accompanied by an increase in crystal size (7 to 58 nm) and contraction of the supports porosity (SSA 532 to 7 m2/g) with increasing thermal treatment. Deposition of gold nanoparticles under similar preparation conditions on different thermally treated zirconia resulted in changes in the mean gold cluster size, ranging from 3.7 to 5.6 nm. Changes in the surface hydroxyl species, support structure and size of the gold centers are important parameters responsible for the observed decrease (> 90 %) in CO conversion activity for the Au/ZrO2 catalysts. Density functional theory calculations provide evidence of increased CO binding to Au nanoclusters in the presence of surface hydroxyls on zirconia, which increases charge transfer at the perimeter of the gold nanocluster on zirconia support. This further helps in reducing a model CO-oxidation reaction barrier in the presence of surface hydroxyls. This work demonstrates the need to understand the structure-activity relationship of both the support and active particles for the design of catalytic materials.

  14. Exploring the activity of a novel Au/TiC(001) model catalyst towards CO and CO2 hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asara, Gian Giacomo; Ricart, Josep M.; Illas, Francesc

    2015-02-02

    Small metallic nanoparticles supported on transition metal carbides exhibit an unexpected high activity towards a series of chemical reactions. In particular, the Au/TiC system has proven to be an excellent catalyst for SO2 decomposition, thiophene hydrodesulfurization, O2 and H2 dissociation and the water gas shift reaction. Recent studies have shown that Au/TiC is a very good catalyst for the reverse watergas shift (CO2 + H2 ? CO + H2O) and CO2 hydrogenation to methanol. The present work further expands the range of applicability of this novel type of systems by exploring the catalytic activity of Au/TiC towards the hydrogenation of CO or CO2 with periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations on model systems. Hydrogen dissociates easily on Au/TiC but direct hydrogenation of CO to methanol is hindered by very high activation barriers implying that, on this model catalyst, methanol production from CO2 involves the hydrogenation of a HOCO-like intermediate. Thus, when dealing with mixtures of syngas (CO/CO2/H2/H2O), CO could be transformed into CO2 through the water gas shift reaction with subsequent hydrogenation of CO2 to methanol.

  15. Preparation and Characterization of Au-ZrO2-SiO2 Nanocomposite Spheres and Their Application in Enrichment and Detection of Organophosphorus Agents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Yuqi; Tu, Haiyang; Zhang, Aidong; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2012-03-01

    Au-ZrO{sub 2}-SiO{sub 2} nanocomposite spheres were synthesized and used as selective sorbents for the solid-phase extraction (SPE) of orananophosphorous agents. A non-enzymatic electrochemical sensor based on an Au-ZrO{sub 2}-SiO{sub 2} modified electrode was developed for selective detection of orananophosphorous pesticides (OPs). The Au-ZrO{sub 2}-SiO{sub 2} nanocomposite spheres were synthesized by hydrolysis and condensation of zirconia n-butoxide (TBOZ) on the surface of SiO{sub 2} spheres and then introduction of gold nanoparticles on the surface. Transmission electron microscope and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were performed to characterize the formation of the nanocomposite sphere. Fast extraction of OP was achieved by Au-ZrO{sub 2}-SiO{sub 2} modified electrode within 5 min via the specific affinity between zirconia and phosphoric group. The assay yields a broad concentration range of paraoxon-ethyl from 1.0 to 500 ng/mL{sup -1} with a detection limit 0.5 ng/mL{sup -1}. This selective and sensitive method holds great promise for the enrichment and detection of OPs.

  16. Effects of ion and nanosecond-pulsed laser co-irradiation on the surface nanostructure of Au thin films on SiO{sub 2} glass substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Ruixuan; Meng, Xuan; Takayanagi, Shinya [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan); Shibayama, Tamaki, E-mail: shiba@qe.eng.hokudai.ac.jp; Yatsu, Shigeo; Ishioka, Junya; Watanabe, Seiichi [Center for Advanced Research of Energy and Materials Science, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan)

    2014-04-14

    Ion irradiation and short-pulsed laser irradiation can be used to form nanostructures on the surfaces of substrates. This work investigates the synergistic effects of ion and nanosecond-pulsed laser co-irradiation on surface nanostructuring of Au thin films deposited under vacuum on SiO{sub 2} glass substrates. Gold nanoparticles are randomly formed on the surface of the substrate after nanosecond-pulsed laser irradiation under vacuum at a wavelength of 532 nm with a repetition rate of 10?Hz and laser energy density of 0.124 kJ/m{sup 2}. Gold nanoparticles are also randomly formed on the substrate after 100-keV Ar{sup +} ion irradiation at doses of up to 3.8??10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}, and nearly all of these nanoparticles are fully embedded in the substrate. With increasing ion irradiation dose (number of incident laser pulses), the mean diameter of the Au nanoparticles decreases (increases). However, Au nanoparticles are only formed in a periodic surface arrangement after co-irradiation with 6000 laser pulses and 3.8??10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}. The periodic distance is ?540 nm, which is close to the wavelength of the nanosecond-pulsed laser, and the mean diameter of the Au nanoparticles remains at ?20 nm with a relatively narrow distribution. The photoabsorption peaks of the ion- or nanosecond-pulsed laser-irradiated samples clearly correspond to the mean diameter of Au nanoparticles. Conversely, the photoabsorption peaks for the co-irradiated samples do not depend on the mean nanoparticle diameter. This lack of dependence is likely caused by the periodic nanostructure formed on the surface by the synergistic effects of co-irradiation.

  17. Measurement of long-range angular correlation and quadrupole anisotropy of pions and (anti)protons in central d+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Ta’ani, H.; Alexander, J.; Andrews, K. R.; Angerami, A.; et al

    2015-05-12

    In this study, we present azimuthal angular correlations between charged hadrons and energy deposited in calorimeter towers in central d+Au and aluminum bias p+p collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV. The charged hadron is measured at midrapidity lηl < 0.35, and the energy us measured at large rapidity (–3.7 < η < –3.1, Au-going direction). An enhanced near-side angular correlation across lΔηl > 2.75 is observed in d+Au collisions. Using the event plane method applied to the Au-going energy distribution, we extract the anisotropy strength v₂ for inclusive charged hadrons at midrapidity up to pT = 4.5 GeV/c. We alsomore » present the measurement of v₂ for identified π± and (anti)protons in central d+Au collisions, and observe a mass-ordering pattern similar to that seen in heavy ion collisions. These results are compared with viscous hydrodynamic calculations and measurements from p+Pb at √sNN = 5.02 TeV. The magnitude of the mass-ordering in d+Au is found to be smaller than that in p+Pb collisions, which may indicate smaller radial flow in lower energy d+Au collisions.« less

  18. Understanding the Mechanism of Solvent-Mediated Adhesion of Vacuum Deposited Au and Pt Thin Films onto PMMA Substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mo, Alan K [ORNL; Brown, Victoria L. [James Madison University; Rugg, Brandon K. [James Madison University; Devore, Prof. Thomas C. [James Madison University; Meyer III, Harry M [ORNL; Hu, Dr. Xiaofeng [James Madison University; Hughes, Prof. W. Christopher [James Madison University; Augustine, Prof. Brian H. [James Madison University

    2012-01-01

    The adhesion of 100 nm thick electron-beam deposited Au and Pt and magnetron sputtered Au thin films onto poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) substrates can be significantly enhanced to over 90% adhesion by either spin-casting or vapor-exposure to hydrohalocarbon solvents prior to metal deposition compared to samples that are either cleaned in isopropyl alcohol or pre-treated with a remote O2 plasma. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and evolved gas Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (EGA-FTIR) reveal the presence of residual halogenated solvent molecules at the PMMA surface which chemically activates the surface to produce a stable chemical interaction between the noble metal film and the PMMA. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations show that the halogenated solvent molecules preferentially form a Lewis acid-base adduct with the oxygen atoms in the ester group in PMMA which is consistent with the measured enthalpy of desorption of chloroform (CHCl3) on PMMA determined by EGA-FTIR to be 36 kJ mol-1. The DFT model also supports the experimentally observed change in the high resolution XPS O 1s peak at 533.77 eV after metallization attributed to a change in the local bonding environment of the bridging O in the PMMA ester group. DFT also predicts that the deposited metal atom (M) inserts into the C-X bond where X is the halogen atom on either CHCl3 or bromoform (CHBr3) to form a O M X interaction that is observed by a M-X bond in the high resolution XPS Cl 2p3/2 peak at 198.03 eV and Br 3p3/2 peak at 182.06 eV. A range of solvents with differing polarities for PMMA pre-treatment have been used and it is proposed that non-complexing solvents result in significant metal adhesion improvement. The Gutmann acceptor number can be used to predict the effectiveness of solvent treatment for noble metal adhesion. A model is proposed in which the bond energy of the C-X bond of the solvent must be sufficiently low so that the C-X bond can be cleaved to form the M-X bond. Supporting this model, a negative control of vapor phase exposure to fluoroform (CHF3) is shown to have no effect on noble metal adhesion due to the higher bond dissociation energy of the C-F bond compared to the C-Cl and C-Br bond energy. The surface activation of vapor-phase exposed PMMA surfaces is technologically significant for the fabrication of polymer microdevices requiring Au or Pt metallization.

  19. Microstructure of Co/X (X=Cu,Ag,Au) epitaxial thin films grown on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohtake, Mitsuru; Akita, Yuta; Futamoto, Masaaki; Kirino, Fumiyoshi

    2007-05-01

    Epitaxial thin films of Co/X (X=Cu,Ag,Au) were prepared on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) substrates at substrate temperatures of 100 and 300 degree sign C by UHV molecular beam epitaxy. A complicated microstructure was realized for the epitaxial thin films. In-situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction observation has shown that X atoms of the buffer layer segregated to the surface during Co layer deposition, and it yielded a unique epitaxial granular structure. The structure consists of small Co grains buried in the X buffer layer, where both the magnetic small Co grains and the nonmagnetic X layer are epitaxially grown on the single crystal substrate. The structure varied depending on the X element and the substrate temperature. The crystal structure of Co grains is influenced by the buffer layer material and determined to be hcp and fcc structures for the buffer layer materials of Au and Cu, respectively.

  20. The analysis of leakage current in MIS Au/SiO{sub 2}/n-GaAs at room temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Altuntas, H.; Ozcelik, S.

    2013-10-15

    The aim of this study is to determine the reverse-bias leakage current conduction mechanisms in Au/SiO{sub 2}/n-GaAs metal-insulator-semiconductor type Schottky contacts. Reverse-bias current-voltage measurements (I-V) were performed at room temperature. The using of leakage current values in SiO{sub 2} at electric fields of 1.46-3.53 MV/cm, ln(J/E) vs. {radical}E graph showed good linearity. Rom this plot, dielectric constant of SiO{sub 2} was calculated as 3.7 and this value is perfect agreement with 3.9 which is value of SiO{sub 2} dielectric constant. This indicates, Poole-Frenkel type emission mechanism is dominant in this field region. On the other hand, electric fields between 0.06-0.73 and 0.79-1.45 MV/cm, dominant leakage current mechanisms were found as ohmic type conduction and space charge limited conduction, respectively.

  1. Photocatalytic and antibacterial properties of Au-TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite on monolayer graphene: From experiment to theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Wangxiao; Huang, Hongen; Yan, Jin; Zhu, Jian; The Key Laboratory of Biomedical Information Engineering of Ministry of Education, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049

    2013-11-28

    The formation of the Au-TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite on monolayer Graphene (GTA) by sequentially depositing titanium dioxide particles and gold nanoparticles on graphene sheet was synthesized and analyzed in our work. The structural, morphological, and physicochemical properties of samples were thoroughly investigated by UV-Vis spectrophotometer, Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscope, and transmission electron microscope. Photocatalytic performance of GTA, graphene (GR), TiO{sub 2,} and TiO{sub 2} -graphene nanocomposite (GT) were comparatively studied for degradation of methyl orange, and it was found that GTA had highest performance among all samples. More importantly, antibacterial performance of this novel composite against Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria, and fungus was predominant compared to GR, TiO{sub 2}, and GT. And the result of biomolecules oxidation tests suggested that antimicrobial actions were contributed by oxidation stress on both membrane and antioxidant systems. Besides, the rate of two decisive processes during photocatalytic reaction, the rate of the charge transfer (k{sub CT}) and the rate of the electron-hole recombination (k{sub R}) have been studied by Perturbation theory, Radiation theory, and Schottky barrier theory. Calculation and derivation results show that GTA possesses superior charge separation and transfer rate, which gives an explanation for the excellent oxidation properties of GTA.

  2. Multishell Au/Ag/SiO2 nanorods with tunable optical properties as single particle orientation and rotational tracking probes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, Kuangcai; Lin, Chia -Cheng; Vela, Javier; Fang, Ning

    2015-04-07

    In this study, three-layer core–shell plasmonic nanorods (Au/Ag/SiO2–NRs), consisting of a gold nanorod core, a thin silver shell, and a thin silica layer, were synthesized and used as optical imaging probes under a differential interference contrast microscope for single particle orientation and rotational tracking. The localized surface plasmon resonance modes were enhanced upon the addition of the silver shell, and the anisotropic optical properties of gold nanorods were maintained. The silica coating enables surface functionalization with silane coupling agents and provides enhanced stability and biocompatibility. Taking advantage of the longitudinal LSPR enhancement, the orientation and rotational information of the hybridmore » nanorods on synthetic lipid bilayers and on live cell membranes were obtained with millisecond temporal resolution using a scientific complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor camera. The results demonstrate that the as-synthesized hybrid nanorods are promising imaging probes with improved sensitivity and good biocompatibility for single plasmonic particle tracking experiments in biological systems.« less

  3. Photoelectron imaging and theoretical study on the structure and chemical binding of the mixed-ligand M(I) complexes, [HMSH]{sup ?} (M = Cu, Ag, and Au)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qin, Zhengbo; Liu, Zhiling; Cong, Ran; Xie, Hua; Tang, Zichao, E-mail: zctang@dicp.ac.cn, E-mail: fanhj@dicp.ac.cn; Fan, Hongjun, E-mail: zctang@dicp.ac.cn, E-mail: fanhj@dicp.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2014-03-21

    We have reported a combined photoelectron imaging and theoretical study on gaseous mixed-ligand M(I) complexes of [HMSH]{sup ?} (M = Cu, Ag, and Au). With the aid of Franck-Condon simulations, vibrationally resolved photoelectron spectra yield accurate electron affinities of 3.269(6), 3.669(10), and 3.591(6) eV for [HCuSH], [HAgSH], and [HAuSH], respectively. And low-frequency modes are observed: 368(12) cm{sup ?1} for [HCuSH], 286(12) cm{sup ?1} for [HAgSH], and 327(12) cm{sup ?1} for [HAuSH], respectively. Extensive theoretical calculations are performed to aid in the spectral assignments and the calculated values agree well with the experimental observations. Although the S and H atoms have little discrepancy in electronegativity (2.20 for H and 2.54 for S), distinct bonding properties are demonstrated between HM and MS bond. It is revealed that there exists significant ionic bonding between MS in [HMSH]{sup ?} (M = Cu, Ag, and Au), while a gradual transition from ionic behavior between HCu in [HCuSH]{sup ?} to quite strong covalent bonding between HAu in [HAuSH]{sup ?}, supported by a variety of chemical bonding analyses.

  4. Measurements of elliptic and triangular flow in high-multiplicity 3He+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.

    2015-09-28

    We present the first measurement of elliptic (v2) and triangular (v3) flow in high-multiplicity 3He+Aucollisions at √sNN=200 GeV. Two-particle correlations, where the particles have a large separation in pseudorapidity, are compared in 3He+Au and in p+p collisions and indicate that collective effects dominate the second and third Fourier components for the correlations observed in the 3He+Ausystem. The collective behavior is quantified in terms of elliptic v2 and triangular v3 anisotropy coefficients measured with respect to their corresponding event planes. The v2 values are comparable to those previously measured in d+Au collisions at the same nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy. Comparisons with variousmore »theoretical predictions are made, including to models where the hot spots created by the impact of the three 3He nucleons on the Au nucleus expand hydrodynamically to generate the triangular flow. The agreement of these models with data may indicate the formation of low-viscosity quark-gluon plasma even in these small collision systems.« less

  5. The Vital Function of Fe3O4@Au nanocomposites for Hydrolase Biosensor Design and Its Application in Detection of Methyl Parathion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Yuting; Zhang, Weiying; Lin, Yuehe; Du, Dan

    2013-02-04

    A nanocomposite of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) decorating a magnetic Fe3O4 core was synthesized using cysteamine (SHNH2) as linker, and characterized by TEM, XPS, UV and electrochemistry. Then a hydrolase biosensor, based on self-assembly of methyl parathion hydrolase (MPH) on the Fe3O4@Au nanocomposite, was developed for sensitive and selective detection of the organophosphorus pesticide (OP) methyl parathion. The magnetic nanocomposite provides an easy way to construct the enzyme biosensor by simply exerting an external magnetic field, and also provides a simple way to renew the electrode surface by removing the magnet. Unlike inhibition-based enzyme biosensors, the hydrolase is not poisoned by OPs and thus is reusable for continuous measurement. AuNPs not only provide a large surface area, high loading efficiency and fast electron transfer, but also stabilize the enzyme through electrostatic interactions. The MPH biosensor shows rapid response and high selectivity for detection of methyl parathion, with a linear range from 0.5 to 1000 ng/mL and a detection limit of 0.1 ng/mL. It also shows acceptable reproducibility and stability. The simplicity and ease of operation of the proposed method has great potential for on-site detection of PS containing pesticides and provides a promising strategy to construct a robust biosensor.

  6. Measurements of elliptic and triangular flow in high-multiplicity 3He+Au collisions at ?sNN=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adare, A.

    2015-09-28

    We present the first measurement of elliptic (v2) and triangular (v3) flow in high-multiplicity 3He+Aucollisions at ?sNN=200 GeV. Two-particle correlations, where the particles have a large separation in pseudorapidity, are compared in 3He+Au and in p+p collisions and indicate that collective effects dominate the second and third Fourier components for the correlations observed in the 3He+Ausystem. The collective behavior is quantified in terms of elliptic v2 and triangular v3 anisotropy coefficients measured with respect to their corresponding event planes. The v2 values are comparable to those previously measured in d+Au collisions at the same nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy. Comparisons with various theoretical predictions are made, including to models where the hot spots created by the impact of the three 3He nucleons on the Au nucleus expand hydrodynamically to generate the triangular flow. The agreement of these models with data may indicate the formation of low-viscosity quark-gluon plasma even in these small collision systems.

  7. Measurements of elliptic and triangular flow in high-multiplicity 3He+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.

    2015-09-28

    We present the first measurement of elliptic (v2) and triangular (v3) flow in high-multiplicity 3He+Aucollisions at √sNN=200 GeV. Two-particle correlations, where the particles have a large separation in pseudorapidity, are compared in 3He+Au and in p+p collisions and indicate that collective effects dominate the second and third Fourier components for the correlations observed in the 3He+Ausystem. The collective behavior is quantified in terms of elliptic v2 and triangular v3 anisotropy coefficients measured with respect to their corresponding event planes. The v2 values are comparable to those previously measured in d+Au collisions at the same nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy. Comparisons with variousmore » theoretical predictions are made, including to models where the hot spots created by the impact of the three 3He nucleons on the Au nucleus expand hydrodynamically to generate the triangular flow. The agreement of these models with data may indicate the formation of low-viscosity quark-gluon plasma even in these small collision systems.« less

  8. Measurement of long-range angular correlation and quadrupole anisotropy of pions and (anti)protons in central d+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Ta’ani, H.; Alexander, J.; Andrews, K. R.; Angerami, A.; et al

    2015-05-12

    In this study, we present azimuthal angular correlations between charged hadrons and energy deposited in calorimeter towers in central d+Au and aluminum bias p+p collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV. The charged hadron is measured at midrapidity lηl 2.75 is observed in d+Au collisions. Using the event plane method applied to the Au-going energy distribution, we extract the anisotropy strength v₂ for inclusive charged hadrons at midrapidity up to pT = 4.5 GeV/c. We alsomore »present the measurement of v₂ for identified π± and (anti)protons in central d+Au collisions, and observe a mass-ordering pattern similar to that seen in heavy ion collisions. These results are compared with viscous hydrodynamic calculations and measurements from p+Pb at √sNN = 5.02 TeV. The magnitude of the mass-ordering in d+Au is found to be smaller than that in p+Pb collisions, which may indicate smaller radial flow in lower energy d+Au collisions.« less

  9. Measurement of long-range angular correlation and quadrupole anisotropy of pions and (anti)protons in central d+Au collisions at ?s NN = 200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.

    2015-05-12

    We present azimuthal angular correlations between charged hadrons and energy deposited in calorimeter towers in central d+Au and aluminum bias p+p collisions at ?s NN = 200 GeV. The charged hadron is measured at midrapidity l?l 2.75 is observed in d+Au collisions. Using the event plane method applied to the Au-going energy distribution, we extract the anisotropy strength v? for inclusive charged hadrons at midrapidity up to pT = 4.5 GeV/c. We also present themoremeasurement of v? for identified ? and (anti)protons in central d+Au collisions, and observe a mass-ordering pattern similar to that seen in heavy ion collisions. These results are compared with viscous hydrodynamic calculations and measurements from p+Pb at ?s NN = 5.02 TeV. The magnitude of the mass-ordering in d+Au is found to be smaller than that in p+Pb collisions, which may indicate smaller radial flow in lower energy d+Au collisions.less

  10. Connecting speeds, directions and arrival times of 22 coronal mass ejections from the sun to 1 AU

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mstl, C.; Veronig, A. M.; Rollett, T.; Temmer, M.; Peinhart, V.; Amla, K.; Hall, J. R.; Liewer, P. C.; De Jong, E. M.; Colaninno, R. C.; Davies, J. A.; Harrison, R. A.; Lugaz, N.; Farrugia, C. J.; Galvin, A. B.; Liu, Y. D.; Luhmann, J. G.; Vrnak, B.

    2014-06-01

    Forecasting the in situ properties of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) from remote images is expected to strongly enhance predictions of space weather and is of general interest for studying the interaction of CMEs with planetary environments. We study the feasibility of using a single heliospheric imager (HI) instrument, imaging the solar wind density from the Sun to 1 AU, for connecting remote images to in situ observations of CMEs. We compare the predictions of speed and arrival time for 22 CMEs (in 2008-2012) to the corresponding interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) parameters at in situ observatories (STEREO PLASTIC/IMPACT, Wind SWE/MFI). The list consists of front- and backsided, slow and fast CMEs (up to 2700 km s{sup 1}). We track the CMEs to 34.9 7.1 deg elongation from the Sun with J maps constructed using the SATPLOT tool, resulting in prediction lead times of 26.4 15.3 hr. The geometrical models we use assume different CME front shapes (fixed-?, harmonic mean, self-similar expansion) and constant CME speed and direction. We find no significant superiority in the predictive capability of any of the three methods. The absolute difference between predicted and observed ICME arrival times is 8.1 6.3 hr (rms value of 10.9 hr). Speeds are consistent to within 284 288 km s{sup 1}. Empirical corrections to the predictions enhance their performance for the arrival times to 6.1 5.0 hr (rms value of 7.9 hr), and for the speeds to 53 50 km s{sup 1}. These results are important for Solar Orbiter and a space weather mission positioned away from the Sun-Earth line.

  11. Current transient spectroscopy for trapping analysis on Au-free AlGaN/GaN Schottky barrier diode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, J. Groeseneken, G.; Stoffels, S.; Lenci, S.; Venegas, R.; Decoutere, S.; Bakeroot, B.

    2015-02-23

    This paper presents a combined technique of high voltage off-state stress and current transient measurements to investigate the trapping/de-trapping characteristics of Au-free AlGaN/GaN Schottky barrier diodes. The device features a symmetric three-terminal structure with a central anode contact surrounded by two separate cathodes. Under the diode off-state stress conditions, the two separate cathodes were electrically shorted. The de-trapping dynamics was studied by monitoring the recovery of the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) current at different temperatures by applying 0.5?V at cathode 2 while grounding cathode 1. During the recovery, the anode contact acts as a sensor of changes in diode leakage current. This leakage variation was found to be mainly due to the barrier height variation. With this method, the energy level and capture cross section of different traps in the AlGaN/GaN Schottky barrier diode can be extracted. Furthermore, the physical location of different trapping phenomena is indicated by studying the variation of the diode leakage current during the recovery. We have identified two distinct trapping mechanisms: (i) electron trapping at the AlGaN surface in the vicinity of the Schottky contact which results in the leakage reduction (barrier height ?{sub B} increase) together with R{sub ON} degradation; (ii) the electron trapping in the GaN channel layer which partially depletes the 2DEG. The physical origin of the two different traps is discussed in the text.

  12. The currentvoltage and capacitancevoltage characteristics at high temperatures of Au Schottky contact to n-type GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    zerli, Halil; Karteri, ?brahim; Karata?, ?kr; Altindal, ?emsettin

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: The electronic parameters of the diode under temperature were investigated. The barrier heights have a Gaussian distribution. Au/n-GaAs diode exhibits a rectification behavior. - Abstract: We have investigated the temperature-dependent currentvoltage (IV) and capacitancevoltage (CV) characteristics of Au/n-GaAs Schottky barrier diodes (SBDs) in the temperature range of 280415 K. The barrier height for the Au/n-type GaAs SBDs from the IV and CV characteristics have varied from 0.901 eV to 0.963 eV (IV) and 1.234 eV to 0.967 eV (CV), and the ideality factor (n) from 1.45 to 1.69 in the temperature range 280415 K. The conventional Richardson plots are found to be linear in the temperature range measured. Both the ln(I{sub 0}/T{sup 2}) versus (kT){sup ?1} and ln(I{sub 0}/T{sup 2}) versus (nkT){sup ?1} plots gives a straight line corresponding to activation energies 0.773 eV and 0.870 eV, respectively. A ?{sub b0} versus 1/T plot was drawn to obtain evidence of a Gaussian distribution of the BHs, and values of ?{sup }{sub b0} = 1.071 eV and ?{sub 0} = 0.094 V for the mean BH and zero-bias standard deviation have been obtained from this plot.

  13. Measurement of K0S and K*0 in p+p, d+Au, and Cu+Cu collisions at sqrt SNN = 200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.

    2014-11-01

    The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has performed a systematic study of K0S and K*0 meson production at midrapidity in p+p, d+Au, and Cu+Cu collisions at sqrt SNN = 200 GeV. The K0S and K*0 mesons are reconstructed via their K0S and π0(→γγ)π0 (→γγ) and K*0 → K ±#25;π± decay modes, respectively. The measured transverse-momentum spectra are used to determine the nuclear modification factor of K0S and K*0 mesons in d+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at different centralities. In the d+Au collisions, the nuclear modification factor of K0S and K*0 mesons is almost constant as a function ofmore »transverse momentum and is consistent with unity showing that cold-nuclear-matter effects do not play a significant role in the measured kinematic range. In Cu+Cu collisions, within the uncertainties no nuclear modification is registered in peripheral collisions. In central collisions, both mesons show suppression relative to the expectations from the p+p yield scaled by the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions in the Cu+Cu system. In the pT range 2–5 GeV/c, the strange mesons ( K0S, K*0) similarly to the #30;Φ meson with hidden strangeness, show an intermediate suppression between the more suppressed light quark mesons (π0) and the nonsuppressed baryons (p, p-bar). At higher transverse momentum, pT > 5 GeV/c, production of all particles is similarly suppressed by a factor of ≈2. (auth)« less

  14. Measurement of K0S and K*0 in p+p, d+Au, and Cu+Cu collisions at sqrt SNN = 200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.

    2014-11-01

    The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has performed a systematic study of K0S and K*0 meson production at midrapidity in p+p, d+Au, and Cu+Cu collisions at sqrt SNN = 200 GeV. The K0S and K*0 mesons are reconstructed via their K0S and π0(→γγ)π0 (→γγ) and K*0 → K ±#25;π± decay modes, respectively. The measured transverse-momentum spectra are used to determine the nuclear modification factor of K0S and K*0 mesons in d+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at different centralities. In the d+Au collisions, the nuclear modification factor of K0S and K*0 mesons is almost constant as a function ofmore » transverse momentum and is consistent with unity showing that cold-nuclear-matter effects do not play a significant role in the measured kinematic range. In Cu+Cu collisions, within the uncertainties no nuclear modification is registered in peripheral collisions. In central collisions, both mesons show suppression relative to the expectations from the p+p yield scaled by the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions in the Cu+Cu system. In the pT range 2–5 GeV/c, the strange mesons ( K0S, K*0) similarly to the #30;Φ meson with hidden strangeness, show an intermediate suppression between the more suppressed light quark mesons (π0) and the nonsuppressed baryons (p, p-bar). At higher transverse momentum, pT > 5 GeV/c, production of all particles is similarly suppressed by a factor of ≈2. (auth)« less

  15. Temperature dependence of contact resistance for Au-Ti-Pd{sub 2}Si-n{sup +}-Si ohmic contacts subjected to microwave irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belyaev, A. E.; Boltovets, N. S.; Konakova, R. V. Kudryk, Ya. Ya.; Sachenko, A. V.; Sheremet, V. N.; Vinogradov, A. O.

    2012-03-15

    Based on a theoretical analysis of the temperature dependence of the contact resistance R{sub c} for an Au-Ti-Pd{sub 2}Si-n{sup +}-Si ohmic contact, a current-transfer mechanism explaining the experimentally observed increase in R{sub c} in the temperature range 100-380 K is proposed. It is shown that microwave treatment of such contacts results in a decrease in the spread of R{sub c} over the wafer and a decrease in the value of R{sub c} whilst retaining an increase in R{sub c} in the temperatures range 100-380 K.

  16. C{sub 6}H{sub 6}/Au(111): Interface dipoles, band alignment, charging energy, and van der Waals interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abad, E.; Martinez, J. I.; Flores, F.; Ortega, J.; Dappe, Y. J.

    2011-01-28

    We analyze the benzene/Au(111) interface taking into account charging energy effects to properly describe the electronic structure of the interface and van der Waals interactions to obtain the adsorption energy and geometry. We also analyze the interface dipoles and discuss the barrier formation as a function of the metal work-function. We interpret our DFT calculations within the induced density of interface states (IDIS) model. Our results compare well with experimental and other theoretical results, showing that the dipole formation of these interfaces is due to the charge transfer between the metal and benzene, as described in the IDIS model.

  17. d-alpha correlation functions and collective motion in Xe+Au collisions at E/A=50 MeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verde, G; Danielewicz, P; Lynch, W; Chan, C; Gelbke, C; Kwong, L; Liu, T; Liu, X; Seymour, D; Tan, W; Tsang, M; Wagner, A; Xu, H; Brown, D; Davin, B; Larochelle, Y; de Souza, R; Charity, R; Sobotka, L

    2006-07-27

    The interplay of the effects of geometry and collective motion on d-{alpha} correlation functions is investigated for central Xe+Au collisions at E/A=50 MeV. The data cannot be explained with out collective motion, which could be partly along the beam axis. A semi-quantitative description of the data can be obtained using a Monte -Carlo model, where thermal emission is superimposed on collective motion. Both the emission volume and the competition between the thermal and collective motion influence significantly the shape of the correlation function, motivating new strategies for extending intensity interferometry studies to massive particles.

  18. Observation of D0 meson nuclear modifications in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J.?K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M.?M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C.?D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E.?C.; Averichev, G.?S.; Banerjee, A.; Beavis, D.?R.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.?K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L.?C.; Bordyuzhin, I.?G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A.?V.; Brovko, S.?G.; Bltmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T.?P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Caldern de la Barca Snchez, M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M.?C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.?F.; Chen, J.?H.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M.?J.?M.; Contin, G.; Cramer, J.?G.; Crawford, H.?J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L.?C.; Debbe, R.?R.; Dedovich, T.?G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A.?A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Dhamija, S.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J.?L.; Draper, J.?E.; Du, C.?M.; Dunkelberger, L.?E.; Dunlop, J.?C.; Efimov, L.?G.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K.?S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C.?E.; Gagliardi, C.?A.; Gangadharan, D.?R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Gliske, S.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D.?S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J.?W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G.?W.; Hofman, D.?J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H.?Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T.?J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W.?W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E.?G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H.?W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Khan, Z.?H.; Kikola, D.?P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D.?D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A.?F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R.?A.; Lamont, M.?A.?C.; Landgraf, J.?M.; Landry, K.?D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J.?H.; LeVine, M.?J.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z.?M.; Lisa, M.?A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W.?J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R.?S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G.?L.; Ma, Y.?G.; Madagodagettige Don, D.?M.?M.?D.; Mahapatra, D.?P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H.?S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T.?S.; Minaev, N.?G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M.?M.; Morozov, D.?A.; Mustafa, M.?K.; Nandi, B.?K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T.?K.; Nelson, J.?M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L.?V.; Noh, S.?Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S.?B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E.?W.; Olvitt, D.?L.; Pachr, M.; Page, B.?S.; Pal, S.?K.; Pan, Y.?X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A.?M.; Pruthi, N.?K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P.?R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R.?L.; Riley, C.?K.; Ritter, H.?G.; Roberts, J.?B.; Rogachevskiy, O.?V.; Romero, J.?L.; Ross, J.?F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N.?R.; Sahu, P.?K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R.?P.; Schmah, A.?M.; Schmidke, W.?B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P.?V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W.?Q.; Shi, S.?S.; Shou, Q.?Y.; Sichtermann, E.?P.; Singaraju, R.?N.; Skoby, M.?J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H.?M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T.?D.?S.; Stevens, J.?R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X.?M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D.?N.; Symons, T.?J.?M.; Szelezniak, M.?A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A.?H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J.?H.; Timmins, A.?R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R.?E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B.?A.; Tsai, O.?D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D.?G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Vanfossen, J.?A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G.?M.?S.; Vasiliev, A.?N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbk, F.; Viyogi, Y.?P.; Vokal, S.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.?S.; Wang, X.?L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J.?C.; Westfall, G.?D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S.?W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.?F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, J.; Xu, N.

    2014-09-30

    We report the first measurement of charmed-hadron (D0) production via the hadronic decay channel (D0?K-+?+) in Au+Au collisions at ?sNN=200 GeV with the STAR experiment. The charm production cross section per nucleon-nucleon collision at midrapidity scales with the number of binary collisions, Nbin, from p+p to central Au+Au collisions. The D0 meson yields in central Au+Aucollisions are strongly suppressed compared to those in p+p scaled by Nbin, for transverse momenta pT>3 GeV/c, demonstrating significant energy loss of charm quarks in the hot and dense medium. An enhancement at intermediate pT is also observed. Model calculations including strong charm-medium interactions and coalescence hadronization describe our measurements.

  19. Effects of electron recirculation on a hard x-ray source observed during the interaction of a high intensity laser pulse with thin Au targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Compant La Fontaine, A.; Courtois, C.; Lefebvre, E.; Bourgade, J. L.; Landoas, O.; Thorp, K.; Stoeckl, C.

    2013-12-15

    The interaction of a high intensity laser pulse on the preplasma of a high-Z solid target produced by the pulse's pedestal generates high-energy electrons. These electrons subsequently penetrate inside the solid target and produce bremsstrahlung photons, generating an x-ray source which can be used for photonuclear studies or to radiograph high area density objects. The source characteristics are compared for targets with thin (20 μm) and thick (100 μm) Au foils on the Omega EP laser at Laboratory for Laser Energetics. Simulations using the particle-in-cell code CALDER show that for a 20 μm thickness Au target, electrons perform multiple round-trips in the target under the effect of the laser ponderomotive potential and the target electrostatic potential. These relativistic electrons have random transverse displacements, with respect to the target normal, attributed to electrostatic fluctuation fields. As a result, the x-ray spot size is increased by a factor 2 for thin target compared to thick targets, in agreement with experimental results. In addition, the computed doses agree with the measured ones provided that electron recirculation in the thin target is taken into account. A dose increase by a factor 1.7 is then computed by allowing for recirculation. In the 100 μm target case, on the other hand, this effect is found to be negligible.

  20. Determination of redox reaction rates and orders by in-situ liquid cell electron microscopy of Pd and Au solution growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutter, Eli A.; Sutter, Peter W.

    2014-11-19

    In-situ liquid cell transmission and scanning transmission electron microscopy (TEM/STEM) experiments are important as they provide direct insight into processes in liquids, such as solution growth of nanoparticles among others. In liquid cell TEM/STEM redox reaction experiments the hydrated electrons e?aq created by the electron beam are responsible for the reduction of metal-ion complexes. Here we investigate the rate equation of redox reactions involving reduction by e?aq generated by the electron beam during in-situ liquid TEM/STEM. Specifically we consider the growth of Pd on Au seeds in aqueous solutions containing Pd-chloro complexes. From the quantification of the rate of Pd deposition at different electron beam currents and as a function of distance from a stationary, nanometer-sized exciting beam, we determine that the reaction is first order with respect to the concentration of hydrated electrons, [e?aq]. By comparing Pd- and Au-deposition, we further demonstrate that measurements of the local deposition rate on nanoparticles in the solution via real-time imaging can be used to measure not only [e?aq] but also the rate of reduction of a metal-ion complex to zero-valent metal atoms in solution.

  1. Quantitative Phase Composition of TiO2-Coated Nanoporous-Au Monoliths by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and Correlations to Catalytic

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bagge-Hansen, Michael; Wichmann, Andre; Wittstock, Arne; Lee, Jonathan R. I.; Ye, Jianchao; Willey, Trevor M.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; van Buuren, Tony; Biener, Juergen; Baumer, Marcus; et al

    2014-02-03

    Porous titania/metal composite materials have many potential applications in the fields of green catalysis, energy harvesting, and storage in which both the overall morphology of the nanoporous host material and the crystallographic phase of the titania (TiO 2) guest determine the material’s performance. New insights into the structure–function relationships of these materials were obtained by near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy that, for example, provides quantitative crystallographic phase composition from ultrathin, nanostructured titania films, including sensitivity to amorphous components. We demonstrate that crystallographic phase, morphology, and catalytic activity of TiO 2-functionalized nanoporous gold (np-Au) can be controlled by amore » simple annealing procedure (T < 1300 K). The material was prepared by atomic layer deposition of ~2 nm thick TiO2 on millimeter-sized samples of np-Au (40–50 nm mean ligament size) and catalytically investigated with respect to aerobic CO oxidation. Moreover, the annealing-induced changes in catalytic activity are correlated with concurrent morphology and phase changes as provided by cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy.« less

  2. Cross section for bb¯ production via dielectrons in d + Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; et al

    2015-01-26

    We report a measurement of e⁺e⁻ pairs from semileptonic heavy-flavor decays in d+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV. Thus, exploring the mass and transverse-momentum dependence of the yield, the bottom decay contribution can be isolated from charm, and quantified by comparison to PYTHIA and MC@NLO simulations. The resulting bb-production cross section is σdAubb=1.37±0.28(stat)±0.46(syst) mb, which is equivalent to a nucleon-nucleon cross section of σNNbb =3.4 ± 0.8(stat)±1.1(syst) µb.

  3. POST-CLOSURE INSPECTION REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 333: U-3auS DISPOSAL SITE, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA FOR THE PERIOD JULY 2005-JUNE 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-08-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 333, U-3auS Disposal Site, is a closed construction landfill located in Area 3 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The closure of this site was approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) in a letter to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) dated June 27, 2001. Post-closure requirements are described in a letter from NNSA/NV to NDEP dated October 9, 2001, and were approved by the NDEP in a letter dated November 5, 2001. This report covers the period July 2005 through June 2006 and consists of copies of the inspection checklist and field notes, repair records (if any), photographs, and recommendations and conclusions.

  4. Effect of final state interactions on particle production in d+Au collisions at energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, X.; Xu, Z.; Chen, J.; Ren, Z.; Xu, N.; Zheng, Q.; and Zhu, X.

    2011-09-15

    We show that particle species dependence of enhanced hadron production at intermediate transverse momentum (p{sub T}) for d+Au collisions at RHIC can be understood in terms of the hadronization from string fragmentation and the subsequent hadronic rescatterings in the final state. A multiphase transport model (AMPT) with two different hadronization mechanisms, string fragmentation or parton coalescence, is used in our study. When the hadrons are formed from string fragmentation, the subsequent hadronic rescatterings will result in particle mass dependence of the nuclear modification factor R{sub CP}, which is consistent with the present experimental data. On the other hand, in the framework of parton coalescence, the mass dependence disappears and the strangeness plays an important role in hadron production.

  5. Growth of GaN@InGaN Core-Shell and Au-GaN Hybrid Nanostructures for Energy Applications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kuykendall, Tevye; Aloni, Shaul; Jen-La Plante, Ilan; Mokari, Taleb

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrated a method to control the bandgap energy of GaN nanowires by forming GaN@InGaN core-shell hybrid structures using metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Furthermore, we show the growth of Au nanoparticles on the surface of GaN nanowires in solution at room temperature. The work shown here is a first step toward engineering properties that are crucial for the rational design and synthesis of a new class of photocatalytic materials. The hybrid structures were characterized by various techniques, including photoluminescence (PL), energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), transmission and scanning electron microscopy (TEM and SEM), and x-ray diffraction (XRD).

  6. Spin and orbital magnetism of coinage metal trimers (Cu{sub 3}, Ag{sub 3}, Au{sub 3}): A relativistic density functional theory study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Afshar, Mahdi; Sargolzaei, Mohsen

    2013-11-15

    We have demonstrated electronic structure and magnetic properties of Cu{sub 3}, Ag{sub 3} and Au{sub 3} trimers using a full potential local orbital method in the framework of relativistic density functional theory. We have also shown that the non-relativistic generalized gradient approximation for the exchange-correlation energy functional gives reliable magnetic properties in coinage metal trimers compared to experiment. In addition we have indicated that the spin-orbit coupling changes the structure and magnetic properties of gold trimer while the structure and magnetic properties of copper and silver trimers are marginally affected. A significant orbital moment of 0.21?{sub B} was found for most stable geometry of the gold trimer whereas orbital magnetism is almost quenched in the copper and silver trimers.

  7. Influence of stellar multiplicity on planet formation. II. Planets are less common in multiple-star systems with separations smaller than 1500 AU

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Ji; Fischer, Debra A.; Xie, Ji-Wei; Ciardi, David R.

    2014-08-20

    Almost half of the stellar systems in the solar neighborhood are made up of multiple stars. In multiple-star systems, planet formation is under the dynamical influence of stellar companions, and the planet occurrence rate is expected to be different from that of single stars. There have been numerous studies on the planet occurrence rate of single star systems. However, to fully understand planet formation, the planet occurrence rate in multiple-star systems needs to be addressed. In this work, we infer the planet occurrence rate in multiple-star systems by measuring the stellar multiplicity rate for planet host stars. For a subsample of 56 Kepler planet host stars, we use adaptive optics (AO) imaging and the radial velocity (RV) technique to search for stellar companions. The combination of these two techniques results in high search completeness for stellar companions. We detect 59 visual stellar companions to 25 planet host stars with AO data. Three stellar companions are within 2'' and 27 within 6''. We also detect two possible stellar companions (KOI 5 and KOI 69) showing long-term RV acceleration. After correcting for a bias against planet detection in multiple-star systems due to flux contamination, we find that planet formation is suppressed in multiple-star systems with separations smaller than 1500 AU. Specifically, we find that compared to single star systems, planets in multiple-star systems occur 4.5 3.2, 2.6 1.0, and 1.7 0.5 times less frequently when a stellar companion is present at a distance of 10, 100, and 1000 AU, respectively. This conclusion applies only to circumstellar planets; the planet occurrence rate for circumbinary planets requires further investigation.

  8. GROUND-BASED INFRARED DETECTIONS OF CO IN THE CENTAUR-COMET 29P/SCHWASSMANN-WACHMANN 1 AT 6.26 AU FROM THE SUN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paganini, Lucas; Mumma, Michael J.; DiSanti, Michael A.; Villanueva, Geronimo L.; Bonev, Boncho P.; Boehnhardt, Hermann; Lippi, Manuela; Kaeufl, Hans U.; Blake, Geoffrey A.

    2013-04-01

    We observed Comet 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1 (hereafter, 29P) in 2012 February and May with CRIRES/VLT and NIRSPEC/Keck-II, when the comet was at 6.26 AU from the Sun and about 5.50 AU from Earth. With CRIRES, we detected five CO emission lines on several nights in each epoch, confirming the ubiquitous content and release of carbon monoxide from the nucleus. This is the first simultaneous detection of multiple lines from any (neutral) gaseous species in comet 29P at infrared wavelengths. It is also the first extraction of a rotational temperature based on the intensities of simultaneously measured spectral lines in 29P, and the retrieved rotational temperature is the lowest obtained in our infrared survey to date. We present the retrieved production rates ({approx}3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 28} molecules s{sup -1}) and remarkably low ({approx}5 K) rotational temperatures for CO, and compare them with results from previous observations at radio wavelengths. Along with CO, we pursued detections of other volatiles, namely H{sub 2}O, C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, HCN, NH{sub 3}, and CH{sub 3}OH. Although they were not detected, we present sensitive upper limits. These results establish a new record for detections by infrared spectroscopy of parent volatiles in comets at large heliocentric distances. Until now considered to be a somewhat impossible task with IR ground-based facilities, these discoveries demonstrate new opportunities for targeting volatile species in distant comets.

  9. THE CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF CO-RICH COMET C/2009 P1 (GARRADD) AT R{sub h} = 2.4 and 2.0 AU BEFORE PERIHELION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paganini, L.; Mumma, M. J.; Villanueva, G. L.; DiSanti, M. A.; Bonev, B. P.; Lippi, M.; Boehnhardt, H.

    2012-03-20

    We quantified 10 parent volatiles in comet C/2009 P1 (Garradd) before perihelion, through high-dispersion infrared spectra acquired with CRIRES at ESO's Very Large Telescope on UT 2011 August 7 (R{sub h} = 2.4 AU) and September 17-21 (R{sub h} = 2.0 AU). On August 7, water was searched for but not detected at an upper limit (3{sigma}) of 2.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 28} s{sup -1}, while ethane was detected with a production rate of 6.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 26} s{sup -1}. On September 17-21, the mean production rate for water was 8.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 28} s{sup -1}, and five trace species (CO, C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, CH{sub 4}, HCN, and CH, OH) were securely detected, and (3{sigma}) upper limits were retrieved for NH{sub 3}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, OCS, and HDO. Given the relatively large heliocentric distance, we explored the effect of water not being fully sublimated within our field of view and identified the 'missing' water fraction needed to reconcile the retrieved abundance ratios with the mean values found for 'organics-normal' comets. The individual spatial profiles of parent volatiles and the continuum displayed rather asymmetric outgassing. Indications of H{sub 2}O and CO gas being released in different directions suggest chemically distinct active vents and/or the possible existence of polar and apolar ice aggregates in the nucleus. The high fractional abundance of CO identifies comet C/2009 P1 as a CO-rich comet.

  10. Decay of the 9/2{sup -} isomer in {sup 181}Tl and mass determination of low-lying states in {sup 181}Tl, {sup 177}Au, and {sup 173}Ir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andreyev, A. N.; Antalic, S.; Saro, S.; Ackermann, D.; Comas, V. F.; Heinz, S.; Heredia, J. A.; Hessberger, F. P.; Khuyagbaatar, J.; Kojouharov, I.; Kindler, B.; Lommel, B.; Mann, R.; Cocolios, T. E.; Elseviers, J.; Huyse, M.; Van Duppen, P. Van; Venhart, M.; Franchoo, S.; Hofmann, S.

    2009-08-15

    A detailed spectroscopic study of the neutron-deficient isotope {sup 181}Tl and the daughter of its {alpha} decay, {sup 177}Au, has been performed in the complete fusion reaction {sup 40}Ca+{sup 144}Sm{yields}{sup 184}Pb* at the velocity filter SHIP (GSI). The mass excess, excitation energy, and decay scheme of the isomeric 1.40(3) ms, 9/2{sup -} intruder state in {sup 181}Tl have been established for the first time. These results solve a long-standing puzzle of the unrealistically large reduced {alpha}-decay width of this isomer. Based on this, the previously unknown masses of the long-lived isomeric states in {sup 177}Au and {sup 173}Ir have been derived. In turn, it now allows the excitation energies of previously identified bands in {sup 177}Au and {sup 173}Ir to be deduced and compared with theoretical predictions. First measurements of {alpha}-decay branching ratios for {sup 181}Tl{sup m} and {sup 177}Au{sup m,g} are also reported.

  11. Charged-to-neutral correlation at forward rapidity in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bltmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Caldern de la Barca Snchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Contin, G.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K. S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Gliske, S.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Olvitt, D. L.; Page, B. S.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandacz, A.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simko, M.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yan, W.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.

    2015-03-20

    Event-by-event fluctuations of the ratio of inclusive charged to photon multiplicities at forward rapidity in Au+Au collision at ?sNN=200 GeV have been studied. Dominant contribution to such fluctuations is expected to come from correlated production of charged and neutral pions. We search for evidences of dynamical fluctuations of different physical origins. Observables constructed out of moments of multiplicities are used as measures of fluctuations. Mixed events and model calculations are used as baselines. Results are compared to the dynamical net-charge fluctuations measured in the same acceptance. A non-zero statistically significant signal of dynamical fluctuations is observed in excess to the model prediction when charged particles and photons are measured in the same acceptance. Thus, we find that, unlike dynamical net-charge fluctuation, charge-neutral fluctuation is not dominated by correlation due to particle decay. Results are compared to the expectations based on the generic production mechanism of pions due to isospin symmetry, for which no significant (< 1%) deviation is observed.

  12. Investigation of the deposition and thermal behavior of striped phases of unsymmetric disulfide self-assembled monolayers on Au(111): The case of 11-hydroxyundecyl decyl disulfide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albayrak, Erol; Karabuga, Semistan; Bracco, Gianangelo; Dan??man, M. Fatih

    2015-01-07

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of unsymmetric disulfides on Au(111) are used to form mixed SAMs that can be utilized in many applications. Here, we have studied 11-hydroxyundecyl decyl disulfide (CH{sub 3}(CH{sub 2}){sub 9}SS(CH{sub 2}){sub 11}OH, HDD) SAMs produced by supersonic molecular beam deposition and characterized by He diffraction. The film growth was monitored at different temperatures up to a coverage which corresponds to a full lying down phase and the diffraction analysis shows that below 250 K the phase is different from the phase measured above 300 K. During the annealing of the film, two phase transitions were observed, at 250 K and 350 K. The overall data suggest that the former is related to an irreversible phase separation of HDD above 250 K to decanethiolate (S(CH{sub 2}){sub 9}CH{sub 3}, DTT) and hydroxyundecylthiolate (S(CH{sub 2}){sub 11}OH, MUDT), while the latter to a reversible melting of the film. Above 450 K, the specular intensity shows an increase related to film desorption and different chemisorbed states were observed with energies in the same range as observed for decanethiol (HS(CH{sub 2}){sub 9}CH{sub 3}, DT) and mercaptoundecanol (HS(CH{sub 2}){sub 11}OH, MUD) SAMs.

  13. INTERVALS OF RADIAL INTERPLANETARY MAGNETIC FIELDS AT 1 AU, THEIR ASSOCIATION WITH RAREFACTION REGIONS, AND THEIR APPARENT MAGNETIC FOOT POINTS AT THE SUN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orlove, Steven T.; Smith, Charles W.; Vasquez, Bernard J.; Schwadron, Nathan A.; Skoug, Ruth M.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Zhao Liang E-mail: Charles.Smith@unh.edu E-mail: N.Schwadron@unh.edu E-mail: thomasz@umich.edu

    2013-09-01

    We have examined 226 intervals of nearly radial interplanetary magnetic field orientations at 1 AU lasting in excess of 6 hr. They are found within rarefaction regions as are the previously reported high-latitude observations. We show that these rarefactions typically do not involve high-speed wind such as that seen by Ulysses at high latitudes during solar minimum. We have examined both the wind speeds and the thermal ion composition before, during and after the rarefaction in an effort to establish the source of the flow that leads to the formation of the rarefaction. We find that the bulk of the measurements, both fast- and slow-wind intervals, possess both wind speeds and thermal ion compositions that suggest they come from typical low-latitude sources that are nominally considered slow-wind sources. In other words, we find relatively little evidence of polar coronal hole sources even when we examine the faster wind ahead of the rarefaction regions. While this is in contrast to high-latitude observations, we argue that this is to be expected of low-latitude observations where polar coronal hole sources are less prevalent. As with the previous high-latitude observations, we contend that the best explanation for these periods of radial magnetic field is interchange reconnection between two sources of different wind speed.

  14. SUN-TO-EARTH CHARACTERISTICS OF TWO CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS INTERACTING NEAR 1 AU: FORMATION OF A COMPLEX EJECTA AND GENERATION OF A TWO-STEP GEOMAGNETIC STORM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Ying D.; Yang, Zhongwei; Wang, Rui; Luhmann, Janet G.; Richardson, John D.; Lugaz, No

    2014-10-01

    On 2012 September 30-October 1 the Earth underwent a two-step geomagnetic storm. We examine the Sun-to-Earth characteristics of the coronal mass ejections (CMEs) responsible for the geomagnetic storm with combined heliospheric imaging and in situ observations. The first CME, which occurred on 2012 September 25, is a slow event and shows an acceleration followed by a nearly invariant speed in the whole Sun-Earth space. The second event, launched from the Sun on 2012 September 27, exhibits a quick acceleration, then a rapid deceleration, and finally a nearly constant speed, a typical Sun-to-Earth propagation profile for fast CMEs. These two CMEs interacted near 1 AU as predicted by the heliospheric imaging observations and formed a complex ejecta observed at Wind, with a shock inside that enhanced the pre-existing southward magnetic field. Reconstruction of the complex ejecta with the in situ data indicates an overall left-handed flux-rope-like configuration with an embedded concave-outward shock front, a maximum magnetic field strength deviating from the flux rope axis, and convex-outward field lines ahead of the shock. While the reconstruction results are consistent with the picture of CME-CME interactions, a magnetic cloud-like structure without clear signs of CME interactions is anticipated when the merging process is finished.

  15. Multishell Au/Ag/SiO2 nanorods with tunable optical properties as single particle orientation and rotational tracking probes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Kuangcai; Lin, Chia -Cheng; Vela, Javier; Fang, Ning

    2015-04-07

    In this study, three-layer coreshell plasmonic nanorods (Au/Ag/SiO2NRs), consisting of a gold nanorod core, a thin silver shell, and a thin silica layer, were synthesized and used as optical imaging probes under a differential interference contrast microscope for single particle orientation and rotational tracking. The localized surface plasmon resonance modes were enhanced upon the addition of the silver shell, and the anisotropic optical properties of gold nanorods were maintained. The silica coating enables surface functionalization with silane coupling agents and provides enhanced stability and biocompatibility. Taking advantage of the longitudinal LSPR enhancement, the orientation and rotational information of the hybrid nanorods on synthetic lipid bilayers and on live cell membranes were obtained with millisecond temporal resolution using a scientific complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor camera. The results demonstrate that the as-synthesized hybrid nanorods are promising imaging probes with improved sensitivity and good biocompatibility for single plasmonic particle tracking experiments in biological systems.

  16. Absolute radiant power measurement for the Au M lines of laser-plasma using a calibrated broadband soft X-ray spectrometer with flat-spectral response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Troussel, Ph.; Villette, B.; Oudot, G.; Tassin, V.; Bridou, F.; Delmotte, F.; Krumrey, M.

    2014-01-15

    CEA implemented an absolutely calibrated broadband soft X-ray spectrometer called DMX on the Omega laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) in 1999 to measure radiant power and spectral distribution of the radiation of the Au plasma. The DMX spectrometer is composed of 20 channels covering the spectral range from 50 eV to 20 keV. The channels for energies below 1.5 keV combine a mirror and a filter with a coaxial photo-emissive detector. For the channels above 5 keV the photoemissive detector is replaced by a conductive detector. The intermediate energy channels (1.5 keV < photon energy < 5 keV) use only a filter and a coaxial detector. A further improvement of DMX consists in flat-response X-ray channels for a precise absolute measurement of the photon flux in the photon energy range from 0.1 keV to 6 keV. Such channels are equipped with a filter, a Multilayer Mirror (MLM), and a coaxial detector. We present as an example the development of channel for the gold M emission lines in the photon energy range from 2 keV to 4 keV which has been successfully used on the OMEGA laser facility. The results of the radiant power measurements with the new MLM channel and with the usual channel composed of a thin titanium filter and a coaxial detector (without mirror) are compared. All elements of the channel have been calibrated in the laboratory of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Germany's National Metrology Institute, at the synchrotron radiation facility BESSY II in Berlin using dedicated well established and validated methods.

  17. Measurements of dielectron production in Au + Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV from the STAR experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, X.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gupta, A.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, X.; Huang, H. Z.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Jiang, K.; Judd, E. G.; Jung, K.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Kochenda, L.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, X.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, Z. M.; Li, Y.; Li, X.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, L.; Ma, R.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; Meehan, K.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peterson, A.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M. K.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stepanov, M.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, X.; Sun, Z.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, N.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A. N.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, G.; Wang, Y.; Wang, F.; Wang, Y.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Webb, J. C.; Webb, G.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Z.; Xu, H.; Xu, N.; Xu, Y. F.; Yang, Q.; Yang, Y.; Yang, S.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I. -K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.

    2015-08-24

    We report on measurements of dielectron (e⁺e⁻) production in Au+Au collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 200 GeV per nucleon-nucleon pair using the STAR detector at RHIC. Systematic measurements of the dielectron yield as a function of transverse momentum (pT) and collision centrality show an enhancement compared to a cocktail simulation of hadronic sources in the low invariant-mass region (Mee < 1GeV/c2). This enhancement cannot be reproduced by the ρ-meson vacuum spectral function. In minimum-bias collisions, in the invariant-mass range of 0.30 – 0.76GeV/c², integrated over the full pT acceptance, the enhancement factor is 1.76±0.06(stat.)±0.26(sys.)±0.29(cocktail). The enhancement factor exhibits weak centrality and pT dependence in STAR's accessible kinematic regions, while the excess yield in this invariant-mass region as a function of the number of participating nucleons follows a power-law shape with a power of 1.44±0.10. Models that assume an in-medium broadening of the ρ-meson spectral function consistently describe the observed excess in these measurements. In addition, we report on measurements of ω- and Φ-meson production through their e⁺e⁻ decay channel. These measurements show good agreement with Tsallis blast-wave model predictions, as well as, in the case of the Φ meson, results through its K⁺K⁻ decay channel. In the intermediate invariant-mass region (1.1 < Mee < 3GeV/c²), we investigate the spectral shapes from different collision centralities. Physics implications for possible in-medium modification of charmed hadron production and other physics sources are discussed.

  18. Au intensity enhancement for RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Y. Zhang; Huang, H.

    2015-12-09

    In this article, possible improvement related to the AGS 6-3-1 bunch merge test is presented. After that, relevant issues for beams with larger longitudinal emittance at RHIC are discussed.

  19. p-Au ramp test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montag, C.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Schoefer, V.; Blackler, I.; Shrey, T.

    2014-06-10

    During FY2015 RHIC will be providing proton-gold collisions for the first time. The large difference in Z/A of these species results in challenging conditions at injection. The two injection scenarios under investigation are injection at equal B? which results in different revolution frequencies of the two beams, and injection at equal revolution frequencies, which requires different rigidities of B? of protons and gold.

  20. The evolution of 1 AU equatorial solar wind and its association with the morphology of the heliospheric current sheet from solar cycles 23 to 24

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, L.; Landi, E.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Fisk, L. A.; Lepri, S. T.

    2014-09-20

    The solar wind can be categorized into three types based on its 'freeze-in' temperature (T {sub freeze-in}) in the coronal source: low T {sub freeze-in} wind mostly from coronal holes, high T {sub freeze-in} wind mostly from regions outside of coronal holes, including streamers (helmet streamer and pseudostreamer), active regions, etc., and transient interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) usually possessing the hottest T {sub freeze-in}. The global distribution of these three types of wind has been investigated by examining the most effective T {sub freeze-in} indicator, the O{sup 7+}/O{sup 6+} ratio, as measured by the Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer on board the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) during 1998-2008 by Zhao et al. In this study, we extend the previous investigation to 2011 June, covering the unusual solar minimum between solar cycles 23 and 24 (2007-2010) and the beginning of solar cycle 24. We find that during the entire solar cycle, from the ascending phase of cycle 23 in 1998 to the ascending phase of cycle 24 in 2011, the average fractions of the low O{sup 7+}/O{sup 6+} ratio (LOR) wind, the high O{sup 7+}/O{sup 6+} ratio (HOR) wind, and ICMEs at 1 AU are 50.3%, 39.4%, and 10.3%, respectively; the contributions of the three types of wind evolve with time in very different ways. In addition, we compare the evolution of the HOR wind with two heliospheric current sheet (HCS) parameters, which indicate the latitudinal standard deviation (SD) and the slope (SL) of the HCS on the synoptic Carrington maps at 2.5 solar radii surface. We find that the fraction of HOR wind correlates with SD and SL very well (slightly better with SL than with SD), especially after 2005. This result verifies the link between the production of HOR wind and the morphology of the HCS, implying that at least one of the major sources of the HOR wind must be associated with the HCS.

  1. SSAP Annual_13may2013.indb

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... of three identical MMI instruments fabricated at the UNR Physics machine shop (middle). ... only once, so that measured signals are directly correlated with the fast electron flux. ...

  2. Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Address: University of Nevada178 Place: Nevada Zip: 89557 Website: www.nbmg.unr.eduOil&Gasindex Coordinates: 39.5440601, -119.8136573 Show Map Loading map......

  3. Geothermal Site Assessment Using the National Geothermal Data...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    www.unr.edugeothermalpdffilesPenfieldGRC2010GeothermalSiteAssessme Cost: Free Language: English References: Paper1 "This paper examines the features and functionality of...

  4. Measurement of K0S and K*0 in p+p, d+Au, and Cu+Cu collisions at sqrt SNN = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.

    2014-11-01

    The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has performed a systematic study of K0S and K*0 meson production at midrapidity in p+p, d+Au, and Cu+Cu collisions at sqrt SNN = 200 GeV. The K0S and K*0 mesons are reconstructed via their K0S and ?0(???)?0 (???) and K*0 ? K #25;? decay modes, respectively. The measured transverse-momentum spectra are used to determine the nuclear modification factor of K0S and K*0 mesons in d+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at different centralities. In the d+Au collisions, the nuclear modification factor of K0S and K*0 mesons is almost constant as a function of transverse momentum and is consistent with unity showing that cold-nuclear-matter effects do not play a significant role in the measured kinematic range. In Cu+Cu collisions, within the uncertainties no nuclear modification is registered in peripheral collisions. In central collisions, both mesons show suppression relative to the expectations from the p+p yield scaled by the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions in the Cu+Cu system. In the pT range 25 GeV/c, the strange mesons ( K0S, K*0) similarly to the #30;? meson with hidden strangeness, show an intermediate suppression between the more suppressed light quark mesons (?0) and the nonsuppressed baryons (p, p-bar). At higher transverse momentum, pT > 5 GeV/c, production of all particles is similarly suppressed by a factor of ?2. (auth)

  5. Temperature-induced sign change of the magnetic interlayer coupling in Ni/Ni{sub 25}Mn{sub 75}/Ni trilayers on Cu{sub 3}Au(001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shokr, Y. A.; Zhang, B.; Sandig, O.; Kuch, W.; Erkovan, M.; Wu, C.-B.

    2015-05-07

    We investigated the magnetic interlayer coupling between two ferromagnetic (FM) Ni layers through an antiferromagnetic (AFM) Ni{sub 25}Mn{sub 75} layer and the influence of this coupling on the exchange bias phenomenon. The interlayer coupling energy of an epitaxial trilayer of 14 atomic monolayers (ML) Ni/45 ML Ni{sub 25}Mn{sub 75}/16 ML Ni on Cu{sub 3}Au(001) was extracted from minor-loop magnetization measurements using in-situ magneto-optical Kerr effect. The interlayer coupling changes from ferromagnetic to antiferromagnetic when the temperature is increased above 300?K. This sign change is interpreted as the result of the competition between an antiparallel Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY)-type interlayer coupling, which dominates at high temperature, and a stronger direct exchange coupling across the AFM layer, which is present only below the Nel temperature of the AFM layer.

  6. Assignment of the luminescing states of [Au{sup 1}Rh{sup 1}({sup t}BuNC){sub 2}({mu}-dppm){sub 2}][PF{sub 6}]{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Striplin, D.R.; Crosby, G.A.

    1995-07-13

    Fluorescence, phosphorescence, and excitation spectra were measured on the title compound. These results were augmented with polarization ratios obtained at 77 K and detailed studies of the temperature dependence of the phosphorescence in the 77-4 K range. The phosphorescence decay rate at K was also recorded as a function of an applied magnetic field. All the results are consistent with a 4d{sub z}Rh{sup 1} {yields} 6p{sub 2}Au{sup 1} orbital promotion leading to emitting {sup 1}A, {sup 3}A{sub 1} terms in pseudo-C{sub 2v} symmetry. The {sup 3}A{sub 1} term is split by spin-orbit coupling into a forbidden A{sub 2} state lying lowest followed by a quasi-degenerate pair, [B{sub 1}(x), B{sub 2}(y)] lying approximately 16 cm{sup -1} higher that decays >500 times faster than the lowest one. 28 refs., 6 figs.

  7. Breakup of the projectile in [sup 16]O-induced reactions on [sup 27]Al, [sup 58]Ni, and [sup 197]Au targets around 100 MeV/nucleon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Badala, A.; Barbera, R.; Palmeri, A.; Pappalardo, G.S. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Catania, Corso Italia 57, 95129 Catania (Italy)); Riggi, F. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Catania, Corso Italia 57, 95129 Catania (Italy) Dipartimento di Fisica dell'Universita di Catania, Corso Italia 57, 95129 Catania (Italy))

    1993-08-01

    The spatial correlation among the four He ions coming from the disassembly of the [sup 16]O projectile on [sup 27]Al, [sup 58]Ni, and [sup 197]Au targets has been studied at 94 MeV/nucleon. Charged particles have been detected by a multielement array of plastic scintillators covering the angular domain between 3[degree] and 150[degree]. Standard relativistic kinematics has been used to reconstruct the excitation energy of the primary projectilelike nucleus ([ital E][sub PLN][sup *]). Mean values of this quantity are found independent of the target mass and the comparison with existing similar data taken at lower bombarding energies shows a saturation of [ital E][sub PLN][sup *] around 3 MeV/nucleon. An event-by-event analysis has been performed in order to study the distributions of some global variables such as coplanarity, sphericity, and relative angle, helpful in the understanding of the topological characteristics of the process and in the evaluation of its time scale. Experimental data have also been compared with the results of Monte Carlo simulations based on different reaction mechanisms and it is possible to conclude that sequential emission of the fragments is preferred.

  8. An analysis of the pull strength behaviors of fine-pitch, flip chip solder interconnections using a Au-Pt-Pd thick film conductor on Low-Temperature, Co-fired Ceramic (LTCC) substrates.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uribe, Fernando R.; Kilgo, Alice C.; Grazier, John Mark; Vianco, Paul Thomas; Zender, Gary L.; Hlava, Paul Frank; Rejent, Jerome Andrew

    2008-09-01

    The assembly of the BDYE detector requires the attachment of sixteen silicon (Si) processor dice (eight on the top side; eight on the bottom side) onto a low-temperature, co-fired ceramic (LTCC) substrate using 63Sn-37Pb (wt.%, Sn-Pb) in a double-reflow soldering process (nitrogen). There are 132 solder joints per die. The bond pads were gold-platinum-palladium (71Au-26Pt-3Pd, wt.%) thick film layers fired onto the LTCC in a post-process sequence. The pull strength and failure modes provided the quality metrics for the Sn-Pb solder joints. Pull strengths were measured in both the as-fabricated condition and after exposure to thermal cycling (-55/125 C; 15 min hold times; 20 cycles). Extremely low pull strengths--referred to as the low pull strength phenomenon--were observed intermittently throughout the product build, resulting in added program costs, schedule delays, and a long-term reliability concern for the detector. There was no statistically significant correlation between the low pull strength phenomenon and (1) the LTCC 'sub-floor' lot; (2) grit blasting the LTCC surfaces prior to the post-process steps; (3) the post-process parameters; (4) the conductor pad height (thickness); (5) the dice soldering assembly sequence; or (5) the dice pull test sequence. Formation of an intermetallic compound (IMC)/LTCC interface caused by thick film consumption during either the soldering process or by solid-state IMC formation was not directly responsible for the low-strength phenomenon. Metallographic cross sections of solder joints from dice that exhibited the low pull strength behavior, revealed the presence of a reaction layer resulting from an interaction between Sn from the molten Sn-Pb and the glassy phase at the TKN/LTCC interface. The thick film porosity did not contribute, explicitly, to the occurrence of reaction layer. Rather, the process of printing the very thin conductor pads was too sensitive to minor thixotropic changes to ink, which resulted in inconsistent proportions of metal and glassy phase particles present during the subsequent firing process. The consequences were subtle, intermittent changes to the thick film microstructure that gave rise to the reaction layer and, thus, the low pull strength phenomenon. A mitigation strategy would be the use of physical vapor deposition (PVD) techniques to create thin film bond pads; this is multi-chip module, deposited (MCM-D) technology.

  9. New compact hohlraum configuration research at the 1.7 MA Z-pinch generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kantsyrev, V. L. Shrestha, I. K.; Esaulov, A. A.; Safronova, A. S.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.; Osborne, G. C.; Astanovitsky, A. L.; Weller, M. E.; Stafford, A.; Schultz, K. A.; Cooper, M. C.; Chuvatin, A. S.; Rudakov, L. I.; Velikovich, A. L.; Cuneo, M. E.; Jones, B.; Vesey, R. A.

    2014-12-15

    A new compact Z-pinch x-ray hohlraum design with parallel-driven x-ray sources was experimentally demonstrated in a full configuration with a central target and tailored shine shields (to provide a symmetric temperature distribution on the target) at the 1.7 MA Zebra generator. This presentation reports on the joint success of two independent lines of research. One of these was the development of new sources planar wire arrays (PWAs). PWAs turned out to be a prolific radiator. Another success was the drastic improvement in energy efficiency of pulsed-power systems, such as the Load Current Multiplier (LCM). The Zebra/LCM generator almost doubled the plasma load current to 1.7 MA. The two above-mentioned innovative approaches were used in combination to produce a new compact hohlraum design for ICF, as jointly proposed by SNL and UNR. Good agreement between simulated and measured radiation temperature of the central target is shown. Experimental comparison of PWAs with planar foil liners (PFL) - another viable alternative to wire array loads at multi-MA generators show promising data. Results of research at the University of Nevada Reno allowed for the study of hohlraum coupling physics at University-scale generators. The advantages of new hohlraum design applications for multi-MA facilities with W or Au double PWAs or PFL x-ray sources are discussed.

  10. SSAP Annual_13may2013.indb

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1.7 MA Zebra at UNR. a) Photograph of Triple Wire Array load. b) Wire Ablation Dynamic Model predictions at 60 nsec (view from the top). Dotted arrowed lines show the direction of...

  11. CoverSheet

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    to Mssrs. Bob White and Ryan Em- mitt (NSTec) for their tireless support on the seismic array and to the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) for their support with the seismic...

  12. EM, University of Nevada, Reno Team on “Packaging University”

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A burgeoning relationship between EM and the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) is giving new depth and breadth to a program that trains students and nuclear industry professionals in packing and transporting radioactive material.

  13. Widespread effects of middle Mississippian deformation in the...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... Footnotes trexler@mines.unr.edu GSA Data Repository item 2003139, detailed regional discussion of stratigraphy in Nevada, is available on the Web at http:www.geosociety.org...

  14. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-11-015 Nevada EC.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 SECTION A. Project Title: General Infrastructure to Enhance Nuclear Materials Research and Education at the University of Nevada, Reno SECTION B. Project Description The University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) will purchase and install a custom designed high-temperature and high-pressure dynamic water loop equipment for mechanical and corrosion testing. UNR will evaluate mechanical performance of various alloys at extreme temperature and pressure conditions using a slow strain rate test equipment;

  15. Identification of Au-S complexes on Au(100) (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    PCCP (Print); Journal Volume: 18; Journal Issue: 6; Journal ID: ISSN 1463-9076 ... Subject: 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY Word Cloud More Like This ...

  16. The electrical and mechanical properties of Au-V and Au-V{sub...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Subject: 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; BINARY ALLOY SYSTEMS; DISLOCATIONS; DISPERSION HARDENING; ELECTRIC CONDUCTIVITY; ELECTROMECHANICS; GOLD ALLOYS; HARDNESS; MICROSTRUCTURE; PARTICLES; ...

  17. Probing the Unique Size-Dependent Properties of Small Au Clusters, Au Alloy Clusters, and CO Chemisorbed Au Clusters in the Gas Phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhai, Hua-jin; Li, Xi; Wang, Lai S.

    2007-04-01

    When materials are reduced in size to the nanometer scale, their physical and chemical properties undergo major changes and become size-dependent, forming the foundation for nanoscience and nanotechnology. Gold nanoparticles and small gold clusters have been the focus of intensive research activities lately. The modern goldrush is largely motivated by the recent discoveries that (i) nanogold shows unexpected catalytic properties for a wide spectrum of chemical reactions [1], (ii) nanogold enables selective binding to biomolecules such as DNA and thus can serve as biosensors [2], (iii) gold has important potential applications in nanoelectronics [3,4], and (iv) gold clusters and gold-containing compounds possess unique chemical properties [5]. All these golden discoveries have made gold a surprising and rewarding subject of investigation in nanoscience and cluster science. Indeed, some of our oldest notions regarding gold, such as its inertness, are being changed dramatically by the recent findings in nanogold.

  18. Graphene-Au Nanoparticles Composite-Based Electrochemical Aptamer

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Not Provided Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Oppenheimer Fellowship United States 2014-03-27 English Conference Conference: 247th ACS National Meeting & Exposition ;...

  19. Graphene-Au Nanoparticles Composite-Based Electrochemical Aptamer...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Relation: Conference: 247th ACS National Meeting & Exposition ; 2014-03-16 - 2014-03-20 ; Dallas, Texas, United States Research Org: Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) ...

  20. Structural Phase Transition in AuZn Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winn,B.L.; Shapiro, S.M.; Lashley, J.C.; Opeil, C.; Ratcliff, W.

    2009-05-03

    AuxZn1-x alloys undergo a shape memory martensitic transformation whose temperature and nature (continuous or discontinuous) is strongly composition dependent. Neutron diffraction experiments were performed on single crystals of x=50 and 52 to explore the structural changes occurring at the transition temperature. A transverse modulation with wavevector q0=(1/3,1/3,0) develops below the transition temperature, with no observable change in lattice parameter. However, the Bragg peak width shows a broadening suggesting an unresolved rhombohedral distortion similar to what has been observed in NiTi-Fe alloys.

  1. Isle au Haut, Maine: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 44.0753601, -68.6333583 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type"...

  2. Memorandum, AU-1 Clarification on the Drug Testing Custody and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications POLICY FLASH 2015-30 Policy Flash - Recent State Initiatives on "Recreational" Marijuana use Federal Register Notice, Amending 10 CFR part 707, ...

  3. Heavy-quark production and elliptic flow in Au+Au collisions at √sNN=62.4 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.

    2015-04-28

    In this study, we present measurements of electrons and positrons from the semileptonic decays of heavy-flavor hadrons at midrapidity (|y|NN = 62.4 GeV. The data were collected in 2010 by the PHENIX experiment that included the new hadron-blind detector. The invariant yield of electrons from heavy-flavor decays is measured as a function of transverse momentum in the range 1 eT more »may be a result of the interplay between initial-state Cronin effects, final-state flow, and energy loss in medium. The v₂ of electrons from heavy-flavor decays is nonzero when averaged between 1.3 eT NN = 62.4 GeV. For 20%–40% centrality collisions, the v₂ at √sNN = 62.4 GeV is smaller than that for heavy-flavor decays at √sNN = 200 GeV. The v₂ of the electrons from heavy-flavor decay at the lower beam energy is also smaller than v₂ for pions. Both results indicate that the heavy-quarks interact with the medium formed in these collisions, but they may not be at the same level of thermalization with the medium as observed at √sNN = 200 GeV.« less

  4. Packaging and Transportation News | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Packaging and Transportation News Packaging and Transportation News January 14, 2016 Ron Hafner with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory lectures for a course in San Ramon, Calif. on packaging and transporting radioactive material. EM, University of Nevada, Reno Team on "Packaging University" A burgeoning relationship between EM and the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) is giving new depth and breadth to a program that trains students and nuclear industry professionals in packing and

  5. DATE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 SECTION A. Project Title: In situ Raman Spectroscopy to Enhance Nuclear Materials Research and Education - University of Nevada Reno SECTION B. Project Description The University of Nevada Reno proposes to purchase and install a Raman Spectrometer on the existing water loop for in situ analysis of materials to be used to characterize the surface chemistry of various alloys, understand the effect of mechanical stress on corrosion behavior of alloys, and improve nuclear education at UNR. SECTION

  6. CX-100068: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-100068: Categorical Exclusion Determination Qualifying EGS Reservoir Complexity with an Integrated Geophysical Approach-Improved Resolution Ambient Seismic Noise Interferometry Award: DE-EE0006767 CX(s) Applied: A9 Geothermal Technologies Office Date: 9/23/2014 Location(s): Nevada Office(s): Golden Field Office Board of Regents, NSHE, obo University of Nevada, Reno (hereafter UNR) would utilize DOE and cost hare funds to apply high resolution ambient

  7. C:\Work 102004\2006 Projections\NV Projections Review 2008 v45.wpd

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    08 to 2028 August 2008 Prepared By: The Nevada State Demographer's Office Jeff Hardcastle, AICP NV State Demographer Dilek Uz, Demographic Graduate Assistant University of NV Reno MS/032 Reno, NV 89557 (775) 784-6353 jhardcas@unr.edu nvdemographer@gmail.com The NV State Demographers's Office is part of the NV Small Business Development Center and Is funded by the NV Department of Taxation Table of Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  8. C:\Work 102004\2008 Projections\Table of Contents 2008.wpd

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    10 to 2030 October 2010 Prepared By: The Nevada State Demographer's Office Jeff Hardcastle, AICP NV State Demographer University of NV Reno MS/032 Reno, NV 89557 (775) 784-6353 jhardcas@unr.edu The NV State Demographers's Office is part of the NV Small Business Development Center and Is funded by the NV Department of Taxation Table of Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Recent Economic

  9. Materials Data on ThAu2 (SG:191) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on Th(SiAu)2 (SG:139) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on Th(GeAu)2 (SG:139) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on AgTe2Au (SG:51) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on AgTe4Au (SG:13) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on Ag3AuS2 (SG:1) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Materials Data on K3PbAu5 (SG:74) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Materials Data on K(SnAu2)2 (SG:120) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on K4GaAu8 (SG:12) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-01-27

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on KTeAu (SG:194) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on K(InAu2)2 (SG:140) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-01-27

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Darwin, AU (ARMBE-ATM TWPC3)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  1. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Darwin, AU (ARMBE-ATM TWPC2)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  2. Fabrication of two-dimensional Au at FePt core-shell nanoparticle...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY; ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY; DEPOSITION; ENCAPSULATION; FABRICATION; GOLD; GOLD...

  3. Spectral response of nanocrystalline ZnO films embedded with Au nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patra, Anuradha; Manivannan, A.; Kasiviswanathan, S.

    2012-10-28

    Flame sheet modeling is a common approach for the determination of flame transfer functions for prediction and modeling of thermoacoustic combustion instabilities. The dynamics of the flame-sheet model for simple flame geometries can be shown to be equivalent to a basic model of convective disturbances interacting with a steady heat release region. This framework shows that the flame transfer functions predicted by linearized flame-sheet models are the Fourier transform of the steady heat release rate profile for the flamesheet geometry transformed into Lagrangian convective time reference frame. This result is significant relative to existing flame-sheet modeling approaches in allowing the prediction of dynamic behaviors on the basis of steady information only. Multiple perturbations on the flame can be treated simply via superposition of individual perturbations. Analysis of results from these convective disturbance models illuminates the existence of two independent length scales governing the flame transfer function dynamics. Magnitude is governed by the tip-to-tail length of the flame, whereas phase is governed by the heat release rate profile center of mass calculated from the disturbance origin. The convective disturbance approach shows promise in its potential to derive flame transfer function predictions from a steady flame heat release rate profile.

  4. Materials Data on La(In2Au)2 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on Ce(In2Au)2 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on BaBiAu (SG:194) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-19

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on BaSbAu (SG:194) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-19

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on Ba4Ge20Au3 (SG:223) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-08

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on Li2PbAu (SG:216) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on SnAu5 (SG:155) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on HoAu4 (SG:87) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on Rb4Sn2Au7 (SG:166) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on ErInAu (SG:189) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on Mn2Au (SG:139) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Materials Data on BaAu5 (SG:191) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Materials Data on Hf2Au (SG:139) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on Li2SnAu (SG:216) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on RbAu (SG:221) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. AU-1-Signed-Memo-for-Distribution-re-Clarification-on-Drug-Testing-Form.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

  20. Materials Data on Sn4Au (SG:68) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-01-27

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. THE RHIC INJECTOR ACCELERATORS CONFIGURATIONS, AND PERFORMANCE FOR THE RHIC 2003 AU - D PHYSICS RUN.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahrens, L; Benjamin, J; Blaskiewicz, M; Brennan, J M; Brown, K A; Carlson, K A; Delong, J; D' Ottavio, T; Frak, B; Gardner, C J; Glenn, J W; Harvey, M; Hayes, T; Hseuh, H- C; Ingrassia, P; Lowenstein, D; Mackay, W; Marr, G; Morris, J; Roser, T; Satogata, T; Smith, G; Smith, K S; Steski, D; Tsoupas, N; Thieberger, P; Zeno, K

    2003-05-12

    The RHIC 2003 Physics Run [1] required collisions between gold ions and deuterons. The injector necessarily had to deliver adequate quality (transverse and longitudinal emittance) and quantity of both species. For gold this was a continuing evolution from past work [2]. For deuterons it was new territory. For the filling of the RHIC the injector not only had to deliver quality beams but also had to switch between these species quickly. This paper details the collider requirements and our success in meeting these. Some details of the configurations employed are given.

  2. Turbulent Cascade at 1 AU in High Cross-Helicity Flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Charles W.; Stawarz, Joshua E.; Vasquez, Bernard J.; Forman, Miriam A.; MacBride, Benjamin T.

    2009-11-13

    Analysis of the scaling of the mixed third moments of velocity and magnetic fluctuations in the solar wind plasma, and the energy cascade rates derived from the scaling, reveal a strong dependence on the amount of cross-field correlation between the velocity and magnetic field fluctuations. When the correlation is greater than about 75%, the cascade rate of the outward-propagating (majority) component, and of the total energy and the cross-helicity are surprisingly negative. This indicates a back transfer of energy from small to large scales within the inertial range of the dominant outward-propagating component. It is clear that the transfer of energy acts to reinforce the dominance of the outward-propagating (majority) component and may explain, in part, the persistent observations of large cross-field correlations that have been a defining aspect of solar wind physics for almost 40 years.

  3. Variable cascade dynamics and intermittency in the solar wind at 1 AU

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coburn, Jesse T.; Smith, Charles W.; Vasquez, Bernard J.; Forman, Miriam A.; Stawarz, Julia E. E-mail: Charles.Smith@unh.edu E-mail: Miriam.Forman@sunysb.edu

    2014-05-01

    In recent studies by ourselves and others of third-moment expressions for the rate of energy cascade in the solar wind, it has been shown that relatively large volumes of data are needed to produce convergent averages. These averages are in good agreement with independently obtained estimates for the average heating rate for a solar wind plasma under those conditions. The unanswered question has been whether the convergence issue is the result of intermittent dynamics or simple measurement uncertainties. In other words, is the difficulty in obtaining a single result that characterizes many similarly prepared samples due to in situ dynamics that create physically real variations or simple statistics? There have been publications showing evidence of intermittent dynamics in the solar wind. Here we show that the third-moment expressions and the computed energy cascade for relatively small samples of data comparable to the correlation length are generally well-formed estimates of the local dynamics. This leads us to conclude that intermittency and not simple measurement uncertainties are responsible for the slow convergence to expected heating rates. We partially characterize the scale size of the intermittency to be comparable to or smaller than the correlation length of the turbulence and we attempt to rephrase the discussion of third moments in terms of intermittent dynamics.

  4. Materials Data on CsAuI3 (SG:139) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on TeAuI (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Darwin, AU (ARMBE-ATM TWPC3)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    2010-10-05

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  7. Fragmentation of massive dense cores down to ? 1000 AU: Relation between fragmentation and density structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palau, Aina; Girart, Josep M.; Estalella, Robert; Fuente, Asuncin; Fontani, Francesco; Snchez-Monge, lvaro; Commeron, Benoit; Hennebelle, Patrick; Busquet, Gemma; Bontemps, Sylvain; Zapata, Luis A.; Zhang, Qizhou; Di Francesco, James

    2014-04-10

    In order to shed light on the main physical processes controlling fragmentation of massive dense cores, we present a uniform study of the density structure of 19 massive dense cores, selected to be at similar evolutionary stages, for which their relative fragmentation level was assessed in a previous work. We inferred the density structure of the 19 cores through a simultaneous fit of the radial intensity profiles at 450 and 850 ?m (or 1.2 mm in two cases) and the spectral energy distribution, assuming spherical symmetry and that the density and temperature of the cores decrease with radius following power-laws. Even though the estimated fragmentation level is strictly speaking a lower limit, its relative value is significant and several trends could be explored with our data. We find a weak (inverse) trend of fragmentation level and density power-law index, with steeper density profiles tending to show lower fragmentation, and vice versa. In addition, we find a trend of fragmentation increasing with density within a given radius, which arises from a combination of flat density profile and high central density and is consistent with Jeans fragmentation. We considered the effects of rotational-to-gravitational energy ratio, non-thermal velocity dispersion, and turbulence mode on the density structure of the cores, and found that compressive turbulence seems to yield higher central densities. Finally, a possible explanation for the origin of cores with concentrated density profiles, which are the cores showing no fragmentation, could be related with a strong magnetic field, consistent with the outcome of radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations.

  8. On the dust environment of comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) from 12 AU...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ALFVEN WAVES; COMETS; CONFIGURATION; DENSITY; DUSTS; EMISSION; FRAGMENTATION; GALAXY NUCLEI; IMAGES; MASS; MONTE CARLO METHOD; PARTICLES; SPHERES;...

  9. On the dust environment of comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) from 12 AU...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    de Astrofsica de Andaluca, CSIC, Glorieta de la Astronoma sn, E-18008 Granada (Spain) Publication Date: 2014-08-20 OSTI Identifier: 22365300 Resource Type: Journal Article...

  10. CO Oxidation Facilitated by Robust Surface States on Au-Covered...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publication Date: 2011-07-28 OSTI Identifier: 1100417 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review Letters Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: ...

  11. Nucleon-gold collisions at 200 A GeV using tagged d + Au...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    C. ; Roland, C. ; Roland, G. ; Sagerer, J. ; Sarin, P. ; Sedykh, I. ; Skulski, W. ; Smith, C. E. ; Steinberg, P. ; Stephans, G. S. F. ; Sukhanov, A. ; Tonjes, M. B. ; Trzupek,...

  12. Materials Data on Hg(AuF4)2 (SG:124) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on AuSCl5 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Grain growth of nanocrystalline 3C-SiC under Au ion irradiation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in which lattice disorder is accumulated to a saturation level without full amorphization, the average grain size of the former increases with dose following a power-law trend. ...

  15. Diffusion Compton profondement virtuelle dans le Hall A au Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlos Munoz Camacho

    2005-12-01

    Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs), introduced in the late 90s, provide a universal description of hadrons in terms of the underlying degrees of freedom of Quantum Chromodynamics: quarks and gluons. GPDs appear in a wide variety of hard exclusive reactions and the advent of high luminosity accelerator facilities has made the study of GPDs accessible to experiment. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) is the golden process involving GPDs. The first dedicated DVCS experiment ran in the Hall A of Jefferson Lab in Fall 2004. An electromagnetic calorimeter and a plastic scintillator detector were constructed for this experiment, together with specific electronics and acquisition system. The experiment preparation, data taking and analysis are described in this document. Results on the absolute cross section difference for opposite beam helicities provide the first measurement of a linear combination of GPDs as a function of the momentum transfer to the nucleon.

  16. Materials Data on Au(OF3)2 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on CeInAu2 (SG:225) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on Cd5Au3 (SG:140) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-19

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on Cd(AuF4)2 (SG:124) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on Cd3Au (SG:185) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on Cd2AgAu (SG:225) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-22

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on RbAuF4 (SG:140) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on La2Au5F21 (SG:92) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on ZnAu3 (SG:64) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Self-organization of S adatoms on Au(111): √3R30° rows at...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    This content will become publicly available on July 6, 2016 Title: Self-organization of S ... will become publicly available on July 6, 2016 Publisher's Version of Record 10.1063...

  6. LAKESHORE AVON BR ANT-EDEN ALD EN-LANC ASTER AU BURN W SH ELDON

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BOE Reserve Class No 2001 reserves 0.1 - 10 MBOE 10.1 - 100 MBOE 100.1 - 1000 MBOE 1000.1 - 10,000 MBOE 10,000.1 - 100,000 MBOE > 100,000 MBOE Appalachian Basin Boundary C a n a d a N Y P A N Y U S A Appalachian Basin, NY Area (Panel 1 of 7) Oil and Gas Fields By 2001 BOE

  7. LAKESHORE AVON BR ANT-EDEN ALD EN-LANC ASTER AU BURN W SH ELDON

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Liquids Reserve Class No 2001 Liiquids Reserves 0.1 - 10 Mbbl 10.1 - 100 Mbbl 100.1 - 1000 Mbbl 1000.1 - 10,000 Mbbl Appalachian Basin Boundary C a n a d a N Y P A N Y U S A Appalachian Basin, NY Area (Panel 1 of 7) Oil and Gas Fields By 2001 Liquids

  8. Lattice Distortions and Oxygen Vacancies Produced in Au+-Irradiated Nanocrystalline Cubic Zirconia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edmondson, P. D.; Weber, William J.; Namavar, Fereydoon; Zhang, Yanwen

    2011-07-13

    The oxygen ion conductivity, attributed to an oxygen vacancy mechanism, of yttria-stabilized zirconia membranes used in solid oxide fuel cells is restricted due to trapping limitations. In this work, a high concentration of oxygen vacancies has been deliberately introduced into nanocrystalline stabilizer-free zirconia through ion-irradiation. Oxygen vacancies with different charge states can be produced by varying irradiation temperatures. Due to the reduced trapping sites and high oxygen vacancy concentration, this work suggests that the efficiency of solid oxide fuel cells can be improved.

  9. Lattice distortions and oxygen vacancies produced in Au+ irradiated nano-crystalline cubic zirconia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edmondson, Philip D; Weber, William J; Namavar, Fereydoon; Zhang, Yanwen

    2011-01-01

    The structural impact of oxygen vacancies in nanocrystalline cubic zirconia is investigated. A non-equilibrium number of oxygen vacancies in introduced to the lattice by ion irradiation. The lattice is observed to be initially compressed, undergoes a relaxation at 0.7 displacements per atom (dpa), and experiences a contraction before reaching a temperature dependent steady state value at above 7 dpa. The level of lattice distortion is related to the charge state of the accumulating oxygen vacancies.

  10. Electroproduction de pions neutres dans le Hall A au Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric Fuchey

    2010-06-01

    The past decade has seen a strong evolution of the study of the hadron structure through exclusive processes, allowing to access to a more complete description of this structure. Exclusive processes include DVCS (Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering) as well as hard exclusive meson production. This document is particularly focussed on the latter, and more particularly on exclusive neutral pion production. In this thesis is described the analysis of triple coincidence events H(e, e'{gamma}{gamma})X, which were a consequent by-product of the DVCS experiment which occured during Fall 2004 at Jefferson Lab Hall A, to extract the ep {yields} ep{pi}{sup 0} cross section. This cross section has been measured at two values of four-momentum transfer Q{sup 2} = 1.9 GeV{sup 2} and Q{sup 2} = 2.3 GeV{sup 2}. The statistical precision for these measurements is achieved at better than 5 %. The kinematic range allows to study the evolution of the extracted cross section as a function of Q{sup 2} and W. Results are be confronted with Regge inspired calculations and Generalized (GPD) predictions. An intepretation of our data within the framework of semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering is also discussed.

  11. Centrales au gaz et Energies renouvelables: comparer des pommes avec des pommes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

    2003-10-20

    The fundamental conclusion that we draw from this analysis is that one should not to base itself blindly on forecasts prices of natural gas when one compare contracts at price fixes with producers of renewable energy with contracts at variable prices with promoters power stations with gas. Indeed, forecasts of the prices of gas do not succeed not to enter the associated costs with the covering of the risk, that they are connected to the negative pressure against the cover, with the CAPM, with costs of transaction or with unspecified combination of three. Thus, insofar as price stability to length term is developed, better way of comparing the two choices would be to have recourse to the data on the prices in the long term natural gas, and not with forecasts of the prices. During three last years at least, the use of these prices in the long term would have besides license to correct a methodological error who, obviously, seem to have supported unduly, and of relatively important way, power stations with natural gas compared to their competitors of renewable energies.

  12. The effect of Au and Ni doping on the heavy fermion state of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Subject: 75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; CERIUM; CORRELATIONS; ELECTRIC CONDUCTIVITY; ELECTRONS; GOLD; GROUND STATES; INTERMETALLIC COMPOUNDS; ...

  13. Au-Ag Alloy Static High Pressure EOS measurements: FY09 summary...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Static high-pressure measurements of the equation of state of a Gold-Silver alloy (23.5 ... EOS curves of silver and gold, taken from the literature, are shown for comparison. We fit ...

  14. Density Functional Study of Au-n110(n = 3-5) Clusters on Relaxed...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Subject: 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; DENSITY FUNCTIONAL METHOD; GOLD; ADSORPTION; GRAPHITE; SORPTIVE PROPERTIES ENVIRONMENTAL MOLECULAR SCIENCES ...

  15. Vapor Sensing Using Conjugated Molecule-Linked Au Nanoparticles in a Silica Matrix

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dirk, Shawn M.; Howell, Stephen W.; Price, B. Katherine; Fan, Hongyou; Washburn, Cody; Wheeler, David R.; Tour, James M.; Whiting, Joshua; Simonson, R. Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Cross-linkedmore » assemblies of nanoparticles are of great value as chemiresistor-type sensors. Herein, we report a simple method to fabricate a chemiresistor-type sensor that minimizes the swelling transduction mechanism while optimizing the change in dielectric response. Sensors prepared with this methodology showed enhanced chemoselectivity for phosphonates which are useful surrogates for chemical weapons. Chemoselective sensors were fabricated using an aqueous solution of gold nanoparticles that were then cross-linked in the presence of the silica precursor, tetraethyl orthosilicate with the α -, ω -dithiolate (which is derived from the in situ deprotection of 1,4-di(Phenylethynyl- 4 ′ , 4 ″ -diacetylthio)-benzene ( 1 ) with wet triethylamine). The cross-linked nanoparticles and silica matrix were drop coated onto interdigitated electrodes having 8  μ m spacing. Samples were exposed to a series of analytes including dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), octane, and toluene. A limit of detection was obtained for each analyte. Sensors assembled in this fashion were more sensitive to dimethyl methylphosphonate than to octane by a factor of 1000.« less

  16. Photoconductive response of a single Au nanorod coupled to LaAlO...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Here, we present coupling between plasmonic degrees of freedom in a single gold nanorod ... OF FREEDOM; FAR INFRARED RADIATION; GOLD; LANTHANUM COMPOUNDS; LATTICE VIBRATIONS; ...

  17. Materials Data on Sb2(AuF6)3 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on CeInAu2 (SG:225) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on Sr(GaAu)2 (SG:129) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-01-21

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on SrAu (SG:11) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on Sr(GeAu)2 (SG:139) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-24

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on Sr3Au2 (SG:148) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-19

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on Sr7Au3 (SG:186) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-05-16

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. INTERSTELLAR NEUTRAL ATOMS AT 1 AU OBSERVED BY THE IMAGE/LENA IMAGER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuselier, S. A.; Ghielmetti, A. G.; Wurz, P. E-mail: gmetti@mail.spasci.com

    2009-06-20

    Observations from the Imager for Magnetopause to Aurora: Global Exploration (IMAGE) Low Energy Neutral Atom (LENA) imager from 2005 are used to investigate characteristics of interstellar neutrals in the inner solar system. The LENA imager detected an interstellar neutral signal starting in 2004 December and extending to early 2005 April. Using the orientation of the field of view of the imager and the date of the loss of the interstellar neutral signal, it is concluded that the signal is consistent with a relatively compact (several degrees wide in ecliptic latitude and longitude) source of neutral helium and/or energetic (>150 eV) hydrogen originating from the solar apex direction. Observations later in 2005 are used to distinguish the composition and conclude that the relatively compact source likely contains some energetic hydrogen (in addition to the helium)

  5. Absolute radiant power measurement for the Au M lines of laser...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Germany) Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Abbestr. 2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany) Publication Date: 2014-01-15 OSTI Identifier: 22251206 Resource Type: Journal...

  6. Materials Data on Mn2Au5 (SG:12) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Sécurité au-delà des mythes et des croyances

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    Présentation orale en français, support visuel en français et en anglais. La pire des failles de sécurité est l'impression de sécurité. Le décalage entre la compréhension que l?on a des technologies utilisées, et leurs potentiels réels, ainsi que l'impact potentiellement négatif qu'elles peuvent avoir sur nos vies, n'est pas toujours compris, ou pris en compte par la plupart d'entre-nous. On se contente de nos perceptions pour ne pas avoir à se confronter à la réalité... Alors qu'en est-il vraiment ? En matière de sécurité qui de l'humain ou des technologies a le contrôle ?

  8. Partager : des technologies de pointe au service de la société

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    Médecine, climatologie, métrologie et informatique, les techniques utilisées par le LHC trouvent déjà des répercussions dans d?autres domaines scientifiques. Utilisant des techniques inédites, la physique des particules en fait bénéficier la société toute entière.

  9. Microsoft PowerPoint - Attachment 2 AU Org Chart [Compatibility Mode]

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Departmental Representative to the DNFSB Joseph Olencz Director Office of the Associate Under Secretary for Environment, Health, Safety and Security Associate Under Secretary for Environment, Health, Safety and Security Matthew B. Moury Associate Under Secretary Stephen A. Kirchhoff Deputy Associate Under Secretary Employee Concerns Program Andrew C. Lawrence Acting Director Dr. Michael J. Ardaiz Chief Medical Officer Office of Environmental Protection, Sustainability Support, and Corporate

  10. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Darwin, AU (ARMBE-ATM TWPC3)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    2013-12-27

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  11. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Darwin, AU (ARMBE-ATM TWPC2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    2013-12-26

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  12. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Darwin, AU (ARMBE-ATM TWPC3)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    2013-12-26

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  13. Materials Data on In2Au (SG:225) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Darwin, AU (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC3 V2.1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    2010-08-10

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  15. Nuclear relaxation in the superconducting state of (MDT-TTF)[sub 2]AuI[sub 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kobayashi, Yoshiaki; Nakamura, Toshikazu; Takahashi, Toshihiro ); Kanoda, Kazushi ); Hilti, B.; Zambounis, J.S. )

    1994-06-01

    We report the results of our attempt to measure the proton nuclear relaxation rate, 1/T[sub 1], in the superconducting state of the title material. The relaxation rate in the superconducting state at a field of 1 T was found much longer than that in the normal state, but it became clear that the dominant contribution came from the normal core region. The nuclear relaxation at zero field was examined by using the field cycling technique. An In(t) term in the relaxation curve was observed at low temperatures, suggesting the contribution of the creeping motion of vortices. We discuss the possibility to determine the intrinsic temperature dependence of 1/T[sub 1] in the superconducting state. 10 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Photoluminescence Enhancement in CdSe/ZnSDNA linkedAu Nanoparticle Heterodimers Probed by Single Molecule Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cotlet, M.; Maye, M.M.; Gang, O.

    2010-07-26

    Photoluminescence enhancement of up to 20 fold is demonstrated at the single molecule level for heterodimers composed of a core/shell CdSe/ZnS semiconductive quantum dot and a gold nanoparticle of 60 nm size separated by a 32 nm-long dsDNA linker when employing optical excitation at wavelengths near the surface plasmon resonance of the gold nanoparticle.

  17. Covalent Coupling of Organophosphorus Hydrolase Loaded Quantum Dots to Carbon Nanotube/Au Nanocomposite for Enhanced Detection of Methyl Parathion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Dan; Chen, Wenjuan; Zhang, Weiying; Liu, Deli; Li, Haibing; Lin, Yuehe

    2010-02-15

    An amperometric biosensor for highly selective and sensitive determination of methyl parathion (MP) was developed based on dual signal amplification: (1) a large amount of introduced enzyme on the electrode surface and (2) synergistic effects of nanoparticles towards enzymatic catalysis. The fabrication process includes (1) electrochemical deposition of gold nanoparticles by a multi-potential step technique at multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) film pre-cast on a glassy carbon electrode and (2) immobilization of methyl parathion degrading enzyme (MPDE) onto a modified electrode through CdTe quantum dots (CdTe QDs) covalent attachment. The introduced MWCNT and gold nanoparticles significantly increased the surface area and exhibited synergistic effects towards enzymatic catalysis. CdTe QDs are further used as carriers to load a large amount of enzyme. As a result of these two important enhancement factors, the proposed biosensor exhibited extremely sensitive, perfectly selective, and rapid response to methyl parathion in the absence of a mediator.

  18. CHARACTERIZING THE DUST COMA OF COMET C/2012 S1 (ISON) AT 4.15 AU FROM THE SUN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Jian-Yang; Kelley, Michael S. P.; Farnham, Tony L.; A'Hearn, Michael F.; Kolokolova, Ludmilla; Knight, Matthew M.; Weaver, Harold A.; Mutchler, Max J.; Lamy, Philippe; Toth, Imre E-mail: msk@astro.umd.edu E-mail: ma@astro.umd.edu E-mail: knight@lowell.edu E-mail: mutchler@stsci.edu E-mail: tothi@konkoly.hu

    2013-12-10

    We report results from broadband visible images of comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 on 2013 April 10. C/ISON's coma brightness follows a 1/? (where ? is the projected distance from the nucleus) profile out to 5000km, consistent with a constant speed dust outflow model. The turnaround distance in the sunward direction suggests that the dust coma is composed of sub-micron-sized particles emitted at speeds of tens of ms{sup 1}. A(?)f?, which is commonly used to characterize the dust production rate, was 1340 and 1240cm in the F606W and F438W filters, respectively, in apertures <1.''6 in radius. The dust colors are slightly redder than solar, with a slope of 5.0% 0.2% per 100nm, increasing to >10% per 100nm 10,000km down the tail. The colors are similar to those of comet C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp) and other long-period comets, but somewhat bluer than typical values for short-period comets. The spatial color variations are also reminiscent of C/Hale-Bopp. A sunward jet is visible in enhanced images, curving to the north and then tailward in the outer coma. The 1.''6 long jet is centered at a position angle of 291, with an opening angle of ?45. The jet morphology remains unchanged over 19 hr of our observations, suggesting that it is near the rotational pole of the nucleus, and implying that the pole points to within 30 of (R.A., decl.) = (330, 0). This pole orientation indicates a high obliquity of 50-80.

  19. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Darwin, AU (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC3 V2.1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  20. Radiation sources with planar wire arrays and planar foils for inertial confinement fusion and high energy density physics research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kantsyrev, V. L.; Safronova, A. S.; Esaulov, A. A.; Shrestha, I.; Astanovitsky, A.; Osborne, G. C.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.; Weller, M. E.; Keim, S.; Stafford, A.; Cooper, M.; Chuvatin, A. S.; Rudakov, L. I.; Velikovich, A. L.

    2014-03-15

    This article reports on the joint success of two independent lines of research, each of them being a multi-year international effort. One of these is the development of innovative sources, such as planar wire arrays (PWAs). PWAs turned out to be a prolific radiator, which act mainly as a resistor, even though the physical mechanism of efficient magnetic energy conversion into radiation still remains unclear. We review the results of our extensive studies of PWAs. We also report the new results of the experimental comparison PWAs with planar foil liners (another promising alternative to wire array loads at multi-mega-ampere generators). Pioneered at UNR, the PWA Z-pinch loads have later been tested at the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) on the Saturn generator, on GIT-12 machine in Russia, and on the QiangGuang-1 generator in China, always successfully. Another of these is the drastic improvement in energy efficiency of pulsed-power systems, which started in early 1980s with Zucker's experiments at Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). Successful continuation of this approach was the Load Current Multiplier (LCM) proposed by Chuvatin in collaboration with Rudakov and Weber from NRL. The 100?ns LCM was integrated into the Zebra generator, which almost doubled the plasma load current, from 0.9 to 1.7 MA. The two above-mentioned innovative approaches were used in combination to produce a new compact hohlraum radiation source for ICF, as jointly proposed by SNL and UNR [Jones et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 125001 (2010)]. The first successful proof-of-the-principle experimental implementation of new hohlraum concept at university-scale generator Zebra/LCM is demonstrated. A numerical simulation capability with VisRaD code (from PRISM Co.) established at UNR allowed for the study of hohlraum coupling physics and provides the possibility of optimization of a new hohlraum. Future studies are discussed.

  1. Acronyms A AAAP Accelerated Access Authorization Program ACREM Accountable Removable Classified Media (outdated term)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    v Acronyms A AAAP Accelerated Access Authorization Program ACREM Accountable Removable Classified Media (outdated term) APR Accountable Property Representative AU Associate Under Secretary for Environment, Health, Safety and Security AU1.2 Office of Corporate Security Strategy, Analysis, and Special Operations AU-40 Office of Headquarters Security Operations AU-41 Office of Physical Protection AU-42 Office of Information Security AU-43 Office of Headquarters Personnel Security Operations AU-52

  2. Acronyms A AAAP Accelerated Access Authorization Program ACREM Accountable Removable Classified Media (outdated term)

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    v Acronyms A AAAP Accelerated Access Authorization Program ACREM Accountable Removable Classified Media (outdated term) APR Accountable Property Representative AU Associate Under Secretary for Environment, Health, Safety and Security AU1.2 Office of Corporate Security Strategy, Analysis, and Special Operations AU-40 Office of Headquarters Security Operations AU-41 Office of Physical Protection AU-42 Office of Information Security AU-43 Office of Headquarters Personnel Security Operations AU-52

  3. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Darwin, AU with additional satellite product (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC3 V2.1a)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    2011-02-07

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  4. Search for dark photons from neutral meson decays in p+p and d+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Ta'ani, H.; Alexander, J.; Alfred, M.; et al

    2015-03-10

    In this study, the standard model (SM) of particle physics is spectacularly successful, yet the measured value of the muon anomalous magnetic moment (g-2)μ deviates from SM calculations by 3.6σ. Several theoretical models attribute this to the existence of a “dark photon,” an additional U(1) gauge boson, which is weakly coupled to ordinary photons. The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has searched for a dark photon, U, in π⁰, η → γe⁺e⁻ decays and obtained upper limits of O(2×10⁻⁶) on U-γ mixing at 90% CL for the mass range 30 < mU < 90 MeV/c². Combined withmore » other experimental limits, the remaining region in the U-γ mixing parameter space that can explain the (g-2)μ deviation from its SM value is nearly completely excluded at the 90% confidence level, with only a small region of 29 < mU < 32 MeV/c² remaining.« less

  5. Search for dark photons from neutral meson decays in p+p and d+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Ta'ani, H.; Alexander, J.; Alfred, M.; et al

    2015-03-10

    In this study, the standard model (SM) of particle physics is spectacularly successful, yet the measured value of the muon anomalous magnetic moment (g-2)μ deviates from SM calculations by 3.6σ. Several theoretical models attribute this to the existence of a “dark photon,” an additional U(1) gauge boson, which is weakly coupled to ordinary photons. The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has searched for a dark photon, U, in π⁰, η → γe⁺e⁻ decays and obtained upper limits of O(2×10⁻⁶) on U-γ mixing at 90% CL for the mass range 30 U more »other experimental limits, the remaining region in the U-γ mixing parameter space that can explain the (g-2)μ deviation from its SM value is nearly completely excluded at the 90% confidence level, with only a small region of 29 U « less

  6. Magnetic field fluctuations observed in the heliosheath and interstellar magnetic field by Voyager 1 at 115.7-124.9 AU during 2011-2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.; Florinski, V.; Heerikhuisen, J. E-mail: nfnudel@yahoo.com

    2014-09-10

    We discuss microscale fluctuations of the hour averages of the magnetic field B observed on a scale of one day by Voyager 1 (V1) from 2011.0 to 2012.3143 (when it was within the distant heliosheath, where the average magnetic field strength (B) = 0.17 nT) and during the interval from 2012.6503 to 2013.5855 (when it was within the interstellar plasma with (B) = 0.47 nT). In both regions, the fluctuations were primarily compressive fluctuations, varying along the average B (?T direction in RTN coordinates). In the heliosheath, the average of the daily standard deviations (SDs) of the compressive and transverse components of B were (SD{sub c}) = 0.010 nT and (SD{sub t}) ? 0.005 nT (which is the limit of the measurement). In the distant heliosheath (SD{sub c})/(B) = 0.06, and the distributions of SD were skewed and highly kurtotic. The interstellar magnetic field (ISMF) strength was B = 0.48 nT, but the fluctuations were below the limit of measurement: (SD{sub c}) = 0.004 nT and (abs(SD{sub t})) = 0.004 nT. The distributions of these interstellar SDs have skewness and kurtosis consistent with a Gaussian noise distribution. We also discuss the fluctuations of 48 s averages of B on a scale of 1 day during a 30 day interval when V1 was observing the ISMF. For the fluctuations in all three components of B, SD = 0.010 nT, which gives an upper limit on the fluctuations of the ISMF on the scales observed by V1. This SD rules out the possibility that there is significant power in electromagnetic fluctuations generated by pickup ion ring instabilities at these scales, which strongly constrains models of the IBEX ribbon.

  7. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Darwin, AU with additional satellite product (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC3 V2.1a)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  8. Inner heliospheric evolution of a 'STEALTH' CME derived from multi-view imaging and multipoint in situ observations. I. Propagation to 1 AU

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nieves-Chinchilla, T.; Vourlidas, A.; Stenborg, G.; Savani, N. P.; Koval, A.; Szabo, A.; Jian, L. K.

    2013-12-10

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the main driver of space weather. Therefore, a precise forecasting of their likely geo-effectiveness relies on an accurate tracking of their morphological and kinematical evolution throughout the interplanetary medium. However, single viewpoint observations require many assumptions to model the development of the features of CMEs. The most common hypotheses were those of radial propagation and self-similar expansion. The use of different viewpoints shows that, at least for some cases, those assumptions are no longer valid. From radial propagation, typical attributes that can now be confirmed to exist are over-expansion and/or rotation along the propagation axis. Understanding the 3D development and evolution of the CME features will help to establish the connection between remote and in situ observations, and hence help forecast space weather. We present an analysis of the morphological and kinematical evolution of a STEREO-B-directed CME on 2009 August 25-27. By means of a comprehensive analysis of remote imaging observations provided by the SOHO, STEREO, and SDO missions, and in situ measurements recorded by Wind, ACE, and MESSENGER, we prove in this paper that the event exhibits signatures of deflection, which are usually associated with changes in the direction of propagation and/or also with rotation. The interaction with other magnetic obstacles could act as a catalyst of deflection or rotation effects. We also propose a method to investigate the change of the CME tilt from the analysis of height-time direct measurements. If this method is validated in further work, it may have important implications for space weather studies because it will allow for inference of the interplanetary counterpart of the CME's orientation.

  9. High Catalytic Activity of Au/CeOx/TiO2(110) Controlled by the Nature of the Mixed Metal Oxide at the Nanometer Level

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, J.; Graciani, J; Evans, J; Stacchiola, D; Ma, S; Liu, P; Nambu, A; Sanz, J; Hrbek, J; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Mixed-metal oxides play a very important role in many areas of chemistry, physics, materials science, and geochemistry. Recently, there has been a strong interest in understanding phenomena associated with the deposition of oxide nanoparticles on the surface of a second (host) oxide. Here, scanning tunneling microscopy, photoemission, and density-functional calculations are used to study the behavior of ceria nanoparticles deposited on a TiO2(110) surface. The titania substrate imposes nontypical coordination modes on the ceria nanoparticles. In the CeOx/TiO2(110) systems, the Ce cations adopt an structural geometry and an oxidation state (+3) that are quite different from those seen in bulk ceria or for ceria nanoparticles deposited on metal substrates. The increase in the stability of the Ce3+ oxidation state leads to an enhancement in the chemical and catalytic activity of the ceria nanoparticles. The codeposition of ceria and gold nanoparticles on a TiO2(110) substrate generates catalysts with an extremely high activity for the production of hydrogen through the water-gas shift reaction (H2O + CO ? H2 + CO2) or for the oxidation of carbon monoxide (2CO + O2 ? 2CO2). The enhanced stability of the Ce3+ state is an example of structural promotion in catalysis described here on the atomic level. The exploration of mixed-metal oxides at the nanometer level may open avenues for optimizing catalysts through stabilization of unconventional surface structures with special chemical activity.

  10. Kinks, loops, and protein folding, with protein A as an example

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krokhotin, Andrey, E-mail: Andrei.Krokhotine@cern.ch [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 803, S-75108 Uppsala (Sweden)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 803, S-75108 Uppsala (Sweden); Liwo, Adam, E-mail: adam@chem.univ.gda.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Gdansk, ul. Sobieskiego 18, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland)] [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Gdansk, ul. Sobieskiego 18, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland); Maisuradze, Gia G., E-mail: gm56@cornell.edu; Scheraga, Harold A., E-mail: has5@cornell.edu [Baker Laboratory of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853-1301 (United States); Niemi, Antti J., E-mail: Antti.Niemi@physics.uu.se [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 803, S-75108 Uppsala (Sweden); Laboratoire de Mathematiques et Physique Theorique CNRS UMR 6083, Fdration Denis Poisson, Universit de Tours, Parc de Grandmont, F37200 Tours, France and Department of Physics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Haidian District, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2014-01-14

    The dynamics and energetics of formation of loops in the 46-residue N-terminal fragment of the B-domain of staphylococcal protein A has been studied. Numerical simulations have been performed using coarse-grained molecular dynamics with the united-residue (UNRES) force field. The results have been analyzed in terms of a kink (heteroclinic standing wave solution) of a generalized discrete nonlinear Schrdinger (DNLS) equation. In the case of proteins, the DNLS equation arises from a C{sup ?}-trace-based energy function. Three individual kink profiles were identified in the experimental three-?-helix structure of protein A, in the range of the Glu16-Asn29, Leu20-Asn29, and Gln33-Asn44 residues, respectively; these correspond to two loops in the native structure. UNRES simulations were started from the full right-handed ?-helix to obtain a clear picture of kink formation, which would otherwise be blurred by helix formation. All three kinks emerged during coarse-grained simulations. It was found that the formation of each is accompanied by a local free energy increase; this is expressed as the change of UNRES energy which has the physical sense of the potential of mean force of a polypeptide chain. The increase is about 7 kcal/mol. This value can thus be considered as the free energy barrier to kink formation in full ?-helical segments of polypeptide chains. During the simulations, the kinks emerge, disappear, propagate, and annihilate each other many times. It was found that the formation of a kink is initiated by an abrupt change in the orientation of a pair of consecutive side chains in the loop region. This resembles the formation of a Bloch wall along a spin chain, where the C{sup ?} backbone corresponds to the chain, and the amino acid side chains are interpreted as the spin variables. This observation suggests that nearest-neighbor side chainside chain interactions are responsible for initiation of loop formation. It was also found that the individual kinks are reflected as clear peaks in the principal modes of the analyzed trajectory of protein A, the shapes of which resemble the directional derivatives of the kinks along the chain. These observations suggest that the kinks of the DNLS equation determine the functionally important motions of proteins.

  11. Sandia National Laboratories- Fallon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Fallon FORGE team seeks to establish and manage a well characterized and highly instrumented field test site dedicated to advancing EGS research, enabling the broader engineering and science community to accelerate the deployment of EGS. The team is working in partnership with the U.S. Department of Defense to reduce our Nations dependency on fossil fuels and to safeguard the military readiness for the United States. Prior geothermal exploration at the proposed site has identified attractive temperatures but sub-commercial permeabilities have prevented conventional geothermal development in the area. Led by Sandia National Laboratories, the Fallon FORGE team is strongly committed to the underground R&D laboratory and includes: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, U.S. Navy & the U.S. Navy Geothermal Program Office, Ormat Nevada, Inc., U.S. Geological Survey (Menlo Park, California), University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), GeothermEx / Schlumberger, and Itasca Consulting Group, Inc.

  12. LANL: AOT & LANSCE The Pulse May 2010

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 Los Alamos National Laboratory * Est. 1943 The Pulse-Newsletter of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center and Accelerator Operations and Technology Division I N S I D E 2 A nAno look At AmmoniA borAne And hydrogen storAge lujAn Center studies struCturAl mAteriAls for nuCleAr AppliCAtions And highly irrAdiAted steels 3 lAnsCe-ns hosts nAtionAl lAborAtories At fission meAsure- ment meeting 4 unrAveling the mysteries of lipid domAins in bio-membrAnes 5 heAds up! James Rhyne selected to be a

  13. 2008 4th QTR Employment Report .xls

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    th QTR 2008 (2) NV TOTALS Las Vegas Mercury Fwd. Area NTS Total Other Nevada Other Areas Total NV This Qtr. Prior Year U.S. GOVERNMENT NNSA/NSO 115 7 1 8 1 124 124 128 ARL/SORD 10 2 2 12 12 15 DOI/USGS 11 3 3 3 17 17 20 DTRA 11 11 11 11 16 US Post Office 2 2 2 2 2 Subtotals 136 25 1 26 3 1 166 166 181 M&O CONTRACTORS NSTec 1,018 668 484 1,152 404 2,574 2,574 2,922 Subtotals 1,018 668 484 1,152 404 2,574 2,574 2,922 PRIME CONTRACTORS UNR/DRI 35 7 42 42 34 Chugach-McKinley 22 22 22 12 Epsilon

  14. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    distributions to a new structure type: The gold-rich Eu5Au16(AuIn)6 structure Steinberg, ... Gold-rich R3Au7Sn3: Establishing the interdependence between electronic features and ...

  15. Indications of Conical Emission of Charged Hadrons at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abelev, B. I.; Barannikova, O.; Betts, R. R.; Callner, J.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Iordanova, A.; Suarez, M. C.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Bhati, A. K.; Kumar, L.; Pruthi, N. K.; Ahammed, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Dutta Mazumdar, M. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Ghosh, P.; Mohanty, B.; Nayak, T. K.

    2009-02-06

    Three-particle azimuthal correlation measurements with a high transverse momentum trigger particle are reported for pp, d+Au, and Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV by the STAR experiment. Dijet structures are observed in pp, d+Au and peripheral Au+Au collisions. An additional structure is observed in central Au+Au data, signaling conical emission of correlated charged hadrons. The conical emission angle is found to be {theta}=1.37{+-}0.02(stat){sub -0.07}{sup +0.06}(syst), independent of p{sub perpendicular}.

  16. Indications of conical emission of charged hadrons at the BNL relativistic heavy ion collider.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Krueger, K.; Spinka, H. M.; Underwood, D. G.; High Energy Physics; Univ. of Illinois; Panjab Univ.; Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre; Kent State Univ.; Particle Physic Lab.; STAR Collaboration

    2009-01-01

    Three-particle azimuthal correlation measurements with a high transverse momentum trigger particle are reported for pp, d+Au, and Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV by the STAR experiment. Dijet structures are observed in pp, d+Au and peripheral Au+Au collisions. An additional structure is observed in central Au+Au data, signaling conical emission of correlated charged hadrons. The conical emission angle is found to be {theta} = 1.37 {+-} 0.02(stat){sub -0.07}{sup +0.06} (syst), independent of p.

  17. Indications of Conical Emission of Charged Hadrons at the BNL Relativistic HeavyIon Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STAR Coll

    2009-02-09

    Three-particle azimuthal correlation measurements with a high transverse momentum trigger particle are reported for pp, d + Au, and Au + Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV by the STAR experiment. Dijet structures are observed in pp, d + Au and peripheral Au + Au collisions. An additional structure is observed in central Au + Au data, signaling conical emission of correlated charged hadrons. The conical emission angle is found to be {theta} = 1.37 {+-} 0.02(stat){sub -0.07}{sup +0.06}(syst), independent of p{sub {perpendicular}}.

  18. Organizational Chart | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Organizational Chart Organizational Chart AU Organizational Chart, December 22, 2015 Full Resolution Version News

  19. INSTITUTE COLLOQUIA AND SEMINARS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Event Anisotropy Parameters from Au+Au Collisions at RHIC June 14 Professor Michael Hass, The Weizmann Institute, Rehovot, Israel A New Precision Measurement of the 7 Be (p,)...

  20. Energy dependence of acceptance-corrected dielectron excess mass...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy dependence of acceptance-corrected dielectron excess mass spectrum at mid-rapidity in Au+Au collisions at sNN19.6 and 200 GeV Citation Details In-Document Search Title:...

  1. Preliminary Analysis of Surface Radiation Measurement Data Quality...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Zenith Angle 0 Cos(SZA) if SZA 90 ; Else 0 0.0 S 0 solar constant at mean Earth-Sun distance AU Earth - Sun distance in Astronomical Units S a S 0 AU 2 ...

  2. Count Directive No. Title OPI Approval Date

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Facilities Safety Board AU 3302001 13 DOE M 441.1-1 Nuclear Material Packaging Manual AU 372008 14 DOE M 471.3-1 Manual for Identifying and Protecting Official...

  3. LANL: AOT & LANSCE The Pulse October 2011

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Study of La 4 LiAuO 8 : Understanding Au3+ in an Oxide Environment, Journal of Solid State Chemistry 184, 1439 (2011). The DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences funded the...

  4. 2015 Nuclear and Facility Safety Programs Workshop Block Agenda

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Worthington (AU-10) ISM o Colette Broussard (AU-23) QA and Other Data Trending o Pat Lewis (SC-CH) Lessons From Safety Basis Reviews o Carl Sykes (NA-511) Exemptions * Readiness...

  5. Papers Published April 1, 1995 - March 31, 1996

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1995) Fragment Flow in Au + Au Collisions M.D. Partlan, S. Albergo, F. Bieser, F.P. Brady, Z. Caccia, D. Cebra, A.D. Chacon, J. Chance, Y. Choi, S. Costa, J.B. Elliott, M.L....

  6. PET

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    le DG fait l'introduction et laisse la parole à plusieurs intervenants au sujet de la physique des particules

  7. Seismicity in the Vicinity of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for the Period October 1, 2004 to September 30, 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Ken

    2007-11-26

    This report describes earthquake activity within approximately 65 km of Yucca Mountain site during the October 1, 2004 to September 30, 2006 time period (FY05-06). The FY05-06 earthquake activity will be compared with the historical and more recent period of seismic activity in the Yucca Mountain region. The relationship between the distribution of seismicity and active faults, historical patterns of activity, and rates of earthquakes (number of events and their magnitudes) are important components in the assessment of the seismic hazard for the Yucca Mountain site. Since October 1992 the University of Nevada has compiled a catalog of earthquakes in the Yucca Mountain area. Seismicity reports have identified notable earthquake activity, provided interpretations of the seismotectonics of the region, and documented changes in the character of earthquake activity based on nearly 30 years of site-characterization monitoring. Data from stations in the seismic network in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain is collected and managed at the Nevada Seismological Laboratory (NSL) at the University of Nevada Reno (UNR). Earthquake events are systematically identified and cataloged under Implementing Procedures developed in compliance with the Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE) Quality Assurance Program. The earthquake catalog for FY05-06 in the Yucca Mountain region submitted to the Yucca Mountain Technical Data Management System (TDMS) forms the basis of this report.

  8. Expanding Geothermal Resource Utilization through Directed Research, Education, and Public Outreach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, Wendy

    2015-06-29

    The Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy (GBCGE or the Center) was established at the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) in May 2000 to promote research and utilization of geothermal resources. The Center received funding through this grant to promote increased geothermal development in the Great Basin, with most of the funding used for peerreviewed research. Funding to the Center and work under the contract were initiated in March 2002, with supplemental funding in subsequent years. The Center monitored the research projects that were competitively awarded in a series of proposal calls between 2002 and 2007. Peer-reviewed research promoted identification and utilization of geothermal resources in Nevada. Projects used geology, geochemistry, geophysics, remote sensing, and the synthesis of multi-disciplinary information to produce new models of geothermal systems in the Western U.S. and worldwide. Funds were also used to support graduate student research and training. Part of the grant was used to support public outreach activities, including webpages, online maps and data resources, and informational workshops for stakeholders.

  9. Intense Magnetized Plasma-Wall Interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, Bruno S.; Fuelling, Stephan

    2013-11-30

    This research project studied wall-plasma interactions relevant to fusion science. Such interactions are a critical aspect of Magneto-Inertial Fusion (MIF) because flux compression by a pusher material, in particular the metal for the liner approach to MIF, involves strong eddy current heating on the surface of the pusher, and probably interactions and mixing of the pusher with the interior fuel during the time when fusion fuel is being burned. When the pusher material is a metal liner, high-energy-density conditions result in fascinating behavior. For example, "warm dense matter" is produced, for which material properties such as resistivity and opacity are not well known. In this project, the transformation into plasma of metal walls subjected to pulsed megagauss magnetic fields was studied with an experiment driven by the UNR 1 MA Zebra generator. The experiment was numerically simulated with using the MHRDR code. This simple, fundamental high-energy-density physics experiment, in a regime appropriate to MIF, has stimulated an important and fascinating comparison of numerical modeling codes and tables with experiment. In addition, we participated in developing the FRCHX experiment to compress a field-reversed-configuration (FRC) plasma with a liner, in collaboration with researchers from Air Force Research Laboratory and Los Alamos National Lab, and we helped develop diagnostics for the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) at LANL. Last, but not least, this project served to train students in high-energy-density physics.

  10. Investigations of the Fundamental Surface Reactions Involved in the Sorption and Desorption of Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Czerwinski, Ken; Heske, Clemens; Moser, Duane; Misra, Mnoranjan; McMillion, Glen

    2011-04-20

    Models for describing solution- and surface-phase reactions have been used for 30 years, but only recently applicable to complex surfaces. Duff et al., using micro-XANES, found that Pu was concentrated on Mn-oxide and smectite phases of zeolitic tuff, providing an evaluation of contaminant speciation on surfaces for modeling. Experiments at Los Alamos demonstrated that actinides display varying surface residence time distributions, probably reflective of mineral surface heterogeneity. We propose to investigate the sorption/desorption behavior of radionuclides from mineral surfaces, as effected by microorganisms, employing isolates from Nevada Test Site deep alluvium as a model system. Characterizations will include surface area, particle size distribution, x-ray diffraction (XRD), microprobe analysis, extractions, and microbiology. Surface interactions will be assessed by electron spectroscopy (XPS), x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS), X-ray emission spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Desert Research Institute (DRI), University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), and University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) researchers will collaborate to enhance scientific infrastructure and the understanding of contaminant behavior on surfaces, with broader implications for the management of DOE sites.

  11. Sun light mediated synthesis of gold nanoparticles as carrier for 6-mercaptopurine: Preparation, characterization and toxicity studies in zebrafish embryo model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganeshkumar, Moorthy; Sastry, Thotapalli Parvathaleswara; Sathish Kumar, Muniram; Dinesh, Murugan Girija; Kannappan, Sudalyandi; Suguna, Lonchin

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: ? Gold nanoparticles prepared using eco-friendly method with good in vitro stability. ? Can be used as drug delivery system. ? Did not show any toxicity in zebrafish embryo. ? More toxic to cancer cells when compared to N-Au-Mp and Mp. -- Abstract: The objective of this study is to synthesize green chemistry based gold nanoparticles by sun light irradiation method. The prepared gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were modified using folic acid and then coupled with 6-mercaptopurine. These modified nanoparticles were used as a tool for targeted drug delivery to treat laryngeal cancer. In the present study, novel bionanocomposites containing nutrient agar coated gold nano particles (N-AuNPs) coupled with 6-mercaptopurine (drug) (N-AuNPs-Mp), folic acid (ligand) (N-AuNPs-Mp-Fa) and rhodamine (dye) (N-AuNPs-Rd), a fluorescent agent, were prepared and characterized by IR, UV, TEM, Particle size analysis and in vitro stability. The toxicity and fluorescence of N-Au was studied using zebrafish embryo model. The in vitro cytotoxicity of free Mp, N-Au-Mp and N-Au-Mp-Fa against HEp-2 cells was compared and found that the amount of Mp required to achieve 50% of growth of inhibition (IC{sub 50}) was much lower in N-Au-Mp-Fa than in free Mp and N-Au-Mp.

  12. Structural analysis of palladium-decorated gold nanoparticles as colloidal bimetallic catalysts.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, Y. L.; Miller, J. T.; Guo, N.; Heck, K. N.; Alvarez, P. J. J.; Wong, M. S. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division); (Rice Univ.)

    2011-02-02

    Bimetallic palladium-decorated gold nanoparticle (Pd/Au NP) catalysts are significantly more active than palladium-only catalysts, but the mechanism for enhancement is not completely clear for most reactions, like the aqueous-phase hydrodechlorination of trichloroethene. In this study, we conducted X-ray absorption spectroscopy on carbon-supported Pd/Au NPs to obtain information about the local atomic environment (i.e., oxidation states, coordination numbers, and bond distances) of the two metals under different treatment conditions. The as-synthesized NPs were confirmed to have a Pd-shell/Au-core nanostructure, in which the Pd was found as surface ensembles. Upon exposure to room temperature in air, a portion of the Pd, but not the Au, was oxidized. In comparison, nearly the entire surface of monometallic Pd NPs was oxidized, suggesting that Au in Pd/Au NPs imparts oxidation resistance to Pd atoms. The surface Pd was found randomly distributed, presumably as a PdAu surface alloy, after reduction at 300 C. X-ray absorption spectroscopy provides direct evidence for the Pd-shell/Au-core structure of Pd/Au NPs, and suggests that metallic Pd in the Pd/Au NPs is a source for higher catalytic activity for aqueous-phase trichloroethene hydrodechlorination.

  13. Final Project Report "Advanced Concept Exploration For Fast Ignition Science Program"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STEPHENS, Richard B.; McLEAN, Harry M.; THEOBALD, Wolfgang; AKLI, Kramer; BEG, Farhat N.; SENTOKU, Yasuiko; SCHUMACHER, Douglas; WEI, Mingsheng S.

    2014-01-31

    The Fast Ignition (FI) Concept for Inertial Confinement Fusion has the potential to provide a significant advance in the technical attractiveness of Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) reactors. FI differs from conventional central hot spot (CHS) target ignition by decoupling compression from heating: using the laser (or heavy ion beam or Z pinch) drive pulse (10s of ns) to create a dense fuel and a second, much shorter (~10 ps) high intensity pulse to ignite a small region of it. There are two major physics issues concerning this concept; controlling the laser-induced generation of large electron currents and their propagation through high density plasmas. This project has addressed these two significant scientific issues in Relativistic High Energy Density (RHED) physics. Learning to control relativistic laser matter interaction (and the limits and potential thereof) will enable a wide range of applications. While these physics issues are of specific interest to inertial fusion energy science, they are also important for a wide range of other HED phenomena, including high energy ion beam generation, isochoric heating of materials, and the development of high brightness x-ray sources. Generating, controlling, and understanding the extreme conditions needed to advance this science has proved to be challenging: Our studies have pushed the boundaries of physics understanding and are at the very limits of experimental, diagnostic, and simulation capabilities in high energy density laboratory physics (HEDLP). Our research strategy has been based on pursuing the fundamental physics underlying the Fast Ignition (FI) concept. We have performed comprehensive study of electron generation and transport in fast-ignition targets with experiments, theory, and numerical modeling. A major issue is that the electrons produced in these experiments cannot be measured directlyonly effects due to their transport. We focused mainly on x-ray continuum photons from bremsstrahlung and x-ray line radiation from K-shell fluorescence. Integrated experiments, which combine target compression with short-pulse laser heating, yield additional information on target heating efficiency. This indirect way of studying the underlying behavior of the electrons must be validated with computational modeling to understand the physics and improve the design. This program execution required a large, well-organized team and it was managed by a joint Collaboration between General Atomics (GA), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). The Collaboration was formed 8 years ago to understand the physics issues of the Fast Ignition concept, building on the strengths of each partner. GA fulfills its responsibilities jointly with the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), The Ohio State University (OSU) and the University of Nevada at Reno (UNR). Since RHED physics is pursued vigorously in many countries, international researchers have been an important part of our efforts to make progress. The division of responsibility was as follows: (1) LLE had primary leadership for channeling studies and the integrated energy transfer, (2) LLNL led the development of measurement methods, analysis, and deployment of diagnostics, and (3) GA together with UCSD, OSU and UNR studied the detailed energy-transfer physics. The experimental program was carried out using the Titan laser at the Jupiter Laser Facility at LLNL, the OMEGA and OMEGA EP lasers at LLE and the Texas Petawatt laser (TPW) at UT Austin. Modeling has been pursued on large computing facilities at LLNL, OSU, and UCSD using codes developed (by us and others) within the HEDLP program, commercial codes, and by leveraging existing supercomputer codes developed by the NNSA ICF program. This Consortium brought together all the componentsresources, facilities, and personnelnecessary to accomplish its aggressive goals. The ACE Program has been strongly collaborative, taking advantage of the expertise of the participating institutions to provide a research effort

  14. Self assembly of acetylcholinesterase on a gold nanoparticlesgraphene nanosheet hybrid for organophosphate pesticide detection using polyelectrolyte as a linker

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Ying; Zhang, Sheng; Du, Dan; Shao, Yuyan; Li, Zhaohui; Wang, Jun; Engelhard, Mark H.; Li, Jinghong; Lin, Yuehe

    2011-04-14

    A nanohybrid of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) and chemically reduced graphene oxide nanosheets (cr-Gs) was synthesized by in situ growth of Au NPs on the surface of graphene nanosheets in the presence of poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA), which not only improved the dispersion of Au NPs but also stabilized cholinesterase with high activity and loading efficiency. The obtained nanohybrid was characterized by TEM, XRD, XPS, and electrochemistry. Then an enzyme nanoassembly (AChE/Au NPs/cr-Gs) was prepared by self-assembling acetylcholinesterase (AChE) on Au NP/cr-Gs nanohybrid. An electrochemical sensor based on AChE/Au NPs/cr-Gs was further developed for ultrasensitive detection of organophosphate pesticide. The results demonstrate that the developed approach provides a promising strategy to improve the sensitivity and enzyme activity of electrochemical biosensors.

  15. Larger sized wire arrays on 1.5 MA Z-pinch generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Safronova, A. S. Kantsyrev, V. L. Weller, M. E. Shlyaptseva, V. V. Shrestha, I. K. Esaulov, A. A. Stafford, A.; Chuvatin, A. S.; Coverdale, C. A.; Jones, B.

    2014-12-15

    Experiments on the UNR Zebra generator with Load Current Multiplier (LCM) allow for implosions of larger sized wire array loads than at standard current of 1 MA. Advantages of larger sized planar wire array implosions include enhanced energy coupling to plasmas, better diagnostic access to observable plasma regions, and more complex geometries of the wire loads. The experiments with larger sized wire arrays were performed on 1.5 MA Zebra with LCM (the anode-cathode gap was 1 cm, which is half the gap used in the standard mode). In particular, larger sized multi-planar wire arrays had two outer wire planes from mid-atomic-number wires to create a global magnetic field (gmf) and plasma flow between them. A modified central plane with a few Al wires at the edges was put in the middle between outer planes to influence gmf and to create Al plasma flow in the perpendicular direction (to the outer arrays plasma flow). Such modified plane has different number of empty slots: it was increased from 6 up to 10, hence increasing the gap inside the middle plane from 4.9 to 7.7 mm, respectively. Such load configuration allows for more independent study of the flows of L-shell mid-atomic-number plasma (between the outer planes) and K-shell Al plasma (which first fills the gap between the edge wires along the middle plane) and their radiation in space and time. We demonstrate that such configuration produces higher linear radiation yield and electron temperatures as well as advantages of better diagnostics access to observable plasma regions and how the load geometry (size of the gap in the middle plane) influences K-shell Al radiation. In particular, K-shell Al radiation was delayed compared to L-shell mid-atomic-number radiation when the gap in the middle plane was large enough (when the number of empty slots was increased up to ten)

  16. PowerPoint Presentation

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Phenomena Hazards DOE-STD 1020-2012 & DOE Handbook Mark Blackburn P.E. Office of Nuclear Facility Safety Programs AU, 32 October 21, 2014 Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security Overview * DOE's Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Program * DOE-STD-1020-2012, Natural Phenomena Hazards Analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities * DOE NPH Handbook 2 Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security DOE NPH Program AU Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security AU-30 Office

  17. Robotics Methods for Beam Line Instrument Simulation and Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James, J. A.; Oliver, E. C.; Paradowska, A; Hubbard, Camden R; Schmidlin, Joshua E; Edwards, L

    2008-01-01

    NOBUGS 2008 Conference, Ansto, Lucas Heights, Australia, http://www.nbi.ansto.gov.au/nobugs2008/papers/paper107.pdf, November 3-5, 2008

  18. 65th Birthday of Dr.Owen Lock

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    Remerciements au Dr.Owen Lock, un des pionniers du Cern, à l'occasion de son 65me anniversaire et sa retraite (avec plusieurs intervenants)

  19. Memorial V.J.Glaser

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    Plusieurs orateurs rendent hommage au grand physicien et scientifique Vladimir Jurko Glaser (1924 - 1984) qui travaillait au Ruder Boscovic Institut à Zagreb avant de venir au Cern en 1957 où il trouvait un poste permanent au département de physique théorique. Walter Tearing, Harry Lehmann,Henry Epstein, Jacques Bros et André Martin font des résumés biographiques de leurs collègue et ami en honorant ses grands qualités d'homme et ses remarquables conquêtes de la science et leurs accomplissement.

  20. General Staff Meeting

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    Le DG H.Schopper informe le personnel des derniers événements au Cern, comme: 1.) Décision du LEP 2.) Budget 3.) Pension

  1. Operating Experience Summaries

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security (AU) Office of Analysis publishes the Operating Experience Summary to exchange lessons-learned information between DOE facilities.

  2. Whitfield Solar Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kingdom Zip: RG6 6AU Sector: Renewable Energy, Solar Product: Developing solar photovoltaic concentrators aimed at generating clean renewable energy for the world market....

  3. ABSTRACTS FOR PAPERS SUBMITTED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FOR PAPERS SUBMITTED April 1, 2001 - March 31, 2002 Mid-rapidity and Λ Λ Production in Au+Au Collisions at NN S = 103 GeV STAR Collaboration Phys. Rev. Lett. (submitted) We report the first measurement of strange ( and anti-strange ) Λ ) Λ ( baryon production from NN S = 130 GeV Au + Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Rapidity density and transverse mass distributions at mid-rapidity are presented as a function of centrality. The yield of ( and ) Λ ) (Λ hyperons

  4. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy level alignment of self-assembled linear chains of benzenediamine on Au(111) from ... Reliable Energy Level Alignment at Physisorbed Molecule-Metal Interfaces from Density ...

  5. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Graphene Au Nanoparticles Composite Based Electrochemical Aptamer Biosensors Guo Shaojun Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory Inorganic Organic Physical...

  6. Schopper Fest

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    Après 8 ans de responsabilité du Prof.Schopper en tant que DG au Cern, une période importante se termine.

  7. Knox County, Maine: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Maine Appleton, Maine Camden, Maine Criehaven, Maine Cushing, Maine Friendship, Maine Hope, Maine Isle au Haut, Maine Matinicus Isle, Maine Muscle Ridge Islands, Maine North...

  8. Australia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Australia Population Unavailable GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code AU 3-letter ISO code AUS Numeric ISO code...

  9. Deputy Associate Under Secretary for Security

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of the Associate Under Secretary for Environment, Health, Safety, and Security (AU) provides corporate leadership and strategic approaches for protecting DOEs workers, the public, the...

  10. Mercury Vapor At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area (Kodosky...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    on air-dried ( < 80 mesh fraction) samples using the Jerome Instrument 301 Au-film Hg degrees detector. References Lawrence G. Kodosky (1989) Surface Mercury Geochemistry As...

  11. Soil Sampling At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area (Kodosky...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    on air-dried ( < 80 mesh fraction) samples using the Jerome Instrument 301 Au-film Hg degrees detector. References Lawrence G. Kodosky (1989) Surface Mercury Geochemistry As...

  12. Temporal Shifts in the Geochemistry and Microbial Community Structure of an Ultradeep Mine Borehole Following Isolation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moser, Duane P. ); Onstott, T C.; Fredrickson, Jim K. ); Brockman, Fred J. ); Balkwill, David L.; Drake, G R.; Pfiffner, S; White, D C.; Takai, K Project Japan); Pratt, L M.; Fong, J; Lollar, B S.; Slater, G; Phelps, T J. ); Spoelstra, N ); Deflaun, M; Southam, G; Welty, A T.; Baker, B J.; Hoek, J

    2003-12-01

    A borehole draining a water-bearing dyke fracture at 3.2 km depth in a South African Au mine was isolated from the open mine environment...

  13. Untitled Document

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Morning Talks bugaev_RHIC1.pdf crab-2.au gross_talk2005.pdf gross_Texastalk.pdf horowitz_neutron_matter.ppt pasta.mpeg

  14. Building Management System Integrators | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Place: Berkshire, England, United Kingdom Zip: SL1 5AU Product: Service and maintenance provider. References: Building Management System Integrators1 This article is a...

  15. EPJ

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stopping and Flow in Au+Au Collisions A. Andronic, 1 J. Lukasik, 1,2 W. Reisdorf 1 and W. Trautmann 1 1 GSI, D-64291 Darmstadt, Germany 2 IFJ-PAN, Pl-31342 Krak´ ow, Poland Received: April 25, 2006 Abstract. Excitation functions of flow and stopping observables for the Au+Au system at energies from 40 to 1500 MeV per nucleon are presented. The systematics were obtained by merging the results of the INDRA and FOPI experiments, both performed at the GSI facility. The connection to the nuclear

  16. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gold Symbol: Au Atomic Number: 79 Atomic Weight (Average): 196.9666 Mass (amu) 196.966550 Abundance 100.00000...

  17. Computerized Accident Incident Reporting System | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Through the Office of Analysis, within AU, the Office provides customer-oriented assistance to help maintain consistent and accurate data recording and reporting throughout the ...

  18. The MicroBooNE Experiment Ryan Grosso

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 Wire Installation 8256 Sense Wires: 3456 collection wires (vertical) 4800 induction wires (+- 60) Wires are 150m diameter SS CuAu plated All Wires Tensioned...

  19. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (2) atoms (2) electric potential (2) gold (2) carbon monoxide (1) carbon nanotubes ... hydrocarbon molecules onto the gold surface, Au(111), is one of the essential ...

  20. 2013 Annual Merit Review Results Report - Acronyms

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Technology Partial Zero Emissions Vehicle ATR Attenuated Total Reflectance Au Gold AVFL Advanced VehicleFuelLubricant Committee AVFL-18 Project 18 under Advanced ...

  1. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (3) electric potential (2) functionals (2) gold (2) oxides (2) oxygen (2) surfaces (2) ... hydrocarbon molecules onto the gold surface, Au(111), is one of the essential ...

  2. ORNL Transportation Technology Program - Annual Report Fiscal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Machines ASE Alliance to Save Energy Au gold B20 fuel containing 20% biodiesel BTE ... In situ heating of gold-palladium nanoparticles revealed that adjacent particles sometimes ...

  3. 2015 Annual Merit Review, Vehicle Technologies Office

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Materials ATF Automatic transmission fluid ATR Attenuated Total Reflectance Au Gold AVFL Advanced VehicleFuelLubricants AVTA Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity AVTE ...

  4. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Gold nanoparticles formed directly on a membrane by ultraviolet light irradiation Qian, ... efforts directed towards the synthesis of gold (Au) nanoparticles (NPs) and the ...

  5. Global Trade and Environmental Model (GTEM) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Australia Department of Agriculture, Fisheries, and Forestry (ABARES) Sector: Climate, Energy Topics: Analysis Tools ComplexityEase of Use: Advanced Website: www.daff.gov.au...

  6. Multimetallic nanoparticle catalysts with enhanced electrooxidation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Multimetallic nanoparticle catalysts with enhanced electrooxidation A new structure-control strategy to optimize nanoparticle catalysis is provided. The presence of Au in ...

  7. IN SITU SURFACE X-RAY SCATTERING STUDIES OF ELECTROSORPTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WANG,J.X.; ADZIC,R.R.; OCKO,B.M.

    1998-07-01

    A short review of the application of surface x-ray scattering techniques to the electrode/electrolyte interfaces is presented. Recent results on metal, halide, and metal-halide adlayers with three specific systems: Bi on Au(100) and Au(110); Br on Au(100) and Ag(100); and the coadsorption of Tl with Br or I on Au(111), are given as an illustration. Factors affecting ordering of pure metal and halide adlayers and the metal-halide surface compounds are discussed in some detail.

  8. Director, Office of Resource Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of the Associate Under Secretary for Environment, Health, Safety, and Security (AU) provides corporate leadership and strategic approaches for protecting DOEs workers, the public, the...

  9. Welcome_Poster_5_14_15_FINAL

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Quality Assurance Framework Sponsored By: Office of Acquisition and Project Management, (MA-63) Office of Quality Assurance, (AU-33) Office of Chief of Nuclear Safety, (CNS)...

  10. InP:Fe photoconducting device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hammond, R.B.; Paulter, N.G.; Wagner, R.S.

    A photoconducting device fabricated from Fe-doped, semi-insulating InP crystals exhibits an exponential decay transient with decay time inversely related to Fe concentration. Photoconductive gain as high as 5 is demonstrated in photoconducting devices with AuGe and AuSn contacts. Response times from 150 to 1000 picoseconds can be achieved.

  11. InP:Fe Photoconducting device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hammond, Robert B.; Paulter, Nicholas G.; Wagner, Ronald S.

    1984-01-01

    A photoconducting device fabricated from Fe-doped, semi-insulating InP crystals exhibits an exponential decay transient with decay time inversely related to Fe concentration. Photoconductive gain as high as 5 is demonstrated in photoconducting devices with AuGe and AuSn contacts. Response times from 150 to 1000 picoseconds can be achieved.

  12. Speech of italian ambassador

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    L'ambassadeur italien (nom?)fait un discours sur l'aspect de la recherche au Cern, une organisation internationale qui a comme but la connaissance dans sa forme la plus pure et libre d'un intérêt planétaire. Il remet un prix au DG C.Rubbia qui lui remercie en français

  13. Office of Business Operations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Business Operations manages financial and acquisition management programs throughout the Associate Under Secretary for the Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security (AU), including the formulation and execution of the AU budget; funding control and accounting activities; preparation of management studies; and provision of acquisition management support.

  14. European Cosmic Ray Symposium

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    13me Symposium qui se déroule du 27 au 31 juillet pour la première fois au Cern. Brian Pattison ouvre la cérémonie et donne la parole à Dr.Ugland (qui représente le DG C.Rubbia excusé) et d'autres intervenants

  15. Dynamic formation of single-atom catalytic active sites on ceria-supported gold nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yanggang; Mei, Donghai; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; Li, Jun; Rousseau, Roger J.

    2015-03-04

    Ab initio Molecular Dynamics simulations and static Density Functional Theory calculations have been performed to investigate the reaction mechanism of CO oxidation on Au/CeO2 catalyst. It is found that under reaction condition CO adsorption significantly labializes the surface atoms of the Au cluster and leads to the formation of isolated Au+-CO species that resides on the support in the vicinity of the Au particle. In this context, we identified a dynamic single-atom catalytic mechanism at the interfacial area for CO oxidation on Au/CeO2 catalyst, which is a lower energy pathway than that of CO oxidation at the interface with the metal particle. This results from the ability of the single atom site to strongly couple with the redox properties of the support in a synergistic manner thereby lowering the barrier for redox reactions. We find that the single Au+ ion, which only exists under reaction conditions, breaks away from the Au cluster to catalyze CO oxidation and returns to the Au cluster after the catalytic cycle is completed. Generally, our study highlights the importance of the dynamic creation of active sites under reaction conditions and their essential role in a catalytic process.

  16. Multifunctional gold coated rare-earth hydroxide fluoride nanotubes for simultaneous wastewater purification and quantitative pollutant determination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Da-Quan; Sun, Tian-Ying; Yu, Xue-Feng; Jia, Yue; Chen, Ming; Wang, Jia-Hong; Huang, Hao; Chu, Paul K.

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: The morphology and properties of Ce-doped yttrium hydroxide fluoride nanotubes (YHF:Ce NTs) were investigated. YHF:Ce NTs were conjugated with Au nanoparticles to produce Au-YHF:Ce nanocomposites. Au-YHF:Ce NTs showed excellent capability and efficiency in removing Congo red from solutions. Au-YHF:Ce NTs were utilized to determine the concentration of Congo red based on SERS. - Abstract: Ce-doped yttrium hydroxide fluoride nanotubes (YHF:Ce NTs) with large surface area are synthesized and conjugated with Au nanoparticles (NPs) to produce Au-YHF:Ce nanocomposites. The Au-YHF:Ce NTs have a hollow structure, rough surface, polymer coating, and good surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) properties. They are applied to wastewater treatment to remove Congo red as a typical pollutant. The materials not only remove pollutants rapidly from the wastewater, but also detect trace amounts of the pollutants quantitatively. The multifunctional Au-YHF:Ce NTs have commercial potential as nano-absorbents and nano-detectors in water treatment and environmental monitoring.

  17. A hybrid DNA-templated gold nanocluster for enhanced enzymatic reduction of oxygen

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chakraborty, Saumen; Babanova, Sofia; Rocha, Reginaldo C.; Desireddy, Anil; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Boncella, Amy E.; Atanassov, Plamen; Martinez, Jennifer S.

    2015-08-19

    We report the synthesis and characterization of a new DNA-templated gold nanocluster (AuNC) of ~1 nm in diameter and possessing ~7 Au atoms. When integrated with bilirubin oxidase (BOD) and single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), the AuNC acts as an enhancer of electron transfer (ET) and lowers the overpotential of electrocatalytic oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) by ~15 mV as compared to the enzyme alone. In addition, the presence of AuNC causes significant enhancements in the electrocatalytic current densities at the electrode. Control experiments show that such enhancement of ORR by the AuNC is specific to nanoclusters and not to plasmonicmore » gold particles. Rotating ring disk electrode (RRDE) measurements confirm 4e– reduction of O2 to H2O with minimal production of H2O2, suggesting that the presence of AuNC does not perturb the mechanism of ORR catalyzed by the enzyme. This unique role of the AuNC as enhancer of ET at the enzyme-electrode interface makes it a potential candidate for the development of cathodes in enzymatic fuel cells, which often suffer from poor electronic communication between the electrode surface and the enzyme active site. In conclusion, the AuNC displays phosphorescence with large Stokes shift and microsecond lifetime.« less

  18. VI-12 STUDENTS WHO RECEIVED GRADUATE DEGREES FROM THESIS WORK...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GeV Au+Au Collision with STAR S. Mioduszewski N.A. James Lucus Drachenberg 2012 Forward Di-Hadron Asymmetries from p + p at sqrt(s)200GeV at STAR C. A. Gagliardi N.A. Matthew C....

  19. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buttry, Daniel A

    2012-11-06

    We adapted and refined a synthesis of gold nanoparticles of type, Au101(PPh3)21Cl5 (Au101). In our hands, this method routinely gave fairly high yields of Au101 NPs. These NPs were characterized using several techniques, including TEM, AFM/STM and various NMR measurements, including solid state methods. We also used a simpler citrate-based preparation of Au NPs. We immobilized the Au NPs on carbon and characterized their electrochemical behavior. In addition, we prepared and characterized tin oxide NPs that were capped with phosphonic acid capping ligands. Our goal in this part of the project was to expand the NMR methods available to study ligand complexation in non-metallic NP materials that may be of interest as electrochemical materials. The use of tin oxide as a host material for tin metal that could be used to alloy of Li in battery anodes was the motivation for our interest in these types of materials.

  20. Surface plasmon polariton assisted red shift in excitonic emission of semiconductor microflowers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parameswaran, Chithra; Warrier, Anita R. Bingi, Jayachandra Vijayan, C.

    2014-10-15

    We report on the study of metal nanoparticle-semiconductor hybrid system composed of ?-indium sulfide (?-In{sub 2}S{sub 3}) and gold (Au) nanoparticles. ?-In{sub 2}S{sub 3} micron sized flower like structures (?1 ?m) and Au nanoparticles (?10 nm) were synthesized by chemical route. These Au nanoparticles have surface plasmon resonance at ? 520 nm. We study the influence of Au surface plasmon polaritons on the radiative properties of the ?-In{sub 2}S{sub 3} microflowers. As a result of the coupling between the surface plasmon polaritons and the excitons there is a red shift ? 50 nm in emission spectrum of hybrid ?-In{sub 2}S{sub 3}-Au system. Such hybrid systems provide scope for a control on the optical properties of semiconductor microstructures, thus rendering them suitable for specific device applications in optoelectronics and photovoltaics.

  1. Upper limits to the masses of objects in the solar comet cloud

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hills, J.G.

    1985-01-01

    The lack of a large steady stream of long-period comets with semi-major axes less than 2 x 10/sup 4/ AU rules out the sun having a companion more massive than about 0.01 M/sub solar/ with a semi-major axis less than about 1 x 10/sup 4/ AU. Any companion with a semi-major axis between 1 x 10/sup 4/ AU and 5 x 10/sup 4/ AU has more than a 50% probability of having entered the planetary system during the lifetime of the Solar System. The lack of apparent damage to the planetary system rules out any companion more massive than about 0.02 M/sub solar/ with a semi-major axis less than about 5 x 10/sup 4/ AU.

  2. A 5 {mu}m IMAGE OF {beta} PICTORIS b AT A SUB-JUPITER PROJECTED SEPARATION: EVIDENCE FOR A MISALIGNMENT BETWEEN THE PLANET AND THE INNER, WARPED DISK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Currie, Thayne; Kuchner, Marc; Thalmann, Christian; Matsumura, Soko; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Burrows, Adam

    2011-08-01

    We present and analyze a new M' detection of the young exoplanet {beta} Pictoris b from 2008 VLT/NaCo data at a separation of {approx}4 AU and a high signal-to-noise rereduction of L' data taken in 2009 December. Based on our orbital analysis, the planet's orbit is viewed almost perfectly edge-on (i {approx} 89 deg) and has a Saturn-like semimajor axis of 9.50 AU{sup +3.93} {sup AU}{sub -1.7AU}. Intriguingly, the planet's orbit is aligned with the major axis of the outer disk ({Omega} {approx} 31 deg.) but is probably misaligned with the warp/inclined disk at 80 AU, often cited as a signpost for the planet's existence. Our results motivate new studies to clarify how {beta} Pic b sculpts debris disk structures and whether a second planet is required to explain the warp/inclined disk.

  3. Tunable trimers: Using temperature and pressure to control luminescent emission in gold(I) pyrazolate-based trimers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodall, Christopher H.; Fuertes, Sara; Beavers, Christine M.; Hatcher, Lauren E.; Parlett, Andrew; Shepherd, Helena J.; Christensen, Jeppe; Teat, Simon J.; Intissar, Mourad; Rodrigue-Witchel, Alexandre; Suffren, Yan; Reber, Christian; Hendon, Christopher H.; Tiana, Davide; Walsh, Aron; Raithby, Paul R.

    2014-10-21

    A systematic investigation into the relationship between the solid-state luminescence and the intermolecular Au???Au interactions in a series of pyrazolate-based gold(I) trimers; tris(?2-pyrazolato-N,N')-tri-gold(I) (1), tris(?2-3,4,5-trimethylpyrazolato-N,N')-tri-gold(I) (2), tris(?2-3-methyl-5-phenylpyrazolato-N,N')-tri-gold(I) (3) and tris(?2-3,5-diphenylpyrazolato-N,N')-tri-gold(I) (4) has been carried out using variable temperature and high pressure X-ray crystallography, solid-state emission spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and computational techniques. Single-crystal X-ray studies show that there is a significant reduction in the intertrimer Au???Au distances both with decreasing temperature and increasing pressure. In the four complexes, the reduction in temperature from 293 to 100 K is accompanied by a reduction in the shortest intermolecular Au???Au contacts of between 0.04 and 0.08 . The solid-state luminescent emission spectra of 1 and 2 display a red shift with decreasing temperature or increasing pressure. Compound 3 does not emit under ambient conditions but displays increasingly red-shifted luminescence upon cooling or compression. Compound 4 remains emissionless, consistent with the absence of intermolecular Au???Au interactions. The largest pressure induced shift in emission is observed in 2 with a red shift of approximately 630 cm-1 per GPa between ambient and 3.80 GPa. The shifts in all the complexes can be correlated with changes in Au???Au distance observed by diffraction.

  4. Investigation of the effects of cell model and subcellular location of gold nanoparticles on nuclear dose enhancement factors using Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, Zhongli; Chattopadhyay, Niladri; Kwon, Yongkyu Luke; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Lechtman, Eli; Reilly, Raymond M.; Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E2; Toronto General Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2C4

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: The authors aims were to model how various factors influence radiation dose enhancement by gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and to propose a new modeling approach to the dose enhancement factor (DEF).Methods: The authors used Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP 5) computer code to simulate photon and electron transport in cells. The authors modeled human breast cancer cells as a single cell, a monolayer, or a cluster of cells. Different numbers of 5, 30, or 50 nm AuNPs were placed in the extracellular space, on the cell surface, in the cytoplasm, or in the nucleus. Photon sources examined in the simulation included nine monoenergetic x-rays (10100 keV), an x-ray beam (100 kVp), and {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd brachytherapy seeds. Both nuclear and cellular dose enhancement factors (NDEFs, CDEFs) were calculated. The ability of these metrics to predict the experimental DEF based on the clonogenic survival of MDA-MB-361 human breast cancer cells exposed to AuNPs and x-rays were compared.Results: NDEFs show a strong dependence on photon energies with peaks at 15, 30/40, and 90 keV. Cell model and subcellular location of AuNPs influence the peak position and value of NDEF. NDEFs decrease in the order of AuNPs in the nucleus, cytoplasm, cell membrane, and extracellular space. NDEFs also decrease in the order of AuNPs in a cell cluster, monolayer, and single cell if the photon energy is larger than 20 keV. NDEFs depend linearly on the number of AuNPs per cell. Similar trends were observed for CDEFs. NDEFs using the monolayer cell model were more predictive than either single cell or cluster cell models of the DEFs experimentally derived from the clonogenic survival of cells cultured as a monolayer. The amount of AuNPs required to double the prescribed dose in terms of mg Au/g tissue decreases as the size of AuNPs increases, especially when AuNPs are in the nucleus and the cytoplasm. For 40 keV x-rays and a cluster of cells, to double the prescribed x-ray dose (NDEF = 2) using 30 nm AuNPs, would require 5.1 0.2, 9 1, 10 1, 10 1 mg Au/g tissue in the nucleus, in the cytoplasm, on the cell surface, or in the extracellular space, respectively. Using 50 nm AuNPs, the required amount decreases to 3.1 0.3, 8 1, 9 1, 9 1 mg Au/g tissue, respectively.Conclusions: NDEF is a new metric that can predict the radiation enhancement of AuNPs for various experimental conditions. Cell model, the subcellular location and size of AuNPs, and the number of AuNPs per cell, as well as the x-ray photon energy all have effects on NDEFs. Larger AuNPs in the nucleus of cluster cells exposed to x-rays of 15 or 40 keV maximize NDEFs.

  5. Measurements of {phi} meson production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at the BNL relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Krueger, K.; Spinka, H.; Underwood, D. G.; High Energy Physics; Univ. of Illinois; Kent State Univ.; Panjab Univ.; Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre; Kent State Univ.; Particle Physics Lab.; STAR Collaboration

    2009-01-01

    We present results for the measurement of {phi} meson production via its charged kaon decay channel {phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} in Au+Au collisions at {radical}S{sub NN} = 62.4, 130, and 200 GeV, and in p+p and d+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV from the STAR experiment at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The midrapidity (|y| < 0.5) {phi} meson transverse momentum (p{sub T}) spectra in central Au+Au collisions are found to be well described by a single exponential distribution. On the other hand, the p{sub T} spectra from p+p, d+Au, and peripheral Au+Au collisions show power-law tails at intermediate and high p{sub T} and are described better by Levy distributions. The constant {phi}/K{sup -} yield ratio vs beam species, collision centrality, and colliding energy is in contradiction with expectations from models having kaon coalescence as the dominant mechanism for {phi} production at RHIC. The {Omega}/{phi} yield ratio as a function of p{sub T} is consistent with a model based on the recombination of thermal s quarks up to p{sub T} {approx} 4 GeV/c, but disagrees at higher transverse momenta. The measured nuclear modification factor, R{sub dAu}, for the {phi} meson increases above unity at intermediate p{sub T}, similar to that for pions and protons, while R{sub AA} is suppressed due to the energy loss effect in central Au+Au collisions. Number of constituent quark scaling of both R{sub cp} and v{sub 2} for the {phi} meson with respect to other hadrons in Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV at intermediate p{sub T} is observed. These observations support quark coalescence as being the dominant mechanism of hadronization in the intermediate p{sub T} region at RHIC.

  6. Measurements of {phi} meson production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abelev, B. I.; Barannikova, O.; Betts, R. R.; Callner, J.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Iordanova, A.; Suarez, M. C.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Bhati, A. K.; Kumar, L.; Pruthi, N. K.; Ahammed, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Ganti, M. S.; Ghosh, P.; Mohanty, B.; Nayak, T. K.

    2009-06-15

    We present results for the measurement of {phi} meson production via its charged kaon decay channel {phi}{yields}K{sup +}K{sup -} in Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=62.4,130, and 200 GeV, and in p+p and d+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV from the STAR experiment at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The midrapidity (|y|<0.5) {phi} meson transverse momentum (p{sub T}) spectra in central Au+Au collisions are found to be well described by a single exponential distribution. On the other hand, the p{sub T} spectra from p+p, d+Au, and peripheral Au+Au collisions show power-law tails at intermediate and high p{sub T} and are described better by Levy distributions. The constant {phi}/K{sup -} yield ratio vs beam species, collision centrality, and colliding energy is in contradiction with expectations from models having kaon coalescence as the dominant mechanism for {phi} production at RHIC. The {omega}/{phi} yield ratio as a function of p{sub T} is consistent with a model based on the recombination of thermal s quarks up to p{sub T}{approx}4 GeV/c, but disagrees at higher transverse momenta. The measured nuclear modification factor, R{sub dAu}, for the {phi} meson increases above unity at intermediate p{sub T}, similar to that for pions and protons, while R{sub AA} is suppressed due to the energy loss effect in central Au+Au collisions. Number of constituent quark scaling of both R{sub cp} and v{sub 2} for the {phi} meson with respect to other hadrons in Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV at intermediate p{sub T} is observed. These observations support quark coalescence as being the dominant mechanism of hadronization in the intermediate p{sub T} region at RHIC.

  7. WE-G-BRE-07: Proton Therapy Enhanced by Tumor-Targeting Gold Nanoparticles: A Pilot in Vivo Experiment at The Proton Therapy Center at MD Anderson Cancer Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolfe, T; Grant, J; Wolfe, A; Gillin, M; Krishnan, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Assess tumor-growth delay and survival in a mouse model of prostate cancer treated with tumor-targeting gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and proton therapy. Methods: We first examined the accumulation of targeting nanoparticles within prostate tumors by imaging AuNPs with ultrasound-guided photoacoustics at 24h after the intravenous administration of goserelin-conjugated AuNPs (gAuNP) in three mice. Nanoparticles were also imaged at the cellular level with TEM in PC3 cells incubated with gAuNP for 24h. Pegylated AuNPs (pAuNP) were also imaged in vivo and in vitro for comparison. PC3 cells were then implanted subcutaneously in nude mice; 51mice with 810mm tumors were included. AuNPs were injected intravenously at 0.2%w/w final gold concentration 24h before irradiation. A special jig was designed to facilitate tumor irradiation perpendicular to the proton beam. Proton energy was set to 180MeV, the radiation field was 1818cm{sup 2}, and 9cm or 13.5cm thick solid-water compensators were used to position the tumors at either the beam entrance (BE) or the SOBP. Physical doses of 5Gy were delivered to all tumors on a patient beam line at MD Anderson's Proton Therapy Center. Results: The photoacoustic experiment reveled that our nanoparticles leak from the tumor-feeding vasculature and accumulate within the tumor volume over time. Additionally, TEM images showed gAuNP are internalized in cancer cells, accumulating within the cytoplasm, whereas pAuNP are not. Tumor-growth was delayed by 11 or 32days in mice receiving gAuNP irradiated at the BE or the SOBP, relative to proton radiation alone. Survival curves (ongoing experiment) reveal that gAuNPs improved survival by 36% or 74% for tumors irradiated at the BE or SOBP. Conclusion: These important, albeit preliminary, in vivo findings reveal nanoparticles to be potent sensitizers to proton therapy. Further, conjugation of AuNPs to tumor-specific antigens that promote enhanced cellular internalization improved both tumor-growth delay and survival of mice after proton therapy.

  8. Precision Photothermal Annealing of Nanoporous Gold Thin Films for the Microfabrication of a Single-chip Material Libraries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, C. D.; Shen, N.; Rubenchik, A.; Demos, S. G.; Matthews, M. J.

    2015-06-30

    Single-chip material libraries of thin films of nanostructured materials are a promising approach for high throughput studies of structure-property relationship in the fields of physics and biology. Nanoporous gold (np-Au), produced by an alloy corrosion process, is a nanostructured material of specific interest in both these fields. One attractive property of np-Au is its self-similar coarsening behavior by thermally induced surface diffusion. However, traditional heat application techniques for the modification of np-Au are bulk processes that cannot be used to generate a library of different pore sizes on a single chip. Laser micromachining offers an attractive solution to this problem by providing a means to apply energy with high spatial and temporal resolution. In the present study we use finite element multiphysics simulations to predict the effects of laser mode (continuous-wave vs. pulsed) and supporting substrate thermal conductivity on the local np-Au film temperatures during photothermal annealing and subsequently investigate the mechanisms by which the np-Au network is coarsening. Our simulations predict that continuous-wave mode laser irradiation on a silicon supporting substrate supports the widest range of morphologies that can be created through the photothermal annealing of thin film np-Au. Using this result we successfully fabricate a single-chip material library consisting of 81 np-Au samples of 9 different morphologies for use in increased throughput material interaction studies.

  9. N

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RHIC/LHC h eavy i on p rogram requirements NERSC N P R equirements W orkshop Apr 2 9---30, 2 014 High T emperature P hases o f Q CD 4/28/14 R J eff P orter L BNL 2 STAR a t R HIC 4/28/14 R J eff P orter L BNL 3 STAR Rich p rogram o ver ~ 14 y ears Top E nergy: A uAu @ √ s = 2 00 G eV/c 2 Polarized: p p @ √ s = 2 00 & 5 00 G eV/c 2 Reference d ata: pp, d Au, C uCu, C uAu Beam E nergy S can: AuAu @ √s = 7 ,11,15,19,27,39 G eV/c 2 Largest d ata s et t o d ate AuAu @ √ s = 2 00 G eV/c 2

  10. Molecular and Electronic Structure of Cyclic Trinuclear Gold(I) Carbeniate Complexes: Insights for Structure/Luminescence/Conductivity Relationships

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDougaldJr, Roy N; Chilukuri, Bhaskar; Jia, Huiping; Perez, Michael R; Rabaa, Hassan; Wang, Xiaoping; Nesterov, Vladimir; Cundari, Thomas R.; Gnade, Bruce E; Omary, Mohammad A

    2014-01-01

    An experimental and computational study of correlations between solid-state structure and optical/electronic properties of cyclotrimeric gold(I) carbeniates, [Au-3(RN=COR')(3)] (R, R' = H, Me, Bu-n, or (c)Pe), is reported. Synthesis and structural and photophysical characterization of novel complexes [Au-3(MeN=(COBu)-Bu-n)(3)], [Au-3((BuN)-Bu-n=COMe)(3)], [Au-3((BuN)-Bu-n=(COBu)-Bu-n)(3)], and [Au-3((c)PeN=COMe)(3)] are presented. Changes in R and R' lead to distinctive variations in solid-state stacking, luminescence spectra, and conductive properties. Solid-state emission and excitation spectra for each complex display a remarkable dependence on the solid-state packing of the cyclotrimers. The electronic structure of [Au-3(RN=COR')(3)] was investigated via molecular and solid-state simulations. Calculations on [Au-3(HN=COH)(3)] models indicate that the infinitely extended chain of eclipsed structures with equidistant Au-Au intertrimer aurophilic bonding can have lower band gaps, smaller Stokes shifts, and reduced reorganization energies (lambda). The action of one cyclotrimer as a molecular nanowire is demonstrated via fabrication of an organic field effect transistor and shown to produce a p-type field effect. Hole transport for the same cyclotrimer-doped within a poly(9-vinylcarbazole) host-produced a colossal increase in current density from similar to 1 to similar to 1000 mA/cm(2). Computations and experiments thus delineate the complex relationships between solid-state morphologies, electronic structures, and optoelectronic properties of gold(I) carbeniates.

  11. Green synthesis of gold nanoparticles using aqueous ethanol extract of Curcuma mangga rhizomes as reducing agent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yee, Foo Yiing; Malek, Sri Nurestri Abd; Periasamy, Vengadesh

    2015-04-24

    Green synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) had been developed as an alternative to chemical and physical methods due to its simplicity, cost effectiveness and eco-friendliness. The high biocompatibility and biostability features of AuNPs have found importance in biomedical applications in recent years. In this study, aqueous ethanol extract of Curcuma mangga rhizomes which acts as reducing and stabilizing agent was used to synthesize stable AuNPs by bioreduction of chloroauric acid. The formation of AuNPs was highlighted by the color change of the suspension from light yellow to reddish purple. Time-evolution was monitored by UV-visible spectroscopy, while surface plasmon (SP) absorption band of the AuNPs suspension was observed at a maximum absorption of 540?nm. Hydrodynamic radii and size distribution of the AuNPs in the suspension were evaluated using dynamic light scattering (DLS) and zeta potential measurement demonstrated negative surface charge. The particle size was calculated in the range of 2-30?nm using High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM). The morphology and elemental composition were further determined by Field Effect Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy meanwhile was used to confirm the presence of AuNPs and functional groups involved in the gold bio-reduction process. Influence of the volume of extract and concentration of gold (III) chloride trihydrate (HAuCl{sub 4}.3H{sub 2}O) on the synthesis of AuNPs were also investigated. The results obtained indicate potential optimization and functionalization of AuNPs for future applications in bionanotechnology especially in the field of medicine.

  12. Uniform 2 nm gold nanoparticles supported on iron oxides as active catalysts for CO oxidation reaction: Structure-activity relationship

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Guo, Yu; Senanayake, Sanjaya; Gu, Dong; Jin, Zhao; Du, Pei -Pei; Si, Rui; Xu, Wen -Qian; Huang, Yu -Ying; Tao, Jing; Song, Qi -Sheng; et al

    2015-01-12

    Uniform Au nanoparticles (~2 nm) with narrow size-distribution (standard deviation: 0.5–0.6 nm) supported on both hydroxylated (Fe_OH) and dehydrated iron oxide (Fe_O) have been prepared by either deposition-precipitation (DP) or colloidal-deposition (CD) methods. Different structural and textural characterizations were applied to the dried, calcined and used gold-iron oxide samples. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-resolution TEM (HRTEM) described the high homogeneity in the supported Au nanoparticles. The ex-situ and in-situ X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) characterization monitored the electronic and short-range local structure of active gold species. The synchrotron-based in-situ X-ray diffraction (XRD), together with the corresponding temperature-programmed reductionmore » by hydrogen (H₂-TPR), indicated a structural evolution of the iron-oxide supports, correlating to their reducibility. An inverse order of catalytic activity between DP (Au/Fe_OH < Au/Fe_O) and CD (Au/Fe_OH > Au/Fe_O) was observed. Effective gold-support interaction results in a high activity for gold nanoparticles, locally generated by the sintering of dispersed Au atoms on the oxide support in the DP synthesis, while a hydroxylated surface favors the reactivity of externally introduced Au nanoparticles on Fe_OH support for the CD approach. This work reveals why differences in the synthetic protocol translate to differences in the catalytic performance of Au/FeOx catalysts with very similar structural characteristics in CO oxidation.« less

  13. Radiation from Ag high energy density Z-pinch plasmas and applications to lasing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weller, M. E. Safronova, A. S.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Esaulov, A. A.; Shrestha, I.; Stafford, A.; Keim, S. F.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.; Osborne, G. C.; Petkov, E. E.; Apruzese, J. P.; Giuliani, J. L.; Chuvatin, A. S.

    2014-03-15

    Silver (Ag) wire arrays were recently introduced as efficient x-ray radiators and have been shown to create L-shell plasmas that have the highest electron temperature (>1.8?keV) observed on the Zebra generator so far and upwards of 30?kJ of energy output. In this paper, results of single planar wire arrays and double planar wire arrays of Ag and mixed Ag and Al that were tested on the UNR Zebra generator are presented and compared. To further understand how L-shell Ag plasma evolves in time, a time-gated x-ray spectrometer was designed and fielded, which has a spectral range of approximately 3.55.0?. With this, L-shell Ag as well as cold L{sub ?} and L{sub ?} Ag lines was captured and analyzed along with photoconducting diode (PCD) signals (>0.8?keV). Along with PCD signals, other signals, such as filtered XRD (>0.2?keV) and Si-diodes (SiD) (>9?keV), are analyzed covering a broad range of energies from a few eV to greater than 53?keV. The observation and analysis of cold L{sub ?} and L{sub ?} lines show possible correlations with electron beams and SiD signals. Recently, an interesting issue regarding these Ag plasmas is whether lasing occurs in the Ne-like soft x-ray range, and if so, at what gains? To help answer this question, a non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) kinetic model was utilized to calculate theoretical lasing gains. It is shown that the Ag L-shell plasma conditions produced on the Zebra generator at 1.7 maximum current may be adequate to produce gains as high as 6?cm{sup ?1} for various 3p???3s transitions. Other potential lasing transitions, including higher Rydberg states, are also included in detail. The overall importance of Ag wire arrays and plasmas is discussed.

  14. Multimetallic nanoparticle catalysts with enhanced electrooxidation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sun, Shouheng; Zhang, Sen; Zhu, Huiyuan; Guo, Shaojun

    2015-07-28

    A new structure-control strategy to optimize nanoparticle catalysis is provided. The presence of Au in FePtAu facilitates FePt structure transformation from chemically disordered face centered cubic (fcc) structure to chemically ordered face centered tetragonal (fct) structure, and further promotes formic acid oxidation reaction (FAOR). The fct-FePtAu nanoparticles show high CO poisoning resistance, achieve mass activity as high as about 2810 mA/mg Pt, and retain greater than 90% activity after a 13 hour stability test.

  15. Active DOE Technical Standards Managers

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    TECHNICAL STANDARDS PROGRAM ASSIGNMENT TELEPHONE/FAX/EMAIL NAME DOE FACILITY/ADDRESS LOC CODE AU-30 Je D. Feit DOE Technical Standards Program, Manager U.S. Department of Energy 19901 Germantown Road Germantown, MD 20876 Phone: (301) 903-0471 Fax: (301) 903-6172 Je rey.Feit@hq.doe.gov AU-30 Kathy A. Knight DOE Technical Standards Program, Program Specialist U.S. Department of Energy 19901 Germantown Road Germantown, MD 20876 Phone: (301) 903-4439 Fax: (301) 903-6172 kathy.knight@hq.doe.gov AU-30

  16. Quality of epitaxial InAs nanowires controlled by catalyst size in molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Zhi; Xu, Hong-Yi; Guo, Ya-Nan; Liao, Zhi-Ming; Lu, Zhen-Yu; Chen, Ping-Ping; Shi, Sui-Xing; Lu, Wei; Zou, Jin; Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Queensland 4072

    2013-08-12

    In this study, the structural quality of Au-catalyzed InAs nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy is investigated. Through detailed electron microscopy characterizations and analysis of binary Au-In phase diagram, it is found that defect-free InAs nanowires can be induced by smaller catalysts with a high In concentration, while comparatively larger catalysts containing less In induce defected InAs nanowires. This study indicates that the structural quality of InAs nanowires can be controlled by the size of Au catalysts when other growth conditions remain as constants.

  17. Technical Standards Managers

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    TECHNICAL STANDARDS PROGRAM ASSIGNMENT TELEPHONE/FAX/EMAIL NAME DOE FACILITY/ADDRESS LOC CODE DOE TECHNICAL STANDARD MANAGERS AU-30 DOE Technical Standards Program, Manager Jeī D. Feit AU-30 DOE Technical Standards Program, Program Specialist Kathy A. Knight AU-30 Support DOE Technical Standards Program, Contractor, supporƟng the DOE Oĸce of Environmental, Health, Safety and Security William A. Studniarz U.S. Department of Energy 19901 Germantown Road Germantown, MD 20876 U.S. Department of

  18. Technical Standards Managers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    TECHNICAL STANDARDS PROGRAM ASSIGNMENT TELEPHONE/FAX/EMAIL NAME DOE FACILITY/ADDRESS LOC CODE AU-30 Je D. Feit DOE Technical Standards Program, Manager U.S. Department of Energy 19901 Germantown Road Germantown, MD 20876 Phone: (301) 903-0471 Fax: (301) 903-6172 Je rey.Feit@hq.doe.gov AU-30 Kathy A. Knight DOE Technical Standards Program, Program Specialist U.S. Department of Energy 19901 Germantown Road Germantown, MD 20876 Phone: (301) 903-4439 Fax: (301) 903-6172 kathy.knight@hq.doe.gov AU-30

  19. EOS standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greeff, Carl W

    2011-01-12

    An approach to creating accurate EOS for pressure standards is described. Applications to Cu, Au, and Ta are shown. Extension of the method to high compressions using DFT is illustrated. Comparisons with modern functionals show promise.

  20. Multinational societies and syndicates

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    Monsieur Charles Levinson, par la longue expérience qu'il a acquise au contact des sociétés multinationales et syndicats, nous en parle ce soir

  1. EIA-814

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...,"Australia",160,"AS",3195 "Distillate Fuel Oil, Other 15 ppm Sulfur and Under",465,,"Austria",165,"AU",3102 "Distillate Fuel Oil, Other Greater than 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur ...

  2. Probing the photoluminescence properties of gold nanoclusters by fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan, C. T. Lin, T. N.; Shen, J. L.; Center for Biomedical Technology, Chung Yuan Christian University, Taiwan ; Lin, C. A.; Chang, W. H.; Department of Biomedical Engineering, Chung Yuan Christian University, Taiwan ; Cheng, H. W.; Tang, J.

    2013-12-21

    Gold nanoclusters (Au NCs) have attracted much attention for promising applications in biological imaging owing to their tiny sizes and biocompatibility. So far, most efforts have been focused on the strategies for fabricating high-quality Au NCs and then characterized by conventional ensemble measurement. Here, a fusion single-molecule technique combining fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and time-correlated single-photon counting can be successfully applied to probe the photoluminescence (PL) properties for sparse Au NCs. In this case, the triplet-state dynamics and diffusion process can be observed simultaneously and the relevant time constants can be derived. This work provides a complementary insight into the PL mechanism at the molecular levels for Au NCs in solution.

  3. Mask-assisted seeded growth of segmented metallic heteronanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crane, Cameron C.; Tao, Jing; Wang, Feng; Zhu, Yimei; Chen, Jingyi

    2014-11-24

    Controlling the deposition of exotic metals in the seeded growth of multi-metal nanostructures is challenging. This work describes a seeded growth method assisted by a mask for synthesis of segmented binary or ternary metal nanostructures. Silica is used as a mask to partially block the surface of a seed and a second metal is subsequently deposited on the exposed area, forming a bimetallic heterodimer. The initial demonstration was carried out on a Au seed, followed by deposition of Pd or Pt on the seed. It was found that Pd tends to spread out laterally on the seed while Pt inclines to grow vertically into branched topology on Au. Without removal of the SiO? mask, Pt could be further deposited on the unblocked Pd of the Pd-Au dimer to form a Pt-Pd-Au trimer. The mask-assisted seeded growth provides a general strategy to construct segmented metallic nanoarchitectures.

  4. WCI_Bugaev.dvi

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... 2.16, is consistent with ISiS Collaboration data 20 and EOS Collaboration data 21. ... In the E900 - + Au multifragmentation experiment 20 the ISiS collaboration measured ...

  5. BPA-2013-01582-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    jq Winn,Kim S (BPA) - NN-1 From: Srini Kailasam au > Sent: Monday, August 26, 2013 9:58 PM To: Winn,Kim S (BPA) NN-1 Subject: Corona and Field...

  6. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... April 2014 The effect of Au and Ni doping on the heavy fermion state of the Kondo lattice ... The magnetic entropy of CePdSn shows that the crystal-field-split ground state of Cesup ...

  7. Office of Information Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Information Management provides a broad range of information technology services in support of the Associate Under Secretary for the Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security (AU).

  8. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    intense convection. Corresponding Author P. T. May, p.may@bom.gov.au References Gossard, E. E., 1988: Measuring drop-size distributions in clouds with a clear-air-sensing radar. J....

  9. EPR Ely Power Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    London, United Kingdom Zip: SW1Y 5AU Sector: Biomass Product: Owns and operates the Ely biomass power plant. Coordinates: 51.506325, -0.127144 Show Map Loading map......

  10. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... (HG) (United States) USDOE Office of Human Resources and Administration (HR) (United ... Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. less July 2014 Gold-rich R3Au7Sn3: ...

  11. The first operation of 56 MHz SRF cavity in RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Q.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Blaskiewicz, M.; DeSanto, L.; Goldberg, D.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; McIntyre, G.; Mernick, K.; Orfin, P.; Seberg, S.; Severino, F.; Smith, K.; Than, R.; Zaltsman, A.

    2015-05-03

    A 56 MHz superconducting RF cavity has been designed, fabricated and installed in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The cavity operates at 4.4 K with a “quiet helium source” to isolate the cavity from environmental acoustic noise. The cavity is a beam driven quarter wave resonator. It is detuned and damped during injection and acceleration cycles and is brought to operation only at store energy. For a first test operation, the cavity voltage was stabilized at 300 kV with full beam current. Within both Au + Au and asymmetrical Au + He3 collisions, luminosity improvement was detected from direct measurement, and the hourglass effect was reduced. One higher order mode (HOM) coupler was installed on the cavity. We report in this paper on our measurement of a broadband HOM spectrum excited by the Au beam.

  12. Mask-Assisted Seeded Growth of Segmented Metallic Heteronanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crane, Cameron C.; Tao, Jing; Wang, Feng; Zhu, Yimei; Chen, Jingyi

    2014-12-04

    Controlling the deposition of exotic metals in the seeded growth of multi-metal nanostructures is challenging. This work describes a seeded growth method assisted by a mask for synthesis of segmented binary or ternary metal nanostructures. Silica is used as a mask to partially block the surface of a seed and a second metal is subsequently deposited on the exposed area, forming a bimetallic heterodimer. The initial demonstration was carried out on a Au seed, followed by deposition of Pd or Pt on the seed. It was found that Pd tends to spread out laterally on the seed while Pt inclines to grow vertically into branched topology on Au. Without removal of the SiO? mask, Pt could be further deposited on the unblocked Pd of the Pd-Au dimer to form a Pt-Pd-Au trimer. The mask-assisted seeded growth provides a general strategy to construct segmented metallic nanoarchitectures.

  13. Haiti - Annual Average Wind Speed at 80 meters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Liberte Hinche 06-JAN-2014 3.5.1 50 0 Port-au-Prince Jacmel Les Cayes Jeremie 50 100 Kilometers DOMINI REPUBL CAN IC The wind resource estimates on this map are from model...

  14. Mask-Assisted Seeded Growth of Segmented Metallic Heteronanostructures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Crane, Cameron C.; Tao, Jing; Wang, Feng; Zhu, Yimei; Chen, Jingyi

    2014-12-04

    Controlling the deposition of exotic metals in the seeded growth of multi-metal nanostructures is challenging. This work describes a seeded growth method assisted by a mask for synthesis of segmented binary or ternary metal nanostructures. Silica is used as a mask to partially block the surface of a seed and a second metal is subsequently deposited on the exposed area, forming a bimetallic heterodimer. The initial demonstration was carried out on a Au seed, followed by deposition of Pd or Pt on the seed. It was found that Pd tends to spread out laterally on the seed while Pt inclinesmore » to grow vertically into branched topology on Au. Without removal of the SiO₂ mask, Pt could be further deposited on the unblocked Pd of the Pd-Au dimer to form a Pt-Pd-Au trimer. The mask-assisted seeded growth provides a general strategy to construct segmented metallic nanoarchitectures.« less

  15. Notice of Intent to Revise Department of Energy Guide 424.1-1B...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (AU) is proposing to perform a full revision of DOE Guide 424.1-1B to incorporate lessons learned identified by DOE Program Offices since the Guide's last full revision in...

  16. Directives Quarterly Update for July-August-September 2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (AU) is proposing to perform a full revision of DOE Guide 424.1-1B to incorporate lessons learned identified by DOE Program Offices since the Guide's last full revision in...

  17. St Paul's cathedral

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    Visite de la cathédrale Saint-Paul au centre de Londres. Le révérend Bill Atkins commente cette magnifique église baroque, dessinée par Sir Christopher Wren en 1673

  18. Electronic confinement in modulation doped quantum dots (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The energy reduction was found to follow a power law relationship with the QD size. Authors: Puthen Veettil, B., E-mail: b.puthen-veettil@unsw.edu.au ; Knig, D. ; Patterson, R. ; ...

  19. Informal Meeting

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    Le D.G.W. Jentschke fait un rapport de ce qui se passe au Lab.I et J.B.Adams du Lab.II avec discussion et questions

  20. Sol Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    15 lighting kits to Port-au-Prince. Each lighting kit contains a pole, an LED lamp, a solar panel and a battery. About half the lights were allocated to a medical clinic and...