National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for unprecedented time scales

  1. Time scales in LISA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Pireaux

    2007-03-23

    The LISA mission is a space interferometer aiming at the detection of gravitational waves in the [$10^{-4}$,$10^{-1}$] Hz frequency band. In order to reach the gravitational wave detection level, a Time Delay Interferometry (TDI) method must be applied to get rid of (most of) the laser frequency noise and optical bench noise. This TDI analysis is carried out in terms of the coordinate time corresponding to the Barycentric Coordinate Reference System (BCRS), TCB, whereas the data at each of the three LISA stations is recorded in terms of each station proper time. We provide here the required proper time versus BCRS time transformation. We show that the difference in rate of station proper time versus TCB is of the order of $5 10^{-8}$. The difference between station proper times and TCB exhibits an oscillatory trend with a maximum amplitude of about $10^{-3}$ s.

  2. Time Scales in Spectator Fragmentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Schwarz; for the ALADIN collaboration

    2000-09-07

    Proton-proton correlations and correlations of p-alpha, d-alpha, and t-alpha from spectator decays following Au + Au collisions at 1000 AMeV have been measured with an highly efficient detector hodoscope. The constructed correlation functions indicate a moderate expansion and low breakup densities similar to assumptions made in statistical multifragmentation models. In agreement with a volume breakup rather short time scales were deduced employing directional cuts in proton-proton correlations. PACS numbers: 25.70.Pq, 21.65.+f, 25.70.Mn

  3. Halanay type inequalities on time scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ad\\ivar, Murat

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to introduce Halanay type inequalities on time scales. By means of these inequalities we derive new global stability conditions for nonlinear dynamic equations on time scales. Giving several examples we show that beside generalization and extension to q-difference case, our results also provide improvements for the existing theory regarding differential and difference inequalites, which are the most important particular cases of dynamic inequalities on time scales.

  4. Time scales in nuclear giant resonances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WD Heiss; RG Nazmitdinov; FD Smit

    2009-12-18

    We propose a general approach to characterise fluctuations of measured cross sections of nuclear giant resonances. Simulated cross sections are obtained from a particular, yet representative self-energy which contains all information about fragmentations. Using a wavelet analysis, we demonstrate the extraction of time scales of cascading decays into configurations of different complexity of the resonance. We argue that the spreading widths of collective excitations in nuclei are determined by the number of fragmentations as seen in the power spectrum. An analytic treatment of the wavelet analysis using a Fourier expansion of the cross section confirms this principle. A simple rule for the relative life times of states associated with hierarchies of different complexity is given.

  5. Simple time-variant filtering by operator scaling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Choon Byong; Black, Ross A.

    1995-09-01

    A convolutional method of time?variant, band?pass filtering presented shows that a change of filter cutoff frequencies with time is achieved by frequency scaling the amplitude spectrum of a reference operator. According to the scaling property...

  6. Observation time scale, free-energy landscapes, and molecular symmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salamon, Peter

    Observation time scale, free-energy landscapes, and molecular symmetry David J. Walesa,1 and Peter structures that interconvert on a given time scale are lumped together, the corresponding free-energy surface that are connected by free-energy barriers below a certain threshold. We illustrate this time dependence for some

  7. Local-time effect on small space-time scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. A. Panchelyuga; V. A. Kolombet; M. S. Panchelyuga; S. E. Shnoll

    2006-10-18

    The paper presents an investigation of local-time effect - one of the manifestations of macroscopic fluctuations phenomena. Was shown the existence of the named effect for longitudinal distance between locations of measurements up to 500 meters. Also a structure of intervals distribution in neighborhood of local-time peak was studied and splitting of the peak was found out. Obtained results lead to conclusion about sharp anisotropy of space-time.

  8. Time Scaling of Chaotic Systems: Application to Secure Communications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donatello Materassi; Michele Basso

    2007-10-25

    The paper deals with time-scaling transformations of dynamical systems. Such scaling functions operate a change of coordinates on the time axis of the system trajectories preserving its phase portrait. Exploiting this property, a chaos encryption technique to transmit a binary signal through an analog channel is proposed. The scheme is based on a suitable time-scaling function which plays the role of a private key. The encoded transmitted signal is proved to resist known decryption attacks offering a secure and reliable communication.

  9. Horizontal structure of winter time 250 mb jet stream variations on the fifteen day time scale 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Sangwook

    1993-01-01

    The horizontal structure of the 250 mb jet stream on the fifteen-day time scale during Northern Hemisphere winter is presented. The winter season is divided into six fifteen-day periods for the 24-year NMC data set. The fifteen-day time...

  10. Transport relaxation time and length scales in turbulent suspensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Claudin; F. Charru; B. Andreotti

    2010-11-03

    We show that in a turbulent flow transporting suspended sediment, the unsaturated sediment flux $q(x,t)$ can be described by a first-order relaxation equation. From a mode analysis of the advection-diffusion equation for the particle concentration, the relaxation length and time scales of the dominant mode are shown to be the deposition length $H U/V_{\\rm fall}$ and deposition time $H/V_{\\rm fall}$, where $H$ is the flow depth, $U$ the mean flow velocity and $V_{\\rm fall}$ the sediment settling velocity. This result is expected to be particularly relevant for the case of sediment transport in slowly varying flows, where the flux is never far from saturation. Predictions are shown to be in quantitative agreement with flume experiments, for both net erosion and net deposition situations.

  11. Rotational relaxation time as unifying time scale for polymer and fiber drag reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boelens, A M P

    2015-01-01

    Using hybrid Direct Numerical Simulation with Langevin dynamics, a comparison is performed between polymer and fiber stress tensors in turbulent flow. The stress tensors are found to be similar, suggesting a common drag reducing mechanism in the onset regime for both flexible polymers and rigid fibers. Since fibers do not have an elastic backbone this must be a viscous effect. Analysis of the viscosity tensor reveals that all terms are negligible, except the off-diagonal shear viscosity associated with rotation. Based on this analysis, we identify the rotational orientation time as the unifying time scale setting a new time criterion for drag reduction by both flexible polymers and rigid fibers.

  12. Finite-difference time-domain simulation of fusion plasmas at radiofrequency time scales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smithe, David N. [Tech-X Corporation, 5621 Arapahoe Avenue, Suite A, Boulder, Colorado 80303 (United States)

    2007-05-15

    Simulation of dense plasmas in the radiofrequency range are typically performed in the frequency domain, i.e., by solving Laplace-transformed Maxwell's equations. This technique is well-suited for the study of linear heating and quasilinear evolution, but does not generalize well to the study of nonlinear phenomena. Conversely, time-domain simulation in this range is difficult because the time scale is long compared to the electron plasma wave period, and in addition, the various cutoff and resonance behaviors within the plasma insure that any explicit finite-difference scheme would be numerically unstable. To resolve this dilemma, explicit finite-difference Maxwell terms are maintained, but a carefully time-centered locally implicit method is introduced to treat the plasma current, such that all linear plasma dispersion behavior is faithfully reproduced at the available temporal and spatial resolution, despite the fact that the simulation time step may exceed the electron gyro and electron plasma time scales by orders of magnitude. Demonstrations are presented of the method for several classical benchmarks, including mode conversion to ion cyclotron wave, cyclotron resonance, propagation into a plasma-wave cutoff, and tunneling through low-density edge plasma.

  13. U.S. Virgin Islands Clears the Way for Unprecedented Levels of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Clears the Way for Unprecedented Levels of Solar Energy U.S. Virgin Islands Clears the Way for Unprecedented Levels of Solar Energy Almost 1,500 solar water heating and PV systems...

  14. The arrow of time, complexity and the scale free analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhurjati Prasad Datta; Santanu Raut

    2010-01-10

    The origin of complex structures, randomness, and irreversibility are analyzed in the scale free SL(2,R) analysis, which is an extension of the ordinary analysis based on the recently uncovered scale free $C^{2^n-1}$ solutions to linear ordinary differential equations. The role of an intelligent decision making is discussed. We offer an explanation of the recently observed universal renormalization group dynamics at the edge of chaos in logistic maps. The present formalism is also applied to give a first principle explanation of 1/$f$ noise in electrical circuits and solid state devices. Its relevance to heavy tailed (hyperbolic) distributions is pointed out.

  15. Time resolved single photon imaging in Nanometer Scale CMOS technology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, Justin Andrew

    2010-06-28

    Time resolved imaging is concerned with the measurement of photon arrival time. It has a wealth of emerging applications including biomedical uses such as fluorescence lifetime microscopy and positron emission tomography, ...

  16. Energy-Aware Modeling and Scheduling of Real-Time Tasks for Dynamic Voltage Scaling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Cheng-Zhong

    scaling (DVS) is an effective approach to power reduction by scaling the processor voltage and frequency the voltage accordingly. On the other hand, a reduction of the operating frequency leads to an increaseEnergy-Aware Modeling and Scheduling of Real-Time Tasks for Dynamic Voltage Scaling Xiliang Zhong

  17. Bi-Plasma Interactions on Femtosecond Time-Scales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-06-22

    Ultrafast THz radiation has important applications in materials science studies, such as characterizing transport properties, studying the vibrational response of materials, and in recent years, controlling materials and elucidating their response in intense electromagnetic fields. THz fields can be generated in a lab setting using various plasma-based techniques. This study seeks to examine the interaction of two plasmas in order to better understand the fundamental physics associated with femtosecond filamentation processes and to achieve more efficient THz generation in a lab setting. The intensity of fluorescence in the region of overlap was measured as a function of polarization, power, and relative time delay of the two plasma-generating laser beams. Results of time dependent intensity studies indicate strikingly similar behaviors across polarizations and power levels; a sudden intensity spike was observed at time-zero, followed by a secondary maxima and subsequent decay to the initial plasma intensity. Dependence of the intensity on the power through either beam arm was also observed. Spectral studies of the enhanced emission were also carried out. Although this physical phenomenon is still not fully understood, future studies, including further spectral analysis of the fluorescence overlap, could yield new insight into the ultrafast processes occurring at the intersection of femtosecond filaments, and would provide a better understanding of the mechanisms for enhanced THz production.

  18. Li-Yorke chaos in hybrid systems on a time scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marat Akhmet; Mehmet Onur Fen

    2015-09-04

    By using the reduction technique to impulsive differential equations [1], we rigorously prove the presence of chaos in dynamic equations on time scales (DETS). The results of the present study are based on the Li-Yorke definition of chaos. This is the first time in the literature that chaos is obtained for DETS. An illustrative example is presented by means of a Duffing equation on a time scale.

  19. Long Time Stability of the Energy Scale Calibration of a Quantum 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scheithauer, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    According to the international standard ISO 15472 the energy scale of an XPS instrument, type Physical Electronics Quantum 2000, was calibrated. It is shown, how the procedures of the ISO 15472 were adapted to the hardware and software design of the Quantum 2000. The long time stability of the energy scale calibration of the XPS instrument was investigated. The instrumented was operated with a satisfying energy scale calibration over a period of 8 years. All the time energy differences between certain peaks could be measured with the chosen precision of the energy scale calibration.

  20. Space and time dependent scaling of numbers in mathematical structures: Effects on physical and geometric quantities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul Benioff

    2015-08-07

    The relationship between the foundations of mathematics and physics is a topic of of much interest. This paper continues this exploration by examination of the effect of space and time dependent number scaling on theoretical descriptions of some physical and geometric quantities. Fiber bundles provide a good framework to introduce a space and time or space time dependent number scaling field. The effect of the scaling field on a few nonlocal physical and geometric quantities is described. The effect on gauge theories is to introduce a new complex scalar field into the derivatives appearing in Lagrangians. U(1) invariance of Lagrangian terms does not affect the real part of the scaling field. For this field, any mass is possible. The scaling field is also shown to affect quantum wave packets and path lengths, and geodesic equations even on flat space. Scalar fields described so far in physics, are possible candidates for the scaling field. The lack of direct evidence for the field in physics restricts the scaling field in that the gradient of the field must be close to zero in a local region of cosmological space and time. There are no restrictions outside the region. It is also seen that the scaling field does not affect comparisons of computation or measurements outputs with one another. However it does affect the assignment of numerical values to the outputs of computations or measurements. These are needed because theory predictions are in terms of numerical values.

  1. Mastering Uncertainty and Risk at Multiple Time Scales in the Future Electrical Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chertkov, Michael; Bent, Russell W.; Backhaus, Scott N.

    2012-07-10

    Today's electrical grids enjoy a relatively clean separation of spatio-temporal scales yielding a compartmentalization of grid design, optimization, control and risk assessment allowing for the use of conventional mathematical tools within each area. In contrast, the future grid will incorporate time-intermittent renewable generation, operate via faster electrical markets, and tap the latent control capability at finer grid modeling scales; creating a fundamentally new set of couplings across spatiotemporal scales and requiring revolutionary advances in mathematics techniques to bridge these scales. One example is found in decade-scale grid expansion planning in which today's algorithms assume accurate load forecasts and well-controlled generation. Incorporating intermittent renewable generation creates fluctuating network flows at the hourly time scale, inherently linking the ability of a transmission line to deliver electrical power to hourly operational decisions. New operations-based planning algorithms are required, creating new mathematical challenges. Spatio-temporal scales are also crossed when the future grid's minute-scale fluctuations in network flows (due to intermittent generation) create a disordered state upon which second-scale transient grid dynamics propagate effectively invalidating today's on-line dynamic stability analyses. Addressing this challenge requires new on-line algorithms that use large data streams from new grid sensing technologies to physically aggregate across many spatial scales to create responsive, data-driven dynamic models. Here, we sketch the mathematical foundations of these problems and potential solutions.

  2. Global warming from chlorofluorocarbons and their alternatives: Time scales of chemistry and climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ko, Malcolm K.W.; Sze, Nien Dak; Molnar, Gyula; Prather, Michael J

    1993-01-01

    and their replacements on global warming. Nature Hansen J. ,gas emissions to global warming. Nature London Amendment toNature 315, 649-652, Global warming time scales WMO (World

  3. Interplay between multiple length and time scales in complex chemical systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giri, Ranjit K.

    , India. 2 Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi, India. e-mail: charusita scales smaller by several orders of magni- tude in time and space. While statistical mechanics does

  4. Long time simulation of a beam in a periodic focusing channel via a two-scale PIC-method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frénod, Emmanuel

    Long time simulation of a beam in a periodic focusing channel via a two-scale PIC-method E. Fr. Keywords: Vlasov-Poisson system, kinetic equations, homogenization, two-scale convergence, two- scale PIC

  5. Non-intersecting squared Bessel paths: critical time and double scaling limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. B. J. Kuijlaars; A. Martinez-Finkelshtein; F. Wielonsky

    2010-11-04

    We consider the double scaling limit for a model of $n$ non-intersecting squared Bessel processes in the confluent case: all paths start at time $t=0$ at the same positive value $x=a$, remain positive, and are conditioned to end at time $t=1$ at $x=0$. After appropriate rescaling, the paths fill a region in the $tx$--plane as $n\\to \\infty$ that intersects the hard edge at $x=0$ at a critical time $t=t^{*}$. In a previous paper (arXiv:0712.1333), the scaling limits for the positions of the paths at time $t\

  6. A hybrid procedure for MSW generation forecasting at multiple time scales in Xiamen City, China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Lilai; Gao, Peiqing; Cui, Shenghui; Liu, Chun

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: ? We propose a hybrid model that combines seasonal SARIMA model and grey system theory. ? The model is robust at multiple time scales with the anticipated accuracy. ? At month-scale, the SARIMA model shows good representation for monthly MSW generation. ? At medium-term time scale, grey relational analysis could yield the MSW generation. ? At long-term time scale, GM (1, 1) provides a basic scenario of MSW generation. - Abstract: Accurate forecasting of municipal solid waste (MSW) generation is crucial and fundamental for the planning, operation and optimization of any MSW management system. Comprehensive information on waste generation for month-scale, medium-term and long-term time scales is especially needed, considering the necessity of MSW management upgrade facing many developing countries. Several existing models are available but of little use in forecasting MSW generation at multiple time scales. The goal of this study is to propose a hybrid model that combines the seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average (SARIMA) model and grey system theory to forecast MSW generation at multiple time scales without needing to consider other variables such as demographics and socioeconomic factors. To demonstrate its applicability, a case study of Xiamen City, China was performed. Results show that the model is robust enough to fit and forecast seasonal and annual dynamics of MSW generation at month-scale, medium- and long-term time scales with the desired accuracy. In the month-scale, MSW generation in Xiamen City will peak at 132.2 thousand tonnes in July 2015 – 1.5 times the volume in July 2010. In the medium term, annual MSW generation will increase to 1518.1 thousand tonnes by 2015 at an average growth rate of 10%. In the long term, a large volume of MSW will be output annually and will increase to 2486.3 thousand tonnes by 2020 – 2.5 times the value for 2010. The hybrid model proposed in this paper can enable decision makers to develop integrated policies and measures for waste management over the long term.

  7. Caustic Crossing Microlensing Event by Binary MACHOs and Time Scale Bias

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mareki Honma

    1998-11-25

    Caustic crossing microlensing events provide us a unique opportunity to measure the relative proper motion of the lens to the source, and so those caused by binary MACHOs are of great importance for understanding the structure of the Galactic halo and the nature of MACHOs. The microlensing event 98-SMC-01, occurred in June 1998, is the first event for which the proper motion is ever measured through the caustic crossing, and this event may be caused by binary MACHOs as we argue in this Letter. Motivated by the possible existence of binary MACHOs, we have performed the Monte Carlo simulations of caustic crossing events by binary MACHOs and investigated the properties and detectability of the events. Our calculation shows that typical caustic crossing events have the interval between two caustic crossings ($t_{\\rm cc}$) of about 5 days. We argue that with the current strategy of binary event search the proper motions of these typical events are not measurable because of the short time scale. Therefore the proper motion distribution measured from caustic crossing events suffers significantly from {`}time scale bias{'}, which is a bias toward finding long time scale events and hence slowly moving lenses. We predict there are two times more short time scale events ($t_{\\rm cc}\\le 10$ days) than long time scale events ($t_{\\rm cc}\\ge 10$ days), and propose an hourly monitoring observation instead of the nightly monitoring currently undertaken to detect caustic crossing events by binary MACHOs more efficiently.

  8. Studies on Oximidine II - Total Synthesis by an Unprecedented Reductive Coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, Christopher Mark

    2009-10-20

    the ring-closure using a Castro-Stephens reaction. While optimizing this copper-mediated macrocyclization, we discovered an unprecedented copper-mediated reductive coupling reaction. The enamide side chain of these natural products is postulated...

  9. U.S. Virgin Islands Clears the Way for Unprecedented Levels of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    the Way for Unprecedented Levels of Solar Energy Almost 1,500 solar water heating and PV systems have popped up throughout the territory since the EDIN-USVI project launched in...

  10. The IAU Resolutions on Astronomical Reference Systems, Time Scales, and Earth Rotation Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George H. Kaplan

    2006-02-03

    Recent resolutions passed by the International Astronomical Union (IAU) on astronomical reference systems, time scales, and Earth rotation models are the most significant set of international agreements in positional astronomy in several decades. These resolutions, the result of over ten years of international research and study, provide a coherent set of foundational standards for the treatment of astrometric data and the modeling of dynamics in the solar system. This circular explains these resolutions and provides a complete set of practical formulas for their implementation. The six main chapters cover relativity, time scales, the fundamental celestial reference system, ephemerides of solar system bodies, precession and nutation, and modeling the Earth's rotation.

  11. Day-Ahead and Real-Time Models for Large-Scale Energy Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engineering Research Center Empowering Minds to Engineer the Future Electric Energy System #12;DayDay-Ahead and Real-Time Models for Large-Scale Energy Storage Final Project Report Power Systems of Electrical, Computer, and Energy Engineering P.O. BOX 875706 Tempe, AZ 85287-5706 Phone: 480 965-1276 Fax

  12. time scale observed in some close binary systems (19), and tidal dissipation (20)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, H. Eugene

    time scale observed in some close binary systems (19), and tidal dissipation (20) may also cause). At this stage, the core of star A undergoes collapse, and the residual nuclear fuel is ignited to power aware that both tidal and general relativistic ef- fects will be important in this system

  13. A Linear Framework for Time-Scale Separation in Nonlinear Biochemical Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunawardena, Jeremy

    permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author combinatorial construction of vast numbers of molecular states, [2]. How such complexity evolves and how system and its environment adjust on slower time-scales to the steady-state of the sub

  14. How Much Energy Is Transferred from the Winds to the Thermocline on ENSO Time Scales?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    How Much Energy Is Transferred from the Winds to the Thermocline on ENSO Time Scales? JACLYN N the winds (via wind power) and changes in the storage of available potential energy in the tropical ocean~o is characterized by a decrease in wind power that leads to a decrease in available potential energy, and hence

  15. Improving Building Performance at Urban Scale with a Framework for Real-time Data Sharing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pang, Xiufeng; Hong, Tianzhen; Piette, Mary Ann

    2013-06-03

    This paper describes work in progress toward an urban-scale system aiming to reduce energy use in neighboring buildings by providing three components: a database for accessing past and present weather data from high quality weather stations; a network for communicating energy-saving strategies between building owners; and a set of modeling tools for real-time building energy simulation.

  16. PreDVS: Preemptive Dynamic Voltage Scaling for Real-time Systems using Approximation Scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mishra, Prabhat

    , dynamic voltage scal- ing, approximation algorithm 1. INTRODUCTION Energy conservation has been the main to save energy is that linear reduction in the supply voltage leads to approximately linear slow downPreDVS: Preemptive Dynamic Voltage Scaling for Real-time Systems using Approximation Scheme Weixun

  17. Modeling of Large Scale RF-MEMS Circuits Using Efficient Time-Domain Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tentzeris, Manos

    Modeling of Large Scale RF-MEMS Circuits Using Efficient Time-Domain Techniques N. Bushyager, E Engineering Georgia Institute of Technology Atlanta, GA 30332-0250, USA Abstract RF-MEMS design is made difficult due to the lack of tools capable of simulating both MEMS devices and their surrounding circuits

  18. Time Scale and Feedback of Zonal-Mean-Flow Variability SEOK-WOO SON* AND SUKYOUNG LEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Son, Seok-Woo

    Time Scale and Feedback of Zonal-Mean-Flow Variability SEOK-WOO SON* AND SUKYOUNG LEE Department that determine the time scale of zonal-mean-flow variability are examined with an idealized numerical model that has a zonally symmetric lower boundary. In the part of the parameter space where the time-mean zonal

  19. Scaling Laws and Transient Times in 3He Induced Nuclear Fission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Th. Rubehn; K. X. Jing; L. G. Moretto; L. Phair; K. Tso; G. J. Wozniak

    1996-07-09

    Fission excitation functions of compound nuclei in a mass region where shell effects are expected to be very strong are shown to scale exactly according to the transition state prediction once these shell effects are accounted for. The fact that no deviations from the transition state method have been observed within the experimentally investigated excitation energy regime allows one to assign an upper limit for the transient time of 10 zs.

  20. Loschmidt echo in many-spin systems: contrasting time-scales of local and global measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pablo R. Zangara; Denise Bendersky; Patricia R. Levstein; Horacio M. Pastawski

    2015-08-28

    A local excitation in a quantum many-spin system evolves deterministically. A time-reversal procedure, involving the inversion of the signs of every energy and interaction, should produce the excitation revival. This idea, experimentally coined in NMR, embodies the concept of the Loschmidt echo (LE). While such an implementation involves a single spin autocorrelation $M_{1,1}$, i.e. a local LE, theoretical efforts have focused on the study of the recovery probability of a complete many-body state, referred here as global or many-body LE $M_{MB}$. Here, we analyze the relation between these magnitudes, in what concerns to their characteristic time scales and their dependence on the number of spins $N$. We show that the global LE can be understood, to some extent, as the simultaneous occurrence of $N$ independent local LEs, i.e. $M_{MB}\\sim \\left( M_{1,1}\\right) ^{N/4}$. This extensive hypothesis is exact for very short times and confirmed numerically beyond such a regime. Furthermore, we discuss a general picture of the decay of $M_{1,1}$ as a consequence of the interplay between the time scale that characterizes the reversible interactions ($T_{2}$) and that of the perturbation ($\\tau _{\\Sigma }$). Our analysis suggests that the short time decay, characterized by the time scale $\\tau _{\\Sigma }$, is greatly enhanced by the complex processes that occur beyond $T_{2}$ . This would ultimately lead to the experimentally observed $T_{3},$ which was found to be roughly independent of $\\tau _{\\Sigma }$ but closely tied to $T_{2}$.

  1. A Black Hole Mass-Variability Time Scale Correlation at Submillimeter Wavelengths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bower, Geoffrey C; Markoff, Sera; Gurwell, Mark A; Rao, Ramprasad; McHardy, Ian

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the light curves of 413 radio sources at submillimeter wavelengths using data from the Submillimeter Array calibrator database. The database includes more than 20,000 observations at 1.3 and 0.8 mm that span 13 years. We model the light curves as a damped random walk and determine a characteristic time scale $\\tau$ at which the variability amplitude saturates. For the vast majority of sources, primarily blazars and BL Lac objects, we find only lower limits on $\\tau$. For two nearby low luminosity active galactic nuclei, M81 and M87, however, we measure $\\tau=1.6^{+3.0}_{-0.9}$ days and $\\tau=45^{+61}_{-24}$ days, respectively ($2\\sigma$ errors). Including the previously measured $\\tau=0.33\\pm 0.16$ days for Sgr A*, we show an approximately linear correlation between $\\tau$ and black hole mass for these nearby LLAGN. Other LLAGN with spectra that peak in the submm are expected to follow this correlation. These characteristic time scales are comparable to the minimum time scale for emission processes...

  2. Multiple Time-Scale Behaviour and Network Dynamics in Liquid Methanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruchi Sharma; Charusita Chakravarty

    2008-11-11

    Canonical ensemble molecular dynamics simulations of liquid methanol, modeled using a rigid-body, pair-additive potential, are used to compute static distributions and temporal correlations of tagged molecule potential energies as a means of characterising the liquid state dynamics. The static distribution of tagged molecule potential energies shows a clear multimodal structure with three distinct peaks, similar to those observed previously in water and liquid silica. The multimodality is shown to originate from electrostatic effects, but not from local, hydrogen-bond interactions. An interesting outcome of this study is the remarkable similarity in the tagged potential energy power spectra of methanol, water and silica, despite the differences in the underlying interactions and the dimensionality of the network. All three liquids show a distinct multiple time scale (MTS) regime with a 1/f dependence with a clear positive correlation between the scaling exponent alpha and the diffusivity. The low-frequency limit of the MTS regime is determined by the frequency of crossover to white noise behaviour which occurs at approximately 0.1 cm{-1} in the case of methanol under standard temperature and pressure conditions. The power spectral regime above 200 cm{-1} in all three systems is dominated by resonances due to localised vibrations, such as librations. The correlation between $\\alpha$ and the diffusivity in all three liquids appears to be related to the strength of the coupling between the localised motions and the larger length/time-scale network reorganizations. Thus the time scales associated with network reorganization dynamics appear to be qualitatively similar in these systems, despite the fact that water and silica both display diffusional anomalies but methanol does not.

  3. Climate response to changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide and solar irradiance on the time scale of days to weeks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasan, N.

    Climate response to changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide and solar irradiance on the time scale response to changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide and solar irradiance on the time scale of days to weeks this with the response to a 4% increase in solar irradiance. Our simulations show that significant climate effects occur

  4. Role of entropy in the thermodynamic evolution of the time scale of molecular dynamics near the glass transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Grzybowska; A. Grzybowski; S. Pawlus; J. Pionteck; M. Paluch

    2014-10-23

    In this Letter, we investigate how changes in the system entropy influence the characteristic time scale of the system molecular dynamics near the glass transition. Independently of any model of thermodynamic evolution of the time scale, against some previous suppositions, we show that the system entropy $S$ is not sufficient to govern the time scale defined by structural relaxation time $\\tau $. In the density scaling regime, we argue that the decoupling between $\\tau $ and $S$ is a consequence of different values of the scaling exponents $\\gamma $ and $\\gamma_S $ in the density scaling laws, $\\tau = f(\\rho ^\\gamma /T)$ and $S = h(\\rho ^{\\gamma_S}/T)$, where $\\rho $ and $T$ denote density and temperature, respectively. It implies that the proper relation between $\\tau $ and $S$ requires supplementing with a density factor, $u(\\rho)$, i.e.,$\\tau = g(u(\\rho)w(S))$. This meaningful finding additionally demonstrates that the density scaling idea can be successfully used to separate physically relevant contributions to the time scale of molecular dynamics near the glass transition. As an example, we revise the Avramov entropic model of the dependence $\\tau (T,\\rho)$, giving evidence that its entropic basis has to be extended by the density dependence of the maximal energy barrier for structural relaxation. We also discuss the excess entropy $S_{ex}$, the density scaling of which is found to mimic the density scaling of the total system entropy $S$.

  5. Investigating dark matter substructure with pulsar timing: II. Improved limits on small-scale cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamish A. Clark; Geraint F. Lewis; Pat Scott

    2015-11-19

    Ultracompact Minihalos (UCMHs) have been proposed as a type of dark matter sub-structure seeded by large-amplitude primordial perturbations and topological defects. UCMHs are expected to survive to the present era, allowing constraints to be placed on their cosmic abundance using observations within our own Galaxy. Constraints on their number density can be linked to conditions in the early universe that impact structure formation, such as increased primordial power on small scales, generic weak non-Gaussianity, and the presence of cosmic strings. We use new constraints on the abundance of UCMHs from pulsar timing to place generalised limits on the parameters of each of these cosmological scenarios. At some scales, the limits are the strongest to date, exceeding those from dark matter annihilation. Our new limits have the added advantage of being independent of the particle nature of dark matter, as they are based only on gravitational effects.

  6. Scaling laws, transient times and shell effects in helium induced nuclear fission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Th. Rubehn; K. X. Jing; L. G. Moretto; L. Phair; K. Tso; G. J. Wozniak

    1996-07-22

    Fission excitation functions of He-3 and He-4 induced compound nuclei are shown to scale exactly according to the Bohr-Wheeler transition state prediction once the shell effects are accounted for. The presented method furthermore allows one to model-independently extract values for the shell effects which are in good agreement to those obtained from liquid-drop model calculations. The fact that no deviations from the transition state method have been observed within the experimentally investigated excitation energy regime allows one to assign an upper limit for the transient time of 10 zs.

  7. Wind speed forecasting at different time scales: a non parametric approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D'Amico, Guglielmo; Prattico, Flavio

    2013-01-01

    The prediction of wind speed is one of the most important aspects when dealing with renewable energy. In this paper we show a new nonparametric model, based on semi-Markov chains, to predict wind speed. Particularly we use an indexed semi-Markov model, that reproduces accurately the statistical behavior of wind speed, to forecast wind speed one step ahead for different time scales and for very long time horizon maintaining the goodness of prediction. In order to check the main features of the model we show, as indicator of goodness, the root mean square error between real data and predicted ones and we compare our forecasting results with those of a persistence model.

  8. Model-independent plotting of the cosmological scale factor as a function of lookback time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ringermacher, H. I.; Mead, L. R., E-mail: ringerha@gmail.com, E-mail: Lawrence.mead@usm.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS 39406 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    In this work we describe a model-independent method of developing a plot of scale factor a(t) versus lookback time t{sub L} from the usual Hubble diagram of modulus data against redshift. This is the first plot of this type. We follow the model-independent methodology of Daly and Djorgovski used for their radio-galaxy data. Once the a(t)data plot is completed, any model can be applied and will display as described in the standard literature. We then compile an extensive data set to z = 1.8 by combining Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) data from SNLS3 of Conley et al., high-z SNe data of Riess et al., and radio-galaxy data of Daly and Djorgovski to validate the new plot. We first display these data on a standard Hubble diagram to confirm the best fit for ?CDM cosmology, and thus validate the joined data set. The scale factor plot is then developed from the data and the ?CDM model is again displayed from a least-squares fit. The fit parameters are in agreement with the Hubble diagram fit confirming the validity of the new plot. Of special interest is the transition time of the universe, which in the scale factor plot will appear as an inflection point in the data set. Noise is more visible in this presentation, which is particularly sensitive to inflection points of any model displayed in the plot, unlike on a modulus-z diagram, where there are no inflection points and the transition-z is not at all obvious by inspection. We obtain a lower limit of z ? 0.6. It is evident from this presentation that there is a dearth of SNe data in the range z = 1-2, exactly the range necessary to confirm a ?CDM transition-z around z = 0.76. We then compare a 'toy model' wherein dark matter is represented as a perfect fluid with an equation of state p = –(1/3) ? to demonstrate the plot sensitivity to model choice. Its density varies as 1/t {sup 2} and it enters the Friedmann equations as ?{sub dark}/t {sup 2}, replacing only the ?{sub dark}/a {sup 3} term. The toy model is a close match to ?CDM, but separates from it on the scale factor plot for similar ?CDM density parameters. It is described in the Appendix. A more complete transition time analysis will be presented in a future paper.

  9. Induced core formation time in subcritical magnetic clouds by large-scale trans-Alfvénic flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kudoh, Takahiro; Basu, Shantanu E-mail: basu@uwo.ca

    2014-10-20

    We clarify the mechanism of accelerated core formation by large-scale nonlinear flows in subcritical magnetic clouds by finding a semi-analytical formula for the core formation time and describing the physical processes that lead to them. Recent numerical simulations show that nonlinear flows induce rapid ambipolar diffusion that leads to localized supercritical regions that can collapse. Here, we employ non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations including ambipolar diffusion for gravitationally stratified sheets threaded by vertical magnetic fields. One of the horizontal dimensions is eliminated, resulting in a simpler two-dimensional simulation that can clarify the basic process of accelerated core formation. A parameter study of simulations shows that the core formation time is inversely proportional to the square of the flow speed when the flow speed is greater than the Alfvén speed. We find a semi-analytical formula that explains this numerical result. The formula also predicts that the core formation time is about three times shorter than that with no turbulence, when the turbulent speed is comparable to the Alfvén speed.

  10. Analysis of Wind Power and Load Data at Multiple Time Scales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coughlin, Katie; Eto, J.H.

    2010-12-20

    In this study we develop and apply new methods of data analysis for high resolution wind power and system load time series, to improve our understanding of how to characterize highly variable wind power output and the correlations between wind power and load. These methods are applied to wind and load data from the ERCOT region, and wind power output from the PJM and NYISO areas. We use a wavelet transform to apply mathematically well-defined operations of smoothing and differencing to the time series data. This approach produces a set of time series of the changes in wind power and load (or ?deltas?), over a range of times scales from a few seconds to approximately one hour. A number of statistical measures of these time series are calculated. We present sample distributions, and devise a method for fitting the empirical distribution shape in the tails. We also evaluate the degree of serial correlation, and linear correlation between wind and load. Our examination of the data shows clearly that the deltas do not follow a Gaussian shape; the distribution is exponential near the center and appears to follow a power law for larger fluctuations. Gaussian distributions are frequently used in modeling studies. These are likely to over-estimate the probability of small to moderate deviations. This in turn may lead to an over-estimation of the additional reserve requirement (hence the cost) for high penetration of wind. The Gaussian assumption provides no meaningful information about the real likelihood of large fluctuations. The possibility of a power law distribution is interesting because it suggests that the distribution shape for of wind power fluctuations may become independent of system size for large enough systems.

  11. Scales

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Murray Gibson

    2010-01-08

    Musical scales involve notes that, sounded simultaneously (chords), sound good together. The result is the left brain meeting the right brain ? a Pythagorean interval of overlapping notes. This synergy would suggest less difference between the working of the right brain and the left brain than common wisdom would dictate. The pleasing sound of harmony comes when two notes share a common harmonic, meaning that their frequencies are in simple integer ratios, such as 3/2 (G/C) or 5/4 (E/C).

  12. Extending the length and time scales of Gram–Schmidt Lyapunov vector computations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Costa, Anthony B.; Green, Jason R.

    2013-08-01

    Lyapunov vectors have found growing interest recently due to their ability to characterize systems out of thermodynamic equilibrium. The computation of orthogonal Gram–Schmidt vectors requires multiplication and QR decomposition of large matrices, which grow as N{sup 2} (with the particle count). This expense has limited such calculations to relatively small systems and short time scales. Here, we detail two implementations of an algorithm for computing Gram–Schmidt vectors. The first is a distributed-memory message-passing method using Scalapack. The second uses the newly-released MAGMA library for GPUs. We compare the performance of both codes for Lennard–Jones fluids from N=100 to 1300 between Intel Nahalem/Infiniband DDR and NVIDIA C2050 architectures. To our best knowledge, these are the largest systems for which the Gram–Schmidt Lyapunov vectors have been computed, and the first time their calculation has been GPU-accelerated. We conclude that Lyapunov vector calculations can be significantly extended in length and time by leveraging the power of GPU-accelerated linear algebra.

  13. Nanometer scale elemental analysis in the helium ion microscope using time of flight spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klingner, Nico; Hlawacek, Gregor; von Borany, Johannes; Notte, John; Huang, Jason; Facsko, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Time of flight Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (ToF-RBS) was successfully implemented in a helium ion microscope (HIM). Its integration introduces the ability to perform laterally resolved elemental analysis as well as elemental depth profiling on the nm scale. A lateral resolution of $\\leq$ 54 nm and an energy resolution of $\\Delta E \\leq$ 1.5 keV $(\\Delta E/E=5.4\\%)$ are achieved. By using the energy of the backscattered particles for contrast generation, we introduce a new imaging method to the HIM allowing direct elemental mapping as well as local spectrometry. In addition laterally resolved time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) can be performed with the same setup. Time of flight is implemented by pulsing the primary ion beam. This is achieved in a cost effective and minimal invasive way that does not influence the high resolution capabilities of the microscope when operating in standard secondary electron (SE) imaging mode. This technique can thus be easily adapted to existing...

  14. Dynamic response of materials on subnanosecond time scales, and beryllium properties for inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, Damian C.; Tierney, Thomas E.; Luo Shengnian; Paisley, Dennis L.; Kyrala, George A.; Hauer, Allan; Greenfield, Scott R.; Koskelo, Aaron C.; McClellan, Kenneth J.; Lorenzana, Hector E.; Kalantar, Daniel; Remington, Bruce A.; Peralta, Pedro; Loomis, Eric

    2005-05-15

    During the past few years, substantial progress has been made in developing experimental techniques capable of investigating the response of materials to dynamic loading on nanosecond time scales and shorter, with multiple diagnostics probing different aspects of the behavior. These relatively short time scales are scientifically interesting because plastic flow and phase changes in common materials with simple crystal structures--such as iron--may be suppressed, allowing unusual states to be induced and the dynamics of plasticity and polymorphism to be explored. Loading by laser-induced ablation can be particularly convenient: this technique has been used to impart shocks and isentropic compression waves from {approx}1 to 200 GPa in a range of elements and alloys, with diagnostics including line imaging surface velocimetry, surface displacement (framed area imaging), x-ray diffraction (single crystal and polycrystal), ellipsometry, and Raman spectroscopy. A major motivation has been the study of the properties of beryllium under conditions relevant to the fuel capsule in inertial confinement fusion: magnetically driven shock and isentropic compression shots at Z were used to investigate the equation of state and shock melting characteristics, complemented by laser ablation experiments to investigate plasticity and heterogeneous response from the polycrystalline microstructure. These results will help to constrain acceptable tolerances on manufacturing, and possible loading paths, for inertial fusion ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility. Laser-based techniques are being developed further for future material dynamics experiments, where it should be possible to obtain high quality data on strength and phase changes up to at least 1 TPa.

  15. Characterizing Multi-Scale Self-Similar Behavior and Non-Statistical Properties of Financial Time Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Sayantan; Panigrahi, Prasanta K

    2010-01-01

    We make use of wavelet transform to study the multi-scale, self similar behavior and deviations thereof, in the stock prices of large companies, belonging to different economic sectors. The stock market returns exhibit multi-fractal characteristics, with some of the companies showing deviations at small and large scales. The fact that, the wavelets belonging to the Daubechies' (Db) basis enables one to isolate local polynomial trends of different degrees, plays the key role in isolating fluctuations at different scales. We make use of Db4 and Db6 basis sets to respectively isolate local linear and quadratic trends at different scales in order to study the statistical characteristics of these financial time series. The fluctuations reveal fat tail non-Gaussian behavior, unstable periodic modulations, at finer scales, from which the characteristic $k^{-3}$ power law behavior emerges at sufficiently large scales. We further identify stable periodic behavior through the continuous Morlet wavelet.

  16. Improving Building Performance at Urban Scale with a Framework for Real-time Data Sharing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pang, Xiufeng

    2014-01-01

    motivated to improve building energy efficiency as long aslarge scale energy efficiency by motivating building ownersfor Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building

  17. Extending molecular simulation time scales: Parallel in time integrations for high-level quantum chemistry and complex force representations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bylaska, Eric J.; Weare, Jonathan Q.; Weare, John H.

    2013-08-21

    Parallel in time simulation algorithms are presented and applied to conventional molecular dynamics (MD) and ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) models of realistic complexity. Assuming that a forward time integrator, f (e.g., Verlet algorithm), is available to propagate the system from time t{sub i} (trajectory positions and velocities x{sub i} = (r{sub i}, v{sub i})) to time t{sub i+1} (x{sub i+1}) by x{sub i+1} = f{sub i}(x{sub i}), the dynamics problem spanning an interval from t{sub 0}…t{sub M} can be transformed into a root finding problem, F(X) = [x{sub i} ? f(x{sub (i?1})]{sub i} {sub =1,M} = 0, for the trajectory variables. The root finding problem is solved using a variety of root finding techniques, including quasi-Newton and preconditioned quasi-Newton schemes that are all unconditionally convergent. The algorithms are parallelized by assigning a processor to each time-step entry in the columns of F(X). The relation of this approach to other recently proposed parallel in time methods is discussed, and the effectiveness of various approaches to solving the root finding problem is tested. We demonstrate that more efficient dynamical models based on simplified interactions or coarsening time-steps provide preconditioners for the root finding problem. However, for MD and AIMD simulations, such preconditioners are not required to obtain reasonable convergence and their cost must be considered in the performance of the algorithm. The parallel in time algorithms developed are tested by applying them to MD and AIMD simulations of size and complexity similar to those encountered in present day applications. These include a 1000 Si atom MD simulation using Stillinger-Weber potentials, and a HCl + 4H{sub 2}O AIMD simulation at the MP2 level. The maximum speedup ((serial execution time)/(parallel execution time) ) obtained by parallelizing the Stillinger-Weber MD simulation was nearly 3.0. For the AIMD MP2 simulations, the algorithms achieved speedups of up to 14.3. The parallel in time algorithms can be implemented in a distributed computing environment using very slow transmission control protocol/Internet protocol networks. Scripts written in Python that make calls to a precompiled quantum chemistry package (NWChem) are demonstrated to provide an actual speedup of 8.2 for a 2.5 ps AIMD simulation of HCl + 4H{sub 2}O at the MP2/6-31G* level. Implemented in this way these algorithms can be used for long time high-level AIMD simulations at a modest cost using machines connected by very slow networks such as WiFi, or in different time zones connected by the Internet. The algorithms can also be used with programs that are already parallel. Using these algorithms, we are able to reduce the cost of a MP2/6-311++G(2d,2p) simulation that had reached its maximum possible speedup in the parallelization of the electronic structure calculation from 32 s/time step to 6.9 s/time step.

  18. Nonadiabatic dynamics of electron transfer in solution: Explicit and implicit solvent treatments that include multiple relaxation time scales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwerdtfeger, Christine A.; Soudackov, Alexander V.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon, E-mail: shs3@illinois.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 South Mathews Avenue, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 South Mathews Avenue, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2014-01-21

    The development of efficient theoretical methods for describing electron transfer (ET) reactions in condensed phases is important for a variety of chemical and biological applications. Previously, dynamical dielectric continuum theory was used to derive Langevin equations for a single collective solvent coordinate describing ET in a polar solvent. In this theory, the parameters are directly related to the physical properties of the system and can be determined from experimental data or explicit molecular dynamics simulations. Herein, we combine these Langevin equations with surface hopping nonadiabatic dynamics methods to calculate the rate constants for thermal ET reactions in polar solvents for a wide range of electronic couplings and reaction free energies. Comparison of explicit and implicit solvent calculations illustrates that the mapping from explicit to implicit solvent models is valid even for solvents exhibiting complex relaxation behavior with multiple relaxation time scales and a short-time inertial response. The rate constants calculated for implicit solvent models with a single solvent relaxation time scale corresponding to water, acetonitrile, and methanol agree well with analytical theories in the Golden rule and solvent-controlled regimes, as well as in the intermediate regime. The implicit solvent models with two relaxation time scales are in qualitative agreement with the analytical theories but quantitatively overestimate the rate constants compared to these theories. Analysis of these simulations elucidates the importance of multiple relaxation time scales and the inertial component of the solvent response, as well as potential shortcomings of the analytical theories based on single time scale solvent relaxation models. This implicit solvent approach will enable the simulation of a wide range of ET reactions via the stochastic dynamics of a single collective solvent coordinate with parameters that are relevant to experimentally accessible systems.

  19. ing depends not only on initial porosity but also on the relative time scales for soil defor-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hendry, Andrew

    - mation and pore pressure diffusion (18). If fluid pressure can diffuse into or away from contracting and the effects of po- rosity change diminish. However, the time scale for pore pressure diffusion is h2 /D, where for diffusive pore pressure equilibration in deforming soil masses with h 1 m typically surpasses 10 s

  20. Modeling Multiple Time Scales during Glass Formation with Phase-Field Crystals Joel Berry and Martin Grant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant, Martin

    describe several aspects of glass formation over multiple time scales. Agreement with mode coupling theory is related to the liquid bulk modulus, qi sets the equilibrium distance between particles of the same species) The dynamics of glass formation in monatomic and binary liquids are studied numerically using a microscopic

  1. Investment Timing and Capacity Choice for Small-Scale Wind Power Under Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleten, Stein-Erik; Maribu, Karl Magnus

    2004-01-01

    REFERENCES [1] American Wind Power Association (AWEA), Road-CHOICE FOR SMALL-SCALE WIND POWER UNDER UNCERTAINTY Stein-Power production from wind power has stochastic inflows, and

  2. Investment Timing and Capacity Choice for Small-Scale Wind Power Under Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleten, Stein-Erik; Maribu, Karl Magnus

    2004-01-01

    A 20-year industry plan for small wind turbine tech- nology,has estimated that small wind turbines could contribute to 3CAPACITY CHOICE FOR SMALL-SCALE WIND POWER UNDER UNCERTAINTY

  3. Broad-Scale Analysis Contradicts the Theory That Generation Time Affects Molecular Evolutionary Rates in Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, Mark

    Abstract. Several studies of plant taxa have con- cluded that generation time, including annual/ perennial in animals, there is little theoretical basis for why generation-time effects would exist in plants. Furthermore, previous reports fail to establish the generality of a generation-time effect in plants be- cause

  4. Femtosecond resolution timing jitter correction on a TW scale Ti:sapphire laser system for FEL pump-probe experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Divall, Marta Csatari; Divall, Edwin J; Hauri, Christoph P

    2015-01-01

    Intense ultrashort pulse lasers are used for fs resolution pumpprobe experiments more and more at large scale facilities, such as free electron lasers (FEL). Measurement of the arrival time of the laser pulses and stabilization to the machine or other sub-systems on the target, is crucial for high time-resolution measurements. In this work we report on a single shot, spectrally resolved, non-collinear cross-correlator with sub-fs resolution. With a feedback applied we keep the output of the TW class Ti:sapphire amplifier chain in time with the seed oscillator to ~3 fs RMS level for several hours. This is well below the typical pulse duration used at FELs and supports fs resolution pump-probe experiments. Short term jitter and long term timing drift measurements are presented. Applicability to other wavelengths and integration into the timing infrastructure of the FEL are also covered to show the full potential of the device.

  5. Symmetrized complex amplitudes for He double photoionization from the time-dependent close coupling and exterior complex scaling methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horner, D.A.; Colgan, J.; Martin, F.; McCurdy, C.W.; Pindzola, M.S.; Rescigno, T.N.

    2004-06-01

    Symmetrized complex amplitudes for the double photoionization of helium are computed by the time-dependent close-coupling and exterior complex scaling methods, and it is demonstrated that both methods are capable of the direct calculation of these amplitudes. The results are found to be in excellent agreement with each other and in very good agreement with results of other ab initio methods and experiment.

  6. Quantum Field Theory of Gravity with Spinnic $\\&$ Scaling Gauge Invariance and Space-time Dynamics with Quantum Inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yue-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Treating the gravitational force on the same footing as the electroweak and strong forces, we present a quantum field theory (QFT) of gravity based on spinnic and scaling gauge symmetries. The so-called Gravifield sided on both locally flat non-coordinate space-time and globally flat Minkowski space-time is an essential ingredient for gauging global spinnic and scaling symmetries. The locally flat Gravifield space-time spanned by the Gravifield is associated with a non-commutative geometry characterized by a gauge-type field strength of Gravifield. A gauge invariant and coordinate independent action for the quantum gravity is built in the Gravifield basis, we derive equations of motion for all quantum fields with including the gravitational effect and obtain basic conservation laws for all symmetries. The equation of motion for Gravifield tensor is deduced in connection directly with the energy-momentum tensor. When the spinnic and scaling gauge symmetries are broken down to a background structure that posses...

  7. The October 1985 Long Outburst of U Geminorum: Revealing the Viscous Time Scale in Long Orbital Period Dwarf Novae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John K. Cannizzo; Neil Gehrels; Janet A. Mattei

    2002-07-11

    We examine the AAVSO light curve of U Geminorum from 1908 to 2002, with particular focus on the October 1985 outburst. This outburst was longer than any other seen in U Gem by about a factor of 2, and appears to be unique among all dwarf nova outbursts seen in systems with orbital periods longer than 3 hr in that one can measure the decay time scale during the initial slow decay. This rate is ~26+-6 d/mag. Using estimates of the rate of accretion during outburst taken from Froning et al., one can show that ~1e24 g of gas was accreted onto the white dwarf during the outburst. When coupled with the viscous time inferred from the (short orbital period) SU UMa stars, the U Gem viscous time scale lends support to the standard model in which the decays in dwarf novae can either be viscous or thermal, with the ratio between them being roughly h/r where h is the vertical pressure scale height in the disk.

  8. Probing the two temperature paradigm for advection dominated accretion flow: test for the component thermalization time-scale passed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Tsiklauri

    1999-01-15

    We report here on a calculation of thermalization time-scale of the two temperature advection dominated accretion flow (ADAF) model. It is established that time required to equalize the electron and ion temperatures via electron-ion collisions in the ADAF with plausible physical parameters greatly exceeds age of the Universe, which corroborates validity one of the crucial assumptions of the ADAF model, namely the existence of a hot two temperature plasma. This work is motivated by the recent success (Mahadevan 1998a,b) of ADAF model in explaining the emitted spectrum of Sgr A*.

  9. Analysis of passive scalar advection in parallel shear flows: Sorting of modes at intermediate time scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camassa, Roberto

    Analysis of passive scalar advection in parallel shear flows: Sorting of modes at intermediate time; published online 4 November 2010 The time evolution of a passive scalar advected by parallel shear flows. INTRODUCTION The advection-diffusion of a passive scalar is a pivotal problem in mathematical physics

  10. Real-time large-scale dense RGB-D SLAM with volumetric fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whelan, Thomas

    We present a new simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) system capable of producing high-quality globally consistent surface reconstructions over hundreds of meters in real time with only a low-cost commodity RGB-D ...

  11. Studies of Ocean Predictability at Decade to Century Time Scales Using a Global Ocean General Circulation Model in a Parallel Computing Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, T.P.

    1998-11-30

    The objectives of this report are to determine the structure of oceanic natural variability at time scales of decades to centuries, characterize the physical mechanisms responsible for the variability; determine the relative importance of heat, fresh water, and moment fluxes on the variability; determine the predictability of the variability on these times scales. (B204)

  12. Constraints on the time-scale of nuclear breakup from thermal hard-photon emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Ortega; D. d'Enterria; G. Martinez; D. Baiborodin; H. Delagrange; J. Diaz; F. Fernandez; H. Loehner; T. Matulewicz; R. W. Ostendorf; S. Schadmand; Y. Schutz; P. Tlusty; R. Turrisi; V. Wagner; H. W. Wilschut; N. Yahlali

    2005-08-26

    Measured hard photon multiplicities from second-chance nucleon-nucleon collisions are used in combination with a kinetic thermal model, to estimate the break-up times of excited nuclear systems produced in nucleus-nucleus reactions at intermediate energies. The obtained nuclear break-up time for the $^{129}${Xe} + $^{nat}${Sn} reaction at 50{\\it A} MeV is $\\Delta$$\\tau$ $\\approx$ 100 -- 300 fm/$c$ for all reaction centralities. The lifetime of the radiating sources produced in seven other different heavy-ion reactions studied by the TAPS experiment are consistent with $\\Delta$$\\tau$ $\\approx$ 100 fm/$c$, such relatively long thermal photon emission times do not support the interpretation of nuclear breakup as due to a fast spinodal process for the heavy nuclear systems studied.

  13. Quantum Chemistry on the time axis: electron correlations and rearrangements on femtosecond and attosecond scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolaides, Cleanthes A

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments toward the production and laboratory use of pulses of high intensity, and/or of very high frequency, and/or of ultrashort duration, make possible experiments which can produce time-resolved data on ultrafast transformations involving motions of electrons. The formulation, quantitative understanding and prediction of related new phenomena entail the possibility of computing and applying solutions of the many-electron time-dependent Schroedinger equation, for arbitrary electronic structures, including the dominant effects of Rydberg series, of multiply excited states and of the multi-channel continuous spectrum. To this purpose, we have proposed and applied to many prototypical cases the state-specific expansion approach (SSEA). (Mercouris, Komninos and Nicolaides, Adv. Quantum Chem. 60, 333 (2010)). The paper explains briefly the SSEA, and outlines four of its applications to recently formulated problems concerning time-resolved electronic processes, where electron correlations are crucial....

  14. Time scale of the thermal multifragmentation in p(3.6 GeV) + Au collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. P. Avdeyev; V. A. Karnaukhov; H. Oeschler; V. K. Rodionov; A. V. Simonenko; V. V. Kirakosyan; P. A. Rukoyatkin; A. Budzanowski; W. Karcz; I. Skwirczynska; B. Czech; E. A. Kuzmin; L. V. Chulkov; E. Norbeck; A. S. Botvina

    2006-03-14

    The relative angle correlation of intermediate mass fragments has been studied for p+Au collisions at 3.6 GeV. Strong suppression at small angles is observed caused by IMF-IMF Coulomb repulsion. Experimental correlation function is compared to that obtained by the multi-body Coulomb trajectory calculations with the various decay time of fragmenting system. The combined model including the empirically modified intranuclear cascade followed by statistical multifragmentation was used to generate starting conditions for these calculations. The model dependence of the results obtained has been carefully checked. The mean decay time of fragmenting system is found to be 85 +- 50 fm/c.

  15. Real-Time Optical Characterization of Laser Oxidation Process in Bimetallic Direct Write Gray Scale Photomasks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Glenn H.

    density (OD), changes smoothly with increasing laser power, from ~3.0OD (unexposed) to developed capable of providing real time optical density and exposure power changes for the bimetallic thin) are exposed to laser light with power greater than its conversion threshold power, the thin film oxidizes

  16. Time Resolution Dependence of Information Measures for Spiking Neurons: Atoms, Scaling, and Universality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarah E. Marzen; Michael R. DeWeese; James P. Crutchfield

    2015-04-18

    The mutual information between stimulus and spike-train response is commonly used to monitor neural coding efficiency, but neuronal computation broadly conceived requires more refined and targeted information measures of input-output joint processes. A first step towards that larger goal is to develop information measures for individual output processes, including information generation (entropy rate), stored information (statistical complexity), predictable information (excess entropy), and active information accumulation (bound information rate). We calculate these for spike trains generated by a variety of noise-driven integrate-and-fire neurons as a function of time resolution and for alternating renewal processes. We show that their time-resolution dependence reveals coarse-grained structural properties of interspike interval statistics; e.g., $\\tau$-entropy rates that diverge less quickly than the firing rate indicate interspike interval correlations. We also find evidence that the excess entropy and regularized statistical complexity of different types of integrate-and-fire neurons are universal in the continuous-time limit in the sense that they do not depend on mechanism details. This suggests a surprising simplicity in the spike trains generated by these model neurons. Interestingly, neurons with gamma-distributed ISIs and neurons whose spike trains are alternating renewal processes do not fall into the same universality class. These results lead to two conclusions. First, the dependence of information measures on time resolution reveals mechanistic details about spike train generation. Second, information measures can be used as model selection tools for analyzing spike train processes.

  17. Particle Falls is a large-scale public artwork that provides a real time visualization of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maccabe, Barney

    at the same time by using particulate air pollution as a basis for a cascading waterfall flowing down the side in California. Despite the invisibility of air, modern sensors can detect tiny particulate pollution levels of particulate pollution in the San Fernando Corridor in the form of a projection on the AT&T Building in San

  18. Residence Time Distribution Measurement and Analysis of Pilot-Scale Pretreatment Reactors for Biofuels Production: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sievers, D.; Kuhn, E.; Tucker, M.; Stickel, J.; Wolfrum, E.

    2013-06-01

    Measurement and analysis of residence time distribution (RTD) data is the focus of this study where data collection methods were developed specifically for the pretreatment reactor environment. Augmented physical sampling and automated online detection methods were developed and applied. Both the measurement techniques themselves and the produced RTD data are presented and discussed.

  19. Laser-induced short time scale thermal chemistry of perfluoropolyether lubricant films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heller, J.; Mate, C.J.; Poon, C.C.; Tam, A.C.

    1999-11-09

    The authors investigate the effect of heating a perfluoropolyether lubricant film in a localized area for relatively short time periods using laser irradiation versus conventional oven heating. These experiments help provide understanding on how flash temperatures generated at frictional contacts affect the thermal chemistry of lubricant films. In these experiments, a CO{sub 2} laser heats a 50 {micro}m wide area of a silicon wafer for time periods ranging from 0.1 to 60 s. The surface temperature within the heated area (up to 280 C in these experiments) is monitored with a second laser by measuring the change in reflectivity near the center of the heated area. A major difference observed for laser heating compared to oven heating is that the effective evaporation rate is orders of magnitude higher for laser heating. If the lubricant film is heated for sufficiently long enough time at high temperatures, the authors are able to observe thermal bonding of the lubricant via its alcohol end groups to the silicon oxide surface, followed by thermal decomposition of the lubricant molecules. After laser heating, the authors are able to observe the diffusion of lubricant back into the localized heated area using a combination of optical microscopy and imaging ellipsometry.

  20. Spectral irradiance variations: Comparison between observations and the SATIRE model on solar rotation time scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yvonne C. Unruh; Natalie A. Krivova; Sami K. Solanki; Jerald W. Harder; Greg Kopp

    2008-02-28

    Aims: We test the reliability of the observed and calculated spectral irradiance variations between 200 and 1600 nm over a time span of three solar rotations in 2004. Methods: We compare our model calculations to spectral irradiance observations taken with SORCE/SIM, SoHO/VIRGO and UARS/SUSIM. The calculations assume LTE and are based on the SATIRE (Spectral And Total Irradiance REconstruction) model. We analyse the variability as a function of wavelength and present time series in a number of selected wavelength regions covering the UV to the NIR. We also show the facular and spot contributions to the total calculated variability. Results: In most wavelength regions, the variability agrees well between all sets of observations and the model calculations. The model does particularly well between 400 and 1300 nm, but fails below 220 nm as well as for some of the strong NUV lines. Our calculations clearly show the shift from faculae-dominated variability in the NUV to spot-dominated variability above approximately 400 nm. We also discuss some of the remaining problems, such as the low sensitivity of SUSIM and SORCE for wavelengths between approximately 310 and 350 nm, where currently the model calculations still provide the best estimates of solar variability.

  1. Identical temperature dependence of the time scales of several linear-response functions of two glass-forming liquids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bo Jakobsen; Tina Hecksher; Kristine Niss; Tage Christensen; Niels Boye Olsen; Jeppe C. Dyre

    2012-02-10

    The frequency-dependent dielectric constant, shear and adiabatic bulk moduli, longitudinal thermal expansion coefficient, and longitudinal specific heat have been measured for two van der Waals glass-forming liquids, tetramethyl-tetraphenyl-trisiloxane (DC704) and 5-polyphenyl-4-ether. Within the experimental uncertainties the loss-peak frequencies of the measured response functions have identical temperature dependence over a range of temperatures, for which the Maxwell relaxation time varies more than nine orders of magnitude. The time scales are ordered from fastest to slowest as follows: Shear modulus, adiabatic bulk modulus, dielectric constant, longitudinal thermal expansion coefficient, longitudinal specific heat. The ordering is discussed in light of the recent conjecture that van der Waals liquids are strongly correlating, i.e., approximate single-parameter liquids.

  2. Capital investment requirements for greenhouse gas emissions mitigation in power generation on near term to century time scales and global to regional spatial scales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Kyle, G. Page

    2014-11-01

    Electrification plays a crucial role in cost-effective greenhouse gas emissions mitigation strategies. Such strategies in turn carry implications for financial capital markets. This paper explores the implication of climate mitigation policy for capital investment demands by the electric power sector on decade to century time scales. We go further to explore the implications of technology performance and the stringency of climate policy for capital investment demands by the power sector. Finally, we discuss the regional distribution of investment demands. We find that stabilizing GHG emissions will require additional investment in the electricity generation sector over and above investments that would be need in the absence of climate policy, in the range of 16 to 29 Trillion US$ (60-110%) depending on the stringency of climate policy during the period 2015 to 2095 under default technology assumptions. This increase reflects the higher capital intensity of power systems that control emissions. Limits on the penetration of nuclear and carbon capture and storage technology could increase costs substantially. Energy efficiency improvements can reduce the investment requirement by 8 to21 Trillion US$ (default technology assumptions), depending on climate policy scenario with higher savings being obtained under the most stringent climate policy. The heaviest investments in power generation were observed in the China, India, SE Asia and Africa regions with the latter three regions dominating in the second half of the 21st century.

  3. Proposal for a Full-Scale Prototype Single-Phase Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber and Detector Beam Test at CERN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kutter, T

    2015-01-01

    The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) will use a large liquid argon (LAr) detector to measure the CP violating phase, determine the neutrino mass hier- archy and perform precision tests of the three-flavor paradigm in long-baseline neutrino oscillations. The detector will consist of four modules each with a fiducial mass of 10 kt of LAr and due to its unprecedented size will allow sensitive searches for proton decay and the detection and measurement of electron neutrinos from core collapse supernovae [1]. The first 10 kt module will use single-phase LAr detection technique and be itself modular in design. The successful manufacturing, installation and operation of several full-scale detector components in a suitable configuration represents a critical engineering milestone prior to the construction and operation of the first full 10 kt DUNE detector module at the SURF underground site. A charged particle beam test of a prototype detector will provide critical calibration measurements as well as inva...

  4. Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    has led to unprecedented study of dynamic processes. The ability to image the chemical reactions in living cells in real time, especially in parallel with fluorescence...

  5. Open-access databases as unprecedented resources and drivers of cultural change in fisheries science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McManamay, Ryan A [ORNL; Utz, Ryan [National Ecological Observatory Network

    2014-01-01

    Open-access databases with utility in fisheries science have grown exponentially in quantity and scope over the past decade, with profound impacts to our discipline. The management, distillation, and sharing of an exponentially growing stream of open-access data represents several fundamental challenges in fisheries science. Many of the currently available open-access resources may not be universally known among fisheries scientists. We therefore introduce many national- and global-scale open-access databases with applications in fisheries science and provide an example of how they can be harnessed to perform valuable analyses without additional field efforts. We also discuss how the development, maintenance, and utilization of open-access data are likely to pose technical, financial, and educational challenges to fisheries scientists. Such cultural implications that will coincide with the rapidly increasing availability of free data should compel the American Fisheries Society to actively address these problems now to help ease the forthcoming cultural transition.

  6. A relationship between statistical time to breakdown distributions and pre-breakdown negative differential resistance at nanometric scale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foissac, R.; Blonkowski, S.; Delcroix, P.; Kogelschatz, M.

    2014-07-14

    Using an ultra-high vacuum Conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) current voltage, pre-breakdown negative differential resistance (NDR) characteristics are measured together with the time dependent dielectric breakdown (TDDB) distributions of Si/SiON (1.4 and 2.6?nm thick). Those experimental characteristics are systematically compared. The NDR effect is modelled by a conductive filament growth. It is showed that the Weibull TDDB statistic distribution scale factor is proportional to the growth rate of an individual filament and then has the same dependence on the electric field. The proportionality factor is a power law of the ratio between the surfaces of the CAFM tip and the filament's top. Moreover, it was found that, for the high fields used in those experiments, the TDDB acceleration factor as the growth rate characteristic is proportional to the Zener tunnelling probability. Those observations are discussed in the framework of possible breakdown or forming mechanism.

  7. Comparison of large-scale flows on the Sun measured by time-distance helioseismology and local correlation tracking technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michal Svanda; Junwei Zhao; Alexander G. Kosovichev

    2007-01-25

    We present a direct comparison between two different techniques time-distance helioseismology and a local correlation tracking method for measuring mass flows in the solar photosphere and in a near-surface layer: We applied both methods to the same dataset (MDI high-cadence Dopplergrams covering almost the entire Carrington rotation 1974) and compared the results. We found that after necessary corrections, the vector flow fields obtained by these techniques are very similar. The median difference between directions of corresponding vectors is 24 degrees, and the correlation coefficients of the results for mean zonal and meridional flows are 0.98 and 0.88 respectively. The largest discrepancies are found in areas of small velocities where the inaccuracies of the computed vectors play a significant role. The good agreement of these two methods increases confidence in the reliability of large-scale synoptic maps obtained by them.

  8. Dynamic response of materials on sub-nanosecond time scales, and beryllium properties for inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, D C; Tierney, T E; Luo, S N; Paisley, D L; Kyrala, G A; Hauer, A; Greenfield, S R; Koskelo, A C; McClellan, K J; Lorenzana, H E; Knudson, M D; Peralta, P P; Loomis, E

    2004-12-09

    During the past few years, substantial progress has been made in developing experimental techniques capable of investigating the response of materials to dynamic loading on nanosecond time scales and shorter, with multiple diagnostics probing different aspects of the behavior. these relatively short time scales are scientifically interesting because plastic flow and phase changes in common materials with simple crystal structures--such as iron--may be suppressed, allowing unusual states to be induced and the dynamics of plasticity and polymorphism to be explored. Loading by laser ablation can be particularly convenient. The TRIDENT laser has been used to impart shocks and isentropic compression waves from {approx}1 to 200GPa in a range of elements and alloys, with diagnostics including surface velocimetry (line-imaging VISAR), surface displacement (framed area imaging), x-ray diffraction (single crystal and polycrystal), ellipsometry, and Raman spectroscopy. A major motivation has been the study of the properties of beryllium under conditions relevant to the fuel capsule in inertial confinement fusion: magnetically-driven shock and isentropic compression shots at Z were used to investigate the equation of state and shock melting characteristics, complemented by laser ablation experiments to investigate plasticity and heterogeneous response. These results will help to constrain acceptable tolerances on manufacturing, and possible loading paths, for inertial fusion ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility. Laser-based techniques are being developed further for future material dynamics experiments, where it should be possible to obtain high quality data on strength and phase changes up to at least 1TPa.

  9. An Unprecedented Constraint on Water Content in the Sunlit Lunar Exosphere Seen by Lunar-Based Ultraviolet Telescope of Chang'e-3 Mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, J; Qiu, Y L; Meng, X M; Cai, H B; Cao, L; Deng, J S; Han, X H; Wei, J Y

    2015-01-01

    The content of $\\mathrm{OH/H_2O}$ molecules in the tenuous exosphere of the Moon is still an open issue at present. We here report an unprecedented upper limit of the content of the OH radicals, which is obtained from the in-situ measurements carried out \\rm by the Lunar-based Ultraviolet Telescope, a payload of Chinese Chang'e-3 mission. By analyzing the diffuse background in the images taken by the telescope, the column density and surface concentration of the OH radicals are inferred to be $<10^{11}\\ \\mathrm{cm^{-2}}$ and $<10^{4}\\ \\mathrm{cm^{-3}}$ (by assuming a hydrostatic equilibrium with a scale height of 100km), respectively, by assuming that the recorded background is fully contributed by their resonance fluorescence emission. The resulted concentration is lower than the previously reported value by about two orders of magnitude, and is close to the prediction of the sputtering model. In addition, the same measurements and method allow us to derive a surface concentration of $<10^{2}\\ \\math...

  10. Scaling of volume to surface ratio and doubling time in growing unicellular organisms: Do cells appear quantum-mechanical systems?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atanasov, Atanas Todorov, E-mail: atanastod@abv.bg [Department of Physics and Biophysics, Faculty of Medicine, Trakia University, 11 Armeiska Str., 6000 Stara Zagora (Bulgaria)

    2014-10-06

    The scaling of physical and biological characteristics of the living organisms is a basic method for searching of new biophysical laws. In series of previous studies the author showed that in Poikilotherms, Mammals and Aves, the volume to surface ratio V×S{sup ?1} (m) of organisms is proportional to their generation time T{sub gt}(s) via growth rate v (m s{sup ?1}): V×S{sup ?1}?=?v{sub gr}×T{sup r}. The power and the correlation coefficients are near to 1.0. Aim of this study is: i) to prove with experimental data the validity of the above equation for Unicellular organisms and ii) to show that perhaps, the cells are quantum-mechanical systems. The data for body mass M (kg), density ? (kg/m{sup 3}), minimum and maximum doubling time T{sub dt} (s) for 50 unicellular organisms are assembled from scientific sources, and the computer program ‘Statistics’ is used for calculations. In result i) the analytical relationship from type: V×S{sup ?1}?=?4.46?10{sup ?11}×T{sub dt} was found, where v{sub gr}?=?4.46×10{sup ?11} m/s and ii) it is shown that the products between cell mass M, cell length expressed by V/S ratio and growth rate v{sub gr} satisfied the Heisenberg uncertainty principle i.e. the inequalities V/S×M×v{sub gr}>h/2? and T{sub dt}×M×v{sub gr}{sup 2}>h/2? are valid, where h= 6.626×10{sup ?34} J?s is the Planck constant. This rise the question: do cells appear quantum-mechanical systems?.

  11. Attosecond Light and Science at the Time-scale of the Electron - Coherent X-Rays from Tabletop Ultrafast Lasers

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Margaret, Murnane [University of Colorado, Boulder and NIST

    2010-09-01

    Ever since the invention of the laser 50 years ago and its application in nonlinear optics, scientists have been striving to extend coherent laser beams into the x-ray region of the spectrum. Very recently however, the prospects for tabletop coherent sources at very short wavelengths, even in the hard x-ray region of the spectrum at wavelengths < 1nm, have brightened considerably. This advance is possible by taking nonlinear optics techniques to an extreme - physics that is the direct result of a new ability to manipulate electrons on the fastest, attosecond, time-scales of our natural world. Several applications have already been demonstrated, including making a movie of how electrons rearrange in a chemical bond changes shape as a molecule breaks apart, following how fast a magnetic material can flip orientation, understanding how fast heat flows in a nanocircuit, or building a microscope without lenses. Nature 460, 1088 (2009); Science 317, 775 (2007); Physical Review Letters 103, 257402 (2009); Nature Materials 9, 26 (2010); Nature 463, 214 (2010); Science 322, 1207 (2008).

  12. Unfolding large-scale online collaborative human dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zha, Yilong; Zhou, Changsong

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale interacting human activities underlie all social and economic phenomena, but quantitative understanding of regular patterns and mechanism is very challenging and still rare. Self-organized online collaborative activities with precise record of event timing provide unprecedented opportunity. Our empirical analysis of the history of millions of updates in Wikipedia shows a universal double power-law distribution of time intervals between consecutive updates of an article. We then propose a generic model to unfold collaborative human activities into three modules: (i) individual behavior characterized by Poissonian initiation of an action, (ii) human interaction captured by a cascading response to others with a power-law waiting time, and (iii) population growth due to increasing number of interacting individuals. This unfolding allows us to obtain analytical formula that is fully supported by the universal patterns in empirical data. Our modeling approaches reveal "simplicity" beyond complex interac...

  13. Dong, S., G. Goni, and R. Lumpkin. 2015. Mixed-layer salinity budget in the SPURS region on seasonal to interannual time scales. Oceanography 28(1):7885,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on seasonal to interannual time scales. Oceanography 28(1):78­85, http://dx.doi.org/10.5670/oceanog.2015 in Oceanography, Volume 28, Number 1, a quarterly journal of The Oceanography Society. Copyright 2015 by The Oceanography Society. All rights reserved. USAGE Permission is granted to copy this article for use in teaching

  14. 1999 Hazeleger, W., 1 February 1999. Variability in Mode Water Formation on the Decadal Time Scale. University of Utrecht, the Netherlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    PhD-Theses 1999 Hazeleger, W., 1 February 1999. Variability in Mode Water Formation on the Decadal Time Scale. University of Utrecht, the Netherlands. Lipzig, N.P.M. van, 6 October 1999. The surfaceD-Thesis, University of Utrecht, the Netherlands. Veefkind, J.P., 11 October 1999. Aerosol Satellite Remote Sensing. Ph

  15. Scaling MG-RAST to Terabases (MICW - Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Desai, Narayan [ANL

    2013-01-22

    Argonne National Lab's Narayan Desai on "Scaling MG-RAST to Terabases" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  16. Tropical precipitation variability and convectively coupled equatorial waves1 on submonthly time-scales in reanalyses and TRMM2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander, M. Joan

    convection plays a vital role in global climate by driving large-scale circulation,41 releasing latent heat, modulating radiative forcing, and most importantly redistributing water in42 the earth system. Due to complex

  17. A coarse grained perturbation theory for the Large Scale Structure, with cosmology and time independence in the UV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alessandro Manzotti; Marco Peloso; Massimo Pietroni; Matteo Viel; Francisco Villaescusa-Navarro

    2014-11-30

    Standard cosmological perturbation theory (SPT) for the Large Scale Structure (LSS) of the Universe fails at small scales (UV) due to strong nonlinearities and to multistreaming effects. In Pietroni et al. 2011 a new framework was proposed in which the large scales (IR) are treated perturbatively while the information on the UV, mainly small scale velocity dispersion, is obtained by nonlinear methods like N-body simulations. Here we develop this approach, showing that it is possible to reproduce the fully nonlinear power spectrum (PS) by combining a simple (and fast) 1-loop computation for the IR scales and the measurement of a single, dominant, correlator from N-body simulations for the UV ones. We measure this correlator for a suite of seven different cosmologies, and we show that its inclusion in our perturbation scheme reproduces the fully non-linear PS with percent level accuracy, for wave numbers up to $k\\sim 0.4\\, h~{\\rm Mpc^{-1}}$ down to $z=0$. We then show that, once this correlator has been measured in a given cosmology, there is no need to run a new simulation for a different cosmology in the suite. Indeed, by rescaling this correlator by a proper function computable in SPT, the reconstruction procedure works also for the other cosmologies and for all redshifts, with comparable accuracy. Finally, we clarify the relation of this approach to the Effective Field Theory methods recently proposed in the LSS context.

  18. Time Domain Optical Studies of Dynamics in Supercooled o-Terphenyl: Comparison to Mode Coupling Theory on Fast and Slow Time Scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayer, Michael D.

    is also in agreement with the predictions of MCT. Detailed comparisons of the data to MCT "master curves" show excellent agreement at times >10 ps. However, the faster component of the data ( not improve the agreement. It is noted that a portion of the data at intermediate times (faster than

  19. Summary of the Midwest conference on small-scale hydropower in the Midwest: an old technology whose time has come

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-05-01

    A variety of decision makers convened to examine and discuss certain significant problems associated with small-scale hydroelectric development in the Midwestern region, comprised of Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, Ohio, West Virginia, and Wisconsin. The conference opened with an introductory panel of resource persons who outlined the objectives of the conference, presented information on small-scale hydro, and described the materials available to conference participants. A series of workshop sessions followed. Two of the workshop sessions discussed problems and policy responses raised by state and Federal regulation. The remaining two workshops dealt with economic issues confronting small-scale hydro development and the operation and usefulness of the systems dynamics model developed by the Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth College. A plenary session and recommendations completed the workshop.

  20. Real-Time Adaptive Management of Soil Salinity Using a Receding Horizon Control Algorithm: A Pilot-Scale Demonstration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Yeonjeong; Harmon, Thomas C

    2009-01-01

    optimization horizon. After the first optimal control is applied for the current management time step, the optimization process

  1. Earth Planets Space, 57, 895902, 2005 Short time-scale heating of the Earth's mantle by ice-sheet dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    -scale energy transfer from the ice sheet loading and unloading processes to the Earth's interior via viscous flow can represent a non-negligible mantle energy source with cryogenic origins. Volumetric heating rebound. 1. Introduction The Earth is a nonlinear dynamical system with a fluid atmosphere and oceans

  2. Measuring catchment-scale chemical retardation using spectral analysis of reactive and passive chemical tracer time series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirchner, James W.

    Measuring catchment-scale chemical retardation using spectral analysis of reactive and passive for Ecology and Hydrology, McLean Building, Wallingford, Oxon OX10 8BB, UK Received 28 August 2002; revised 14, carrying soluble substances with it. Some chemical constituents are non- reactive; these act as passive

  3. A new P-velocity model for the Tethyan margin from a scaled S-velocity model and the inversion of P-and PKP-delay times

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Lee, Suzan

    A new P-velocity model for the Tethyan margin from a scaled S-velocity model and the inversion of P- and PKP-delay times Sung-Joon Chang a, , Suzan Van der Lee a , Megan P. Flanagan b a Dept. of Earth Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-205, Livermore, CA 94551, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article

  4. Time scale of the fission process in the reaction 50A MeV 20Ne + 165Ho 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mdeiwayeh, Nader

    1995-01-01

    The pre-scission time in the de-excitation of highly excited 178W produced in the reaction of 2ONe + 165Ho at 50A MeV was determined as a function of fission fragment mass asymmetry. The techniques employed used the pre-scission and post scission...

  5. Large-Scale Uncertainty and Error Analysis for Time-dependent Fluid/Structure Interactions in Wind Turbine Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alonso, Juan J. [Stanford University; Iaccarino, Gianluca [Stanford University

    2013-08-25

    The following is the final report covering the entire period of this aforementioned grant, June 1, 2011 - May 31, 2013 for the portion of the effort corresponding to Stanford University (SU). SU has partnered with Sandia National Laboratories (PI: Mike S. Eldred) and Purdue University (PI: Dongbin Xiu) to complete this research project and this final report includes those contributions made by the members of the team at Stanford. Dr. Eldred is continuing his contributions to this project under a no-cost extension and his contributions to the overall effort will be detailed at a later time (once his effort has concluded) on a separate project submitted by Sandia National Laboratories. At Stanford, the team is made up of Profs. Alonso, Iaccarino, and Duraisamy, post-doctoral researcher Vinod Lakshminarayan, and graduate student Santiago Padron. At Sandia National Laboratories, the team includes Michael Eldred, Matt Barone, John Jakeman, and Stefan Domino, and at Purdue University, we have Prof. Dongbin Xiu as our main collaborator. The overall objective of this project was to develop a novel, comprehensive methodology for uncertainty quantification by combining stochastic expansions (nonintrusive polynomial chaos and stochastic collocation), the adjoint approach, and fusion with experimental data to account for aleatory and epistemic uncertainties from random variable, random field, and model form sources. The expected outcomes of this activity were detailed in the proposal and are repeated here to set the stage for the results that we have generated during the time period of execution of this project: 1. The rigorous determination of an error budget comprising numerical errors in physical space and statistical errors in stochastic space and its use for optimal allocation of resources; 2. A considerable increase in efficiency when performing uncertainty quantification with a large number of uncertain variables in complex non-linear multi-physics problems; 3. A solution to the long-time integration problem of spectral chaos approaches; 4. A rigorous methodology to account for aleatory and epistemic uncertainties, to emphasize the most important variables via dimension reduction and dimension-adaptive refinement, and to support fusion with experimental data using Bayesian inference; 5. The application of novel methodologies to time-dependent reliability studies in wind turbine applications including a number of efforts relating to the uncertainty quantification in vertical-axis wind turbine applications. In this report, we summarize all accomplishments in the project (during the time period specified) focusing on advances in UQ algorithms and deployment efforts to the wind turbine application area. Detailed publications in each of these areas have also been completed and are available from the respective conference proceedings and journals as detailed in a later section.

  6. An unprecedented amount of digital information, appearing on a daily basis, needs to be archived and preserved over long time peri-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JaJa, Joseph F.

    -Term Preservation of Digital Information Joseph JaJa and Sangchul Song LIBRARY TRENDS, Vol. 57, No. 3, Winter 2009 ("The Library of Congress National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation Program," edited archiving communities, library organizations, government agencies, scientific communities, and individual

  7. Long-lived time-dependent remnants during cosmological symmetry breaking: From inflation to the electroweak scale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gleiser, Marcelo; Stamatopoulos, Nikitas [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States); Graham, Noah [Department of Physics, Middlebury College, Middlebury, Vermont 05753 (United States)

    2010-08-15

    Through a detailed numerical investigation in three spatial dimensions, we demonstrate that long-lived time-dependent field configurations emerge dynamically during symmetry breaking in an expanding de Sitter spacetime. We investigate two situations: a single scalar field with a double-well potential and an SU(2) non-Abelian Higgs model. For the single scalar, we show that large-amplitude oscillon configurations emerge spontaneously and persist to contribute about 1.2% of the energy density of the Universe. We also show that for a range of parameters, oscillon lifetimes are enhanced by the expansion and that this effect is a result of parametric resonance. For the SU(2) case, we see about 4% of the final energy density in oscillons.

  8. Acoustic Source Localization via Time Difference of Arrival Estimation for Distributed Sensor Networks Using Tera-Scale Optical Core Devices

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Imam, Neena; Barhen, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    For real-time acoustic source localization applications, one of the primary challenges is the considerable growth in computational complexity associated with the emergence of ever larger, active or passive, distributed sensor networks. These sensors rely heavily on battery-operated system components to achieve highly functional automation in signal and information processing. In order to keep communication requirements minimal, it is desirable to perform as much processing on the receiver platforms as possible. However, the complexity of the calculations needed to achieve accurate source localization increases dramatically with the size of sensor arrays, resulting in substantial growth of computational requirements that cannot bemore »readily met with standard hardware. One option to meet this challenge builds upon the emergence of digital optical-core devices. The objective of this work was to explore the implementation of key building block algorithms used in underwater source localization on the optical-core digital processing platform recently introduced by Lenslet Inc. This demonstration of considerably faster signal processing capability should be of substantial significance to the design and innovation of future generations of distributed sensor networks.« less

  9. The tale of a modern animal plague: Tracing the evolutionary history and determining the time-scale for foot and mouth disease virus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tully, Damien C. Fares, Mario A.

    2008-12-20

    Despite significant advances made in the understanding of its epidemiology, foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) is among the most unexpected agricultural devastating plagues. While the disease manifests itself as seven immunologically distinct strains their origin, population dynamics, migration patterns and divergence times remain unknown. Herein we have assembled a comprehensive data set of gene sequences representing the global diversity of the disease and inferred the time-scale and evolutionary history for FMDV. Serotype-specific rates of evolution and divergence times were estimated using a Bayesian coalescent framework. We report that an ancient precursor FMDV gave rise to two major diversification events spanning a relatively short interval of time. This radiation event is estimated to have taken place towards the end of the 17th and the beginning of the 18th century giving us the present circulating Euro-Asiatic and South African viral strains. Furthermore our results hint that Europe acted as a possible hub for the disease from where it successfully dispersed elsewhere via exploration and trading routes.

  10. VisIO: enabling interactive visualization of ultra-scale, time-series data via high-bandwidth distributed I/O systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, Christopher J; Ahrens, James P; Wang, Jun

    2010-10-15

    Petascale simulations compute at resolutions ranging into billions of cells and write terabytes of data for visualization and analysis. Interactive visuaUzation of this time series is a desired step before starting a new run. The I/O subsystem and associated network often are a significant impediment to interactive visualization of time-varying data; as they are not configured or provisioned to provide necessary I/O read rates. In this paper, we propose a new I/O library for visualization applications: VisIO. Visualization applications commonly use N-to-N reads within their parallel enabled readers which provides an incentive for a shared-nothing approach to I/O, similar to other data-intensive approaches such as Hadoop. However, unlike other data-intensive applications, visualization requires: (1) interactive performance for large data volumes, (2) compatibility with MPI and POSIX file system semantics for compatibility with existing infrastructure, and (3) use of existing file formats and their stipulated data partitioning rules. VisIO, provides a mechanism for using a non-POSIX distributed file system to provide linear scaling of 110 bandwidth. In addition, we introduce a novel scheduling algorithm that helps to co-locate visualization processes on nodes with the requested data. Testing using VisIO integrated into Para View was conducted using the Hadoop Distributed File System (HDFS) on TACC's Longhorn cluster. A representative dataset, VPIC, across 128 nodes showed a 64.4% read performance improvement compared to the provided Lustre installation. Also tested, was a dataset representing a global ocean salinity simulation that showed a 51.4% improvement in read performance over Lustre when using our VisIO system. VisIO, provides powerful high-performance I/O services to visualization applications, allowing for interactive performance with ultra-scale, time-series data.

  11. Time-Dependent Measure of a Nano-Scale Force-Pulse Driven by the Axonemal Dynein Motors in Individual Live Sperm Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, M J; Rudd, R E; McElfresh, M W; Balhorn, R

    2009-04-23

    Nano-scale mechanical forces generated by motor proteins are crucial to normal cellular and organismal functioning. The ability to measure and exploit such forces would be important to developing motile biomimetic nanodevices powered by biological motors for Nanomedicine. Axonemal dynein motors positioned inside the sperm flagellum drive microtubule sliding giving rise to rhythmic beating of the flagellum. This force-generating action makes it possible for the sperm cell to move through viscous media. Here we report new nano-scale information on how the propulsive force is generated by the sperm flagellum and how this force varies over time. Single cell recordings reveal discrete {approx}50 ms pulses oscillating with amplitude 9.8 {+-} 2.6 nN independent of pulse frequency (3.5-19.5 Hz). The average work carried out by each cell is 4.6 x 10{sup -16} J per pulse, equivalent to the hydrolysis of {approx}5,500 ATP molecules. The mechanochemical coupling at each active dynein head is {approx}2.2 pN/ATP, and {approx}3.9 pN per dynein arm, in agreement with previously published values obtained using different methods.

  12. Chemical surface inhomogeneities in late B-type stars with Hg and Mn peculiarity I Spot evolution in HD 11753 on short and long time scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korhonen, H; Briquet, M; Soriano, M Flores; Hubrig, S; Savanov, I; Hackman, T; Ilyin, I V; Eulaers, E; Pessemier, W

    2013-01-01

    Aims: Time series of high-resolution spectra of the late B-type star HD 11753 exhibiting HgMn chemical peculiarity are used to study the surface distribution of different chemical elements and their temporal evolution. Methods: High-resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio spectra were obtained using the CORALIE spectrograph at La Silla in 2000, 2009, and 2010. Surface maps of YII, SrII, TiII, and CrII were calculated using the Doppler imaging technique. The results were also compared to equivalent width measurements. The evolution of chemical spots both on short and long time scales were investigated. Results: We determine the binary orbit of HD 11753 and fine-tune the rotation period of the primary. The earlier discovered fast evolution of the chemical spots is confirmed by an analysis using both the chemical spot maps and equivalent width measurements. In addition, a long-term decrease in the overall YII and SrII abundances is discovered. A detailed analysis of the chemical spot configurations reveals som...

  13. Silica Scaling Removal Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    millions of dollars each year in facility down time, maintenance, discharge water treatments (blowdown), and anti-scaling chemical additives. This is particularly true for...

  14. The OME Framework for genome-scale systems biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palsson, Bernhard O.; Ebrahim, Ali; Federowicz, Steve

    2014-12-19

    The life sciences are undergoing continuous and accelerating integration with computational and engineering sciences. The biology that many in the field have been trained on may be hardly recognizable in ten to twenty years. One of the major drivers for this transformation is the blistering pace of advancements in DNA sequencing and synthesis. These advances have resulted in unprecedented amounts of new data, information, and knowledge. Many software tools have been developed to deal with aspects of this transformation and each is sorely needed [1-3]. However, few of these tools have been forced to deal with the full complexity of genome-scale models along with high throughput genome- scale data. This particular situation represents a unique challenge, as it is simultaneously necessary to deal with the vast breadth of genome-scale models and the dizzying depth of high-throughput datasets. It has been observed time and again that as the pace of data generation continues to accelerate, the pace of analysis significantly lags behind [4]. It is also evident that, given the plethora of databases and software efforts [5-12], it is still a significant challenge to work with genome-scale metabolic models, let alone next-generation whole cell models [13-15]. We work at the forefront of model creation and systems scale data generation [16-18]. The OME Framework was borne out of a practical need to enable genome-scale modeling and data analysis under a unified framework to drive the next generation of genome-scale biological models. Here we present the OME Framework. It exists as a set of Python classes. However, we want to emphasize the importance of the underlying design as an addition to the discussions on specifications of a digital cell. A great deal of work and valuable progress has been made by a number of communities [13, 19-24] towards interchange formats and implementations designed to achieve similar goals. While many software tools exist for handling genome-scale metabolic models or for genome-scale data analysis, no implementations exist that explicitly handle data and models concurrently. The OME Framework structures data in a connected loop with models and the components those models are composed of. This results in the first full, practical implementation of a framework that can enable genome-scale design-build-test. Over the coming years many more software packages will be developed and tools will necessarily change. However, we hope that the underlying designs shared here can help to inform the design of future software.

  15. A Real-time Framework for Model Predictive Control of Continuous-Time Nonlinear Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sontag, Eduardo

    for piecewise constant NMPC of continuous-time processes. Index Terms-- nonlinear model predictive control, real-time optimization, optimal control, piecewise constant control I. INTRODUCTION Model predictive control (MPC horizon, open-loop optimal control problem. The unprecedented industrial success of MPC ap- proaches based

  16. Block Time Step Storage Scheme for Astrophysical N-body Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Maxwell Xu; Kouwenhoven, M B N; Assmann, Paulina; Spurzem, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Astrophysical research in recent decades has made significant progress thanks to the availability of various $N$-body simulation techniques. With the rapid development of high-performance computing technologies, modern simulations have been able to take the computing power of massively parallel clusters with more than $10^5$ GPU cores. While unprecedented accuracy and dynamical scales have been achieved, the enormous amount of data being generated continuously poses great challenges for the subsequent procedures of data analysis and archiving. As an urgent response to these challenges, in this paper we propose an adaptive storage scheme for simulation data, inspired by the block time step integration scheme found in a number of direct $N$-body integrators available nowadays. The proposed scheme, namely the block time step storage scheme, works by minimizing the data redundancy with assignments of data with individual output frequencies as required by the researcher. As demonstrated by benchmarks, the proposed...

  17. Using Soir Lucene for Large-Scale Metagenomics Data Retrieval and Analysis (MICW - Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Goll, Johannes [JCVI

    2013-01-22

    JCVI's Johannes Goll on "Using Solr/Lucene for Large-Scale Metagenomics Data Retrieval and Analysis" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  18. 2 Valuing ecosystem services Benefits, values, space and time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    ); and global fisheries collapse (Myers and Worm, 2003). These problems are occurring on an unprecedented scale comprehension of the environmental infrastructure upon which human existence and welfare depends (Schroter et al, systematic approaches to measur- ing, modelling and mapping of ecosystem services, governance analysis

  19. Design and Analysis of Robust Variability-Aware SRAM to Predict Optimum Access-Time to Achieve Yield Enhancement in Future Nano-Scaled CMOS.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samandari-Rad, Jeren

    2012-01-01

    Mean and standard deviation of Ideal Access-Time (ACI) forMean and standard deviation of Ideal Access-Time (ACI) forof the standard deviation, and therefore variability, of ACI

  20. DOE JGI Quality Metrics; Approaches to Scaling and Improving Metagenome Assembly (Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Copeland, Alex [DOE JGI]; Brown, C Titus [Michigan State University

    2013-01-22

    DOE JGI's Alex Copeland on "DOE JGI Quality Metrics" and Michigan State University's C. Titus Brown on "Approaches to Scaling and Improving Metagenome Assembly" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  1. Differential Gene Expression Profiles and Real-Time Measurements of Growth Parameters in Saccharomyces cereWisiae Grown in Microliter-Scale Bioreactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinskey, Anthony J.

    . These differential gene expression levels were similar to those observed in large-scale culture vessels widely applied in basic biological research as well as in specialized fields, such as drug screening, environmental testing, and clinical diagnosis (Debouck et al., 1999; Bodrossy et al., 2004). The development

  2. [Cu(pyrazine-2-carboxylate)2]2Cd4I8: unprecedented 1-D serpentine inorganic chains and regular 2-D metalorganic square grids in a 3-D

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    zur Loye, Hans-Conrad

    the design and synthesis of new hybrid organic­ inorganic materials to become a prolific domain in the field[Cu(pyrazine-2-carboxylate)2]2Cd4I8: unprecedented 1-D serpentine inorganic chains and regular 2-D are also known: Zubieta and coworkers13 have reported the synthesis of anionic 1-D oxide chains covalently

  3. External Surveillance of Geothermal Scale Deposits Employing...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    brine to provide in situ scale deposition observations without the disadvantage of dismantling piping for visual scale inspection. Exposure times and film orientations have been...

  4. An investigation of the effects of history dependent damage in time dependent fracture mechanics: nano-scale studies of damage evolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brust, F.W. (Bud) Jr; Mohan, R.; Yang, Y.P.; Oh, J.; Katsube, N.

    2002-12-01

    High-temperature operation of technical engineering systems is critical for system efficiency, and will be a key driver in the future US DOE energy policy. Developing an understanding of high-temperature creep and creep-fatigue failure processes is a key driver for the research work described here. The focus is on understanding the high-temperature deformation and damage development on the nano-scale (50 to 500 nm) level. The high-temperature damage development process, especially with regard to low and high cyclic loading, which has received little attention to date, is studied. Damage development under cyclic loading develops in a fashion quite different from the constant load situation. The development of analytical methodologies so that high-temperature management of new systems can be realized is the key goal of this work.

  5. Self-Adaptive Management of The Sleep Depths of Idle Nodes in Large Scale Systems to Balance Between Energy Consumption and Response Times

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Hong

    U.S. electricity consumption or the output of about 15 typical power plants [2]. In 2007, the electricity consumption of global cloud computing was 623 billion kWh which is larger than the 5th largest Between Energy Consumption and Response Times Yongpeng Liu(1) , Hong Zhu(2) , Kai Lu(1) , Xiaoping Wang(1

  6. Time-reversed imaging as a diagnostic of wave and particle chaos R. K. Snieder1,2,* and J. A. Scales1,3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snieder, Roel

    chaol- ogy.'' The relation between classical chaos and quantum chaos is not trivial 3 . For classical phenomena 4 . Although many aspects of the relation between classical chaos and quantum chaosTime-reversed imaging as a diagnostic of wave and particle chaos R. K. Snieder1,2,* and J. A

  7. A Framework of Concurrent Task Scheduling and Dynamic Voltage and Frequency Scaling in Real-Time Embedded Systems with Energy Harvesting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    harvesting is a promising technique to overcome the limitation imposed by the finite energy capacity harvesting module is comprised of a Photovoltaic (PV) panel for harvesting energy and a supercapacitor, photovoltaic, real-time embedded system, supercapacitor 1. Introduction Minimizing power consumption remains

  8. The recent times have seen a surge in computational modeling of materials and processes. New research initiatives like the Materials Genome Initiative (MGI)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Somnath

    . New research initiatives like the Materials Genome Initiative (MGI) and the Integrated Computational Materials Science & Engineering (ICMSE) are creating unprecedented opportunities for unraveling new1 PREFACE The recent times have seen a surge in computational modeling of materials and processes

  9. Physical Consequences of a Momenta-Transfering Particle Theory of Induced Gravity and New Measurements Indicating Variation from Inverse Square Law at Length Scale of .1 mm: Statistical Time Properties of Gravitational Interaction and Analysis Thereof

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gary Christopher Vezzoli

    2001-04-04

    This work presents physical consequences of our theory of induced gravity (Ref.1) regarding: 1) the requirement to consider shape and materials properties when calculating graviton cross section collision area; 2) use of Special Relativity; 3) implications regarding the shape of cosmos; 4) comparison to explanations using General Relativity; 5) properties of black holes; 6) relationship to the strong force and the theorized Higgs boson; 7) the possible origin of magnetic attraction; 8) new measurements showing variation from gravitational inverse square behavior at length scales of 0.1 mm and relationship to the Cosmological constant, and proof of the statistical time properties of the gravitational interaction.

  10. Time-resolved measurements of the hot-electron population in ignition-scale experiments on the National Ignition Facility (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hohenberger, M. Stoeckl, C.; Albert, F.; Palmer, N. E.; Döppner, T.; Divol, L.; Dewald, E. L.; Bachmann, B.; MacPhee, A. G.; LaCaille, G.; Bradley, D. K.; Lee, J. J.

    2014-11-15

    In laser-driven inertial confinement fusion, hot electrons can preheat the fuel and prevent fusion-pellet compression to ignition conditions. Measuring the hot-electron population is key to designing an optimized ignition platform. The hot electrons in these high-intensity, laser-driven experiments, created via laser-plasma interactions, can be inferred from the bremsstrahlung generated by hot electrons interacting with the target. At the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Opt. Eng. 43, 2841 (2004)], the filter-fluorescer x-ray (FFLEX) diagnostic–a multichannel, hard x-ray spectrometer operating in the 20–500 keV range–has been upgraded to provide fully time-resolved, absolute measurements of the bremsstrahlung spectrum with ?300 ps resolution. Initial time-resolved data exhibited significant background and low signal-to-noise ratio, leading to a redesign of the FFLEX housing and enhanced shielding around the detector. The FFLEX x-ray sensitivity was characterized with an absolutely calibrated, energy-dispersive high-purity germanium detector using the high-energy x-ray source at NSTec Livermore Operations over a range of K-shell fluorescence energies up to 111 keV (U K{sub ?}). The detectors impulse response function was measured in situ on NIF short-pulse (?90 ps) experiments, and in off-line tests.

  11. Direct observation of the terahertz optical free induction decay of molecular rotation absorption lines in the sub-nanosecond time scale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chesnokov, E. N.; Koshlyakov, P. V. [Institute of Chemical Kinetics and Combustion, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Kubarev, V. V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Kulipanov, G. N. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2012-09-24

    Optical free induction decay (FID) in the region of 60-75 cm{sup -1} was detected using 120 ps pulses of free electron laser. Signals were detected in real time using ultra-fast Schottky diode detectors. The oscillations corresponding to the splitting of absorption lines in deuterated water vapor ({Delta}f = 0.15 cm{sup -1}) and hydrogen bromide ({Delta}f = 0.02 cm{sup -1}) were detected. At high optical density, we observed the oscillations arising from 'top-hat' shape of absorption lines. Free induction decay signals could be detected in a single shot. This observation allowed obtaining a spectrum in one laser pulse, which facilitates studies of very fast processes.

  12. On the increase of the “non-uniform” scaling of the magnetic field variations before the M{sub w}9.0 earthquake in Japan in 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skordas, E. S.

    2014-06-01

    By applying Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) to the time series of the geomagnetic data recorded at three measuring stations in Japan, Rong et al. in 2012 recently reported that anomalous magnetic field variations were identified well before the occurrence of the disastrous Tohoku M{sub w}9.0 earthquake that occurred on 11 March 2011 in Japan exhibiting increased “non-uniform” scaling behavior. Here, we provide an explanation for the appearance of this increase of “non-uniform” scaling on the following grounds: These magnetic field variations are the ones that accompany the electric field variations termed Seismic Electric Signals (SES) activity which have been repeatedly reported that precede major earthquakes. DFA as well as multifractal DFA reveal that the latter electric field variations exhibit scaling behavior as shown by analyzing SES activities observed before major earthquakes in Greece. Hence, when these variations are superimposed on a background of pseudosinusoidal trend, their long range correlation properties—quantified by DFA—are affected resulting in an increase of the “non-uniform” scaling behavior. The same is expected to hold for the former magnetic field variations. This explanation is strengthened by recent findings showing that the fluctuations of the order parameter of seismicity exhibited an unprecedented minimum almost two months before the Tohoku earthquake occurrence which is characteristic for an almost simultaneous emission of Seismic Electric Signals activity.

  13. Variable dimensionality in the uranium fluoride/2-methyl-piperazine system: Synthesis and structures of UFO-5, -6, and -7; Zero-, one-, and two-dimensional materials with unprecedented topologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francis, R.J.; Halasyamani, P.S.; Bee, J.S.; O'Hare, D.

    1999-02-24

    Recently, low temperature (T < 300 C) hydrothermal reactions of inorganic precursors in the presence of organic cations have proven highly productive for the synthesis of novel solid-state materials. Interest in these materials is driven by the astonishingly diverse range of structures produced, as well as by their many potential materials chemistry applications. This report describes the high yield, phase pure hydrothermal syntheses of three new uranium fluoride phases with unprecedented structure types. Through the systematic control of the synthesis conditions the authors have successfully controlled the architecture and dimensionality of the phase formed and selectively synthesized novel zero-, one-, and two-dimensional materials.

  14. Growing interfaces uncover universal fluctuations behind scale invariance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazumasa A. Takeuchi; Masaki Sano; Tomohiro Sasamoto; Herbert Spohn

    2011-08-10

    Stochastic motion of a point -- known as Brownian motion -- has many successful applications in science, thanks to its scale invariance and consequent universal features such as Gaussian fluctuations. In contrast, the stochastic motion of a line, though it is also scale-invariant and arises in nature as various types of interface growth, is far less understood. The two major missing ingredients are: an experiment that allows a quantitative comparison with theory and an analytic solution of the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) equation, a prototypical equation for describing growing interfaces. Here we solve both problems, showing unprecedented universality beyond the scaling laws. We investigate growing interfaces of liquid-crystal turbulence and find not only universal scaling, but universal distributions of interface positions. They obey the largest-eigenvalue distributions of random matrices and depend on whether the interface is curved or flat, albeit universal in each case. Our exact solution of the KPZ equation provides theoretical explanations.

  15. Extension of gyrokinetics to transport time scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parra Díaz, Félix Ignacio

    2009-01-01

    In the last decade, gyrokinetic simulations have greatly improved our theoretical understanding of turbulent transport in fusion devices. Most gyrokinetic models in use are [sigma]f simulations in which the slowly varying ...

  16. A perspective on time: loss frequencies, time scales and lifetimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prather, Michael J; Holmes, Christopher D

    2013-01-01

    isotopic variations in atmospheric chemistry. Geophys. Res.Perturbation dynamics in atmospheric chemistry. J. Geophys.eigenstates in atmospheric chemistry. Geophys. Res. Lett.

  17. RANDOM COEFFICIENT H MODE CONFINEMENT SCALINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;nement time for most other machines, we are e#11;ectively penalising ASDEX. This small penalty may device scalings are more uniform and closer to standard L mode con#12;nement scaling. To model

  18. Elastic strain engineering for unprecedented materials properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Ju

    “Smaller is stronger.” Nanostructured materials such as thin films, nanowires, nanoparticles, bulk nanocomposites, and atomic sheets can withstand non-hydrostatic (e.g., tensile or shear) stresses up to a significant ...

  19. Scaling Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winfried Zimdahl; Diego Pavón

    2002-10-22

    We show that with the help of a suitable coupling between dark energy and cold dark matter it is possible to reproduce any scaling solution $\\rho _{X}\\propto \\rho_{M}a^{\\xi}$, where $\\rho_{X}$ and $\\rho_{M}$ are the densities of dark energy and dark matter, respectively. We demonstrate how the case $\\xi = 1$ alleviates the coincidence problem. Future observations of supernovae at high redshift as well as quasar pairs which are planned to discriminate between different cosmological models will also provide direct constraints on the coupling between dark matter and dark energy.

  20. Report on Fission Time Projection Chamber M3FT-12IN0210052

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James K. Jewell

    2012-08-01

    The Time Projection Chamber is a collaborative effort to implement an innovative approach and deliver unprecedented fission measurements to DOE programs. This 4?-detector system will provide unrivaled 3-D data about the fission process. Shown here is a half populated TPC (2?) at the LLNL TPC laboratory as it undergoes testing before being shipped to LANSCE for beam experiments.

  1. Teaching Contemporary Physics Topics Using Real-Time Data Obtained via the World Wide Web Authors: A.P. Post-Zwicker,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page 1 Teaching Contemporary Physics Topics Using Real-Time Data Obtained via the World Wide Web As a teaching tool, the World Wide Web (WWW) is unprecedented in its ability to transmit information and enhance the site in the classroom. Keywords: Real-time data, World Wide Web, teaching, high school, fusion energy

  2. Building Scale DC Microgrids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris

    2014-01-01

    ABORATORY Building Scale DC Microgrids Chris Marnay, Stevenemployer. Building Scale DC Microgrids Chris Marnay, IEEEgenerally known as microgrids (or µgrids). The dominance of

  3. Scales and Scale-like Structures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landreneau, Eric Benjamin

    2011-08-08

    Scales are a visually striking feature that grows on many animals. These small, rigid plates embedded in the skin form an integral part of our description of ?sh and reptiles, some plants, and many extinct animals. Scales exist in many shapes...

  4. Scaling the Web Scaling Web Sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menascé, Daniel A.

    Scaling the Web Scaling Web Sites Through Caching A large jump in a Web site's traffic may indi, pushing the site's through- put to its maximum point. When a Web site becomes overloaded, cus- tomers grow-generated revenue and may even tarnish the reputation of organizations relying on Web sites to support mission

  5. Convex Optimization: from Real-Time Embedded

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Convex Optimization: from Real-Time Embedded to Large-Scale Distributed Stephen Boyd Neal Parikh Lectures, UC Berkeley, 3/30/2015 1 #12;Outline Convex Optimization Real-Time Embedded Optimization Large-Scale Distributed Optimization Summary 2 #12;Outline Convex Optimization Real-Time Embedded Optimization Large

  6. Convex Optimization: from Real-Time Embedded

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Julian

    Convex Optimization: from Real-Time Embedded to Large-Scale Distributed Stephen Boyd Neal Parikh of Edinburgh, June 25 2014 1 #12;Outline Convex Optimization Real-Time Embedded Optimization Large-Scale Distributed Optimization Summary 2 #12;Outline Convex Optimization Real-Time Embedded Optimization Large

  7. Conjecture on the physical implications of the scale anomaly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, Christopher T.; /Fermilab

    2005-10-01

    Murray Gell-Mann, after co-inventing QCD, recognized the interplay of the scale anomaly, the renormalization group, and the origin of the strong scale, {Lambda}{sub QCD}. I tell a story, then elaborate this concept, and for the sake of discussion, propose a conjecture that the physical world is scale invariant in the classical, {h_bar}, limit. This principle has implications for the dimensionality of space-time, the cosmological constant, the weak scale, and Planck scale.

  8. Large-Scale Sequencing: The Future of Genomic Sciences Colloquium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margaret Riley; Merry Buckley

    2009-01-01

    Genetic sequencing and the various molecular techniques it has enabled have revolutionized the field of microbiology. Examining and comparing the genetic sequences borne by microbes - including bacteria, archaea, viruses, and microbial eukaryotes - provides researchers insights into the processes microbes carry out, their pathogenic traits, and new ways to use microorganisms in medicine and manufacturing. Until recently, sequencing entire microbial genomes has been laborious and expensive, and the decision to sequence the genome of an organism was made on a case-by-case basis by individual researchers and funding agencies. Now, thanks to new technologies, the cost and effort of sequencing is within reach for even the smallest facilities, and the ability to sequence the genomes of a significant fraction of microbial life may be possible. The availability of numerous microbial genomes will enable unprecedented insights into microbial evolution, function, and physiology. However, the current ad hoc approach to gathering sequence data has resulted in an unbalanced and highly biased sampling of microbial diversity. A well-coordinated, large-scale effort to target the breadth and depth of microbial diversity would result in the greatest impact. The American Academy of Microbiology convened a colloquium to discuss the scientific benefits of engaging in a large-scale, taxonomically-based sequencing project. A group of individuals with expertise in microbiology, genomics, informatics, ecology, and evolution deliberated on the issues inherent in such an effort and generated a set of specific recommendations for how best to proceed. The vast majority of microbes are presently uncultured and, thus, pose significant challenges to such a taxonomically-based approach to sampling genome diversity. However, we have yet to even scratch the surface of the genomic diversity among cultured microbes. A coordinated sequencing effort of cultured organisms is an appropriate place to begin, since not only are their genomes available, but they are also accompanied by data on environment and physiology that can be used to understand the resulting data. As single cell isolation methods improve, there should be a shift toward incorporating uncultured organisms and communities into this effort. Efforts to sequence cultivated isolates should target characterized isolates from culture collections for which biochemical data are available, as well as other cultures of lasting value from personal collections. The genomes of type strains should be among the first targets for sequencing, but creative culture methods, novel cell isolation, and sorting methods would all be helpful in obtaining organisms we have not yet been able to cultivate for sequencing. The data that should be provided for strains targeted for sequencing will depend on the phylogenetic context of the organism and the amount of information available about its nearest relatives. Annotation is an important part of transforming genome sequences into useful resources, but it represents the most significant bottleneck to the field of comparative genomics right now and must be addressed. Furthermore, there is a need for more consistency in both annotation and achieving annotation data. As new annotation tools become available over time, re-annotation of genomes should be implemented, taking advantage of advancements in annotation techniques in order to capitalize on the genome sequences and increase both the societal and scientific benefit of genomics work. Given the proper resources, the knowledge and ability exist to be able to select model systems, some simple, some less so, and dissect them so that we may understand the processes and interactions at work in them. Colloquium participants suggest a five-pronged, coordinated initiative to exhaustively describe six different microbial ecosystems, designed to describe all the gene diversity, across genomes. In this effort, sequencing should be complemented by other experimental data, particularly transcriptomics and metabolomics data, all of which

  9. Scaling Analysis of On-Chip Power Grid Voltage Variations in Nanometer Scale ULSI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    Scaling Analysis of On-Chip Power Grid Voltage Variations in Nanometer Scale ULSI AMIR H. AJAMI, 1 be insufficient to limit the voltage fluctuations over the power grid for future technologies. It is also shown voltage drop in the power grid may result in a functional failure in dynamic logic and a timing violation

  10. Time-stretch microscopy based on time-wavelength sequence reconstruction from wideband incoherent source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Chi Xu, Yiqing; Wei, Xiaoming; Tsia, Kevin K.; Wong, Kenneth K. Y.

    2014-07-28

    Time-stretch microscopy has emerged as an ultrafast optical imaging concept offering the unprecedented combination of the imaging speed and sensitivity. However, dedicated wideband and coherence optical pulse source with high shot-to-shot stability has been mandated for time-wavelength mapping—the enabling process for ultrahigh speed wavelength-encoded image retrieval. From the practical point of view, exploiting methods to relax the stringent requirements (e.g., temporal stability and coherence) for the source of time-stretch microscopy is thus of great value. In this paper, we demonstrated time-stretch microscopy by reconstructing the time-wavelength mapping sequence from a wideband incoherent source. Utilizing the time-lens focusing mechanism mediated by a narrow-band pulse source, this approach allows generation of a wideband incoherent source, with the spectral efficiency enhanced by a factor of 18. As a proof-of-principle demonstration, time-stretch imaging with the scan rate as high as MHz and diffraction-limited resolution is achieved based on the wideband incoherent source. We note that the concept of time-wavelength sequence reconstruction from wideband incoherent source can also be generalized to any high-speed optical real-time measurements, where wavelength is acted as the information carrier.

  11. SYMBOLS FOR TIME = time variable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    =forever) Cost spent to build variation point i at time i = index over variation points #12;SYMBOLS FOR TIME to account for net present value of money r = assumed interest rate i = index over variation points Cost Expected cost summed over all relevant time intervals Cost spent to build variation point i at time r

  12. Scale Models & Wind Turbines

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Turbines * Readings about Cape Wind and other offshore and onshore siting debates for wind farms * Student Worksheet * A number of scale model items: Ken, Barbie or other dolls...

  13. Running Large Scale Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    try on their large scale applications on Hopper for better performance. Try different compilers and compiler options The available compilers on Hopper are PGI, Cray, Intel, GNU,...

  14. Thermodynamics and scale relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Carroll

    2011-10-13

    It is shown how the fractal paths of scale relativity (following Nottale) can be introduced into a thermodynamical context (following Asadov-Kechkin).

  15. Modelling Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burra G. Sidharth

    2008-09-03

    We briefly review two concepts of time - the usual time associated with "being" and more recent ideas, answering to the description of "becoming". The approximation involved in the former is examined. Finally we argue that it is (unpredictable) fluctuations that underlie time.

  16. Interaction of Fast-Scale and Slow-Scale Bifurcations in Current-Mode Controlled DC/DC Converters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tse, Chi K. "Michael"

    of fast-scale and slow-scale bifurcations in the boost converter under current- mode control operating, and it manifests as period-doubling in the time scale, as reported in Iu et al. [7] for parallel boost converters, Wong et al. [8] for noise-coupled boost converters, and Wu et al. [9] for power

  17. Yet another time about time - Part I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plamen L. Simeonov

    2015-08-29

    This paper presents yet another personal reflection on one the most important concepts in both science and the humanities: time. This elusive notion has been not only bothering philosophers since Plato and Aristotle. It goes throughout human history embracing all analytical and creative (anthropocentric) disciplines. Time has been a central theme in physical and life sciences, philosophy, psychology, music, art and many more. This theme is known with a vast body of knowledge across different theories and categories. What has been explored concerns its nature (rational, irrational, arational), appearances/qualia, degrees, dimensions and scales of conceptualization (internal, external, fractal, discrete, continuous, mechanical, quantum, local, global, etc.). Of particular interest have been parameters of time such as duration ranges, resolutions, modes (present, now, past, future), varieties of tenses (e.g. present perfect, present progressive, etc.) and some intuitive, but also fancy phenomenological characteristics such as arrow, stream, texture, width, depth, density, even scent. Perhaps the most distinct characteristic of this fundamental concept is the absolute time constituting the flow of consciousness according to Husserl, the reflection of pure (human) nature without having the distinction between exo and endo. This essay is a personal reflection upon the meaning of time in modern physics and phenomenological philosophy.

  18. Ångström-scale chemically powered motors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter H. Colberg; Raymond Kapral

    2014-05-16

    Like their larger micron-scale counterparts, {\\AA}ngstr\\"om-scale chemically self-propelled motors use asymmetric catalytic activity to produce self-generated concentration gradients that lead to directed motion. Unlike their micron-scale counterparts, the sizes of {\\AA}ngstr\\"om-scale motors are comparable to the solvent molecules in which they move, they are dominated by fluctuations, and they operate on very different time scales. These new features are studied using molecular dynamics simulations of small sphere dimer motors. We show that the ballistic regime is dominated by the thermal speed but the diffusion coefficients of these motors are orders of magnitude larger than inactive dimers. Such small motors may find applications in nano-confined systems or perhaps eventually in the cell.

  19. Quantum Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Ashmead

    2010-05-05

    Normally we quantize along the space dimensions but treat time classically. But from relativity we expect a high level of symmetry between time and space. What happens if we quantize time using the same rules we use to quantize space? To do this, we generalize the paths in the Feynman path integral to include paths that vary in time as well as in space. We use Morlet wavelet decomposition to ensure convergence and normalization of the path integrals. We derive the Schr\\"odinger equation in four dimensions from the short time limit of the path integral expression. We verify that we recover standard quantum theory in the non-relativistic, semi-classical, and long time limits. Quantum time is an experiment factory: most foundational experiments in quantum mechanics can be modified in a way that makes them tests of quantum time. We look at single and double slits in time, scattering by time-varying electric and magnetic fields, and the Aharonov-Bohm effect in time.

  20. Teaching Contemporary Physics Topics Using RealTime Data Obtained via the World Wide Web Authors: A.P. PostZwicker, 1 W. Davis, 1 R. Grip, 2 M. McKay, 3 R. Pfaff, 4 and D.P. Stotler 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page 1 Teaching Contemporary Physics Topics Using Real­Time Data Obtained via the World Wide Web@pppl.gov #12; Page 2 Abstract As a teaching tool, the World Wide Web (WWW) is unprecedented in its ability­led learning is encouraged when using the site in the classroom. Keywords: Real­time data, World Wide Web

  1. LBNO-DEMO: Large-scale neutrino detector demonstrators for phased performance assessment in view of a long-baseline oscillation experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Agostino; B. Andrieu; R. Asfandiyarov; D. Autiero; O. Bésida; F. Bay; R. Bayes; A. M. Blebea-Apostu; A. Blondel; M. Bogomilov; S. Bolognesi; S. Bordoni; A. Bravar; M. Buizza-Avanzini; F. Cadoux; D. Caiulo; M. Calin; M. Campanelli; C. Cantini; L. Chaussard; D. Chesneanu; N. Colino; P. Crivelli; I. De Bonis; Y. Déclais; J. Dawson; C. De La Taille; P. Del Amo Sanchez; A. Delbart; S. Di Luise; D. Duchesneau; F. Dulucq; J. Dumarchez; I. Efthymiopoulos; S. Emery; T. Enqvist; L. Epprecht; T. Esanu; D. Franco; D. Franco; M. Friend; V. Galymov; A. Gendotti; C. Giganti; I. Gil-Botella; M. C Gomoiu; P. Gorodetzky; A. Haesler; T. Hasegawa; S. Horikawa; M. Ieva; A. Jipa; Y. Karadzhov; I. Karpikov; A. Khotjantsev; A. Korzenev; D. Kryn; Y. Kudenko; P. Kuusiniemi; I. Lazanu; J. -M. Levy; K. Loo; T. Lux; J. Maalampi; R. M. Margineanu; J. Marteau; C. Martin; G. Martin-Chassard; E. Mazzucato; A. Mefodiev; O. Mineev; B. Mitrica; S. Murphy; T. Nakadaira; M. Nessi; K. Nikolics; L. Nita; E. Noah; P. Novella; G. A. Nuijten; T. Ovsiannikova; C. Palomares; T. Patzak; E. Pennacchio; L. Periale; H. Pessard; B. Popov; M. Ravonel; M. Rayner; C. Regenfus; C. Ristea; O. Ristea; A. Robert; A. Rubbia; K. Sakashita; F. Sanchez; R. Santorelli; E. Scantamburlo; F. Sergiampietri; D. Sgalaberna; M. Slupecki; F. J. P. Soler; D. L. Stanca; A. Tonazzo; W. H. Trzaska; R. Tsenov; G. Vankova-Kirilova; F. Vannucci; G. Vasseur; A. Verdugo; T. Viant; S. Wu; N. Yershov; L. Zambelli; M. Zito

    2014-09-14

    In June 2012, an Expression of Interest for a long-baseline experiment (LBNO) has been submitted to the CERN SPSC. LBNO considers three types of neutrino detector technologies: a double-phase liquid argon (LAr) TPC and a magnetised iron detector as far detectors. For the near detector, a high-pressure gas TPC embedded in a calorimeter and a magnet is the baseline design. A mandatory milestone is a concrete prototyping effort towards the envisioned large-scale detectors, and an accompanying campaign of measurements aimed at assessing the detector associated systematic errors. The proposed $6\\times 6\\times 6$m$^3$ DLAr is an industrial prototype of the design discussed in the EoI and scalable to 20 kton or 50~kton. It is to be constructed and operated in a controlled laboratory and surface environment with test beam access, such as the CERN North Area (NA). Its successful operation and full characterisation will be a fundamental milestone, likely opening the path to an underground deployment of larger detectors. The response of the DLAr demonstrator will be measured and understood with an unprecedented precision in a charged particle test beam (0.5-20 GeV/c). The exposure will certify the assumptions and calibrate the response of the detector, and allow to develop and to benchmark sophisticated reconstruction algorithms, such as those of 3-dimensional tracking, particle ID and energy flow in liquid argon. All these steps are fundamental for validating the correctness of the physics performance described in the LBNO EoI.

  2. Finite Future Cosmological Singularity Times and Maximum Predictability Times in a Nonlinear FRW-KG Scalar Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Max Wilson; Keith Andrew

    2012-07-27

    We investigate the relative time scales associated with finite future cosmological singularities, especially those classified as Big Rip cosmologies, and the maximum predictability time of a coupled FRW-KG scalar cosmology with chaotic regimes. Our approach is to show that by starting with a FRW-KG scalar cosmology with a potential that admits an analytical solution resulting in a finite time future singularity there exists a Lyapunov time scale that is earlier than the formation of the singularity. For this singularity both the cosmological scale parameter a(t) and the Hubble parameter H(t) become infinite at a finite future time, the Big Rip time. We compare this time scale to the predictability time scale for a chaotic FRW-KG scalar cosmology. We find that there are cases where the chaotic time scale is earlier than the Big Rip singularity calling for special care in interpreting and predicting the formation of the future cosmological singularity.

  3. Time in Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Brout; R. Parentani

    1999-02-05

    The notion of time in cosmology is revealed through an examination of transition matrix elements of radiative processes occurring in the cosmos. To begin with, the very concept of time is delineated in classical physics in terms of correlations between the succession of configurations which describe a process and a standard trajectory called the clock. The total is an isolated system of fixed energy. This is relevant for cosmology in that the universe is an isolated system which we take to be homogeneous and isotropic. Furthermore, in virtue of the constraint which arises from reparametrization invariance of time, it has total energy zero. Therefore the momentum of the scale factor is determined from the energy of matter. In the quantum theory this is exploited through use of the WKB approximation for the wave function of the scale factor, justified for a large universe. The formalism then gives rise to matrix elements describing matter processes. These are shown to take on the form of usual time dependent quantum amplitudes wherein the temporal dependence is given by a background which is once more fixed by the total energy of matter.

  4. Kodama time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abreu, Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    In a general time-dependent (3+1)-dimensional spherically symmetric spacetime, the so-called Kodama vector is a naturally defined geometric quantity that is timelike outside the evolving horizon and so defines a preferred class of fiducial observers. However the Kodama vector does not by itself define any preferred notion of time. We demonstrate that a preferred time coordinate - which we shall call Kodama time - can be introduced by taking the additional step of applying the Clebsch decomposition theorem to the Kodama vector. We thus construct a geometrically preferred coordinate system for any time-dependent spherically symmetric spacetime, and explore its properties. In particular we use this formalism to construct a general class of conservation laws, generalizing Kodama's energy flux. We study the geometrically preferred fiducial observers, and demonstrate that it is possible to define and calculate a generalized notion of surface gravity that is valid throughout the entire evolving spacetime. Furthermor...

  5. AssumeGuarantee Refinement Between Different Time Scales ?;??

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henzinger, Thomas A.

    been implemented in the model checker Mocha and successfully applied to verify the VGI multiprocessor

  6. Time and length scales of autocrine signals in three dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathieu Coppey; Alexander M. Berezhkovskii; Stuart C. Sealfon; Stanislav Y. Shvartsman

    2007-09-22

    A model of autocrine signaling in cultures of suspended cells is developed on the basis of the effective medium approximation. The fraction of autocrine ligands, the mean and distribution of distances traveled by paracrine ligands before binding, as well as the mean and distribution of the ligand lifetime are derived. Interferon signaling by dendritic immune cells is considered as an illustration.

  7. Detecting separate time scales in genetic expression data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orlando, David A.; Brady, Siobhan M.; Fink, Thomas M. A.; Benfey, Philip N.; Ahnert, Sebastian E.

    2010-06-16

    stream_source_info 1471-2164-11-381-S1.PDF.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 7753 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name 1471-2164-11-381-S1.PDF.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 AG L4 2_ M EA N AP L_ M EA N CO... BL 9_ M EA N CO RT EX _M EA N gl 2_ M EA N JO 12 1_ M EA N J0 57 1_ M EA N J2 66 1_ M EA N LR C_ M EA N pe t1 11 _M EA N rm 10 00 _M EA N S1 7_ M EA N S1 8_ M EA N S4 _M EA N S3 2_ M EA N sc r5 _M EA N SU C2 _M EA N w o l_ M EA N xy le m _2 50 1_ M EA...

  8. A Method for Calculating Reference Evapotranspiration on Daily Time Scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farmer, William

    Measures of reference evapotranspiration are essential for applications of agricultural management and water resources engineering. Using numerous esoteric variables, one can calculate daily reference evapotranspiration ...

  9. Regional Projections of Climate on Decadal Time Scales: High...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Bibtex Format Close 0 pages in this document matching the terms "" Search For Terms: Enter terms in the toolbar above to search the full text of this document for pages...

  10. Regional Projections of Climate on Decadal Time Scales: High resolution

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTech ConnectSpeedingConnect(Conference) |(Patent) |

  11. Regional Projections of Climate on Decadal Time Scales: High resolution

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTech ConnectSpeedingConnect(Conference) |(Patent) |global predictions and regionally

  12. Time-Off Awards Scale | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCEDInstallers/ContractorsPhotovoltaicsState ofSavings for Specific2HeldTidal EnergyTim

  13. Utility-Scale Concentrating Solar Power and Photovoltaic Projects: A Technology and Market Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendelsohn, M.; Lowder, T.; Canavan, B.

    2012-04-01

    Over the last several years, solar energy technologies have been, or are in the process of being, deployed at unprecedented levels. A critical recent development, resulting from the massive scale of projects in progress or recently completed, is having the power sold directly to electric utilities. Such 'utility-scale' systems offer the opportunity to deploy solar technologies far faster than the traditional 'behind-the-meter' projects designed to offset retail load. Moreover, these systems have employed significant economies of scale during construction and operation, attracting financial capital, which in turn can reduce the delivered cost of power. This report is a summary of the current U.S. utility-scale solar state-of-the-market and development pipeline. Utility-scale solar energy systems are generally categorized as one of two basic designs: concentrating solar power (CSP) and photovoltaic (PV). CSP systems can be further delineated into four commercially available technologies: parabolic trough, central receiver (CR), parabolic dish, and linear Fresnel reflector. CSP systems can also be categorized as hybrid, which combine a solar-based system (generally parabolic trough, CR, or linear Fresnel) and a fossil fuel energy system to produce electric power or steam.

  14. The propagation of kinetic energy across scales in turbulent flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardesa, José I; Dong, Siwei; Jiménez, Javier

    2015-01-01

    A temporal study of energy transfer across length scales is performed in 3D numerical simulations of homogeneous shear flow and isotropic turbulence, at Reynolds numbers in the range $Re_{\\lambda}=107-384$. The average time taken by perturbations in the energy flux to travel between scales is measured and shown to be additive, as inferred from the agreement between the total travel time from a given scale to the smallest dissipative motions, and the time estimated from successive jumps through intermediate scales. Our data suggests that the propagation of disturbances in the energy flux is independent of the forcing and that it defines a `velocity' that determines the energy flux itself. These results support that the cascade is, on average, a scale-local process where energy is continuously transmitted from one scale to the next in order of decreasing size.

  15. Quantum time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giovannetti, Vittorio

    We give a consistent quantum description of time, based on Page and Wootters’s conditional probabilities mechanism, which overcomes the criticisms that were raised against similar previous proposals. In particular we show ...

  16. Chow Time 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-09-05

    -1 THE PREDICTION OF BUS ARRIVAL TIME USING AUTOMATIC VEHICLE LOCATION SYSTEMS DATA A Dissertation by RAN HEE JEONG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY December 2004 Major Subject: Civil Engineering THE PREDICTION OF BUS ARRIVAL TIME USING AUTOMATIC VEHICLE LOCATION SYSTEMS DATA A Dissertation by RAN HEE JEONG Submitted to Texas A...

  17. Paradoxical Interpretations of Urban Scaling Laws

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cottineau, Clementine; Arcaute, Elsa; Batty, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Scaling laws are powerful summaries of the variations of urban attributes with city size. However, the validity of their universal meaning for cities is hampered by the observation that different scaling regimes can be encountered for the same territory, time and attribute, depending on the criteria used to delineate cities. The aim of this paper is to present new insights concerning this variation, coupled with a sensitivity analysis of urban scaling in France, for several socio-economic and infrastructural attributes from data collected exhaustively at the local level. The sensitivity analysis considers different aggregations of local units for which data are given by the Population Census. We produce a large variety of definitions of cities (approximatively 5000) by aggregating local Census units corresponding to the systematic combination of three definitional criteria: density, commuting flows and population cutoffs. We then measure the magnitude of scaling estimations and their sensitivity to city defin...

  18. Scaling laws of solar and stellar flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markus J. Aschwanden; Robert A. Stern; Manuel Güdel

    2007-10-12

    In this study we compile for the first time comprehensive data sets of solar and stellar flare parameters, including flare peak temperatures T_p, flare peak volume emission measures EM_p, and flare durations t_f from both solar and stellar data, as well as flare length scales L from solar data. Key results are that both the solar and stellar data are consistent with a common scaling law of EM_p ~ T_p^4.7, but the stellar flares exhibit ~250 times higher emission measures (at the same flare peak temperature). For solar flares we observe also systematic trends for the flare length scale L(T_p) ~ T_p^0.9 and the flare duration t_F(T_p) ~ T_p^0.9 as a function of the flare peak temperature. Using the theoretical RTV scaling law and the fractal volume scaling observed for solar flares, i.e., V(L) ~ L^2.4, we predict a scaling law of EM_p ~ T_p^4.3, which is consistent with observations, and a scaling law for electron densities in flare loops, n_p ~ T_p^2/L ~ T_p^1.1. The RTV-predicted electron densities were also found to be consistent with densities inferred from total emission measures, n_p=(EM_p/q_V*V)^1/2, using volume filling factors of q_V=0.03-0.08 constrained by fractal dimensions measured in solar flares. Our results affect also the determination of radiative and conductive cooling times, thermal energies, and frequency distributions of solar and stellar flare energies.

  19. Scaling behavior of regularized bosonic strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan Ambjorn; Yuri Makeenko

    2015-10-12

    We implement a proper-time UV regularisation of the Nambu-Goto string, introducing an independent metric tensor and the corresponding Lagrange multiplier, and treating them in the mean-field approximation justified for long strings and/or when the dimensions of space-time is large. We compute the regularised determinant of the 2d Laplacian for the closed string winding around a compact dimension, obtaining in this way the effective action, whose minimisation determines the energy of the string ground state in the mean-field approximation. We discuss the existence of two scaling limits when the cutoff is taken to infinity. One scaling limit reproduces the results obtained by the hypercubic regularisation of the Nambu-Goto string as well as by the use of the dynamical triangulation regularisation of the Polyakov string. The other scaling limit reproduces the results obtained by canonical quantisation of the Nambu-Goto string.

  20. Scale Insects on Ornamental Plants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muegge, Mark A.; Merchant, Michael E.

    2000-08-21

    Scale insects damage landscape plants, shrubs and trees. This publication explains how to control scale insects economically without damaging the environment, including sampling for scale crawlers, using natural enemies and applying pesticides....

  1. Space-time diamonds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daiqin Su; T. C. Ralph

    2015-07-02

    We show that the particle number distribution of diamond modes, modes that are localised in a finite space-time region, are thermal for the Minkowski vacuum state of a massless scalar field, an analogue to the Unruh effect. The temperature of the diamond is inversely proportional to its size. An inertial observer can detect this thermal radiation by coupling to the diamond modes using an appropriate energy scaled detector. We further investigate the correlations between various diamonds and find that entanglement between adjacent diamonds dominates.

  2. Turbocharged Speed Scaling: Analysis and Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williamson, Carey

    Turbocharged Speed Scaling: Analysis and Evaluation Maryam Elahi Carey Williamson Philipp Woelfel-based turbocharging, applied in conjunction with Fair Sojourn Protocol (FSP) scheduling and job-count-based speed. The simulation results show that Turbocharged FSP (T­FSP) outperforms PS in response time, and often in energy

  3. Scaling the Web Performance and Availability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menascé, Daniel A.

    Scaling the Web Performance and Availability of Internet Data Centers Daniel A. Menascé · George, including response time, throughput, and availability, in the context of Web scalability. In most of my past) as a motivating example to discuss how performance and availability are interrelated. IDCs provide the means

  4. Urban Scaling in Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bettencourt, Luis M A

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decades, in disciplines as diverse as economics, geography, and complex systems, a perspective has arisen proposing that many properties of cities are quantitatively predictable due to agglomeration or scaling effects. Using new harmonized definitions for functional urban areas, we examine to what extent these ideas apply to European cities. We show that while most large urban systems in Western Europe (France, Germany, Italy, Spain, UK) approximately agree with theoretical expectations, the small number of cities in each nation and their natural variability preclude drawing strong conclusions. We demonstrate how this problem can be overcome so that cities from different urban systems can be pooled together to construct larger datasets. This leads to a simple statistical procedure to identify urban scaling relations, which then clearly emerge as a property of European cities. We compare the predictions of urban scaling to Zipf's law for the size distribution of cities and show that while the for...

  5. Angular Scaling In Jets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jankowiak, Martin; Larkoski, Andrew J.; /SLAC

    2012-02-17

    We introduce a jet shape observable defined for an ensemble of jets in terms of two-particle angular correlations and a resolution parameter R. This quantity is infrared and collinear safe and can be interpreted as a scaling exponent for the angular distribution of mass inside the jet. For small R it is close to the value 2 as a consequence of the approximately scale invariant QCD dynamics. For large R it is sensitive to non-perturbative effects. We describe the use of this correlation function for tests of QCD, for studying underlying event and pile-up effects, and for tuning Monte Carlo event generators.

  6. The Large Observatory For X-ray Timing: LOFT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bozzo, E

    2013-01-01

    LOFT, the Large Observatory for X-ray Timing, is a new space mission concept devoted to observations of Galactic and extra-Galactic sources in the X-ray domain with the main goals of probing gravity theory in the very strong field environment of black holes and other compact objects, and investigating the state of matter at supra-nuclear densities in neutron stars. The instruments on-board LOFT, the Large area detector and the Wide Field Monitor combine for the first time an unprecedented large effective area (~10 m2 at 8 keV) sensitive to X-ray photons mainly in the 2-30 keV energy range and a spectral resolution approaching that of CCD-based telescopes (down to 200 eV at 6 keV). LOFT is currently competing for a launch of opportunity in 2022 together with the other M3 mission candidates of the ESA Cosmic Vision Program.

  7. The scale invariant generator technique for quantifying anisotropic scale invariance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovejoy, Shaun

    The scale invariant generator technique for quantifying anisotropic scale invariance G.M. Lewisa, 1 invariant generator technique (SIG). The accuracy of the technique is tested using anisotropic multifractal characteristics. The scale invariant generator technique can pro®tably be applied to the scale invariant study

  8. A Hollow-Ion Resonance of Unprecedented Strength

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion Batteries Print Lithium-ionA First LookPlasmaA

  9. A Hollow-Ion Resonance of Unprecedented Strength

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion Batteries Print Lithium-ionA First LookPlasmaAA

  10. A Hollow-Ion Resonance of Unprecedented Strength

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion Batteries Print Lithium-ionA First LookPlasmaAAA

  11. A Hollow-Ion Resonance of Unprecedented Strength

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion Batteries Print Lithium-ionA First LookPlasmaAAAA

  12. A Hollow-Ion Resonance of Unprecedented Strength

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.TheoryTuesday, August 10, 20102016 News Below are4BElectron---neutrinoAAA G EA

  13. Unprecedented Precise Determination of Three-Dimensional Atomic Positions |

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D- 6 0GrantsThe Life of Enrico FermiU.S. DOE Office of

  14. Mesh Generation for SHARP: Unprecedented Complexity | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties - WAPAEnergy May 28 WebinarProtect MigratoryRegulators,andMesh

  15. Business Time in the Foreign Exchange Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    Business Time in the Foreign Exchange Markets Mark J L Orr Centre for Cognitive Science Edinburgh University June 1997 #12; Business Time in the Foreign Exchange Markets Mark J L Orr y Centre for Cognitive; Contents 1 Introduction 4 2 The Price Change Scaling Law 5 3 Business Time 7 4 The BZW Data 11 5 Volatility

  16. Sensor system scaling issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canavan, G.H.

    1996-07-01

    A model for IR sensor performance is used to compare estimates of sensor cost effectiveness. Although data from aircraft sensors indicate a weaker scaling, their agreement is adequate to support the assessment of the benefits of operating up to the maximum altitude of most current UAVs.

  17. Scaling the Web Architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menascé, Daniel A.

    Scaling the Web Web Server Software Architectures W eb site scalability depends on several things -- workload characteristics,1 security mechanisms,2 Web cluster architectures3 -- as I've discussed in previous issues. Another important item that can affect a site's performance and scalability is the Web

  18. Wind Extremes and Scales: Multifractal Insights and Empirical Evidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovejoy, Shaun

    17 Wind Extremes and Scales: Multifractal Insights and Empirical Evidence I. Tchiguirinskaia, D. Schertzer, S. Lovejoy, J.M. Veysseire Summary. An accurate assessment of wind extremes at various space-time scales (e.g. gusts, tempests, etc.) is of prime importance for a safe and efficient wind energy

  19. An Elastica Arm Scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Bosi; D. Misseroni; F. Dal Corso; D. Bigoni

    2015-09-18

    The concept of 'deformable arm scale' (completely different from a traditional rigid arm balance) is theoretically introduced and experimentally validated. The idea is not intuitive, but is the result of nonlinear equilibrium kinematics of rods inducing configurational forces, so that deflection of the arms becomes necessary for the equilibrium, which would be impossible for a rigid system. In particular, the rigid arms of usual scales are replaced by a flexible elastic lamina, free of sliding in a frictionless and inclined sliding sleeve, which can reach a unique equilibrium configuration when two vertical dead loads are applied. Prototypes realized to demonstrate the feasibility of the system show a high accuracy in the measure of load within a certain range of use. It is finally shown that the presented results are strongly related to snaking of confined beams, with implications on locomotion of serpents, plumbing, and smart oil drilling.

  20. An Elastica Arm Scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bosi, F; Corso, F Dal; Bigoni, D

    2015-01-01

    The concept of 'deformable arm scale' (completely different from a traditional rigid arm balance) is theoretically introduced and experimentally validated. The idea is not intuitive, but is the result of nonlinear equilibrium kinematics of rods inducing configurational forces, so that deflection of the arms becomes necessary for the equilibrium, which would be impossible for a rigid system. In particular, the rigid arms of usual scales are replaced by a flexible elastic lamina, free of sliding in a frictionless and inclined sliding sleeve, which can reach a unique equilibrium configuration when two vertical dead loads are applied. Prototypes realized to demonstrate the feasibility of the system show a high accuracy in the measure of load within a certain range of use. It is finally shown that the presented results are strongly related to snaking of confined beams, with implications on locomotion of serpents, plumbing, and smart oil drilling.

  1. Building Scale DC Microgrids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris

    2013-01-01

    however, DC was less amenable to transmission over longtransmission 32 km to Buffalo, even though the loads at that time were entirely DC.

  2. Time parallel gravitational collapse simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreienbuehl, Andreas; Ruprecht, Daniel; Krause, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    This article demonstrates the applicability of the parallel-in-time method Parareal to the numerical solution of the Einstein gravity equations for the spherical collapse of a massless scalar field. To account for the shrinking of the spatial domain in time, a tailored load balancing scheme is proposed and compared to load balancing based on number of time steps alone. The performance of Parareal is studied for both the sub-critical and black hole case; our experiments show that Parareal generates substantial speedup and, in the super-critical regime, can also reproduce the black hole mass scaling law.

  3. BENCH SCALE SALTSTONE PROCESS DEVELOPMENT MIXING STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cozzi, A.; Hansen, E.

    2011-08-03

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to develop a bench scale test facility, using a mixer, transfer pump, and transfer line to determine the impact of conveying the grout through the transfer lines to the vault on grout properties. Bench scale testing focused on the effect the transfer line has on the rheological property of the grout as it was processed through the transfer line. Rheological and other physical properties of grout samples were obtained prior to and after pumping through a transfer line. The Bench Scale Mixing Rig (BSMR) consisted of two mixing tanks, grout feed tank, transfer pump and transfer hose. The mixing tanks were used to batch the grout which was then transferred into the grout feed tank. The contents of the feed tank were then pumped through the transfer line (hose) using a progressive cavity pump. The grout flow rate and pump discharge pressure were monitored. Four sampling stations were located along the length of the transfer line at the 5, 105 and 205 feet past the transfer pump and at 305 feet, the discharge of the hose. Scaling between the full scale piping at Saltstone to bench scale testing at SRNL was performed by maintaining the same shear rate and total shear at the wall of the transfer line. The results of scaling down resulted in a shorter transfer line, a lower average velocity, the same transfer time and similar pressure drops. The condition of flow in the bench scale transfer line is laminar. The flow in the full scale pipe is in the transition region, but is more laminar than turbulent. The resulting plug in laminar flow in the bench scale results in a region of no-mixing. Hence mixing, or shearing, at the bench scale should be less than that observed in the full scale, where this plug is non existent due to the turbulent flow. The bench scale tests should be considered to be conservative due to the highly laminar condition of flow that exists. Two BSMR runs were performed. In both cases, wall shearing was shown to reduce the rheological properties of the grout as it was processed through the transfer line. Samples taken at the static feed tank showed that gelling impacted the rheological properties of the grout before it was fed into the pump and transfer line. A comparison of the rheological properties of samples taken at the feed tank and transfer line discharge indicated shearing of the grout was occurring in the transfer line. Bench scale testing of different mixing methods with three different salt solutions showed that method of mixing influences the rheological properties of the grouts. The paddle blade mixing method of the salt solution used for the BMSR testing provided comparable rheological properties of the grout prepared in the BMSR after 14 minutes of processing, B3. The paddle blade mixing method can be used to represent BMSR results and mixing time can be adjusted to represent larger scale mixing.

  4. Platforms and real options in large-scale engineering systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalligeros, Konstantinos C., 1976-

    2006-01-01

    This thesis introduces a framework and two methodologies that enable engineering management teams to assess the value of real options in programs of large-scale, partially standardized systems implemented a few times over ...

  5. Evolving desiderata for validating engineered-physics systems without full-scale testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langenbrunner, James R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Booker, Jane M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hemez, Francois M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ross, Timothy J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Theory and principles of engineered-physics designs do not change over time, but the actual engineered product does evolve. Engineered components are prescient to the physics and change with time. Parts are never produced exactly as designed, assembled as designed, or remain unperturbed over time. For this reason, validation of performance may be regarded as evolving over time. Desired use of products evolves with time. These pragmatic realities require flexibility, understanding, and robustness-to-ignorance. Validation without full-scale testing involves engineering, small-scale experiments, physics theory and full-scale computer-simulation validation. We have previously published an approach to validation without full-scale testing using information integration, small-scale tests, theory and full-scale simulations [Langenbrunner et al. 2008]. This approach adds value, but also adds complexity and uncertainty due to inference. We illustrate a validation example that manages evolving desiderata without full-scale testing.

  6. Development of time projection chamber for precise neutron lifetime measurement using pulsed cold neutron beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Arimoto; N. Higashi; Y. Igarashi; Y. Iwashita; T. Ino; R. Katayama; R. Kitahara; M. Kitaguchi; H. Matsumura; K. Mishima; H. Oide; H. Otono; R. Sakakibara; T. Shima; H. M. Shimizu; T. Sugino; N. Sumi; H. Sumino; K. Taketani; G. Tanaka; M. Tanaka; K. Tauchi; A. Toyoda; T. Yamada; S. Yamashita; H. Yokoyama; T. Yoshioka

    2015-09-11

    A new time projection chamber (TPC) was developed for neutron lifetime measurement using a pulsed cold neutron spallation source at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC). Managing considerable background events from natural sources and the beam radioactivity is a challenging aspect of this measurement. To overcome this problem, the developed TPC has unprecedented features such as the use of polyether-ether-ketone plates in the support structure and internal surfaces covered with $^6$Li-enriched tiles to absorb outlier neutrons. In this paper, the design and performance of the new TPC are reported in detail.

  7. Scaling Analysis of Nanowire Phase Change Memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Jie; Anantram, M P

    2013-01-01

    This letter analyzes the scaling property of nanowire (NW) phase change memory (PCM) using analytic and numerical methods. The scaling scenarios of the three widely-used NW PCM peration schemes (constant electric field, voltage, and current) are studied and compared. It is shown that if the device size is downscaled by a factor of 1/k (k>1), the peration energy (current) will be reduced by more than k3 (k) times, and the operation speed will be increased by k2 times. It is also shown that more than 90% of operation energy is wasted as thermal flux into substrate and electrodes. We predict that, if the wasted thermal flux is effectively reduced by heat confinement technologies, the energy consumed per RESET operation can be decreased from about 1 pJ to less than 100 fJ. It is shown that reducing NW aspect ratio (AR) helps decreasing PCM energy consumption. It is revealed that cross-cell thermal proximity disturbance is counter-intuitively alleviated by scaling, leading to a desirable scaling scenario.

  8. The San Jose Scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conradi, Albert F.

    1906-01-01

    for controlling the scale. The most important spray mixtures in use are lime-sulphur salt, lime-sulphur, whale oil soap, kero? sene, crude petroleum, Kero-water, and kerosene or crude oil emulsions. All these preparations are mainly winter sprays, being applied... salt as those containing it. t 7 8 0 I R y 0 - . 8 E 2 This wash consists of a solution made by dissolving two pounds of potash soap into a gallon of boiling water. It is applied while hot. The solution is safe to use on all kinds of trees. When...

  9. Small-scale strength

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, J.L.

    1995-11-01

    In the world of power project development there is a market for smaller scale cogeneration projects in the range of 1MW to 10MW. In the European Union alone, this range will account for about $25 Billion in value over the next 10 years. By adding the potential that exists in Eastern Europe, the numbers are even more impressive. In Europe, only about 7 percent of needed electrical power is currently produced through cogeneration installations; this is expected to change to around 15 percent by the year 2000. Less than one year ago, two equipment manufacturers formed Dutch Power Partners (DPP) to focus on the market for industrial cogeneration throughout Europe.

  10. Dispatch R427 Time perception: Brain time or event time?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, Alan

    Dispatch R427 Time perception: Brain time or event time? Alan Johnston* and Shin'ya Nishida Recent experiments show that synchronous events can appear to an observer to occur at different times. Neural processing time delays are offered as an explanation of these temporal illusions, but equating perceived time

  11. Scaling of Lyapunov exponents in chaotic delay systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Jüngling; Wolfgang Kinzel

    2012-10-12

    The scaling behavior of the maximal Lyapunov exponent in chaotic systems with time-delayed feedback is investigated. For large delay times it has been shown that the delay-dependence of the exponent allows a distinction between strong and weak chaos, which are the analogy to strong and weak instability of periodic orbits in a delay system. We find significant differences between scaling of exponents in periodic or chaotic systems. We show that chaotic scaling is related to fluctuations in the linearized equations of motion. A linear delay system including multiplicative noise shows the same properties as the deterministic chaotic systems.

  12. Scaling up psycholinguistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Nathaniel J.

    2011-01-01

    regression for ERP estimation . . . . . . . . . . .4.2.1 The basic ERP as an intercept term . . . . . . . 4.2.25 Continuous-time regression for ERP estimation . . 5.1 One

  13. Remembering the time: a continuous Penelope A. Lewis1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miall, Chris

    a hypotheticalneuralpacemaker.Amorerecentmodel[2],the multiple time scales (MTS) framework, dispenses with the pacemaker­8], for motor versus nonmotor timing [9] and, more recently, for the

  14. Status of Chiral-Scale Perturbation Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crewther, R J

    2015-01-01

    Chiral-scale perturbation theory $\\chi$PT$_\\sigma$ has been proposed as an alternative to chiral $SU(3)_L\\times SU(3)_R$ perturbation theory which explains the $\\Delta I = 1/2$ rule for kaon decays. It is based on a low-energy expansion about an infrared fixed point in three-flavor QCD. In $\\chi$PT$_\\sigma$, quark condensation $\\langle\\bar q q \\rangle_\\mathrm{vac} \

  15. Simple scaling laws for astrophysical jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Huarte-Espinosa; S. Mendoza

    2006-07-15

    The idea of a unified model for all astrophysical jets has been considered for quite some time. We present here a few scaling laws relevant to all type of astrophysical jets, analogous to those of \\citet{sams96} which are widely used for astrophysical black holes. We use Buckingham's $ \\Pi $ theorem of dimensional analysis to obtain a family of dimensional relations among the physical quantities associated to astrophysical jets.

  16. Time Management Managing Time and Tasks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunkle, Tom

    Time Management Managing Time and Tasks What is time management? Time can't be managed ­ but you can manage the amount of time you use each day for fun, work, rest, and time spent with others. Why is time management important? You have responsibilities to yourself, to your family and friends, to your

  17. Scaling the Web in Designing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menascé, Daniel A.

    Scaling the Web Trade-offs in Designing Web Clusters 76 SEPTEMBER · OCTOBER 2002 http://computer.org/internet/ 1089-7801/02/$17.00 ©2002 IEEE IEEE INTERNET COMPUTING H igh-volume Web sites often use clusters approaches to scaling Web clusters: adding more servers of the same type (scaling out, or horizontally

  18. Cosmology on the Largest Scales with the SKA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camera, S; Bull, P; Bertacca, D; Chen, X; Ferreira, P G; Kunz, M; Maartens, R; Mao, Y; Santos, M G; Shapiro, P R; Viel, M; Xu, Y

    2015-01-01

    The study of the Universe on ultra-large scales is one of the major science cases for the Square Kilometre Array (SKA). The SKA will be able to probe a vast volume of the cosmos, thus representing a unique instrument, amongst next-generation cosmological experiments, for scrutinising the Universe's properties on the largest cosmic scales. Probing cosmic structures on extremely large scales will have many advantages. For instance, the growth of perturbations is well understood for those modes, since it falls fully within the linear regime. Also, such scales are unaffected by the poorly understood feedback of baryonic physics. On ultra-large cosmic scales, two key effects become significant: primordial non-Gaussianity and relativistic corrections to cosmological observables. Moreover, if late-time acceleration is driven not by dark energy but by modifications to general relativity, then such modifications should become apparent near and above the horizon scale. As a result, the SKA is forecast to deliver transf...

  19. Impedance Scaling for Small Angle Transitions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stupakov, G.; Bane, Karl; /SLAC; Zagorodnov, I.; /DESY; ,

    2010-10-27

    Based on the parabolic equation approach to Maxwell's equations we have derived scaling properties of the high frequency impedance/short bunch wakefields of structures. For the special case of small angle transitions we have shown the scaling properties are valid for all frequencies. Using these scaling properties one can greatly reduce the calculation time of the wakefield/impedance of long, small angle, beam pipe transitions, like one often finds in insertion regions of storage rings. We have tested the scaling with wakefield simulations of 2D and 3D models of such transitions, and found that the scaling works well. In modern ring-based light sources one often finds insertion devices having extremely small vertical apertures (on the order of millimeters) to allow for maximal undulator fields reaching the beam. Such insertion devices require that there be beam pipe transitions from these small apertures to the larger cross-sections (normally on the order of centimeters) found in the rest of the ring. The fact that there may be many such transitions, and that these transitions introduce beam pipe discontinuities very close to the beam path, means that their impedance will be large and, in fact, may dominate the impedance budget of the entire ring. To reduce their impact on impedance, the transitions are normally tapered gradually over a long distance. The accurate calculation of the impedance or wakefield of these long transitions, which are typically 3D objects (i.e. they do not have cylindrical symmetry), can be quite a challenging numerical task. In this report we present a method of obtaining the impedance of a long, small angle transition from the calculation of a scaled, shorter one. Normally, the actual calculation is obtained from a time domain simulation of the wakefield in the structure, where the impedance can be obtained by performing a Fourier transform. We shall see that the scaled calculation reduces the computer time and memory requirements significantly, especially for 3D problems, and can make the difference between being able to solve a problem or not. The method is based on the parabolic equation approach to solving Maxwell's equation developed in Refs. [1, 2].

  20. Scaling of fluctuations in a colloidal glass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Wang; C. Song; H. A. Makse

    2006-11-01

    We report experimental measurements of particle dynamics in a colloidal glass in order to understand the dynamical heterogeneities associated with the cooperative motion of the particles in the glassy regime. We study the local and global fluctuation of correlation and response functions in an aging colloidal glass. The observables display universal scaling behavior following a modified power-law, with a plateau dominating the less heterogeneous short-time regime and a power-law tail dominating the highly heterogeneous long-time regime.

  1. Goethite Bench-scale and Large-scale Preparation Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Josephson, Gary B.; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2011-10-23

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is the keystone for cleanup of high-level radioactive waste from our nation's nuclear defense program. The WTP will process high-level waste from the Hanford tanks and produce immobilized high-level waste glass for disposal at a national repository, low activity waste (LAW) glass, and liquid effluent from the vitrification off-gas scrubbers. The liquid effluent will be stabilized into a secondary waste form (e.g. grout-like material) and disposed on the Hanford site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) along with the low-activity waste glass. The major long-term environmental impact at Hanford results from technetium that volatilizes from the WTP melters and finally resides in the secondary waste. Laboratory studies have indicated that pertechnetate ({sup 99}TcO{sub 4}{sup -}) can be reduced and captured into a solid solution of {alpha}-FeOOH, goethite (Um 2010). Goethite is a stable mineral and can significantly retard the release of technetium to the environment from the IDF. The laboratory studies were conducted using reaction times of many days, which is typical of environmental subsurface reactions that were the genesis of this new process. This study was the first step in considering adaptation of the slow laboratory steps to a larger-scale and faster process that could be conducted either within the WTP or within the effluent treatment facility (ETF). Two levels of scale-up tests were conducted (25x and 400x). The largest scale-up produced slurries of Fe-rich precipitates that contained rhenium as a nonradioactive surrogate for {sup 99}Tc. The slurries were used in melter tests at Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) to determine whether captured rhenium was less volatile in the vitrification process than rhenium in an unmodified feed. A critical step in the technetium immobilization process is to chemically reduce Tc(VII) in the pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}{sup -}) to Tc(Iv)by reaction with the ferrous ion, Fe{sup 2+}-Fe{sup 2+} is oxidized to Fe{sup 3+} - in the presence of goethite seed particles. Rhenium does not mimic that process; it is not a strong enough reducing agent to duplicate the TcO{sub 4}{sup -}/Fe{sup 2+} redox reactions. Laboratory tests conducted in parallel with these scaled tests identified modifications to the liquid chemistry necessary to reduce ReO{sub 4}{sup -} and capture rhenium in the solids at levels similar to those achieved by Um (2010) for inclusion of Tc into goethite. By implementing these changes, Re was incorporated into Fe-rich solids for testing at VSL. The changes also changed the phase of iron that was in the slurry product: rather than forming goethite ({alpha}-FeOOH), the process produced magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}). Magnetite was considered by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and VSL to probably be a better product to improve Re retention in the melter because it decomposes at a higher temperature than goethite (1538 C vs. 136 C). The feasibility tests at VSL were conducted using Re-rich magnetite. The tests did not indicate an improved retention of Re in the glass during vitrification, but they did indicate an improved melting rate (+60%), which could have significant impact on HLW processing. It is still to be shown whether the Re is a solid solution in the magnetite as {sup 99}Tc was determined to be in goethite.

  2. Real-time capable first principle based modelling of tokamak turbulent transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breton, S; Felici, F; Imbeaux, F; Aniel, T; Artaud, J F; Baiocchi, B; Bourdelle, C; Camenen, Y; Garcia, J

    2015-01-01

    A real-time capable core turbulence tokamak transport model is developed. This model is constructed from the regularized nonlinear regression of quasilinear gyrokinetic transport code output. The regression is performed with a multilayer perceptron neural network. The transport code input for the neural network training set consists of five dimensions, and is limited to adiabatic electrons. The neural network model successfully reproduces transport fluxes predicted by the original quasilinear model, while gaining five orders of magnitude in computation time. The model is implemented in a real-time capable tokamak simulator, and simulates a 300s ITER discharge in 10s. This proof-of-principle for regression based transport models anticipates a significant widening of input space dimensionality and physics realism for future training sets. This aims to provide unprecedented computational speed coupled with first-principle based physics for real-time control and integrated modelling applications.

  3. Time Machine at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Ya. Aref'eva; I. V. Volovich

    2007-10-25

    Recently, black hole and brane production at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been widely discussed. We suggest that there is a possibility to test causality at the LHC. We argue that if the scale of quantum gravity is of the order of few TeVs, proton-proton collisions at the LHC could lead to the formation of time machines (spacetime regions with closed timelike curves) which violate causality. One model for the time machine is a traversable wormhole. We argue that the traversable wormhole production cross section at the LHC is of the same order as the cross section for the black hole production. Traversable wormholes assume violation of the null energy condition (NEC) and an exotic matter similar to the dark energy is required. Decay of the wormholes/time machines and signatures of time machine events at the LHC are discussed.

  4. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerber, Richard

    2012-01-01

    simulations of fusion and energy systems with unprecedentedRequirements  for  Fusion  Energy  Sciences   14 General  and  Storage  Requirements  for  Fusion  Energy  Sciences  

  5. Elastic Ubiquitous Platform as a Service for Large-scale Ubiquitous Applications , Schahram Dustdar1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dustdar, Schahram

    emerging in the fields of pervasive healthcare, smart cities and so on. They present unprecedented, 1991), including for example pervasive healthcare, smart cities, and so on. The development

  6. Large scale tracking algorithms.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, Ross L.; Love, Joshua Alan; Melgaard, David Kennett; Karelitz, David B.; Pitts, Todd Alan; Zollweg, Joshua David; Anderson, Dylan Z.; Nandy, Prabal; Whitlow, Gary L.; Bender, Daniel A.; Byrne, Raymond Harry

    2015-01-01

    Low signal-to-noise data processing algorithms for improved detection, tracking, discrimination and situational threat assessment are a key research challenge. As sensor technologies progress, the number of pixels will increase signi cantly. This will result in increased resolution, which could improve object discrimination, but unfortunately, will also result in a significant increase in the number of potential targets to track. Many tracking techniques, like multi-hypothesis trackers, suffer from a combinatorial explosion as the number of potential targets increase. As the resolution increases, the phenomenology applied towards detection algorithms also changes. For low resolution sensors, "blob" tracking is the norm. For higher resolution data, additional information may be employed in the detection and classfication steps. The most challenging scenarios are those where the targets cannot be fully resolved, yet must be tracked and distinguished for neighboring closely spaced objects. Tracking vehicles in an urban environment is an example of such a challenging scenario. This report evaluates several potential tracking algorithms for large-scale tracking in an urban environment.

  7. A scaling analysis of thermoacoustic convection in a zero-gravity environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krane, R.J.; Parang, M.

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents a scaling analysis of a one-dimensional thermoacoustic convection heat transfer process in a zero-gravity environment. The relative importance of the terms in the governing equations is discussed for different time scales without attempting to solve the equations. The scaling analysis suggests certain generalizations that can be made in this class of heat transfer problems.

  8. UGE Scheduler Cycle Time

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    UGE Scheduler Cycle Time UGE Scheduler Cycle Time Genepool Cycle Time Genepool Daily Genepool Weekly Phoebe Cycle Time Phoebe Daily Phoebe Weekly What is the Scheduler Cycle? The...

  9. Multiscale functions, Scale dynamics and Applications to partial differential equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacky Cresson; Frédéric Pierret

    2015-09-03

    Modeling phenomena from experimental data, always begin with a \\emph{choice of hypothesis} on the observed dynamics such as \\emph{determinism}, \\emph{randomness}, \\emph{derivability} etc. Depending on these choices, different behaviors can be observed. The natural question associated to the modeling problem is the following : \\emph{"With a finite set of data concerning a phenomenon, can we recover its underlying nature ?} From this problem, we introduce in this paper the definition of \\emph{multi-scale functions}, \\emph{scale calculus} and \\emph{scale dynamics} based on the \\emph{time-scale calculus} (see \\cite{bohn}). These definitions will be illustrated on the \\emph{multi-scale Okamoto's functions}. The introduced formalism explains why there exists different continuous models associated to an equation with different \\emph{scale regimes} whereas the equation is \\emph{scale invariant}. A typical example of such an equation, is the \\emph{Euler-Lagrange equation} and particularly the \\emph{Newton's equation} which will be discussed. Notably, we obtain a \\emph{non-linear diffusion equation} via the \\emph{scale Newton's equation} and also the \\emph{non-linear Schr\\"odinger equation} via the \\emph{scale Newton's equation}. Under special assumptions, we recover the classical \\emph{diffusion} equation and the \\emph{Schr\\"odinger equation}.

  10. Large-scale chromosome fluctuations are driven by chromatin folding organization at small scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ana Maria Florescu; Pierre Therizols; Angelo Rosa

    2015-11-18

    Characterizing the link between small-scale chromatin structure and large-scale chromosome conformation is a prerequisite for understanding transcription. Yet, it remains poorly characterized. We present a simple biophysical model, where chromosomes are described in terms of folding of a chromatin sequence with alternating blocks of fibers with different thickness. We demonstrate that chromosomes undergo prominent conformational changes when the two fibers form separate domains. Conversely, when small stretches of the thinner fiber are randomly distributed, they act as impurities and conformational changes can be observed only at small length and time scales. Our results bring a limit to the possibility of detecting variations in the behavior of chromosomes due to chromatin modifications, and suggest that the debate whether chromosomes expand upon transcription, which is fueled by conflicting experimental observations, can be reconciled by examining how transcribed loci are distributed. Finally, to validate our conclusions, we compare our results to experimental FISH data.

  11. Transit light curves with finite integration time: Fisher information analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Ellen M.; Rogers, Leslie A.

    2014-10-10

    Kepler has revolutionized the study of transiting planets with its unprecedented photometric precision on more than 150,000 target stars. Most of the transiting planet candidates detected by Kepler have been observed as long-cadence targets with 30 minute integration times, and the upcoming Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite will record full frame images with a similar integration time. Integrations of 30 minutes affect the transit shape, particularly for small planets and in cases of low signal to noise. Using the Fisher information matrix technique, we derive analytic approximations for the variances and covariances on the transit parameters obtained from fitting light curve photometry collected with a finite integration time. We find that binning the light curve can significantly increase the uncertainties and covariances on the inferred parameters when comparing scenarios with constant total signal to noise (constant total integration time in the absence of read noise). Uncertainties on the transit ingress/egress time increase by a factor of 34 for Earth-size planets and 3.4 for Jupiter-size planets around Sun-like stars for integration times of 30 minutes compared to instantaneously sampled light curves. Similarly, uncertainties on the mid-transit time for Earth and Jupiter-size planets increase by factors of 3.9 and 1.4. Uncertainties on the transit depth are largely unaffected by finite integration times. While correlations among the transit depth, ingress duration, and transit duration all increase in magnitude with longer integration times, the mid-transit time remains uncorrelated with the other parameters. We provide code in Python and Mathematica for predicting the variances and covariances at www.its.caltech.edu/?eprice.

  12. Time and Labor Manual -Time Keepers -LSUSH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Time and Labor Manual - Time Keepers - LSUSH Version Date: July 2012 #12;COPYRIGHT & TRADEMARKS create a risk of personal injury. If you use this software in dangerous applications, then you shall Guide Time and Labor Manual - Time Keepers - LSUSH Page iii Table of Contents Time and Labor Manual

  13. Time Commitments Where Does Your Time Go

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunkle, Tom

    Time Commitments Where Does Your Time Go Everyone starts the week with the same number of hours. So, why does your time go so fast? Let's find out! Number of hours of sleep each night ____ x 7 preparation/clean-up time) ____ x 7 = ____ Travel time to and from campus ___ x __ = ____ Number of hours per

  14. Scale, scaling and multifractals in geophysics: twenty Shaun Lovejoy1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovejoy, Shaun

    Scale, scaling and multifractals in geophysics: twenty years on Shaun Lovejoy1 and Daniel Schertzer number of degrees of freedom approaches to nonlin- ear geophysics: a) the transition from fractal are generally necessary for geophysical applications. We illustrate these ideas with data analyses from both

  15. High-Performance Computing for Real-Time Grid Analysis and Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Zhenyu; Chen, Yousu; Chavarría-Miranda, Daniel

    2013-10-31

    Power grids worldwide are undergoing an unprecedented transition as a result of grid evolution meeting information revolution. The grid evolution is largely driven by the desire for green energy. Emerging grid technologies such as renewable generation, smart loads, plug-in hybrid vehicles, and distributed generation provide opportunities to generate energy from green sources and to manage energy use for better system efficiency. With utility companies actively deploying these technologies, a high level of penetration of these new technologies is expected in the next 5-10 years, bringing in a level of intermittency, uncertainties, and complexity that the grid did not see nor design for. On the other hand, the information infrastructure in the power grid is being revolutionized with large-scale deployment of sensors and meters in both the transmission and distribution networks. The future grid will have two-way flows of both electrons and information. The challenge is how to take advantage of the information revolution: pull the large amount of data in, process it in real time, and put information out to manage grid evolution. Without addressing this challenge, the opportunities in grid evolution will remain unfulfilled. This transition poses grand challenges in grid modeling, simulation, and information presentation. The computational complexity of underlying power grid modeling and simulation will significantly increase in the next decade due to an increased model size and a decreased time window allowed to compute model solutions. High-performance computing is essential to enable this transition. The essential technical barrier is to vastly increase the computational speed so operation response time can be reduced from minutes to seconds and sub-seconds. The speed at which key functions such as state estimation and contingency analysis are conducted (typically every 3-5 minutes) needs to be dramatically increased so that the analysis of contingencies is both comprehensive and real time. An even bigger challenge is how to incorporate dynamic information into real-time grid operation. Today’s online grid operation is based on a static grid model and can only provide a static snapshot of current system operation status, while dynamic analysis is conducted offline because of low computational efficiency. The offline analysis uses a worst-case scenario to determine transmission limits, resulting in under-utilization of grid assets. This conservative approach does not necessarily lead to reliability. Many times, actual power grid scenarios are not studied, and they will push the grid over the edge and resulting in outages and blackouts. This chapter addresses the HPC needs in power grid analysis and operations. Example applications such as state estimation and contingency analysis are given to demonstrate the value of HPC in power grid applications. Future research directions are suggested for high performance computing applications in power grids to improve the transparency, efficiency, and reliability of power grids.

  16. Improved gradient flow for step scaling function and scale setting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anna Hasenfratz

    2015-01-30

    The gradient flow renormalized coupling offers a simple and relatively inexpensive way to calculate the step scaling function and the lattice scale, but both applications can be hindered by large lattice artifacts. Recently we introduced an empirical non-perturbative improvement that can reduce, even remove $\\mathcal{O}(a^2)$ lattice artifacts. The method is easy to implement and can be applied to any lattice gauge theory of interest both in step scaling studies and for scale setting. In this talk I will briefly review this improvement method and discuss its application for determining the discrete $\\beta$ function of the 8 and 12 flavor SU(3) systems and for improved scale setting in 2+1+1 flavor QCD

  17. Drift Scale THM Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Rutqvist

    2004-10-07

    This model report documents the drift scale coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical (THM) processes model development and presents simulations of the THM behavior in fractured rock close to emplacement drifts. The modeling and analyses are used to evaluate the impact of THM processes on permeability and flow in the near-field of the emplacement drifts. The results from this report are used to assess the importance of THM processes on seepage and support in the model reports ''Seepage Model for PA Including Drift Collapse'' and ''Abstraction of Drift Seepage'', and to support arguments for exclusion of features, events, and processes (FEPs) in the analysis reports ''Features, Events, and Processes in Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport and Features, Events, and Processes: Disruptive Events''. The total system performance assessment (TSPA) calculations do not use any output from this report. Specifically, the coupled THM process model is applied to simulate the impact of THM processes on hydrologic properties (permeability and capillary strength) and flow in the near-field rock around a heat-releasing emplacement drift. The heat generated by the decay of radioactive waste results in elevated rock temperatures for thousands of years after waste emplacement. Depending on the thermal load, these temperatures are high enough to cause boiling conditions in the rock, resulting in water redistribution and altered flow paths. These temperatures will also cause thermal expansion of the rock, with the potential of opening or closing fractures and thus changing fracture permeability in the near-field. Understanding the THM coupled processes is important for the performance of the repository because the thermally induced permeability changes potentially effect the magnitude and spatial distribution of percolation flux in the vicinity of the drift, and hence the seepage of water into the drift. This is important because a sufficient amount of water must be available within a drift to transport any exposed radionuclides out of the drift to the groundwater below, and eventually to people within the accessible environment. Absent sufficient water, radionuclides cannot be transported and there would be no significant health effect on people, even if radioactive waste containers were damaged or corroded to such an extent that radionuclides were exposed to water.

  18. Method of producing nano-scaled inorganic platelets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhamu, Aruna; Jang, Bor Z.

    2012-11-13

    The present invention provides a method of exfoliating a layered material (e.g., transition metal dichalcogenide) to produce nano-scaled platelets having a thickness smaller than 100 nm, typically smaller than 10 nm. The method comprises (a) dispersing particles of a non-graphite laminar compound in a liquid medium containing therein a surfactant or dispersing agent to obtain a stable suspension or slurry; and (b) exposing the suspension or slurry to ultrasonic waves at an energy level for a sufficient length of time to produce separated nano-scaled platelets. The nano-scaled platelets are candidate reinforcement fillers for polymer nanocomposites.

  19. Cosmology on the Largest Scales with the SKA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Camera; A. Raccanelli; P. Bull; D. Bertacca; X. Chen; P. G. Ferreira; M. Kunz; R. Maartens; Y. Mao; M. G. Santos; P. R. Shapiro; M. Viel; Y. Xu

    2015-01-19

    The study of the Universe on ultra-large scales is one of the major science cases for the Square Kilometre Array (SKA). The SKA will be able to probe a vast volume of the cosmos, thus representing a unique instrument, amongst next-generation cosmological experiments, for scrutinising the Universe's properties on the largest cosmic scales. Probing cosmic structures on extremely large scales will have many advantages. For instance, the growth of perturbations is well understood for those modes, since it falls fully within the linear regime. Also, such scales are unaffected by the poorly understood feedback of baryonic physics. On ultra-large cosmic scales, two key effects become significant: primordial non-Gaussianity and relativistic corrections to cosmological observables. Moreover, if late-time acceleration is driven not by dark energy but by modifications to general relativity, then such modifications should become apparent near and above the horizon scale. As a result, the SKA is forecast to deliver transformational constraints on non-Gaussianity and to probe gravity on super-horizon scales for the first time.

  20. Multi-scaling of wholesale electricity prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caravelli, Francesco; Ududec, Cozmin; Ashtari, Ali; Di Matteo, Tiziana; Aste, Tomaso

    2015-01-01

    We empirically analyze the most volatile component of the electricity price time series from two North-American wholesale electricity markets. We show that these time series exhibit fluctuations which are not described by a Brownian Motion, as they show multi-scaling, high Hurst exponents and sharp price movements. We use the generalized Hurst exponent (GHE, $H(q)$) to show that although these time-series have strong cyclical components, the fluctuations exhibit persistent behaviour, i.e., $H(q)>0.5$. We investigate the effectiveness of the GHE as a predictive tool in a simple linear forecasting model, and study the forecast error as a function of $H(q)$, with $q=1$ and $q=2$. Our results suggest that the GHE can be used as prediction tool for these time series when the Hurst exponent is dynamically evaluated on rolling time windows of size $\\approx 50 - 100$ hours. These results are also compared to the case in which the cyclical components have been subtracted from the time series, showing the importance of...

  1. SCALING PROPERTIES OF SMALL-SCALE FLUCTUATIONS IN MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez, Jean Carlos; Mason, Joanne; Boldyrev, Stanislav; Cattaneo, Fausto E-mail: j.mason@exeter.ac.uk E-mail: cattaneo@flash.uchicago.edu

    2014-09-20

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in the majority of natural systems, including the interstellar medium, the solar corona, and the solar wind, has Reynolds numbers far exceeding the Reynolds numbers achievable in numerical experiments. Much attention is therefore drawn to the universal scaling properties of small-scale fluctuations, which can be reliably measured in the simulations and then extrapolated to astrophysical scales. However, in contrast with hydrodynamic turbulence, where the universal structure of the inertial and dissipation intervals is described by the Kolmogorov self-similarity, the scaling for MHD turbulence cannot be established based solely on dimensional arguments due to the presence of an intrinsic velocity scale—the Alfvén velocity. In this Letter, we demonstrate that the Kolmogorov first self-similarity hypothesis cannot be formulated for MHD turbulence in the same way it is formulated for the hydrodynamic case. Besides profound consequences for the analytical consideration, this also imposes stringent conditions on numerical studies of MHD turbulence. In contrast with the hydrodynamic case, the discretization scale in numerical simulations of MHD turbulence should decrease faster than the dissipation scale, in order for the simulations to remain resolved as the Reynolds number increases.

  2. Radio Source Evolution on Galactic Scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maciel, T.; Alexander, P.

    2014-01-01

    is where we begin our young source model. The source will evolve until the pressure in the cocoon is high enough compared to the falling sideways ram pressure of the jet as to send an oblique reconfinement shock to the jet axis (Falle 1991). KA97 show... reconfinement, z1 = ?Lr, as the length-scale where the cocoon pressure equals the sideways ram pressure of the jet, pc = pj (here, we use ? instead of the ? used in A06). Lr is the source size at the time, tr, when the jet is fully reconfined and ?...

  3. Deterministic Scale-Free Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albert-Laszlo Barabasi; Erzsebet Ravasz; Tamas Vicsek

    2002-02-06

    Scale-free networks are abundant in nature and society, describing such diverse systems as the world wide web, the web of human sexual contacts, or the chemical network of a cell. All models used to generate a scale-free topology are stochastic, that is they create networks in which the nodes appear to be randomly connected to each other. Here we propose a simple model that generates scale-free networks in a deterministic fashion. We solve exactly the model, showing that the tail of the degree distribution follows a power law.

  4. LOFT: the Large Observatory For X-ray Timing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belloni, Tomaso M

    2012-01-01

    LOFT, the large observatory for X-ray timing, is a new mission concept competing with other four candidates for a launch opportunity in 2022-2024. LOFT will be performing high-time resolution X-ray observations of compact objects, combining for the first time an unprecedented large collecting area for X-ray photons and a spectral resolution approaching that of CCD-based X-ray instruments (down to 200 eV FWHM at 6 keV). The operating energy range is 2-80 keV. The main science goals of LOFT are the measurement of the neutron stars equation of states and the test of General Relativity in the strong field regime. The breakthrough capabilities of the instruments on-board LOFT will permit to open also new discovery windows for a wide range of Galactic and extragalactic X-ray sources. In this contribution, we provide a general description of the mission concept and summarize its main scientific capabilities.

  5. Chaos and scaling in daily river flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. De Domenico; M. Ali Ghorbani

    2011-04-07

    Adequate knowledge of the nature of river flow process is crucial for proper planning and management of our water resources and environment. This study attempts to detect the salient characteristics of flow dynamics of the Karoon River in Iran. Daily discharge series observed over a period of six years (1999-2004) is analyzed to examine the chaotic and scaling characteristics of the flow dynamics. The presence of chaos is investigated through the correlation dimension and Lyapunov exponent methods, while the Hurst exponent and R\\'enyi dimension analyses are performed to explore the scaling characteristics. The low correlation dimension ($2.60 \\pm 0.07$) and the positive largest Lyapunov exponent ($0.014 \\pm 0.001$) suggest the presence of low-dimensional chaos; they also imply that the flow dynamics are dominantly governed by three variables and can be reliably predicted up to 48 days (i.e. prediction horizon). Results from the Hurst exponent and R\\'enyi dimension analyses reveal the multifractal character of the flow dynamics, with persistent and anti-persistent behaviors observed at different time scales.

  6. Theory of Earthquake Recurrence Times

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Saichev; D. Sornette

    2006-05-31

    The statistics of recurrence times in broad areas have been reported to obey universal scaling laws, both for single homogeneous regions (Corral, 2003) and when averaged over multiple regions (Bak et al.,2002). These unified scaling laws are characterized by intermediate power law asymptotics. On the other hand, Molchan (2005) has presented a mathematical proof that, if such a universal law exists, it is necessarily an exponential, in obvious contradiction with the data. First, we generalize Molchan's argument to show that an approximate unified law can be found which is compatible with the empirical observations when incorporating the impact of the Omori law of earthquake triggering. We then develop the full theory of the statistics of inter-event times in the framework of the ETAS model of triggered seismicity and show that the empirical observations can be fully explained. Our theoretical expression fits well the empirical statistics over the whole range of recurrence times, accounting for different regimes by using only the physics of triggering quantified by Omori's law. The description of the statistics of recurrence times over multiple regions requires an additional subtle statistical derivation that maps the fractal geometry of earthquake epicenters onto the distribution of the average seismic rates in multiple regions. This yields a prediction in excellent agreement with the empirical data for reasonable values of the fractal dimension $d \\approx 1.8$, the average clustering ratio $n \\approx 0.9$, and the productivity exponent $\\alpha \\approx 0.9$ times the $b$-value of the Gutenberg-Richter law.

  7. Completing the complex Poynting theorem: Conservation of reactive energy in reactive time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerald Kaiser

    2014-12-11

    The complex Poynting theorem is extended canonically to a time-scale domain $(t, s)$ by replacing the phasors of time-harmonic fields by the analytic signals $X(r, t+is)$ of fields $X(r,t)$ with general time dependence. The imaginary time $s>0$ is shown to play the role of a time resolution scale, and the extended Poynting theorem splits into two conservation laws: its real part gives the conservation in $t$ of the scale-averaged active energy at fixed $s$, and its imaginary part gives the conservation in $s$ of the scale-averaged reactive energy at fixed $t$. At coarse scales (large $s$, slow time), where the system reduces to the circuit level, this may have applications to the theory of electric power transmission and conditioning. At fine scales (small $s$, fast time) it describes reactive energy dynamics in radiating systems.

  8. Demonstration Scale Projects Michael Cooney

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    investigated the application of anaerobic digestion to primary clarifier treatment as a means to lower bulk packing material in anaerobic digesters. #12;Demonstration Scale Projects Michael Cooney With a grant from the DOE, a 3,000 gallon anaerobic

  9. Pilot Scale Advanced Fogging Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demmer, Rick L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Fox, Don T. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Archiblad, Kip E. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Experiments in 2006 developed a useful fog solution using three different chemical constituents. Optimization of the fog recipe and use of commercially available equipment were identified as needs that had not been addressed. During 2012 development work it was noted that low concentrations of the components hampered coverage and drying in the United Kingdom’s National Nuclear Laboratory’s testing much more so than was evident in the 2006 tests. In fiscal year 2014 the Idaho National Laboratory undertook a systematic optimization of the fogging formulation and conducted a non-radioactive, pilot scale demonstration using commercially available fogging equipment. While not as sophisticated as the equipment used in earlier testing, the new approach is much less expensive and readily available for smaller scale operations. Pilot scale testing was important to validate new equipment of an appropriate scale, optimize the chemistry of the fogging solution, and to realize the conceptual approach.

  10. Time-resolved fuel injector flow characterisation based on 3D laser Doppler vibrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crua, Cyril

    2015-01-01

    In order to enable investigations of the fuel flow inside unmodified injectors, we have developed a new experimental approach to measure time-resolved vibration spectra of diesel nozzles using a three dimensional laser vibrometer. The technique we propose is based on the triangulation of the vibrometer and fuel pressure transducer signals, and enables the quantitative characterisation of quasi-cyclic internal flows without requiring modifications to the injector, the working fluid, or limiting the fuel injection pressure. The vibrometer, which uses the Doppler effect to measure the velocity of a vibrating object, was used to scan injector nozzle tips during the injection event. The data were processed using a discrete Fourier transform to provide time-resolved spectra for valve-closed-orifice, minisac and microsac nozzle geometries, and injection pressures ranging from 60 to 160MPa, hence offering unprecedented insight into cyclic cavitation and internal mechanical dynamic processes. A peak was consistently f...

  11. Time Crystals from Minimum Time Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mir Faizal; Mohammed M. Khalil; Saurya Das

    2014-12-29

    Motivated by the Generalized Uncertainty Principle, covariance, and a minimum measurable time, we propose a deformation of the Heisenberg algebra, and show that this leads to corrections to all quantum mechanical systems. We also demonstrate that such a deformation implies a discrete spectrum for time. In other words, time behaves like a crystal.

  12. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA ACADEMIC SALARY SCALES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA ACADEMIC SALARY SCALES July 1, 2014* You can navigate the salary scales is the annual salary rate for Step 9, plus 11 percent For information on the "Minimum Scales" from 10 and the Adjunct Professor Series are also paid on the Academic-Year Ladder Ranks Salary Scale. Adjusted Scale 7

  13. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON VISUALIZATION & COMPUTER GRAPHICS 1 Radiance Transfer Biclustering for Real-time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Kun

    --We present a real-time algorithm to render all-frequency radiance transfer at both macro-scale and meso-scale. At a meso-scale, the shading is computed on a per-pixel basis by integrating the product of the local inci in a meso-scale, densely sampled at each pixel and mapped over the object. The bi-scale transfer

  14. Scale-dependent seismic velocity in heterogeneous media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukerji, T.; Mavko, G.; Mujica, D. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)] [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Lucet, N. [IFP, Rueil-Malmaison (France)] [IFP, Rueil-Malmaison (France)

    1995-07-01

    The measurable traveltime of seismic events propagating in heterogeneous media depend on the geologic scale, the seismic wavelength, and the propagation distance. In general, the velocity inferred from arrival times is slower when the wavelength is longer than the scale of heterogeneity and faster when the wavelength is shorter. For normal incidence propagation in stratified media, this is the difference between averaging elastic compliance sin the long wavelength limit. In two and three dimensions there is also the path effect. Shorter wavelengths tend to find faster paths, thus biasing the traveltimes to lower values. In the shorter wavelength limit, the slowness inferred from the average traveltime is smaller than the mean slowness of the medium. When the propagation distance is much larger than the scale of the heterogeneity, the path effect causes the velocity increase from long to short wavelengths to be much larger in two dimensions than in one dimension, and even larger in three dimensions. The amount of velocity dispersion can be understood theoretically, but there is some discrepancy between theory and experiment as to what ratio of wavelength to heterogeneity scale separates the long and short wavelength limits. The scale-dependent traveltime implies that a measured velocity depends not just on rock properties, but also on the scale of the measurement relative to he scale of the geology.

  15. Trapped ion scaling with pulsed fast gates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. D. B. Bentley; A. R. R. Carvalho; J. J. Hope

    2015-07-10

    Fast entangling gates for trapped ions offer vastly improved gate operation times relative to implemented gates, as well as approaches to trap scaling. Gates on neighbouring ions only involve local ions when performed sufficiently fast, and we find that even a fast gate between distant ions with few degrees of freedom restores all the motional modes given more stringent gate speed conditions. We compare pulsed fast gate schemes, defined by a timescale faster than the trap period, and find that our proposed scheme has less stringent requirements on laser repetition rate for achieving arbitrary gate time targets and infidelities well below $10^{-4}$. By extending gate schemes to ion crystals, we explore the effect of ion number on gate fidelity for coupling neighbouring pairs of ions in large crystals. Inter-ion distance determines the gate time, and a factor of five increase in repetition rate, or correspondingly the laser power, reduces the infidelity by almost two orders of magnitude. We also apply our fast gate scheme to entangle the first and last ions in a crystal. As the number of ions in the crystal increases, significant increases in the laser power are required to provide the short gate times corresponding to fidelity above 0.99.

  16. COOLING COIL EFFECTS ON BLENDING IN A PILOT SCALE TANK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leishear, R.; Poirier, M.; Fowley, M.; Steeper, T.

    2010-08-26

    Blending, or mixing, processes in 1.3 million gallon nuclear waste tanks are complicated by the fact that miles of serpentine, vertical, cooling coils are installed in the tanks. As a step toward investigating blending interference due to coils in this type of tank, a 1/10.85 scale tank and pump model were constructed for pilot scale testing. A series of tests were performed in this scaled tank by adding blue dye to visualize blending, and by adding acid or base tracers to solution to quantify the time required to effectively blend the tank contents. The acid and base tests were monitored with pH probes, which were located in the pilot scale tank to ensure that representative samples were obtained. Using the probes, the hydronium ion concentration [H{sup +}] was measured to ensure that a uniform concentration was obtained throughout the tank. As a result of pilot scale testing, a significantly improved understanding of mixing, or blending, in nuclear waste tanks has been achieved. Evaluation of test data showed that cooling coils in the waste tank model increased pilot scale blending times by 200% in the recommended operating range, compared to previous theoretical estimates of a 10-50% increase. Below the planned operating range, pilot scale blending times were increased by as much as 700% in a tank with coils installed. One pump, rather than two or more, was shown to effectively blend the tank contents, and dual pump nozzles installed parallel to the tank wall were shown to provide optimal blending. In short, experimental results varied significantly from expectations.

  17. Grid-scale Fluctuations and Forecast Error in Wind Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Bel; C. P. Connaughton; M. Toots; M. M. Bandi

    2015-03-29

    The fluctuations in wind power entering an electrical grid (Irish grid) were analyzed and found to exhibit correlated fluctuations with a self-similar structure, a signature of large-scale correlations in atmospheric turbulence. The statistical structure of temporal correlations for fluctuations in generated and forecast time series was used to quantify two types of forecast error: a timescale error ($e_{\\tau}$) that quantifies the deviations between the high frequency components of the forecast and the generated time series, and a scaling error ($e_{\\zeta}$) that quantifies the degree to which the models fail to predict temporal correlations in the fluctuations of the generated power. With no $a$ $priori$ knowledge of the forecast models, we suggest a simple memory kernel that reduces both the timescale error ($e_{\\tau}$) and the scaling error ($e_{\\zeta}$).

  18. Grid-scale Fluctuations and Forecast Error in Wind Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bel, G; Toots, M; Bandi, M M

    2015-01-01

    The fluctuations in wind power entering an electrical grid (Irish grid) were analyzed and found to exhibit correlated fluctuations with a self-similar structure, a signature of large-scale correlations in atmospheric turbulence. The statistical structure of temporal correlations for fluctuations in generated and forecast time series was used to quantify two types of forecast error: a timescale error ($e_{\\tau}$) that quantifies the deviations between the high frequency components of the forecast and the generated time series, and a scaling error ($e_{\\zeta}$) that quantifies the degree to which the models fail to predict temporal correlations in the fluctuations of the generated power. With no $a$ $priori$ knowledge of the forecast models, we suggest a simple memory kernel that reduces both the timescale error ($e_{\\tau}$) and the scaling error ($e_{\\zeta}$).

  19. Signature-change events in emergent spacetimes with anisotropic scaling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinfurtner, Silke; Visser, Matt

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the behaviour of quantum fields coupled to a spacetime geometry exhibiting finite regions of Euclidean (Riemannian) signature. Although from a gravity perspective this situation might seem somewhat far fetched, we will demonstrate its direct physical relevance for an explicitly realizable condensed matter system whose linearized perturbations experience an effective emergent spacetime geometry with externally controllable signature. This effective geometry is intrinsically quantum in origin, and its signature is determined by the details of the microscopic structure. At the level of the effective field theory arising from our condensed matter system we encounter explicit anisotropic scaling in time and space. Here Lorentz symmetry is an emergent symmetry in the infrared. This anisotropic scaling of time and space cures some of the technical problems that arise when working within a canonical quantisation scheme obeying strict Lorentz invariance at all scales, and so is helpful in permitting sig...

  20. Large-Scale Magnetic Field Re-generation by Resonant MHD Wave Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Galtier; S. Nazarenko

    2007-10-24

    We investigate numerically the long-time behavior of balanced Alfven wave turbulence forced at intermediate scales. Whereas the usual constant-flux solution is found at the smallest scales, two new scalings are obtained at the forcing scales and at the largest scales of the system. In the latter case we show, in particular, that the spectrum evolves first to a state determined by Loitsyansky invariant and later a state close to the thermodynamic equipartition solution predicted by wave turbulence. The astrophysical implications for galactic magnetic field generation are discussed.

  1. Global Warming in Geologic Time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Archer, David

    2008-02-27

    The notion is pervasive in the climate science community and in the public at large that the climate impacts of fossil fuel CO2 release will only persist for a few centuries. This conclusion has no basis in theory or models of the atmosphere/ ocean carbon cycle, which we review here. The largest fraction of the CO2 recovery will take place on time scales of centuries, as CO2 invades the ocean, but a significant fraction of the fossil fuel CO2, ranging in published models in the literature from 20-60%, remains airborne for a thousand years or longer. Ultimate recovery takes place on time scales of hundreds of thousands of years, a geologic longevity typically associated in public perceptions with nuclear waste. The glacial/interglacial climate cycles demonstrate that ice sheets and sea level respond dramatically to millennial-timescale changes in climate forcing. There are also potential positive feedbacks in the carbon cycle, including methane hydrates in the ocean, and peat frozen in permafrost, that are most sensitive to the long tail of the fossil fuel CO2 in the atmosphere.

  2. Global Warming in Geologic Time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Archer

    2008-02-27

    The notion is pervasive in the climate science community and in the public at large that the climate impacts of fossil fuel CO2 release will only persist for a few centuries. This conclusion has no basis in theory or models of the atmosphere / ocean carbon cycle, which we review here. The largest fraction of the CO2 recovery will take place on time scales of centuries, as CO2 invades the ocean, but a significant fraction of the fossil fuel CO2, ranging in published models in the literature from 20-60%, remains airborne for a thousand years or longer. Ultimate recovery takes place on time scales of hundreds of thousands of years, a geologic longevity typically associated in public perceptions with nuclear waste. The glacial / interglacial climate cycles demonstrate that ice sheets and sea level respond dramatically to millennial-timescale changes in climate forcing. There are also potential positive feedbacks in the carbon cycle, including methane hydrates in the ocean, and peat frozen in permafrost, that are most sensitive to the long tail of the fossil fuel CO2 in the atmosphere.

  3. Global Warming in Geologic Time

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    David Archer

    2010-01-08

    The notion is pervasive in the climate science community and in the public at large that the climate impacts of fossil fuel CO2 release will only persist for a few centuries. This conclusion has no basis in theory or models of the atmosphere / ocean carbon cycle, which we review here. The largest fraction of the CO2 recovery will take place on time scales of centuries, as CO2 invades the ocean, but a significant fraction of the fossil fuel CO2, ranging in published models in the literature from 20-60%, remains airborne for a thousand years or longer. Ultimate recovery takes place on time scales of hundreds of thousands of years, a geologic longevity typically associated in public perceptions with nuclear waste. The glacial / interglacial climate cycles demonstrate that ice sheets and sea level respond dramatically to millennial-timescale changes in climate forcing. There are also potential positive feedbacks in the carbon cycle, including methane hydrates in the ocean, and peat frozen in permafrost, that are most sensitive to the long tail of the fossil fuel CO2 in the atmosphere.

  4. Mechanistically-Based Field-Scale Models of Uranium Biogeochemistry from Upscaling Pore-Scale Experiments and Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tim Scheibe; Alexandre Tartakovsky; Brian Wood; Joe Seymour

    2007-04-19

    Effective environmental management of DOE sites requires reliable prediction of reactive transport phenomena. A central issue in prediction of subsurface reactive transport is the impact of multiscale physical, chemical, and biological heterogeneity. Heterogeneity manifests itself through incomplete mixing of reactants at scales below those at which concentrations are explicitly defined (i.e., the numerical grid scale). This results in a mismatch between simulated reaction processes (formulated in terms of average concentrations) and actual processes (controlled by local concentrations). At the field scale, this results in apparent scale-dependence of model parameters and inability to utilize laboratory parameters in field models. Accordingly, most field modeling efforts are restricted to empirical estimation of model parameters by fitting to field observations, which renders extrapolation of model predictions beyond fitted conditions unreliable. The objective of this project is to develop a theoretical and computational framework for (1) connecting models of coupled reactive transport from pore-scale processes to field-scale bioremediation through a hierarchy of models that maintain crucial information from the smaller scales at the larger scales; and (2) quantifying the uncertainty that is introduced by both the upscaling process and uncertainty in physical parameters. One of the challenges of addressing scale-dependent effects of coupled processes in heterogeneous porous media is the problem-specificity of solutions. Much effort has been aimed at developing generalized scaling laws or theories, but these require restrictive assumptions that render them ineffective in many real problems. We propose instead an approach that applies physical and numerical experiments at small scales (specifically the pore scale) to a selected model system in order to identify the scaling approach appropriate to that type of problem. Although the results of such studies will generally not be applicable to other broad classes of problems, we believe that this approach (if applied over time to many types of problems) offers greater potential for long-term progress than attempts to discover a universal solution or theory. We are developing and testing this approach using porous media and model reaction systems that can be both experimentally measured and quantitatively simulated at the pore scale, specifically biofilm development and metal reduction in granular porous media. The general approach we are using in this research follows the following steps: (1) Perform pore-scale characterization of pore geometry and biofilm development in selected porous media systems. (2) Simulate selected reactive transport processes at the pore scale in experimentally measured pore geometries. (3) Validate pore-scale models against laboratory-scale experiments. (4) Perform upscaling to derive continuum-scale (local darcy scale) process descriptions and effective parameters. (5) Use upscaled models and parameters to simulate reactive transport at the continuum scale in a macroscopically heterogeneous medium.

  5. Fast scale prototyping for folded millirobots Aaron M. Hoover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fearing, Ron

    of a robot design. The process utilizes very low cost, so-called "green" materials and allows available polymer films, we can realize a prototype design in a matter of minutes compared with days for a complicated SCM design at the small scale. The time savings enable a significantly shorter design cycle

  6. Test Administration Instructions for the Fullerton Advanced Balance (FAB) Scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Test Administration Instructions for the Fullerton Advanced Balance (FAB) Scale 1. Stand with feet: Stopwatch with lanyard (for placing around neck). Safety Procedures: Position person being tested n a corner at eye level so participant and time can be monitored simultaneously. Testing procedures: Demonstrate

  7. Universal scaling in fast quantum quenches in conformal field theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sumit R. Das; Damian A. Galante; Robert C. Myers

    2015-03-05

    We study the time evolution of a conformal field theory deformed by a relevant operator under a smooth but fast quantum quench which brings it to the conformal point. We argue that when the quench time scale $\\delta t$ is small compared to the scale set by the relevant coupling, the expectation value of the quenched operator scales universally as $\\delta g/ \\delta t ^{2\\Delta-d}$ where $\\delta g$ is the quench amplitude. This growth is further enhanced by a logarithmic factor in even dimensions. We present explicit results for free scalar and fermionic field theories, supported by an analytic understanding of the leading contribution for fast quenches. Results from this Letter suggest that this scaling result, first found in holography, is in fact universal to quantum quenches. Our considerations also show that this limit of fast smooth quenches is quite different from an instantaneous quench from one time-independent Hamiltonian to another, where the Schrodinger picture state at the time of the quench simply serves as an initial condition for subsequent evolution with the final Hamiltonian.

  8. Microfluidics: Fluid physics at the nanoliter scale Todd M. Squires*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quake, Stephen R.

    Microfluidics: Fluid physics at the nanoliter scale Todd M. Squires* Departments of Physics by vastly reducing the space, labor, and time required for calculations. Microfluidic systems hold similar, the long-range nature of viscous flows and the small device dimensions inherent in microfluidics mean

  9. Thermodynamics and Finite size scaling in Scalar Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debasish Banerjee; Saumen Datta; Sourendu Gupta

    2008-12-05

    In this work we consider the 1-component real scalar $\\phi^4$ theory in 4 space-time dimensions on the lattice and investigate the finite size scaling of thermodynamic quantities to study whether the thermodynamic limit is attained. The results are obtained for the symmetric phase of the theory.

  10. TRANSCONTINENTAL PRINTING INC.: FULL SCALE DEMONSTRATION OF A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;TRANSCONTINENTAL PRINTING INC.: FULL SCALE DEMONSTRATION OF A TREATMENT TECHNOLOGY TO REDUCE Prevention Section Environment Canada 224 West Esplanade North Vancouver, B.C. V7M 3H7 #12;Transcontinental at the Transcontinental Printing facility in Delta, BC. At the time of writing, Transcontinental was the only printing

  11. Continuous time very low frequency analog signal processors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veeravalli Raghupathy, Anand

    2000-01-01

    In this work, basic analog integrated circuits such as integrators, multipliers, comparators, summers and impedance scaling networks which serve as the basic building blocks for designing complicated continuous time analog ...

  12. Space time and the passage of time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George F. R. Ellis; Rituparno Goswami

    2012-08-26

    This paper examines the various arguments that have been put forward suggesting either that time does not exist, or that it exists but its flow is not real. I argue that (i) time both exists and flows; (ii) an Evolving Block Universe (`EBU') model of spacetime adequately captures this feature, emphasizing the key differences between the past, present, and future; (iii) the associated surfaces of constant time are uniquely geometrically and physically determined in any realistic spacetime model based in General Relativity Theory; (iv) such a model is needed in order to capture the essential aspects of what is happening in circumstances where initial data does not uniquely determine the evolution of spacetime structure because quantum uncertainty plays a key role in that development. Assuming that the functioning of the mind is based in the physical brain, evidence from the way that the mind apprehends the flow of time prefers this evolving time model over those where there is no flow of time.

  13. Manage Your Time 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Lynn

    2000-06-27

    People view time in different ways, but we all could do a better job of managing our time. This publication explains three different time management tools: the 24-hour time log and chart; a self-assessment of thinking styles and time management...

  14. Scaling Properties of Universal Tetramers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadizadeh, M. R.; Yamashita, M. T. [Instituto de Fisica Teorica, Universidade Estadual Paulista, 01140-070, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Tomio, Lauro [Instituto de Fisica Teorica, Universidade Estadual Paulista, 01140-070, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, 24210-346, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Delfino, A. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, 24210-346, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Frederico, T. [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, 12228-900, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2011-09-23

    We evidence the existence of a universal correlation between the binding energies of successive four-boson bound states (tetramers), for large two-body scattering lengths (a), related to an additional scale not constrained by three-body Efimov physics. Relevant to ultracold atom experiments, the atom-trimer relaxation peaks for |a|{yields}{infinity} when the ratio between the tetramer and trimer energies is {approx_equal}4.6 and a new tetramer is formed. The new scale is also revealed for a<0 by the prediction of a correlation between the positions of two successive peaks in the four-atom recombination process.

  15. Scaling and correlations in the dynamics of forest-fire occurrence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corral, Alvaro; Lasaponara, Rosa

    2007-01-01

    Forest-fire waiting times, defined as the time between successive events above a certain size in a given region, are calculated for Italy. The probability densities of the waiting times are found to verify a scaling law, despite that fact that the distribution of fire sizes is not a power law. The meaning of such behavior in terms of the possible self-similarity of the process in a nonstationary system is discussed. We find that the scaling law arises as a consequence of the stationarity of fire sizes and the existence of a non-trivial ``instantaneous'' scaling law, sustained by the correlations of the process.

  16. SCALE IN FEET STEVENSON COLLEGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    PARKING LOT 109 PARKING LOT 110 PARKING LOT 108 STEVENSON EVENT CENTER #12;E N SCALE IN FEET 0 8040 STEVENSON COLLEGE Disabled parking space Disabled access path Disabled access ramp Power-assisted doors Emergency blue light phone Metered parking Campus shuttle stop Santa

  17. Presented by Statistics at Scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .S. Department of Energy Contact George Ostrouchov Statistics and Data Sciences Computer Science and MathematicsPresented by Statistics at Scale George Ostrouchov Statistics and Data Sciences Computer Science and Mathematics Division #12;2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Ostrouchov_SDS_SC10 Common

  18. SCALE DRAM subsystem power analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhalodia, Vimal

    2005-01-01

    To address the needs of the next generation of low-power systems, DDR2 SDRAM offers a number of low-power modes with various performance and power consumption tradeoffs. The SCALE DRAM Subsystem is an energy-aware DRAM ...

  19. Scaling the Web Load Testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menascé, Daniel A.

    Scaling the Web Load Testing of Web Sites D evelopers typically measure a Web appli- cation on a Web site's IT infrastructure are a function of the site's expect- ed traffic. Ideally, you want, you shouldn't upgrade your Web servers if customers experience most delays in the database server

  20. Scaling the Web Composing Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menascé, Daniel A.

    Scaling the Web Composing Web Services:A QoS View A n Internet application can invoke several ser- vices -- a stock-trading Web service, for example, could invoke a payment service, which could then invoke an authentication service. Such a scenario is called a composite Web service, and it can

  1. Statistical Measures of Planck Scale Signal Correlations in Interferometers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogan, Craig J

    2015-01-01

    A model-independent statistical framework is presented to interpret data from systems where the mean time derivative of positional cross correlation between world lines, a measure of spreading in a quantum geometrical wave function, is measured with a precision smaller than the Planck time. The framework provides a general way to constrain possible departures from perfect independence of classical world lines, associated with Planck scale bounds on positional information. A parametrized candidate set of possible correlation functions is shown to be consistent with the known causal structure of the classical geometry measured by an apparatus, and the holographic scaling of information suggested by gravity. Frequency-domain power spectra are derived that can be compared with interferometer data. Simple projections of sensitivity for specific experimental set-ups suggests that measurements will directly yield constraints on a universal time derivative of the correlation function, and thereby confirm or rule out ...

  2. Emergence of the Electroweak Scale through the Higgs Portal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christoph Englert; Joerg Jaeckel; Valentin V. Khoze; Michael Spannowsky

    2013-02-12

    Having discovered a candidate for the final piece of the Standard Model, the Higgs boson, the question remains why its vacuum expectation value and its mass are so much smaller than the Planck scale (or any other high scale of new physics). One elegant solution was provided by Coleman and Weinberg, where all mass scales are generated from dimensionless coupling constants via dimensional transmutation. However, the original Coleman-Weinberg scenario predicts a Higgs mass which is too light; it is parametrically suppressed compared to the mass of the vectors bosons, and hence is much lighter than the observed value. In this paper we argue that a mass scale, generated via the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism in a hidden sector and then transmitted to the Standard Model through a Higgs portal, can naturally explain the smallness of the electroweak scale compared to the UV cutoff scale, and at the same time be consistent with the observed value. We analyse the phenomenology of such a model in the context of present and future colliders and low energy measurements.

  3. Bright-White Beetle Scales Optimise Multiple Scattering of Light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burresi, Matteo; Cortese, Lorenzo; Pattelli, Lorenzo; Kolle, Mathias; Vukusic, Peter; Wiersma, Diederik S.; Steiner, Ullrich; Vignolini, Silvia

    2014-08-15

    -resolved measurements were performed by overlapping the probe pulse with a gate pulse at 1550 nm from a parametric oscillator on a b-Barium Borate (BBO) crystal in time, space and in reciprocal space. Electromagnetic radiation with a frequency equal to the sum... the time-of-flight of a light pulse through single scales. These measure- ments separate the ‘early’ light, which undergoes only few scattering events, from the ‘late’ light, characteristic for multiple scattering25,26. An ultra-fast time...

  4. Method and appartus for converting static in-ground vehicle scales into weigh-in-motion systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muhs, Jeffrey D. (Lenior City, TN); Scudiere, Matthew B. (Oak Ridge, TN); Jordan, John K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method for converting in-ground static weighing scales for vehicles to weigh-in-motion systems. The apparatus upon conversion includes the existing in-ground static scale, peripheral switches and an electronic module for automatic computation of the weight. By monitoring the velocity, tire position, axle spacing, and real time output from existing static scales as a vehicle drives over the scales, the system determines when an axle of a vehicle is on the scale at a given time, monitors the combined weight output from any given axle combination on the scale(s) at any given time, and from these measurements automatically computes the weight of each individual axle and gross vehicle weight by an integration, integration approximation, and/or signal averaging technique.

  5. Buoyancy Effects on the Scaling Characteristics of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Wind Fields in the Mesoscale Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliyanpilakkil, V P; Ruiz-Columbié, A; Araya, G; Castillo, L; Hirth, B; Burgett, W

    2015-01-01

    We have analyzed long-term wind speed time-series from five field sites up to a height of 300 m from the ground. Structure function-based scaling analysis has revealed that the scaling exponents in the mesoscale regime systematically depend on height. This anomalous behavior is shown to be caused by the buoyancy effects. In the framework of the extended self-similarity, the relative scaling exponents portray quasi-universal behavior.

  6. Scale-free download network for publications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. D. Han; J. G. Liu; Y. G. Ma; X. Z. Cai; W. Q. Shen

    2004-05-19

    The scale-free power-law behavior of the statistics of the download frequency of publications has been, for the first time, reported. The data of the download frequency of publications are taken from a well-constructed web page in the field of economic physics (http://www.unifr.ch/econophysics/). The Zipf-law analysis and the Tsallis entropy method were used to fit the download frequency. It was found that the power-law exponent of rank-ordered frequency distribution is $\\gamma \\sim 0.38 \\pm 0.04$ which is consistent with the power-law exponent $\\alpha \\sim 3.37 \\pm 0.45$ for the cumulated frequency distributions. Preferential attachment model of Barabasi and Albert network has been used to explain the download network.

  7. On Time. 6b: Quantum Mechanical Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. K. Raju

    2008-08-09

    The existence of small amounts of advanced radiation, or a tilt in the arrow of time, makes the basic equations of physics mixed-type functional differential equations. The novel features of such equations point to a microphysical structure of time. This corresponds to a change of logic at the microphysical level. We show that the resulting logic is a quantum logic. This provides a natural and rigorous explanation of quantum interference. This structured-time interpretation of quantum mechanics is briefly compared with various other interpretations of q.m.

  8. Progress in fast, accurate multi-scale climate simulations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Collins, W. D.; Johansen, H.; Evans, K. J.; Woodward, C. S.; Caldwell, P. M.

    2015-06-01

    We present a survey of physical and computational techniques that have the potential to contribute to the next generation of high-fidelity, multi-scale climate simulations. Examples of the climate science problems that can be investigated with more depth with these computational improvements include the capture of remote forcings of localized hydrological extreme events, an accurate representation of cloud features over a range of spatial and temporal scales, and parallel, large ensembles of simulations to more effectively explore model sensitivities and uncertainties. Numerical techniques, such as adaptive mesh refinement, implicit time integration, and separate treatment of fast physical time scales are enablingmore »improved accuracy and fidelity in simulation of dynamics and allowing more complete representations of climate features at the global scale. At the same time, partnerships with computer science teams have focused on taking advantage of evolving computer architectures such as many-core processors and GPUs. As a result, approaches which were previously considered prohibitively costly have become both more efficient and scalable. In combination, progress in these three critical areas is poised to transform climate modeling in the coming decades.« less

  9. Progress in fast, accurate multi-scale climate simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, W. D.; Johansen, H.; Evans, K. J.; Woodward, C. S.; Caldwell, P. M.

    2015-01-01

    We present a survey of physical and computational techniques that have the potential to contribute to the next generation of high-fidelity, multi-scale climate simulations. Examples of the climate science problems that can be investigated with more depth with these computational improvements include the capture of remote forcings of localized hydrological extreme events, an accurate representation of cloud features over a range of spatial and temporal scales, and parallel, large ensembles of simulations to more effectively explore model sensitivities and uncertainties. Numerical techniques, such as adaptive mesh refinement, implicit time integration, and separate treatment of fast physical time scales are enabling improved accuracy and fidelity in simulation of dynamics and allowing more complete representations of climate features at the global scale. At the same time, partnerships with computer science teams have focused on taking advantage of evolving computer architectures such as many-core processors and GPUs. As a result, approaches which were previously considered prohibitively costly have become both more efficient and scalable. In combination, progress in these three critical areas is poised to transform climate modeling in the coming decades.

  10. Progress in Fast, Accurate Multi-scale Climate Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, William D [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Johansen, Hans [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Evans, Katherine J [ORNL; Woodward, Carol S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Caldwell, Peter [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

    2015-01-01

    We present a survey of physical and computational techniques that have the potential to con- tribute to the next generation of high-fidelity, multi-scale climate simulations. Examples of the climate science problems that can be investigated with more depth include the capture of remote forcings of localized hydrological extreme events, an accurate representation of cloud features over a range of spatial and temporal scales, and parallel, large ensembles of simulations to more effectively explore model sensitivities and uncertainties. Numerical techniques, such as adaptive mesh refinement, implicit time integration, and separate treatment of fast physical time scales are enabling improved accuracy and fidelity in simulation of dynamics and allow more complete representations of climate features at the global scale. At the same time, part- nerships with computer science teams have focused on taking advantage of evolving computer architectures, such as many-core processors and GPUs, so that these approaches which were previously considered prohibitively costly have become both more efficient and scalable. In combination, progress in these three critical areas is poised to transform climate modeling in the coming decades.

  11. Large-scale cosmic flows and moving dark energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jose Beltran Jimenez; Antonio L. Maroto

    2009-02-24

    Large-scale matter bulk flows with respect to the cosmic microwave background have very recently been detected on scales 100 Mpc/h and 300 Mpc/h by using two different techniques showing an excellent agreement in the motion direction. However, the unexpectedly large measured amplitudes are difficult to understand within the context of standard LCDM cosmology. In this work we show that the existence of such a flow could be signaling the presence of moving dark energy at the time when photons decoupled from matter. We also comment on the relation between the direction of the CMB dipole and the preferred axis observed in the quadrupole in this scenario.

  12. Quantum electrodynamics with anisotropic scaling: Heisenberg-Euler action and Schwinger pair production in the bilayer graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. I. Katsnelson; G. E. Volovik

    2012-03-19

    We discuss quantum electrodynamics emerging in the vacua with anisotropic scaling. Systems with anisotropic scaling were suggested by Horava in relation to the quantum theory of gravity. In such vacua the space and time are not equivalent, and moreover they obey different scaling laws, called the anisotropic scaling. Such anisotropic scaling takes place for fermions in bilayer graphene, where if one neglects the trigonal warping effects the massless Dirac fermions have quadratic dispersion. This results in the anisotropic quantum electrodynamics, in which electric and magnetic fields obey different scaling laws. Here we discuss the Heisenberg-Euler action and Schwinger pair production in such anisotropic QED

  13. Scale-adjusted metrics for predicting the evolution of urban indicators and quantifying the performance of cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alves, Luiz G A; Lenzi, Ervin K; Ribeiro, Haroldo V

    2015-01-01

    More than a half of world population is now living in cities and this number is expected to be two-thirds by 2050. Fostered by the relevancy of a scientific characterization of cities and for the availability of an unprecedented amount of data, academics have recently immersed in this topic and one of the most striking and universal finding was the discovery of robust allometric scaling laws between several urban indicators and the population size. Despite that, most governmental reports and several academic works still ignore these nonlinearities by often analyzing the raw or the per capita value of urban indicators, a practice that actually makes the urban metrics biased towards small or large cities depending on whether we have super or sublinear allometries. By following the ideas of Bettencourt et al., we account for this bias by evaluating the difference between the actual value of an urban indicator and the value expected by the allometry with the population size. We show that this scale-adjusted metri...

  14. Scheduling of large scale crude oil blending Felipe Diaz-Alvarado1, Francisco Trespalacios2,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    Scheduling of large scale crude oil blending Felipe D´iaz-Alvarado1, Francisco Trespalacios2, 30 (4): 614-634. D´iaz-Alvarado, Trespalacios, Grossmann Scheduling of large scale crude oil blending, P. A Novel Priority-Slot Based Continuous-Time Formulation for Crude-Oil Scheduling Problems

  15. Scaling of Lyapunov exponents of coupled chaotic systems Rudiger Zillmer, Volker Ahlers, and Arkady Pikovsky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pikovsky, Arkady

    Scaling of Lyapunov exponents of coupled chaotic systems Ru¨diger Zillmer, Volker Ahlers in the Lyapunov exponent in coupled chaotic systems at very small couplings. Using a continuous-time stochastic model for the coupled systems we derive a scaling relation for the largest Lyapunov exponent

  16. 2. Scaling Laws and Complexity in Fire Donald McKenzie and Maureen Kennedy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to define and quantify scales in communities or ecosystems. 2.1 Scale and Contagious Disturbance A contagious disturbance is one that spreads across a landscape over time, and whose intensity depends;2 2002). Some natural hazards (Cello and Malamud 2006), such as wildfires, are therefore contagious

  17. Domain Controlled Architecture A New Approach for Large Scale Software Integrated Automotive Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kühnhauser, Winfried

    Domain Controlled Architecture A New Approach for Large Scale Software Integrated Automotive Scale Software Integration, LSSI, Automotive Real Time, Multi-core, Many-core, Embedded Automo- tive mobility domain. The automotive in- dustry is confronted with a rising system complexity and several

  18. Density-Transition Scale at Quasiperpendicular Collisionless Shocks S. D. Bale* and F. S. Mozer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    , the macroscopic density transition scale at 98 crossings of the quasiperpendicular terrestrial bow shock. A timing scales much smaller than a collisional mean free path. The terrestrial bow shock forms from a fast Rm =0vsh associated with some anomalous resistivity , and the kinetic Reynolds length Re =vsh

  19. Scaled Solar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk,Sage ResourcesFlorida:Satcon JumpSawmill,Sayreville, NewScaled

  20. Flavor from the Electroweak Scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin Bauer; Marcela Carena; Katrin Gemmler

    2015-06-04

    We discuss the possibility that flavor hierarchies arise from the electroweak scale in a two Higgs doublet model, in which the two Higgs doublets jointly act as the flavon. Quark masses and mixing angles are explained by effective Yukawa couplings, generated by higher dimensional operators involving quarks and Higgs doublets. Modified Higgs couplings yield important effects on the production cross sections and decay rates of the light Standard Model like Higgs. In addition, flavor changing neutral currents arise at tree-level and lead to strong constraints from meson-antimeson mixing. Remarkably, flavor constraints turn out to prefer a region in parameter space that is in excellent agreement with the one preferred by recent Higgs precision measurements at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Direct searches for extra scalars at the LHC lead to further constraints. Precise predictions for the production and decay modes of the additional Higgs bosons are derived, and we present benchmark scenarios for searches at the LHC Run II. Flavor breaking at the electroweak scale as well as strong coupling effects demand a UV completion at the scale of a few TeV, possibly within the reach of the LHC.

  1. Centennial-scale elemental and isotopic variability in the tropical and subtropical North Atlantic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reuer, Matthew K. (Matthew Kindt), 1972-

    2002-01-01

    The marine geochemistry of the North Atlantic Ocean varies on decadal to centennial time scales, a consequence of natural and anthropogenic forcing. Surface corals provide a useful geochemical archive to quantify past mixed ...

  2. Water Vapor Variability Across Spatial Scales: Insights for Theory, Parameterization, and Model Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pressel, Kyle Gregory

    2012-01-01

    11 2 Scaling of Water Vapor Structure Functions as 2.1cloud model. q is the total water mixing-ratio and q ? isAIRS Exponents from AIRS Data Water Vapor Time Series from a

  3. DECORRELATION TIMES OF PHOTOSPHERIC FIELDS AND FLOWS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welsch, B. T.; Kusano, K.; Yamamoto, T. T.; Muglach, K.

    2012-03-10

    We use autocorrelation to investigate evolution in flow fields inferred by applying Fourier local correlation tracking (FLCT) to a sequence of high-resolution (0.''3), high-cadence ({approx_equal} 2 minute) line-of-sight magnetograms of NOAA active region (AR) 10930 recorded by the narrowband filter imager of the Solar Optical Telescope aboard the Hinode satellite over 2006 December 12 and 13. To baseline the timescales of flow evolution, we also autocorrelated the magnetograms, at several spatial binnings, to characterize the lifetimes of active region magnetic structures versus spatial scale. Autocorrelation of flow maps can be used to optimize tracking parameters, to understand tracking algorithms' susceptibility to noise, and to estimate flow lifetimes. Tracking parameters varied include: time interval {Delta}t between magnetogram pairs tracked, spatial binning applied to the magnetograms, and windowing parameter {sigma} used in FLCT. Flow structures vary over a range of spatial and temporal scales (including unresolved scales), so tracked flows represent a local average of the flow over a particular range of space and time. We define flow lifetime to be the flow decorrelation time, {tau}. For {Delta}t > {tau}, tracking results represent the average velocity over one or more flow lifetimes. We analyze lifetimes of flow components, divergences, and curls as functions of magnetic field strength and spatial scale. We find a significant trend of increasing lifetimes of flow components, divergences, and curls with field strength, consistent with Lorentz forces partially governing flows in the active photosphere, as well as strong trends of increasing flow lifetime and decreasing magnitudes with increases in both spatial scale and {Delta}t.

  4. Scattering and; Delay, Scale, and Sum Migration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lehman, S K

    2011-07-06

    How do we see? What is the mechanism? Consider standing in an open field on a clear sunny day. In the field are a yellow dog and a blue ball. From a wave-based remote sensing point of view the sun is a source of radiation. It is a broadband electromagnetic source which, for the purposes of this introduction, only the visible spectrum is considered (approximately 390 to 750 nanometers or 400 to 769 TeraHertz). The source emits an incident field into the known background environment which, for this example, is free space. The incident field propagates until it strikes an object or target, either the yellow dog or the blue ball. The interaction of the incident field with an object results in a scattered field. The scattered field arises from a mis-match between the background refractive index, considered to be unity, and the scattering object refractive index ('yellow' for the case of the dog, and 'blue' for the ball). This is also known as an impedance mis-match. The scattering objects are referred to as secondary sources of radiation, that radiation being the scattered field which propagates until it is measured by the two receivers known as 'eyes'. The eyes focus the measured scattered field to form images which are processed by the 'wetware' of the brain for detection, identification, and localization. When time series representations of the measured scattered field are available, the image forming focusing process can be mathematically modeled by delayed, scaled, and summed migration. This concept of optical propagation, scattering, and focusing have one-to-one equivalents in the acoustic realm. This document is intended to present the basic concepts of scalar scattering and migration used in wide band wave-based remote sensing and imaging. The terms beamforming and (delayed, scaled, and summed) migration are used interchangeably but are to be distinguished from the narrow band (frequency domain) beamforming to determine the direction of arrival of a signal, and seismic migration in which wide band time series are shifted but not to form images per se. Section 3 presents a mostly graphically-based motivation and summary of delay, scale, and sum beamforming. The model for incident field propagation in free space is derived in Section 4 under specific assumptions. General object scattering is derived in Section 5 and simplified under the Born approximation in Section 6. The model of this section serves as the basis in the derivation of time-domain migration. The Foldy-Lax, full point scatterer scattering, method is derived in Section 7. With the previous forward models in hand, delay, scale, and sum beamforming is derived in Section 8. Finally, proof-of-principle experiments are present in Section 9.

  5. Use of dual plane PIV to assess scale-by-scale energy budgets in wall turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marusic, Ivan

    Use of dual plane PIV to assess scale-by-scale energy budgets in wall turbulence N Saikrishnan1-layer, the buffer region, the logarithmic region and the outer region. In the space of scales, turbulent energy is produced at the large scales and transferred to smaller scales, finally dissipating in the form of heat

  6. Universal Time Tunneling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guenter Nimtz

    2009-01-26

    How much time does a tunneling wave packet spent in traversing a barrier? Quantum mechanical calculations result in zero time inside a barrier . In the nineties analogous tunneling experiments with microwaves were carried out. The results agreed with quantum mechanical calculations. Electron tunneling time is hard to measure being extremely short and parasitic effects due to the electric charge of electrons may be dominant. However, quite recently the atomic ionization tunneling time has been measured. Experimental data of photonic, phononic, and electronic tunneling time is available now and will be presented. It appears that the tunneling time is a universal property independent of the field in question.

  7. Synthesis, structure, and physical properties of [Sm(C{sub 6}NO{sub 2}H{sub 5}){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub 2n}.(H{sub 5}O{sub 2}){sub n}(ZnCl{sub 5}){sub n}(ZnCl{sub 4}){sub 2n}.(H{sub 2}O){sub 2n} with unprecedented ZnCl{sub 5}{sup 3-} species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie Yiming Chen Wentong; Wu Jihuai

    2008-08-15

    A novel bimetallic 4f-3d metal-isonicotinic acid inorganic-organic hybrid complex [Sm(C{sub 6}NO{sub 2}H{sub 5}){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub 2n}.(H{sub 5}O{sub 2}){sub n}(ZnCl{sub 5}){sub n}(ZnCl{sub 4}){sub 2n}.(H{sub 2}O){sub 2n} (1) has been synthesized via hydrothermal reaction and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Complex 1 is characteristic of a one-dimensional polycationic chain-like structure and unprecedented ZnCl{sub 5}{sup 3-} species. Photoluminescent investigation reveals that the title complex displays interesting emissions in a wide region. Optical absorption spectra of 1 reveal the presence of an optical gap of 3.59 eV. - Graphical abstract: A novel bimetallic 4f-3d metal-isonicotinic acid inorganic-organic hybrid complex was synthesized. It is characteristic of a one-dimensional polycationic chain-like structure. Photoluminescent investigation reveals that the title complex displays interesting emissions in a wide region. Optical absorption spectra of 1 reveal the presence of a wide optical bandgap.

  8. Examining the Variability of Wind Power Output in the Regulation Time Frame: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodge, B. M.; Shedd, S.; Florita, A.

    2012-08-01

    This work examines the distribution of changes in wind power for different time scales in the regulation time frame as well as the correlation of changes in power output for individual wind turbines in a wind plant.

  9. LAMMPS strong scaling performance optimization on Blue Gene/Q

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coffman, Paul; Jiang, Wei; Romero, Nichols A.

    2014-11-12

    LAMMPS "Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator" is an open-source molecular dynamics package from Sandia National Laboratories. Significant performance improvements in strong-scaling and time-to-solution for this application on IBM's Blue Gene/Q have been achieved through computational optimizations of the OpenMP versions of the short-range Lennard-Jones term of the CHARMM force field and the long-range Coulombic interaction implemented with the PPPM (particle-particle-particle mesh) algorithm, enhanced by runtime parameter settings controlling thread utilization. Additionally, MPI communication performance improvements were made to the PPPM calculation by re-engineering the parallel 3D FFT to use MPICH collectives instead of point-to-point. Performance testing was done using an 8.4-million atom simulation scaling up to 16 racks on the Mira system at Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF). Speedups resulting from this effort were in some cases over 2x.

  10. Multi-Scale Coupling in Ocean and Climate Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhengyu Liu, Leslie Smith

    2009-08-14

    We have made significant progress on several projects aimed at understanding multi-scale dynamics in geophysical flows. Large-scale flows in the atmosphere and ocean are influenced by stable density stratification and rotation. The presence of stratification and rotation has important consequences through (i) the conservation of potential vorticity q = {omega} {center_dot} {del} {rho}, where {omega} is the total vorticity and {rho} is the density, and (ii) the existence of waves that affect the redistribution of energy from a given disturbance to the flow. Our research is centered on quantifying the effects of potential vorticity conservation and of wave interactions for the coupling of disparate time and space scales in the oceans and the atmosphere. Ultimately we expect the work to help improve predictive capabilities of atmosphere, ocean and climate modelers. The main findings of our research projects are described.

  11. Anisotropic dark energy model with a hybrid scale factor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Mishra; S. K. Tripathy

    2015-11-08

    Anisotropic dark energy model with dynamic pressure anisotropies along different spatial directions is constructed at the backdrop of a spatially homogeneous diagonal Bianchi type $V$ $(BV)$ space-time in the framework of General Relativity. A time varying deceleration parameter generating a hybrid scale factor is considered to simulate a cosmic transition from early deceleration to late time acceleration. We found that the pressure anisotropies along the $y-$ and $z-$ axes evolve dynamically and continue along with the cosmic expansion without being subsided even at late times. The anisotropic pressure along the $x-$axis becomes equal to the mean fluid pressure. At a late phase of cosmic evolution, the model enters into a phantom region. From a state finder diagnosis, it is found that the model overlaps with $\\Lambda$CDM at late phase of cosmic time.

  12. Engineering Systems Matrix: An organizing framework for modeling large-scale complex systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartolomei, Jason E.

    The scope and complexity of engineered systems are ever-increasing as burgeoning global markets, unprecedented technological capabilities, rising consumer expectations, and ever-changing social requirements present difficult ...

  13. PREDICTION OF OXIDE SCALE EXFOLIATION IN STEAM TUBES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabau, Adrian S; Wright, Ian G

    2010-01-01

    Numerical simulation results are presented for the prediction of the likelihood of oxide scale exfoliation from superheater tubes. The scenarios considered involved alloys T22, TP347H, and TP347HFG subjected to a simplified operating cycle in a power plant generating supercritical steam. The states of stress and strain of the oxides grown in steam were based solely on modeling the various phenomena experienced by superheater tubes during boiler operation, current understanding of the oxidation behavior of each alloy in steam, and consideration of operating parameters such as heat flux, tube dimensions, and boiler duty cycle. Interpretation of the evolution of strain in these scales, and the approach to conditions where scale failure (hence exfoliation) is expected, makes use of the type of Exfoliation Diagrams that incorporate various cracking and exfoliation criteria appropriate for the system considered. In these diagrams, the strain accumulation with time in an oxide is represented by a strain trajectory derived from the net strain resulting from oxide growth, differences in coefficients of thermal expansion among the components, and relaxation due to creep. It was found that an oxide growing on a tube subjected to routine boiler load cycling conditions attained relatively low values of net strain, indicating that oxide failure would not be expected to occur during normal boiler operation. However, during a boiler shut-down event, strains sufficient to exceed the scale failure criteria were developed after times reasonably in accord with plant experience, with the scales on the ferritic steel failing in tension, and those on the austenitic steels in compression. The results presented illustrate that using this approach to track the state of strain in the oxide scale through all phases of boiler operation, including transitions from full-to-low load and shut-down events, offers the possibility of identifying the phase(s) of boiler operation during which oxide failure is most likely to occur.

  14. Optimal Production Planning under Time-sensitive Electricity Prices for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    . The control actions, which balance the electricity supply and demand, differ on the time scale and usuallyOptimal Production Planning under Time-sensitive Electricity Prices for Continuous Power-dependent electricity pricing schemes. In this paper, we describe a deterministic MILP model that allows optimal

  15. Time Asymmetric Quantum Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Bohm

    1999-02-26

    Mathematical and phenomenological arguments in favor of asymmetric time evolution of micro-physical states are presented.

  16. Random Matrix Spectra as a Time Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruben Fossion; Gamaliel Torres Vargas; Juan Carlos López Vieyra

    2013-11-23

    Spectra of ordered eigenvalues of finite Random Matrices are interpreted as a time series. Dataadaptive techniques from signal analysis are applied to decompose the spectrum in clearly differentiated trend and fluctuation modes, avoiding possible artifacts introduced by standard unfolding techniques. The fluctuation modes are scale invariant and follow different power laws for Poisson and Gaussian ensembles, which already during the unfolding allows to distinguish the two cases.

  17. Proton Emission Times in Spectator Fragmentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Schwarz; for the ALADIN collaboration

    2000-09-05

    Proton-proton correlations from spectator decays following Au + Au collisions at 1000 AMeV have been measured with an highly efficient detector hodoscope. The constructed correlation functions indicate a moderate expansion and low breakup densities similar to assumptions made in statistical multifragmentation models. In agreement with a volume breakup rather short time scales were deduced employing directional cuts in proton-proton correlations.

  18. Preliminary Scaling Estimate for Select Small Scale Mixing Demonstration Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, Beric E.; Fort, James A.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Rector, David R.; Schonewill, Philip P.

    2013-09-12

    The Hanford Site double-shell tank (DST) system provides the staging location for waste that will be transferred to the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Specific WTP acceptance criteria for waste feed delivery describe the physical and chemical characteristics of the waste that must be met before the waste is transferred from the DSTs to the WTP. One of the more challenging requirements relates to the sampling and characterization of the undissolved solids (UDS) in a waste feed DST because the waste contains solid particles that settle and their concentration and relative proportion can change during the transfer of the waste in individual batches. A key uncertainty in the waste feed delivery system is the potential variation in UDS transferred in individual batches in comparison to an initial sample used for evaluating the acceptance criteria. To address this uncertainty, a number of small-scale mixing tests have been conducted as part of Washington River Protection Solutions’ Small Scale Mixing Demonstration (SSMD) project to determine the performance of the DST mixing and sampling systems.

  19. Noncommutative Two Time Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Chagas-Filho

    2006-05-10

    We present a classical formalism describing two-time physics with Abelian canonical gauge field backgrounds. The formalism can be used as a starting point for the construction of an interacting quantized two-time physics theory in a noncommutative soace-time.

  20. Time-periodic universes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De-Xing Kong; Kefeng Liu; Ming Shen

    2008-08-30

    In this letter we construct a new time-periodic solution of the vacuum Einstein's field equations whose Riemann curvature norm takes the infinity at some points. We show that this solution is intrinsically time-periodic and describes a time-periodic universe with the "black hole". New physical phenomena are investigated and new singularities are analyzed for this universal model.

  1. SCALE DEPENDENCE OF MAGNETIC HELICITY IN THE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandenburg, Axel; Subramanian, Kandaswamy; Balogh, Andre; Goldstein, Melvyn L. E-mail: kandu@iucaa.ernet.in E-mail: melvyn.l.goldstein@nasa.gov

    2011-06-10

    We determine the magnetic helicity, along with the magnetic energy, at high latitudes using data from the Ulysses mission. The data set spans the time period from 1993 to 1996. The basic assumption of the analysis is that the solar wind is homogeneous. Because the solar wind speed is high, we follow the approach first pioneered by Matthaeus et al. by which, under the assumption of spatial homogeneity, one can use Fourier transforms of the magnetic field time series to construct one-dimensional spectra of the magnetic energy and magnetic helicity under the assumption that the Taylor frozen-in-flow hypothesis is valid. That is a well-satisfied assumption for the data used in this study. The magnetic helicity derives from the skew-symmetric terms of the three-dimensional magnetic correlation tensor, while the symmetric terms of the tensor are used to determine the magnetic energy spectrum. Our results show a sign change of magnetic helicity at wavenumber k {approx} 2 AU{sup -1} (or frequency {nu} {approx} 2 {mu}Hz) at distances below 2.8 AU and at k {approx} 30 AU{sup -1} (or {nu} {approx} 25 {mu}Hz) at larger distances. At small scales the magnetic helicity is positive at northern heliographic latitudes and negative at southern latitudes. The positive magnetic helicity at small scales is argued to be the result of turbulent diffusion reversing the sign relative to what is seen at small scales at the solar surface. Furthermore, the magnetic helicity declines toward solar minimum in 1996. The magnetic helicity flux integrated separately over one hemisphere amounts to about 10{sup 45} Mx{sup 2} cycle{sup -1} at large scales and to a three times lower value at smaller scales.

  2. Holographic Superconductors with Lifshitz Scaling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. J. Brynjolfsson; U. H. Danielsson; L. Thorlacius; T. Zingg

    2010-03-27

    Black holes in asymptotically Lifshitz spacetime provide a window onto finite temperature effects in strongly coupled Lifshitz models. We add a Maxwell gauge field and charged matter to a recently proposed gravity dual of 2+1 dimensional Lifshitz theory. This gives rise to charged black holes with scalar hair, which correspond to the superconducting phase of holographic superconductors with z > 1 Lifshitz scaling. Along the way we analyze the global geometry of static, asymptotically Lifshitz black holes at arbitrary critical exponent z > 1. In all known exact solutions there is a null curvature singularity in the black hole region, and, by a general argument, the same applies to generic Lifshitz black holes.

  3. Absolute Time Derivatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Matolcsi; P. Van

    2006-10-23

    A four dimensional treatment of nonrelativistic space-time gives a natural frame to deal with objective time derivatives. In this framework some well known objective time derivatives of continuum mechanics appear as Lie-derivatives. Their coordinatized forms depends on the tensorial properties of the relevant physical quantities. We calculate the particular forms of objective time derivatives for scalars, vectors, covectors and different second order tensors from the point of view of a rotating observer. The relation of substantial, material and objective time derivatives is treated.

  4. Time in Quantum Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curt A. Moyer

    2013-05-23

    The failure of conventional quantum theory to recognize time as an observable and to admit time operators is addressed. Instead of focusing on the existence of a time operator for a given Hamiltonian, we emphasize the role of the Hamiltonian as the generator of translations in time to construct time states. Taken together, these states constitute what we call a timeline, or quantum history, that is adequate for the representation of any physical state of the system. Such timelines appear to exist even for the semi-bounded and discrete Hamiltonian systems ruled out by Pauli's theorem. However, the step from a timeline to a valid time operator requires additional assumptions that are not always met. Still, this approach illuminates the crucial issue surrounding the construction of time operators, and establishes quantum histories as legitimate alternatives to the familiar coordinate and momentum bases of standard quantum theory.

  5. Proton Decay and the Planck Scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson, Daniel T.

    2009-01-01

    LBNL- 56556 PROTON DECAY AND THE PLANCK SCALE DANIEL T.ph/0410035v1 2 Oct 2004 PROTON DECAY AND THE PLANCK SCALE ?without grand uni?cation, proton decay can be a powerful

  6. Scaling Microblogging Services with Divergent Traffic Demands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, Xiaoming

    Scaling Microblogging Services with Divergent Traffic Demands Tianyin Xu, Yang Chen, Lei Jiao, Ben-server architecture has not scaled with user demands, lead- ing to server overload and significant impairment

  7. Scale in object and process ontologies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reitsma, Femke; Bittner, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    Scale is of great importance to the analysis of real world phenomena, be they enduring objects or perduring processes. This paper presents a new perspective on the concept of scale by considering it within two complementary ...

  8. PathScale Compliers at NERSC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1-800-66-NERSC, option 3 or 510-486-8611 Home For Users Software Compilers PathScale PathScale Compilers (Fortran, C, C++) Availability The Pathscale...

  9. Scale Invariant Metrics of Volumetric Datasets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raskar, Ramesh

    Nature reveals itself in similar structures of different scales. A child and an adult share similar organs yet dramatically differ in size. Comparing the two is a challenging task to a computerized approach as scale and ...

  10. Ballistic and superdiffusive scales in macroscopic evolution of a chain of oscillators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomasz Komorowski; Stefano Olla

    2015-06-22

    We consider a one dimensional infinite chain of harmonic oscillators whose dynamics is perturbed by a random exchange of velocities, such that the energy and momentum of the chain are conserved. Consequently, the evolution of the system has only three conserved quantities: mass, momentum and energy. We show the existence of two space--time scales on which the energy of the system evolves. On the hyperbolic scale the limits of the conserved quantities satisfy a Euler system of equations, while the thermal part of the energy macroscopic profile remains stationary. This part of energy starts evolving at a longer time scale, corresponding to the superdiffusive scaling and follows a fractional heat equation. We also prove the diffusive scaling limit of the Riemann invariants-the so called normal modes, corresponding to the linear hyperbolic propagation.

  11. Industrial Scale Demonstration of Smart Manufacturing Achieving...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Smart Manufacturing Achieving Transformational Energy Productivity Gains Industrial Scale Demonstration of Smart Manufacturing Achieving Transformational Energy...

  12. PV Controls Utility-Scale Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Neill, Barbara; Gevorgian, Vahan

    2015-10-14

    This presentation provides a high-level overview of the utility-scale PV controls demonstration project.

  13. Bench-Scale Fermentation Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-07-01

    This fact sheet provides information about Bench-Scale Fermentation Laboratory capabilities and applications at NREL's National Bioenergy Center.

  14. Range Fuels Commercial-Scale Biorefinery

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Range Fuels commercial-scale biorefinery will use a variety of feedstocks to create cellulosic ethanol, methanol, and power.

  15. Industrial Scale Demonstration of Smart Manufacturing Achieving...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    OFFICE Industrial Scale Demonstration of Smart Manufacturing Achieving Transformational Energy Productivity Gains Development of an Open Architecture, Widely Applicable Smart...

  16. National-Scale Wind Resource Assessment for Power Generation (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, E. I.

    2013-08-01

    This presentation describes the current standards for conducting a national-scale wind resource assessment for power generation, along with the risk/benefit considerations to be considered when beginning a wind resource assessment. The presentation describes changes in turbine technology and viable wind deployment due to more modern turbine technology and taller towers and shows how the Philippines national wind resource assessment evolved over time to reflect changes that arise from updated technologies and taller towers.

  17. Upscaling of U(VI) Desorption and Transport from Decimeter-Scale Heterogeneity to Plume-Scale Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, Gary P; Kohler, Matthias; Kannappan, Ramakrishnan; Briggs, Martin; Day-Lewis, Fred

    2015-02-24

    Reactive solute transport in aquifers is commonly affected by rate limited mass transfer. This slow mass transfer can exhibit significant control on the times required to restore contaminated aquifers to near-pristine conditions under both ambient and forced-gradient flow systems and is therefore important to understand. Both nonreactive and reactive tracer experiments provide valuable insight into the exchange of solute between mobile and immobile porosity. At the grain scale and column scale, mass transfer limitations were manifested as a concentration rebound when contaminated sediments were contacted with pristine groundwater. This behavior was successfully modeled using the multirate mass transfer model. Mass transfer observed in a 2 m long intermediate laboratory scale experiment showed significant concentration rebound in the first half meter along a flowpath through the tank and negligible rebound near the exit of the tank. Experimental observations and model simulations show that although concentration rebound was small at the end of the tank, the overall elution of uranium from of the tank was still controlled by mass transfer which was manifested by a long tail. At the field scale, mass transfer parameters inferred from geo-electrical measurements of bulk conductivity and traditional conductivity measurements of fluid samples showed significant spatial variability. Overall the improved understanding of mass transfer across multiple scales should lead to more robust reactive transport simulations and site management.

  18. Scaling Microblogging Services with Divergent Traffic Demands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almeroth, Kevin C.

    Scaling Microblogging Services with Divergent Traffic Demands Tianyin Xu1 , Yang Chen1 , Lei Jiao1 client-server architecture has not scaled with user demands, leading to server overload and significant #12;Scaling Microblogging Services with Divergent Traffic Demands 21 producing effective predictions

  19. Conundrum of the Large Scale Streaming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. M. Malm

    1999-09-12

    The etiology of the large scale peculiar velocity (large scale streaming motion) of clusters would increasingly seem more tenuous, within the context of the gravitational instability hypothesis. Are there any alternative testable models possibly accounting for such large scale streaming of clusters?

  20. 4, 10931135, 2007 Scaling NEP and NBP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    BGD 4, 1093­1135, 2007 Scaling NEP and NBP in the western U.S. D. P. Turner et al. Title Page;BGD 4, 1093­1135, 2007 Scaling NEP and NBP in the western U.S. D. P. Turner et al. Title Page Abstract Interactive Discussion EGU Abstract Bottom-up scaling of net ecosystem production (NEP) and net biome

  1. DISSERTATION QUANTIFYING SCALE RELATIONSHIPS IN SNOW DISTRIBUTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Charles W.

    . To quantify this bias, or to properly design measurement schemes and model applications, the process scale (power law) scaling patterns over two distinct scale ranges, separated by a distinct break at the 15-40 m in wind redistribution processes from wind/vegetation interactions at small lags to wind

  2. Nuclear Reactions & Scaling Arguments 11 October 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Militzer, Burkhard

    Nuclear Reactions & Scaling Arguments 11 October 2011 Goals · Review nuclear reaction rates · Practice using scaling arguments Nuclear Reactions 1. Consider the simple reaction A k1 ---- B k2 ---- C = 3. #12;nuclear reactions & scaling arguments 2 3. Frequently, we approximate nuclear reaction rates

  3. Nuclear Reactions & Scaling Arguments 11 October 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Militzer, Burkhard

    Nuclear Reactions & Scaling Arguments 11 October 2011 Goals · Review nuclear reaction rates · Practice using scaling arguments Nuclear Reactions 1. Consider the simple reaction A k1 ---- B k2 ---- C rate for something like p + p D scales like n2 p. Think in microscopic terms. #12;nuclear reactions

  4. Introduction & scope Scale-dependent phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuhn, Matthew R.

    on Multi-scale Modeling of Materials University of Puget Sound, Tacoma, WA May 25­30, 2006 Kuhn -- May 27, 2006 http:// faculty.up.edu / kuhn / papers / Tacoma.pdf LATEX #12;Introduction & scope Scale 27, 2006 http:// faculty.up.edu / kuhn / papers / Tacoma.pdf LATEX #12;Introduction & scope Scale

  5. Web Scale Taxonomy Cleansing Taesung Lee ,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hwang, Seung-won

    Web Scale Taxonomy Cleansing Taesung Lee , Zhongyuan Wang Haixun Wang Seung-won Hwang POSTECH.wang,haixunw}@microsoft.com ABSTRACT Large ontologies and taxonomies are automatically harvested from web-scale data. These taxonomies- scale taxonomies becomes a great challenge. A natural way to en- rich a taxonomy is to map the taxonomy

  6. Lightweight and Statistical Techniques for Petascale PetaScale Debugging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Barton

    2014-06-30

    This project investigated novel techniques for debugging scientific applications on petascale architectures. In particular, we developed lightweight tools that narrow the problem space when bugs are encountered. We also developed techniques that either limit the number of tasks and the code regions to which a developer must apply a traditional debugger or that apply statistical techniques to provide direct suggestions of the location and type of error. We extend previous work on the Stack Trace Analysis Tool (STAT), that has already demonstrated scalability to over one hundred thousand MPI tasks. We also extended statistical techniques developed to isolate programming errors in widely used sequential or threaded applications in the Cooperative Bug Isolation (CBI) project to large scale parallel applications. Overall, our research substantially improved productivity on petascale platforms through a tool set for debugging that complements existing commercial tools. Previously, Office Of Science application developers relied either on primitive manual debugging techniques based on printf or they use tools, such as TotalView, that do not scale beyond a few thousand processors. However, bugs often arise at scale and substantial effort and computation cycles are wasted in either reproducing the problem in a smaller run that can be analyzed with the traditional tools or in repeated runs at scale that use the primitive techniques. New techniques that work at scale and automate the process of identifying the root cause of errors were needed. These techniques significantly reduced the time spent debugging petascale applications, thus leading to a greater overall amount of time for application scientists to pursue the scientific objectives for which the systems are purchased. We developed a new paradigm for debugging at scale: techniques that reduced the debugging scenario to a scale suitable for traditional debuggers, e.g., by narrowing the search for the root-cause analysis to a small set of nodes or by identifying equivalence classes of nodes and sampling our debug targets from them. We implemented these techniques as lightweight tools that efficiently work on the full scale of the target machine. We explored four lightweight debugging refinements: generic classification parameters, such as stack traces, application-specific classification parameters, such as global variables, statistical data acquisition techniques and machine learning based approaches to perform root cause analysis. Work done under this project can be divided into two categories, new algorithms and techniques for scalable debugging, and foundation infrastructure work on our MRNet multicast-reduction framework for scalability, and Dyninst binary analysis and instrumentation toolkits.

  7. Lagrangian view of time irreversibility of fluid turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Haitao; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2015-01-01

    A turbulent flow is maintained by an external supply of kinetic energy, which is eventually dissipated into heat at steep velocity gradients. The scale at which energy is supplied greatly differs from the scale at which energy is dissipated, the more so as the turbulent intensity (the Reynolds number) is larger. The resulting energy flux over the range of scales, intermediate between energy injection and dissipation, acts as a source of time irreversibility. As it is now possible to follow accurately fluid particles in a turbulent flow field, both from laboratory experiments and from numerical simulations, a natural question arises: how do we detect time irreversibility from these Lagrangian data? Here we discuss recent results concerning this problem. For Lagrangian statistics involving more than one fluid particle, the distance between fluid particles introduces an intrinsic length scale into the problem. The evolution of quantities dependent on the relative motion between these fluid particles, including t...

  8. Intrinsic time in Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavlov, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    A global intrinsic time in Friedmann - Robertson - Walker models is proportional to a scaling factor of the spatial metric. The aim of the paper is to study an applicability of the intrinsic global time chosen to nearest non-symmetric cases by taking into account linear metric perturbations. Scalar linear perturbations add some corrections to the effective energy density in the Hubble law. The metric vector and tensor perturbations in linear approximation do not influence the intrinsic time.

  9. Matter: Space without Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yousef Ghazi-Tabatabai

    2012-11-19

    While Quantum Gravity remains elusive and Quantum Field Theory retains the interpretational difficulties of Quantum Mechanics, we have introduced an alternate approach to the unification of particles, fields, space and time, suggesting that the concept of matter as space without time provides a framework which unifies matter with spacetime and in which we anticipate the development of complete theories (ideally a single unified theory) describing observed 'particles, charges, fields and forces' solely with the geometry of our matter-space-time universe.

  10. Intrinsic Time Quantum Geometrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eyo Eyo Ita III; Chopin Soo; Hoi-Lai Yu

    2015-02-06

    Quantum Geometrodynamics with intrinsic time development and momentric variables is presented. An underlying SU(3) group structure at each spatial point regulates the theory. The intrinsic time behavior of the theory is analyzed, together with its ground state and primordial quantum fluctuations. Cotton-York potential dominates at early times when the universe was small; the ground state naturally resolves Penrose's Weyl Curvature Hypothesis, and thermodynamic and gravitational `arrows of time' point in the same direction. Ricci scalar potential corresponding to Einstein's General Relativity emerges as a zero-point energy contribution. A new set of fundamental commutation relations without Planck's constant emerges from the unification of Gravitation and Quantum Mechanics.

  11. Enabling department-scale supercomputing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenberg, D.S.; Hart, W.E.; Phillips, C.A.

    1997-11-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories have one of the longest and most consistent histories of supercomputer use. The authors summarize the architecture of DOE`s new supercomputers that are being built for the Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI). The authors then argue that in the near future scaled-down versions of these supercomputers with petaflop-per-weekend capabilities could become widely available to hundreds of research and engineering departments. The availability of such computational resources will allow simulation of physical phenomena to become a full-fledged third branch of scientific exploration, along with theory and experimentation. They describe the ASCI and other supercomputer applications at Sandia National Laboratories, and discuss which lessons learned from Sandia`s long history of supercomputing can be applied in this new setting.

  12. Invariant relationships deriving from classical scaling transformations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bludman, Sidney; Kennedy, Dallas C.

    2011-04-15

    Because scaling symmetries of the Euler-Lagrange equations are generally not variational symmetries of the action, they do not lead to conservation laws. Instead, an extension of Noether's theorem reduces the equations of motion to evolutionary laws that prove useful, even if the transformations are not symmetries of the equations of motion. In the case of scaling, symmetry leads to a scaling evolutionary law, a first-order equation in terms of scale invariants, linearly relating kinematic and dynamic degrees of freedom. This scaling evolutionary law appears in dynamical and in static systems. Applied to dynamical central-force systems, the scaling evolutionary equation leads to generalized virial laws, which linearly connect the kinetic and potential energies. Applied to barotropic hydrostatic spheres, the scaling evolutionary equation linearly connects the gravitational and internal energy densities. This implies well-known properties of polytropes, describing degenerate stars and chemically homogeneous nondegenerate stellar cores.

  13. Time functions as utilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Minguzzi

    2009-09-04

    Every time function on spacetime gives a (continuous) total preordering of the spacetime events which respects the notion of causal precedence. The problem of the existence of a (semi-)time function on spacetime and the problem of recovering the causal structure starting from the set of time functions are studied. It is pointed out that these problems have an analog in the field of microeconomics known as utility theory. In a chronological spacetime the semi-time functions correspond to the utilities for the chronological relation, while in a K-causal (stably causal) spacetime the time functions correspond to the utilities for the K^+ relation (Seifert's relation). By exploiting this analogy, we are able to import some mathematical results, most notably Peleg's and Levin's theorems, to the spacetime framework. As a consequence, we prove that a K-causal (i.e. stably causal) spacetime admits a time function and that the time or temporal functions can be used to recover the K^+ (or Seifert) relation which indeed turns out to be the intersection of the time or temporal orderings. This result tells us in which circumstances it is possible to recover the chronological or causal relation starting from the set of time or temporal functions allowed by the spacetime. Moreover, it is proved that a chronological spacetime in which the closure of the causal relation is transitive (for instance a reflective spacetime) admits a semi-time function. Along the way a new proof avoiding smoothing techniques is given that the existence of a time function implies stable causality, and a new short proof of the equivalence between K-causality and stable causality is given which takes advantage of Levin's theorem and smoothing techniques.

  14. An Occupied Subspace Optimization for Linear Scaling in LargeScale Ab Initio Electronic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raczkowski, David

    1 CONTENTS An Occupied Subspace Optimization for Linear Scaling in Large­Scale Ab Initio Electronic 2000 Physics An Occupied Subspace Optimization for Linear Scaling in Large Scale Ab Initio Electronic Structure Calculations Abstract We present an approach to electronic structure calcu­ lations that replaces

  15. Laboratory studies of 2H evaporator scale dissolution in dilute nitric acid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oji, L.

    2014-09-23

    The rate of 2H evaporator scale solids dissolution in dilute nitric acid has been experimentally evaluated under laboratory conditions in the SRNL shielded cells. The 2H scale sample used for the dissolution study came from the bottom of the evaporator cone section and the wall section of the evaporator cone. The accumulation rate of aluminum and silicon, assumed to be the two principal elemental constituents of the 2H evaporator scale aluminosilicate mineral, were monitored in solution. Aluminum and silicon concentration changes, with heating time at a constant oven temperature of 90 deg C, were used to ascertain the extent of dissolution of the 2H evaporator scale mineral. The 2H evaporator scale solids, assumed to be composed of mostly aluminosilicate mineral, readily dissolves in 1.5 and 1.25 M dilute nitric acid solutions yielding principal elemental components of aluminum and silicon in solution. The 2H scale dissolution rate constant, based on aluminum accumulation in 1.5 and 1.25 M dilute nitric acid solution are, respectively, 9.21E-04 ± 6.39E-04 min{sup -1} and 1.07E-03 ± 7.51E-05 min{sup -1}. Silicon accumulation rate in solution does track the aluminum accumulation profile during the first few minutes of scale dissolution. It however diverges towards the end of the scale dissolution. This divergence therefore means the aluminum-to-silicon ratio in the first phase of the scale dissolution (non-steady state conditions) is different from the ratio towards the end of the scale dissolution. Possible causes of this change in silicon accumulation in solution as the scale dissolution progresses may include silicon precipitation from solution or the 2H evaporator scale is a heterogeneous mixture of aluminosilicate minerals with several impurities. The average half-life for the decomposition of the 2H evaporator scale mineral in 1.5 M nitric acid is 12.5 hours, while the half-life for the decomposition of the 2H evaporator scale in 1.25 M nitric acid is 10.8 hours. Based on averaging the two half-lives from the 2H scale acid dissolution in 1.25 and 1.5 M nitric acid solutions, a reasonable half-live for the dissolution of 2H scales in dilute nitric acid is 11.7 ± 1.3 hours. The plant operational time for chemically cleaning (soaking) the 2H evaporator with dilute nitric acid is 32 hours. It therefore may require about 3 half-lives or less to completely dissolve most of the scales in the Evaporator pot which come into contact with the dilute nitric acid solution. On a mass basis, the Al-to-Si ratio for the scale dissolution in 1.5 M nitric acid averaged 1.30 ± 0.20 and averaged 1.18 ± 0.10 for the 2H scale dissolution in 1.25 M nitric acid. These aluminum-to-silicon ratios are in fairly good agreement with ratios from previous studies. Therefore, there is still more aluminum in the 2H evaporator scales than silicon which implies that there are no significant changes in scale properties which will exclude nitric acid as a viable protic solvent for aluminosilicate scale buildup dissolution from the 2H evaporator. Overall, the monitoring of the scale decomposition reaction in 1.25 and 1.5 M nitric acid may be better ascertained through the determination of aluminum concentration in solution than monitoring silicon in solution. Silicon solution chemistry may lead to partial precipitating of silicon with time as the scale and acid solution is heated.

  16. Time Domain Reflectometry Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palermo, Sam

    Time Domain Reflectometry Theory Application Note 1304-2 For Use with Agilent 86100 Infiniium DCA #12;2 The most general approach to evaluating the time domain response of any electromagnetic system a concise presentation of the fundamentals of TDR and then relates these fundamentals to the parameters

  17. Universality and scaling of optimal heat engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michele Campisi; Rosario Fazio

    2015-10-21

    From the steam engine to current nano-devices, the design of efficient thermal machines has been instrumental in modern societies. In its essence a thermal engine can be thought as a working substance, in contact with two or more baths, undergoing a cyclic transformation. What happens if the working substance is on the verge of a phase transition? Already in 1902 the latent heat was identified as a key to improve the efficiency of steam engines Despite this early observation, the impact of phase transitions on the performance of thermal machines has not been addressed. By combining the tools of non-equilibrium and quantum thermodynamics with finite-size-scaling and information theory, we unveil an unnoticed mechanism, triggered by the vicinity to a phase transition, to boost the performance of an engine. This result sheds new light on the so called power-efficiency dilemma and could be used to realise powerful and, at the same time, efficient engines. Specific implementations with trapped ions and superconducting nano-circuits will be discussed.

  18. Digital time delay

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, A.D.

    1986-05-09

    Method and apparatus are provided for generating an output pulse following a trigger pulse at a time delay interval preset with a resolution which is high relative to a low resolution available from supplied clock pulses. A first lumped constant delay provides a first output signal at predetermined interpolation intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution time interval. Latching circuits latch the high resolution data to form a first synchronizing data set. A selected time interval has been preset to internal counters and corrected for circuit propagation delay times having the same order of magnitude as the desired high resolution. Internal system clock pulses count down the counters to generate an internal pulse delayed by an internal which is functionally related to the preset time interval. A second LCD corrects the internal signal with the high resolution time delay. A second internal pulse is then applied to a third LCD to generate a second set of synchronizing data which is complementary with the first set of synchronizing data for presentation to logic circuits. The logic circuits further delay the internal output signal with the internal pulses. The final delayed output signal thereafter enables the output pulse generator to produce the desired output pulse at the preset time delay interval following input of the trigger pulse.

  19. Measurable Maximal Energy and Minimal Time Interval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eiman Abou El Dahab; Abdel Nasser Tawfik

    2014-01-14

    The possibility of finding the measurable maximal energy and the minimal time interval is discussed in different quantum aspects. It is found that the linear generalized uncertainty principle (GUP) approach gives a non-physical result. Based on large scale Schwarzshild solution, the quadratic GUP approach is utilized. The calculations are performed at the shortest distance, at which the general relativity is assumed to be a good approximation for the quantum gravity and at larger distances, as well. It is found that both maximal energy and minimal time have the order of the Planck time. Then, the uncertainties in both quantities are accordingly bounded. Some physical insights are addressed. Also, the implications on the physics of early Universe and on quantized mass are outlined. The results are related to the existence of finite cosmological constant and minimum mass (mass quanta).

  20. DLFM library tools for large scale dynamic applications.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DLFM library tools for large scale dynamic applications DLFM library tools for large scale dynamic applications Large scale Python and other dynamic applications may spend huge...

  1. Engineering-Scale Demonstration of DuraLith and Ceramicrete Waste Forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Josephson, Gary B.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Pires, Richard P.; Bickford, Jody; Foote, Martin W.

    2011-09-23

    To support the selection of a waste form for the liquid secondary wastes from the Hanford Waste Immobilization and Treatment Plant, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) has initiated secondary waste form testing on four candidate waste forms. Two of the candidate waste forms have not been developed to scale as the more mature waste forms. This work describes engineering-scale demonstrations conducted on Ceramicrete and DuraLith candidate waste forms. Both candidate waste forms were successfully demonstrated at an engineering scale. A preliminary conceptual design could be prepared for full-scale production of the candidate waste forms. However, both waste forms are still too immature to support a detailed design. Formulations for each candidate waste form need to be developed so that the material has a longer working time after mixing the liquid and solid constituents together. Formulations optimized based on previous lab studies did not have sufficient working time to support large-scale testing. The engineering-scale testing was successfully completed using modified formulations. Further lab development and parametric studies are needed to optimize formulations with adequate working time and assess the effects of changes in raw materials and process parameters on the final product performance. Studies on effects of mixing intensity on the initial set time of the waste forms are also needed.

  2. Gradient flow and scale setting on MILC HISQ ensembles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MILC Collaboration; A. Bazavov; C. Bernard; N. Brown; C. DeTar; J. Foley; Steven Gottlieb; U. M. Heller; J. Komijani; J. Laiho; L. Levkova; R. L. Sugar; D. Toussaint; R. S. Van de Water

    2015-03-24

    We report on a scale determination with gradient-flow techniques on the $N_f=2+1+1$ HISQ ensembles generated by the MILC collaboration. The ensembles include four lattice spacings, ranging from approximately 0.15 to 0.06 fm, and both physical and unphysical values of the quark masses. The scales $\\sqrt{t_0}/a$ and $w_0/a$ and their tree-level improvements, $\\sqrt{t_{0,{\\rm imp}}}$ and $w_{0,{\\rm imp}}$, are computed on each ensemble using Symanzik flow and the cloverleaf definition of the energy density $E$. Using a combination of continuum chiral perturbation theory and a Taylor-series ansatz for the lattice-spacing and strong-coupling dependence, the results are simultaneously extrapolated to the continuum and interpolated to physical quark masses. We determine the scales $\\sqrt{t_0} = 0.1416({}_{-5}^{+8})$ fm and $w_0 = 0.1717({}_{-11}^{+12})$ fm, where the errors are sums, in quadrature, of statistical and all systematic errors. The precision of $w_0$ and $\\sqrt{t_0}$ is comparable to or more precise than the best previous estimates, respectively. We also find the continuum mass-dependence of $w_0$ that will be useful for estimating the scales of other ensembles. We also estimate the integrated autocorrelation length of $\\langle E(t) \\rangle$. For long flow times, the autocorrelation length of $\\langle E \\rangle$ appears to be comparable to or smaller than that of the topological charge.

  3. 2010 Thin Film & Small Scale Mechanical Behavior Gordon Research Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Thomas Balk

    2010-07-30

    Over the past decades, it has been well established that the mechanical behavior of materials changes when they are confined geometrically at least in one dimension to small scale. It is the aim of the 2010 Gordon Conference on 'Thin Film and Small Scale Mechanical Behavior' to discuss cutting-edge research on elastic, plastic and time-dependent deformation as well as degradation mechanisms like fracture, fatigue and wear at small scales. As in the past, the conference will benefit from contributions from fundamental studies of physical mechanisms linked to material science and engineering reaching towards application in modern applications ranging from optical and microelectronic devices and nano- or micro-electrical mechanical systems to devices for energy production and storage. The conference will feature entirely new testing methodologies and in situ measurements as well as recent progress in atomistic and micromechanical modeling. Particularly, emerging topics in the area of energy conversion and storage, such as material for batteries will be highlighted. The study of small-scale mechanical phenomena in systems related to energy production, conversion or storage offer an enticing opportunity to materials scientists, who can provide new insight and investigate these phenomena with methods that have not previously been exploited.

  4. Comparing Scales of Environmental Effects from Gasoline and Ethanol Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parish, Esther S; Kline, Keith L; Dale, Virginia H; Efroymson, Rebecca Ann; McBride, Allen; Johnson, Timothy L; Hilliard, Michael R; Bielicki, Dr Jeffrey M

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the environmental effects of alternative fuel production is critical to characterizing the sustainability of energy resources to inform policy and regulatory decisions. The magnitudes of these environmental effects vary according to the intensity and scale of fuel production along each step of the supply chain. We compare the scales (i.e., spatial extent and temporal duration) of ethanol and gasoline production processes and environmental effects based on a literature review, and then synthesize the scale differences on space-time diagrams. Comprehensive assessment of any fuel-production system is a moving target, and our analysis shows that decisions regarding the selection of spatial and temporal boundaries of analysis have tremendous influences on the comparisons. Effects that strongly differentiate gasoline and ethanol supply chains in terms of scale are associated with when and where energy resources are formed and how they are extracted. Although both gasoline and ethanol production may result in negative environmental effects, this study indicates that ethanol production traced through a supply chain may impact less area and result in more easily reversed effects of a shorter duration than gasoline production.

  5. MeV Dark Matter and Small Scale Structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hooper, Dan; /Fermilab; Kaplinghat, Manoj; Strigari, Louis E.; /UC, Irvine; Zurek, Kathryn M.; /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2007-04-01

    WIMPs with electroweak scale masses (neutralinos, etc.) remain in kinetic equilibrium with other particle species until temperatures approximately in the range of 10 MeV to 1 GeV, leading to the formation of dark matter substructure with masses as small as 10{sup -4} M{sub {circle_dot}} to 10{sup -12} M{sub {circle_dot}}. However, if dark matter consists of particles with MeV scale masses, as motivated by the observation of 511 keV emission from the Galactic Bulge, such particles are naturally expected to remain in kinetic equilibrium with the cosmic neutrino background until considerably later times. This would lead to a strong suppression of small scale structure with masses below about 10{sup 7}M{sub {circle_dot}} to 10{sup 4} M{sub {circle_dot}}. This cutoff scale has important implications for present and future searches for faint Local Group satellite galaxies and for the missing satellites problem.

  6. Kairoscope : coordinating time socially

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Reed Eric

    2010-01-01

    If everyone says time is relative, why is it still so rigidly defined? There have been many attempts to address the issue of coordinating schedules, but each of these attempts runs into an issue of rigidity: in order to ...

  7. The Williston time capsule

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moses, David (David Patrick)

    2015-01-01

    This project is a time capsule of the oil economy, created by entombing everyday objects made from and powered by petroleum into a landscape that spatially recreates the processes of drilling and fracking a contemporary ...

  8. Sublinear Time Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubinfeld, Ronitt

    Sublinear time algorithms represent a new paradigm in computing, where an algorithm must give some sort of an answer after inspecting only a very small portion of the input. We discuss the types of answers that one can ...

  9. Time, energy & form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McInnis, Martha Jane

    1982-01-01

    Physical manifestations of time occur in natural forms of all sizes. Architectural form serves as shelter while providing a built envelope of human life, simultaneously influencing and influenced by energetic activities ...

  10. Drug Retention Times

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Center for Human Reliability Studies

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this monograph is to provide information on drug retention times in the human body. The information provided is based on plausible illegal drug use activities that might be engaged in by a recreational drug user

  11. Drug Retention Times

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Center for Human Reliability Studies

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this monograph is to provide information on drug retention times in the human body. The information provided is based on plausible illegal drug use activities that might be engaged in by a recreational drug user.

  12. Large scale structures in gas-liquid mixture flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, M.R.; Fungtamasan, B.

    1984-12-01

    Relatively slow variations in mixture void fraction in gas-liquid mixture flows are indicated by low pass filter averaging. The slow void fluctuations are found to have a regular characteristic frequency or scale in the churn flow regime or near the boundary with the dispersed bubble flow regime. These regular disturbances develop inherently in a vertical pipe flow in strength and in size and are not due to the method of flow mixing. There was no evidence of distinctive gas slugs in the flow, and the structures were identified as large clouds of bubbles which moved faster than the average velocity, growing in size and strength as they moved with the flow. The magnitude of the voidage fluctuations in the churn flow regime was on average 57% of the value for a slug flow. The large scale bubble clouds convect coherently over relatively long distances a up to 1.45 times the mean mixture flow velocity at a gas volume flow fraction of 0.4. In the bubbl flow regime, the slow voidage variations were more random in scale and were only approx. 10% of the slug flow (maximum possible) value. However, even in the bubble flow regime, the disturbances convected coherently over relatively long distances at a velocity of approx. 1.1 time the mean mixture velocity.

  13. Time in quantum mechanics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapin, Kimberly R.

    1997-01-01

    TIME IN QUANTUM MECHANICS A Thesis by KIMBERLY R. CHAPIN Submitted to Texas A8M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content by: Marian O. Scully (Chair... of Committee) Edward S. Fry (Member) aan Laane (Member) Thomas W. Adair, III (Head of Department) August 1997 Major Subject: Physics TIME IN QIJANTUM MECHANICS A Thesis by KIMBERLY R. CHAPIN Submitted to the Oflice of Graduate Studies of Texas A...

  14. On Soft Limits of Large-Scale Structure Correlation Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ido Ben-Dayan; Thomas Konstandin; Rafael A. Porto; Laura Sagunski

    2015-02-24

    We study soft limits of correlation functions for the density and velocity fields in the theory of structure formation. First, we re-derive the (resummed) consistency conditions at unequal times using the eikonal approximation. These are solely based on symmetry arguments and are therefore universal. Then, we explore the existence of equal-time relations in the soft limit which, on the other hand, depend on the interplay between soft and hard modes. We scrutinize two approaches in the literature: The time-flow formalism, and a background method where the soft mode is absorbed into a locally curved cosmology. The latter has been recently used to set up (angular averaged) `equal-time consistency relations'. We explicitly demonstrate that the time-flow relations and `equal-time consistency conditions' are only fulfilled at the linear level, and fail at next-to-leading order for an Einstein de-Sitter universe. While applied to the velocities both proposals break down beyond leading order, we find that the `equal-time consistency conditions' quantitatively approximates the perturbative results for the density contrast. Thus, we generalize the background method to properly incorporate the effect of curvature in the density and velocity fluctuations on short scales, and discuss the reasons behind this discrepancy. We conclude with a few comments on practical implementations and future directions.

  15. Sensitivity technologies for large scale simulation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collis, Samuel Scott; Bartlett, Roscoe Ainsworth; Smith, Thomas Michael; Heinkenschloss, Matthias; Wilcox, Lucas C.; Hill, Judith C.; Ghattas, Omar; Berggren, Martin Olof; Akcelik, Volkan; Ober, Curtis Curry; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; Keiter, Eric Richard

    2005-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis is critically important to numerous analysis algorithms, including large scale optimization, uncertainty quantification,reduced order modeling, and error estimation. Our research focused on developing tools, algorithms and standard interfaces to facilitate the implementation of sensitivity type analysis into existing code and equally important, the work was focused on ways to increase the visibility of sensitivity analysis. We attempt to accomplish the first objective through the development of hybrid automatic differentiation tools, standard linear algebra interfaces for numerical algorithms, time domain decomposition algorithms and two level Newton methods. We attempt to accomplish the second goal by presenting the results of several case studies in which direct sensitivities and adjoint methods have been effectively applied, in addition to an investigation of h-p adaptivity using adjoint based a posteriori error estimation. A mathematical overview is provided of direct sensitivities and adjoint methods for both steady state and transient simulations. Two case studies are presented to demonstrate the utility of these methods. A direct sensitivity method is implemented to solve a source inversion problem for steady state internal flows subject to convection diffusion. Real time performance is achieved using novel decomposition into offline and online calculations. Adjoint methods are used to reconstruct initial conditions of a contamination event in an external flow. We demonstrate an adjoint based transient solution. In addition, we investigated time domain decomposition algorithms in an attempt to improve the efficiency of transient simulations. Because derivative calculations are at the root of sensitivity calculations, we have developed hybrid automatic differentiation methods and implemented this approach for shape optimization for gas dynamics using the Euler equations. The hybrid automatic differentiation method was applied to a first order approximation of the Euler equations and used as a preconditioner. In comparison to other methods, the AD preconditioner showed better convergence behavior. Our ultimate target is to perform shape optimization and hp adaptivity using adjoint formulations in the Premo compressible fluid flow simulator. A mathematical formulation for mixed-level simulation algorithms has been developed where different physics interact at potentially different spatial resolutions in a single domain. To minimize the implementation effort, explicit solution methods can be considered, however, implicit methods are preferred if computational efficiency is of high priority. We present the use of a partial elimination nonlinear solver technique to solve these mixed level problems and show how these formulation are closely coupled to intrusive optimization approaches and sensitivity analyses. Production codes are typically not designed for sensitivity analysis or large scale optimization. The implementation of our optimization libraries into multiple production simulation codes in which each code has their own linear algebra interface becomes an intractable problem. In an attempt to streamline this task, we have developed a standard interface between the numerical algorithm (such as optimization) and the underlying linear algebra. These interfaces (TSFCore and TSFCoreNonlin) have been adopted by the Trilinos framework and the goal is to promote the use of these interfaces especially with new developments. Finally, an adjoint based a posteriori error estimator has been developed for discontinuous Galerkin discretization of Poisson's equation. The goal is to investigate other ways to leverage the adjoint calculations and we show how the convergence of the forward problem can be improved by adapting the grid using adjoint-based error estimates. Error estimation is usually conducted with continuous adjoints but if discrete adjoints are available it may be possible to reuse the discrete version for error estimation. We investigate the advantages and disadvantages of continuous and discre

  16. The thermodynamics of time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dries Sels; Michiel Wouters

    2015-01-22

    The problem of time is a deep paradox in our physical description of the world. According to Aristotle's relational theory, time is a measure of change and does not exist on its own. In contrast, quantum mechanics, just like Newtonian mechanics, is equipped with a master clock that dictates the evolution of a system. This clock is infinitely precise and tacitly supplied free of charge from outside physics. Not only does this absolute time make it notoriously difficult to make a consistent theory of quantum gravity, it is also the underlying problem in establishing the second law. Indeed, contrary to our experience, the Wheeler-deWitt equation --a canonical quantization of general relativity-- predicts a static universe. Similarly, when simply concerned with the dynamics of a closed quantum system, there is no second law because the Von Neumann entropy is invariant under unitary transformations. Here we are mainly concerned with the latter problem and we show that it can be resolved by attributing a minimal amount of resources to the measurement of time. Although there is an absolute time in quantum mechanics, an observer can only establish a time by measuring a clock. For a local measurement, the minimal entropy production is equal to the number of ticks. This lower bound is attained by a black hole.

  17. Scaling Rules for Pre-Injector Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tom Schwarz; Dan Amidei

    2003-07-13

    Proposed designs of the prebunching system of the NLC and TESLA are based on the assumption that scaling the SLC design to NLC/TESLA requirements should provide the desired performance. A simple equation is developed to suggest a scaling rule in terms of bunch charge and duration. Detailed simulations of prebunching systems scaled from a single design have been run to investigate these issues.

  18. High Performance Electronic Structure Engineering: Large Scale...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High Performance Electronic Structure Engineering: Large Scale GW Calculations Event Sponsor: Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Seminar Start Date: Aug 7 2015 - 10:00am...

  19. Scaling in stratocumulus fields: an emergent property

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Tianle

    2015-01-01

    Marine stratocumulus clouds play a critical role in the Earth's climate system. They display an amazing array of complex behaviors at many different spatiotemporal scales. Precipitation in these clouds is in general very light, but it is vital for clouds' systematic evolution and organization. Here we identify areas of high liquid water path within these clouds as potentially precipitating, or pouches. They are breeding grounds for stratocumuli to change their organization form. We show, using different satellite data sets, that the size distribution of these pouches show a universal scaling. We argue that such scaling is an emergent property of the cloud system, which results from numbers interactions at the microscopic scale.

  20. Scaling the practical education experience Joel Sommers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haddadi, Hamed

    Scaling the practical education experience Joel Sommers Colgate University jsommers outline a successful This work was done in part while Joel Sommers was visiting the University

  1. Extreme Scale Computing, Co-design

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Extreme Scale Computing, Co-design Informing system design, ensuring productive and efficient code Project Description To address the increasingly complex problems of the modern...

  2. Condensed matter lessons about the origin of time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gil Jannes

    2015-05-13

    It is widely hoped that quantum gravity will shed light on the question of the origin of time in physics. The currently dominant approaches to a candidate quantum theory of gravity have naturally evolved from general relativity, on the one hand, and from particle physics, on the other hand. A third important branch of 20th century `fundamental' physics, condensed-matter physics, also offers an interesting perspective on quantum gravity, and thereby on the problem of time. The bottomline might sound disappointing: to understand the origin of time, much more experimental input is needed than what is available today. Moreover it is far from obvious that we will ever find out the true origin of physical time, even if we become able to directly probe physics at the Planck scale. But we might learn some interesting lessons about time and the structure of our universe in the process. A first lesson is that there are probably several characteristic scales associated with "quantum gravity" effects, rather than the single Planck scale usually considered. These can differ by several orders of magnitude, and thereby conspire to hide certain effects expected from quantum gravity, rendering them undetectable even with Planck-scale experiments. A more tentative conclusion is that the hierarchy between general relativity, special relativity and Newtonian physics, usually taken for granted, might have to be interpreted with caution.

  3. Large-Scale Information Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. M. Nicol; H. R. Ammerlahn; M. E. Goldsby; M. M. Johnson; D. E. Rhodes; A. S. Yoshimura

    2000-12-01

    Large enterprises are ever more dependent on their Large-Scale Information Systems (LSLS), computer systems that are distinguished architecturally by distributed components--data sources, networks, computing engines, simulations, human-in-the-loop control and remote access stations. These systems provide such capabilities as workflow, data fusion and distributed database access. The Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC) contains many examples of LSIS components, a fact that motivates this research. However, most LSIS in use grew up from collections of separate subsystems that were not designed to be components of an integrated system. For this reason, they are often difficult to analyze and control. The problem is made more difficult by the size of a typical system, its diversity of information sources, and the institutional complexities associated with its geographic distribution across the enterprise. Moreover, there is no integrated approach for analyzing or managing such systems. Indeed, integrated development of LSIS is an active area of academic research. This work developed such an approach by simulating the various components of the LSIS and allowing the simulated components to interact with real LSIS subsystems. This research demonstrated two benefits. First, applying it to a particular LSIS provided a thorough understanding of the interfaces between the system's components. Second, it demonstrated how more rapid and detailed answers could be obtained to questions significant to the enterprise by interacting with the relevant LSIS subsystems through simulated components designed with those questions in mind. In a final, added phase of the project, investigations were made on extending this research to wireless communication networks in support of telemetry applications.

  4. Fully kinetic simulations of megajoule-scale dense plasma focus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, A.; Link, A.; Tang, V.; Halvorson, C.; May, M.; Welch, D.; Meehan, B. T.; Hagen, E. C.

    2014-10-15

    Dense plasma focus (DPF) Z-pinch devices are sources of copious high energy electrons and ions, x-rays, and neutrons. Megajoule-scale DPFs can generate 10{sup 12} neutrons per pulse in deuterium gas through a combination of thermonuclear and beam-target fusion. However, the details of the neutron production are not fully understood and past optimization efforts of these devices have been largely empirical. Previously, we reported on the first fully kinetic simulations of a kilojoule-scale DPF and demonstrated that both kinetic ions and kinetic electrons are needed to reproduce experimentally observed features, such as charged-particle beam formation and anomalous resistivity. Here, we present the first fully kinetic simulation of a MegaJoule DPF, with predicted ion and neutron spectra, neutron anisotropy, neutron spot size, and time history of neutron production. The total yield predicted by the simulation is in agreement with measured values, validating the kinetic model in a second energy regime.

  5. Parallel Scaling Characteristics of Selected NERSC User ProjectCodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skinner, David; Verdier, Francesca; Anand, Harsh; Carter,Jonathan; Durst, Mark; Gerber, Richard

    2005-03-05

    This report documents parallel scaling characteristics of NERSC user project codes between Fiscal Year 2003 and the first half of Fiscal Year 2004 (Oct 2002-March 2004). The codes analyzed cover 60% of all the CPU hours delivered during that time frame on seaborg, a 6080 CPU IBM SP and the largest parallel computer at NERSC. The scale in terms of concurrency and problem size of the workload is analyzed. Drawing on batch queue logs, performance data and feedback from researchers we detail the motivations, benefits, and challenges of implementing highly parallel scientific codes on current NERSC High Performance Computing systems. An evaluation and outlook of the NERSC workload for Allocation Year 2005 is presented.

  6. LLNL Small-Scale Friction sensitivity (BAM) Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpson, L.R.; Foltz, M.F.

    1996-06-01

    Small-scale safety testing of explosives, propellants and other energetic materials, is done to determine their sensitivity to various stimuli including friction, static spark, and impact. Testing is done to discover potential handling problems for either newly synthesized materials of unknown behavior, or materials that have been stored for long periods of time. This report describes the existing {open_quotes}BAM{close_quotes} Small-Scale Friction Test, and the methods used to determine the friction sensitivity pertinent to handling energetic materials. The accumulated data for the materials tested is not listed here - that information is in a database. Included is, however, a short list of (1) materials that had an unusual response, and (2), a few {open_quotes}standard{close_quotes} materials representing the range of typical responses usually seen.

  7. A tentative programme towards a full scale energy amplifier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubbia, Carlo

    1996-01-01

    We present a proposal of a full scale demonstration plant of the Energy Amplifier (EA), following the conceptual design of Ref. [1]. Unlike the presently on going CERN experiments, reaction rates will be sufficiently massive to permit demonstrating the practical feasibility of energy generation on an industrial scale and to tackle the complete family chains of [1] the breeding process in Thorium fuel, [2] the burning of the self-generated Actinides, [3] the Plutonium (higher Actinides) burning of spent fuel from ordinary Reactors and [4] Fuel reprocessing/regeneration. The accelerator must provide a beam power which is commensurate to the rate of transformations which are sought. No existing accelerator can meet such a performance and a dedicated facility must be built. We describe an alternative based on the superconducting cavities (SC) now in standard use at the LEP \\[e^+-e^-\\] collider which is scheduled to terminate its operation by year 200 After this time, with reasonable modifications, the fully opera...

  8. Cosmological constant in SUGRA models with Planck scale SUSY breaking and degenerate vacua

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. D. Froggatt; R. Nevzorov; H. B. Nielsen; A. W. Thomas

    2014-10-08

    The empirical mass of the Higgs boson suggests small to vanishing values of the quartic Higgs self--coupling and the corresponding beta function at the Planck scale, leading to degenerate vacua. This leads us to suggest that the measured value of the cosmological constant can originate from supergravity (SUGRA) models with degenerate vacua. This scenario is realised if there are at least three exactly degenerate vacua. In the first vacuum, associated with the physical one, local supersymmetry (SUSY) is broken near the Planck scale while the breakdown of the SU(2)_W\\times U(1)_Y symmetry takes place at the electroweak (EW) scale. In the second vacuum local SUSY breaking is induced by gaugino condensation at a scale which is just slightly lower than \\Lambda_{QCD} in the physical vacuum. Finally, in the third vacuum local SUSY and EW symmetry are broken near the Planck scale.

  9. Nonlinear analysis of time series of vibration data from a friction brake: SSA, PCA, and MFDFA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikolay K. Vitanov; Norbert P. Hoffmann; Boris Wernitz

    2014-10-23

    We use the methodology of singular spectrum analysis (SSA), principal component analysis (PCA), and multi-fractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MFDFA), for investigating characteristics of vibration time series data from a friction brake. SSA and PCA are used to study the long time-scale characteristics of the time series. MFDFA is applied for investigating all time scales up to the smallest recorded one. It turns out that the majority of the long time-scale dynamics, that is presumably dominated by the structural dynamics of the brake system, is dominated by very few active dimensions only and can well be understood in terms of low dimensional chaotic attractors. The multi-fractal analysis shows that the fast dynamical processes originating in the friction interface are in turn truly multi-scale in nature.

  10. Propulsion engineering study for small-scale Mars missions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitehead, J.

    1995-09-12

    Rocket propulsion options for small-scale Mars missions are presented and compared, particularly for the terminal landing maneuver and for sample return. Mars landing has a low propulsive {Delta}v requirement on a {approximately}1-minute time scale, but at a high acceleration. High thrust/weight liquid rocket technologies, or advanced pulse-capable solids, developed during the past decade for missile defense, are therefore more appropriate for small Mars landers than are conventional space propulsion technologies. The advanced liquid systems are characterize by compact lightweight thrusters having high chamber pressures and short lifetimes. Blowdown or regulated pressure-fed operation can satisfy the Mars landing requirement, but hardware mass can be reduced by using pumps. Aggressive terminal landing propulsion designs can enable post-landing hop maneuvers for some surface mobility. The Mars sample return mission requires a small high performance launcher having either solid motors or miniature pump-fed engines. Terminal propulsion for 100 kg Mars landers is within the realm of flight-proven thruster designs, but custom tankage is desirable. Landers on a 10 kg scale also are feasible, using technology that has been demonstrated but not previously flown in space. The number of sources and the selection of components are extremely limited on this smallest scale, so some customized hardware is required. A key characteristic of kilogram-scale propulsion is that gas jets are much lighter than liquid thrusters for reaction control. The mass and volume of tanks for inert gas can be eliminated by systems which generate gas as needed from a liquid or a solid, but these have virtually no space flight history. Mars return propulsion is a major engineering challenge; earth launch is the only previously-solved propulsion problem requiring similar or greater performance.

  11. Diagenesis in seagrass vegetated sediments: biogeochemical processes on diurnal time scales 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hebert, Andrew Brian

    2005-11-01

    Seagrass productivity is largely limited by nutrient and light availability. However, increasing evidence suggests that sedimentary geochemical processes may play an essential role in seagrass productivity/health. Much ...

  12. Model reduction of systems exhibiting two-time scale behavior or parametric uncertainty 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Chuili

    2007-04-25

    DAE solver for its solution, but system trajectories can instead be computed with regular ordinary differential equation (ODE) solvers. For systems with uncertain parameters, two types of problems are investigated, including parameter reduction...

  13. Can primordial helium survive in diamonds on geologic time scales? Rebecca Granot and Roi Baer*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baer, Roi

    in the past to provide bounds and clues on the formation of the solar system, the planets and Earth. Yet-binding models. Various results of these models compare well to known experimental data. We find helium re- sides billion years.1 They can be used to sample varying depths of earth's mantle, ranging from 150 km to 600 km

  14. Implementation of BEE: a Real-time Large-scale Hardware Emulation Engine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    . Categories: I. Computing Methodologies I.6 Simulation and Modeling I.6.7 Simulation Support Systems Subject complexity and integration of digital and analog systems, the computing power required for detailed cycle verification of integrated systems with heterogeneous components very difficult. In communication systems

  15. Atomistic simulation of defect structure evolution and mechanical properties at long time scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Yue, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01

    This thesis is a computational and theoretical investigation of the response of materials' mechanical properties to a wide range of environmental conditions, with a particular focus on the coupled effects of strain rate ...

  16. Distributed Model Predictive Control of Nonlinear and Two-Time-Scale Process Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Xianzhong

    2012-01-01

    process of alkylation of benzene with ethylene to produce ethylbenzene is widely used in the petrochemicalprocess of alkylation of benzene with ethylene to produce ethylbenzene is widely used in the petrochemical

  17. Joint EM-NE-International Study of Glass Behavior over Geologic Time Scales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan, Joseph V.; Ebert, W. L.; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Strachan, Denis M.; Vienna, John D.

    2012-03-30

    Vitrification has been chosen as the best demonstrated available technology for waste immobilization worldwide. To date, the contributions of physical and chemical processes controlling the long-term glass dissolution rate in geologic disposal remain uncertain; leading to a lack of international consensus on a glass corrosion rate law. Existing rate laws have overcome the uncertainty through conservatism, but a thorough mechanistic understanding of waste form durability in geologic environments would improve public and regulator confidence, as well as lead to cost savings if it is possible to take credit for the true durability of the waste form itself in system evaluations. To this end, six nations have joined together to formulate a joint plan for collaborative research into the mechanisms controlling the long-term corrosion of glass. This report highlights the technical program plan behind the US portion of this effort, with an emphasis on the current understanding (and limitations) of several mechanistic theories for glass corrosion. Some recent results are presented to provide an example of the ongoing research.

  18. Joint EM-NE-International Study of Glass Behavior over Geologic Time Scales - 12303

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan, J.V.; Schreiber, D.K.; Strachan, D.M.; Vienna, J.D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P. O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Ebert, W.L. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Icenhower, J.P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Vitrification has been chosen as the best demonstrated available technology for waste immobilization worldwide. To date, the contributions of physical and chemical processes controlling the long-term glass dissolution rate in geologic disposal remain uncertain, leading to a lack of international consensus on a rate law for glass corrosion. Existing rate laws have overcome uncertainty through conservatism, but a thorough mechanistic understanding of waste form durability in geologic environments would improve public and regulator confidence. If it is possible to take credit for the true durability of the waste form in repository system evaluations, then it is possible to design the repository with less conservatism with concomitant cost savings. To gain a fundamental understanding of the dissolution rate law, six nations have joined together to formulate a joint plan for collaborative research into the mechanisms controlling the long-term corrosion of glass. This report highlights the technical program plan behind the US portion of this effort, with an emphasis on the current understanding (and limitations) of several mechanistic theories for glass corrosion. Some recent results are presented to provide an example of the ongoing research. Atom probe tomography has been used to provide a high-resolution analysis of elemental concentration gradients present at the hydrated glass / pristine glass interface in SON68 after 25.75 years of corrosion in a simulated granitic groundwater at 90 deg. C. The most valuable result of these initial studies is the success of the technique. Characterization by APT had never been previously demonstrated for glass corrosion layers. The resolution of APT is a powerful addition to the tools with which we can investigate the mechanisms dominating glass corrosion. Some other key results of this study include the observation that the elemental interfacial width between the hydrated glass and pristine glass appears to be much sharper (?2 nm for B, Na and Al) than had been previously measured using nanoSIMS (?240 nm). It is not clear whether the APT analysis and nanoSIMS characterizations were possibly performed on topographically unique regions, or whether nanoSIMS overestimated the elemental width. However, the APT data seems very convincing that the elemental width can be much sharper than was previously thought. This result calls into question some of the assumptions made for the diffusion-control models of glass dissolution, since such a sharp profile would not match the diffusion coefficients used to date. Other results, such as the observation of apparently layered concentration profiles, show that gel evolution is not as simple as is currently assumed in nearly every model. This task is a good example of the collaborative nature of the I-TEAM effort. Based on experimental needs and differences in expertise, scientists from DOE and CEA worked together to change the level of understanding in the field. These types of interactions are nearly ubiquitous among the tasks in the technical program plan. With the excellence of the team in place and the willingness of the participants to work together for a common understanding, the stated goal of consensus on the mechanistic basis for radionuclide release from glass is well within reach. (authors)

  19. Analysis of Wind Power and Load Data at Multiple Time Scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Katie

    2011-01-01

    Behavior. National Renewable Energy Lab Report NREL/TP- 550-Operations. National Renewable Energy Lab Report NREL/JA-Applications. National Renewable Energy Lab Report NREL/TP-

  20. Analysis of Wind Power and Load Data at Multiple Time Scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Katie

    2011-01-01

    Huei. 2005. Primer on Wind Power for Utility Applications.Wan, Yih-Huei. 2004. Wind Power Plant Behaviors: Analysesof Long-Term Wind Power Data. National Renewable Energy Lab

  1. Time scales in atmospheric chemistry: Theory, GWPs for CH 4 and CO, and runaway growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prather, Michael J

    1996-01-01

    Program and NSF's Atmospheric Chemistry Program for supporteigenstates in atmospheric chemistry, (2) Exponential decaytracer gases and atmospheric chemistry, in steady-state

  2. Time scales in atmospheric chemistry: Theory, GWPs for CH4 and CO, and runaway growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prather, MJ; Prather, MJ

    1996-01-01

    Program and NSF's Atmospheric Chemistry Program for supporteigenstates in atmospheric chemistry, (2) Exponential decaytracer gases and atmospheric chemistry, in steady-state

  3. Lifetime of Anthropogenic Climate Change: Millennial Time Scales of Potential CO2 and Surface Temperature Perturbations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ). Earth system models can be used to simulate the ev- olution of the climate system under different anthro

  4. Second order coherence of broadband down-converted light on ultrashort time scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    correlation is carried out thanks to a modified Hanbury Brown-Twiss interferometer based on two photon. Q. Twiss, "Correlation between photons in two coherent beams of light," Nature 177(4497), 27

  5. Influence of Mean State on Climate Variability at Interannual and Decadal Time Scales 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Xiaojie

    2013-05-17

    for many phenomena associated with variables that are nonlinear by definition, such as the vertical wind shear and surface wind speed. In the first part of this dissertation, the influence of mean flow and anomalous flow on vertical wind shear variability...

  6. Interannual Atmospheric Variability Affects Continental Ice Sheet Simulations on Millennial Time Scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pritchard, Michael S; Bush, Andrew B. G; Marshall, Shawn J

    2008-01-01

    Wu, P. , and W. R. Peltier, 1982: Viscous gravitationalG. K. C. Clarke, and W. R. Peltier, 2000: Gla- ciologicalTech. Rep. 2, 17 pp. Peltier, W. R. , 1985: The LAGEOS

  7. Nested stochastic simulation algorithms for chemical kinetic systems with multiple time scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Den Eijnden, Eric

    c Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, NY 10012, USA Received as well as stochastic effects. This feature makes it an attractive alternative to the approach of using often depend exponentially on the activation energy. For a deterministic system of ODEs, this results

  8. Nested stochastic simulation algorithms for chemical kinetic systems with multiple time scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Tiejun

    c Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, NY 10012, USA Received alternative to the approach of using systems of deterministic ODEs, particularly in situations when. This is easy to appre- ciate, since chemical reaction rates often depend exponentially on the activation energy

  9. MCODE-3 : time-dependent depletion isotopics with MCNP-5 and SCALE-6.1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerrity, Thomas P., III

    2012-01-01

    In order to operate a reactor safely and efficiently, computer simulations must be used to predict certain nuclear characteristics of the reactor. To determine how materials change in a fission power environment, a ...

  10. Analysis of Wind Power and Load Data at Multiple Time Scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Katie

    2011-01-01

    The spectrum of power from wind turbines. Journal of PowerAWEA 2010. American Wind Energy Association ProjectsErik and Jason Kemper. 2009. Wind Plant Ramping Behavior.

  11. Analysis of Wind Power and Load Data at Multiple Time Scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Katie

    2011-01-01

    use of near-term wind power forecasts (GE 2008, CAISO 2007).partially controllable. Wind power can be forecast with someforecast will be based on some combination of the same-day wind

  12. Competition of noise sources in systems with delay: the role of multiple time scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fournier, John J.F.

    (additive) noise can amplify vibrations via coherence resonance while random variation of delay can suppress, and experiments, with manufacturing issues and virtual machining via computational modeling discussed in detail in the context of randomness. Variation in material parameters leads to both additive and multiplicative noise

  13. Optimal temporal planning at reactive time scales via dynamic backtracking branch and bound

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Effinger, Robert T

    2006-01-01

    Autonomous robots are being considered for increasingly capable roles in our society, such as urban search and rescue, automation for assisted living, and lunar habitat construction. To fulfill these roles, teams of ...

  14. Optimal Coordination of Distributed Energy Resources in Isolated Power Systems: A Cross-Time Scale Perspective 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayhorn, Ebony T

    2015-08-09

    This dissertation investigates the problem of optimally coordinating distributed energy resources (DERs) in isolated power systems. It is motivated by the recent efforts worldwide of integrating large amounts of renewable generation into power grids...

  15. Intermediate- to Deep-Water Circulation Changes on Short and Long Time Scales 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Daniel Patrick

    2012-07-16

    . Deborah Thomas Oceanic circulation remains one of the poorly understood elements of the global climate system, despite its importance to planetary heat redistribution and carbon cycling. The nature of deep-water formation and circulation in ancient... oceans are even more poorly constrained. In order to understand climate dynamics of past and future climates we must have a better understanding of the role of deep-ocean circulation. In this dissertation I investigated changes in intermediate...

  16. Interannual Atmospheric Variability Affects Continental Ice Sheet Simulations on Millennial Time Scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pritchard, Michael S; Bush, Andrew B. G; Marshall, Shawn J

    2008-01-01

    the westerly midlatitude jet stream into two branches thatthis midlatitude “split jet stream” recombine down- streamern branch of the split jet stream also acts to increase

  17. A reference time scale for Site U1385 (Shackleton Site) on the SW Iberian Margin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hodell, D.; Lourens, L.; Crowhurst, S.; Konijnendijk, T.; Tjallingii, R.; Jimenez-Espejo, F.; Skinner, L.; Tzedakis, P. C.

    2015-07-16

    ACCEPTED MANUSCRIPT 5 fidelity of the sediments on the SW Iberian Margin make this region a prime target for ocean drilling. In 2011, an Ancillary Program Letter (APL 763) was submitted to the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) requesting four...

  18. Distributed Model Predictive Control of Nonlinear and Two-Time-Scale Process Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Xianzhong

    2012-01-01

    the economic optimization and process control layer. Inoptimization and control for intentionally transient processpredictive control and optimization of processes : Enabling

  19. Near-optimal meanvariance controls under two-time-scale formulations and applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Hongwei

    University, Detroit, MI 48202, USA; b Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202, USA; c Department of Computer Science, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI

  20. Increasing the parallel efficiency of multi-scale, space-time simulations of turbulent flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuik, Kees

    of preliminary research for the Master of Science's degree in Applied Mathematics at the faculty of Electrical of aircraft and civil structures. The cheapest and also most flexible source of data is a numerical simulation

  1. Short time scale thermal mechanical shock wave propagation in high performance microelectronic packaging configuration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagaraj, Mahavir

    2004-11-15

    The generalized theory of thermoelasticity was employed to characterize the coupled thermal and mechanical wave propagation in high performance microelectronic packages. Application of a Gaussian heat source of spectral profile similar to high...

  2. Analysis of Wind Power and Load Data at Multiple Time Scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Katie

    2011-01-01

    AWEA 2010. American Wind Energy Association ProjectsR Liao. 2006. Analyses of Wind Energy Impact on WFEC Systemresources. The American Wind Energy Association maintains a

  3. The Grumps Architecture: Run-time Evolution in a Large Scale Distributed System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, J.H.

    Evans,J.H. Dickman,P. Atkinson,M. Proceedings of the Workshop on Engineering Complex Object-Oriented Solutions for Evolution (ECOOSE), held as part of OOPSLA 2001

  4. A model for universal time scale of vortex ring formation Kamran Mohseni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohseni, Kamran

    and Applied Science, 104-44, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 Morteza Gharib Graduate Aeronautical Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 Received of the fluid out of the cylinder and the approximation of the vortex at the pinch off moment by a vortex

  5. Investment Timing and Capacity Choice for Small-Scale Wind Power Under Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleten, Stein-Erik; Maribu, Karl Magnus

    2004-01-01

    A 20-year industry plan for small wind turbine tech- nology,has estimated that small wind turbines could contribute to 3

  6. COLLOQUIUM - PLEASE NOTE SPECIAL DATE/TIME: The Magnetospheric MultiScale

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits &Bradbury ScienceComplex earning FPEComplexPlasmaMission

  7. Radiative Influences on Glaciation Time-Scales of Mixed-Phase Clouds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 Winners * Impacts on GlobalRachel RuggirelloRadiative Influences on

  8. Holographic Space-time and Newton's Law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Banks; Willy Fischler

    2013-10-25

    We derive Newton's Law from the formalism of Holographic Space-Time (HST). More precisely, we show that for a large class of Hamiltonians of the type proposed previously for the HST description of a geodesic in Minkowski space, the eikonal for scattering of two massless particles at large impact parameter scales as expected with the impact parameter and the energies of the particles in the center of mass (CM) frame. We also discuss the criteria for black hole production in this collision, and find an estimate, purely within the HST framework, for the impact parameter at which it sets in, which coincides with the estimate based on general relativity.

  9. Time and Labor 9.1 Time Keeper Payroll -HCSD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Time and Labor 9.1 Time Keeper Payroll - HCSD Version Date: July 2012 #12;COPYRIGHT & TRADEMARKS create a risk of personal injury. If you use this software in dangerous applications, then you shall Guide Time and Labor 9.1 Time Keeper Payroll - HCSD Page iii Table of Contents Time and Labor 9.1 Time

  10. Timed Alternating-Time Temporal Logic Thomas A. Henzinger1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henzinger, Thomas A.

    equally powerful options for updating the state of the game, advancing time, or blocking time. Second, we in order to specify real-time objectives for games played on timed structures. We define the semantics Timed games are a formal model for the synthesis of real-time systems [22, 20]. While much research

  11. Time-Resolved

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDidDevelopment TopMetathesisSediments andTheTime-Resolved Time-Resolved

  12. Inverse modeling of NOx emissions at regional scale over northern France: Preliminary investigation of the second-order

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallet, Vivien

    Inverse modeling of NOx emissions at regional scale over northern France: Preliminary investigation time distribution of NOx emissions is robust. Citation: Que´lo, D., V. Mallet, and B. Sportisse (2005), Inverse modeling of NOx emissions at regional scale over northern France: Preliminary investigation

  13. 6, 43254340, 2006 Scaling in ozone and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ACPD 6, 4325­4340, 2006 Scaling in ozone and temperature C. Varotsos and D. Kirk-Davidoff Title Chemistry and Physics Discussions Long-memory processes in global ozone and temperature variations C #12;ACPD 6, 4325­4340, 2006 Scaling in ozone and temperature C. Varotsos and D. Kirk-Davidoff Title

  14. Scale evolution of double parton correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomas Kasemets

    2014-11-17

    We review the effect of scale evolution on a number of different correlations in double parton scattering (DPS). The strength of the correlations generally decreases with the scale but at a rate which greatly varies between different types. Through studies of the evolution, an understanding of which correlations can be of experimental relevance in different processes and kinematical regions is obtained.

  15. Microfluidic Large-Scale Integration: The Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quake, Stephen R.

    Microfluidic Large-Scale Integration: The Evolution of Design Rules for Biological Automation, polydimethylsiloxane Abstract Microfluidic large-scale integration (mLSI) refers to the develop- ment of microfluidic, are discussed. Several microfluidic components used as building blocks to create effective, complex, and highly

  16. Management of Large-Scale International

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Management of Large- Scale International Science Projects Dr. Benjamin J. Cross, P.E. Savannah of Government Commerce) #12;Extending Project Management to New, Complex Challenges · Emergence of large-scale-of-the-art R&D and technologies ­ Exceedingly high energies, temperatures, radiological conditions, special

  17. Scaling metabolism from organisms to ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enquist, Brian Joseph

    of ecosystem respiration based on the kinetics of meta- bolic reactions11­13 and the scaling of resource use constant for plants and microbes12,13 , the two groups that comprise most of the biomass in terrestrial rates, Bi, for all Box 1 A general model for scaling biochemical kinetics from organisms to ecosystems

  18. Modeling and application of soil moisture at varying spatial scales with parameter scaling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Narendra Narayan

    2009-05-15

    The dissertation focuses on characterization of subpixel variability within a satellite-based remotely sensed coarse-scale soil moisture footprint. The underlying heterogeneity of coarse-scale soil moisture footprint is masked by the area...

  19. INTERMITTENCY OF SOLAR WIND DENSITY FLUCTUATIONS FROM ION TO ELECTRON SCALES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, C. H. K.; Sorriso-Valvo, L.; Šafránková, J.; N?me?ek, Z.

    2014-07-01

    The intermittency of density fluctuations in the solar wind at kinetic scales has been examined using high time resolution Faraday cup measurements from the Spektr-R spacecraft. It was found that the probability density functions (PDFs) of the fluctuations are highly non-Gaussian over this range, but do not show large changes in shape with scale. These properties are statistically similar to those of the magnetic fluctuations and are important to understanding the dynamics of small scale turbulence in the solar wind. Possible explanations for the behavior of the density and magnetic fluctuations are discussed.

  20. A Pore Scale Evaluation of the Kinetics of Mineral Dissolution and Precipitation Reactions (EMSI)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steefel, Carl I.

    2006-06-01

    The chief goals for CEKA are to (1) collect and synthesize molecular-level kinetic data into a coherent framework that can be used to predict time evolution of environmental processes over a range of temporal and spatial scales; (2) train a cohort of talented and diverse students to work on kinetic problems at multiple scales; (3) develop and promote the use of new experimental techniques in environmental kinetics; (4) develop and promote the use of new modeling tools to conceptualize reaction kinetics in environmental systems; and (5) communicate our understanding of issues related to environmental kinetics and issues of scale to the broader scientific community and to the public.

  1. Scaling of the Longitudinal Electric Field and Transformer Ratio in a Nonlinear Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blumenfeld, I.; /SLAC; Clayton, C.E.; /UCLA; Decker, F.J.; Hogan, M.J.; /SLAC; Huang, C.; /UCLA; Ischebeck, R.; Iverson, R.H.; /SLAC; Joshi, C.; /UCLA; Katsouleas, T.; /Southern California U.; Kirby, N.; /SLAC; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.B.; /UCLA; Muggli, P.; Oz, E.; /Southern California U.; Siemann, R.H.; Walz, D.R.; /SLAC; Zhou, M.; /UCLA

    2012-06-12

    The scaling of the two important figures of merit, the transformer ratio T and the longitudinal electric field E{sub z}, with the peak drive-bunch current I{sub p}, in a nonlinear plasma wakefield accelerator is presented for the first time. The longitudinal field scales as I{sub P}{sup 0.623{+-}0.007}, in good agreement with nonlinear wakefield theory ({approx}I{sub P}{sup 0.5}), while the unloaded transformer ratio is shown to be greater than unity and scales weakly with the bunch current. The effect of bunch head erosion on both parameters is also discussed.

  2. Bias in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonardo Senatore

    2014-11-05

    We study how to describe collapsed objects, such as galaxies, in the context of the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures. The overdensity of galaxies at a given location and time is determined by the initial tidal tensor, velocity gradients and spatial derivatives of the regions of dark matter that, during the evolution of the universe, ended up at that given location. Similarly to what recently done for dark matter, we show how this Lagrangian space description can be recovered by upgrading simpler Eulerian calculations. We describe the Eulerian theory. We show that it is perturbatively local in space, but non-local in time, and we explain the observational consequences of this fact. We give an argument for why to a certain degree of accuracy the theory can be considered as quasi time-local and explain what the operator structure is in this case. We describe renormalization of the bias coefficients so that, after this and after upgrading the Eulerian calculation to a Lagrangian one, the perturbative series for galaxies correlation functions results in a manifestly convergent expansion in powers of $k/k_{\\rm NL}$ and $k/k_{\\rm M}$, where $k$ is the wavenumber of interest, $k_{\\rm NL}$ is the wavenumber associated to the non-linear scale, and $k_{\\rm M}$ is the comoving wavenumber enclosing the mass of a galaxy.

  3. The Pulse Scale Conjecture and the Case of BATSE Trigger 2193

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert J. Nemiroff

    2000-07-14

    The pulses that compose gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are hypothesized to have the same shape at all energies, differing only by scale factors in time and amplitude. This "Pulse Scale Conjecture" is confirmed here between energy channels of the dominant pulse in GRB 930214c (BATSE trigger 2193), the single most fluent single-pulsed GRB that occurred before May 1998. Furthermore, pulses are hypothesized to start at the same time independent of energy. This "Pulse Start Conjecture" is also confirmed in GRB 930214c. Analysis of GRB 930214c also shows that, in general, higher energy channels show shorter temporal scale factors. Over the energy range 100 KeV - 1 MeV, it is found that the temporal scale factors between a pulse measured at different energies are related to that energy by a power law, possibly indicating a simple relativistic mechanism is at work. To test robustness, the Pulse Start and Pulse Scale Conjectures were also tested on the four next most fluent single-pulse GRBs. Three of the four clearly passed, with a second smaller pulse possibly confounding the discrepant test. Models where the pulse rise and decay are created by different phenomena do not typically predict pulses that satisfy both the Pulse Start Conjecture and the Pulse Scale Conjecture, unless both processes are seen to undergo common time dilation.

  4. Time Activity Time Activity Time Activity Tuesday CLOSED CONFERENCE CLOSED CONFERENCE CLOSED CONFERENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burg, Theresa

    Time Activity Time Activity Time Activity Tuesday CLOSED CONFERENCE CLOSED CONFERENCE CLOSED CONFERENCE 2-Jun-15 Wednesday CLOSED CONFERENCE CLOSED CONFERENCE CLOSED CONFERENCE 3-Jun-15 Thursday CLOSED

  5. Time and Attendance Reporting

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-10-22

    DOE O 535.1 establishes the Department's requirements and responsibilities governing time and attendance reporting. The purpose of this revision is to reflect the transition of payroll processing from the Capital Accounting Center to the Defense Finance and Accounting System. Cancels DOE O 3600.1B. Canceled by DOE O 322.1C.

  6. Presenter:! Time & Date: !

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collar, Juan I.

    a checkbook, you can understand which energy options have the promise of supporting humankind - wind, hydro://cfcpwork.uchicago.edu/mailman/listinfo/cafe! A Reality Check on Alternative Energy! #12;A Reality Check on Alternative Energy! Presenter: Liz Moyer! Time a bigger, richer population without fossil fuels (which will definitely run out someday)? Energy is a hot

  7. Time-Encoded Imagers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik

    2014-11-01

    This report provides a short overview of the DNN R&D funded project, Time-Encoded Imagers. The project began in FY11 and concluded in FY14. The Project Description below provides the overall motivation and objectives for the project as well as a summary of programmatic direction. It is followed by a short description of each task and the resulting deliverables.

  8. Time reversal communication system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Candy, James V. (Danville, CA); Meyer, Alan W. (Danville, CA)

    2008-12-02

    A system of transmitting a signal through a channel medium comprises digitizing the signal, time-reversing the digitized signal, and transmitting the signal through the channel medium. The channel medium may be air, earth, water, tissue, metal, and/or non-metal.

  9. The value of electricity storage under large-scale penetration of renewable energy : a hybrid modeling approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Octaviano Villasana, Claudia Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    Due to the physics of electricity, and the current high costs of storage technologies, electricity generation and demand need to be instantaneously balanced at all times. The large-scale deployment of intermittent renewables ...

  10. Energy-Efficient HOG-based Object Detection at 1080HD 60 fps with Multi-Scale Support

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suleiman, Amr AbdulZahir

    In this paper, we present a real-time and energy-efficient multi-scale object detector using Histogram of Oriented Gradient (HOG) features and Support Vector Machine (SVM) classification. Parallel detectors with balanced ...

  11. Probabilistic Precipitation Forecast Skill as a Function of Ensemble Size and Spatial Scale in a Convection-Allowing Ensemble

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Ming

    Probabilistic Precipitation Forecast Skill as a Function of Ensemble Size and Spatial Scale decreases. These results appear to reflect the broadening of the forecast probability distribution function lead time. They also illustrate that efficient allocation of computing resources for convection

  12. The Association of Large-Scale Climate Variability and Teleconnections on Wind Energy Resource over Europe and its Intermittency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kriesche, Pascal

    In times of increasing importance of wind power in the world’s energy mix, this study focuses on a better understanding of the influences of large-scale climate variability on wind power resource over Europe. The impact ...

  13. Impact of Friction and Scale-Dependent Initial Stress on Radiated Energy-Moment Scaling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Bruce E.

    . Shaw Lamont­Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, New York, USA The radiated energy coming271 Impact of Friction and Scale-Dependent Initial Stress on Radiated Energy-Moment Scaling Bruce E of elucidat- ing their radiated energy-moment scaling. We find, contrary to expectations, that apparent stress

  14. Scaling between Structural Relaxation and Particle Caging in a Model Colloidal Gel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cristiano De Michele; Emanuela Del Gado; Dino Leporini

    2010-09-08

    In polymers melts and supercooled liquids, the glassy dynamics is characterized by the rattling of monomers or particles in the cage formed by their neighbors. Recently, a direct correlation in such systems, described by a universal scaling form, has been established between the rattling amplitude and the structural relaxation time. In this paper we analyze the glassy dynamics emerging from the formation of a persistent network in a model colloidal gel at very low density. The structural relaxation time of the gel network is compared with the mean squared displacement at short times, corresponding to the localization length associated to the presence of energetic bonds. Interestingly, we find that the same type of scaling as for the dense glassy systems holds. Our findings well elucidate the strong coupling between the cooperative rearrangements of the gel network and the single particle localization in the structure. Our results further indicate that the scaling captures indeed fundamental physical elements of glassy dynamics.

  15. ACCELERATION OF ELECTRONS WITH THE RACETRACK NON-SCALING FFAG FOR E-RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TRBOJEVIC,D.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; LITVINENKO, V.; PTITSYN, V.; ROSER, T.

    2007-06-25

    The future relativistic electron hadron collider: e-RHIC requires acceleration of electrons to 10 GeV. In the case that the super conducting linac is selected for acceleration, an energy recovery scheme is required. We propose to study a possibility of using the non-scaling Fixed-Field Gradient-Accelerator (NS-FFAG) for different energies. The beam will be accelerated by the superconducting linac at the top of the sine function, brought back to the front of the linac by the non-scaling FFAG and repeating this few times until the total energy of 20 GeV is reached. After collisions the beam is brought back by the non-scaling FFAG and decelerated (on the lower RF phase) in the same sequence but in the reverse order. Conventional and non-conventional beam dynamic issues will be discussed, like the transit time matching effect and the time of flight adjustments.

  16. Topological Effects of Synaptic Time Dependent Plasticity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James R. Kozloski; Guillermo A. Cecchi

    2010-03-19

    We show that the local Spike Timing-Dependent Plasticity (STDP) rule has the effect of regulating the trans-synaptic weights of loops of any length within a simulated network of neurons. We show that depending on STDP's polarity, functional loops are formed or eliminated in networks driven to normal spiking conditions by random, partially correlated inputs, where functional loops comprise weights that exceed a non-zero threshold. We further prove that STDP is a form of loop-regulating plasticity for the case of a linear network comprising random weights drawn from certain distributions. Thus a notable local synaptic learning rule makes a specific prediction about synapses in the brain in which standard STDP is present: that under normal spiking conditions, they should participate in predominantly feed-forward connections at all scales. Our model implies that any deviations from this prediction would require a substantial modification to the hypothesized role for standard STDP. Given its widespread occurrence in the brain, we predict that STDP could also regulate long range synaptic loops among individual neurons across all brain scales, up to, and including, the scale of global brain network topology.

  17. Scaling Evolution of Universal Dark-Matter Halo Density Profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Raig; G. Gonzalez-Casado; E. Salvador-Sole

    1998-10-10

    Dark-matter halos show a universal density profile with a scaling such that less massive systems are typically denser. This mass-density relation is well described by a proportionality between the characteristic density of halos and the mean cosmic density at halo formation time. It has recently been shown that this proportionality could be the result of the following simple evolutionary picture. Halos form in major mergers with essentially the same, cosmogony-dependent, dimensionless profile, and then grow inside-outside, as a consequence of accretion. Here we verify the consistency of this picture and show that it predicts the correct zero point of the mass-density relation.

  18. A Tree Swaying in a Turbulent Wind: A Scaling Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theo Odijk

    2014-07-10

    A tentative scaling theory is presented of a tree swaying in a turbulent wind. It is argued that the turbulence of the air within the crown is in the inertial regime. An eddy causes a dynamic bending response of the branches according to a time criterion. The resulting expression for the penetration depth of the wind yields an exponent which appears to be consistent with that pertaining to the morphology of the tree branches. An energy criterion shows that the dynamics of the branches is basically passive. The possibility of hydrodynamic screening by the leaves is discussed.

  19. POC-SCALE TESTING OF A DRY TRIBOELECTROSTATIC SEPARATOR FOR FINE COAL CLEANING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.-H. Yoon; G.H. Luttrell; A.D. Walters

    2000-01-01

    During the past quarter, several modifications were made to the TES unit and the materials handling system. The cylindrical electrodes were replaced by a set of screen electrodes to provide a more uniform electrostatic field. The problem with the recycle conveyor neutralizing the particle charge was also corrected by replacing it with a bucket elevator. In addition, problems with the turbocharger were corrected by increasing the number of charging stages from one to two. These modifications have significantly improved the separation performance and have permitted the POC-scale unit to achieve results in line with those obtained by the bench-scale separator. The testing phase of the project was continued at a rapid pace during this quarter. The test work showed that the modifications to the TES unit and the reduction in feed size from 28 mesh to 35 mesh resulted in significant overall improvement in yield and combustible recovery compared to the data reported in the last quarter. At that time, there was a significant discrepancy between the bench-scale and the pilot-scale results. The pilot-scale test work is now approaching the bench scale test results. However, further pilot-scale test work is required to further improve the results and duplicate the bench-scale test work.

  20. Cost aware real time big data processing in Cloud Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buyya, Rajkumar

    Cost aware real time big data processing in Cloud Environments By Cristian Montero Under and volatility of Big-data application workloads, it is difficult to decide when and how to scale up and down Environments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 2.2 Big Data

  1. Competitive Non-migratory Scheduling for Flow Time and Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Prudence W.H.

    @liv.ac.uk ABSTRACT Energy usage has been an important concern in recent re- search on online scheduling technology to reduce energy usage is dynamic speed scaling (see, e.g., [9, 15, 24, 28]) where the processorCompetitive Non-migratory Scheduling for Flow Time and Energy Tak-Wah Lam Department of Computer

  2. Mining, Modeling, and Analyzing Real-Time Social Trails 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamath, Krishna Y

    2013-05-28

    Real-time social systems are the fastest growing phenomena on the web, enabling millions of users to generate, share, and consume content on a massive scale. These systems are manifestations of a larger trend toward the global sharing of the real...

  3. Time autocorrelation function analysis of master equation and its application to atomic clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berry, R. Stephen

    Time autocorrelation function analysis of master equation and its application to atomic clusters the energy fluctuation 2 E, and the time autocorrelation and its Fourier transformation--the fluctuation in the relaxation processes. The time scales associated with these relaxation processes are determined

  4. EEHG Performance and Scaling Laws

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penn, Gregory

    2013-10-09

    This note will calculate the idealized performance of echo-enabled harmonic generation performance (EEHG), explore the parameter settings, and look at constraints determined by incoherent synchrotron radiation (ISR) and intrabeam scattering (IBS). Another important effect, time-of-flight variations related to transverse emittance, is included here but without detailed explanation because it has been described previously. The importance of ISR and IBS is that they lead to random energy shifts that lead to temporal shifts after the various beam manipulations required by the EEHG scheme. These effects give competing constraints on the beamline. For chicane magnets which are too compact for a given R56, the magnetic fields will be sufficiently strong that ISR will blur out the complex phase space structure of the echo scheme to the point where the bunching is strongly suppressed. The effect of IBS is more omnipresent, and requires an overall compact beamline. It is particularly challenging for the second pulse in a two-color attosecond beamline, due to the long delay between the first energy modulation and the modulator for the second pulse.

  5. Tevatron injection timing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saritepe, S.; Annala, G.

    1993-06-01

    Bunched beam transfer from one accelerator to another requires coordination and synchronization of many ramped devices. During collider operation timing issues are more complicated since one has to switch from proton injection devices to antiproton injection devices. Proton and antiproton transfers are clearly distinct sequences since protons and antiprotons circulate in opposite directions in the Main Ring (MR) and in the Tevatron. The time bumps are different, the kicker firing delays are different, the kickers and lambertson magnets are different, etc. Antiprotons are too precious to be used for tuning purposes, therefore protons are transferred from the Tevatron back into the Main Ring, tracing the path of antiprotons backwards. This tuning operation is called ``reverse injection.`` Previously, the reverse injection was handled in one supercycle. One batch of uncoalesced bunches was injected into the Tevatron and ejected after 40 seconds. Then the orbit closure was performed in the MR. In the new scheme the lambertson magnets have to be moved and separator polarities have to be switched, activities that cannot be completed in one supercycle. Therefore, the reverse injection sequence was changed. This involved the redefinition of TVBS clock event $D8 as MRBS $D8 thus making it possible to inject 6 proton batches (or coalesced bunches) and eject them one at a time on command, performing orbit closure each time in the MR. Injection devices are clock event driven. The TCLK is used as the reference clock. Certain TCLK events are triggered by the MR beam synchronized clock (MRBS) events. Some delays are measured in terms of MRBS ticks and MR revolutions. See Appendix A for a brief description of the beam synchronized clocks.

  6. Time Reversal Violation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, H; /SLAC

    2009-01-27

    This talk briefly reviews three types of time-asymmetry in physics, which I classify as universal, macroscopic and microscopic. Most of the talk is focused on the latter, namely the violation of T-reversal invariance in particle physics theories. In sum tests of microscopic T-invariance, or observations of its violation, are limited by the fact that, while we can measure many processes, only in very few cases can we construct a matched pair of process and inverse process and observe it with sufficient sensitivity to make a test. In both the cases discussed here we can achieve an observable T violation making use of flavor tagging, and in the second case also using the quantum properties of an antisymmetric coherent state of two B mesons to construct a CP-tag. Both these tagging properties depend only on very general properties of the flavor and/or CP quantum numbers and so provide model independent tests for T-invariance violations. The microscopic laws of physics are very close to T-symmetric. There are small effects that give CP- and T-violating processes in three-generation-probing weak decays. Where a T-violating observable can be constructed we see the relationships between T-violation and CP-violation expected in a CPT conserving theory. These microscopic effects are unrelated to the 'arrow of time' that is defined by increasing entropy, or in the time direction defined by the expansion of our Universe.

  7. http://tti.tamu.edu Saving Lives, Time and Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) has created unprecedented economic growth and opportunity for Mexico, sooptimizingcurrentborderoperationsiskeytofacilitating increased trade. The mayors' offices of El Paso and Juarez have recognized bridge saturation as a problem that will only worsen as trade increases. Conclusions Researchers have identified reasons why

  8. Method and system for small scale pumping

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Insepov, Zeke (Darien, IL); Hassanein, Ahmed (Bolingbrook, IL)

    2010-01-26

    The present invention relates generally to the field of small scale pumping and, more specifically, to a method and system for very small scale pumping media through microtubes. One preferred embodiment of the invention generally comprises: method for small scale pumping, comprising the following steps: providing one or more media; providing one or more microtubes, the one or more tubes having a first end and a second end, wherein said first end of one or more tubes is in contact with the media; and creating surface waves on the tubes, wherein at least a portion of the media is pumped through the tube.

  9. Pressurized melt ejection into scaled reactor cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarbell, W.W.; Pilch, M.; Brockmann, J.E.; Ross, J.W.; Gilbert, D.W.

    1986-10-01

    This report describes four tests performed in the High-Pressure Melt Streaming Program (HIPS) using linear-scaled cavities of the Zion Nuclear Power Plant. These experiments were conducted to study the phenomena involved in high-pressure ejection of core debris into the cavity beneath the reactor pressure vessel. One-tenth and one-twentieth linear scale models of reactor cavities were constructed and instrumented. The first test used an apparatus constructed of alumina firebrick to minimize the potential interaction between the ejected melt and cavity material. The remaining three experiments used scaled representations of the Zion nuclear plant geometry, constructed of prototypic concrete composition.

  10. WIMP isocurvature perturbation and small scale structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Ki-Young; Shin, Chang Sub

    2015-01-01

    The adiabatic component of perturbations is damped during the kinetic decoupling due to the collision with relativistic component on sub-horizon scales. However the isocurvature part is free from the damping and could be large enough to make a substantial contribution to the formation of small scale structure. We explicitly study the weakly interacting massive particles as dark matter with an early matter dominated period before radiation domination and show that the isocurvature perturbation is generated during the phase transition and leaves imprint in the observable signatures for the small scale structure.

  11. New Efficient Sparse SpaceTime Algorithms for Superparameterization on Mesoscales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xing, Yulong

    New Efficient Sparse Space­Time Algorithms for Superparameterization on Mesoscales YULONG XING-scale and mesoscale processes provided by a cloud-resolving model (CRM) embedded in each column of a large-scale model for limited-area mesoscale ensemble forecasting. 1. Introduction Atmospheric processes of weather and climate

  12. Modified Dust and the Small Scale Crisis in CDM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabio Capela; Sabir Ramazanov

    2015-04-29

    At large scales and for sufficiently early times, dark matter is described as a pressureless perfect fluid---dust---non-interacting with Standard Model fields. These features are captured by a simple model with two scalars: a Lagrange multiplier and another playing the role of the velocity potential. That model arises naturally in some gravitational frameworks, e.g., the mimetic dark matter scenario. We consider an extension of the model by means of higher derivative terms, such that the dust solutions are preserved at the background level, but there is a non-zero sound speed at the linear level. We associate this {\\it Modified Dust} with dark matter, and study the linear evolution of cosmological perturbations in that picture. The most prominent effect is the suppression of their power spectrum for sufficiently large cosmological momenta. This can be relevant in view of the problems that cold dark matter faces at sub-galactic scales, e.g., the missing satellites problem. At even shorter scales, however, perturbations of Modified Dust are enhanced compared to the predictions of more common particle dark matter scenarios. This is a peculiarity of their evolution in radiation dominated background. We also briefly discuss clustering of Modified Dust. We write the system of equations in the Newtonian limit, and sketch the possible mechanism which could prevent the appearance of caustic singularities. The same mechanism may be relevant in light of the core-cusp problem.

  13. A time-varying subsidence parameterization for the atmospheric boundary layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flagg, David D. (David Douglas)

    2005-01-01

    This study examines the effect of a time-varying parameterization for subsidence in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) on a one-dimensional coupled land-atmosphere model. Measurements of large-scale divergence in the ABL ...

  14. ProtEx: a toolkit for the analysis of distributed real-time systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meylan, Yves Damien Meylan

    2000-01-01

    Large-scale distributed real-time systems are increasingly difficult to analyze within the Rate Monotonic Analysis (RMA) framework. This is due partly to their heterogeneity, complex interaction between components, and the ...

  15. Time Evolution of the Mutual Fund Size Distribution Yonathan Schwarzkopf1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -33 Pasadena, CA 91125 2 Santa Fe Institute, 1399 Hyde Park Road, Santa Fe, NM 87501 3 Luiss Guido Carli, Viale into a power law only over long time scales, suggesting that log-normality comes about because the industry

  16. Conduction in alumina with atomic scale copper filaments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Xu; Liu, Jie; Anantram, M. P.

    2014-10-28

    The conductance of atomic scale filaments with three and seven Cu atoms in ?-alumina are calculated using ab initio density functional theory. We find that the filament with 3 Cu atoms is sufficient to increase the conductance of 1.3?nm thick alumina film by more than 10{sup 3} times in linear response. As the applied voltage increases, the current quickly saturates and differential resistance becomes negative. Compared to the filament with three Cu atoms, while the conductance of the filament with seven Cu atoms is comparable in linear response, they carry as much as twenty times larger current at large biases. The electron transport is analyzed based on local density of states, and the negative differential resistance in the seven Cu filaments occurs due to their narrow bandwidth.

  17. Diffusion in the Presence of Scale-Free Absorbing Boundaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nir Alfasi; Yacov Kantor

    2015-04-26

    Scale-free surfaces, such as cones, remain unchanged under a simultaneous expansion of all coordinates by the same factor. Probability density of a particle diffusing near such absorbing surface at large time approaches a simple form that incorporates power-law dependencies on time and distance from a special point, such as apex of the cone, which are characterized by a single exponent $\\eta$. The same exponent is used to describe the number of spatial conformations of long ideal polymer attached to the special point of a repulsive surface of the same geometry and can be used in calculation of entropic forces between such polymers and surfaces. We use the solution of diffusion equation near such surfaces to find the numerical values of $\\eta$, as well as to provide some insight into the behavior of ideal polymers near such surfaces.

  18. Black hole lightning due to particle acceleration at subhorizon scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aleksi?, J; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Babic, A; Bangale, P; Barrio, J A; González, J Becerra; Bednarek, W; Bernardini, E; Biasuzzi, B; Biland, A; Blanch, O; Bonnefoy, S; Bonnoli, G; Borracci, F; Bretz, T; Carmona, E; Carosi, A; Colin, P; Colombo, E; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Covino, S; Da Vela, P; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; De Caneva, G; De Lotto, B; Wilhelmi, E de Oña; Mendez, C Delgado; Prester, D Dominis; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Einecke, S; Eisenacher, D; Elsaesser, D; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Frantzen, K; Fruck, C; Galindo, D; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Terrats, D Garrido; Gaug, M; Godinovi?, N; Muñoz, A González; Gozzini, S R; Hadasch, D; Hanabata, Y; Hayashida, M; Herrera, J; Hildebrand, D; Hose, J; Hrupec, D; Idec, W; Kadenius, V; Kellermann, H; Kodani, K; Konno, Y; Krause, J; Kubo, H; Kushida, J; La Barbera, A; Lelas, D; Lewandowska, N; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; Longo, F; López, M; López-Coto, R; López-Oramas, A; Lorenz, E; Lozano, I; Makariev, M; Mallot, K; Maneva, G; Mankuzhiyil, N; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Marcote, B; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Menzel, U; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Moralejo, A; Munar-Adrover, P; Nakajima, D; Niedzwiecki, A; Nilsson, K; Nishijima, K; Noda, K; Orito, R; Overkemping, A; Paiano, S; Palatiello, M; Paneque, D; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Paredes-Fortuny, X; Persic, M; Poutanen, J; Moroni, P G Prada; Prandini, E; Puljak, I; Reinthal, R; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Garcia, J Rodriguez; Rügamer, S; Saito, T; Saito, K; Satalecka, K; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schultz, C; Schweizer, T; Shore, S N; Sillanpää, A; Sitarek, J; Snidaric, I; Sobczynska, D; Spanier, F; Stamatescu, V; Stamerra, A; Steinbring, T; Storz, J; Strzys, M; Takalo, L; Takami, H; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Terzi?, T; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Thaele, J; Tibolla, O; Torres, D F; Toyama, T; Treves, A; Uellenbeck, M; Vogler, P; Zanin, R; Kadler, M; Schulz, R; Ros, E; Bach, U; Krauß, F; Wilms, J

    2014-01-01

    Supermassive black holes with masses of millions to billions of solar masses are commonly found in the centers of galaxies. Astronomers seek to image jet formation using radio interferometry, but still suffer from insufficient angular resolution. An alternative method to resolve small structures is to measure the time variability of their emission. Here, we report on gamma-ray observations of the radio galaxy IC 310 obtained with the MAGIC telescopes revealing variability with doubling time scales faster than 4.8 min. Causality constrains the size of the emission region to be smaller than 20\\% of the gravitational radius of its central black hole. We suggest that the emission is associated with pulsar-like particle acceleration by the electric field across a magnetospheric gap at the base of the radio jet.

  19. Large-Scale Molecular Dynamics Simulations for Highly Parallel Infrastructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pazúriková, Jana

    2014-01-01

    Computational chemistry allows researchers to experiment in sillico: by running a computer simulations of a biological or chemical processes of interest. Molecular dynamics with molecular mechanics model of interactions simulates N-body problem of atoms$-$it computes movements of atoms according to Newtonian physics and empirical descriptions of atomic electrostatic interactions. These simulations require high performance computing resources, as evaluations within each step are computationally demanding and billions of steps are needed to reach interesting timescales. Current methods decompose the spatial domain of the problem and calculate on parallel/distributed infrastructures. Even the methods with the highest strong scaling hit the limit at half a million cores: they are not able to cut the time to result if provided with more processors. At the dawn of exascale computing with massively parallel computational resources, we want to increase the level of parallelism by incorporating parallel-in-time comput...

  20. Low-scale seesaw and dark matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Fabbrichesi; S. Petcov

    2013-04-15

    We discuss how two birds---the little hierarchy problem of low-scale type-I seesaw models and the search for a viable dark matter candidate---are (proverbially) killed by one stone: a new inert scalar state

  1. Small scale vacuum chamber for general use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clayton, Alexander P

    2013-01-01

    For this thesis a small scale vacuum chamber assembly was designed and fabricated. This chamber's purpose is to provide high quality vacuum conditions for a variety of samples. Often these samples are in need of precise ...

  2. Psychotherapy Computational Psychotherapy Research: Scaling up the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steyvers, Mark

    research. New methods are required to "scale up" to larger evaluation tasks and "drill down" into the raw researchable because the intermediate technology required . . . does not exist. I mean auxiliaries and methods

  3. Program Management for Large Scale Engineering Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oehmen, Josef

    The goal of this whitepaper is to summarize the LAI research that applies to program management. The context of most of the research discussed in this whitepaper are large-scale engineering programs, particularly in the ...

  4. Large scale prediction models and algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monsch, Matthieu (Matthieu Frederic)

    2013-01-01

    Over 90% of the data available across the world has been produced over the last two years, and the trend is increasing. It has therefore become paramount to develop algorithms which are able to scale to very high dimensions. ...

  5. Scaling Reinforcement Learning Paradigms for Motor Control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vijayakumar, Sethu; Peters, Jan; Schaal, Stefan

    Reinforcement learning offers a general framework to explain reward related learning in artificial and biological motor control. However, current reinforcement learning methods rarely scale to high dimensional movement systems ...

  6. Scale-invariant nonlinear optics in gases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heyl, C M; Miranda, M; Louisy, M; Kovacs, K; Tosa, V; Balogh, E; Varjú, K; L'Huillier, A; Couairon, A; Arnold, C L

    2015-01-01

    Nonlinear optical methods are becoming ubiquitous in many areas of modern photonics. They are, however, often limited to a certain range of input parameters, such as pulse energy and average power, since restrictions arise from, for example, parasitic nonlinear effects, damage problems and geometrical considerations. Here, we show that many nonlinear optics phenomena in gaseous media are scale-invariant if spatial coordinates, gas density and laser pulse energy are scaled appropriately. We develop a general scaling model for (3+1)-dimensional wave equations, demonstrating the invariant scaling of nonlinear pulse propagation in gases. Our model is numerically applied to high-order harmonic generation and filamentation as well as experimentally verified using the example of pulse post-compression via filamentation. Our results provide a simple recipe for up-or downscaling of nonlinear processes in gases with numerous applications in many areas of science.

  7. Dissolution of Barite Scale using Chelating Agents 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shende, Aniket Vishwanath

    2012-07-16

    Barium sulfate scaling can cause many oilfield problems leading to loss of well productivity and well abandonment. Currently, diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) is used, along with synergist oxalic acid and potassium hydroxide, to remove...

  8. Planet-scale Human Mobility Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan Hui; Richard Mortier; Tristan Henderson; Jon Crowcroft

    2009-09-18

    Research into, and design and construction of mobile systems and algorithms requires access to large-scale mobility data. Unfortunately, the wireless and mobile research community lacks such data. For instance, the largest available human contact traces contain only 100 nodes with very sparse connectivity, limited by experimental logistics. In this paper we pose a challenge to the community: how can we collect mobility data from billions of human participants? We re-assert the importance of large-scale datasets in communication network design, and claim that this could impact fundamental studies in other academic disciplines. In effect, we argue that planet-scale mobility measurements can help to save the world. For example, through understanding large-scale human mobility, we can track and model and contain the spread of epidemics of various kinds.

  9. A Small Scale Magnetic Particle Relaxometer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El Ghamrawy, Ahmed

    2013-12-09

    scanner development, superparamagnetic materials development, and image reconstruction techniques. In this project a small scale LabView-based system will be developed for use on small lab created phantoms, using 25 nm superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO...

  10. Scale effects in microindentation of ductile crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielson, Gregory Nolan, 1974-

    2000-01-01

    Indentation testing has long been a standard test used to classify all types of materials. In the past several decades the scale of indentation testing has moved into the micron and even sub-micron range. For many types ...

  11. Observation of multi-scale oscillation of laminar lifted flames with low-frequency AC electric fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryu, S.K.; Kim, Y.K.; Kim, M.K.; Won, S.H. [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea); Chung, S.H. [Clean Combustion Research Center, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal (Saudi Arabia)

    2010-01-15

    The oscillation behavior of laminar lifted flames under the influence of low-frequency AC has been investigated experimentally in coflow jets. Various oscillation modes were existed depending on jet velocity and the voltage and frequency of AC, especially when the AC frequency was typically smaller than 30 Hz. Three different oscillation modes were observed: (1) large-scale oscillation with the oscillation frequency of about 0.1 Hz, which was independent of the applied AC frequency, (2) small-scale oscillation synchronized to the applied AC frequency, and (3) doubly-periodic oscillation with small-scale oscillation embedded in large-scale oscillation. As the AC frequency decreased from 30 Hz, the oscillation modes were in the order of the large-scale oscillation, doubly-periodic oscillation, and small-scale oscillation. The onset of the oscillation for the AC frequency smaller than 30 Hz was in close agreement with the delay time scale for the ionic wind effect to occur, that is, the collision response time. Frequency-doubling behavior for the small-scale oscillation has also been observed. Possible mechanisms for the large-scale oscillation and the frequency-doubling behavior have been discussed, although the detailed understanding of the underlying mechanisms will be a future study. (author)

  12. Property:Scale Test | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource HistoryPotentialRuralUtilityScalePVGeneration Jump to: navigation,PowerAdvancedBiofuelEnergyrevScale Test

  13. Supplementary material for: Arctic stratospheric dehydration Part 1: Unprecedented observation of vertical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    the measurements may be affected by the water outgassing. Occasionally the descent measurements of CFH, whose by water outgassing due to the instrument'

  14. An unprecedented blend of intense magnetic and X-ray laser pulses...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    planet to discover a surprising three-dimensional (3D) arrangement of a material's electrons that appears closely linked to a mysterious phenomenon known as high-temperature...

  15. Mechanistic studies of an unprecedented enzyme-catalysed 1,2-phosphono-migration reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Wei-chen

    (S)-2-hydroxypropylphosphonate ((S)-2-HPP) epoxidase (HppE) is a mononuclear non-haem-iron-dependent enzyme1, 2, 3 responsible for the final step in the biosynthesis of the clinically useful antibiotic fosfomycin4. Enzymes ...

  16. Earth'sFuture Multidecadal global cooling and unprecedented ozone loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    of the impacts of 100 small nuclear weapons should motivate the elimination of more than 17,000 nuclear weapons that odd nitrogen produced by the largest nuclear weapons could loft to the stratosphere, resulting; Mills et al., 2008; Stenke et al., 2013]. Even the smallest of nuclear weapons, such as the 15 kt weapon

  17. A composite HII region luminosity function in H alpha of unprecedented statistical weight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradley, T R; Beckman, J E; Folkes, S L

    2006-01-01

    Context. Statistical properties of HII region populations in disk galaxies yield important clues to the physics of massive star formation. Aims. We present a set of HII region catalogues and luminosity functions for a sample of 56 spiral galaxies in order to derive the most general form of their luminosity function. Methods. HII region luminosity functions are derived for individual galaxies which, after photometric calibration, are summed to form a total luminosity function comprising 17,797 HII regions from 53 galaxies. Results. The total luminosity function, above its lower limit of completeness, is clearly best fitted by a double power law with a significantly steeper slope for the high luminosity portion of the function. This change of slope has been reported in the literature for individual galaxies, and occurs at a luminosity of log L = 38.6\\pm0.1 (L in erg/s) which has been termed the Stromgren luminosity. A steep fall off in the luminosity function above log L = 40 is also noted, and is related to an...

  18. A composite HII region luminosity function in H alpha of unprecedented statistical weight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. R. Bradley; J. H. Knapen; J. E. Beckman; S. L. Folkes

    2006-09-21

    Context. Statistical properties of HII region populations in disk galaxies yield important clues to the physics of massive star formation. Aims. We present a set of HII region catalogues and luminosity functions for a sample of 56 spiral galaxies in order to derive the most general form of their luminosity function. Methods. HII region luminosity functions are derived for individual galaxies which, after photometric calibration, are summed to form a total luminosity function comprising 17,797 HII regions from 53 galaxies. Results. The total luminosity function, above its lower limit of completeness, is clearly best fitted by a double power law with a significantly steeper slope for the high luminosity portion of the function. This change of slope has been reported in the literature for individual galaxies, and occurs at a luminosity of log L = 38.6\\pm0.1 (L in erg/s) which has been termed the Stromgren luminosity. A steep fall off in the luminosity function above log L = 40 is also noted, and is related to an upper limit to the luminosities of underlying massive stellar clusters. Detailed data are presented for the individual sample galaxies. Conclusions. The luminosity functions of HII regions in spiral galaxies show a two slope power law behaviour, with a significantly steeper slope for the high luminosity branch. This can be modelled by assuming that the high luminosity regions are density bounded, though the scenario is complicated by the inhomogeneity of the ionized interstellar medium. The break, irrespective of its origin, is of potential use as a distance indicator for disc galaxies.

  19. Unprecedented studies of the low-energy negatively charged kaons interactions in nuclear matter by AMADEUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Curceanu; K. Piscicchia; M. Bazzi; C. Berucci; D. Bosnar; A. M. Bragadireanu; A. Clozza; M. Cargnelli; A. D'uffizi; L. Fabbietti; C. Fiorini; F. Ghio; C. Guaraldo; M. Iliescu; P. Levi Sandri; J. Marton; D. Pietreanu; M. Poli Lener; R. Quaglia; A. Romero Vidal; E. Sbardella; A. Scordo; H. Shi; D. Sirghi; F. Sirghi; M. Skurzok; I. Tucakovic; O. Vazquez Doce; E. Widmann; J. Zmeskal

    2015-01-23

    The AMADEUS experiment aims to provide unique quality data of $K^-$ hadronic interactions in light nuclear targets, in order to solve fundamental open questions in the non-perturbative strangeness QCD sector, like the controversial nature of the $\\Lambda(1405)$ state, the yield of hyperon formation below threshold, the yield and shape of multi-nucleon $K^-$ absorption, processes which are intimately connected to the possible existence of exotic antikaon multi-nucleon clusters. AMADEUS takes advantage of the DA$\\Phi$NE collider, which provides a unique source of monochromatic low-momentum kaons and exploits the KLOE detector as an active target, in order to obtain excellent acceptance and resolution data for $K^-$ nuclear capture on H, ${}^4$He, ${}^{9}$Be and ${}^{12}$C, both at-rest and in-flight. During the second half of 2012 a successful data taking was performed with a dedicated pure carbon target implemented in the central region of KLOE, providing a high statistic sample of pure at-rest $K^-$ nuclear interactions. For the future dedicated setups involving cryogenic gaseous targets are under preparation.

  20. DOI: 10.1002/chem.200900341 Unprecedented Sulfone-Functionalized MetalOrganic Frameworks and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trikalitis, Pantelis N.

    and in particular with sulfonate (-SO3 À ) groups. In contrast to a number of MOFs with Lewis acid sites originating­base interactions. Recently, Kita- gawa and co-workers reported a robust porous coordination polymer, with free -SO3 to functionalize the ligand (1,1'-biphenyl)-4,4'- dicarboxylic acid (H2L1) (see Scheme 1) with -SO3H groups and use