Sample records for unlimited x-ray energy

  1. Solar energy unlimited

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahjouri, F.S.

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy efficiency and renewable energy are valued resources in meeting future energy demands. Aside from environmental incentives, the economic value of these alternate energy resources is measured primarily by the avoided costs of conventional supplies. The renewable energy technologies are significantly more market-mature and ready for large-scale economic application than is commonly thought. Advanced solar thermal technologies - Evacuated Heat Pipe Solar Collectors (Tubes) - have been used for eighteen years. Technology has overcome the limitations of flat-plate solar panels, especially in unfavorable weather conditions. These kinds of collectors easily produce temperatures higher than 160 degrees F. This paper addresses Photo-Thermal Conversion, Vacuum, Heat Pipe, Thermomax, and Desiccant Technologies. Further, the integration of these technologies in three commercial/residential units is briefly described.

  2. Energy resolved X-ray grating interferometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thuering, T.; Stampanoni, M. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland) [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich (Switzerland); Barber, W. C.; Iwanczyk, J. S. [DxRay, Inc., Northridge, California 91324 (United States)] [DxRay, Inc., Northridge, California 91324 (United States); Seo, Y.; Alhassen, F. [UCSF Physics Research Laboratory, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States)] [UCSF Physics Research Laboratory, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States)

    2013-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Although compatible with polychromatic radiation, the sensitivity in X-ray phase contrast imaging with a grating interferometer is strongly dependent on the X-ray spectrum. We used an energy resolving detector to quantitatively investigate the dependency of the noise from the spectral bandwidth and to consequently optimize the system-by selecting the best energy band matching the experimental conditions-with respect to sensitivity maximization and, eventually, dose. Further, since theoretical calculations of the spectrum are usually limited due to non-ideal conditions, an energy resolving detector accurately quantifies the spectral changes induced by the interferometer including flux reduction and beam hardening.

  3. Energy Unlimited Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDIT REPORTEnergy OffshoreDeveloper -NeoEnterprisesUnlimited Inc Place:

  4. Performance enhancement approaches for a dual energy x-ray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, Kenneth

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evans, J.P.O. , “Stereoscopic dual energy imaging for targetCrawford, C.R. , “Dual Energy Volumetric X-ray Tomographicimages in 4–10 MeV Dual- energy customs system for material

  5. In situ X-ray Characterization of Energy Storage Materials |...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-ray Characterization of Energy Storage Materials Tuesday, July 9, 2013 - 11:00am SLAC, Conference Room 137-322 Presented by Johanna Nelson, Stanford Postdoctoral Scholar, SSRL...

  6. The color of X-rays Spectral X-ray computed tomography using energy sensitive pixel detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schioppa, Enrico Junior

    Energy sensitive X-ray imaging detectors are produced by connecting a semiconductor sensor to a spectroscopic pixel readout chip. In this thesis, the applicability of such detectors to X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is studied. A prototype Medipix based silicon detector is calibrated using X-ray fluorescence. The charge transport properties of the sensor are characterized using a high energy beam of charged particles at the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN). Monochromatic X-rays at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) are used to determined the energy response function. These data are used to implement a physics-based CT projection operator that accounts for the transmission of the source spectrum through the sample and detector effects. Based on this projection operator, an iterative spectral CT reconstruction algorithm is developed by extending an Ordered Subset Expectation Maximization (OSEM) method. Subsequently, a maximum likelihood based algo...

  7. Attenuation of high-energy x rays by iron shielding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bespalov, V.I.; Chakhlov, V.L.; Shtein, M.M.

    1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monte Carlo calculations are presented on electron-accelerator x-ray spectra for actual target thicknesses and electron energies of 4-50 MeV. Effective attenuation coefficients have been obtained as well as build-up factors for collimated beams andiron shielding of thickness form 1 to 80 cm. The radiation contrast has been determined as a function of thickness for this energy range.

  8. Advances in the Detection of As in Environmental Samples Using Low Energy X-ray Fluorescence in a Scanning Transmission X-ray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hitchcock, Adam P.

    X-ray emission (PIXE),4 or energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectrometry in scanning or transmission XAdvances in the Detection of As in Environmental Samples Using Low Energy X-ray Fluorescence at high spatial resolution is needed in many areas of geobiochemistry and environmental science. Scanning

  9. PHERMEX: Pulsed High-Energy Radiographic Machine Emitting X rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dick, R.D.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The PHERMEX facility used to provide flash radiographs of explosives and explosive-driven metal systems is described. With this facility, precision radiographs of large objects containing materials with high atomic number and high density are attainable. PHERMEX encompasses the high-current, three-cavity, 30-MeV linear electron accelerator; the 50-MHz-radiofrequency power source to drive the cavities; timing, firing, and signal detection system; and a data-acquisition system. Some unique features of PHERMEX are reliability; very intensive submicrosecond bremsstrahlung source rich in 4- to 8-MeV x rays; less than 1.0-mm-diam spot size; precision determination of edges, discontinuities, and areal-mass distribution; and flash radiographs of large explosive systems close to the x-ray target. Some aspects of the PHERMEX-upgrading program are discussed. The program will result (1) in an increased electron-beam energy to about 50 MeV, (2) the use of an electron-gun pulser that is capable of producing three time-adjustable pulses for obtaining three radiographic pictures of a single explosive event, (3) an increased electron injection energy of 1.25 MeV, (4) the capability for recording high-speed signals, and (5) the use of computers to assist the monitoring and control of the data-acquisition system and the PHERMEX accelerator.

  10. Dimensionality and noise in energy selective x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvarez, Robert E. [Aprend Technology, Mountain View, California 94043 (United States)] [Aprend Technology, Mountain View, California 94043 (United States)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To develop and test a method to quantify the effect of dimensionality on the noise in energy selective x-ray imaging.Methods: The Cramèr-Rao lower bound (CRLB), a universal lower limit of the covariance of any unbiased estimator, is used to quantify the noise. It is shown that increasing dimensionality always increases, or at best leaves the same, the variance. An analytic formula for the increase in variance in an energy selective x-ray system is derived. The formula is used to gain insight into the dependence of the increase in variance on the properties of the additional basis functions, the measurement noise covariance, and the source spectrum. The formula is also used with computer simulations to quantify the dependence of the additional variance on these factors. Simulated images of an object with three materials are used to demonstrate the trade-off of increased information with dimensionality and noise. The images are computed from energy selective data with a maximum likelihood estimator.Results: The increase in variance depends most importantly on the dimension and on the properties of the additional basis functions. With the attenuation coefficients of cortical bone, soft tissue, and adipose tissue as the basis functions, the increase in variance of the bone component from two to three dimensions is 1.4 × 10{sup 3}. With the soft tissue component, it is 2.7 × 10{sup 4}. If the attenuation coefficient of a high atomic number contrast agent is used as the third basis function, there is only a slight increase in the variance from two to three basis functions, 1.03 and 7.4 for the bone and soft tissue components, respectively. The changes in spectrum shape with beam hardening also have a substantial effect. They increase the variance by a factor of approximately 200 for the bone component and 220 for the soft tissue component as the soft tissue object thickness increases from 1 to 30 cm. Decreasing the energy resolution of the detectors increases the variance of the bone component markedly with three dimension processing, approximately a factor of 25 as the resolution decreases from 100 to 3 bins. The increase with two dimension processing for adipose tissue is a factor of two and with the contrast agent as the third material for two or three dimensions is also a factor of two for both components. The simulated images show that a maximum likelihood estimator can be used to process energy selective x-ray data to produce images with noise close to the CRLB.Conclusions: The method presented can be used to compute the effects of the object attenuation coefficients and the x-ray system properties on the relationship of dimensionality and noise in energy selective x-ray imaging systems.

  11. Spatial resolution of synchrotron x-ray microtomography in high energy range: Effect of x-ray energy and sample-to-detector distance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seo, D.; Tomizato, F.; Toda, H.; Kobayashi, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Uesugi, K.; Takeuchi, A.; Suzuki, Y. [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, Mikazuki, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2012-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Spatial resolution of three-dimensional images obtained by synchrotron X-ray microtomography technique is evaluated using cyclic bar patterns machined on a steel wire. Influences of X-ray energy and the sample-to-detector distance on spatial resolution were investigated. High X-ray energies of 33-78 keV are applied due to the high X-ray absorption of transition metals. Best spatial resolution of about 1.2 {mu}m pitch was observed at the sample-to-detector distance range of 20-110 mm and at the energy range of 68-78 keV. Several factors such as X-ray scattering and diffraction phenomena affecting the degradation of spatial resolution are also discussed.

  12. Unlimited Energy GmbH | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCalifornia Sector:Shreniksource HistoryUnlimited Energy GmbH Jump to:

  13. High resolution energy-sensitive digital X-ray

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nygren, David R. (Berkeley, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for detecting an x-ray and for determining the depth of penetration of an x-ray into a semiconductor strip detector. In one embodiment, a semiconductor strip detector formed of semiconductor material is disposed in an edge-on orientation towards an x-ray source such that x-rays From the x-ray source are incident upon and substantially perpendicular to the front edge of the semiconductor strip detector. The semiconductor strip detector is formed of a plurality of segments. The segments are coupled together in a collinear arrangement such that the semiconductor strip detector has a length great enough such that substantially all of the x-rays incident on the front edge of the semiconductor strip detector interact with the semiconductor material which forms the semiconductor strip detector. A plurality of electrodes are connected to the semiconductor strip detect or such that each one of the of semiconductor strip detector segments has at least one of the of electrodes coupled thereto. A signal processor is also coupled to each one of the electrodes. The present detector detects an interaction within the semiconductor strip detector, between an x-ray and the semiconductor material, and also indicates the depth of penetration of the x-ray into the semiconductor strip detector at the time of the interaction.

  14. A Model-Based Iterative Algorithm for Dual-Energy X-Ray CT Reconstruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Model-Based Iterative Algorithm for Dual-Energy X-Ray CT Reconstruction Ruoqiao Zhang, Jean, Senior Member, IEEE Abstract--Recent developments in dual-energy X-ray CT have shown a number of benefits the opportunity to reduce noise and artifacts in dual energy reconstructions. However, previous approaches

  15. SIMULATION OF ENERGY SELECTIVE X-RAY IMAGES FOR MATERIAL DIS-CRIMINATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    SIMULATION OF ENERGY SELECTIVE X-RAY IMAGES FOR MATERIAL DIS- CRIMINATION Rune S Thing1 , Syen J Carlo model is presented to evaluate the clinical benefits of optimal energy bins in spectral X-ray imaging, using the BEAMnrc code system. While energy resolving photon counting detectors have been

  16. Interferometric phase detection at x-ray energies via Fano resonance control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. P. Heeg; C. Ott; D. Schumacher; H. -C. Wille; R. Röhlsberger; T. Pfeifer; J. Evers

    2014-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Modern x-ray light sources promise access to structure and dynamics of matter in largely unexplored spectral regions. However, the desired information is encoded in the light intensity and phase, whereas detectors register only the intensity. This phase problem is ubiquitous in crystallography and imaging, and impedes the exploration of quantum effects at x-ray energies. Here, we demonstrate phase-sensitive measurements characterizing the quantum state of a nuclear two-level system at hard x-ray energies. The nuclei are initially prepared in a superposition state. Subsequently, the relative phase of this superposition is interferometrically reconstructed from the emitted x-rays. Our results form a first step towards x-ray quantum state tomography, and provide new avenues for structure determination and precision metrology via x-ray Fano interference.

  17. Automatic detection of bone fragments in poultry using multi-energy x-rays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gleason, Shaun S. (Knoxville, TN); Paulus, Michael J. (Knoxville, TN); Mullens, James A. (Knoxville, TN)

    2002-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    At least two linear arrays of x-ray detectors are placed below a conveyor belt in a poultry processing plant. Multiple-energy x-ray sources illuminate the poultry and are detected by the detectors. Laser profilometry is used to measure the poultry thickness as the x-ray data is acquired. The detector readout is processed in real time to detect the presence of small highly attenuating fragments in the poultry, i.e., bone, metal, and cartilage.

  18. TheChandraViewofRadiativeandKineticEnergyDissipationin Beyond Unification:An X-ray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Dan

    optically thin corona · X-rays from Comptonization of disk photons in hot corona · Power law X-ray spectrum complex in general consists of a narrow line core, often accompanied by broadened emission · If we can Energy Transmission Gratings Spectrometer well suited · Narrow core always attributed

  19. An Exact Modeling of Signal Statistics in Energy-integrating X-ray Computed Tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An Exact Modeling of Signal Statistics in Energy-integrating X-ray Computed Tomography Yi Fan1 used by modern computed tomography (CT) scanners and has been an interesting research topic 1. INTRODUCTION In x-ray computed tomography (CT), Poisson noise model has been widely used in noise

  20. Inverters Unlimited Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtelInterias Solar Energy Jump to:IESInterval Data Systems

  1. Solar Unlimited USA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistmaSinosteelSolar Energy sro JumpProjectsSolarSolarSolar

  2. Air Displacement Plethysmography versus Dual-Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry in Underweight, Normal-Weight, and Overweight/Obese Individuals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lowry, DW; Tomiyama, AJ

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SB (1993) Use of dual-energy x-ray absorp- tiometry in body-Heymsfield SB (1996) Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry bodyPlethysmography versus Dual-Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry in

  3. Single photon energy dispersive x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higginbotham, Andrew; Patel, Shamim; Ciricosta, Orlando; Suggit, Matthew J.; Wark, Justin S. [Department of Physics, Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)] [Department of Physics, Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Hawreliak, James A.; Collins, Gilbert W.; Coppari, Federica; Eggert, Jon H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Tang, Henry [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    With the pressure range accessible to laser driven compression experiments on solid material rising rapidly, new challenges in the diagnosis of samples in harsh laser environments are emerging. When driving to TPa pressures (conditions highly relevant to planetary interiors), traditional x-ray diffraction techniques are plagued by increased sources of background and noise, as well as a potential reduction in signal. In this paper we present a new diffraction diagnostic designed to record x-ray diffraction in low signal-to-noise environments. By utilising single photon counting techniques we demonstrate the ability to record diffraction patterns on nanosecond timescales, and subsequently separate, photon-by-photon, signal from background. In doing this, we mitigate many of the issues surrounding the use of high intensity lasers to drive samples to extremes of pressure, allowing for structural information to be obtained in a regime which is currently largely unexplored.

  4. A Combinational Approach to the Fusion, De-noising and Enhancement of Dual-Energy X-Ray Luggage Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abidi, Mongi A.

    dual-energy X-ray images for better object classification and threat detection. The fusion stepA Combinational Approach to the Fusion, De-noising and Enhancement of Dual-Energy X-Ray Luggage-based noise reduction technique which is very efficient in removing background noise from fused X-ray images

  5. Fat to Muscle Ratio Measurements with Dual Energy X Ray Absorbtiometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, A; Broadbent, C; Zhong, J; Dilmanian, A; Zafonte, F; Zhong, Z

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate measurement of the fat-to-muscle ratio in animal model is important for obesity research. An efficient way to measure the fat to muscle ratio in animal model using dual-energy absorptiometry is presented in this paper. A radioactive source exciting x-ray fluorescence from a target material is used to provide the two x-ray energies needed. The x-rays, after transmitting through the sample, are measured with an energy-sensitive Ge detector. Phantoms and specimens were measured. The results showed that the method was sensitive to the fat to muscle ratios with good linearity. A standard deviation of a few percent in the fat to muscle ratio could be observed with the x-ray dose of 0.001 mGy.

  6. Fat to muscle ratio measurements with dual energy x-ray absorbtiometry

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, A.; Zhong, Z.; Luo, J.; Wang, A.; Broadbent, C.; Zhong, J.; Dilmanian, F. A.; Zafonte, F.

    2015-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate measurement of the fat-to-muscle ratio in animal model is important for obesity research. An efficient way to measure the fat to muscle ratio in animal model using dual-energy absorptiometry is presented in this paper. A radioactive source exciting x-ray fluorescence from a target material is used to provide the two x-ray energies needed. The x-rays, after transmitting through the sample, are measured with an energy-sensitive Ge detector. Phantoms and specimens were measured. The results showed that the method was sensitive to the fat to muscle ratios with good linearity. A standard deviation of a few percent in the fatmore »to muscle ratio could be observed with the x-ray dose of 0.001 mGy.« less

  7. Innovative Solutions Unlimited, LLC (InSolves) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtel JumpCounty,Jump7OpenInnovative Solutions Unlimited, LLC (InSolves)

  8. Absolute x-ray energy calibration over a wide energy range using a diffraction-based iterative method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Thomas S.

    Mineral Physics Institute, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794, USA 2 DepartmentAbsolute x-ray energy calibration over a wide energy range using a diffraction-based iterative;REVIEW OF SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENTS 83, 063901 (2012) Absolute x-ray energy calibration over a wide energy

  9. Observation of solar high energy gamma and X-ray emission and solar energetic particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Struminsky, Alexei

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We considered 18 solar flares observed between June 2010 and July 2012, in which high energy >100 MeV {\\gamma}-emission was registered by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard FermiGRO. We examined for these {\\gamma}-events soft X-ray observations by GOES, hard X-ray observations by the Anti-Coincidence Shield of the SPectrometer aboard INTEGRAL (ACS SPI) and the Gamma-Ray burst Monitor (GBM) aboard FermiGRO. Hard X-ray and {\\pi}0-decay {\\gamma}-ray emissions are used as tracers of electron and proton acceleration, respectively. Bursts of hard X-ray were observed by ACS SPI during impulsive phase of 13 events. Bursts of hard X-ray >100 keV were not found during time intervals, when prolonged hard {\\gamma}-emission was registered by LAT/FermiGRO. Those events showing prolonged high-energy gamma-ray emission not accompanied by >100 keV hard X-ray emission are interpreted as an indication of either different acceleration processes for protons and electrons or as the presence of a proton population accelerated du...

  10. ENERGY FEEDBACK FROM X-RAY BINARIES IN THE EARLY UNIVERSE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fragos, T.; Zezas, A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)] [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Lehmer, B. D. [The Johns Hopkins University, Homewood Campus, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)] [The Johns Hopkins University, Homewood Campus, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Naoz, S. [Institute for Theory and Computation, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)] [Institute for Theory and Computation, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Basu-Zych, A., E-mail: tfragos@cfa.harvard.edu [NASA Goddard Space Flight Centre, Code 662, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray photons, because of their long mean-free paths, can easily escape the galactic environments where they are produced, and interact at long distances with the intergalactic medium, potentially having a significant contribution to the heating and reionization of the early universe. The two most important sources of X-ray photons in the universe are active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and X-ray binaries (XRBs). In this Letter we use results from detailed, large scale population synthesis simulations to study the energy feedback of XRBs, from the first galaxies (z ? 20) until today. We estimate that X-ray emission from XRBs dominates over AGN at z ?> 6-8. The shape of the spectral energy distribution of the emission from XRBs shows little change with redshift, in contrast to its normalization which evolves by ?4 orders of magnitude, primarily due to the evolution of the cosmic star-formation rate. However, the metallicity and the mean stellar age of a given XRB population affect significantly its X-ray output. Specifically, the X-ray luminosity from high-mass XRBs per unit of star-formation rate varies an order of magnitude going from solar metallicity to less than 10% solar, and the X-ray luminosity from low-mass XRBs per unit of stellar mass peaks at an age of ?300 Myr and then decreases gradually at later times, showing little variation for mean stellar ages ?> 3 Gyr. Finally, we provide analytical and tabulated prescriptions for the energy output of XRBs, that can be directly incorporated in cosmological simulations.

  11. A theoretical analysis of reflection of X-rays from water at energies relevant for diagnostics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arsenovic, Dusan [Institute of Physics, Pregrevica 118, P.O. Box 57, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Davidovic, Dragomir M.; Vukanic, Jovan [Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P.O Box 522, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2003-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The reflection of X-rays from a semi-infinite water target, for energies used in X-ray diagnostics, is treated by the analog Monte Carlo simulation. In the developed procedure it was possible to calculate separately contributions of photons scattered, before reflection, fixed number of times with target electrons. It turned out that multiple collision type of reflection dominates at all energies investigated, whenever the absorption is small. The same process was also treated analytically as the classical albedo problem for isotropic scattering without energy loss. Very good agreement of results of the two approaches is obtained.

  12. High-energy x-ray production with pyroelectric crystals Jeffrey A. Geuthera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    as the lower-energy L-shell peaks, allowing more positive sample identification. This report shows how a paired-ray sources for use in imaging, materials analysis, and other applications. For many applications, for example, high-energy sources enable the excitation of the K-shell x-ray peaks for high-Z materials as well

  13. The spectral energy distribution of quiescent black hole X-ray binaries: new constraints from Spitzer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Gallo; S. Migliari; S. Markoff; J. Tomsick; C. Bailyn; S. Berta; R. Fender; J. Miller-Jones

    2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    (Abridged) Among the various issues that remain open in the field of accretion onto black hole X-ray binaries (BHBs) is the way the gas accretes at very low Eddington ratios, in the so-called quiescent regime. While there is general agreement that the X-rays are produced by a population of high-energy electrons near to the BH, the controversy comes about in modeling the contribution from inflowing vs. outflowing particles, and their relative energy budget. Recent Spitzer observations of three quiescent BHBs have shown evidence for excess emission with respect to the tail of the companion star between 8-24 micron. We suggest that synchrotron emission from a partially self-absorbed outflow might be responsible for the observed mid-IR excess, in place of, or in addition to, thermal emission from circumbinary material. If so, then the jet synchrotron luminosity exceeds the measured 2-10 keV luminosity by a factor of a few in these systems. In turn, the mechanical power stored in the jet exceeds the bolometric X-ray luminosity at least by 4 orders of magnitude. We then compile the broadband spectral energy distribution (SED) of A0620-00, the lowest Eddington-ratio stellar mass BH with a known radio counterpart, by means of simultaneous radio, optical and X-ray observations, and the archival Spitzer data. We are able to fit the SED of A0620-00 with a `maximally jet-dominated' model in which the radio through the soft X-rays are dominated by synchrotron emission, while the hard X-rays are dominated by inverse Compton at the jet base. The fitted parameters land in a range of values that is reminiscent of the Galactic Center super-massive BH Sgr A*. Most notably, the inferred ratio of the jet acceleration rate to local cooling rates is two orders of magnitude weaker with respect to higher luminosity, hard state sources.

  14. Demonstration of x-ray fluorescence imaging of a high-energy-density plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacDonald, M. J., E-mail: macdonm@umich.edu; Gamboa, E. J. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Keiter, P. A.; Fein, J. R.; Klein, S. R.; Kuranz, C. C.; LeFevre, H. J.; Manuel, M. J.-E.; Wan, W. C.; Drake, R. P. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Montgomery, D. S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Biener, M. M.; Fournier, K. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Streit, J. [Schafer Corporation, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments at the Trident Laser Facility have successfully demonstrated the use of x-ray fluorescence imaging (XRFI) to diagnose shocked carbonized resorcinol formaldehyde (CRF) foams doped with Ti. One laser beam created a shock wave in the doped foam. A second laser beam produced a flux of vanadium He-? x-rays, which in turn induced Ti K-shell fluorescence within the foam. Spectrally resolved 1D imaging of the x-ray fluorescence provided shock location and compression measurements. Additionally, experiments using a collimator demonstrated that one can probe specific regions within a target. These results show that XRFI is a capable alternative to path-integrated measurements for diagnosing hydrodynamic experiments at high energy density.

  15. High-energy x-ray diffractometer for nondestructive strain depth profile measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Shorman, M. Y. [Department of Physics, Yarmouk University, 21163 Irbid (Jordan)] [Department of Physics, Yarmouk University, 21163 Irbid (Jordan); Jensen, T. C.; Gray, J. N. [Center for Nondestructive Evaluation, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)] [Center for Nondestructive Evaluation, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a lab-based high-energy x-ray diffraction system and a new approach to nondestructively measuring strain profiles in polycrystalline samples. This technique utilizes the tungsten K{sub ?1} characteristic radiation from a standard industrial x-ray tube. We introduce a simulation model that is used to determine strain values from data collected with this system. Examples of depth profiling are shown for shot peened aluminum and titanium samples. Profiles to 1 mm depth in aluminum and 300 ?m depth in titanium with a depth resolution of 20 ?m are presented.

  16. Thermal Acoustic Sensor for High Pulse Energy X-ray FEL Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, T.J.; Frisch, J.C.; Kraft, E.M.; Loos, J.; /SLAC; Bentsen, G.S.; /Rochester U.

    2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The pulse energy density of X-ray FELs will saturate or destroy conventional X-ray diagnostics, and the use of large beam attenuation will result in a beam that is dominated by harmonics. We present preliminary results at the LCLS from a pulse energy detector based on the thermal acoustic effect. In this type of detector an X-ray resistant material (boron carbide in this system) intercepts the beam. The pulse heating of the target material produces an acoustic pulse that can be detected with high frequency microphones to produce a signal that is linear in the absorbed energy. The thermal acoustic detector is designed to provide first- and second-order calorimetric measurement of X-ray FEL pulse energy. The first-order calorimetry is a direct temperature measurement of a target designed to absorb all or most of the FEL pulse power with minimal heat leak. The second-order measurement detects the vibration caused by the rapid thermoelastic expansion of the target material each time it absorbs a photon pulse. Both the temperature change and the amplitude of the acoustic signal are directly related to the photon pulse energy.

  17. Dual-energy synchrotron X ray measurements of rapid soil density and water content changes in swelling soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    content and bulk density. A number of studies have used dual-energy gamma rays to investigate soilDual-energy synchrotron X ray measurements of rapid soil density and water content changes-energy synchrotron X ray to measure, for the first time, the water content and bulk density changes during the fast

  18. alxga1-xas high-energy x-ray: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    alxga1-xas high-energy x-ray First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 ?????? ??? ??...

  19. THE NUCLEAR SPECTROSCOPIC TELESCOPE ARRAY (NuSTAR) HIGH-ENERGY X-RAY MISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakrabarty, Deepto

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) mission, launched on 2012 June 13, is the first focusing high-energy X-ray telescope in orbit. NuSTAR operates in the band from 3 to 79 keV, extending the sensitivity of ...

  20. Filter-fluorescer measurement of low-voltage simulator x-ray energy spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, G.T.; Craven, R.E.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray energy spectra of the Maxwell Laboratories MBS and Physics International Pulserad 737 were measured using an eight-channel filter-fluorescer array. The PHOSCAT computer code was used to calculate channel response functions, and the UFO code to unfold spectrum.

  1. Measurement of high energy x-ray beam penumbra with GafchromicTM EBT radiochromic film

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, K.N.

    , respectively, for a 6 MV linear accelerator produced x-ray beam. This is com- pared to 3.2 mm±0.2 mm Kodak EDR2. Radiographic film types like Kodak EDR2 have improved this feature due to reduced energy dependence and higher

  2. TENDER ENERGY X-RAY ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY (TES)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    productivity at the earliest possible date. · Strategy combines in-house and external aspects to create world IMPACT: · Energy Materials: Photovoltaic, fuel-cell, battery and superconducting (nano

  3. Portable X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska: EnergyPiratiniEdwards, Wisconsin: EnergyReading, NewJumpPortable

  4. Absolute pulse energy measurements of soft x-rays at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tiedtke, K.; Sorokin, A. A.; Jastrow, U.; Jurani?, P.; Kreis, S.; Gerken, N.; Richter, M.; Arp, U.; Feng, Y.; Nordlund, D.; et al

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports novel measurements of x-ray optical radiation on an absolute scale from the intense and ultra-short radiation generated in the soft x-ray regime of a free electron laser. We give a brief description of the detection principle for radiation measurements which was specifically adapted for this photon energy range. We present data characterizing the soft x-ray instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) with respect to the radiant power output and transmission by using an absolute detector temporarily placed at the downstream end of the instrument. This provides an estimation of the reflectivity of all x-ray opticalmore »elements in the beamline and provides the absolute photon number per bandwidth per pulse. This parameter is important for many experiments that need to understand the trade-offs between high energy resolution and high flux, such as experiments focused on studying materials via resonant processes. Furthermore, the results are compared with the LCLS diagnostic gas detectors to test the limits of linearity, and observations are reported on radiation contamination from spontaneous undulator radiation and higher harmonic content.« less

  5. X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: EnergyWyandanch, New York:State ParksWyrulec1991) |

  6. Category:X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.Telluric Survey as explorationpage? ForChina Pages in

  7. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 Wind Projectsource History View New PagesWzeng's blog

  8. X-Ray Characterization of Diesel Sprays | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric VehicleCenters |-- 9:00 AM OpeningWorld's Largest

  9. THE NUCLEAR SPECTROSCOPIC TELESCOPE ARRAY (NuSTAR) HIGH-ENERGY X-RAY MISSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, Fiona A.; Cook, W. Rick; Forster, Karl; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Madsen, Kristin K.; Mao, Peter H.; Miyasaka, Hiromasa [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Craig, William W.; Pivovaroff, Michael J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Christensen, Finn E. [DTU Space, National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej 327, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Hailey, Charles J.; Koglin, Jason E.; Mori, Kaya [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Zhang, William W. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Boggs, Steven E. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Stern, Daniel; Kim, Yunjin [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Giommi, Paolo; Perri, Matteo [ASI Science Data Center, c/o ESRIN, via G. Galilei, I-00044 Frascati (Italy); Kitaguchi, Takao, E-mail: fiona@srl.caltech.edu [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, via di Frascati 33, I-00040 Monteporzio (Italy); and others

    2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) mission, launched on 2012 June 13, is the first focusing high-energy X-ray telescope in orbit. NuSTAR operates in the band from 3 to 79 keV, extending the sensitivity of focusing far beyond the {approx}10 keV high-energy cutoff achieved by all previous X-ray satellites. The inherently low background associated with concentrating the X-ray light enables NuSTAR to probe the hard X-ray sky with a more than 100-fold improvement in sensitivity over the collimated or coded mask instruments that have operated in this bandpass. Using its unprecedented combination of sensitivity and spatial and spectral resolution, NuSTAR will pursue five primary scientific objectives: (1) probe obscured active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity out to the peak epoch of galaxy assembly in the universe (at z {approx}< 2) by surveying selected regions of the sky; (2) study the population of hard X-ray-emitting compact objects in the Galaxy by mapping the central regions of the Milky Way; (3) study the non-thermal radiation in young supernova remnants, both the hard X-ray continuum and the emission from the radioactive element {sup 44}Ti; (4) observe blazars contemporaneously with ground-based radio, optical, and TeV telescopes, as well as with Fermi and Swift, to constrain the structure of AGN jets; and (5) observe line and continuum emission from core-collapse supernovae in the Local Group, and from nearby Type Ia events, to constrain explosion models. During its baseline two-year mission, NuSTAR will also undertake a broad program of targeted observations. The observatory consists of two co-aligned grazing-incidence X-ray telescopes pointed at celestial targets by a three-axis stabilized spacecraft. Deployed into a 600 km, near-circular, 6 Degree-Sign inclination orbit, the observatory has now completed commissioning, and is performing consistent with pre-launch expectations. NuSTAR is now executing its primary science mission, and with an expected orbit lifetime of 10 yr, we anticipate proposing a guest investigator program, to begin in late 2014.

  10. How Can X-ray Transient Absorption Spectroscopy Aide Solar Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are from optimized on structural, energetic and dynamic parameters. Intense X-ray pulses from synchrotrons and X-ray free electrons lasers coupled with ultrafast lasers...

  11. SMB, X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited ReleaseWelcome to theAbsorption Spectroscopy X-ray

  12. Development of a dual MCP framing camera for high energy x-rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izumi, N., E-mail: izumi2@llnl.gov; Hall, G. N.; Carpenter, A. C.; Allen, F. V.; Cruz, J. G.; Felker, B.; Hargrove, D.; Holder, J.; Lumbard, A.; Montesanti, R.; Palmer, N. E.; Piston, K.; Stone, G.; Thao, M.; Vern, R.; Zacharias, R.; Landen, O. L.; Tommasini, R.; Bradley, D. K.; Bell, P. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently developed diagnostic techniques at LLNL require recording backlit images of extremely dense imploded plasmas using hard x-rays, and demand the detector to be sensitive to photons with energies higher than 50 keV [R. Tommasini et al., Phys. Phys. Plasmas 18, 056309 (2011); G. N. Hall et al., “AXIS: An instrument for imaging Compton radiographs using ARC on the NIF,” Rev. Sci. Instrum. (these proceedings)]. To increase the sensitivity in the high energy region, we propose to use a combination of two MCPs. The first MCP is operated in a low gain regime and works as a thick photocathode, and the second MCP works as a high gain electron multiplier. We tested the concept of this dual MCP configuration and succeeded in obtaining a detective quantum efficiency of 4.5% for 59 keV x-rays, 3 times larger than with a single plate of the thickness typically used in NIF framing cameras.

  13. X-Ray Energy Responses of Silicon Tomography Detectors Irradiated with Fusion Produced Neutrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohagura, J. [Plasma Research Centre, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Cho, T. [Plasma Research Centre, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Hirata, M. [Plasma Research Centre, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Numakura, T. [Plasma Research Centre, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Yokoyama, N. [Plasma Research Centre, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Fukai, T. [Plasma Research Centre, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Tomii, Y. [Plasma Research Centre, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Tokioka, S. [Plasma Research Centre, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Miyake, Y. [Plasma Research Centre, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Kiminami, S. [Plasma Research Centre, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Shimizu, K. [Plasma Research Centre, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Miyoshi, S. [Plasma Research Centre, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Hirano, K. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (Japan); Yoshida, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Japan); Yamauchi, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Japan); Kondoh, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Japan); Nishitani, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Japan)

    2005-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to clarify the effects of fusion-produced neutron irradiation on silicon semiconductor x-ray detectors, the x-ray energy responses of both n- and p-type silicon tomography detectors used in the Joint European Torus (JET) tokamak (n-type) and the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror (p-type) are studied using synchrotron radiation at the Photon Factory of the National Laboratory for High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK). The fusion neutronics source (FNS) of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) is employed as well-calibrated D-T neutron source with fluences from 10{sup 13} to 10{sup 15} neutrons/cm{sup 2} onto these semiconductor detectors. Different fluence dependence is found between these two types of detectors; that is, (i) for the n-type detector, the recovery of the degraded response is found after the neutron exposure beyond around 10{sup 13} neutrons/cm{sup 2} onto the detector. A further finding is followed as a 're-degradation' by a neutron irradiation level over about 10{sup 14} neutrons/cm{sup 2}. On the other hand, (ii) the energy response of the p-type detector shows only a gradual decrease with increasing neutron fluences. These properties are interpreted by our proposed theory on semiconductor x-ray responses in terms of the effects of neutrons on the effective doping concentration and the diffusion length of a semiconductor detector.

  14. Regularized energy-dependent solar flare hard x-ray spectral index

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eduard P. Kontar; Alexander L. MacKinnon

    2005-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The deduction from solar flare X-ray photon spectroscopic data of the energy dependent model-independent spectral index is considered as an inverse problem. Using the well developed regularization approach we analyze the energy dependency of spectral index for a high resolution energy spectrum provided by Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). The regularization technique produces much smoother derivatives while avoiding additional errors typical of finite differences. It is shown that observations imply a spectral index varying significantly with energy, in a way that also varies with time as the flare progresses. The implications of these findings are discussed in the solar flare context.

  15. Microdosimetric predictions of RBE for low-energy X-rays and low-energy fast neutrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potter, Eugene Wayne

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Neff Recently at Texas ABN, Bartlett used a sensitive technique for measuring mutations in E. Coli at low doses of low-energy x-rays. He noted a significant increase in effect with the lowest x-ray energy used (29 Kev) at about 30 R exposure which... ionizing radiation, most of the energy being deposited by heavy recoil particles such as hydrogen, helium, carbon, and oxygen nuclei. Thus even monoenergetic neutrons give rise to a very complex spatial distribution of energy (Be67). When a fast charged...

  16. Tunable X-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boyce, James R. (Williamsburg, VA)

    2011-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for the production of X-ray bunches tunable in both time and energy level by generating multiple photon, X-ray, beams through the use of Thomson scattering. The method of the present invention simultaneously produces two X-ray pulses that are tunable in energy and/or time.

  17. Streaked spectrometry using multilayer x-ray-interference mirrors to investigate energy transport in laser-plasma applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stradling, G.L.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Henke, B.L.; Campbell, E.M.; Mead, W.C.

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transport of energy in laser-produced plasmas is scrutinized by devising spectrally and temporally identifiable characteristics in the x-ray emission history which identify the heat-front position at various times in the heating process. Measurements of the relative turn-on times of these characteristics show the rate of energy transport between various points. These measurements can in turn constrain models of energy transport phenomena. We are time-resolving spectrally distinguishable subkilovolt x-ray emissions from different layers of a disk target to examine the transport rate of energy into the target. A similar technique is used to measure the lateral expansion rate of the plasma spot. A soft x-ray streak camera with 15-psec temporal resolution is used to make the temporal measurements. Spectral discrimination of the incident signal is provided by multilayer x-ray interference mirrors.

  18. Analysis of nuclear materials by energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence and spectral effects of alpha decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worley, Christopher G [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectra collected from alpha emitters are complicated by artifacts inherent to the alpha decay process, particularly when using portable instruments. For example, {sup 239}Pu EDXRF spectra exhibit a prominent uranium L X-ray emission peak series due to sample alpha decay rather than source-induced X-ray fluorescence. A portable EDXRF instrument was used to collect spectra from plutonium, americium, and a Pu-contaminated steel sample. The plutonium sample was also analyzed by wavelength dispersive XRF to demonstrate spectral differences observed when using these very different instruments.

  19. X-ray Emission of Low-Energy-Peaked BL Lacertae Objects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randall, Jill M.; Perlman, Eric S. [Florida Institute of Technology, Department of Physics and Space Sciences, 150 W. University Blvd., Melbourne, FL 32901 (United States)

    2009-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Presented here is an analysis of X-ray observations of the following seven low-energy-peaked BL Lacertae objects: BL Lacertae, S5 0716+71, W Comae, 3C 66A, S4 0954+65, OJ 287, and AO 0235+16. The spectral data for these objects were taken from observations by the XMM-Newton and/or Chandra X-ray observatories. These objects are being analyzed in an effort to reanalyze all XMM-Newton and Chandra data of low-energy BL Lacs, similar to the efforts of Perlman et al.[4] for high energy BL Lacs. The objects were studied in an effort to understand the nature of the X-ray and multi-waveband emissions in these objects, study the shape of the spectra, and compare the observations of low-energy-peaked BL Lacs to previous observations of these objects and also to observations of high-energy-peaked BL Lacs. Light curves and spectra were analyzed to look for evidence of spectral variability in the objects and as a comparison to previous research on these objects. Most data shows both synchrotron and Inverse-Compton emission, though only little correlation was seen between the emission strength and the spectral slope. Our data is generally well-fitted to a broken power law model with distinct bimodality seen in the first spectral index (six observations with {Gamma}{sub 1{approx}}0.4 and four observations with {Gamma}{sub 1{approx}}3.0), a break in energy between 0.6 and 1.4 keV, and a second spectral index {Gamma}{sub 2{approx}}2.0. None of the observations showed spectral lines, which is consistent with past results. For S5 0716+71 the XMM-Newton X-ray and optical data, along with radio data obtained from the University of Michigan Radio Astronomy Observatory (UMRAO), a spectral energy distribution was created and peak frequencies were estimated.

  20. Time-resolved soft-x-ray studies of energy transport in layered and planar laser-driven targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stradling, G.L.

    1982-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    New low-energy x-ray diagnostic techniques are used to explore energy-transport processes in laser heated plasmas. Streak cameras are used to provide 15-psec time-resolution measurements of subkeV x-ray emission. A very thin (50 ..mu..g/cm/sup 2/) carbon substrate provides a low-energy x-ray transparent window to the transmission photocathode of this soft x-ray streak camera. Active differential vacuum pumping of the instrument is required. The use of high-sensitivity, low secondary-electron energy-spread CsI photocathodes in x-ray streak cameras is also described. Significant increases in sensitivity with only a small and intermittant decrease in dynamic range were observed. These coherent, complementary advances in subkeV, time-resolved x-ray diagnostic capability are applied to energy-transport investigations of 1.06-..mu..m laser plasmas. Both solid disk targets of a variety of Z's as well as Be-on-Al layered-disk targets were irradiated with 700-psec laser pulses of selected intensity between 3 x 10/sup 14/ W/cm/sup 2/ and 1 x 10/sup 15/ W/cm/sup 2/.

  1. Energy Unlimited Wind Farm I | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 No revision|LLC Place: Ketchum,SPARQLFailedEnergy

  2. Energy Unlimited Wind Farm II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 No revision|LLC Place: Ketchum,SPARQLFailedEnergyII Jump to:

  3. Calibration of the NuSTAR High Energy Focusing X-ray Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madsen, Kristin K; Markwardt, Craig; An, Hongjun; Grefenstette, Brian W; Bachetti, Matteo; Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Kitaguchi, Takao; Bhalerao, Varun; Christensen, Finn E; Craig, William W; Fuerst, Felix; Walton, Dominic J; Hailey, Charles J; Rana, Vikram; Stern, Daniel; Westergaard, Niels-Jørgen; Zhang, William

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the calibration of the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) X-ray satellite. We used the Crab as the primary effective area calibrator and constructed a piece-wise linear spline function to modify the vignetting response. The achieved residuals for all off-axis angles and energies, compared to the assumed spectrum, are typically better than +/-2% up to 40 keV and 5--10% above due to limited counting statistics. An empirical adjustment to the theoretical 2D point spread function (PSF) was found using several strong point sources, and no increase of the PSF half power diameter (HPD) has been observed since the beginning of the mission. We report on the detector gain calibration, good to 60 eV for all grades, and discuss the timing capabilities of the observatory, which has an absolute timing of +/-3ms. Finally we present cross-calibration results from two campaigns between all the major concurrent X-ray observatories Chandra, Swift, Suzaku and XMM-Newton, conducted in 2012 and 2013 on the s...

  4. Boundary displacement measurements using multi-energy soft x-rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tritz, K., E-mail: ktritz@pppl.gov; Stutman, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Diallo, A.; LeBlanc, B. P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Sabbagh, S. [Department of Applied Physics and Mathematics, Columbia University, New York City, New York 10027 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Multi-Energy Soft X-ray (ME-SXR) system on NSTX provides radial profiles of soft X-ray emission, measured through a set of filters with varying thickness, which have been used to reconstruct the electron temperature on fast time scales (?10?kHz). In addition to this functionality, here we show that the ME-SXR system can be used to measure the boundary displacement of the NSTX plasma with a few mm spatial resolution during magnetohydrodyamic (MHD) activity. Boundary displacement measurements can serve to inform theoretical predictions of neoclassical toroidal viscosity, and will be used to investigate other edge phenomena on NSTX-U. For example, boundary measurements using filtered SXR measurements can provide information on pedestal steepness and dynamic evolution leading up to and during edge localized modes (ELMs). Future applications include an assessment of a simplified, filtered SXR edge detection system as well as its suitability for real-time non-magnetic boundary feedback for ELMs, MHD, and equilibrium position control.

  5. X-ray lithography source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piestrup, Melvin A. (Woodside, CA); Boyers, David G. (Mountain View, CA); Pincus, Cary (Sunnyvale, CA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and elminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an exellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography.

  6. X-ray lithography source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piestrup, M.A.; Boyers, D.G.; Pincus, C.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits is disclosed. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and eliminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an excellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography. 26 figures.

  7. AUTOMATED ELEMENTAL ANALYSIS USING ENERGY DISPERSIVE X-RAY FLUORESCENCE ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaklevic, J.M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    upon the x-ray fluorescence (XRF) method for the elementalnon-destructive nature of XRF is especially important whereconcentrations are measured in the XRF spectrometer and the

  8. Dual energy CT-based characterization of x-ray attenuation properties of breast equivalent material plates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Dual energy CT-based characterization of x-ray attenuation properties of breast equivalent material of the same nominal breast density equivalence (+ 1.5 HU). In addition, dual energy CT provided mono equivalent material, breast density, attenuation properties, linear attenuation coefficients, dual energy CT

  9. Unlimited Release

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not FoundInformation DOEInformation Summary Big*Thee n0738F4-19513Unlimited

  10. The X-ray afterglow flat segment in short GRB 051221A: Energy injection from a millisecond magnetar?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yizhong Fan; Dong Xu

    2006-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The flat segment lasting $\\sim 10^4$ seconds in the X-ray afterglow of GRB051221A represents the first clear case of strong energy injection in the external shock of a short GRB afterglow. In this work, we show that a millisecond pulsar with dipole magnetic field $\\sim 10^{14}$ Gauss could well account for that energy injection. The good quality X-ray flat segment thus suggests that the central engine of this short burst may be a millisecond magnetar.

  11. Characterization of spatially resolved high resolution x-ray spectrometers for high energy density physics and light source experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, K. W., E-mail: khill@pppl.gov; Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparacio, L.; Efthimion, P.; Pablant, N. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Lu, J. [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Technology and System of Ministry of Education, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Beiersdorfer, P.; Chen, H.; Magee, E. [Physics Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A high resolution 1D imaging x-ray spectrometer concept comprising a spherically bent crystal and a 2D pixelated detector is being optimized for diagnostics of small sources such as high energy density physics (HEDP) and synchrotron radiation or x-ray free electron laser experiments. This instrument is used on tokamak experiments for Doppler measurements of ion temperature and plasma flow velocity profiles. Laboratory measurements demonstrate a resolving power, E/?E of order 10?000 and spatial resolution better than 10 ?m. Initial tests of the high resolution instrument on HEDP plasmas are being performed.

  12. Miniature x-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Trebes, James E. (Livermore, CA); Stone, Gary F. (Livermore, CA); Bell, Perry M. (Tracy, CA); Robinson, Ronald B. (Modesto, CA); Chornenky, Victor I. (Minnetonka, MN)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A miniature x-ray source capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature x-ray source comprises a compact vacuum tube assembly containing a cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the anode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connection for an initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is highly x-ray transparent and made, for example, from boron nitride. The compact size and potential for remote operation allows the x-ray source, for example, to be placed adjacent to a material sample undergoing analysis or in proximity to the region to be treated for medical applications.

  13. X-Ray Diagnostics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfires may contribute more toConsensusX-Ray Diagnostics X-Ray

  14. Soft X-ray irradiation of methanol ice: Formation of products as a function of photon energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Y.-J.; Juang, K.-J.; Yih, T.-S. [Department of Physics, National Central University, Jhongli City, Taoyuan County 32054, Taiwan (China); Ciaravella, A.; Cecchi-Pestellini, C. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo, P.za Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy); Muñoz Caro, G. M.; Jiménez-Escobar, A., E-mail: aciaravella@astropa.unipa.it [Centro de Astrobiología (INTA-CSIC), Carretera de Ajalvir, km 4, Torrejón de Ardoz, E-28850 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pure methanol ices have been irradiated with monochromatic soft X-rays of 300 and 550 eV close to the 1s resonance edges of C and O, respectively, and with a broadband spectrum (250-1200 eV). The infrared (IR) spectra of the irradiated ices show several new products of astrophysical interest such as CH{sub 2}OH, H{sub 2}CO, CH{sub 4}, HCOOH, HCOCH{sub 2}OH, CH{sub 3}COOH, CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 3}, HCOOCH{sub 3}, and (CH{sub 2}OH){sub 2}, as well as HCO, CO, and CO{sub 2}. The effect of X-rays is the result of the combined interactions of photons and electrons with the ice. A significant contribution to the formation and growth of new species in the CH{sub 3}OH ice irradiated with X-rays is given by secondary electrons, whose energy distribution depends on the energy of X-ray photons. Within a single experiment, the abundances of the new products increase with the absorbed energy. Monochromatic experiments show that product abundances also increase with the photon energy. However, the abundances per unit energy of newly formed species show a marked decrease in the broadband experiment as compared to irradiations with monochromatic photons, suggesting a possible regulatory role of the energy deposition rate. The number of new molecules produced per absorbed eV in the X-ray experiments has been compared to those obtained with electron and ultraviolet (UV) irradiation experiments.

  15. THE CHANDRA MULTI-WAVELENGTH PROJECT: OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPY AND THE BROADBAND SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS OF X-RAY-SELECTED AGNs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trichas, Markos; Green, Paul J.; Aldcroft, Tom; Kim, Dong-Woo; Mossman, Amy [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Silverman, John D. [Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (IPMU), University of Tokyo, Kashiwanoha 5-1-5, Kashiwa-shi, Chiba 277-8568 (Japan); Barkhouse, Wayne [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND 58202 (United States); Cameron, Robert A. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Constantin, Anca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, James Madison University, PHCH, Harrisonburg, VA 22807 (United States); Ellison, Sara L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8P 1A1 (Canada); Foltz, Craig [Division of Astronomical Sciences, National Science Foundation, 4201 Wilson Blvd., Arlington, VA 22230 (United States); Haggard, Daryl [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Jannuzi, Buell T. [NOAO, Kitt Peak National Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85726 (United States); Marshall, Herman L. [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Perez, Laura M. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Romero-Colmenero, Encarni [South African Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 9, Observatory, 7935 (South Africa); Ruiz, Angel [Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera-INAF, Milan (Italy); Smith, Malcolm G., E-mail: mtrichas@cfa.harvard.edu [Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory, La Serena (Chile); and others

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From optical spectroscopy of X-ray sources observed as part of the Chandra Multi-wavelength Project (ChaMP), we present redshifts and classifications for a total of 1569 Chandra sources from our targeted spectroscopic follow-up using the FLWO/1.5 m, SAAO/1.9 m, WIYN 3.5 m, CTIO/4 m, KPNO/4 m, Magellan/6.5 m, MMT/6.5 m, and Gemini/8 m telescopes, and from archival Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectroscopy. We classify the optical counterparts as 50% broad-line active galactic nuclei (AGNs), 16% emission line galaxies, 14% absorption line galaxies, and 20% stars. We detect QSOs out to z {approx} 5.5 and galaxies out to z {approx} 3. We have compiled extensive photometry, including X-ray (ChaMP), ultraviolet (GALEX), optical (SDSS and ChaMP-NOAO/MOSAIC follow-up), near-infrared (UKIDSS, Two Micron All Sky Survey, and ChaMP-CTIO/ISPI follow-up), mid-infrared (WISE), and radio (FIRST and NVSS) bands. Together with our spectroscopic information, this enables us to derive detailed spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for our extragalactic sources. We fit a variety of template SEDs to determine bolometric luminosities, and to constrain AGNs and starburst components where both are present. While {approx}58% of X-ray Seyferts (10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1} < L{sub 2-10keV} <10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}) require a starburst event (>5% starburst contribution to bolometric luminosity) to fit observed photometry only 26% of the X-ray QSO (L{sub 2-10keV} >10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}) population appear to have some kind of star formation contribution. This is significantly lower than for the Seyferts, especially if we take into account torus contamination at z > 1 where the majority of our X-ray QSOs lie. In addition, we observe a rapid drop of the percentage of starburst contribution as X-ray luminosity increases. This is consistent with the quenching of star formation by powerful QSOs, as predicted by the merger model, or with a time lag between the peak of star formation and QSO activity. We have tested the hypothesis that there should be a strong connection between X-ray obscuration and star formation but we do not find any association between X-ray column density and star formation rate both in the general population or the star-forming X-ray Seyferts. Our large compilation also allows us to report here the identification of 81 X-ray Bright Optically inactive Galaxies, 78 z > 3 X-ray sources, and eight Type-2 QSO candidates. Also, we have identified the highest redshift (z = 5.4135) X-ray-selected QSO with optical spectroscopy.

  16. Facilities and techniques for x-ray diagnostic calibration in the 100-eV to 100-keV energy range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaines, J.L.; Wittmayer, F.J.

    1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been a pioneer in the field of x-ray diagnostic calibration for more than 20 years. We have built steady state x-ray sources capable of supplying fluorescent lines of high spectral purity in the 100-eV to 100-keV energy range, and these sources have been used in the calibration of x-ray detectors, mirrors, crystals, filters, and film. This paper discusses our calibration philosophy and techniques, and describes some of our x-ray sources. Examples of actual calibration data are presented as well.

  17. Compact x-ray source and panel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sampayon, Stephen E. (Manteca, CA)

    2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact, self-contained x-ray source, and a compact x-ray source panel having a plurality of such x-ray sources arranged in a preferably broad-area pixelized array. Each x-ray source includes an electron source for producing an electron beam, an x-ray conversion target, and a multilayer insulator separating the electron source and the x-ray conversion target from each other. The multi-layer insulator preferably has a cylindrical configuration with a plurality of alternating insulator and conductor layers surrounding an acceleration channel leading from the electron source to the x-ray conversion target. A power source is connected to each x-ray source of the array to produce an accelerating gradient between the electron source and x-ray conversion target in any one or more of the x-ray sources independent of other x-ray sources in the array, so as to accelerate an electron beam towards the x-ray conversion target. The multilayer insulator enables relatively short separation distances between the electron source and the x-ray conversion target so that a thin panel is possible for compactness. This is due to the ability of the plurality of alternating insulator and conductor layers of the multilayer insulators to resist surface flashover when sufficiently high acceleration energies necessary for x-ray generation are supplied by the power source to the x-ray sources.

  18. Joule Unlimited previously Joule Biotechnologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtelInteriasIowa: Energy Resources Jump to:Jolly,Jonestown,JosephJoule

  19. DETERMINING NEUTRON STAR MASSES AND RADII USING ENERGY-RESOLVED WAVEFORMS OF X-RAY BURST OSCILLATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lo, Ka Ho; Lamb, Frederick K. [Center for Theoretical Astrophysics and Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801-3080 (United States); Miller, M. Coleman [Department of Astronomy and Joint Space-Science Institute, University of Maryland, College Park, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States); Bhattacharyya, Sudip, E-mail: fkl@illinois.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India)

    2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Simultaneous, precise measurements of the mass M and radius R of neutron stars can yield uniquely valuable information about the still uncertain properties of cold matter at several times the density of nuclear matter. One method that could be used to measure M and R is to analyze the energy-dependent waveforms of the X-ray flux oscillations seen during some thermonuclear bursts from some neutron stars. These oscillations are thought to be produced by X-ray emission from hotter regions on the surface of the star that are rotating at or near the spin frequency of the star. Here we explore how well M and R could be determined by generating and analyzing, using Bayesian techniques, synthetic energy-resolved X-ray data that we produce assuming a future space mission having 2-30 keV energy coverage and an effective area of 10 m{sup 2}, such as the proposed Large Observatory for X-Ray Timing or Advanced X-Ray Timing Array missions. We find that waveforms from hot spots within 10° of the rotation equator usually constrain both M and R with an uncertainty of about 10%, if there are 10{sup 6} total counts from the spot, whereas waveforms from spots within 20° of the rotation pole provide no useful constraints. The constraints we report can usually be achieved even if the burst oscillations vary with time and data from multiple bursts must be used to obtain 10{sup 6} counts from the hot spot. This is therefore a promising method to constrain M and R tightly enough to discriminate strongly between competing models of cold, high-density matter.

  20. A Variable-Energy Soft X-Ray Microprobe to Investigate Mechanisms of the Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Folkard, Melvyn; Vojnovic, Borivoj; Schettino, Giuseppe; Atkinson, Kirk; Prise, Kevin, M.; Michael, Barry, D.

    2007-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gray Cancer Institute has pioneered the use of X ray focussing techniques to develop systems for micro irradiating individual cells and sub cellular targets in vitro. Cellular micro irradiation is now recognised as a highly versatile technique for understanding how ionising radiation interacts with living cells and tissues. The strength of the technique lies in its ability to deliver precise doses of radiation to selected individual cells (or sub cellular targets). The application of this technique in the field of radiation biology continues to be of great interest for investigating a number of phenomena currently of concern to the radiobiological community. One important phenomenon is the so called ‘bystander effect’ where it is observed that unirradiated cells can also respond to signals transmitted by irradiated neighbours. Clearly, the ability of a microbeam to irradiate just a single cell or selected cells within a population is well suited to studying this effect. Our prototype ‘tabletop’ X-ray microprobe was optimised for focusing 278 eV C-K X rays and has been used successfully for a number of years. However, we have sought to develop a new variable energy soft X-ray microprobe capable of delivering focused CK (0.28 keV), Al-K (1.48 keV) and notably, Ti-K (4.5 keV) X rays. Ti-K X rays are capable of penetrating several cell layers and are therefore much better suited to studies involving tissues and multi cellular layers. In our new design, X-rays are generated by the focussed electron bombardment of a material whose characteristic-K radiation is required. The source is mounted on a 1.5 x 1.0 metre optical table. Electrons are generated by a custom built gun, designed to operate up to 15 kV. The electrons are focused using a permanent neodymium iron boron magnet assembly. Focusing is achieved by adjusting the accelerating voltage and by fine tuning the target position via a vacuum position feedthrough. To analyze the electron beam properties, a custom built microscope is used to image the focussed beam on the target, through a vacuum window. The X-rays are focussed by a zone plate optical assembly mounted to the end of a hollow vertical tube that can be precisely positioned above the X ray source. The cell finding and positioning stage comprises an epi-fluorescence microscope and a feedback controlled 3 axis cell positioning stage, also mounted on the optical table. Independent vertical micro positioning of the microscope objective turret allows the focus of the microscope and the X ray focus to coincide in space (i.e. at the point where the cell should be positioned for exposure). The whole microscope stage assembly can be precisely raised or lowered, to cater for large differences in the focal length of the X ray zone plates. The facility is controlled by PC and the software provides full status and control of the source and makes use of a dual-screen for control and display during the automated cell finding and irradiation procedures.

  1. The high energy X-ray tail of Eta Car revealed by BeppoSAX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. F. Viotti; L. A. Antonelli; C. Rossi; S. Rebecchi

    2004-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the June 2000 long (100 ks) BeppoSAX exposure that has unveiled above 10 keV a new very high energy component of the X-ray spectrum of Eta Car extending to at least 50 keV. We find that the 2-150 keV spectrum is best reproduced by a thermal + non-thermal model. The thermal component dominates the 2-10 keV spectral range with kT_h=5.5 +/- 0.3 keV and log NH_h=22.68 +/- 0.01. The spectrum displays a prominent iron emission line centred at 6.70 keV. Its equivalent width of 0.94 keV, if produced by the thermal source, gives a slightly sub-solar iron abundance ([Fe/H]=-0.15 +/- 0.02). The high energy tail above 10 keV is best fitted by a power law with a photon index of 2.42 +/- 0.04. The integrated 13-150 keV luminosity of ~12 L-sun is comparable to that of the 2-10 keV thermal component. The present result can be explained, in the Eta Car binary star scenario, by Comptonisation of low frequency radiation by high energy electrons, probably generated in the colliding wind shock front, or in instabilities in the wind of the S Dor primary star. It is possible that the high energy tail had largely weakened near the minimum of the 5.53 yr cycle. With respect to the thermal component, it probably has a longer recovering time like that of the highest excitation optical emission lines. Both features can be associated with the large absorption measured by BeppoSAX at phase 0.05.

  2. High Energy Neutrino Flashes from Far-Ultraviolet and X-ray Flares in Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohta Murase; Shigehiro Nagataki

    2006-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent observations of bright optical and x-ray flares by the Swift satellite suggest these are produced by the late activities of the central engine. We study the neutrino emission from far-ultraviolet and x-ray flares under the late internal shock model. We show that the efficiency of pion production in the highest energy is comparable to or higher than the unity, and the contribution from such neutrino flashes to a diffuse very high energy neutrino background can be larger than that of prompt bursts if the total baryonic energy input into flares is comparable to the radiated energy of prompt bursts. These signals may be detected by IceCube and are very important because they have possibilities to probe the nature of flares (the baryon loading, the photon field, the magnetic field and so on).

  3. Production and application of a novel energy-tunable X-ray source at the RPI LINAC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    Production and application of a novel energy-tunable X-ray source at the RPI LINAC Bryndol Sones energy linewidth for example, Si(400) FWHM of 134 eV at 9.0 keV (2%). Per electron, the photon production 17­20 keV. Low Z materials like graphite and LiF were most suitable for PXR production because

  4. High Energy X-Ray System Specification for the Device Assembly Facility (DAF) at the NNSS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fry, David A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This specification establishes requirements for an X-Ray System to be used at the Device Assembly Facility (DAF) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) to support radiography of experimental assemblies for Laboratory (LANL, LLNL, SNL) programs conducting work at the NNSS.

  5. THE SAP3 COMPUTER PROGRAM FOR QUANTITATIVE MULTIELEMENT ANALYSIS BY ENERGY DISPERSIVE X-RAY FLUORESCENCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nielson,, K. K.; Sanders,, R. W.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SAP3 is a dual-function FORTRAN computer program which performs peak analysis of energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectra and then quantitatively interprets the results of the multielement analysis. It was written for mono- or bi-chromatic excitation as from an isotopic or secondary excitation source, and uses the separate incoherent and coherent backscatter intensities to define the bulk sample matrix composition. This composition is used in performing fundamental-parameter matrix corrections for self-absorption, enhancement, and particle-size effects, obviating the need for specific calibrations for a given sample matrix. The generalized calibration is based on a set of thin-film sensitivities, which are stored in a library disk file and used for all sample matrices and thicknesses. Peak overlap factors are also determined from the thin-film standards, and are stored in the library for calculating peak overlap corrections. A detailed description is given of the algorithms and program logic, and the program listing and flow charts are also provided. An auxiliary program, SPCAL, is also given for use in calibrating the backscatter intensities. SAP3 provides numerous analysis options via seventeen control switches which give flexibility in performing the calculations best suited to the sample and the user needs. User input may be limited to the name of the library, the analysis livetime, and the spectrum filename and location. Output includes all peak analysis information, matrix correction factors, and element concentrations, uncertainties and detection limits. Twenty-four elements are typically determined from a 1024-channel spectrum in one-to-two minutes using a PDP-11/34 computer operating under RSX-11M.

  6. 12.6 keV Kr K-alpha X-ray Source For High Energy Density Physics Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kugland, N; Constantin, C G; Niemann, C; Neumayer, P; Chung, H; Doppner, T; Kemp, A; Glenzer, S H; Girard, F

    2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A high contrast 12.6 keV Kr K{alpha} source has been demonstrated on the petawatt-class Titan laser facility. The contrast ratio (K{alpha} to continuum) is 65, with a competitive ultra short pulse laser to x-ray conversion efficiency of 10{sup -5}. Filtered shadowgraphy indicates that the Kr K{alpha} and K{beta} x-rays are emitted from a roughly 1 x 2 mm emission volume, making this source suitable for area backlighting and scattering. Spectral calculations indicate a typical bulk electron temperature of 50-70 eV (i.e. mean ionization state 13-16), based on the observed ratio of K{alpha} to K{beta}. Kr gas jets provide a debris-free high energy K{alpha} source for time-resolved diagnosis of dense matter.

  7. Quality indexes based on water measurements for low and medium energy x-ray beams: A theoretical study with PENELOPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chica, U. [Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada, Spain and FISRAD S.A.S Carrera 64 a No 22-41, Bogotá D.C. (Colombia)] [Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada, Spain and FISRAD S.A.S Carrera 64 a No 22-41, Bogotá D.C. (Colombia); Anguiano, M.; Lallena, A. M., E-mail: lallena@ugr.es [Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain); Vilches, M. [Servicio de Radiofísica, Hospital Universitario “San Cecilio”, Avda. Dr. Olóriz, 16, E-18012 Granada (Spain)] [Servicio de Radiofísica, Hospital Universitario “San Cecilio”, Avda. Dr. Olóriz, 16, E-18012 Granada (Spain)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose : To study the use of quality indexes based on ratios of absorbed doses in water at two different depths to characterize x-ray beams of low and medium energies. Methods : A total of 55 x-ray beam spectra were generated with the codes XCOMP5R and SPEKCALC and used as input of a series of Monte Carlo simulations performed with PENELOPE, in which the percentage depth doses in water and thek{sub Q,Q{sub 0}} factors, defined in the TRS-398 protocol, were determined for each beam. Some of these calculations were performed by simulating the ionization chamber PTW 30010. Results : The authors found that the relation betweenk{sub Q,Q{sub 0}} and the ratios of absorbed doses at two depths is almost linear. A set of ratios statistically compatible with that showing the best fit has been determined. Conclusions : The results of this study point out which of these ratios of absorbed doses in water could be used to better characterize x-ray beams of low and medium energies.

  8. Low-Energy X-ray Emission from Young Isolated Neutron Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Ruderman

    2003-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A young neutron star with large spin-down power is expected to be closely surrounded by an e+/- pair plasma maintained by the conversion of gamma-rays associated with the star's polar-cap and/or outer-gap accelerators. Cyclotron-resonance scattering by the e- and e+ within several radii of such neutron stars prevents direct observations of thermal X-rays from the stellar surface. Estimates are presented for the parameters of the Planck-like X-radiation which ultimately diffuses out through this region. Comparisons with observations, especially of apparent blackbody emission areas as a function of neutron star age, support the proposition that we are learning about a neutron star's magnetosphere rather than about its surface from observations of young neutron star thermal X-rays.

  9. A CENSUS OF X-RAY GAS IN NGC 1068: RESULTS FROM 450 ks of CHANDRA HIGH ENERGY TRANSMISSION GRATING OBSERVATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kallman, T.

    We present models for the X-ray spectrum of the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068. These are fitted to data obtained using the High Energy Transmission Grating on Chandra. The data show line and radiative recombination continuum ...

  10. Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy: Applications in Atmospheric Aerosol Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moffet, Ryan C.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2-ID-B intermediate-energy scanning X-ray microscope at theW. D. , Morrison, G. R. et al. Scanning transmission X-rayX-ray spectromicroscopy with the scanning transmission X-ray

  11. Photonuclear reaction based high-energy x-ray spectrometer to cover from 2 MeV to 20 MeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakata, S., E-mail: sakata-s@ile.osaka-u.ac.jp; Arikawa, Y.; Kojima, S.; Ikenouchi, T.; Nagai, T.; Abe, Y.; Inoue, H.; Morace, A.; Utsugi, M.; Nishimura, H.; Nakai, M.; Shiraga, H.; Fujioka, S.; Azechi, H. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Suita 565-0871 (Japan); Kato, R. [Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, Ibaraki 565-0047 (Japan)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A photonuclear-reaction-based hard x-ray spectrometer is developed to measure the number and energy spectrum of fast electrons generated by interactions between plasma and intense laser light. In this spectrometer, x-rays are converted to neutrons through photonuclear reactions, and the neutrons are counted with a bubble detector that is insensitive to x-rays. The spectrometer consists of a bundle of hard x-ray detectors that respond to different photon-energy ranges. Proof-of-principle experiment was performed on a linear accelerator facility. A quasi-monoenergetic electron bunch (N{sub e} = 1.0 × 10{sup ?6} C, E{sub e} = 16 ± 0.32 MeV) was injected into a 5-mm-thick lead plate. Bremsstrahlung x-rays, which emanate from the lead plate, were measured with the spectrometer. The measured spectral shape and intensity agree fairly well with those computed with a Monte Carlo simulation code. The result shows that high-energy x-rays can be measured absolutely with a photon-counting accuracy of 50%–70% in the energy range from 2 MeV to 20 MeV with a spectral resolution (?h?/h?) of about 15%. Quantum efficiency of this spectrometer was designed to be 10{sup ?7}, 10{sup ?4}, 10{sup ?5}, respectively, for 2–10, 11–15, and 15–25 MeV of photon energy ranges.

  12. Miniature x-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Trebes, James E. (Livermore, CA); Bell, Perry M. (Tracy, CA); Robinson, Ronald B. (Modesto, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A miniature x-ray source utilizing a hot filament cathode. The source has a millimeter scale size and is capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature source consists of a compact vacuum tube assembly containing the hot filament cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the cathode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connector for initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is fabricated from highly x-ray transparent materials, such as sapphire, diamond, or boron nitride.

  13. In-situ stoichiometry determination using x-ray fluorescence generated by reflection-high-energy-electron-diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keenan, Cameron; Chandril, Sandeep; Lederman, David [Department of Physics and Multifunctional Materials Laboratory, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Myers, T. H. [Department of Physics and Multifunctional Materials Laboratory, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Materials Science, Engineering, and Commercialization Program, Texas State University-San Marcos, San Marcos, Texas 78666 (United States)

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A major challenge in the stoichiometric growth of complex oxide compounds is the control of the relative compositions of the constituent materials. A potential avenue for compositional analysis during growth is the use of x-ray fluorescence generated during reflection high energy electron diffraction measurements. Using this technique, relative compositions of Y and Mn in molecular beam epitaxy grown YMnO{sub 3} samples were studied. Comparing the results with Rutherford back scattering spectroscopy suggests that the technique has the potential for real-time analysis of elemental fluxes and stoichiometry control during sample growth.

  14. Probing Heterogeneous Chemistry of Individual Atmospheric Particles Using Scanning Electron Microscopy and Energy-Dispersive X-ray Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krueger, Brenda J.; Grassian, Vicki H.; Iedema, Martin J.; Cowin, James P.; Laskin, Alexander

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we demonstrate the utility of single-particle analysis to investigate the chemistry of isolated, individual particles of atmospheric relevance such as NaCl, sea salt, CaCO3, and SiO2. A variety of state-of-th-art scanning electron microscopy techniques, including environmental scanning electon microscopy and computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, were utilized for monitoring and quantifying phase transitions of individual particles, morphology, and compositional changes of individual particles as they react with nitric acid.

  15. High-energy x-ray microscopy of laser-fusion plasmas at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, J.A.; Landen, O.L.; Hammel, B.A. [and others

    1997-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-keV x-ray microscopy will be an important laser-produced plasma diagnostic at future megajoule facilities such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF).In preparation for the construction of this facility, we have investigated several instrumentation options in detail, and we conclude that near normal incidence single spherical or toroidal crystals may offer the best general solution for high-energy x-raymicroscopy at NIF and at similar large facilities. Kirkpatrick-Baez microscopes using multi-layer mirrors may also be good secondary options, particularly if apertures are used to increase the band-width limited field of view.

  16. Lowering the background level and the energy threshold of Micromegas x-ray detectors for axion searches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. J. Iguaz; S. Aune; F. Aznar; J. F. Castel; T. Dafni; M. Davenport; E. Ferrer-Ribas; J. Galan; J. A. Garcia; J. G. Garza; I. Giomataris; I. G. Irastorza; T. Papaevangelou; A. Rodriguez; A. Tomas; T. Vafeiadis; S. C. Yildiz

    2015-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Axion helioscopes search for solar axions by their conversion in x-rays in the presence of high magnetic fields. The use of low background x-ray detectors is an essential component contributing to the sensitivity of these searches. In this work, we review the recent advances on Micromegas detectors used in the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) and proposed for the future International Axion Observatory (IAXO). The actual setup in CAST has achieved background levels below 10$^{-6}$ keV$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$, a factor 100 lower than the first generation of Micromegas detectors. This reduction is based on active and passive shielding techniques, the selection of radiopure materials, offline discrimination techniques and the high granularity of the readout. We describe in detail the background model of the detector, based on its operation at CAST site and at the Canfranc Underground Laboratory (LSC), as well as on Geant4 simulations. The best levels currently achieved at LSC are low than 10$^{-7}$ keV$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ and show good prospects for the application of this technology in IAXO. Finally, we present some ideas and results for reducing the energy threshold of these detectors below 1 keV, using high-transparent windows, autotrigger electronics and studying the cluster shape at different energies. As a high flux of axion-like-particles is expected in this energy range, a sub-keV threshold detector could enlarge the physics case of axion helioscopes.

  17. Toward Control of Matter: Basic Energy Science Needs for a New Class of X-Ray Light Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arenholz, Elke; Belkacem, Ali; Cocke, Lew; Corlett, John; Falcone, Roger; Fischer, Peter; Fleming, Graham; Gessner, Oliver; Hasan, M. Zahid; Hussain, Zahid; Kevan, Steve; Kirz, Janos; McCurdy, Bill; Nelson, Keith; Neumark, Dan; Nilsson, Anders; Siegmann, Hans; Stocks, Malcolm; Schafer, Ken; Schoenlein, Robert; Spence, John; Weber, Thorsten

    2008-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past quarter century, light-source user facilities have transformed research in areas ranging from gas-phase chemical dynamics to materials characterization. The ever-improving capabilities of these facilities have revolutionized our ability to study the electronic structure and dynamics of atoms, molecules, and even the most complex new materials, to understand catalytic reactions, to visualize magnetic domains, and to solve protein structures. Yet these outstanding facilities still have limitations well understood by their thousands of users. Accordingly, over the past several years, many proposals and conceptual designs for"next-generation" x-ray light sources have been developed around the world. In order to survey the scientific problems that might be addressed specifically by those new light sources operating below a photon energy of about 3 keV and to identify the scientific requirements that should drive the design of such facilities, a workshop"Science for a New Class of Soft X-Ray Light Sources" was held in Berkeley in October 2007. From an analysisof the most compelling scientific questions that could be identified and the experimental requirements for answering them, we set out to define, without regard to the specific technologies upon which they might be based, the capabilities such light sources would have to deliver in order to dramatically advance the state of research in the areas represented in the programs of the Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES). This report is based on the workshop presentations and discussions.

  18. High-Energy X-ray Studies of Real Materials Under Real Conditions and in Real Time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Almer, Jonathan (ANL) [ANL

    2011-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    High-energy x-rays from 3rd generation synchrotron sources, including the APS, possess a unique combination of high penetration power and high spatial, reciprocal space, and temporal resolution. These characteristics can be exploited to non-destructively measure phase, texture and strain distributions under extreme environments including thermo-mechanical loading, high-pressure, irradiation and supercritical environments. Over the past several years, the 1-ID beamline has developed a number of programs for these purposes, namely (i) high-energy diffraction microscopy, in which grain and sub-grain volumes are mapped in polycrystalline aggregates, and (ii) combined small-and wide-angle x-ray scattering which permits information over a broad range of length scales to be collected from the same (micron-level) volume. These programs have been increasingly used to test and extend predictive simulations of materials behavior over size scales ranging from nm to mm. Select studies will be presented including nucleation and growth of nanomaterials, void and structural evolution in complex composites under thermo-mechanical and irradiated environments, and microstructural changes in layered systems including thermal-barrier coatings, batteries and fuel cells. Finally, extension of these programs, through the planned APS upgrade, to higher spatio-temporal resolution will be described.

  19. Constraining H{sub 0} in general dark energy models from Sunyaev-Zeldovich/X-ray technique and complementary probes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holanda, R.F.L.; Lima, J.A.S. [Departamento de Astronomia (IAGUSP), Universidade de São Paulo, Rua do Matão 1226, 05508-900, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Cunha, J.V. [Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, Rua Santa Adélia 166, 09210-170, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Marassi, L., E-mail: holanda@astro.iag.usp.br, E-mail: jvcunha@ufpa.br, E-mail: luciomarassi@ect.ufrn.br, E-mail: limajas@astro.iag.usp.br [Escola de Ciência e Tecnologia, UFRN, 59072-970, Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In accelerating dark energy models, the estimates of the Hubble constant, H{sub 0}, from Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) and X-ray surface brightness of galaxy clusters may depend on the matter content (?{sub M}), the curvature (?{sub K}) and the equation of state parameter (?). In this article, by using a sample of 25 angular diameter distances of galaxy clusters described by the elliptical ? model obtained through the SZE/X-ray technique, we constrain H{sub 0} in the framework of a general ?CDM model (arbitrary curvature) and a flat XCDM model with a constant equation of state parameter ? = p{sub x}/?{sub x}. In order to avoid the use of priors in the cosmological parameters, we apply a joint analysis involving the baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and the CMB Shift Parameter signature. By taking into account the statistical and systematic errors of the SZE/X-ray technique we obtain for nonflat ?CDM model H{sub 0} = 74{sup +5.0}{sub ?4.0} km s{sup ?1} Mpc{sup ?1}(1?) whereas for a flat universe with constant equation of state parameter we find H{sub 0} = 72{sup +5.5}{sub ?4.0} km s{sup ?1} Mpc{sup ?1}(1?). By assuming that galaxy clusters are described by a spherical ? model these results change to H{sub 0} = 62{sup +8.0}{sub ?7.0} and H{sub 0} = 59{sup +9.0}{sub ?6.0} km s{sup ?1} Mpc{sup ?1}(1?), respectively. The results from elliptical description are in good agreement with independent studies from the Hubble Space Telescope key project and recent estimates based on the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe, thereby suggesting that the combination of these three independent phenomena provides an interesting method to constrain the Hubble constant. As an extra bonus, the adoption of the elliptical description is revealed to be a quite realistic assumption. Finally, by comparing these results with a recent determination for a flat ?CDM model using only the SZE/X-ray technique and BAO, we see that the geometry has a very weak influence on H{sub 0} estimates for this combination of data.

  20. Non-matrix corrected organic sulfur determination by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy for western Kentucky coals and residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, C.P.; Freeman, G.B.; Hower, J.C.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for non-matrix corrected organic sulfur analysis by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy has been developed using petroleum coke standards. Typically, electron beam microanalysis is a rapid, nondestructive analytical technique to quantitatively measure organic sulfur in coal. The results show good correlation to ASTM values for numerous well characterized coals with a wide range in total and pyritic sulfur content. This direct analysis is capable of reducing error commonly associated with the present ASTM method which relies on an indirect measure of organic sulfur by difference. The precision of the organic sulfur values determined in the present study is comparable to that obtained by ZAF matrix corrected microanalysis. The energy dispersive microanalysis is capable of measuring micro as well as bulk organic sulfur levels.

  1. Toward Control of Matter: Basic Energy Science Needs for a New Class of X-Ray Light Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arenholz, Elke

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    radiation damage with ultrafast pulses (2) Three-dimensionalradiation damage with ultrafast pulses Radiation damagebe accomplished with ultrafast soft x-ray pulses. In the

  2. X-ray Observations of Mrk 231

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. J. Turner

    1998-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents new X-ray observations of Mrk 231, an active galaxy of particular interest due to its large infrared luminosity and the presence of several blueshifted broad absorption line (BAL) systems, a phenomenon observed in a small fraction of QSOs. A ROSAT HRI image of Mrk 231 is presented, this shows an extended region of soft X-ray emission, covering several tens of kpc, consistent with the extent of the host galaxy. An ASCA observation of Mrk 231 is also presented. Hard X-rays are detected but the data show no significant variability in X-ray flux. The hard X-ray continuum is heavily attenuated and X-ray column estimates range from ~ 2 x 10^{22} - 10^{23} cm^{-2} depending on whether the material is assumed to be neutral or ionized, and on the model assumed for the extended X-ray component. These ASCA data provide only the second hard X-ray spectrum of a BAL AGN presented to date. The broad-band spectral-energy-distribution of the source is discussed. While Mrk 231 is X-ray weak compared to Seyfert 1 galaxies, it has an optical-to-X-ray spectrum typical of a QSO.

  3. X-ray transmissive debris shield

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spielman, Rick B. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A composite window structure is described for transmitting x-ray radiation and for shielding radiation generated debris. In particular, separate layers of different x-ray transmissive materials are laminated together to form a high strength, x-ray transmissive debris shield which is particularly suited for use in high energy fluences. In one embodiment, the composite window comprises alternating layers of beryllium and a thermoset polymer.

  4. X-ray lasers and methods utilizing two component driving illumination provided by optical laser means of relatively low energy and small physical size

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rosen, Mordecai D. (Berkeley, CA); Matthews, Dennis L. (El Granada, CA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An X-ray laser (10), and related methodology, are disclosed wherein an X-ray laser target (12) is illuminated with a first pulse of optical laser radiation (14) of relatively long duration having scarcely enough energy to produce a narrow and linear cool plasma of uniform composition (38). A second, relatively short pulse of optical laser radiation (18) is uniformly swept across the length, from end to end, of the plasma (38), at about the speed of light, to consecutively illuminate continuously succeeding portions of the plasma (38) with optical laser radiation having scarcely enough energy to heat, ionize, and invert them into the continuously succeeding portions of an X-ray gain medium. This inventive double pulse technique results in a saving of more than two orders of magnitude in driving optical laser energy, when compared to the conventional single pulse approach.

  5. An alternative scheme of angular-dispersion analyzers for high-resolution medium-energy inelastic X-ray scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Xian-Rong

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of medium-energy inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) optics with meV and sub-meV resolution has attracted considerable efforts in recent years. Meanwhile, there are also concerns or debates about the fundamental and feasibility of the involved schemes. Here the central optical component, the back-reflection angular-dispersion monochromator or analyzer, is analyzed. The results show that the multiple-beam diffraction effect together with transmission-induced absorption can noticeably reduce the diffraction efficiency, although it may not be a fatal threat. In order to improve the efficiency, a simple four-bounce analyzer is proposed that completely avoids these two adverse effects. The new scheme is illustrated to be a feasible alternative approach for developing meV- to sub-meV-resolution IXS spectroscopy.

  6. Reduction in the intensity of solar X-ray emission in the 2- to 15-keV photon energy range and heating of the solar corona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mirzoeva, I. K., E-mail: colombo2006@mail.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Space Research Institute (Russian Federation)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The time profiles of the energy spectra of low-intensity flares and the structure of the thermal background of the soft X-ray component of solar corona emission over the period of January-February, 2003, are investigated using the data of the RHESSI project. A reduction in the intensity of X-ray emission of the solar flares and the corona thermal background in the 2- to 15-keV photon energy range is revealed. The RHESSI data are compared with the data from the Interball-Geotail project. A new mechanism of solar corona heating is proposed on the basis of the results obtained.

  7. PbSrYCaCuO : a new class of superconducting materials. Chemical analyses refined by Energy Dispersive X-rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    39 PbSrYCaCuO : a new class of superconducting materials. Chemical analyses refined by Energy of superconducting material - PbSrYCaCuO - has been recently synthesized. Energy Dispersive X-ray analyses synthesized a new class of superconducting materials, which can be represented by the general formula Pb2Sr2R1

  8. X-ray Surveys and Wide-Field Optical/Near-Infrared Imaging with the Joint Dark Energy Mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. N. Brandt

    2004-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    I briefly describe a few important scientific issues that could be addressed effectively via the combination of data from JDEM and X-ray missions. The topics covered are largely focused on active galactic nuclei (AGN) and include (1) the selection of AGN via X-ray emission and optical variability, (2) nuclear outbursts in galaxies due to transient fueling of their supermassive black holes, (3) moderate-luminosity AGN at high redshift (z > 4) found via application of "dropout" techniques to X-ray sources, and (4) the host-galaxy morphologies of X-ray selected AGN. I also describe the substantial challenges to obtaining wide-field X-ray data with sufficient sensitivity to complement JDEM properly.

  9. Radiation exposure in X-ray-based imaging techniques used in osteoporosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Damilakis, John; Adams, Judith E.; Guglielmi, Giuseppe; Link, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and nonradiologists in dual-energy X-ray absorptiometrymorphometry studies using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry.dose measurements in dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA).

  10. SAND932591 Unlimited Release

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCurley, Kevin

    SAND93­2591 Unlimited Release First Printed October 1992 Revised October 29, 1993 Revised June 22. This new algorithm is called SHA­1. In this report we describe a portable and efficient implementation information used in their construction. \\Lambda This work was performed under U.S. Department of Energy

  11. Chest x-Rays

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The B-reading is a special reading of a standard chest x-ray film performed by a physician certified by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The reading looks for changes on the chest x-ray that may indicate exposure and disease caused by agents such as asbestos or silica.

  12. X-ray laser microscope apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Suckewer, Szymon (Princeton, NJ); DiCicco, Darrell S. (Plainsboro, NJ); Hirschberg, Joseph G. (Coral Gables, FL); Meixler, Lewis D. (East Windsor, NJ); Sathre, Robert (Princeton, NJ); Skinner, Charles H. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microscope consisting of an x-ray contact microscope and an optical microscope. The optical, phase contrast, microscope is used to align a target with respect to a source of soft x-rays. The source of soft x-rays preferably comprises an x-ray laser but could comprise a synchrotron or other pulse source of x-rays. Transparent resist material is used to support the target. The optical microscope is located on the opposite side of the transparent resist material from the target and is employed to align the target with respect to the anticipated soft x-ray laser beam. After alignment with the use of the optical microscope, the target is exposed to the soft x-ray laser beam. The x-ray sensitive transparent resist material whose chemical bonds are altered by the x-ray beam passing through the target mater GOVERNMENT LICENSE RIGHTS This invention was made with government support under Contract No. De-FG02-86ER13609 awarded by the Department of Energy. The Government has certain rights in this invention.

  13. X-ray microscopy using grazing-incidence reflections optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, R.H.

    1983-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The role of Kirkpatrick-Baez microscopes as the workhorse of the x-ray imaging devices is discussed. This role is being extended with the development of a 22X magnification Kirkpatrick-Baez x-ray microscope with multilayer x-ray mirrors. These mirrors can operate at large angles, high x-ray energies, and have a narrow, well defined x-ray energy bandpass. This will make them useful for numerous experiments. However, where a large solid angle is needed, the Woelter microscope will still be necessary and the technology needed to build them will be useful for many other types of x-ray optics.

  14. X-ray microscopy using grazing-incidence reflection optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, R.H.

    1981-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Kirkpatrick-Baez microscopes are described along with their role as the workhorse of the x-ray imaging devices. This role is being extended with the development of a 22X magnification Kirkpatrick-Baez x-ray microscope with multilayer x-ray mirrors. These mirrors can operate at large angles, high x-ray energies, and have a narrow, well defined x-ray energy bandpass. This will make them useful for numerous experiments. However, where a large solid angle is needed, the Woelter microscope will still be necessary and the technology needed to build them will be useful for many other types of x-ray optics.

  15. On Estimating the High-Energy Cutoff in the X-ray Spectra of Black Holes via Reflection Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia, Javier A; Steiner, James F; McClintock, Jeffrey E; Keck, Mason L; Wilms, Joern

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fundamental parameters describing the coronal spectrum of an accreting black hole are the slope $\\Gamma$ of the power-law continuum and the energy $E_{cut}$ at which it rolls over. Remarkably, this parameter can be accurately measured for values as high as 1 MeV by modeling the spectrum of X-rays reflected from a black hole accretion disk at energies below 100 keV. This is possible because the details in the reflection spectrum, rich in fluorescent lines and other atomic features, are very sensitive to the spectral shape of the hardest coronal radiation illuminating the disk. We show that fitting simultaneous NuSTAR (3-79 keV) and low-energy (e.g., Suzaku) data with the most recent version of our reflection model RELXILL, one can obtain reasonable constraints on $E_{cut}$ at energies from tens of keV up to 1 MeV, for a source as faint as 1 mCrab in a 100 ks observation.

  16. Studies of local and intermediate range structure in crystalline and amorphouse materials at high pressure using high-energy x-rays.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehm, L.; Antao, M.; Chen, J.; Locke, D. R.; Michel, F. M.; Martin, C. D.; Yu, T.; Lee, P. L.; Chupas, P. J.; Shastri, S. D.; Guo, Q.; Parise, J. B.; Stony Brook Univ.; BNL

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The method of high-energy total elastic X-ray scattering to determine the atomic structure of nanocrystalline, highly disordered, and amorphous materials is presented. The current state of the technique, its potential, and limitations are discussed with two successful studies on the pressure induced phase transition in mackinawite (FeS) and the high-pressure behavior of liquid gallium.

  17. Studies of Local and Intermediate Range Structure in Crystalline and Amorphous Materials at High Pressure Using High-Energy X-rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehm,L.; Antao, S.; Chen, J.; Locke, D.; Michel, F.; Martin, D.; Yu, T.; Parise, J.; Lee, P.; et al.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The method of high-energy total elastic X-ray scattering to determine the atomic structure of nanocrystalline, highly disordered, and amorphous materials is presented. The current state of the technique, its potential, and limitations are discussed with two successful studies on the pressure induced phase transition in mackinawite (FeS) and the high-pressure behavior of liquid gallium.

  18. THE CHANDRA MULTI-WAVELENGTH PROJECT: OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPY AND THE BROADBAND SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS OF X-RAY-SELECTED AGNs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trichas, Markos

    From optical spectroscopy of X-ray sources observed as part of the Chandra Multi-wavelength Project (ChaMP), we present redshifts and classifications for a total of 1569 Chandra sources from our targeted spectroscopic ...

  19. A theoretical comparison of x-ray angiographic image quality using energy-dependent and conventional subtraction methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanguay, Jesse; Kim, Ho Kyung; Cunningham, Ian A. [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada) and Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5C1 (Canada); School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, Jangjeon-dong, Geumjeong-gu, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5C1 (Canada); Lawson Health Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A 4V2 (Canada) and London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario N6A 5A5 (Canada)

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: X-ray digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is widely used for vascular imaging. However, the need to subtract a mask image can result in motion artifacts and compromised image quality. The current interest in energy-resolving photon-counting (EPC) detectors offers the promise of eliminating motion artifacts and other advanced applications using a single exposure. The authors describe a method of assessing the iodine signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) that may be achieved with energy-resolved angiography (ERA) to enable a direct comparison with other approaches including DSA and dual-energy angiography for the same patient exposure. Methods: A linearized noise-propagation approach, combined with linear expressions of dual-energy and energy-resolved imaging, is used to describe the iodine SNR. The results were validated by a Monte Carlo calculation for all three approaches and compared visually for dual-energy and DSA imaging using a simple angiographic phantom with a CsI-based flat-panel detector. Results: The linearized SNR calculations show excellent agreement with Monte Carlo results. While dual-energy methods require an increased tube heat load of 2x to 4x compared to DSA, and photon-counting detectors are not yet ready for angiographic imaging, the available iodine SNR for both methods as tested is within 10% of that of conventional DSA for the same patient exposure over a wide range of patient thicknesses and iodine concentrations. Conclusions: While the energy-based methods are not necessarily optimized and further improvements are likely, the linearized noise-propagation analysis provides the theoretical framework of a level playing field for optimization studies and comparison with conventional DSA. It is concluded that both dual-energy and photon-counting approaches have the potential to provide similar angiographic image quality to DSA.

  20. X-ray laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nilsen, Joseph (Livermore, CA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An X-ray laser (10) that lases between the K edges of carbon and oxygen, i.e. between 44 and 23 Angstroms, is provided. The laser comprises a silicon (12) and dysprosium (14) foil combination (16) that is driven by two beams (18, 20) of intense line focused (22, 24) optical laser radiation. Ground state nickel-like dysprosium ions (34) are resonantly photo-pumped to their upper X-ray laser state by line emission from hydrogen-like silicon ions (32). The novel X-ray laser should prove especially useful for the microscopy of biological specimens.

  1. Space X-ray Solves Mysteries of Black Holes | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Site EnvironmentalEnergySafely DeliveringSolid-State Lightingof2 AnnualAudit

  2. The World's First Free-Electron X-ray Laser | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssuesEnergy SolarRadioactive LiquidSavings for Specific U.S.TheTheFirst

  3. Hand-held X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG| Open

  4. SU-E-I-67: X-Ray Fluorescence for Energy Response Calibration of a Photon Counting Detector: A Simulation Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, H; Ding, H; Ziemer, B; Molloi, S [University of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of energy calibration and energy response characterization of a photon counting detector using x-ray fluorescence. Methods: A comprehensive Monte Carlo simulation study was done to investigate the influence of various geometric components on the x-ray fluorescence measurement. Different materials, sizes, and detection angles were simulated using Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) Monte Carlo package. Simulations were conducted using 100 kVp tungsten-anode spectra with 2 mm Al filter for a single pixel cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector with 3 × 3 mm2 in detection area. The fluorescence material was placed 300 mm away from both the x-ray source and the detector. For angular dependence measurement, the distance was decreased to 30 mm to reduce the simulation time. Compound materials, containing silver, barium, gadolinium, hafnium, and gold in cylindrical shape, were simulated. The object size varied from 5 to 100 mm in diameter. The angular dependence of fluorescence and scatter were simulated from 20° to 170° with an incremental step of 10° to optimize the fluorescence to scatter ratio. Furthermore, the angular dependence was also experimentally measured using a spectrometer (X-123CdTe, Amptek Inc., MA) to validate the simulation results. Results: The detection angle between 120° to 160° resulted in more optimal x-ray fluorescence to scatter ratio. At a detection angle of 120°, the object size did not have a significant effect on the fluorescence to scatter ratio. The experimental results of fluorescence angular dependence are in good agreement with the simulation results. The K? and K? peaks of five materials could be identified. Conclusion: The simulation results show that the x-ray fluorescence procedure has the potential to be used for detector energy calibration and detector response characteristics by using the optimal system geometry.

  5. In situ X-ray Characterization of Energy Storage Materials | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  6. Fuel Spray Research Using X-Ray Radiography | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdfTechnologies Program (FCTP)OverviewgreenLife RequirementsUsing

  7. X-Ray Diffraction > Analytical Resources > Research > The Energy Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  8. Portable Parallel Beam X-Ray Diffraction System | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in235-1Department of60 DATE: MarchNEPA/309Energy Poneman Joins

  9. X-ray Tube with Magnetic Electron Steering - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsingWhat isJoin theanniversaryI 1 0 3 PIndustrial

  10. Biomedical nuclear and X-ray imager using high-energy grazing incidence mirrors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ziock, Klaus-Peter; Craig, William W.; Hasegawa, Bruce; Pivovaroff, Michael J.

    2005-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Imaging of radiation sources located in a subject is explored for medical applications. The approach involves using grazing-incidence optics to form images of the location of radiopharmaceuticals administered to a subject. The optics are "true focusing" optics, meaning that they project a real and inverted image of the radiation source onto a detector possessing spatial and energy resolution.

  11. Characterization of Cr poisoning in a solid oxide fuel cell cathode using a high-energy x-ray microbeam.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, D. J.; Almer, J.; Cruse, T.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A key feature of planar solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) is the feasibility of using metallic interconnects made of high temperature ferritic stainless steels, which reduce system cost while providing excellent electric conductivity. Such interconnects, however, contain high levels of chromium, which has been found to be associated with SOFC cathode performance degradation at SOFC operating temperatures; a phenomenon known as Cr poisoning. Here, we demonstrate an accurate measurement of the phase and concentration distributions of Cr species in a degraded SOFC, as well as related properties including deviatoric strain, integrated porosity, and lattice parameter variation, using high energy microbeam X-ray diffraction and radiography. We unambiguously identify (MnCr){sub 3}O{sub 4} and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} as the two main contaminant phases and find that their concentrations correlate strongly with the cathode layer composition. Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} deposition within the active cathode region reduces porosity and produces compressive residual strains, which hinders the reactant gas percolation and can cause structural breakdown of the SOFC cathode. The information obtained through this study can be used to better understand the Cr-poisoning mechanism and improve SOFC design.

  12. Atomic-Scale Chemical Imaging and Quantification of Metallic Alloy Structures by Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Ping [Sandia National Laboratories; Zhou, Lin [Ames Laboratory; Kramer, Matthew J. [Ames Laboratory; Smith, David J. [Arizona State University

    2014-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Determination of atomic-scale crystal structure for nanostructured intermetallic alloys, such as magnetic alloys containing Al, Ni, Co (alnico) and Fe, is crucial for understanding physical properties such as magnetism, but technically challenging due to the small interatomic distances and the similar atomic numbers. By applying energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) mapping to the study of two intermetallic phases of an alnico alloy resulting from spinodal decomposition, we have determined atomic-scale chemical composition at individual lattice sites for the two phases: one is the B2 phase with Fe0.76Co0.24 -Fe0.40Co0.60 ordering and the other is the L21 phase with Ni0.48Co0.52 at A-sites, Al at B?-sites and Fe0.20Ti0.80 at B??-sites, respectively. The technique developed through this study represents a powerful real-space approach to investigate structure chemically at the atomic scale for a wide range of materials systems.

  13. Iran Thomas Auditorium, 8600 Materials For Energy: In Situ Synchrotron X-Ray Studies for

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  14. Advances in X-Ray Diagnostics of Diesel Fuel Sprays | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of1 AAcceleratedDepartmentDepartment2 DOEX-Ray Diagnostics of Diesel

  15. Spray Structure Measured with X-Ray Radiography | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideo »UsageSecretaryVideos Solid-State|Special3020-2015Program Reach2 DOE1

  16. Stabilizing dual-energy X-ray computed tomography reconstructions using patch-based regularization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tracey, Brian H

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent years have seen growing interest in exploiting dual- and multi-energy measurements in computed tomography (CT) in order to characterize material properties as well as object shape. Material characterization is performed by decomposing the scene into constitutive basis functions, such as Compton scatter and photoelectric absorption functions. While well motivated physically, the joint recovery of the spatial distribution of photoelectric and Compton properties is severely complicated by the fact that the data are several orders of magnitude more sensitive to Compton scatter coefficients than to photoelectric absorption, so small errors in Compton estimates can create large artifacts in the photoelectric estimate. To address these issues, we propose a model-based iterative approach which uses patch-based regularization terms to stabilize inversion of photoelectric coefficients, and solve the resulting problem though use of computationally attractive Alternating Direction Method of Multipliers (ADMM) solu...

  17. X-ray beam finder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gilbert, H.W.

    1983-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An X-ray beam finder for locating a focal spot of an X-ray tube includes a mass of X-ray opaque material having first and second axially-aligned, parallel-opposed faces connected by a plurality of substantially identical parallel holes perpendicular to the faces and a film holder for holding X-ray sensitive film tightly against one face while the other face is placed in contact with the window of an X-ray head.

  18. Low-energy x-ray and electron physics and applications to diagnostics development for laser-produced plasma research. Final report, April 30, 1980-April 29, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henke, B.L.

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report describes a collaborative extension of an ongoing research program in low-energy x-ray and electron physics into particular areas of immediate need for the diagnostics of plasmas as involved in laser-produced fusion research. It has been for the continued support for one year of a post-doctoral research associate and for three student research assistants who have been applied to the following specific efforts: (1) the continuation of our research on the absolute characterization of x-ray photocathode systems for the 0.1 to 10 keV photon energy region. The research results were applied collaboratively to the design, construction and calibration of photocathodes for time-resolved detection with the XRD and the streak and framing cameras; (2) the design, construction and absolute calibration of optimized, bolt-on spectrographs for the absolute measurement of laser-produced plasma spectra.

  19. X-RAY SPECTROMETRY X-Ray Spectrom. 2007; 36: 336342

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limburg, Karin E.

    , Chicago, IL 60637, USA 3 Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source and School of Applied and EngineeringX-RAY SPECTROMETRY X-Ray Spectrom. 2007; 36: 336­342 Published online in Wiley InterScience (www to establish a breakthrough in high-resolution, simultaneous area mapping of multiple trace elements

  20. X-Ray Nanoimaging: Instruments and Methods

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  1. A System for Conducting Sophisticated Mechanical Tests in Situ with High Energy Synchrotron X-Rays Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeremy Weiss

    2012-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final technical report for the SBIR Phase I project titled 'A System for Conducting Sophisticated Mechanical Tests in Situ with High Energy Synchrotron X-Rays.' Experiments using diffraction of synchrotron radiation that help scientists understand engineering material failure modes, such as fracture and fatigue, require specialized machinery. This machinery must be able to induce these failure modes in a material specimen while adhering to strict size, weight, and geometric limitations prescribed by diffraction measurement techniques. During this Phase I project, Mechanical Solutions, Inc. (MSI) developed one such machine capable of applying uniaxial mechanical loading to a material specimen in both tension and compression, with zero backlash while transitioning between the two. Engineers currently compensate for a lack of understanding of fracture and fatigue by employing factors of safety in crucial system components. Thus, mechanical and structural parts are several times bigger, thicker, and heavier than they need to be. The scientific discoveries that result from diffraction experiments which utilize sophisticated mechanical loading devices will allow for broad material, weight, fuel, and cost savings in engineering design across all industries, while reducing the number of catastrophic failures in transportation, power generation, infrastructure, and all other engineering systems. With an existing load frame as the starting point, the research focused on two main areas: (1) the design of a specimen alignment and gripping system that enables pure uniaxial tension and compression loading (and no bending, shear, or torsion), and (2) development of a feedback control system that is adaptive and thus can maintain a load set point despite changing specimen material properties (e.g. a decreasing stiffness during yield).

  2. A Strategy to Measure the Dark Energy Equation of State using the HII galaxy Hubble Relation & X-ray AGN Clustering: Preliminary Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Plionis; R. Terlevich; S. Basilakos; F. Bresolin; E. Terlevich; J. Melnick; R. Chavez

    2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the possibility of setting stringent constraints to the Dark Energy equation of state using alternative cosmic tracers like: (a) the Hubble relation using HII galaxies, which can be observed at much higher redshifts (z~3.5) than those currently traced by SNIa samples, and (b) the large-scale structure using the clustering of X-ray selected AGN,which have a redshift distribution peaking at z~1. We use extensive Monte-Carlo simulations to define the optimal strategy for the recovery of the dark-energy equation of state using the high redshift (z~2) Hubble relation, but accounting also for the effects of gravitational lensing, which for such high redshifts can significantly affect the derived cosmological constraints. Based on a "Figure of Merit" analysis, we provide estimates for the number of 2energy equation of state by using the joint likelihood of the X-ray AGN clustering and of the Hubble relation cosmological analyses. A preliminary joint analysis using the X-ray AGN clustering of the 2XMM survey and the Hubble relation of the Constitution SNIa set provide: Omega_m= 0.31+-0.01 and w=-1.06+-0.05. We also find that the joint SNIa-2XMM analysis provides significantly more stringent cosmological constraints, increasing the Figure of Merit by a factor ~2, with respect to that of the joint SNIa-BAO analysis.

  3. X-ray source for mammography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Logan, Clinton M. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An x-ray source utilizing anode material which shifts the output spectrum to higher energy and thereby obtains higher penetrating ability for screening mammography application, than the currently utilized anode material. The currently used anode material (molybdenum) produces an energy x-ray spectrum of 17.5/19.6 keV, which using the anode material of this invention (e.g. silver, rhodium, and tungsten) the x-ray spectrum would be in the 20-35 keV region. Thus, the anode material of this invention provides for imaging of breasts with higher than average x-ray opacity without increase of the radiation dose, and thus reduces the risk of induced breast cancer due to the radiation dose administered for mammograms.

  4. X-ray grid-detector apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boone, John M. (Folsom, CA); Lane, Stephen M. (Oakland, CA)

    1998-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A hybrid grid-detector apparatus for x-ray systems wherein a microchannel plate structure has an air-interspaced grid portion and a phosphor/optical fluid-filled grid portion. The grids are defined by multiple adjacent channels separated by lead-glass septa. X-rays entering the air-interspaced grid portion at an angle of impingement upon the septa are attenuated, while non-impinging x-rays pass through to the phosphor/fluid filled portion. X-ray energy is converted to luminescent energy in the phosphor/fluid filled portion and the resultant beams of light are directed out of the phosphor/optical fluid filled portion to an imaging device.

  5. X-ray source for mammography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Logan, C.M.

    1994-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An x-ray source is described utilizing anode material which shifts the output spectrum to higher energy and thereby obtains higher penetrating ability for screening mammography application, than the currently utilized anode material. The currently used anode material (molybdenum) produces an energy x-ray spectrum of 17.5/19.6 keV, which using the anode material of this invention (e.g. silver, rhodium, and tungsten) the x-ray spectrum would be in the 20-35 keV region. Thus, the anode material of this invention provides for imaging of breasts with higher than average x-ray opacity without increase of the radiation dose, and thus reduces the risk of induced breast cancer due to the radiation dose administered for mammograms. 6 figures.

  6. Imaging of high-energy x-ray emission from cryogenic thermonuclear fuel implosions on the NIF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, T.; Izumi, N.; Tommasini, R.; Bradley, D. K.; Bell, P.; Cerjan, C. J.; Dixit, S.; Doeppner, T.; Jones, O.; Landen, O. L.; LePape, S.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Park, H.-S.; Patel, P. K.; Prasad, R. R.; Ralph, J.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Springer, P. T.; Suter, L.; Town, R. P. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurately assessing and optimizing the implosion performance of inertial confinement fusion capsules is a crucial step to achieving ignition on the NIF. We have applied differential filtering (matched Ross filter pairs) to provide broadband time-integrated absolute x-ray self-emission images of the imploded core of cryogenic layered implosions. This diagnostic measures the temperature- and density-sensitive bremsstrahlung emission and provides estimates of hot spot mass, mix mass, and pressure.

  7. Study of strain propagation in laser irradiated silicon crystal by time-resolved diffraction of K-{alpha} x-ray probe of different photon energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arora, V.; Bagchi, S.; Chakera, J. A.; Naik, P. A.; Gupta, P. D. [Laser Plasma Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452 013 (India); Gupta, M.; Gupta, A.; Chaddah, P. [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, University Campus, Indore 452 001 (India)

    2013-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental study on the time resolved x-ray diffraction from laser shocked silicon crystal, carried out using a 10 TW Ti:sapphire laser system, is presented. The characteristic K{sub {alpha}} x-ray line radiation generated by 45 fs laser produced plasmas of two different target materials (iron and copper) is used as the probe, whereas the stretched pulse of sub-nanosecond duration (pump), derived from the same laser, is used to compress the sample. The use of x-ray probe of different photon energies yields information about the strain over a greater crystal depth. The dynamics of the strain propagation is inferred by monitoring the evolution of rocking curve width of the shocked sample at different time delays between the pump and the probe pulse. The shock velocity deduced from these measurements is {approx}10{sup 6} cm/s, consistent with the sound velocity in bulk silicon. The maximum elastic compression observed is 0.4%, indicating a pressure of 0.8 GPa.

  8. Fluctuation X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saldin, PI: D. K.; Co-I's: J. C. H. Spence and P. Fromme

    2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The work supported by the grant was aimed at developing novel methods of finding the structures of biomolecules using x-rays from novel sources such as the x-ray free electron laser and modern synchrotrons

  9. Coded Aperture Imaging for Fluorescent X-rays-Biomedical Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haboub, Abdel; MacDowell, Alastair; Marchesini, Stefano; Parkinson, Dilworth

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Employing a coded aperture pattern in front of a charge couple device pixilated detector (CCD) allows for imaging of fluorescent x-rays (6-25KeV) being emitted from samples irradiated with x-rays. Coded apertures encode the angular direction of x-rays and allow for a large Numerical Aperture x- ray imaging system. The algorithm to develop the self-supported coded aperture pattern of the Non Two Holes Touching (NTHT) pattern was developed. The algorithms to reconstruct the x-ray image from the encoded pattern recorded were developed by means of modeling and confirmed by experiments. Samples were irradiated by monochromatic synchrotron x-ray radiation, and fluorescent x-rays from several different test metal samples were imaged through the newly developed coded aperture imaging system. By choice of the exciting energy the different metals were speciated.

  10. Principles of X-ray Navigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, John Eric; /SLAC

    2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray navigation is a new concept in satellite navigation in which orientation, position and time are measured by observing stellar emissions in x-ray wavelengths. X-ray navigation offers the opportunity for a single instrument to be used to measure these parameters autonomously. Furthermore, this concept is not limited to missions in close proximity to the earth. X-ray navigation can be used on a variety of missions from satellites in low earth orbit to spacecraft on interplanetary missions. In 1997 the Unconventional Stellar Aspect Experiment (USA) will be launched as part of the Advanced Research and Global Observation Satellite (ARGOS). USA will provide the first platform for real-time experimentation in the field of x-ray navigation and also serves as an excellent case study for the design and manufacturing of space qualified systems in small, autonomous groups. Current techniques for determining the orientation of a satellite rely on observations of the earth, sun and stars in infrared, visible or ultraviolet wavelengths. It is possible to use x-ray imaging devices to provide arcsecond level measurement of attitude based on star patterns in the x-ray sky. This technique is explored with a simple simulation. Collimated x-ray detectors can be used on spinning satellites to provide a cheap and reliable measure of orientation. This is demonstrated using observations of the Crab Pulsar taken by the high Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO-1) in 1977. A single instrument concept is shown to be effective, but dependent on an a priori estimate of the guide star intensity and thus susceptible to errors in that estimate. A star scanner based on a differential measurement from two x-ray detectors eliminates the need for an a priori estimate of the guide star intensity. A first order model and a second order model of the two star scanner concepts are considered. Many of the stars that emit in the x-ray regime are also x-ray pulsars with frequency stability approaching a part in 10{sup 9}. By observing these pulsations, a satellite can keep accurate time autonomously. They have demonstrated the acquisition and tracking of the Crab nebula pulsar by simulating the operation of a phase-locked loop.

  11. Compton backscattered collimated x-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruth, R.D.; Huang, Z.

    1998-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source is disclosed for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications. 4 figs.

  12. Compton backscattered collmated X-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruth, Ronald D. (Woodside, CA); Huang, Zhirong (Stanford, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications.

  13. Compton backscattered collimated x-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruth, Ronald D. (Woodside, CA); Huang, Zhirong (Stanford, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications.

  14. Bandpass x-ray diode and x-ray multiplier detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, C.L.

    1982-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    An absorption-edge of an x-ray absorption filter and a quantum jump of a photocathode determine the bandpass characteristics of an x-ray diode detector. An anode, which collects the photoelectrons emitted by the photocathode, has enhanced amplification provided by photoelectron-multiplying means which include dynodes or a microchannel-plate electron-multiplier. Suppression of undesired high frequency response for a bandpass x-ray diode is provided by subtracting a signal representative of energies above the passband from a signal representative of the overall response of the bandpass diode.

  15. Developing a Compton Polarimeter to Measure Polarization of Hard X-Rays in the 50-300 keV Energy Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. S. Legere; P. Bloser; J. R. Macri; M. L. McConnell; T. Narita; J. M. Ryan

    2005-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the latest progress in the development of GRAPE (Gamma-Ray Polarimeter Experiment), a hard X-ray Compton Polarimeter. The purpose of GRAPE is to measure the polarization of hard X-rays in the 50-300 keV energy range. We are particularly interested in X-rays that are emitted from solar flares and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Accurately measuring the polarization of the emitted radiation from these sources will lead, to a better understating of both the emission mechanisms and source geometries. The GRAPE design consists of an array of plastic scintillators surrounding a central high-Z crystal scintillator. We can monitor individual Compton scatters that occur in the plastics and determine whether the photon is photo absorbed by the high-Z crystal or not. A Compton scattered photon that is immediately photo absorbed by the high-Z crystal constitutes a valid event. These valid events provide us with the interaction locations of each incident photon and ultimately produces a modulation pattern for the Compton scattering of the polarized radiation. Comparing with Monte Carlo simulations of a 100% polarized beam, the level of polarization of the measured beam can then be determined. The complete array is mounted on a flat-panel multi-anode photomultiplier tube (MAPMT) that can measure the deposited energies resulting from the photon interactions. The design of the detector allows for a large field-of-view (>pi steradian), at the same time offering the ability to be close-packed with multiple modules in order to reduce deadspace. We plan to present in this paper the latest laboratory results obtained from GRAPE using partially polarized radiation sources.

  16. Relationship between dislocations and residual stresses in cold-drawn pearlitic steel analyzed by energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sato, Shigeo, E-mail: s.sato@imr.tohoku.ac.jp [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Wagatsuma, Kazuaki [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Suzuki, Shigeru [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Kumagai, Masayoshi; Imafuku, Muneyuki [Faculty of Engineering, Tokyo City University, Tokyo 158-8557 (Japan); Tashiro, Hitoshi [Gyoda 361-0011 (Japan); Kajiwara, Kentaro [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, Sayo 679-5198 (Japan); Shobu, Takahiasa [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Sayo 679-5184 (Japan)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyzed the dislocation distribution of cold-drawn pearlitic-steel wire by using the line-profile analysis based on the energy dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXD). Although this line-profile analysis requires a high resolution in reciprocal space, the resolution for EDXD is generally poor due to the energy resolution of the detector. Our analysis demonstrated that the resolution in the reciprocal space can be maximized at small scattering angles. Using the line-profile analysis based on the EDXD, the microstructural parameters such as the crystallite size and the dislocation density of the ferrite phase in the pearlitic steel were successfully analyzed. In addition, the distribution of the residual stress of the ferrite phase of a pearlitic steel wire was also analyzed using the EDXD measurement. - Highlights: • Energy dispersive X-ray diffraction is applied to the line-profile analysis. • Distribution of dislocations in ferrite in the pearlitic steel wire is analyzed. • Relationship between dislocations and residual stress is discussed.

  17. X-ray spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markowicz, A.A.; Van Grieken, R.E.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the period under review, i.e, through 1984 and 1985, some 600 articles on XRS (X-ray spectrometry) were published; most of these have been scanned and the most fundamental ones are discussed. All references will refer to English-language articles, unless states otherwise. Also general books have appeared on quantitative EPXMA (electron-probe X-ray microanalysis) and analytical electron microscopy (AEM) as well as an extensive review on the application of XRS to trace analysis of environmental samples. In the period under review no radically new developments have been seen in XRS. However, significant improvements have been made. Gain in intensities has been achieved by more efficient excitation, higher reflectivity of dispersing media, and better geometry. Better understanding of the physical process of photon- and electron-specimen interactions led to complex but more accurate equations for correction of various interelement effects. Extensive use of micro- and minicomputers now enables fully automatic operation, including qualitative analysis. However, sample preparation and presentation still put a limit to further progress. Although some authors find XRS in the phase of stabilization or even stagnation, further gradual developments are expected, particularly toward more dedicated equipment, advanced automation, and image analysis systems. Ways are outlined in which XRS has been improved in the 2 last years by excitation, detection, instrumental, methodological, and theoretical advances. 340 references.

  18. In situ synchrotron based x-ray techniques as monitoring tools for atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devloo-Casier, Kilian, E-mail: Kilian.DevlooCasier@Ugent.be; Detavernier, Christophe; Dendooven, Jolien [Department of Solid State Sciences, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281/S1, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Ludwig, Karl F. [Physics Department, Boston University, 590 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a thin film deposition technique that has been studied with a variety of in situ techniques. By exploiting the high photon flux and energy tunability of synchrotron based x-rays, a variety of new in situ techniques become available. X-ray reflectivity, grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering, x-ray diffraction, x-ray fluorescence, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy are reviewed as possible in situ techniques during ALD. All these techniques are especially sensitive to changes on the (sub-)nanometer scale, allowing a unique insight into different aspects of the ALD growth mechanisms.

  19. XMM-Newton Observations Reveal the X-ray Counterpart of the Very-high-energy gamma-ray Source HESS J1640-465

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Funk, S.; Hinton, J.A.; Puhlhofer, G.; Aharonian, F.A.; Hofmann, W.; Reimer, O.; Wagner, S.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. /Leeds U. /Dublin Inst. /Stanford U., HEPL; Funk, S.; Hinton, J.A.; Puehlhofer, G.; Aharonian, F.A.; Hofmann, W.; Reimer, O.; Wagner, S.

    2007-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We present X-ray observations of the as of yet unidentified very high-energy (VHE) {gamma}-ray source HESS J1640-465 with the aim of establishing a counterpart of this source in the keV energy range, and identifying the mechanism responsible for the VHE emission. The 21.8 ksec XMM-Newton observation of HESS J1640-465 in September 2005 represents a significant improvement in sensitivity and angular resolution over previous ASCA studies in this region. These new data show a hard-spectrum X-ray emitting object at the centroid of the H.E.S.S. source, within the shell of the radio Supernova Remnant (SNR) G338.3-0.0. This object is consistent with the position and flux previously measured by both ASCA and Swift-XRT but is now shown to be significantly extended. We argue that this object is very likely the counterpart to HESS J1640-465 and that both objects may represent the Pulsar Wind Nebula of an as of yet undiscovered pulsar associated with G338.3-0.0.

  20. Nonlinear X-ray Compton Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuchs, Matthias; Chen, Jian; Ghimire, Shambhu; Shwartz, Sharon; Kozina, Michael; Jiang, Mason; Henighan, Thomas; Bray, Crystal; Ndabashimiye, Georges; Bucksbaum, P H; Feng, Yiping; Herrmann, Sven; Carini, Gabriella; Pines, Jack; Hart, Philip; Kenney, Christopher; Guillet, Serge; Boutet, Sebastien; Williams, Garth; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, Marvin; Moeller, Stefan; Hastings, Jerome B; Reis, David A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray scattering is a weak linear probe of matter. It is primarily sensitive to the position of electrons and their momentum distribution. Elastic X-ray scattering forms the basis of atomic structural determination while inelastic Compton scattering is often used as a spectroscopic probe of both single-particle excitations and collective modes. X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) are unique tools for studying matter on its natural time and length scales due to their bright and coherent ultrashort pulses. However, in the focus of an XFEL the assumption of a weak linear probe breaks down, and nonlinear light-matter interactions can become ubiquitous. The field can be sufficiently high that even non-resonant multiphoton interactions at hard X-rays wavelengths become relevant. Here we report the observation of one of the most fundamental nonlinear X-ray-matter interactions, the simultaneous Compton scattering of two identical photons producing a single photon at nearly twice the photon energy. We measure scattered...

  1. Separation of particles leading to decay and unlimited growth of energy in a driven stadium-like billiard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    André L. P. Livorati; Matheus S. Palmero; Carl P. Dettmann; Iberê L. Caldas; Edson D. Leonel

    2013-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A competition between decay and growth of energy in a time-dependent stadium billiard is discussed. The dynamics of an ensemble of non-interacting particles inside a closed domain in the shape of a stadium is described by the use of a four-dimensional non-linear mapping. A critical resonance velocity is identified for causing of separation between ensembles of high and low energy. A statistical investigation is made using ensembles of initial conditions both above and below the resonance velocity. Transport along the velocity axis is discussed to quantify the competition of growth and decay of energy by using distributions of histograms of frequency. For high initial velocity, Fermi acceleration -- unlimited energy growth due collisions of a classical particle to a moving boundary -- is inherent in the system. However for low initial velocity, the resonance allies with stickiness to hold the particles in a regular or quasi-regular regime near the fixed points, preventing them from exhibiting Fermi acceleration.

  2. Fabrication process for a gradient index x-ray lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bionta, Richard M. (Livermore, CA); Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); Skulina, Kenneth M. (Livermore, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for fabricating high efficiency x-ray lenses that operate in the 0.5-4.0 keV region suitable for use in biological imaging, surface science, and x-ray lithography of integrated circuits. The gradient index x-ray optics fabrication process broadly involves co-sputtering multi-layers of film on a wire, followed by slicing and mounting on block, and then ion beam thinning to a thickness determined by periodic testing for efficiency. The process enables the fabrication of transmissive gradient index x-ray optics for the 0.5-4.0 keV energy range. This process allows the fabrication of optical elements for the next generation of imaging and x-ray lithography instruments m the soft x-ray region.

  3. Fabrication process for a gradient index x-ray lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bionta, R.M.; Makowiecki, D.M.; Skulina, K.M.

    1995-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is disclosed for fabricating high efficiency x-ray lenses that operate in the 0.5-4.0 keV region suitable for use in biological imaging, surface science, and x-ray lithography of integrated circuits. The gradient index x-ray optics fabrication process broadly involves co-sputtering multi-layers of film on a wire, followed by slicing and mounting on block, and then ion beam thinning to a thickness determined by periodic testing for efficiency. The process enables the fabrication of transmissive gradient index x-ray optics for the 0.5-4.0 keV energy range. This process allows the fabrication of optical elements for the next generation of imaging and x-ray lithography instruments in the soft x-ray region. 13 figures.

  4. A laser triggered vacuum spark x-ray lithography source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keating, Richard Allen

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ionized state or the physical processes occurring 15 in a high temperature plasma. There are many advantages to the use of the vacuum spark as an x-ray source; the simplicity of the machine is one. The x-ray output is within the range usable for x-ray... spark apparatus ha- been studied here to determine its applicability to x-ray lithography. A capacitor which stored approximately 3 KJ supplied most of the energy for the plasma. A Nd-YAG laser was used to supply electrons and metallic atoms...

  5. X-Ray Nanoimaging: Instruments and Methods

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfires may contribute more toConsensusX-RayX-Ray

  6. High-energy magnetic excitations in overdoped La 2 - x Sr x CuO 4 studied by neutron and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wakimoto, S.; Ishii, K.; Kimura, H.; Fujita, M.; Dellea, G.; Kummer, K.; Braicovich, L.; Ghiringhelli, G.; Debeer-Schmitt, L. M.; Granroth, G. E.

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have performed neutron inelastic scattering and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) at the Cu-L? edge to study high-energy magnetic excitations at energy transfers of more than 100 meV for overdoped La2-xSrxCuO? with x=0.25 (Tc=15 K) and x=0.30 (nonsuperconducting) using identical single-crystal samples for the two techniques. From constant-energy slices of neutron-scattering cross sections, we have identified magnetic excitations up to ~250 meV for x=0.25. Although the width in the momentum direction is large, the peak positions along the (?,?) direction agree with the dispersion relation of the spin wave in the nondoped La?CuO? (LCO), which is consistent with the previous RIXS results of cuprate superconductors. Using RIXS at the Cu-L? edge, we have measured the dispersion relations of the so-called paramagnon mode along both (?,?) and (?,0) directions. Although in both directions the neutron and RIXS data connect with each other and the paramagnon along (?,0) agrees well with the LCO spin-wave dispersion, the paramagnon in the (?,?) direction probed by RIXS appears to be less dispersive and the excitation energy is lower than the spin wave of LCO near (?/2,?/2). Thus, our results indicate consistency between neutron inelastic scattering and RIXS, and elucidate the entire magnetic excitation in the (?,?) direction by the complementary use of two probes. The polarization dependence of the RIXS profiles indicates that appreciable charge excitations exist in the same energy range of magnetic excitations, reflecting the itinerant character of the overdoped sample. A possible anisotropy in the charge excitation intensity might explain the apparent differences in the paramagnon dispersion in the (?,?) direction as detected by the x-ray scattering.

  7. High-energy magnetic excitations in overdoped La 2 - x Sr x CuO 4 studied by neutron and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wakimoto, S.; Ishii, K.; Kimura, H.; Fujita, M.; Dellea, G.; Kummer, K.; Braicovich, L.; Ghiringhelli, G.; Debeer-Schmitt, L. M.; Granroth, G. E.

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have performed neutron inelastic scattering and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) at the Cu-L? edge to study high-energy magnetic excitations at energy transfers of more than 100 meV for overdoped La2-xSrxCuO? with x=0.25 (Tc=15 K) and x=0.30 (nonsuperconducting) using identical single-crystal samples for the two techniques. From constant-energy slices of neutron-scattering cross sections, we have identified magnetic excitations up to ~250 meV for x=0.25. Although the width in the momentum direction is large, the peak positions along the (?,?) direction agree with the dispersion relation of the spin wave in the nondoped La?CuO? (LCO), which is consistent with themore »previous RIXS results of cuprate superconductors. Using RIXS at the Cu-L? edge, we have measured the dispersion relations of the so-called paramagnon mode along both (?,?) and (?,0) directions. Although in both directions the neutron and RIXS data connect with each other and the paramagnon along (?,0) agrees well with the LCO spin-wave dispersion, the paramagnon in the (?,?) direction probed by RIXS appears to be less dispersive and the excitation energy is lower than the spin wave of LCO near (?/2,?/2). Thus, our results indicate consistency between neutron inelastic scattering and RIXS, and elucidate the entire magnetic excitation in the (?,?) direction by the complementary use of two probes. The polarization dependence of the RIXS profiles indicates that appreciable charge excitations exist in the same energy range of magnetic excitations, reflecting the itinerant character of the overdoped sample. A possible anisotropy in the charge excitation intensity might explain the apparent differences in the paramagnon dispersion in the (?,?) direction as detected by the x-ray scattering.« less

  8. The experimental feature on the data of the primary proton identification in stratospheric X-ray emulsion chambers at energies >10 TeV (RUNJOB experiment)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. S. Zayarnaya

    2006-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The RUNJOB balloon-born emulsion chamber experiments have been carried out for investigating the composition and energy spectra of primary cosmic rays at energies 10-1000 TeV/nucleon. On the data of the treatment of RUNJOB` X-ray emulsion chambers exposed since 1995 to 1999 year about 50 % proton tracks were identified. In remained half of the events from proton group the one charged primary tracks were not found in the search area determined with high accuracy by the triangulation method using the several background heavy tracks. Considered methodical reasons in this paper could not explain this experimental result. The one from the probable physical reasons that is the neutrons in cosmic ray flux does not explain it too.

  9. X-Ray Interactions with Matter from the Center for X-Ray Optics (CXRO)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Henke, B.L.; Gullikson, E.M.; Davis, J.C.

    The primary interactions of low-energy x-rays within condensed matter, viz. photoabsorption and coherent scattering, are described for photon energies outside the absorption threshold regions by using atomic scattering factors. The atomic scattering factors may be accurately determined from the atomic photoabsorption cross sections using modified Kramers-Kronig dispersion relations. From a synthesis of the currently available experimental data and recent theoretical calculations for photoabsorption, the angle-independent, forward-scattering components of the atomic scattering factors have been thus semiempirically determined and tabulated here for 92 elements and for the region 50-30,000 eV. Atomic scattering factors for all angles of coherent scattering and at the higher photon energies are obtained from these tabulated forward-scattering values by adding a simple angle-dependent form-factor correction. The incoherent scattering contributions that become significant for the light elements at the higher photon energies are similarly determined. The basic x-ray interaction relations that are used in applied x-ray physics are presented here in terms of the atomic scattering factors. The bulk optical constants are also related to the atomic scattering factors. These atomic and optical relations are applied to the detailed calculation of the reflectivity characteristics of a series of practical x-ray mirror, multilayer, and crystal monochromators. Comparisons of the results of this semiempirical,"atom-like", description of x-ray interactions for the low-energy region with those of experiment and ab initio theory are presented.

  10. Bomb Detection Using Backscattered X-Rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobs, J.; Lockwood, G.; Selph, M; Shope, S.; Wehlburg, J.

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bomb Detection Using Backscattered X-rays* Currently the most common method to determine the contents of a package suspected of containing an explosive device is to use transmission radiography. This technique requires that an x-ray source and film be placed on opposite sides of the package. This poses a problem if the pachge is placed so that only one side is accessible, such as against a wall. There is also a threat to persomel and property since exTlosive devices may be "booby trapped." We have developed a method to x-ray a paclage using backscattered x-rays. This procedure eliminates the use of film behind the target. All of the detection is done from the same side as the source. When an object is subjected to x-rays, some of them iare scattered back towards the source. The backscattenng of x-rays is propordoml to the atomic number (Z) of the material raised to the 4.1 power. This 24"' dependence allows us to easily distinguish between explosives, wires, timer, batteries, and other bomb components. Using transmission radiography-to image the contents of an unknown package poses some undesirable risks. The object must have an x-ray film placed on the side opposite the x-ray source; this cannot be done without moving the package if it has been placed firmly against a wall or pillar. Therefore it would be extremely usefid to be able to image the contents of a package from only one side, without ever having to disturb the package itself. where E is the energy of the incoming x-ray. The volume of x-rays absorbed is important because it is, of course, directly correlated to the intensity of x-mys that will be scattered. Most of the x-rays that scatter will do so in a genemlly forward direction; however, a small percentage do scatter in a backward direction. Figure 1 shows a diagram of the various fates of x-rays directed into an object. The package that was examined in this ex~enment was an attache case made of pressed fiberboardwith a vinyl covering. It was approxirmtely 36 cm wide by 51 cm long by 13 cm deep. The case was placed on an aluminum sheet under the x-ray source. Because of the laborato~ setup, the attache case was rastered in the y-coordinate direction, while the x-ray source mstered in the x-coordinate direction. However, for field use, the x-ray source would of course raster in both the x- and y-coordinate directions, while the object under interrogation would remain stationary and undisturbed. A mobile system for use by law enforcement agencies or bomb disposal squads needs to be portable and somewhat durable. A 300 kV x-ray source should be sufficient for the task requirements and can be mounted on a mobile system. A robotic carriage could be used to transport the x-ray source and the CCD camera to the proximity of the suspect package. The controlling and data analyzing elements of the system' could then be maintained at a &tie distance from the possible explosive. F@re 8 shows a diagram of a conceptual design of a possible system for this type of use. The use of backscattered x-rays for interrogation of packages that may contain explosive devices has been shown to be feasible inthelaboratory. Usinga 150kVx-ray source anddetectors consisting of plastic scintillating material, all bomb components including the wiring were detectable. However, at this time the process requires more time than is desirable for the situations in which it will most likely be needed. Further development of the technology using CCD cameras, rather than the plastic stint illator detectors, shows promise of leading to a much faster system, as well as one with better resolution. Mounting the x- ray source and the CCD camera on a robotic vehicle while keeping the controlling and analyzing components and the opemting personnel a safe distance away from the suspect package will allow such a package to be examined at low risk to human life.

  11. Electromagnetic Application: X-RAY Alawi H. Ba-Surrah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masoudi, Husain M.

    , Pulyui published high-quality x-ray images in journals in Paris and London. · Nikola Tesla In April 1887, Nikola Tesla began to investigate X-rays using high voltages and tubes of his own design, as well. The principle behind Tesla's device is called the Bremsstrahlung process, in which a high-energy secondary X

  12. Measurement of high-energy (10–60 keV) x-ray spectral line widths with eV accuracy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seely, J. F., E-mail: seelyjf@gmail.com; Feldman, U. [Artep Inc., 2922 Excelsior Springs Court, Ellicott City, Maryland 21042 (United States); Glover, J. L.; Hudson, L. T.; Ralchenko, Y.; Henins, Albert [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Pereira, N. [Ecopulse Inc., P. O. Box 528, Springfield, Virginia 22152 (United States); Di Stefano, C. A.; Kuranz, C. C.; Drake, R. P. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Chen, Hui; Williams, G. J.; Park, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A high resolution crystal spectrometer utilizing a crystal in transmission geometry has been developed and experimentally optimized to measure the widths of emission lines in the 10–60 keV energy range with eV accuracy. The spectrometer achieves high spectral resolution by utilizing crystal planes with small lattice spacings (down to 2d = 0.099 nm), a large crystal bending radius and Rowland circle diameter (965 mm), and an image plate detector with high spatial resolution (60 ?m in the case of the Fuji TR image plate). High resolution W L-shell and K-shell laboratory test spectra in the 10–60 keV range and Ho K-shell spectra near 47 keV recorded at the LLNL Titan laser facility are presented. The Ho K-shell spectra are the highest resolution hard x-ray spectra recorded from a solid target irradiated by a high-intensity laser.

  13. Spatially resolved energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopic method for in-situ evaluation of mechanical properties during the growth of a C - Pt composite nanowire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banerjee, Amit; Banerjee, S. S., E-mail: satyajit@iitk.ac.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur, 208016 (India)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A core-shell type C-Pt composite nanowire is fabricated using focused ion and electron beam induced chemical vapor deposition techniques. Using information from spatially resolved energy dispersive x-ray spectra, we detect the resonance vibration in the C-Pt composite nanowire. We use this method to measure the Young's moduli of the constituents (C, Pt) of the composite nanowire and also estimate the density of the FEB CVD grown Pt shell surrounding the C core. By measuring the resonance characteristics of the composite nanowire we estimate a Pt shell growth rate of ?0.9 nms{sup ?1}. The study is analyzed to suggest that the Pt shell growth mechanism is primarily governed by the sticking coefficient of the organometallic vapor on the C nanowire core.

  14. Advances in X-Ray Chemical Analysis, Japan, 45 (2014) ISSN 0911-7806 Report on 10th Chinese X-Ray Spectrometry Conference (CXRSC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun, Kawai

    and Information Technology), Dr. Yidong Zhao (Institute of High Energy Physics of Chinese Academy of Sciences-Ray Spectrometry Conference (CXRSC) Ying LIU #12;#12;45 345 Report on 10th Chinese X-Ray Spectrometry Conference (CXRSC) Adv. X-Ray. Chem. Anal., Japan 45, pp.345-348 (2014) Report on 10th Chinese X-Ray Spectrometry

  15. Scattering of x rays from low-Z materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaines, J.L.; Kissel, L.D.; Catron, H.C.; Hansen, R.A.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X rays incident on thin beryllium, boron, carbon, and other low-Z materials undergo both elastic and inelastic scattering as well as diffraction from the crystalline or crystalline-like structure of the material. Unpolarized monoenergetic x rays in the 1.5 to 8.0-keV energy range were used to determine the absolute scattering efficiency of thin beryllium, carbon, and boron foils. These measurements are compared to calculated scattering efficiencies predicted by single-atom theories. In addition, the relative scattering efficiency versus x-ray energy was measured for other low-Z foils using unpolarized bremsstrahlung x rays. In all the low-Z foils examined, we observed Bragg-like x-ray diffraction due to the ordered structure of the materials.

  16. SAND20096226 Unlimited Release

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plimpton, Steve

    SAND2009­6226 Unlimited Release Printed October 2009 Crossing the Mesoscale No-Man's Land via method and its variants are powerful tools for modeling materials at the mesoscale, meaning at length

  17. Center for X-Ray Optics, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following topics: Center for X-Ray Optics; Soft X-Ray Imaging wit Zone Plate Lenses; Biological X-Ray microscopy; Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography for Nanoelectronic Pattern Transfer; Multilayer Reflective Optics; EUV/Soft X-ray Reflectometer; Photoemission Microscopy with Reflective Optics; Spectroscopy with Soft X-Rays; Hard X-Ray Microprobe; Coronary Angiography; and Atomic Scattering Factors.

  18. Staff at sector 30, inelastic x-ray scattering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sector 30 Staff Advanced Photon Source A U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences national synchrotron x-ray research facility Search Button...

  19. Quick extended x-ray absorption fine structure instrument with millisecond time scale, optimized for in situ applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Quick extended x-ray absorption fine structure instrument with millisecond time scale, optimized of quick extended x-ray absorption fine structure QEXAFS and quick x-ray absorption near edge structure- tion spectroscopy XAS was developed in energy dispersive and quick extended x-ray absorption fine

  20. Enhanced betatron X-rays from axially modulated plasma wakefields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palastro, J P; Gordon, D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the cavitation regime of plasma-based accelerators, a population of high-energy electrons tailing the driver can undergo betatron motion. The motion results in X-ray emission, but the brilliance and photon energy are limited by the electrons' initial transverse coordinate. To overcome this, we exploit parametrically unstable betatron motion in a cavitated, axially modulated plasma. Theory and simulations are presented showing that the unstable oscillations increase both the total X-ray energy and average photon energy.

  1. Broadband high resolution X-ray spectral analyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Silver, E.H.; Legros, M.; Madden, N.W.; Goulding, F.; Landis, D.

    1998-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A broad bandwidth high resolution X-ray fluorescence spectrometer has a performance that is superior in many ways to those currently available. It consists of an array of 4 large area microcalorimeters with 95% quantum efficiency at 6 keV and it produces X-ray spectra between 0.2 keV and 7 keV with an energy resolution of 7 to 10 eV. The resolution is obtained at input count rates per array element of 10 to 50 Hz in real-time, with analog pulse processing and thermal pile-up rejection. This performance cannot be matched by currently available X-ray spectrometers. The detectors are incorporated into a compact and portable cryogenic refrigerator system that is ready for use in many analytical spectroscopy applications as a tool for X-ray microanalysis or in research applications such as laboratory and astrophysical X-ray and particle spectroscopy. 6 figs.

  2. Broadband high resolution X-ray spectral analyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Silver, Eric H. (Berkeley, CA); Legros, Mark (Berkeley, CA); Madden, Norm W. (Livermore, CA); Goulding, Fred (Lafayette, CA); Landis, Don (Pinole, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A broad bandwidth high resolution x-ray fluorescence spectrometer has a performance that is superior in many ways to those currently available. It consists of an array of 4 large area microcalorimeters with 95% quantum efficiency at 6 keV and it produces x-ray spectra between 0.2 keV and 7 keV with an energy resolution of 7 to 10 eV. The resolution is obtained at input count rates per array element of 10 to 50 Hz in real-time, with analog pulse processing and thermal pile-up rejection. This performance cannot be matched by currently available x-ray spectrometers. The detectors are incorporated into a compact and portable cryogenic refrigerator system that is ready for use in many analytical spectroscopy applications as a tool for x-ray microanalysis or in research applications such as laboratory and astrophysical x-ray and particle spectroscopy.

  3. SMB, Small Angle X-Ray Scattering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited ReleaseWelcome to the

  4. SMB, X-ray Emission Spectroscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited ReleaseWelcome to theAbsorption Spectroscopy

  5. SMB, X-ray Fluorescence Imaging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited ReleaseWelcome to theAbsorption

  6. The Extreme Ultraviolet and X-Ray Sun in Time: High-Energy Evolutionary Tracks of a Solar-Like Star

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tu, Lin; Güdel, Manuel; Lammer, Helmut

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aims. We aim to describe the pre-main sequence and main-sequence evolution of X-ray and extreme-ultaviolet radiation of a solar mass star based on its rotational evolution starting with a realistic range of initial rotation rates. Methods. We derive evolutionary tracks of X-ray radiation based on a rotational evolution model for solar mass stars and the rotation-activity relation. We compare these tracks to X-ray luminosity distributions of stars in clusters with different ages. Results. We find agreement between the evolutionary tracks derived from rotation and the X-ray luminosity distributions from observations. Depending on the initial rotation rate, a star might remain at the X-ray saturation level for very different time periods, approximately from 10 Myr to 300 Myr for slow and fast rotators, respectively. Conclusions. Rotational evolution with a spread of initial conditions leads to a particularly wide distribution of possible X-ray luminosities in the age range of 20 to 500 Myrs, before rotational co...

  7. X-ray radiography for container inspection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Katz, Jonathan I. (Clayton, MO); Morris, Christopher L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2011-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Arrangements of X-ray inspection systems are described for inspecting high-z materials in voluminous objects such as containers. Inspection methods may involve generating a radiographic image based on detected attenuation corresponding to a pulsed beams of radiation transmitted through a voluminous object. The pulsed beams of radiation are generated by a high-energy source and transmitted substantially downward along an incident angle, of approximately 1.degree. to 30.degree., to a vertical axis extending through the voluminous object. The generated radiographic image may be analyzed to detect on localized high attenuation representative of high-z materials and to discriminate high-z materials from lower and intermediate-z materials on the basis of the high density and greater attenuation of high-z material for higher energy (3-10 MeV) X-rays, and the compact nature of threatening masses of fissionable materials.

  8. X-ray mammography with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burattini, E. (CNR and INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati, Rome (Italy)); Gambaccini, M.; Marziani, M.; Rimondi, O. (Dipartimento di Fisica dell'Universita and Sezione INFN di Ferrara, Ferrara (Italy)); Indovina, P.L. (Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche dell'Universita and Sezione INFN di Napoli, Naples (Italy)); Pocek, M.; Simonetti, G. (Istituto di Radiologia, Ospedale Sant'Eugenio, Universita di Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy)); Benassi, M.; Tirelli, C. (Istituto Nazionale del Cancro, Regina Elena, Rome (Italy)); Passariello, R. (Cattedra di Radiologia, Universita dell'Aquila, L'Aquila (Italy))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the first time in the literature, radiographs of breast phantoms were obtained using several monochromatic synchrotron radiation x-ray beams of selected energy in the range from 14 to 26 keV. In addition, after optimization of the photon energy as a function of the phantom thickness, several mammographs were obtained on surgically removed human breast specimens containing cancer nodules. Comparison between radiographs using a conventional x-ray unit and those obtained of the same specimens utilizing synchrotron monochromatic beams clearly shows that higher contrast and better resolution can be achieved with synchrotron radiation. These results demonstrate the possibility of obtaining radiographs of excised human breast tissue containing a greater amount of radiological information using synchrotron radiation.

  9. The growth of epitaxial iron oxides on platinum (111) as studied by X-ray photoelectron diffraction, scanning tunneling microscopy, and low energy electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Y.J.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three complementary surface structure probes, x-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), and low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) have been combined in a single instrument. This experimental system has been utilized to study the structure and growth mechanisms of iron oxide films on Pt(111); these films were formed by first depositing a single overlayer of Fe with a certain coverage in monolayers (ML`s), and then thermally oxidizing it in an oxygen atmosphere. For films up to {approximately}1 ML in thickness, a bilayer of Fe and O similar to those in FeO(111) is found to form. In agreement with prior studies, STM and LEED show this to be an incommensurate oxide film forming a lateral superlattice with short- and long-range periodicities of {approximately}3.1 {Angstrom} and {approximately}26.0 {Angstrom}. XPD in addition shows a topmost oxygen layer to be relaxed inward by -0.6 {Angstrom} compared to bulk FeO(111), and these are new structural conclusions. The oxygen stacking in the FeO(111) bilayer is dominated by one of two possible binding sites. For thicker iron oxide films from 1.25 ML to 3.0 ML, the growth mode is essentially Stranski-Krastanov: iron oxide islands form on top of the FeO(111) bilayer mentioned above. For iron oxide films of 3.0 ML thickness, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) yields an Fe 2p{sub 3/2} binding energy and an Fe:O stoichiometry consistent with the presence of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. Our XPD data further prove this overlayer to be Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}(111)-magnetite in two almost equally populated domains with a 180{degrees} rotation between them. The structural parameters for this Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} overlayer generally agree with those of a previous LEED study, except that we find a significant difference in the first Fe-O interplanar spacing. This work demonstrates the considerable benefits to be derived by using this set of complementary surface structure probes in such epitaxial growth studies.

  10. A portable high-resolution soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet spectrometer designed for the Shanghai EBIT and the Shanghai low energy EBITs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Zhan; Zhao, Ruifeng; Li, Wenxian; Tu, Bingsheng; Yang, Yang, E-mail: yangyang@fudan.edu.cn; Xiao, Jun; Hutton, Roger; Zou, Yaming [EBIT Laboratory, Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); The Key Laboratory of Applied Ion Beam Physics (Ministry of Education), Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Huldt, Sven [Lund Observatory, Lund University, Lund SE-22100 (Sweden)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A portable high resolution soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectrometer has been developed for spectroscopic research at the Shanghai Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) laboratory. A unique way of aligning the grazing incidence spectrometer using the zero order of the grating is introduced. This method is realized by extending the range of the movement of the CCD detector to cover the zero order. The alignment can be done in a few minutes, thus leading to a portable spectrometer. The high vacuum needed to be compatible with the EBITs is reached by mounting most of the translation and rotation stages outside the chamber. Only one high vacuum compatible linear guide is mounted inside the chamber. This is to ensure the convenient interchange of the gratings needed to enable wavelength coverage of the whole range of 10 to 500 Å. Spectra recorded with one of our low energy EBITs shows that a resolving power of above 800 can be achieved. In the slitless configuration used in this work, we found the resolving power to be limited by the width of the EBIT plasma. When mounted on the Shanghai EBIT which is a high energy EBIT and has a narrower EBIT plasma width, the estimated resolving power will be around 1400 at 221.15 Å.

  11. Soft X-Ray and Vacuum Ultraviolet Based Spectroscopy of the Actinides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tobin, J G

    2011-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The subjects of discussion included: VUV photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Synchrotron-radiation-based photoelectron spectroscopy, Soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy, Soft x-ray emission spectroscopy, Inverse photoelectron spectroscopy, Bremstrahlung Isochromat Spectroscopy, Low energy IPES, Resonant inverse photoelectron spectroscopy.

  12. X-ray micromodulated luminescence tomography in dual-cone ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jul 16, 2014 ... ing the intensity of x-ray energy at the vertex point of a double- cone beam. ... such focusing element, but it is of low efficiency and restricted.

  13. X-ray backscatter imaging of nuclear materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chapman, Jeffrey Allen; Gunning, John E; Hollenbach, Daniel F; Ott, Larry J; Shedlock, Daniel

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy of an X-ray beam and critical depth are selected to detect structural discontinuities in a material having an atomic number Z of 57 or greater. The critical depth is selected by adjusting the geometry of a collimator that blocks backscattered radiation so that backscattered X-ray originating from a depth less than the critical depth is not detected. Structures of Lanthanides and Actinides, including nuclear fuel rod materials, can be inspected for structural discontinuities such as gaps, cracks, and chipping employing the backscattered X-ray.

  14. Characterization of X-ray generator beam profiles.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, Dean J; Harding, Lee T.; Thoreson, Gregory G.; Theisen, Lisa Anne; Parmeter, John Ethan; Thompson, Kyle Richard

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    T to compute the radiography properties of various materials, the flux profiles of X-ray sources must be characterized. This report describes the characterization of X-ray beam profiles from a Kimtron industrial 450 kVp radiography system with a Comet MXC-45 HP/11 bipolar oil-cooled X-ray tube. The empirical method described here uses a detector response function to derive photon flux profiles based on data collected with a small cadmium telluride detector. The flux profiles are then reduced to a simple parametric form that enables computation of beam profiles for arbitrary accelerator energies.

  15. X-ray Diffraction from Membrane Protein Nanocrystals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfires may contribute more toConsensusX-RayX-RayX-ray

  16. X-Ray Emission from Jupiter, Saturn, and Earth: A Short Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anil Bhardwaj

    2006-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Jupiter, Saturn, and Earth - the three planets having dense atmosphere and a well developed magnetosphere - are known to emit X-rays. Recently, Chandra X-ray Observatory has observed X-rays from these planets, and XMM-Newton has observed them from Jupiter and Saturn. These observations have provided improved morphological, temporal, and spectral characteristics of X-rays from these planets. Both auroral and non-auroral (low-latitude) 'disk' X-ray emissions have been observed on Earth and Jupiter. X-rays have been detected from Saturn's disk, but no convincing evidence for X-ray aurora on Saturn has been observed. The non-auroral disk X-ray emissions from Jupiter, Saturn, and Earth, are mostly produced due to scattering of solar X-rays. X-ray aurora on Earth is mainly generated via bremsstrahlung from precipitating electrons and on Jupiter via charge exchange of highlyionized energetic heavy ions precipitating into the polar atmosphere. Recent unpublished work suggests that at higher (>2 keV) energies electron bremsstrahlung also plays a role in Jupiter's X-ray aurora. This paper summarizes the recent results of X-ray observations on Jupiter, Saturn, and Earth mainly in the soft energy (~0.1-2.0 keV) band and provides a comparative overview.

  17. Suppressing Thermal Energy Drift In The LLNL Flash X-Ray Accelerator Using Linear Disk Resistor Stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreitzer, B R; Houck, T L; Luchterhand, O C

    2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper addresses thermal drift in sodium thiosulfate liquid resistors and their replacement with linear disk resistors from HVR Advanced Power Components. Sodium thiosulfate resistors in the FXR induction linear accelerator application have a temperature coefficient of {approx}1.8%/C. The FXR Marx banks send an 8kJ pulse through eight 524 cm{sup 3} liquid resistors at a repetition rate of up to 1 every 45 seconds. Every pulse increases the temperature of the solution by {approx}0.4 C which produces a 0.7% change in resistance. The typical cooling rate is {approx}0.4 C per minute which results in {approx}0.1% energy drop per pulse during continuous pulsed operations. A radiographic accelerator is extraordinarily sensitive to energy variations. Changes in beam energy produce movement in beam transport, changes in spot size, and large dose variations. If self-heating were the only problem, we could predict the increase in input voltage required to compensate for the energy loss. However, there are other variables that influence the temperature of the resistors such as focus magnet heating, changes in room temperature, changes in cooling water, where the cell is located, etc. Additionally not all of the resistors have equivalent cooling rates and as many as 32 resistors are driven from a single power source. The FXR accelerator group elected to replace the sodium thiosulfate resistors with HVR Linear Disk Resistors in a stack type configuration. With data limited for these resistors when used in oil and at low resistance values, a full characterization needed to be performed. High currents (up to 15kA), high voltages (up to 400kV), and Fast Rise times (<10ns) made a resistor choice difficult. Other solid resistors have been tried and had problems at the connection points and with the fact that the resistivity changed as they absorbed oil. The selected HVR resistors have the advantage of being manufactured with the oil impregnated in to them so this characteristic is minimized while still offering the desired low temperature coefficient of resistance compared to sodium thiosulfate. The characterization experiments and comparison with the sodium thiosulfate liquid resistors will be fully discussed and the final design described.

  18. Soft-x-ray spectroscopy study of nanoscale materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, J.-H.

    2005-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to control the particle size and morphology of nanoparticles is of crucial importance nowadays both from a fundamental and industrial point of view considering the tremendous amount of high-tech applications. Controlling the crystallographic structure and the arrangement of atoms along the surface of nanostructured material will determine most of its physical properties. In general, electronic structure ultimately determines the properties of matter. Soft X-ray spectroscopy has some basic features that are important to consider. X-ray is originating from an electronic transition between a localized core state and a valence state. As a core state is involved, elemental selectivity is obtained because the core levels of different elements are well separated in energy, meaning that the involvement of the inner level makes this probe localized to one specific atomic site around which the electronic structure is reflected as a partial density-of-states contribution. The participation of valence electrons gives the method chemical state sensitivity and further, the dipole nature of the transitions gives particular symmetry information. The new generation synchrotron radiation sources producing intensive tunable monochromatized soft X-ray beams have opened up new possibilities for soft X-ray spectroscopy. The introduction of selectively excited soft X-ray emission has opened a new field of study by disclosing many new possibilities of soft X-ray resonant inelastic scattering. In this paper, some recent findings regarding soft X-ray absorption and emission studies of various nanostructured systems are presented.

  19. Using X-ray catalogues to find counterparts to unassociated high-energy Fermi/LAT sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landi, R; Stephen, J B; Masetti, N; Malizia, A; Ubertini, P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) catalogue of sources (1FHL) emitting at high energies (above 10 GeV) reports the details of 514 objects detected in the first three years of the Fermi mission. Of these, 71 were reported as unidentified in the 1FHL catalogue, although six are likely to be associated with a supernova remnant (SNR), a Pulsar Wind Nebula (PWN) or a combination of both, thereby leaving a list of 65 still unassociated objects. Herein, we report a preliminary analysis on this sample of objects concentrating on nine 1FHL sources, which were found to have a clear optical extragalactic classification. They are all blazar, eight BL Lac and one flat spectrum radio quasar, typically at redshift greater than 0.1.

  20. Soft-x-ray

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9MorganYou are hereValue ofSocioeconomic

  1. Focused X-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piestrup, M.A.; Boyers, D.G.; Pincus, C.I.; Maccagno, P.

    1990-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is an intense, relatively inexpensive X-ray source (as compared to a synchrotron emitter) for technological, scientific, and spectroscopic purposes. A conical radiation pattern produced by a single foil or stack of foils is focused by optics to increase the intensity of the radiation at a distance from the conical radiator. 8 figs.

  2. 54X-rays from Hot Gases Near the SN1979C Black Hole The Chandra X-Ray Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is in solar mass units, and R is in kilometers. Problem 1 - Combining these equations using the method-Newton and the German ROSAT observatory revealed a bright source of X-rays that has remained steady for the 12 years, or distribution of X-rays with energy, support the idea that the object in SN 1979C is a black hole being fed

  3. Systems and methods for detecting x-rays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bross, Alan D.; Mellott, Kerry L.; Pla-Dalmau, Anna

    2006-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods for detecting x-rays are disclosed herein. One or more x-ray-sensitive scintillators can be configured from a plurality of heavy element nano-sized particles and a plastic material, such as polystyrene. As will be explained in greater detail herein, the heavy element nano-sized particles (e.g., PbWO4) can be compounded into the plastic material with at least one dopant that permits the plastic material to scintillate. X-rays interact with the heavy element nano-sized particles to produce electrons that can deposit energy in the x-ray sensitive scintillator, which in turn can produce light.

  4. Comparison of low-energy x-ray and cobalt-60 irradiations of MOS devices as a function of gate bias

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaneyfelt, M.R.; Fleetwood, D.M.; Schwank, J.R. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Hughes, K.L. (L and M Technologies, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The E{sup {minus}{1/2}} electric field dependence of the saturated density of interface traps in MOS devices is used to improve estimates of charge yield during {sup 60}Co irradiations. Previous discrepancies between 10-keV x-ray and {sup 60}Co response are resolved. 14 refs., 7 figs.

  5. Small Angle X-ray Scattering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9Morgan ManagingW.tepidumAngle X-ray Scattering

  6. Spectral Formation in X-Ray Pulsar Accretion Columns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter A. Becker; Michael T. Wolff

    2005-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first self-consistent model for the dynamics and the radiative transfer occurring in bright X-ray pulsar accretion columns, with a special focus on the role of the shock in energizing the emerging X-rays. The pressure inside the accretion column of a luminous X-ray pulsar is dominated by the photons, and consequently the equations describing the coupled radiative-dynamical structure must be solved simultaneously. Spectral formation in these sources is therefore a complex, nonlinear phenomenon. We obtain the analytical solution for the Green's function describing the upscattering of monochromatic radiation injected into the column from the thermal mound located near the base of the flow. The Green's function is convolved with a Planck distribution to model the X-ray spectrum resulting from the reprocessing of blackbody photons produced in the thermal mound. These photons diffuse through the infalling gas and eventually escape out the walls of the column, forming the observed X-ray spectrum. We show that the resulting column-integrated, phase-averaged spectrum has a power-law shape at high energies and a blackbody shape at low energies, in agreement with the observational data for many X-ray pulsars.

  7. Producing X-rays at the APS

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An introduction and overview of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory, the technology that produces the brightest X-ray beams in the Western Hemisphere, and the research carried out by scientists using those X-rays.

  8. Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has led to an outburst of research activities in the field of lensless imaging. XFELs...

  9. APS X-rays Reveal Picasso's Secret

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 2000 Subscribe to APS News rss feed APS X-rays Reveal Picasso's Secret OCTOBER 15, 2012 Bookmark and Share X-rays reveal that Picasso's "Old Guitarist," at...

  10. Spectral analysis of X-ray binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridriksson, Joel Karl

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I present work from three separate research projects associated with observations of X-ray binaries. Two of those revolve around spectral characteristics of neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries (NS-LMXBs), ...

  11. Microionization chamber air-kerma calibration coefficients as a function of photon energy for x-ray spectra in the range of 20-250 kVp relative to {sup 60}Co

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snow, J. R.; Micka, J. A.; DeWerd, L. A. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate the applicability of a wide range of microionization chambers for reference dosimetry measurements in low- and medium-energy x-ray beams. Methods: Measurements were performed with six cylindrical microchamber models, as well as one scanning chamber and two Farmer-type chambers for comparison purposes. Air-kerma calibration coefficients were determined at the University of Wisconsin Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory for each chamber for a range of low- and medium-energy x-ray beams (20-250 kVp), with effective energies ranging from 11.5 keV to 145 keV, and a {sup 60}Co beam. A low-Z proof-of-concept microchamber was developed and calibrated with and without a high-Z silver epoxy on the collecting electrode. Results: All chambers composed of low-Z materials (Z{<=} 13), including the Farmer-type chambers, the scanning chamber, and the PTW TN31014 and the proof-of-concept microchambers, exhibited air-kerma calibration coefficients with little dependence on the quality of the beam. These chambers typically exhibited variations in calibration coefficients of less than 3% with the beam quality, for medium energy beams. However, variations in air-kerma calibration coefficients of greater than 50% were measured over the range of medium-energy x-ray beams for each of the microchambers containing high-Z collecting electrodes (Z > 13). For these high-Z chambers, which include the Exradin A14SL and A16 chambers, the PTW TN31006 chamber, the IBA CC01 chamber, and the proof-of-concept chamber containing silver, the average variation in air-kerma calibration coefficients between any two calibration beams was nearly 25% over the entire range of beam qualities investigated. Conclusions: Due to the strong energy dependence observed with microchambers containing high-Z components, these chambers may not be suitable dosimeters for kilovoltage x-ray applications, as they do not meet the TG-61 requirements. It is recommended that only microchambers containing low-Z materials (Z{<=} 13) be considered for air-kerma calibrations for reference dosimetry in low- and medium-energy x-ray beams.

  12. Microgap x-ray detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wuest, C.R.; Bionta, R.M.; Ables, E.

    1994-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An x-ray detector is disclosed which provides for the conversion of x-ray photons into photoelectrons and subsequent amplification of these photoelectrons through the generation of electron avalanches in a thin gas-filled region subject to a high electric potential. The detector comprises a cathode (photocathode) and an anode separated by the thin, gas-filled region. The cathode may comprise a substrate, such a beryllium, coated with a layer of high atomic number material, such as gold, while the anode can be a single conducting plane of material, such as gold, or a plane of resistive material, such as chromium/silicon monoxide, or multiple areas of conductive or resistive material, mounted on a substrate composed of glass, plastic or ceramic. The charge collected from each electron avalanche by the anode is passed through processing electronics to a point of use, such as an oscilloscope. 3 figures.

  13. Microgap x-ray detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wuest, Craig R. (Danville, CA); Bionta, Richard M. (Livermore, CA); Ables, Elden (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An x-ray detector which provides for the conversion of x-ray photons into photoelectrons and subsequent amplification of these photoelectrons through the generation of electron avalanches in a thin gas-filled region subject to a high electric potential. The detector comprises a cathode (photocathode) and an anode separated by the thin, gas-filled region. The cathode may comprise a substrate, such a beryllium, coated with a layer of high atomic number material, such as gold, while the anode can be a single conducting plane of material, such as gold, or a plane of resistive material, such as chromium/silicon monoxide, or multiple areas of conductive or resistive material, mounted on a substrate composed of glass, plastic or ceramic. The charge collected from each electron avalanche by the anode is passed through processing electronics to a point of use, such as an oscilloscope.

  14. Phase-sensitive X-ray imager

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Kevin Louis

    2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray phase sensitive wave-front sensor techniques are detailed that are capable of measuring the entire two-dimensional x-ray electric field, both the amplitude and phase, with a single measurement. These Hartmann sensing and 2-D Shear interferometry wave-front sensors do not require a temporally coherent source and are therefore compatible with x-ray tubes and also with laser-produced or x-pinch x-ray sources.

  15. Self-detection of x-ray Fresnel transmittivity using photoelectron-induced gas ionization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoupin, Stanislav

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric response of an x-ray mirror enclosed in a gas flow ionization chamber was studied under the conditions of total external reflection for hard x-rays. It is shown that the electric response of the system as a function of the incidence angle is defined by x-ray Fresnel transmittivity and photon-electron attenuation properties of the mirror material. A simple interpretation of quantum yield of the system is presented. The approach provides non-invasive in-situ diagnostics of hard x-ray optics, easy access to complementary x-ray transmittivity data in x-ray reflectivity experiments and can also pave the way to novel schemes for angle and energy resolving x-ray detectors.

  16. A short working distance multiple crystal x-ray spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickinson, B.; Seidler, G. T.; Webb, Z. W.; Bradley, J. A.; Nagle, K. P. [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Heald, S. M. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratories, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Gordon, R. A. [Department of Physics, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia V5A 1S6 (Canada); Chou, I. M. [U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia 20192 (United States)

    2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    For x-ray spot sizes of a few tens of microns or smaller, a millimeter-sized flat analyzer crystal placed {approx}1 cm from the sample will exhibit high energy resolution while subtending a collection solid angle comparable to that of a typical spherically bent crystal analyzer (SBCA) at much larger working distances. Based on this observation and a nonfocusing geometry for the analyzer optic, we have constructed and tested a short working distance (SWD) multicrystal x-ray spectrometer. This prototype instrument has a maximum effective collection solid angle of 0.14 sr, comparable to that of 17 SBCA at 1 m working distance. We find good agreement with prior work for measurements of the Mn K{beta} x-ray emission and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering for MnO, and also for measurements of the x-ray absorption near-edge structure for Dy metal using L{alpha}{sub 2} partial-fluorescence yield detection. We discuss future applications at third- and fourth-generation light sources. For concentrated samples, the extremely large collection angle of SWD spectrometers will permit collection of high-resolution x-ray emission spectra with a single pulse of the Linac Coherent Light Source. The range of applications of SWD spectrometers and traditional multi-SBCA instruments has some overlap, but also is significantly complementary.

  17. Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your HomeLatest News ReleasesDepartmentLendingX-Ray Imaging in

  18. Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your HomeLatest News ReleasesDepartmentLendingX-Ray Imaging

  19. Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your HomeLatest News ReleasesDepartmentLendingX-Ray

  20. Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 -ofLearningLensless ImagingLensless X-Ray

  1. X-ray spectroscopy of low-mass X-ray binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juett, Adrienne Marie, 1976-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I present high-resolution X-ray grating spectroscopy of neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) using instruments onboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the X-ray Multi-Mirror Mission (XMM-Newton). The first ...

  2. Extending The Methodology Of X-ray Crystallography To Allow X-ray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miao, Jianwei "John"

    , the radiation damage. While the radiation damage problem can be mitigated somewhat by using cryogenic techniques resolution without serious radiation damage to the specimens. Although X-ray crystallography becomesExtending The Methodology Of X-ray Crystallography To Allow X-ray Microscopy Without X-ray Optics

  3. Development of a High Resolution X-Ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometer for Measurement of Ion-Temperature and Rotation-Velocity Profiles in Fusion Energy Research Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, K W; Broennimann, Ch; Eikenberry, E F; Ince-Cushman, A; Lee, S G; Rice, J E; Scott, S

    2008-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A new imaging high resolution x-ray crystal spectrometer (XCS) has been developed to measure continuous profiles of ion temperature and rotation velocity in fusion plasmas. Following proof-of-principle tests on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak and the NSTX spherical tokamak, and successful testing of a new silicon, pixilated detector with 1MHz count rate capability per pixel, an imaging XCS is being designed to measure full profiles of Ti and v? on C-Mod. The imaging XCS design has also been adopted for ITER. Ion-temperature uncertainty and minimum measurable rotation velocity are calculated for the C-Mod spectrometer. The affects of x-ray and nuclear-radiation background on the measurement uncertainties are calculated to predict performance on ITER.

  4. Development of a High Resolution X-Ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometer for Measurement of Ion-Temperature and Rotation-Velocity Profiles in Fusion Energy Research Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, K W; Broennimann, Ch; Eikenberry, E F; Ince-Cushman, A; Lee, S G; Rice, J E; Scott, S

    2008-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A new imaging high resolution x-ray crystal spectrometer (XCS) has been developed to measure continuous profiles of ion temperature and rotation velocity in fusion plasmas. Following proof-of-principle tests on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak and the NSTX spherical tokamak, and successful testing of a new silicon, pixilated detector with 1 MHz count rate capability per pixel, an imaging XCS is being designed to measure full profiles of Ti and v? on C-Mod. The imaging XCS design has also been adopted for ITER. Ion-temperature uncertainty and minimum measurable rotation velocity are calculated for the C-Mod spectrometer. The affects of x-ray and uclear-radiation background on the measurement uncertainties are calculated to predict performance on ITER.

  5. Synchronization of x-ray pulses to the pump laser in an ultrafast x-ray facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corlett, J.N.; Barry, W.; Byrd, J.M.; Schoenlein, R.; Zholents, A.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate timing of ultrafast x-ray probe pulses emitted fromOF X-RAY PULSES TO THE PUMP LASER IN AN ULTRAFAST X-RAY

  6. X-ray holography of biological specimens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solem, J.C.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The author reviews the reasons for x-ray imaging of biological specimens and the techniques presently being used for x-ray microscopy. The author points out the advantages of x-ray holography and the difficulties of obtaining the requisite coherence with conventional sources. The author discusses the problems of radiation damage and the remarkable fact that short pulse x-ray sources circumvent these problems and obtain high-resolution images of specimens in the living state. Finally, the author reviews some of the efforts underway to develop high-intensity coherent x-ray sources for the laboratory. 14 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  7. Accuracy evaluation of a Compton X-ray spectrometer with bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by a 6 MeV electron bunch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kojima, Sadaoki, E-mail: kojima-s@ile.osaka-u.ac.jp; Arikawa, Yasunobu; Zhang, Zhe; Ikenouchi, Takahito; Morace, Alessio; Nagai, Takahiro; Abe, Yuki; Sakata, Shouhei; Inoue, Hiroaki; Utsugi, Masaru; Nakai, Mitsuo; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Azechi, Hiroshi [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Nishimura, Yasuhiko; Togawa, Hiromi [Toyota Technical Development Corporation, 1-21 Imae, Hanamoto-cho, Toyota, Aichi 470-0334 (Japan); Ozaki, Tetsuo [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshicho, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Kato, Ryukou [The Institute of Science and Industrial Research, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A Compton-scattering-based X-ray spectrometer is developed to obtain the energy distribution of fast electrons produced by intense laser and matter interactions. Bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by fast electrons in a material are used to measure fast electrons’ energy distribution in matter. In the Compton X-ray spectrometer, X-rays are converted into recoil electrons by Compton scattering in a converter made from fused silica glass, and a magnet-based electron energy analyzer is used to measure the energy distribution of the electrons that recoil in the direction of the incident X-rays. The spectrum of the incident X-rays is reconstructed from the energy distribution of the recoil electrons. The accuracy of this spectrometer is evaluated using a quasi-monoenergetic 6 MeV electron bunch that emanates from a linear accelerator. An electron bunch is injected into a 1.5 mm thick tungsten plate to produce bremsstrahlung X-rays. The spectrum of these bremsstrahlung X-rays is obtained in the range from 1 to 9 MeV. The energy of the electrons in the bunch is estimated using a Monte Carlo simulation of particle-matter interactions. The result shows that the spectrometer's energy accuracy is ±0.5 MeV for 6.0 MeV electrons.

  8. Use of the high-energy x-ray microprobe at the Advanced Photon Source to investigate the interactions between metals and bacteria.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kemner, K. M.; Lai, B.; Maser, J.; Schneegurt, M. A.; Cai, Z.; Ilinski, P. P.; Kulpa, C. F.; Legnini, D. G.; Nealson, K. H.; Pratt, S. T.; Rodrigues, W.; Tischler, M. L.; Yun, W.

    1999-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the fate of heavy-metal contaminants in the environment is of fundamental importance in the development and evaluation of effective remediation and sequestration strategies. Among the factors influencing the transport of these contaminants are their chemical separation and the chemical and physical attributes of the surrounding medium. Bacteria and the extracellular material associated with them are thought to play a key role in determining a contaminant's speciation and thus its mobility in the environment. In addition, the microenvironment at and adjacent to actively metabolizing cell surfaces can be significantly different from the bulk environment. Thus, the spatial distribution and chemical separation of contaminants and elements that are key to biological processes must be characterized at micron and submicron resolution in order to understand the microscopic physical, geological, chemical, and biological interfaces that determine a contaminant's macroscopic fate. Hard X-ray microimaging is a powerful technique for the element-specific investigation of complex environmental samples at th needed micron and submicron resolution. An important advantage of this technique results from the large penetration depth of hard X-rays in water. This advantage minimizes the requirements for sample preparation and allows the detailed study of hydrated samples. This paper presents results of studies of the spatial distribution of naturally occurring metals and a heavy-metal contaminant (Cr) in and near hydrated bacteria (Pseudomonas fluorescens) in the early stages of biofilm development, performed at the Advanced Photon Source Sector 2 X-ray microscopy beamline.

  9. A High Efficiency Grazing Incidence Pumped X-ray Laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, J; Keenan, R; Price, D F; Patel, P K; Smith, R F; Shlyaptsev, V N

    2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of the project is to demonstrate a proof-of-principle, new type of high efficiency, short wavelength x-ray laser source that will operate at unprecedented high repetition rates (10Hz) that could be scaled to 1kHz or higher. The development of a high average power, tabletop x-ray laser would serve to complement the wavelength range of 3rd and future 4th generation light sources, e.g. the LCLS, being developed by DOE-Basic Energy Sciences. The latter are large, expensive, central, synchrotron-based facilities while the tabletop x-ray laser is compact, high-power laser-driven, and relatively inexpensive. The demonstration of such a unique, ultra-fast source would allow us to attract funding from DOE-BES, NSF and other agencies to pursue probing of diverse materials undergoing ultrafast changes. Secondly, this capability would have a profound impact on the semiconductor industry since a coherent x-ray laser source would be ideal for ''at wavelength'' {approx}13 nm metrology and microscopy of optics and masks used in EUV lithography. The project has major technical challenges. We will perform grazing-incidence pumped laser-plasma experiments in flat or groove targets which are required to improve the pumping efficiency by ten times. Plasma density characterization using our existing unique picosecond x-ray laser interferometry of laser-irradiated targets is necessary. Simulations of optical laser propagation as well as x-ray laser production and propagation through freely expanding and confined plasma geometries are essential. The research would be conducted using the Physics Directorate Callisto and COMET high power lasers. At the end of the project, we expect to have a high-efficiency x-ray laser scheme operating below 20 nm at 10Hz with a pulse duration of {approx}2 ps. This will represent the state-of-the-art in x-ray lasers and would be a major step forward from our present picosecond laser-driven x-ray lasers. There is an added bonus of creating the shortest wavelength laboratory x-ray laser, below 4.5 nm and operating in the water window, by using the high-energy capability of the Titan laser.

  10. SAND93-2591 Unlimited Release

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCurley, Kevin

    was performed under U.S. Department of Energy contract number DE-AC04-76DP00789. This report has been revisedSAND93-2591 Unlimited Release First Printed October 1992 Revised October 29, 1993 Revised June 22. In this report we describe a portable and efficient implementation of SHA-1 in the C language. Performance

  11. A Soft X-Ray Lag Detected in Centaurus A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tachibana, Yutaro; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Shidatsu, Megumi; Arimoto, Makoto; Yoshii, Taketoshi; Yatsu, Yoichi; Saito, Yoshihiko; Pike, Sean; Kawai, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We performed time lag analysis on the X-ray light curves of Centaurus A (Cen A) obtained by the Gas Slit Camera (GSC) aboard the Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image (MAXI) in three energy bands (2--4 keV, 4--10 keV, and 10--20 keV). We discovered a soft X-ray lag relative to higher energies (soft lag) on a time scale of days by employing the discrete correlation function (DCF) and the z-transformed discrete correlation function (ZDCF) method in a flare episode. A peak in the DCF and the ZDCF was observed at a soft lag of $\\sim 5$ days in 2--4 keV versus 4--10 keV and in 4--10 keV versus 10--20 keV, and $\\sim 10$ days in 2--4 keV versus 10--20 keV. We found it difficult to explain the observed X-ray variation with the one-zone synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) model, in which the soft lags reflect the different cooling times of the relativistic electrons in these three energy bands. Alternatively, if the X-ray variation was produced in a corona surrounding or along the inner part of the accretion disk, we can explain ...

  12. X-ray absorption in distant type II QSOs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Krumpe; G. Lamer; A. Corral; A. D. Schwope; F. J. Carrera; X. Barcons; M. Page; S. Mateos; J. A. Tedds; M. G. Watson

    2008-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of the X-ray spectral analysis of an XMM-Newton-selected type II QSO sample with z>0.5 and 0.5-10 keV flux of 0.3-33 x 10^{-14} erg/s/cm^2. The distribution of absorbing column densities in type II QSOs is investigated and the dependence of absorption on X-ray luminosity and redshift is studied. We inspected 51 spectroscopically classified type II QSO candidates from the XMM-Newton Marano field survey, the XMM-Newton-2dF wide angle survey (XWAS), and the AXIS survey to set-up a well-defined sample with secure optical type II identifications. Fourteen type II QSOs were classified and an X-ray spectral analysis performed. Since most of our sources have only ~40 X-ray counts (PN-detector), we carefully studied the fit results of the simulated X-ray spectra as a function of fit statistic and binning method. We determined that fitting the spectra with the Cash-statistic and a binning of minimum one count per bin recovers the input values of the simulated X-ray spectra best. Above 100 PN counts, the free fits of the spectrum's slope and absorbing hydrogen column density are reliable. We find only moderate absorption (N_H=(2-10) x 10^22 cm^-2) and no obvious trends with redshift and intrinsic X-ray luminosity. In a few cases a Compton-thick absorber cannot be excluded. Two type II objects with no X-ray absorption were discovered. We find no evidence for an intrinsic separation between type II AGN and high X-ray luminosity type II QSO in terms of absorption. The stacked X-ray spectrum of our 14 type II QSOs shows no iron K-alpha line. In contrast, the stack of the 8 type II AGN reveals a very prominent iron K-alpha line at an energy of ~ 6.6 keV and an EW ~ 2 keV.

  13. Soft X-ray techniques to study mesoscale magnetism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kortright, Jeffrey B.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-Ray Techniques to Study Mesoscale Magnetism Jeffrey B.X-Ray Techniques to Study Mesoscale Magnetism Jeffrey B.

  14. Techniques for synchronization of X-Ray pulses to the pump laser in an ultrafast X-Ray facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corlett, J.N.; Doolittle, L.; Schoenlein, R.; Staples, J.; Wilcox, R.; Zholents, A.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    synchronization of ultrafast x-ray pulses produced in theAccurate timing of ultrafast x-ray probe pulses emitted fromOF X-RAY PULSES TO THE PUMP LASER IN AN ULTRAFAST X-RAY

  15. Controlling X-rays With Light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glover, Ernie; Hertlein, Marcus; Southworth, Steve; Allison, Tom; van Tilborg, Jeroen; Kanter, Elliot; Krassig, B.; Varma, H.; Rude, Bruce; Santra, Robin; Belkacem, Ali; Young, Linda

    2010-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultrafast x-ray science is an exciting frontier that promises the visualization of electronic, atomic and molecular dynamics on atomic time and length scales. A largelyunexplored area of ultrafast x-ray science is the use of light to control how x-rays interact with matter. In order to extend control concepts established for long wavelengthprobes to the x-ray regime, the optical control field must drive a coherent electronic response on a timescale comparable to femtosecond core-hole lifetimes. An intense field is required to achieve this rapid response. Here an intense optical control pulse isobserved to efficiently modulate photoelectric absorption for x-rays and to create an ultrafast transparency window. We demonstrate an application of x-ray transparencyrelevant to ultrafast x-ray sources: an all-photonic temporal cross-correlation measurement of a femtosecond x-ray pulse. The ability to control x-ray/matterinteractions with light will create new opportunities at current and next-generation x-ray light sources.

  16. Materials Chemistry and Physics 100 (2006) 3840 X-ray irradiation induced degradation of cellulose nitrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, K.N.

    Abstract Energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometry was previously proposed to measure energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometry. For that method, a reference silver nitrate-ray energy is high enough to avoid total a

  17. Isotropic star in low-mass X-ray binaries and X-ray pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehedi Kalam; Sk. Monowar Hossein; Sajahan Molla

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a model for compact stars in the low mass X-ray binaries(LMXBs) and X-ray pulsars using a metric given by John J. Matese and Patrick G. Whitman \\citep{Matese and Whitman1980}. Here the field equations are reduced to a system of two algebraic equations considering the isotropic pressure. Compact star candidates 4U 1820-30(radius=10km) in LMXBs, and Her X-1(radius=7.7km), SAX J 1808.4-3658(SS1)(radius=7.07km) and SAX J 1808.4-3658(SS2)(radius=6.35km) in X-ray pulsars satisfy all the energy conditions, TOV-equation and stability condition. From our model, we have derived mass($M$), central density($\\rho_{0}$), suface density($\\rho_{b}$), central pressure($p_{0}$), surface pressure($p_{b}$) and surface red-shift($Z_{s}$) of the above mentioned stars, which are very much consistant with the observed/reported datas\\citep{N. K. Glendenning1997,Gondek2000}. We have also observe the adiabatic index($\\gamma$>4/3) of the above steller objects.

  18. Chandra Multiwavelength Project X-ray Point Source Catalog

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minsun Kim; Dong-Woo Kim; Belinda J. Wilkes; Paul J. Green; Eunhyeuk Kim; Craig S. Anderson; Wayne A. Barkhouse; Nancy R. Evans; Zeljko Ivezic; Margarita Karovska; Vinay L. Kashyap; Myung Gyoon Lee; Peter Maksym; Amy E. Mossman; John D. Silverman; Harvey D. Tananbaum

    2006-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the Chandra Multiwavelength Project (ChaMP) X-ray point source catalog with ~6,800 X-ray sources detected in 149 Chandra observations covering \\~10 deg^2. The full ChaMP catalog sample is seven times larger than the initial published ChaMP catalog. The exposure time of the fields in our sample ranges from 0.9 to 124 ksec, corresponding to a deepest X-ray flux limit of f_{0.5-8.0} = 9 x 10^{-16} erg/cm2/sec. The ChaMP X-ray data have been uniformly reduced and analyzed with ChaMP-specific pipelines, and then carefully validated by visual inspection. The ChaMP catalog includes X-ray photometric data in 8 different energy bands as well as X-ray spectral hardness ratios and colors. To best utilize the ChaMP catalog, we also present the source reliability, detection probability and positional uncertainty. To quantitatively assess those parameters, we performed extensive simulations. In particular, we present a set of empirical equations: the flux limit as a function of effective exposure time, and the positional uncertainty as a function of source counts and off axis angle. The false source detection rate is ~1% of all detected ChaMP sources, while the detection probability is better than ~95% for sources with counts >30 and off axis angle <5 arcmin. The typical positional offset between ChaMP X-ray source and their SDSS optical counterparts is 0.7+-0.4 arcsec, derived from ~900 matched sources.

  19. Method and apparatus for micromachining using hard X-rays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siddons, David Peter (Shoreham, NY); Johnson, Erik D. (Ridge, NY); Guckel, Henry (Madison, WI); Klein, Jonathan L. (Madison, WI)

    1997-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An X-ray source such as a synchrotron which provides a significant spectral content of hard X-rays is used to expose relatively thick photoresist such that the portions of the photoresist at an exit surface receive at least a threshold dose sufficient to render the photoresist susceptible to a developer, while the entrance surface of the photoresist receives an exposure which does not exceed a power limit at which destructive disruption of the photoresist would occur. The X-ray beam is spectrally shaped to substantially eliminate lower energy photons while allowing a substantial flux of higher energy photons to pass through to the photoresist target. Filters and the substrate of the X-ray mask may be used to spectrally shape the X-ray beam. Machining of photoresists such as polymethylmethacrylate to micron tolerances may be obtained to depths of several centimeters, and multiple targets may be exposed simultaneously. The photoresist target may be rotated and/or translated in the beam to form solids of rotation and other complex three-dimensional structures.

  20. Method and apparatus for micromachining using hard X-rays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siddons, D.P.; Johnson, E.D.; Guckel, H.; Klein, J.L.

    1997-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An X-ray source such as a synchrotron which provides a significant spectral content of hard X-rays is used to expose relatively thick photoresist such that the portions of the photoresist at an exit surface receive at least a threshold dose sufficient to render the photoresist susceptible to a developer, while the entrance surface of the photoresist receives an exposure which does not exceed a power limit at which destructive disruption of the photoresist would occur. The X-ray beam is spectrally shaped to substantially eliminate lower energy photons while allowing a substantial flux of higher energy photons to pass through to the photoresist target. Filters and the substrate of the X-ray mask may be used to spectrally shape the X-ray beam. Machining of photoresists such as polymethylmethacrylate to micron tolerances may be obtained to depths of several centimeters, and multiple targets may be exposed simultaneously. The photoresist target may be rotated and/or translated in the beam to form solids of rotation and other complex three-dimensional structures. 21 figs.

  1. X-ray and Near-infrared Studies of a Star-forming Cloud; L1448

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsujimoto, M; Tsuboi, Y

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of X-ray and near-infrared (NIR) observations of L1448, a star-forming region in the Perseus cloud complex using the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the 4 m telescope at the Kitt Peak National Observatory. We detect 72 X-ray sources in a ~17 arcmin x 17 arcmin region with a ~68 ks ACIS exposure, for which we conduct follow-up NIR imaging observations in a concentric ~11 arcmin x 11 arcmin region with FLAMINGOS down to m_Ks ~ 17 mag. Twelve X-ray sources have NIR or optical counterparts. By plotting X-ray mean energy versus NIR to X-ray flux ratio, the X-ray sources are clearly separated into two groups. The X-ray spectral and temporal features as well as NIR magnitudes and colors indicate that one group mainly consists of young stellar objects (YSOs) in the cloud and the other of background extragalactic sources. Ten X-ray-emitting YSO candidates are thus newly identified, which are low-mass or brown dwarf mass sources from their NIR magnitudes. In addition, a possible X-ray signal is fou...

  2. X-ray and Near-infrared Studies of a Star-forming Cloud; L1448

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Tsujimoto; N. Kobayashi; Y. Tsuboi

    2005-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of X-ray and near-infrared (NIR) observations of L1448, a star-forming region in the Perseus cloud complex using the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the 4 m telescope at the Kitt Peak National Observatory. We detect 72 X-ray sources in a ~17 arcmin x 17 arcmin region with a ~68 ks ACIS exposure, for which we conduct follow-up NIR imaging observations in a concentric ~11 arcmin x 11 arcmin region with FLAMINGOS down to m_Ks ~ 17 mag. Twelve X-ray sources have NIR or optical counterparts. By plotting X-ray mean energy versus NIR to X-ray flux ratio, the X-ray sources are clearly separated into two groups. The X-ray spectral and temporal features as well as NIR magnitudes and colors indicate that one group mainly consists of young stellar objects (YSOs) in the cloud and the other of background extragalactic sources. Ten X-ray-emitting YSO candidates are thus newly identified, which are low-mass or brown dwarf mass sources from their NIR magnitudes. In addition, a possible X-ray signal is found from a mid-infrared protostar L1448 IRS 3(A). The lack of detection of this source in our deep NIR images indicates that this source has a very steep spectral slope of > 3.2 in 2--10 micron.

  3. Standoff detection of hidden objects using backscattered ultra-intense laser-produced x-rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuwabara, H. [IHI Corporation, 1, Shin-Nakahara-cho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama 235-8501 (Japan)] [IHI Corporation, 1, Shin-Nakahara-cho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama 235-8501 (Japan); Mori, Y.; Kitagawa, Y. [The Graduate School for the Creation of New Photonics Industries, 1955-1 Kurematsucho, Nishiku, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka 431-1202 (Japan)] [The Graduate School for the Creation of New Photonics Industries, 1955-1 Kurematsucho, Nishiku, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka 431-1202 (Japan)

    2013-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultra-intense laser-produced sub-ps X-ray pulses can detect backscattered signals from objects hidden in aluminium containers. Coincident measurements using primary X-rays enable differentiation among acrylic, copper, and lead blocks inside the container. Backscattering reveals the shapes of the objects, while their material composition can be identified from the modification methods of the energy spectra of backscattered X-ray beams. This achievement is an important step toward more effective homeland security.

  4. A Chandra Deep X-ray Exposure on the Galactic Plane and Near Infrared Identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Ebisawa; A. Paizis; T. J. -L. Couvoisier; P. Dubath; M. Tsujimoto; K. Hamaguchi; V. Beckmann; A. Bamba; A. Senda; M. Ueno; H. Kaneda; Y. Maeda; G. Sato; S. Yamauchi; R. Cutri; E. Nishihara

    2004-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the Chandra ACIS-I instruments, we have carried out a deep X-ray observation on the Galactic plane region at (l,b) ~ (28.5, 0.0), where no discrete X-ray sources have been known previously. We have detected, as well as strong diffuse emission, 274 new point X-ray sources (4 sigma confidence) within two partially overlapping fields (~250 arcmin^2 in total) down to the flux limit ~3 x 10^{-15} $ erg s^{-1} cm^{-2} (2 -- 10 keV) and ~ 7 x 10^{-16} erg s^{-1} cm^{-2} (0.5 -- 2 keV). We clearly resolved point sources and the Galactic diffuse emission, and found that ~ 90 % of the flux observed in our field of view originates from diffuse emission. Many point sources are detected either in the soft X-ray band (below 2 keV) or in the hard band (above 2 keV), and only a small number of sources are detected in both energy bands. On the other hand, most soft X-ray sources are considered to be nearby X-ray active stars. We have carried out a follow-up near-infrared (NIR) observation using SOFI at ESO/NTT. Most of the soft X-ray sources were identified, whereas only a small number of hard X-ray sources had counterparts in NIR. Using both X-ray and NIR information, we can efficiently classify the point X-ray sources detected in the Galactic plane. We conclude that most of the hard X-ray sources are background Active Galactic Nuclei seen through the Milky Way, whereas majority of the soft X-ray sources are nearby X-ray active stars.

  5. X-Ray Astronomy to Resonant Theranostics for Cancer Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nahar, Sultana Nurun

    of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA E-mail: nahar@astronomy.ohio. The falling particles spiral around the black hole, move faster close to it and release energy in the form jets at the center (Observed by X-ray space observatory Chandra). In the image: red indicates low-energy

  6. High speed x-ray beam chopper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McPherson, Armon (Oswego, IL); Mills, Dennis M. (Naperville, IL)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fast, economical, and compact x-ray beam chopper with a small mass and a small moment of inertia whose rotation can be synchronized and phase locked to an electronic signal from an x-ray source and be monitored by a light beam is disclosed. X-ray bursts shorter than 2.5 microseconds have been produced with a jitter time of less than 3 ns.

  7. A multi-crystal wavelength dispersive x-ray spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Montanez, Paul; Delor, James; Bergmann, Uwe [LCLS, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Kern, Jan [LCLS, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720-8099 (United States); Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Nordlund, Dennis [SSRL, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Tran, Rosalie; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Yano, Junko [Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720-8099 (United States)

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-crystal wavelength dispersive hard x-ray spectrometer with high-energy resolution and large solid angle collection is described. The instrument is specifically designed for time-resolved applications of x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and x-ray Raman scattering (XRS) at X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFEL) and synchrotron radiation facilities. It also simplifies resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) studies of the whole 2d RIXS plane. The spectrometer is based on the Von Hamos geometry. This dispersive setup enables an XES or XRS spectrum to be measured in a single-shot mode, overcoming the scanning needs of the Rowland circle spectrometers. In conjunction with the XFEL temporal profile and high-flux, it is a powerful tool for studying the dynamics of time-dependent systems. Photo-induced processes and fast catalytic reaction kinetics, ranging from femtoseconds to milliseconds, will be resolvable in a wide array of systems circumventing radiation damage.

  8. Viewing spin structures with soft x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, Peter

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The spin of the electron and its associated magnetic moment marks the basic unit for magnetic properties of matter. Magnetism, in particular ferromagnetism and antiferromagnetism is described by a collective order of these spins, where the interaction between individual spins reflects a competition between exchange, anisotropy and dipolar energy terms. As a result the energetically favored ground state of a ferromagnetic system is a rather complex spin configuration, the magnetic domain structure. Magnetism is one of the eldest scientific phenomena, yet it is one of the most powerful and versatile utilized physical effects in modern technologies, such as in magnetic storage and sensor devices. To achieve highest storage density, the relevant length scales, such as the bit size in disk drives is now approaching the nanoscale and as such further developments have to deal with nanoscience phenomena. Advanced characterization tools are required to fully understand the underlying physical principles. Magnetic microscopes using polarized soft X-rays offer a close-up view into magnetism with unique features, these include elemental sensitivity due to X-ray magnetic dichroism effects as contrast mechanism, high spatial resolution provided by state-of-the-art X-ray optics and fast time resolution limited by the inherent time structure of current X-ray sources, which will be overcome with the introduction of ultrafast and high brilliant X-ray sources.

  9. X-ray populations in galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Fabbiano

    2005-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Today's sensistive, high resolution Chandra X-ray observations allow the study of many populations of X-ray sources. The traditional astronomical tools of photometric diagrams and luminosity functions are now applied to these populations, and provide the means for classifying the X-ray sources and probing their evolution. While overall stellar mass drives the amount of X-ray binaries in old stellar population, the amount of sources in star-forming galaxies is related to the star formation rate. Shart-lived, luminous, high mass binaries (HNXBs) dominate these young populations.

  10. Correlated Optical and X-ray Variability in LMC X-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katherine E. McGowan; Phil A. Charles; Darragh O'Donoghue; Alan P. Smale

    2003-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We have obtained high time resolution (seconds) photometry of LMC X-2 in December 1997, simultaneously with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), in order to search for correlated X-ray and optical variability on timescales from seconds to hours. We find that the optical and X-ray data are correlated only when the source is in a high, active X-ray state. Our analysis shows evidence for the X-ray emission leading the optical with a mean delay of <20s. The timescale for the lag can be reconciled with disc reprocessing, driven by the higher energy X-rays, only by considering the lower limit for the delay. The results are compared with a similar analysis of archival data of Sco X-1.

  11. Tunable sub-luminal propagation of narrowband x-ray pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. P. Heeg; J. Haber; D. Schumacher; L. Bocklage; H. -C. Wille; K. S. Schulze; R. Loetzsch; I. Uschmann; G. G. Paulus; R. Rüffer; R. Röhlsberger; J. Evers

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Group velocity control is demonstrated for x-ray photons of 14.4 keV energy via a direct measurement of the temporal delay imposed on spectrally narrow x-ray pulses. Sub-luminal light propagation is achieved by inducing a steep positive linear dispersion in the optical response of ${}^{57}$Fe M\\"ossbauer nuclei embedded in a thin film planar x-ray cavity. The direct detection of the temporal pulse delay is enabled by generating frequency-tunable spectrally narrow x-ray pulses from broadband pulsed synchrotron radiation. Our theoretical model is in good agreement with the experimental data.

  12. Suzaku Reveals Helium-burning Products in the X-ray Emitting Planetary Nebula BD+303639

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Murashima; M. Kokubun; K. Makishima; J. Kotoku; H. Murakami; K. Matsushita; K. Hayashida; K. Arnaud; K. Hamaguchi; H. Matsumoto

    2006-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    BD+303639, the brightest planetary nebula at X-ray energies, was observed with Suzaku, an X-ray observatory launched on 2005 July 10. Using the X-ray Imaging Spectrometer, the K-lines from C VI, O VII, and O VIII were resolved for the first time, and C/O, N/O, and Ne/O abundance ratios determined. The C/O and Ne/O abundance ratios exceed the solar value by a factor of at least 30 and 5, respectively. These results indicate that the X-rays are emitted mainly by helium shell-burning products.

  13. Suzaku Reveals Helium-burning Products in the X-ray Emitting Planetary Nebula BD+303639

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murashima, M; Makishima, K; Kotoku, J; Murakami, H; Matsushita, K; Hayashida, K; Arnaud, K; Hamaguchi, K; Matsumoto, H

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BD+303639, the brightest planetary nebula at X-ray energies, was observed with Suzaku, an X-ray observatory launched on 2005 July 10. Using the X-ray Imaging Spectrometer, the K-lines from C VI, O VII, and O VIII were resolved for the first time, and C/O, N/O, and Ne/O abundance ratios determined. The C/O and Ne/O abundance ratios exceed the solar value by a factor of at least 30 and 5, respectively. These results indicate that the X-rays are emitted mainly by helium shell-burning products.

  14. X-ray Image Bank Open for Business - NERSC Center News, Feb 22, 2011

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfires may contribute more toConsensusX-RayX-RayX-rayX-ray Image

  15. X-ray Transient Absorption of Transition Metal Complex Excited States and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfires may contribute more toConsensusX-RayX-RayX-rayX-ray

  16. X-ray spectroscopy of neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krauss, Miriam Ilana

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I present work spanning a variety of topics relating to neutron star lowmass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) and utilize spectral information from X-ray observations to further our understanding of these sources. ...

  17. Bragg x-ray survey spectrometer for ITER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varshney, S. K.; Jakhar, S. [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382428 (India); Barnsley, R. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); O'Mullane, M. G. [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Several potential impurity ions in the ITER plasmas will lead to loss of confined energy through line and continuum emission. For real time monitoring of impurities, a seven channel Bragg x-ray spectrometer (XRCS survey) is considered. This paper presents design and analysis of the spectrometer, including x-ray tracing by the Shadow-XOP code, sensitivity calculations for reference H-mode plasma and neutronics assessment. The XRCS survey performance analysis shows that the ITER measurement requirements of impurity monitoring in 10 ms integration time at the minimum levels for low-Z to high-Z impurity ions can largely be met.

  18. The NIF x-ray spectrometer calibration campaign at Omega

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pérez, F.; Kemp, G. E.; Barrios, M. A.; Pino, J.; Scott, H.; Ayers, S.; Chen, H.; Emig, J.; Colvin, J. D.; Fournier, K. B., E-mail: fournier2@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P. O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Regan, S. P.; Bedzyk, M.; Shoup, M. J.; Agliata, A.; Yaakobi, B.; Marshall, F. J.; Hamilton, R. A. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Jaquez, J.; Farrell, M.; Nikroo, A. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The calibration campaign of the National Ignition Facility X-ray Spectrometer (NXS) was carried out at the OMEGA laser facility. Spherically symmetric, laser-driven, millimeter-scale x-ray sources of K-shell and L-shell emission from various mid-Z elements were designed for the 2–18 keV energy range of the NXS. The absolute spectral brightness was measured by two calibrated spectrometers. We compare the measured performance of the target design to radiation hydrodynamics simulations.

  19. The dominant X-ray wind in massive star binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. M. Pittard; I. R. Stevens

    2002-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate which shocked wind is responsible for the majority of the X-ray emission in colliding wind binaries, an issue where there is some confusion in the literature, and which we show is more complicated than has been assumed. We find that where both winds rapidly cool (typically close binaries), the ratio of the wind speeds is often more important than the momentum ratio, because it controls the energy flux ratio, and the faster wind is generally the dominant emitter. When both winds are largely adiabatic (typically long-period binaries), the slower and denser wind will cool faster and the stronger wind generally dominates the X-ray luminosity.

  20. The First Angstrom X-Ray Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galayda, John; /SLAC

    2012-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Linac Coherent Light Source produced its first x-ray laser beam on 10 April 2009. Today it is routinely producing x-ray pulses with energy >2 mJ across the operating range from 820-8,200 eV. The facility has begun operating for atomic/molecular/optical science experiments. Performance of the facility in its first user run (1 October - 21 December) and current machine development activities will be presented. Early results from the preparations for the start of the second user run is also reported.

  1. Confusion of Diffuse Objects in the X-ray Sky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Mark Voit; August E. Evrard; Greg L. Bryan

    2000-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Most of the baryons in the present-day universe are thought to reside in intergalactic space at temperatures of 10^5-10^7 K. X-ray emission from these baryons contributes a modest (~10%) fraction of the ~ 1 keV background whose prominence within the large-scale cosmic web depends on the amount of non-gravitational energy injected into intergalactic space by supernovae and AGNs. Here we show that the virialized regions of groups and clusters cover over a third of the sky, creating a source-confusion problem that may hinder X-ray searches for individual intercluster filaments and contaminate observations of distant groups.

  2. Femtosecond Time-Delay X-ray Holography

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. CategoryFebruaryFebruary 17,Time-Delay X-ray Holography X-ray

  3. X-ray pump optical probe cross-correlation study of GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durbin, S.M.; Clevenger, T.; Graber, T.; Henning, R. (Purdue); (UC)

    2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultrafast dynamics in atomic, molecular and condensed-matter systems are increasingly being studied using optical-pump, X-ray probe techniques where subpicosecond laser pulses excite the system and X-rays detect changes in absorption spectra and local atomic structure. New opportunities are appearing as a result of improved synchrotron capabilities and the advent of X-ray free-electron lasers. These source improvements also allow for the reverse measurement: X-ray pump followed by optical probe. We describe here how an X-ray pump beam transforms a thin GaAs specimen from a strong absorber into a nearly transparent window in less than 100 ps, for laser photon energies just above the bandgap. We find the opposite effect - X-ray induced optical opacity - for photon energies just below the bandgap. This raises interesting questions about the ultrafast many-body response of semiconductors to X-ray absorption, and provides a new approach for an X-ray/optical cross-correlator for synchrotron and X-ray free-electron laser applications.

  4. X-ray Properties of Young Stellar Objects in OMC-2 and OMC-3 from the Chandra X-ray Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Tsujimoto; K. Koyama; Y. Tsuboi; M. Goto; N. Kobayashi

    2001-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We report X-ray results of the Chandra observation of Orion Molecular Cloud 2 and 3. A deep exposure of \\sim 100 ksec detects \\sim 400 X-ray sources in the field of view of the ACIS array, providing one of the largest X-ray catalogs in a star forming region. Coherent studies of the source detection, time variability, and energy spectra are performed. We classify the X-ray sources into class I, class II, and class III+MS based on the J, H, and K-band colors of their near infrared counterparts and discuss the X-ray properties (temperature, absorption, and time variability) along these evolutionary phases.

  5. Note: Application of a pixel-array area detector to simultaneous single crystal x-ray diffraction and x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Cheng-Jun, E-mail: cjsun@aps.anl.gov; Brewe, Dale L.; Heald, Steve M. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)] [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Zhang, Bangmin [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States) [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117575 Singapore (Singapore); NUSNNI-Nanocore, National University of Singapore, 117411 Singapore (Singapore); Chen, Jing-Sheng; Chow, G. M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117575 Singapore (Singapore)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117575 Singapore (Singapore); Venkatesan, T. [NUSNNI-Nanocore, National University of Singapore, 117411 Singapore (Singapore) [NUSNNI-Nanocore, National University of Singapore, 117411 Singapore (Singapore); Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 117542 Singapore (Singapore); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117575 Singapore (Singapore)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) are two main x-ray techniques in synchrotron radiation facilities. In this Note, we present an experimental setup capable of performing simultaneous XRD and XAS measurements by the application of a pixel-array area detector. For XRD, the momentum transfer in specular diffraction was measured by scanning the X-ray energy with fixed incoming and outgoing x-ray angles. By selecting a small fixed region of the detector to collect the XRD signal, the rest of the area was available for collecting the x-ray fluorescence for XAS measurements. The simultaneous measurement of XRD and X-ray absorption near edge structure for Pr{sub 0.67}Sr{sub 0.33}MnO{sub 3} film was demonstrated as a proof of principle for future time-resolved pump-probe measurements. A static sample makes it easy to maintain an accurate overlap of the X-ray spot and laser pump beam.

  6. Modification of the TASMIP x-ray spectral model for the simulation of microfocus x-ray sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisniega, A.; Vaquero, J. J., E-mail: juanjose.vaquero@uc3m.es [Departamento de Bioingeniería e Ingeniería Aeroespacial, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Madrid ES28911 (Spain); Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Gregorio Marañón, Madrid ES28007 (Spain); Desco, M. [Departamento de Bioingeniería e Ingeniería Aeroespacial, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Madrid ES28911 (Spain) [Departamento de Bioingeniería e Ingeniería Aeroespacial, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Madrid ES28911 (Spain); Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Gregorio Marañón, Madrid ES28007 (Spain); Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Salud Mental (CIBERSAM), Madrid ES28029 (Spain)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The availability of accurate and simple models for the estimation of x-ray spectra is of great importance for system simulation, optimization, or inclusion of photon energy information into data processing. There is a variety of publicly available tools for estimation of x-ray spectra in radiology and mammography. However, most of these models cannot be used directly for modeling microfocus x-ray sources due to differences in inherent filtration, energy range and/or anode material. For this reason the authors propose in this work a new model for the simulation of microfocus spectra based on existing models for mammography and radiology, modified to compensate for the effects of inherent filtration and energy range. Methods: The authors used the radiology and mammography versions of an existing empirical model [tungsten anode spectral model interpolating polynomials (TASMIP)] as the basis of the microfocus model. First, the authors estimated the inherent filtration included in the radiology model by comparing the shape of the spectra with spectra from the mammography model. Afterwards, the authors built a unified spectra dataset by combining both models and, finally, they estimated the parameters of the new version of TASMIP for microfocus sources by calibrating against experimental exposure data from a microfocus x-ray source. The model was validated by comparing estimated and experimental exposure and attenuation data for different attenuating materials and x-ray beam peak energy values, using two different x-ray tubes. Results: Inherent filtration for the radiology spectra from TASMIP was found to be equivalent to 1.68 mm Al, as compared to spectra obtained from the mammography model. To match the experimentally measured exposure data the combined dataset required to apply a negative filtration of about 0.21 mm Al and an anode roughness of 0.003 mm W. The validation of the model against real acquired data showed errors in exposure and attenuation in line with those reported for other models for radiology or mammography. Conclusions: A new version of the TASMIP model for the estimation of x-ray spectra in microfocus x-ray sources has been developed and validated experimentally. Similarly to other versions of TASMIP, the estimation of spectra is very simple, involving only the evaluation of polynomial expressions.

  7. Phased Contrast X-Ray Imaging

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Erin Miller

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing a range of technologies to broaden the field of explosives detection. Phased contrast X-ray imaging, which uses silicon gratings to detect distortions in the X-ray wave front, may be applicable to mail or luggage scanning for explosives; it can also be used in detecting other contraband, small-parts inspection, or materials characterization.

  8. X-ray source populations in galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Fabbiano

    2005-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Today's sensitive, high-resolution X-ray observations allow the study of populations of X-ray sources, in the luminosity range of Galactic X-ray binaries, in galaxies as distant as 20-30 Mpc. The traditional astronomical tools of photometric diagrams and luminosity functions are now applied to these populations, providing a direct probe of the evolved binary component of different stellar populations. The study of the X-ray populations of E and S0 galaxies has revamped the debate on the formation and evolution of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) and on the role of globular clusters in these processes. While overall stellar mass drives the amount of X-ray binaries in old stellar populations, the amount of sources in star forming galaxies is related to the star formation rate. Short-lived, luminous, high-mass binaries (HMXBs) dominate these young populations. The most luminous sources in these systems are the debated ULXs, which have been suggested to be ~100-1000 Msol black holes, but could alternatively include a number of binaries with stellar mass black holes. Very soft sources have also been discovered in many galaxies and their nature is currently being debated. Observations of the deep X-ray sky, and comparison with deep optical surveys, are providing the first evidence of the X-ray evolution of galaxies.

  9. DEDUCING ELECTRON PROPERTIES FROM HARD X-RAY OBSERVATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piana, Michele

    of the accelerated electron distribution. Keywords: Sun: flares; Sun: X-rays; Sun: acceleration; Sun: energetic distribution 31 4.5 Low-energy cutoffs in the electron distribution 32 4.6 Temperature distribution of thermal-ray emission process(es) in question with the electron distribution function, which is in turn a function

  10. Compact X-ray Light Source Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Evans, James E.; Terminello, Louis J.; Koppenaal, David W.; Manke, Kristin L.; Plata, Charity

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report, produced jointly by EMSL and FCSD, is the result of a workshop held in September 2011 that examined the utility of a compact x-ray light source (CXLS) in addressing many scientific challenges critical to advancing energy science and technology.

  11. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of Theta Car

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yael Naze; Gregor Rauw

    2008-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Context : The peculiar hot star Theta Car in the open cluster IC2602 is a blue straggler as well as a single-line binary of short period (2.2d). Aims : Its high-energy properties are not well known, though X-rays can provide useful constraints on the energetic processes at work in binaries as well as in peculiar, single objects. Methods : We present the analysis of a 50ks exposure taken with the XMM-Newton observatory. It provides medium as well as high-resolution spectroscopy. Results : Our high-resolution spectroscopy analysis reveals a very soft spectrum with multiple temperature components (1--6MK) and an X-ray flux slightly below the `canonical' value (log[L_X(0.1-10.)/L_{BOL}] ~ -7). The X-ray lines appear surprisingly narrow and unshifted, reminiscent of those of beta Cru and tau Sco. Their relative intensities confirm the anomalous abundances detected in the optical domain (C strongly depleted, N strongly enriched, O slightly depleted). In addition, the X-ray data favor a slight depletion in neon and iron, but they are less conclusive for the magnesium abundance (solar-like?). While no significant changes occur during the XMM-Newton observation, variability in the X-ray domain is detected on the long-term range. The formation radius of the X-ray emission is loosely constrained to <5 R_sol, which allows for a range of models (wind-shock, corona, magnetic confinement,...) though not all of them can be reconciled with the softness of the spectrum and the narrowness of the lines.

  12. X Ray Precursors in SGRs: Precessing Gamma Jet Tails

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniele Fargion

    2001-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Weak isolated X-ray precursor events before the main Gamma Ray Burst, GRB, and also rare Soft Gamma Repeaters, SGR, events are in complete disagreement with any Fireball, or Magnetar, one-shoot explosive scenarios. Fireball model in last two years has been deeply modified into a fountain beamed Jet exploding and interacting on external shells to explain GRB fine time structure. On the contrary earlier we proposed a unified scenario for both GRBs-SGRs where a precessing Gamma Jet (of different intensity) and its geometrical beaming is the source of both GRB and SGRs wide morphology. GRBs are peaked SNs Jet spinning and precessing observed along the thin Jet axis. Their mysterious weak X precursors bursts, corresponding to non-negligible energy powers, up to million Supernova ones for GRB, are gamma Jet tails beamed off-axis, observed at X-Ray tails. They are rare, about (3-6)% of all GRBs, but not unique at all. Comparable brief X-ray precursor flashes occurred in rarest and most detailed SGRs events as the 27 and the 29 August 1998 event from SGR 1900+14. The same source has been in very power-full activity on recent 18 April 2001 once again preceded by X-Ray precursors. These events are inconsistent with any Fireball or Magnetar-Mini-Fireball models. We interpret them naturally as earlier marginal blazing of outlying X conical precessing Jet, an off-axis tails surrounding a narrower gamma precessing Jet. Only when the light-house Jet is in on-axis blazing mode toward the Earth we observe the harder power-full SGR event. We predict such a rich X-Ray precursor signals (more numerous then gamma ones) during Soft Gamma Repeater peak activities; they should be abundant and within detection threshold by a permanent monitoring SGRs by Beppo-Sax WFC or Chandra X ray satellites while at peak activity.

  13. Fitting Narrow Emission Lines in X-ray Spectra Taeyoung Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Patrick J.

    Fitting Narrow Emission Lines in X-ray Spectra Taeyoung Park Department of Statistics, Harvard University October 25, 2005 Taeyoung Park Fitting Narrow Emission Lines in X X-ray luminosity, and the emission of photons with energies is represented by a spectrum

  14. Accretion, fluorescent X-ray emission and flaring magnetic structures in YSOs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Favata

    2004-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    I present some recent developments on high-energy phenomena in YSOs, concentrating on the new evidence for accretion-induced X-ray emission in YSOs, for Fe 6.4 keV fluorescent emission from the disks of YSOs and for very long magnetic structures responsible for intense X-ray flares, likely connecting the star and the circumstellar disk.

  15. X-ray periodicities in sources observed by the RXTE ASM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shivamoggi, Vasudha B

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The X-ray intensities measured from 230 X-ray sources observed by the RXTE All-Sky Monitor (ASM) were analyzed for periodic behavior. The ASM has been observing sources for nine years in the 1.5-12 keV energy range. In ...

  16. ON RELATIVISTIC DISK SPECTROSCOPY IN COMPACT OBJECTS WITH X-RAY CCD CAMERAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, J. M.

    X-ray charge-coupled devices (CCDs) are the workhorse detectors of modern X-ray astronomy. Typically covering the 0.3-10.0 keV energy range, CCDs are able to detect photoelectric absorption edges and K shell lines from ...

  17. The soft x-ray instrument for materials studies at the linac coherent light source x-ray free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlotter, W. F.; Turner, J. J.; Rowen, M.; Holmes, M.; Messerschmidt, M.; Moeller, S.; Krzywinski, J.; Lee, S.; Coffee, R.; Hays, G. [LCLS, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Rd., Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Heimann, P. [LCLS, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Rd., Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Krupin, O. [LCLS, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Rd., Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); European XFEL GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Ring 19, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Soufli, R.; Fernandez-Perea, M.; Hau-Riege, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Kelez, N. [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Beye, M.; Gerken, N.; Sorgenfrei, F.; Wurth, W. [Institute for Experimental Physics and CFEL, University of Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); and others

    2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The soft x-ray materials science instrument is the second operational beamline at the linac coherent light source x-ray free electron laser. The instrument operates with a photon energy range of 480-2000 eV and features a grating monochromator as well as bendable refocusing mirrors. A broad range of experimental stations may be installed to study diverse scientific topics such as: ultrafast chemistry, surface science, highly correlated electron systems, matter under extreme conditions, and laboratory astrophysics. Preliminary commissioning results are presented including the first soft x-ray single-shot energy spectrum from a free electron laser.

  18. Separation of particles leading to decay and unlimited growth of energy in a driven stadium-like billiard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    André L. P. Livorati; Matheus S. Palmero; Carl P. Dettmann; Iberê L. Caldas; Edson D. Leonel

    2015-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A competition between decay and growth of energy in a time-dependent stadium billiard is discussed giving emphasis in the decay of energy mechanism. A critical resonance velocity is identified for causing of separation between ensembles of high and low energy and a statistical investigation is made using ensembles of initial conditions both above and below the resonance velocity. For high initial velocity, Fermi acceleration is inherent in the system. However for low initial velocity, the resonance allies with stickiness hold the particles in a regular or quasi-regular regime near the fixed points, preventing them from exhibiting Fermi acceleration. Also, a transport analysis along the velocity axis is discussed to quantify the competition of growth and decay of energy and making use distributions of histograms of frequency, and we set that the causes of the decay of energy are due to the capture of the orbits by the resonant fixed points.

  19. Optimal focusing for a linac-based hard x-ray source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, C.; Krafft, G.; Talman, R.

    2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In spite of having a small average beam current limit, a linac can have features that make it attractive as an x-ray source: high energy, ultralow emittance and energy spread, and flexible beamline optics. Unlike a storage ring, in which an (undulator) radiation source is necessarily short and positioned at an electron beam waist, in a linac the undulator can be long and the electron beam can be adjusted to have a (virtual) waist far downstream toward the x-ray target. Using a planned CEBAF beamline as an example, this paper shows that a factor of 2000 in beam current can be overcome to produce a monochromatic hard x-ray source comparable with, or even exceeding, the performance of an x-ray line at a third generation storage ring. Optimal electron beam focusing conditions for x-ray flux density and brilliance are derived, and are verified by simulations using the SRW code.

  20. To the Graduate Council: I am submitting herewith a thesis written by Yue Zheng entitled "X-Ray Image

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abidi, Mongi A.

    -ray imaging for airport luggage inspection and the characteristics of single-energy and dual-energy x-ray data single energy and dual energy x-ray images, are then presented in four categories: (1) gray based color-coding approaches and dual-energy image fusion algorithms --spatial information- based

  1. An X-ray Reprocessing Model of Disk Thermal Emission in Type 1 Seyfert Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James Chiang

    2002-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a geometry consisting of a hot central Comptonizing plasma surrounded by a thin accretion disk, we model the optical through hard X-ray spectral energy distributions of the type 1 Seyfert galaxies NGC 3516 and NGC 7469. As in the model proposed by Poutanen, Krolik, & Ryde for the X-ray binary Cygnus X-1 and later applied to Seyfert galaxies by Zdziarski, Lubi\\'nski, & Smith, feedback between the radiation reprocessed by the disk and the thermal Comptonization emission from the hot central plasma plays a pivotal role in determining the X-ray spectrum, and as we show, the optical and ultraviolet spectra as well. Seemingly uncorrelated optical/UV and X-ray light curves, similar to those which have been observed from these objects can be explained by variations in the size, shape, and temperature of the Comptonizing plasma. Furthermore, by positing a disk mass accretion rate which satisfies a condition for global energy balance between the thermal Comptonization luminosity and the power available from accretion, one can predict the spectral properties of the hard X-ray continuum above $\\sim 50$ keV in type 1 Seyfert galaxies. Forthcoming measurements of the hard X-ray continuum by more sensitive hard X-ray and soft $\\gamma$-ray telescopes, in conjunction with simultaneous optical, UV, and soft X-ray monitoring, will allow the mass accretion rates to be directly constrained for these sources in the context of this model.

  2. X-ray Emission from Thunderstorms and Lightning

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Joseph Dwyer

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    How lightning is initiated in the relatively low electric fields inside thunderclouds and how it can then propagate for tens of kilometers through virgin air are two of the great unsolved problems in the atmospheric sciences.  Until very recently it was believed that lightning was entirely a conventional discharge, involving only low-energy (a few eV) electrons.  This picture changed completely a few years ago with the discovery of intense x-ray emission from both natural cloud-to-ground lightning and rocket-triggered lightning.  This energetic emission cannot be produced by a conventional discharge, and so the presence of x-rays strongly implies that runaway breakdown plays a role in lightning processes.  During runaway breakdown, electrons are accelerated through air to nearly the speed of light by strong electric fields.  These runaway electrons then emit bremsstrahlung x-rays and gamma-rays during collisions with air.  Indeed, the x-ray and gamma-ray emission produced by runaway breakdown near the tops of thunderstorms is bright enough to be seen from outer space, 600 km away.  As a result, the physics used for decades to describe thunderstorm electrification and lightning discharges is incomplete and needs to be revisited. 

  3. Soft x-ray diagnostics for pulsed power machines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Idzorek, G.C.; Coulter, W.L.; Walsh, P.J.; Montoya, R.R.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of soft x-ray diagnostics are being fielded on the Los Alamos National Laboratory Pegasus and Procyon pulsed power systems and also being fielded on joint US/Russian magnetized target fusion experiments known as MAGO (Magnitoye Obzhatiye). The authors have designed a low-cost modular photoemissive detector designated the XRD-96 that uses commercial 1100 series aluminum for the photocathode. In addition to photocathode detectors a number of designs using solid state silicon photodiodes have been designed and fielded. They also present a soft x-ray time-integrated pinhole camera system that uses standard type TMAX-400 photographic film that obviates the need for expensive and no longer produced zero-overcoat soft x-ray emulsion film. In a typical experiment the desired spectral energy cuts, signal intensity levels, and desired field of view will determine diagnostic geometry and x-ray filters selected. The authors have developed several computer codes to assist in the diagnostic design process and data deconvolution. Examples of the diagnostic design process and data analysis for a typical pulsed power experiment are presented.

  4. X-rays at Solid-Liquid Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dosch, Helmut (Max Planck Institute for Metals Research) [Max Planck Institute for Metals Research

    2007-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid-liquid interfaces play an important role in many areas of current and future technologies, and in our biosphere. They play a key role in the development of nanofluidics and nanotribology, which sensitively depend on our knowledge of the microscopic structures and phenomena at the solid-liquid interface. The detailed understanding of how a fluid meets a wall is also a theoretical challenge. In particular, the phenomena at repulsive walls are of interest, since they affect many different phenomena, such as water-repellent surfaces or the role of the hydrophobic interaction in protein folding. Recent x-ray reflectivity studies of various solid-liquid interfaces have disclosed rather intriguiing phenomena, which will be discussed in this lecture: premelting of ice in contact with silica; liquid Pb in contact with Si; water in contact with hydrophobic surfaces. These experiments, carried out with high-energy x-ray microbeams, reveal detailed insight into the liquid density profile closest to the wall. A detailed insight into atomistic phenomena at solid-liquid interfaces is also a prerequisite in the microscopic control of electrochemical reactions at interfaces. Recent x-ray studies show the enormous future potential of such non-destructive analytical tools for the in situ observation of (electro-)chemical surface reactions. This lecture will review recent x-ray experiments on solid-liquid interfaces.

  5. X-ray ablation measurements and modeling for ICF applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, A.T.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray ablation of material from the first wall and other components of an ICF (Inertial Confinement Fusion) chamber is a major threat to the laser final optics. Material condensing on these optics after a shot may cause damage with subsequent laser shots. To ensure the successful operation of the ICF facility, removal rates must be predicted accurately. The goal for this dissertation is to develop an experimentally validated x-ray response model, with particular application to the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Accurate knowledge of the x-ray and debris emissions from ICF targets is a critical first step in the process of predicting the performance of the target chamber system. A number of 1-D numerical simulations of NIF targets have been run to characterize target output in terms of energy, angular distribution, spectrum, and pulse shape. Scaling of output characteristics with variations of both target yield and hohlraum wall thickness are also described. Experiments have been conducted at the Nova laser on the effects of relevant x-ray fluences on various materials. The response was diagnosed using post-shot examinations of the surfaces with scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope instruments. Judgments were made about the dominant removal mechanisms for each material. Measurements of removal depths were made to provide data for the modeling. The finite difference ablation code developed here (ABLATOR) combines the thermomechanical response of materials to x-rays with models of various removal mechanisms. The former aspect refers to energy deposition in such small characteristic depths ({approx} micron) that thermal conduction and hydrodynamic motion are significant effects on the nanosecond time scale. The material removal models use the resulting time histories of temperature and pressure-profiles, along with ancillary local conditions, to predict rates of surface vaporization and the onset of conditions that would lead to spallation.

  6. A New Measurement of Kaonic Hydrogen X rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Bazzi; G. Beer; L. Bombelli; A. M. Bragadireanu; M. Cargnelli; G. Corradi; C. Curceanu; A. d'Uffizi; C. Fiorini; T. Frizzi; F. Ghio; B. Girolami; C. Guaraldo; R. S. Hayano; M. Iliescu; T. Ishiwatari; M. Iwasaki; P. Kienle; P. Levi Sandri; A. Longoni; V. Lucherini; J. Marton; S. Okada; D. Pietreanu; T. Ponta; A. Rizzo; A. Romero Vidal; A. Scordo; H. Shi; D. L. Sirghi; F. Sirghi; H. Tatsuno; A. Tudorache; V. Tudorache; O. Vazquez Doce; E. Widmann; J. Zmeskal

    2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The $\\bar{K}N$ system at threshold is a sensitive testing ground for low energy QCD, especially for the explicit chiral symmetry breaking. Therefore, we have measured the $K$-series x rays of kaonic hydrogen atoms at the DA$\\Phi$NE electron-positron collider of Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, and have determined the most precise values of the strong-interaction energy-level shift and width of the $1s$ atomic state. As x-ray detectors, we used large-area silicon drift detectors having excellent energy and timing resolution, which were developed especially for the SIDDHARTA experiment. The shift and width were determined to be $\\epsilon_{1s} = -283 \\pm 36 \\pm 6 {(syst)}$ eV and $\\Gamma_{1s} = 541 \\pm 89 {(stat)} \\pm 22 {(syst)}$ eV, respectively. The new values will provide vital constraints on the theoretical description of the low-energy $\\bar{K}N$ interaction.

  7. Hard X-ray Fluorescence Measurements of Heteroepitaxial Solid...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hard X-ray Fluorescence Measurements of Heteroepitaxial Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathode Materials. Hard X-ray Fluorescence Measurements of Heteroepitaxial Solid Oxide Fuel Cell...

  8. Using X-Ray Computed Tomography in Pore Structure Characterization...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Using X-Ray Computed Tomography in Pore Structure Characterization for a Berea Sandstone: Resolution Effect. Using X-Ray Computed Tomography in Pore Structure Characterization for...

  9. Manipulating X-rays with Tiny Mirrors | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for controlling X-rays. MEMS, or microelectromechanical systems, allow shrinking the optics to the microscale creating ultrafast devices for reflecting X-rays at precise times...

  10. Fuel Injection and Spray Research Using X-Ray Diagnostics

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    temperature ambient (plastic windows) 5 Radiography - Monochromatic x-rays - Absorption of x-rays by the fuel - Ensemble averaged (flux limited) - Room temperature ambient...

  11. Fuel Injection and Spray Research Using X-Ray Diagnostics

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    by ECN using several different techniques - Silicone molds (Valencia) - X-ray absorption tomography (CAT) - X-Ray phase contrast imaging (Argonne) - Microscopy (Sandia) ...

  12. X-ray induced optical reflectivity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Durbin, Stephen M.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The change in optical reflectivity induced by intense x-ray pulses can now be used to study ultrafast many body responses in solids in the femtosecond time domain. X-ray absorption creates photoelectrons and core level holes subsequently filled by Auger or fluorescence processes, and these excitations ultimately add conduction and valence band carriers that perturb optical reflectivity.Optical absorption associated with band filling and band gap narrowing is shown to explain the basic features found in recent measurements on an insulator (silicon nitride, Si3N4), a semiconductor(gallium arsenide,GaAs), and a metal (gold,Au), obtained with ?100 fs x-ray pulses at 500-2000 eV and probed with 800 nm laser pulses. In particular GaAs exhibits an abrupt drop in reflectivity, persisting only for a time comparable to the x-ray excitation pulse duration, consistent with prompt band gap narrowing.

  13. Columbia University X-Ray Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University X-Ray Measurements of the Levitated Dipole Experiment J. L. Ellsworth, J. Kesner MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center D.T. Garnier, A.K. Hansen, M.E. Mauel Columbia University

  14. Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hessler, Jan P.

    2004-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A detector for time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering includes a nearly constant diameter, evacuated linear tube having an end plate detector with a first fluorescent screen and concentric rings of first fiber optic bundles for low angle scattering detection and an annular detector having a second fluorescent screen and second fiber optic bundles concentrically disposed about the tube for higher angle scattering detection. With the scattering source, i.e., the specimen under investigation, located outside of the evacuated tube on the tube's longitudinal axis, scattered x-rays are detected by the fiber optic bundles, to each of which is coupled a respective photodetector, to provide a measurement resolution, i.e., dq/q, where q is the momentum transferred from an incident x-ray to an x-ray scattering specimen, of 2% over two (2) orders of magnitude in reciprocal space, i.e., qmax/qmin approx=lO0.

  15. Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Imaging in Reflection Print Wednesday, 26 October 2011 00:00 The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has led to an outburst of research activities in the field...

  16. Polarized X-Rays Reveal Molecular Alignment in Printed Electronics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomassPPPOPetroleum38 (1996)representativePolarized X-Rays

  17. Probing bismuth ferrite nanoparticles by hard x-ray photoemission: Anomalous occurrence of metallic bismuth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaturvedi, Smita; Rajendra, Ranguwar; Ballav, Nirmalya; Kulkarni, Sulabha, E-mail: s.kulkarni@iiserpune.ac.in [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Dr. Homi Bhabha Road, Pune 411008 (India); Sarkar, Indranil [DESY Photon Science, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Shirolkar, Mandar M. [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Jeng, U-Ser; Yeh, Yi-Qi [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, 101, Hsin-Ann Road, Science Park, Hsinchu 3007-6, Taiwan (China)

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated bismuth ferrite nanoparticles (?75?nm and ?155?nm) synthesized by a chemical method, using soft X-ray (1253.6?eV) and hard X-ray (3500, 5500, and 7500?eV) photoelectron spectroscopy. This provided an evidence for the variation of chemical state of bismuth in crystalline, phase pure nanoparticles. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis using Mg K? (1253.6?eV) source showed that iron and bismuth were present in both Fe{sup 3+} and Bi{sup 3+} valence states as expected for bismuth ferrite. However, hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of the bismuth ferrite nanoparticles using variable photon energies unexpectedly showed the presence of Bi{sup 0} valence state below the surface region, indicating that bismuth ferrite nanoparticles are chemically inhomogeneous in the radial direction. Consistently, small-angle X-ray scattering reveals a core-shell structure for these radial inhomogeneous nanoparticles.

  18. High Performance X-Ray Transmission Windows Based on Graphenic Carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huebner, Sebastian; Kapser, Stefan; Pahlke, Andreas; Kreupl, Franz

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel x-ray transmission window based on graphenic carbon has been developed with superior performance compared to beryllium transmission windows that are currently used in the field. Graphenic carbon in combination with an integrated silicon frame allows for a window design which does not use a mechanical support grid or additional light blocking layers. Compared to beryllium, the novel x-ray transmission window exhibits an improved transmission in the low energy region ($0.1 hbox{keV}-3 hbox{keV}$ ) while demonstrating excellent mechanical stability, as well as light and vacuum tightness. Therefore, the newly established graphenic carbon window, can replace beryllium in x-ray transmission windows with a nontoxic and abundant material. Index terms: Beryllium, Carbon, Graphene, Thin films, X-ray applications, X-ray detectors

  19. Soft X-ray spectral variability of AM Herculis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Beuermann; E. El Kholy; K. Reinsch

    2008-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Polars (AM Herculis binaries) are a prominent class of bright soft X-ray sources, many of which were discovered with ROSAT. We present a homogenous analysis of all the pointed ROSAT PSPC observations of polars subdivided into two papers that discuss the prototype polar AM Her in detail and summarize the class properties of all other polars. We derive the high-state soft X-ray flux and short-term spectral variability of AM Her using a new detector response matrix and a confirmed flux calibration of the ROSAT PSPC below 0.28 keV. The best-fit mean single-blackbody temperature and integrated bright-phase energy flux of AM Her in its April 1991 high state are 27.2 +/- 1.0 eV and (2.6 +/- 0.6) x 10^-9 erg cm^-2s^-1, respectively. The total blackbody flux of a multi-temperature model that fits both the soft X-ray and the fluctuating far-ultraviolet components is Fbb = (4.5 +/- 1.5) x 10^-9 erg cm^-2s^-1. The total accretion luminosity at a distance of 80 pc, Lbb = (2.1 +/- 0.7) x 10^33 erg s-1, implies an accretion rate of Mdot = (2.4 +/- 0.8) x 10^-10 Msun yr^-1 for an 0.78 Msun white dwarf. The soft X-ray flux displays significant variability on time scales down to 200 ms. Correlated spectral and count-rate variations are seen in flares on time scales down to 1 s, demonstrating the heating and cooling associated with individual accretion events. Our spectral and temporal analysis provides direct evidence for the blobby accretion model and suggests a connection between the soft X-ray and the fluctuating far-ultraviolet components.

  20. Transient x-ray diffraction and its application to materials science and x-ray optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hauer, A.A.; Kopp, R.; Cobble, J.; Kyrala, G.; Springer, R. [and others

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Time resolved x-ray diffraction and scattering have been applied to the measurement of a wide variety of physical phenomena from chemical reactions to shock wave physics. Interest in this method has heightened in recent years with the advent of versatile, high power, pulsed x-ray sources utilizing laser plasmas, electron beams and other methods. In this article, we will describe some of the fundamentals involved in time resolved x-ray diffraction, review some of the history of its development, and describe some recent progress in the field. In this article we will emphasize the use of laser-plasmas as the x-ray source for transient diffraction.

  1. SAND2011-3779 Unlimited Release

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonantNovember11-3779 Unlimited Release Printed June 2011

  2. SANDlA REPORT Unlimited Release

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited Release Printed March 2012 2nd52938SANDlA REPORT

  3. On-orbit calibration of soft X-ray detector on Chang'E-2 satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong Xiao; Wenxi Penga; Huanyu Wang; Xingzhu Cui; Dongya Guo

    2015-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray spectrometer is one of the satellite payloads on Chang'E-2 satellite. The soft X-ray detector is one of the device on X-ray spectrometer which is designed to detect the major rock-forming elements within 0.5-10keV range on lunar surface. In this paper, energy linearity and energy resolution calibration is done using a weak Fe55 source, while temperature and time effect is considered not take big error. The total uncertainty is estimated to be within 5% after correction.

  4. On-orbit calibration of soft X-ray detector on Chang'E-2 satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Hong; Wang, Huanyu; Cui, Xingzhu; Guo, Dongya

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray spectrometer is one of the satellite payloads on Chang'E-2 satellite. The soft X-ray detector is one of the device on X-ray spectrometer which is designed to detect the major rock-forming elements within 0.5-10keV range on lunar surface. In this paper, energy linearity and energy resolution calibration is done using a weak Fe55 source, while temperature and time effect is considered not take big error. The total uncertainty is estimated to be within 5% after correction.

  5. Optimization of future high-resolution X-ray instrumentation in astrophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zajczyk, Anna; Dowkontt, Paul; Guo, Qingzhen; Kislat, Fabian; Krawczynski, Henric; De Geronimo, Gianluigi; Li, Shaorui; Beilicke, Matthias

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride and Cadmium Telluride are the detector materials of choice for the detection of X-rays in the X-ray energy band E >= 5keV with excellent spatial and spectral resolution and without cryogenic cooling. Owing to recent breakthroughs in grazing incidence mirror technology, next-generation hard X-ray telescopes will achieve angular resolution between 5 and 10 arc seconds - about an order of magnitude better than that of the NuSTAR hard X-ray telescope. As a consequence, the next generation of X-ray telescopes will require pixelated X-ray detectors with pixels on a grid with a lattice constant of <= 250um. Additional detector requirements include a low energy threshold of less than 5keV and an energy resolution of less than one keV. The science drivers for a high angular-resolution X-ray mission include studies and measurements of black hole spins, the cosmic evolution of super-massive black holes, active galactic nuclei feedback, and the behaviour of matter at very high densities. In this...

  6. Fiber fed x-ray/gamma ray imaging apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hailey, C.J.; Ziock, K.P.

    1992-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray/gamma ray imaging apparatus is disclosed for detecting the position, energy, and intensity of x-ray/gamma ray radiation comprising scintillation means disposed in the path of such radiation and capable of generating photons in response to such radiation; first photodetection means optically bonded to the scintillation means and capable of generating an electrical signal indicative of the intensity, and energy of the radiation detected by the scintillation means; second photodetection means capable of generating an electrical signal indicative of the position of the radiation in the radiation pattern; and means for optically coupling the scintillation means to the second photodetection means. The photodetection means are electrically connected to control and storage means which may also be used to screen out noise by rejecting a signal from one photodetection means not synchronized to a signal from the other photodetection means; and also to screen out signals from scattered radiation. 6 figs.

  7. Differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system and components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stutman, Daniel; Finkenthal, Michael

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system includes an X-ray illumination system, a beam splitter arranged in an optical path of the X-ray illumination system, and a detection system arranged in an optical path to detect X-rays after passing through the beam splitter.

  8. Reflection soft X-ray microscope and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Suckewer, S.; Skinner, C.H.; Rosser, R.

    1993-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A reflection soft X-ray microscope is provided by generating soft X-ray beams, condensing the X-ray beams to strike a surface of an object at a predetermined angle, and focusing the X-ray beams reflected from the surface onto a detector, for recording an image of the surface or near surface features of the object under observation.

  9. The Soft X-ray Spectromicroscopy Beamline at SSRF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Z.; Tai, R.; Wand, Y.; Yan, R.; Chen, M.; Wu, Y.; Chen, J.; Xue, S.; Xu, H. [Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Shanghai Institute of Appled Physics, CAS 239 Zhang Heng Road, Pudong District, Shanghai (China)

    2011-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Commissioning of the soft x-ray spectromicroscopy beanmline at SSRF was formally started on Dec 26, 2008. Beamline performance has reached or surpassed the designing goals according to the measurements by domestic experts, especially for its high energy resolution and high spatial resolution. Since its first operation by users on May 6, 2009, tens of experiments have been conducted, and some preliminary exciting results have been acquired.

  10. Calibrations of a multichannel soft x-ray spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blake, R.L.; Hockaday, R.G.; Grosso, J.S.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A time resolved, 14 channel spectrometer with an absolutely calibrated response, was developed to cove an x-ray photon energy spectrum from 70 to 650 eV. The spectrometer utilized a combination of thin film prefilters, layered synthetic microstructure (LSM) diffractors, metal coated plastic scintillators, and photomultiplier detector tubes. Calibration of the spectrometer was done piecemeal for each component with standard techniques and the component calibrations were convolved to get a complete spectrometer response function. The two calibration procedures were compared.

  11. X-ray lithography using holographic images

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Howells, Malcolm S. (Berkeley, CA); Jacobsen, Chris (Sound Beach, NY)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for forming X-ray images having 0.25 .mu.m minimum line widths on X-ray sensitive material are presented. A holgraphic image of a desired circuit pattern is projected onto a wafer or other image-receiving substrate to allow recording of the desired image in photoresist material. In one embodiment, the method uses on-axis transmission and provides a high flux X-ray source having modest monochromaticity and coherence requirements. A layer of light-sensitive photoresist material on a wafer with a selected surface is provided to receive the image(s). The hologram has variable optical thickness and variable associated optical phase angle and amplitude attenuation for transmission of the X-rays. A second embodiment uses off-axis holography. The wafer receives the holographic image by grazing incidence reflection from a hologram printed on a flat metal or other highly reflecting surface or substrate. In this second embodiment, an X-ray beam with a high degree of monochromaticity and spatial coherence is required.

  12. X-ray lithography using holographic images

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Howells, M.S.; Jacobsen, C.

    1997-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for forming X-ray images having 0.25 {micro}m minimum line widths on X-ray sensitive material are presented. A holographic image of a desired circuit pattern is projected onto a wafer or other image-receiving substrate to allow recording of the desired image in photoresist material. In one embodiment, the method uses on-axis transmission and provides a high flux X-ray source having modest monochromaticity and coherence requirements. A layer of light-sensitive photoresist material on a wafer with a selected surface is provided to receive the image(s). The hologram has variable optical thickness and variable associated optical phase angle and amplitude attenuation for transmission of the X-rays. A second embodiment uses off-axis holography. The wafer receives the holographic image by grazing incidence reflection from a hologram printed on a flat metal or other highly reflecting surface or substrate. In this second embodiment, an X-ray beam with a high degree of monochromaticity and spatial coherence is required. 15 figs.

  13. Radiographic X-Ray Pulse Jitter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitton, C. V., Good, D. E., Henderson, D. J., Hogge, K. W.

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Dual Beam Radiographic Facility consists of two identical radiographic sources. Major components of the machines are: Marx generator, water-filled pulse-forming line (PFL), water-filled coaxial transmission line, three-cell inductive voltage adder, and rod-pinch diode. The diode pulse has the following electrical specifications: 2.25-MV, 60-kA, 60-ns. Each source has the following x-ray parameters: 1-mm-diameter spot size, 4-rad at 1 m, 50-ns full width half max. The x-ray pulse is measured with PIN diode detectors. The sources were developed to produce high resolution images on single-shot, high-value experiments. For this application it is desirable to maintain a high level of reproducibility in source output. X-ray pulse jitter is a key metric for analysis of reproducibility. We will give measurements of x-ray jitter for each machine. It is expected that x-ray pulse jitter is predominantly due to PFL switch jitter, and therefore a correlation of the two will be discussed.

  14. Oscillations During Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tod E. Strohmayer

    2001-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    High amplitude, nearly coherent X-ray brightness oscillations during thermonuclear X-ray bursts were discovered with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) in early 1996. Spectral and timing evidence strongly supports the conclusion that these oscillations are caused by rotational modulation of the burst emission and that they reveal the spin frequency of neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries, a long sought goal of X-ray astronomy. Studies carried out over the past year have led to the discovery of burst oscillations in four new sources, bringing to ten the number with confirmed burst oscillations. I review the status of our knowledge of these oscillations and indicate how they can be used to probe the physics of neutron stars. For a few burst oscillation sources it has been proposed that the strongest and most ubiquitous frequency is actually the first overtone of the spin frequency and hence that two nearly antipodal hot spots are present on the neutron star. This inference has important implications for both the physics of thermonuclear burning as well as the mass - radius relation for neutron stars, so its confirmation is crucial. I discuss recent attempts to confirm this hypothesis for 4U 1636-53, the source for which a signal at the putative fundamental (290 Hz) has been claimed.

  15. In Operando X-ray Diffraction and Transmission X-ray Microscopy of Lithium Sulfur Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    In Operando X-ray Diffraction and Transmission X-ray Microscopy of Lithium Sulfur Batteries Johanna Information ABSTRACT: Rechargeable lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries hold great potential for high of these batteries for commercial use. The two primary obstacles are the solubility of long chain lithium

  16. X-Ray Data from the X-Ray Data Booklet Online

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Thompson, Albert C.; Attwood, David T.; Gullikson, Eric M.; Howells, Malcolm R.; Kortright, Jeffrey B.; Robinson, Arthur L.; Underwood, James H.; Kim, Kwang-Je; Kirz, Janos; Lindau, Ingolf; Pianetta, Piero; Winick, Herman; Williams, Gwyn P.; Scofield, James H.

    The original X-Ray Data Booklet, published in 1985, became a classic reference source. The online version has been significantly revised and updated to reflect today's science. Hundreds of pages of authoritative data provide the x-ray properties of elements, information on synchrotron radiation, scattering processes, optics and detectors, and other related calculations, formulas, and data tables.

  17. R&D for a Soft X-Ray Free Electron Laser Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staples, John

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wavelength seed, and ultrafast pulses. Understanding gainedlasers to produce ultrafast x-ray pulses at the ALS in a “is home to the PULSE Institute for ultrafast energy science,

  18. X-ray imaging with monochromatic and small focal spot size sources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of x-ray energy and intensity (under investigation) Measurements at the Elettra (Trieste) synchrotron Edge Response Function at ATF * Spot size * He Pipe added * 10 7 10 8...

  19. Flat Quartz-Crystal X-ray Spectrometer for Nuclear Forensics Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodsell, Alison

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    structure. The higher energy background radiation was blocked from reaching the detector using a customized collimator and shielding system. A flat quartz-crystal x-ray spectrometer system was designed specifically to fit the constraints and requirements...

  20. A proposal for a generation of two-color ultra-short x-ray pulses

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in this paper. II. Method The following conditions were assumed to be essential for a new proposal: a) photon energies for the first and the second x-ray pulses can be...

  1. SciTech Connect: Validations of Time-Resolved X-Ray Emissions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Validations of Time-Resolved X-Ray Emissions Spectroscopy for Analysis of Mn-Based Natural and Artifical Sunlight-to-Energy Assemblies Citation Details In-Document Search Title:...

  2. 12.141 Electron Microprobe Analysis by Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Spectrometry, January (IAP) 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatterjee, Nilanjan

    Introduction to the theory of x-ray microanalysis through the electron microprobe including ZAF matrix corrections. Techniques to be discussed are wavelength and energy dispersive spectrometry, scanning backscattered ...

  3. Quantitative Compositional Mapping of Core-Shell Polymer Microspheres by Soft X-ray Spectromicroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hitchcock, Adam P.

    of the radiation damage caused by the high-energy electron beams.17-19 Recently, analytical soft X-ray microscopy cannot always be sure whether features observed by electron (or optical) microscopy arise from chemical

  4. Evidence Against BALS in the X-ray Bright QSO PG1416-129

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul J. Green; Thomas L. Aldcroft; Smita Mathur; Norbert Schartel

    1997-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent results from the ROSAT All Sky Survey, and from deep ROSAT pointings reveal that broad absorption line quasars (BALQSOs) are weak in the soft X-ray bandpass (with optical-to-X-ray spectral slope alpha_{ox}>1.8) in comparison to QSOs with normal OUV spectra (mean alpha_{ox}=1.4). One glaring exception appeared to be the nearby BALQSO PG1416-129, which is a bright ROSAT source showing no evidence for intrinsic soft X-ray absorption. We present here our new HST FOS spectrum of PG1416-129, in which we find no evidence for BALs. We show that the features resulting in the original BAL classification, based on IUE spectra, were probably spurious. On the basis of UV, X-ray and optical evidence, we conclude that PG1416-129, is not now, and has never been a BALQSO. Our result suggests that weak soft X-ray emission is a defining characteristic of true BALQSOs. If BALQSOs indeed harbor normal intrinsic spectral energy distributions, their observed soft X-ray weakness is most likely the result of absorption. The ubiquitous occurrence of weak soft X-ray emission with UV absorption (BALs) thus suggests absorbers in each energy regime that are physically associated, if not identical.

  5. Cleared for public release, distribution unlimited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feigenbaum, Joan

    Cleared for public release, distribution unlimited A Study on The Network as Economy #12;Cleared for public release, distribution unlimited The Premise · Modern technological networks are on a collision for public release, distribution unlimited Network-centric Operations are at Risk · Increasingly pervasive

  6. High Gain, Fast Scan, Broad Spectrum, Parallel Beam Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Spectrometer for SEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David OHara; Dr. Eric Lochmer

    2003-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Parallax Research, Inc. proposes to produce a new type of x-ray spectrometer for use with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) that would have the energy resolution of WDS and the ease of use of EDS with sufficient gain for lower energies that it can be used at low beam currents as is EDS. Parallax proposes to do this by development of new multiple reflection x-ray collimation optics, new diffractor technology, new detector technology and new scan algorithms.

  7. Frontiers in X-Ray Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linda Young

    2011-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The year 2010 marked the fiftieth anniversary of the optical laser and the first anniversary of the world's first hard x-ray free-electron laser, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC. This exciting, new accelerator-based source of x-rays provides peak brilliances roughly a billion times greater than currently available from synchrotron sources such as the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne, and thus explores a qualitatively different parameter space. This talk will describe the first experiments at the LCLS aimed at understanding the nature of high intensity x-ray interactions, related applications in ultrafast imaging on the atomic scale and sketch nascent plans for the extension of both linac and storage-ring based photon sources.

  8. The X-ray/submillimetre link

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Almaini

    2000-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    It is widely believed that most of the cosmic X-ray background (XRB) is produced by a vast, hitherto undetected population of obscured AGN. Deep X-ray surveys with Chandra and XMM will soon test this hypothesis. Similarly, recent sub-mm surveys with SCUBA have revealed an analogous population of exceptionally luminous, dust-enshrouded {\\em star-forming} galaxies at high redshift. There is now growing evidence for an intimate link between these obscured populations. There are currently large uncertainties in the models, but several independent arguments lead to the conclusion that a significant fraction of the SCUBA sources ($10-30% $) will contain quasars. Recent observational studies of SCUBA survey sources appear to confirm these predictions, although the relative roles of AGN and star-forming activity in heating the dust are unclear. Forthcoming surveys combining X-ray and sub-mm observations will provide a very powerful tool for disentangling these processes.

  9. X-ray atlas of rheumatic diseases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dihlmann, W.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This atlas comprises instructive X-rays of the various inflammatory rheumatic joint diseases in all stages at the extremities and the spinal column. In addition, the complex pattern of the wide range of arthroses, also known as degenerative rheumatic disease is included. Besides the instructive pointers to X-ray diagnosis, the book is also a guide to differential diagnosis. Hence, this book is actually an X-ray atlas of joint diseases in general. Selected Contents: Introduction: What Does ''Rheumatism'' Actually Mean./Radiographic Methodology in Rheumatic Diseases of the Locomotor System/The Mosaic of Arthritis/Adult Rheumatoid Arthritis/Seronegative Spondylarthritis/Classic Collagen Diseases/Enthesiopathies/Gout-Pseudogout

  10. Combined microstructure x-ray optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbee, T.W. Jr.

    1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multilayers are man-made microstructures which vary in depth and are now of sufficient quality to be used as x-ray, soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet optics. Gratings are man-made in plane microstructures which have been used as optic elements for most of this century. Joining of these two optical microstructures to form combined microstructure optical microstructures to form combined microstructure optical elements has the potential for greatly enhancing both the throughput and the resolution attainable in these spectral ranges. The characteristics of these new optic elements will be presented and compared to experiment with emphasis on the unique properties of these combined microstructures. These results reported are general in nature and not limited to the soft x-ray or extreme ultraviolet spectral domains and also apply to neutrons. 19 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. X-ray reflectivity and surface roughness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ocko, B.M.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the advent of high brightness synchrotron radiation sources there has been a phenomenal growth in the use of x-rays as a probe of surface structure. The technique of x-ray reflectivity is particularly relevant to electrochemists since it is capable of probing the structure normal to an electrode surface in situ. In this paper the theoretical framework for x-ray reflectivity is reviewed and the results from previous non-electrochemistry measurements are summarized. These measurements are from the liquid/air interface (CCl/sub 4/), the metal crystal vacuum interface (Au(100)), and from the liquid/solid interface(liquid crystal/silicon). 34 refs., 5 figs.

  12. LCLS - The X-ray Laser Has Turned On

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergmann, Uwe (Linac Coherent Light Source) [Linac Coherent Light Source

    2010-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    On April 10, 2009 the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the world's first hard x-ray free electron laser, was brought to lasing. Producing an x-ray beam with over a billion times higher peak brightness that then most powerful existing syncrotron sources, it marked the beginning of a new era of science. The LCLS pulses arrive at a rate of 60 - 120 Hz in an energy range from 480 eV to 10 keV, with pulse lengths as short as a few fs to about 300 fs. Since October 2009, users have been performing experiments at the LCLS, and currently three of the six planned instruments are available. Although we stand only at the beginning of LCLS science, there is no doubt about the strong sense of early excitement.

  13. Rotational Doppler effect in x-ray photoionization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun Yuping; Wang Chuankui [College of Physics and Electronics, Shandong Normal University, 250014 Jinan (China); Theoretical Chemistry, Roslagstullsbacken 15, Royal Institute of Technology, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Gel'mukhanov, Faris [Theoretical Chemistry, Roslagstullsbacken 15, Royal Institute of Technology, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy of the photoelectron experiences a red or blue Doppler shift when the molecule recedes from the detector or approaches him. This results in a broadening of the photoelectron line due to the translational thermal motion. However, the molecules also have rotational degrees of freedom and we show that the translational Doppler effect has its rotational counterpart. This rotational Doppler effect leads to an additional broadening of the spectral line of the same magnitude as the Doppler broadening caused by translational thermal motion. The rotational Doppler broadening as well as the rotational recoil broadening is sensitive to the molecular orbital from which the photoelectron is ejected. This broadening should be taken into account in analysis of x-ray photoemission spectra of super-high resolution and it can be directly observed using x-ray pump-probe spectroscopy.

  14. Relativistic Effects on Reflection X-ray Spectra of AGN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Khee-Gan; /University Coll. London; Fuerst, Steven V.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Brandwardi-Raymond, Graziella; Wu, Kinwah; Crowley, Oliver; /University Coll. London

    2007-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We have calculated the reflection component of the X-ray spectra of active galactic nuclei (AGN) and shown that they can be significantly modified by the relativistic motion of the accretion flow and various gravitational effects of the central black hole. The absorption edges in the reflection spectra suffer severe energy shifts and smearing. The degree of distortion depends on the system parameters, and the dependence is stronger for some parameters such as the inner radius of the accretion disk and the disk viewing inclination angles. The relativistic effects are significant and are observable. Improper treatment of the reflection component of the X-ray continuum in spectral fittings will give rise to spurious line-like features, which will mimic the fluorescent emission lines and mask the relativistic signatures of the lines.

  15. Hard X-ray observations of Cygnus X-1 with the Miso telescope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perotti, F.; Della Ventura, A.; Villa, G.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The black hole candidate Cygnus X-1 was observed in the hard X-ray - soft gamma-ray energy range by the Miso telescope on two different occasions: in September 1979 and May 1980. Two hard X-ray states of the source have beem measured: in 1979 the observed spectrum confirms the superlow state measured in the same period by the HEAO-3 satellite, while in 1980 the Miso X-ray data are consistent with the so-called low state of Cygnus X-1. In both occasions, no gamma-ray excess has been observed above 200 keV. 9 references.

  16. Cumulative luminosity functions of the X-ray point source population in M31

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Shaw Greening; C. Tonkin; R. Barnard; U. Kolb; J. P. Osborne

    2005-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present preliminary results from a detailed analysis of the X-ray point sources in the XMM-Newton survey of M31. These sources are expected to be mostly X-ray binaries. We have so far studied 225 of the 535 sources found by automated source detection. Only sources which were present in all three EPIC images were considered. X-ray binaries are identified by their energy spectrum and power density spectrum. Unlike in other surveys we have obtained source luminosities from freely fit emission models. We present uncorrected luminosity functions of the sources analysed so far.

  17. X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfires may contribute more toConsensusX-RayX-Ray Imaging ofX-Ray

  18. Soft X-ray Pulsations in Solar Flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simões, Paulo J A; Fletcher, Lyndsay

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The soft X-ray emissions of solar flares come mainly from the bright coronal loops at the highest temperatures normally achieved in the flare process. Their ubiquity has led to their use as a standard measure of flare occurrence and energy, although the bulk of the total flare energy goes elsewhere. Recently Dolla et al. (2012) noted quasi-periodic pulsations (QPP) in the soft X-ray signature of the X-class flare SOL2011-02-15, as observed by the standard photometric data from the GOES (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite) spacecraft. We analyze the suitability of the GOES data for this kind of analysis and find them to be generally valuable after Sept. 2010 (GOES-15). We then extend Dolla et al. results to a list of X-class flares from Cycle 24, and show that most of them display QPP in the impulsive phase. During the impulsive phase the footpoints of the newly-forming flare loops may also contribute to the observed soft X-ray variations. The QPP show up cleanly in both channels of the GOES dat...

  19. X-ray Lenses Fabricated by LIGA Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nazmov, Vladimir; Last, Arndt; Saile, Volker [Institut fuer Microstrukturtechnik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Karlsruhe University, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Reznikova, Elena; Mohr, Jurgen [Institut fuer Microstrukturtechnik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Simon, Rolf [Institut fuer Synchrotronstrahlung, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); DiMichiel, Marco [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP220, 38043, Grenoble (France)

    2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray refractive optical lens systems have been successfully elaborated, designed, fabricated at the Institute for Microstructure Technology at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany) using LIGA technology in recent years. The lenses are structured in a SU-8 polymer. The capability of the LIGA technique to create an arbitrary profile of the focusing microstructures allow the fabrication of lenses with different curvature radius of parabolic geometry, minimized absorption and a large depth of focus. Also a set of planar lens systems on one substrate can be realized with 17 lenses providing identical focal distances for different X-ray energies from 2 to over 100 keV. Nickel lenses fabricated by electroforming using polymer templates can be applied for energies larger than 80 keV. The parabolic crossed lenses are used for 2D nano focusing of monochromatic beams. The quasi-parabolic crossed lenses with a submicron focus and a focus depth of the centimetre range can be used as an achromatic system. Mosaic truncated parabolic lenses with a focusing aperture up to 1 mm are made to increase the X-ray intensity in the focused spot.

  20. Radiobiological studies using gamma and x rays.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potter, Charles Augustus; Longley, Susan W.; Scott, Bobby R. [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM; Lin, Yong [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM; Wilder, Julie [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM; Hutt, Julie A. [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM; Padilla, Mabel T. [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM; Gott, Katherine M. [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are approximately 500 self-shielded research irradiators used in various facilities throughout the U.S. These facilities use radioactive sources containing either 137Cs or 60Co for a variety of biological investigations. A report from the National Academy of Sciences[1] described the issues with security of particular radiation sources and the desire for their replacement. The participants in this effort prepared two peer-reviewed publications to document the results of radiobiological studies performed using photons from 320-kV x rays and 137Cs on cell cultures and mice. The effectiveness of X rays was shown to vary with cell type.

  1. Theoretical standards in x-ray spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose to extend our state-of-the-art, ab initio XAFS (X-ray absorption fine structure) codes, FEFF. Our current work has been highly successful in achieving accurate, user-friendly XAFS standards, exceeding the performance of both tabulated standards and other codes by a considerable margin. We now propose to add the capability to treat more complex materials. This includes multiple-scattering, polarization dependence, an approximate treatment of XANES (x-ray absorption near edge structure), and other improvements. We also plan to adapt FEFF to other spectroscopies, e.g. photoelectron diffraction (PD) and diffraction anomalous fine structure (DAFS).

  2. Kaonic hydrogen X-ray measurement in SIDDHARTA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Bazzi; G. Beer; L. Bombelli; A. M. Bragadireanu; M. Cargnelli; G. Corradi; C. Curceanu; A. d'Uffizi; C. Fiorini; T. Frizzi; F. Ghio; C. Guaraldo; R. S. Hayano; M. Iliescu; T. Ishiwatari; M. Iwasaki; P. Kienle; P. Levi Sandri; A. Longoni; V. Lucherini; J. Marton; S. Okada; D. Pietreanu; T. Ponta; A. Rizzo; A. Romero Vidal; A. Scordo; H. Shi; D. L. Sirghi; F. Sirghi; H. Tatsuno; A. Tudorache; V. Tudorache; O. Vazquez Doce; E. Widmann; J. Zmeskal

    2012-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Kaonic hydrogen atoms provide a unique laboratory to probe the kaon-nucleon strong interaction at the energy threshold, allowing an investigation of the interplay between spontaneous and explicit chiral symmetry breaking in low-energy QCD. The SIDDHARTA Collaboration has measured the $K$-series X rays of kaonic hydrogen atoms at the DA$\\Phi$NE electron-positron collider of Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, and has determined the most precise values of the strong-interaction induced shift and width of the $1s$ atomic energy level. This result provides vital constraints on the theoretical description of the low-energy $\\bar{K}N$ interaction.

  3. GIANT H II REGIONS IN M101. I. X-RAY ANALYSIS OF HOT GAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun Wei; Chen Yang; Feng Li [Department of Astronomy, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Chu, You-Hua [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Chen, C.-H. Rosie [Max Planck Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Wang, Q. Daniel [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Li Jiangtao [Key Laboratory of Modern Astronomy and Astrophysics, Nanjing University, Ministry of Education, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We performed a Chandra X-ray study of three giant H II regions (GHRs), NGC 5461, NGC 5462, and NGC 5471, in the spiral galaxy M101. The X-ray spectra of the three GHRs all contain a prominent thermal component with a temperature of {approx}0.2 keV. In NGC 5461, the spatial distribution of the soft (<1.5 keV) X-ray emission is generally in agreement with the extent of H1105, the most luminous H II region therein, but extends beyond its southern boundary, which could be attributed to outflows from the star cloud between H1105 and H1098. In NGC 5462, the X-ray emission is displaced from the H II regions and a ridge of blue stars; the H{alpha} filaments extending from the ridge of star cloud to the diffuse X-rays suggest that hot gas outflows have occurred. The X-rays from NGC 5471 are concentrated at the B-knot, a 'hypernova remnant' candidate. Assuming a Sedov-Taylor evolution, the derived explosion energy, on the order of 10{sup 52} erg, is consistent with a hypernova origin. In addition, a bright source in the field of NGC 5462 has been identified as a background active galactic nucleus, instead of a black hole X-ray binary in M101.

  4. Anomalous photoresponse of GaN x-ray Schottky detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duboz, Jean-Yves [CRHEA, CNRS, rue Bernard Gregory, Sophia Antipolis, F-06560 Valbonne (France); Beaumont, Bernard [Lumilog Groupe Saint GOBAIN Crystals, 2720 Chemin de Saint Bernard, F-06220 Vallauris (France); Reverchon, Jean-Luc [THALES R and T, Campus Polytechnique, 1 Avenue Augustin Fresnel, F-91767 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Wieck, Andreas D. [Fakultaet fuer Physik und Astronomie, Lehrstuhl fuer Angewandte Festkoerperphysik, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GaN based materials are believed to be very stable materials, in particular, under irradiation by high energy photons such as x rays. We have studied x-ray detectors based on GaN Schottky diodes. Vertical Schottky diodes were fabricated based on a 20 mum thick undoped GaN layer grown on a conductive GaN substrate. Their photoresponse to near UV light and to x rays was measured. While the response to near UV light was fast and linear as expected, anomalous behaviors were observed under x-ray illumination. The photocurrent increases as the third power of the incident x-ray flux. The photocurrent transient when the x rays is turned on are long and nonexponential (S shape) and strongly differs from the off transient which is fast and exponential. Also, a very strong quenching of the x-ray photoresponse is observed when the detector is simultaneously illuminated with visible light. All of these anomalous behaviors are explained in the frame of a complete model involving traps and tunnel currents. A reasonable quantitative agreement between the model and the experimental data is obtained.

  5. X-ray Imaging Workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsingWhat isJoin theanniversaryI 1 0 3 P

  6. SANDIA REPORT SAND2013-9875 Unlimited Release

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited Release Printed March 2012 2nd US/German875 Unlimited

  7. SANDIA REPORT SAND952938 UC-706 Unlimited Release

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited Release Printed March 2012 2nd52938 UC-706 Unlimited

  8. SANDIA REPORT SAND96-1197 UC-403 Unlimited Release

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited Release Printed March 2012 2nd52938 UC-706 Unlimited7

  9. SANDIA REPORT SAND96-1198 UC-403 Unlimited Release

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited Release Printed March 2012 2nd52938 UC-706 Unlimited78

  10. SANDIA REPORT SAND96-2031 UC-742 Unlimited Release

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  11. Absolute x-ray yields from laser-irradiated germanium-doped low-density aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fournier, K. B.; Satcher, J. H.; May, M. J.; Poco, J. F.; Sorce, C. M.; Colvin, J. D.; Hansen, S. B.; MacLaren, S. A.; Moon, S. J.; Davis, J. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Girard, F.; Villette, B.; Primout, M.; Babonneau, D. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique-Direction des Application Militaires (CEA/DAM), Ile-de-France, F91297 Arpajon (France); Coverdale, C. A.; Beutler, D. E. [Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The x-ray yields from laser-irradiated germanium-doped ultra-low-density aerogel plasmas have been measured in the energy range from sub-keV to {approx_equal}15 keV at the OMEGA laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester. The targets' x-ray yields have been studied for variation in target size, aerogel density, laser pulse length, and laser intensity. For targets that result in plasmas with electron densities in the range of {approx_equal}10% of the critical density for 3{omega} light, one can expect 10-11 J/sr of x rays with energies above 9 keV, and 600-800 J/sr for energies below 3.5 keV. In addition to the x-ray spectral yields, the x-ray temporal waveforms have been measured and it is observed that the emitted x rays generally follow the delivered laser power, with late-time enhancements of emitted x-ray power correlated with hydrodynamic compression of the hot plasma. Further, the laser energy reflected from the target by plasma instabilities is found to be 2%-7% of the incident energy for individual beam intensities {approx_equal}10{sup 14}-10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. The propagation of the laser heating in the target volume has been characterized with two-dimensional imaging. Source-region heating is seen to be correlated with the temporal profile of the emitted x-ray power.

  12. Absolute X-Ray Yields From Laser-Irradiated Ge-Doped Low-Density Aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fournier, K B; Satcher, J H; May, M J; Poco, J F; Sorce, C M; Colvin, J D; Hansen, S B; MacLaren, S A; Moon, S J; Davis, J F; Girard, F; Villette, B; Primout, M; Babonneau, D; Coverdale, C A; Beutler, D E

    2009-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used the OMEGA laser (Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester) to measure the X-ray yields from laser-irradiated germanium-doped ultra-low-density aerogel plasmas in the energy range from sub-keV to {approx} 15 keV. They have studied the targets X-ray yields with variation in target size, aerogel density, laser pulse length and laser intensity. For targets that result in plasmas with electron densities in the range of {approx} 10% of the critical density for 3{omega} light, one can expect 10-11 J/sr of X-rays with energies above 9 keV, and 600-800 J/sr for energies below 3.5 keV. In addition to the X-ray spectral yields, they have measured the X-ray temporal waveforms and found that the emitted X rays generally follow the delivered laser power, with late-time enhancements of emitted X-ray power correlated with hydrodynamic compression of the hot plasma. Also, they find the laser energy reflected from the target by plasma instabilities to be 2-7% of the incident energy for individual beam intensities {approx} 10{sup 14}-10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. They also have characterized the propagation of the laser heating in the target volume with two-dimensional imaging. They find the source-region heating to be correlated with the temporal profile of the emitted X-ray power.

  13. Diagnosing residual motion via the x-ray self emission from indirectly driven inertial confinement implosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pak, A., E-mail: pak5@llnl.gov; Field, J. E.; Benedetti, L. R.; Caggiano, J.; Hatarik, R.; Izumi, N.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Spears, B. K.; Town, R. P. J.; Bradley, D. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Knauer, J. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In an indirectly driven implosion, non-radial translational motion of the compressed fusion capsule is a signature of residual kinetic energy not coupled into the compressional heating of the target. A reduction in compression reduces the peak pressure and nuclear performance of the implosion. Measuring and reducing the residual motion of the implosion is therefore necessary to improve performance and isolate other effects that degrade performance. Using the gated x-ray diagnostic, the x-ray Bremsstrahlung emission from the compressed capsule is spatially and temporally resolved at x-ray energies of >8.7 keV, allowing for measurements of the residual velocity. Here details of the x-ray velocity measurement and fitting routine will be discussed and measurements will be compared to the velocities inferred from the neutron time of flight detectors.

  14. Flat-response x-ray-diode-detector development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tirsell, G.

    1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report we discuss the design of an improved sub-nanosecond flat response x-ray diode detector needed for ICF diagnostics. This device consists of a high Z cathode and a complex filter tailored to flatten the response so that the total x-ray energy below 1.5 keV can be measured using a single detector. Three major problems have become evident as a result of our work with the original LLNL design including deviation from flatness due to a peak in the response below 200 eV, saturation at relatively low x-ray fluences, and long term gold cathode instability. We are investigating grazing incidence reflection to reduce the response below 200 eV, new high Z cathode materials for long term stability, and a new complex filter for improved flatness. Better saturation performance will require a modified XRD detector under development with reduced anode to cathode spacing and increased anode bias voltage.

  15. X-ray Synchrotron Radiation in a Plasma Wiggler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Shuoquin; /UCLA /SLAC, SSRL

    2005-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A relativistic electron beam can radiate due to its betatron motion inside an ion channel. The ion channel is induced by the electron bunch as it propagates through an underdense plasma. In the theory section of this thesis the formation of the ion channel, the trajectories of beam electrons inside the ion channel, the radiation power and the radiation spectrum of the spontaneous emission are studied. The comparison between different plasma wiggler schemes is made. The difficulties in realizing stimulated emission as the beam traverses the ion channel are investigated, with particular emphasis on the bunching mechanism, which is important for the ion channel free electron laser. This thesis reports an experiment conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) to measure the betatron X-ray radiations for the first time. They first describe the construction and characterization of the lithium plasma source. In the experiment, the transverse oscillations of the SLAC 28.5 GeV electron beam traversing through a 1.4 meter long lithium plasma source are clearly seen. These oscillations lead to a quadratic density dependence of the spontaneously emitted betatron X-ray radiation. The divergence angle of the X-ray radiation is measured. The absolute photon yield and the spectral brightness at 14.2 KeV photon energy are estimated and seen to be in reasonable agreement with theory.

  16. Soft X-ray emission in flaring coronal loops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pinto, R F; Brun, A S

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar flares are associated with intense soft X-ray emission generated by the hot flaring plasma in coronal magnetic loops. Kink unstable twisted flux-ropes provide a source of magnetic energy which can be released impulsively and account for the heating of the plasma in flares. We investigate the temporal, spectral and spatial evolution of the properties of the thermal X-ray emission produced in such kink-unstable magnetic flux-ropes using a series of MHD simulations. We deduce emission diagnostics and their temporal evolution and discuss the results of the simulations with respect to observations. The numerical setup used consists of a highly twisted loop embedded in a region of uniform and untwisted background coronal magnetic field. We let the kink instability develop, compute the evolution of the plasma properties in the loop (density, temperature) and deduce the X-ray emission properties of the plasma during the whole flaring episode. During the initial phase of the instability plasma heating is mostly ...

  17. SLAC All Access: X-ray Microscope

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Nelson, Johanna; Liu, Yijin

    2014-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    SLAC physicists Johanna Nelson and Yijin Liu give a brief overview of the X-ray microscope at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) that is helping improve rechargeable-battery technology by letting researchers peek into the inner workings of batteries as they operate.

  18. Femtosecond X-ray protein nanocrystallography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, Henry N.; Fromme, Petra; Barty, Anton; White, Thomas A.; Kirian, Richard A.; Aquila, Andrew; Hunter, Mark S.; Schulz, Joachim; DePonte, Daniel P.; Weierstall, Uwe; Doak, R. Bruce; Maia, Filipe R. N. C.; Martin, Andrew V.; Schlichting, Ilme; Lomb, Lukas; Coppola, Nicola; Shoeman, Robert L.; Epp, Sascha W.; Hartmann, Robert; Rolles, Daniel; Rudenko, Artem; Foucar, Lutz; Kimmel, Nils; Weidenspointner, Georg; Holl, Peter; Liang, Mengning; Barthelmess, Miriam; Caleman, Carl; Boutet, Sebastien; Bogan, Michael J.; Krzywinski, Jacek; Bostedt, Christoph; Bajt, Sasa; Gumprecht, Lars; Rudek, Benedikt; Erk, Benjamin; Schmidt, Carlo; Homke, Andre; Reich, Christian; Pietschner, Daniel; Struder, Lothar; Hauser, Gunter; Gorke, Hubert; Ullrich, Joachim; Herrmann, Sven; Schaller, Gerhard; Schopper, Florian; Soltau, Heike; Kuhnel, Kai-Uwe; Messerschmidt, Marc; Bozek, John D.; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Frank, Matthias; Hampton, Christina Y.; Sierra, Raymond G.; Starodub, Dmitri; Williams, Garth J.; Hajdu, Janos; Timneanu, Nicusor; Seibert, M. Marvin; Andreasson, Jakob; Rocker, Andrea; Jonsson, Olof; Svenda, Martin; Stern, Stephan; Nass, Karol; Andritschke, Robert; Schroter, Claus-Dieter; Krasniqi, Faton; Bott, Mario; Schmidt, Kevin E.; Wang, Xiaoyu; Grotjohann, Ingo; Holton, James M.; Barends, Thomas R. M.; Neutze, Richard; Marchesini, Stefano; Fromme, Raimund; Schorb, Sebastian; Rupp, Daniela; Adolph, Marcus; Gorkhover, Tais; Andersson, Inger; Hirsemann, Helmut; Potdevin, Guillaume; Graafsma, Heinz; Nilsson, Bjorn; Spence, John C. H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray crystallography provides the vast majority of macromolecular structures, but the success of the method relies on growing crystals of sufficient size. In conventional measurements, the necessary increase in X-ray dose to record data from crystals that are too small leads to extensive damage before a diffraction signal can be recorded. It is particularly challenging to obtain large, well-diffracting crystals of membrane proteins, for which fewer than 300 unique structures have been determined despite their importance in all living cells. Here we present a method for structure determination where single-crystal X-ray diffraction ‘snapshots’ are collected from a fully hydrated stream of nanocrystals using femtosecond pulses from a hard-X-ray free-electron laser, the Linac Coherent Light Source. We prove this concept with nanocrystals of photosystem I, one of the largest membrane protein complexes. More than 3,000,000 diffraction patterns were collected in this study, and a three-dimensional data set was assembled from individual photosystem I nanocrystals (~200?nm to 2??m in size). We mitigate the problem of radiation damage in crystallography by using pulses briefer than the timescale of most damage processes. This offers a new approach to structure determination of macromolecules that do not yield crystals of sufficient size for studies using conventional radiation sources or are particularly sensitive to radiation damage.

  19. Catalog of supersoft X-ray sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Greiner

    2000-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This catalog comprises an up-to-date (December 1999) list of luminous (>10^36 erg/s), binary supersoft X-ray sources. This electronic version (including the accompannying Web-pages) supersedes the printed version of Greiner (1996).

  20. The Soft X-ray research instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dakovski, Georgi L.; Heimann, Philip; Holmes, Michael; Krupin, Oleg; Minitti, Michael P.; Mitra, Ankush; Moeller, Stefan; Rowen, Michael; Schlotter, William F.; Turner, Joshua J.

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Soft X-ray Research instrument provides intense ultrashort X-ray pulses in the energy range 280–2000 eV. A diverse set of experimental stations may be installed to investigate a broad range of scientific topics such as ultrafast chemistry, highly correlated materials, magnetism, surface science, and matter under extreme conditions. A brief description of the main instrument components will be given, followed by some selected scientific highlights.

  1. X-ray Spectral Properties of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. E. Strohmayer; E. E. Fenimore; T. Murakami; A. Yoshida

    1997-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We summarize the spectral characteristics of a sample of 22 bright gamma-ray bursts detected with the gamma-ray burst sensors aboard the satellite Ginga. This instrument employed a proportional and scintillation counter to provide sensitivity to photons in the 2 - 400 keV range, providing a unique opportunity to characterize the largely unexplored X-ray properties of gamma-ray bursts. The photon spectra of the Ginga bursts are well described by a low energy slope, a bend energy, and a high energy slope. In the energy range where they can be compared, this result is consistent with burst spectral analyses obtained from the BATSE experiment aboard the Compton Observatory. However, below 20 keV we find evidence for a positive spectral number index in approximately 40% of our burst sample, with some evidence for a strong rolloff at lower energies in a few events. There is a correlation (Pearson's r = -0.62) between the low energy slope and the bend energy. We find that the distribution of spectral bend energies extends below 10 keV. The observed ratio of energy emitted in the X-rays relative to the gamma-rays can be much larger than a few percent and, in fact, is sometimes larger than unity. The average for our sample is 24%.

  2. Associations of Fatty Acids in Cerebrospinal Fluid with Peripheral Glucose Concentrations and Energy Metabolism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jumpertz, Reiner; Guijarro, Ana; Pratley, Richard E.; Mason, Clinton C.; Piomelli, Daniele; Krakoff, Jonathan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    composition was measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometrycomposition was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptio-

  3. Rise time measurement for ultrafast X-ray pulses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Celliers, Peter M. (Berkeley, CA); Weber, Franz A. (Oakland, CA); Moon, Stephen J. (Tracy, CA)

    2005-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A pump-probe scheme measures the rise time of ultrafast x-ray pulses. Conventional high speed x-ray diagnostics (x-ray streak cameras, PIN diodes, diamond PCD devices) do not provide sufficient time resolution to resolve rise times of x-ray pulses on the order of 50 fs or less as they are being produced by modern fast x-ray sources. Here, we are describing a pump-probe technique that can be employed to measure events where detector resolution is insufficient to resolve the event. The scheme utilizes a diamond plate as an x-ray transducer and a p-polarized probe beam.

  4. Rise Time Measurement for Ultrafast X-Ray Pulses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Celliers, Peter M.; Weber, Franz A.; Moon, Stephen J.

    2005-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A pump-probe scheme measures the rise time of ultrafast x-ray pulses. Conventional high speed x-ray diagnostics (x-ray streak cameras, PIN diodes, diamond PCD devices) do not provide sufficient time resolution to resolve rise times of x-ray pulses on the order of 50 fs or less as they are being produced by modern fast x-ray sources. Here, we are describing a pump-probe technique that can be employed to measure events where detector resolution is insufficient to resolve the event. The scheme utilizes a diamond plate as an x-ray transducer and a p-polarized probe beam.

  5. X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer for extended X-ray sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bitter, Manfred L. (Princeton, NJ); Fraenkel, Ben (Jerusalem, IL); Gorman, James L. (Bordentown, NJ); Hill, Kenneth W. (Lawrenceville, NJ); Roquemore, A. Lane (Cranbury, NJ); Stodiek, Wolfgang (Princeton, NJ); von Goeler, Schweickhard E. (Princeton, NJ)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spherically or toroidally curved, double focusing crystals are used in a spectrometer for X-ray diagnostics of an extended X-ray source such as a hot plasma produced in a tokomak fusion experiment to provide spatially and temporally resolved data on plasma parameters using the imaging properties for Bragg angles near 45. For a Bragg angle of 45.degree., the spherical crystal focuses a bundle of near parallel X-rays (the cross section of which is determined by the cross section of the crystal) from the plasma to a point on a detector, with parallel rays inclined to the main plain of diffraction focused to different points on the detector. Thus, it is possible to radially image the plasma X-ray emission in different wavelengths simultaneously with a single crystal.

  6. X-RAY POINT-SOURCE POPULATIONS CONSTITUTING THE GALACTIC RIDGE X-RAY EMISSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morihana, Kumiko [Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)] [Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Ebisawa, Ken [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, 3-1-1 Yoshino-dai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan)] [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, 3-1-1 Yoshino-dai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Yoshida, Tessei, E-mail: morihana@crab.riken.jp [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)] [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparently diffuse X-ray emission has been known to exist along the central quarter of the Galactic Plane since the beginning of X-ray astronomy; this is referred to as the Galactic Ridge X-ray emission (GRXE). Recent deep X-ray observations have shown that numerous X-ray point sources account for a large fraction of the GRXE in the hard band (2-8 keV). However, the nature of these sources is poorly understood. Using the deepest X-ray observations made in the Chandra bulge field, we present the result of a coherent photometric and spectroscopic analysis of individual X-ray point sources for the purpose of constraining their nature and deriving their fractional contributions to the hard-band continuum and Fe K line emission of the GRXE. Based on the X-ray color-color diagram, we divided the point sources into three groups: A (hard), B (soft and broad spectrum), and C (soft and peaked spectrum). The group A sources are further decomposed spectrally into thermal and non-thermal sources with different fractions in different flux ranges. From their X-ray properties, we speculate that the group A non-thermal sources are mostly active galactic nuclei and the thermal sources are mostly white dwarf (WD) binaries such as magnetic and non-magnetic cataclysmic variables (CVs), pre-CVs, and symbiotic stars, whereas the group B and C sources are X-ray active stars in flares and quiescence, respectively. In the log N-log S curve of the 2-8 keV band, the group A non-thermal sources are dominant above Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -14} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, which is gradually taken over by Galactic sources in the fainter flux ranges. The Fe K{alpha} emission is mostly from the group A thermal (WD binaries) and the group B (X-ray active stars) sources.

  7. In-situ high-energy x-ray diffuse-scattering study of the phase transition in a Ni{sub 2}MnGa ferromagnetic shape-memory crystal.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, G.; Yan-Dong, W.; Yang, R.; Yan-Dong, L.; Peter, L. K.; X-Ray Science Division; Northeastern Univ.; Univ. of Tennessee

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The full information on the changes in many crystallographic aspects, including the structural and microstructural characterizations, during the phase transformation is essential for understanding the phase transition and 'memory' behavior in the ferromagnetic shape-memory alloys. In the present article, the defects-related microstructural features connected to the premartensitic and martensitic transition of a Ni{sub 2}MnGa single crystal under a uniaxial pressure of 50 MPa applied along the [110] crystallographic direction were studied by the in-situ high-energy X-ray diffuse-scattering experiments. The analysis of the characteristics of diffuse-scattering patterns around different sharp Bragg spots suggests that the influences of some defect clusters on the pressure-induced phase-transition sequences of Ni2MnGa are significant. Our experiments show that an intermediate phase is produced during the premartensitic transition in the Ni{sub 2}MnGa single crystal, which is favorable for the nucleation of a martensitic phase. The compression stress along the [110] direction of the Heusler phase can promote the premartensitic and martensitic transition of the Ni{sub 2}MnGa single crystal.

  8. Fundamental Parameters of Low Mass X-ray Binaries II: X-Ray Persistent Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jorge Casares; Phil Charles

    2005-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The determination of fundamental parameters in X-ray luminous (persistent) X-ray binaries has been classically hampered by the large optical luminosity of the accretion disc. New methods, based on irradiation of the donor star and burst oscillations, provide the opportunity to derive dynamical information and mass constraints in many persistent systems for the first time. These techniques are here reviewed and the latest results presented.

  9. Measurement of 238U muonic x-rays with a germanium detector setup

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Esch, Ernst I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jason, Andrew [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miyadera, Haruo [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hoteling, Nathan J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Heffner, Robert H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Adelmann, Andreas [PAUL SCHERRER INSTITUT; Stocki, Trevor [HEALTH CANADA; Mitchell, Lee [NAVAL RESEARCH LAB

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the field of nuclear non-proliferation muon interactions with materials are of great interest. This paper describes an experiment conducted at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) in Switzerland where a muon beam is stopped in a uranium target. The muons produce characteristic muonic x-rays. Muons will penetrate shielding easily and the produced characteristic x-rays can be used for positive isotope identification. Furthermore, the x-rays for uranium isotopes lie in the energy range of 6-7 MeV, which allows them to have an almost optimal mean free path in heavy shielding such as lead or steel. A measurement was conducted at PSI to prove the feasibility of detecting muonic x-rays from a large sample of depleted uranium (several kilograms) with a germanium detector. In this paper, the experimental setup and analysis of the measurement itself is presented.

  10. High-resolution x-ray diffraction microscopy of specifically labeled yeast cells

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nelson, Johanna; Huang, Xiaojing; Steinbrener, Jan; Shapiro, David; Kirz, Janos; Marchesini, Stephano; Neiman, Aaron M.; Turner, Joshua J.; Jacobsen, Chris

    2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray diffraction microscopy complements other x-ray microscopy methods by being free of lens-imposed radiation dose and resolution limits, and it allows for high-resolution imaging of biological specimens too thick to be viewed by electron microscopy. We report here the highest resolution (11-13 nm) x-ray diffraction micrograph of biological specimens, and a demonstration of molecular-specific gold labeling at different depths within cells via through-focus propagation of the reconstructed wavefield. The lectin concanavalin A conjugated to colloidal gold particles was used to label the ?-mannan sugar in the cell wall of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cells were plunge-frozen in liquid ethane andmore »freeze-dried, after which they were imaged whole using x-ray diffraction microscopy at 750 eV photon energy.« less

  11. High-resolution x-ray diffraction microscopy of specifically labeled yeast cells

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nelson, Johanna [Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States); Huang, Xiaojing [Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States); Steinbrener, Jan [Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States); Shapiro, David [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Advanced Light Source; Kirz, Janos [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Advanced Light Source; Marchesini, Stephano [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Advanced Light Source; Neiman, Aaron M. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Turner, Joshua J. [Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States); Jacobsen, Chris [Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Advanced Light Source; Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source

    2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray diffraction microscopy complements other x-ray microscopy methods by being free of lens-imposed radiation dose and resolution limits, and it allows for high-resolution imaging of biological specimens too thick to be viewed by electron microscopy. We report here the highest resolution (11-13 nm) x-ray diffraction micrograph of biological specimens, and a demonstration of molecular-specific gold labeling at different depths within cells via through-focus propagation of the reconstructed wavefield. The lectin concanavalin A conjugated to colloidal gold particles was used to label the ?-mannan sugar in the cell wall of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cells were plunge-frozen in liquid ethane and freeze-dried, after which they were imaged whole using x-ray diffraction microscopy at 750 eV photon energy.

  12. Characteristic x-ray emission from undermines plasmas irradiated by ultra-intense lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niemann, Christoph

    2012-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Between FY09 and FY11 we have conducted more than a dozen three-week experimental campaigns at high-power laser facilities around the world to investigate laser-channeling through x-ray and optical imaging and the conversion from laser-energy to xrays. We have performed simultaneous two-wavelength x-ray imaging (K-alpha and He-alpha) to distinguish the hot-plasma region (hot-spot) from the laser-produced electrons (K-alpha). In addition, we have initiated a new collaboration with SNL and have performed first shots on the 100 TW beamlet chamber to commission a fast x-ray streak camera to be used to investigate the temporal evolution of our K-alpha sources. We also collaborated on campaigns at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK) and the LANL Trident laser to employ laser produced x-ray sources for Thomson scattering off dense matter.

  13. IFE chamber dry wall materials response to pulsed X-rays and ions at power-plant level fluences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    IFE chamber dry wall materials response to pulsed X-rays and ions at power-plant level fluences T initiated to test IFE chamber wall materials response to X-rays on the Z facility, and to ions on RHEPP-1 a collaborative investigation of the response of candidate first-wall inertial fusion energy (IFE) reactor chamber

  14. Pump pulse-width dependence of grazing-incidence pumped transient collisional soft-x-ray lasers M. Berrill,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rocca, Jorge J.

    Pump pulse-width dependence of grazing-incidence pumped transient collisional soft-x-ray lasers M 2007 The output energy dependence of high repetition rate grazing incidence pumped Ni-like Mo, Ni-like Ag, and Ne-like Ti transient collisional soft x-ray lasers on the duration of the pump pulse

  15. 53Estimating the Diameter of the SN1979C Black Hole The Chandra X-Ray Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with a mass of 120 solar masses. Can it escape or remain where it is? Space Math http, as well as NASA's Swift, the European Space Agency's XMM-Newton and the German ROSAT observatory revealed been observed. This behavior and the X-ray spectrum, or distribution of X-rays with energy, support

  16. Borman effect in resonant diffraction of X-rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oreshko, A. P., E-mail: ap.oreshko@physics.msu.ru [Moscow State University (Russian Federation)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A dynamic theory of resonant diffraction (occurring when the energy of incident radiation is close to the energy of the absorption edge of an element in the composition of a given substance) of synchronous X-rays is developed in the two-wave approximation in the coplanar Laue geometry for large grazing angles in perfect crystals. A sharp decrease in the absorption coefficient in the substance with simultaneously satisfied diffraction conditions (Borman effect) is demonstrated, and the theoretical and first experimental results are compared. The calculations reveal the possibility of applying this approach in analyzing the quadrupole-quadrupole contribution to the absorption coefficient.

  17. Polarized X-Rays Reveal Molecular Alignment in Printed Electronics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomassPPPOPetroleum38 (1996)representativePolarized X-Rays Reveal

  18. Polarized X-Rays Reveal Molecular Alignment in Printed Electronics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomassPPPOPetroleum38 (1996)representativePolarized X-RaysPolarized

  19. Polarized X-Rays Reveal Molecular Alignment in Printed Electronics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomassPPPOPetroleum38 (1996)representativePolarizedPolarized X-Rays

  20. X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsingWhat isJoin theanniversaryI 1 0 3 P 0 d d X O O lX-Ray

  1. HARD X-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF A JET AND ACCELERATED ELECTRONS IN THE CORONA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glesener, Lindsay; Lin, R. P.; Krucker, Saem, E-mail: glesener@ssl.berkeley.edu [Space Science Laboratory, UC Berkeley, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first hard X-ray observation of a solar jet on the limb with flare footpoints occulted, so that faint emission from accelerated electrons in the corona can be studied in detail. In this event on 2003 August 21, RHESSI observed a double coronal hard X-ray source in the pre-impulsive phase at both thermal and nonthermal energies. In the impulsive phase, the first of two hard X-ray bursts consists of a single thermal/nonthermal source coinciding with the lower of the two earlier sources, and the second burst shows an additional nonthermal, elongated source, spatially and temporally coincident with the coronal jet. Analysis of the jet hard X-ray source shows that collisional losses by accelerated electrons can deposit enough energy to generate the jet. The hard X-ray time profile above 20 keV matches that of the accompanying Type III and broadband gyrosynchrotron radio emission, indicating both accelerated electrons escaping outward along the jet path and electrons trapped in the flare loop. The double coronal hard X-ray source, the open field lines indicated by Type III bursts, and the presence of a small post-flare loop are consistent with significant electron acceleration in an interchange reconnection geometry.

  2. Portable total reflection x-ray fluorescence analysis in the identification of unknown laboratory hazards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Ying, E-mail: liu.ying.48r@st.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Imashuku, Susumu; Sasaki, Nobuharu; Ze, Long; Kawai, Jun [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Takano, Shotaro; Sohrin, Yoshiki [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Seki, Hiroko; Miyauchi, Hiroya [Kyoto Prefectural Technology Center for Small and Medium Enterprises, Chudojiminami machi, Shimogyo-ku, Kyoto 600-8813 (Japan)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, a portable total reflection x-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometer was used to analyze unknown laboratory hazards that precipitated on exterior surfaces of cooling pipes and fume hood pipes in chemical laboratories. With the aim to examine the accuracy of TXRF analysis for the determination of elemental composition, analytical results were compared with those of wavelength-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry, scanning electron microscope and energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometry, energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry, x-ray diffraction spectrometry (XRD), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Detailed comparison of data confirmed that the TXRF method itself was not sufficient to determine all the elements (Z?>?11) contained in the samples. In addition, results suggest that XRD should be combined with XPS in order to accurately determine compound composition. This study demonstrates that at least two analytical methods should be used in order to analyze the composition of unknown real samples.

  3. A new endstation at the Swiss Light Source for ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements of liquid solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Matthew A.; Redondo, Amaia Beloqui; Duyckaerts, Nicolas; Mächler, Jean-Pierre [Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering, ETH Zürich, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland)] [Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering, ETH Zürich, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Jordan, Inga; Wörner, Hans Jakob [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, ETH Zürich, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland)] [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, ETH Zürich, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Lee, Ming-Tao; Ammann, Markus; Nolting, Frithjof; Kleibert, Armin; Huthwelker, Thomas; Birrer, Mario; Honegger, Juri; Wetter, Reto [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)] [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Bokhoven, Jeroen A. van [Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering, ETH Zürich, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland) [Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering, ETH Zürich, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new liquid microjet endstation designed for ultraviolet (UPS) and X-ray (XPS) photoelectron, and partial electron yield X-ray absorption (XAS) spectroscopies at the Swiss Light Source is presented. The new endstation, which is based on a Scienta HiPP-2 R4000 electron spectrometer, is the first liquid microjet endstation capable of operating in vacuum and in ambient pressures up to the equilibrium vapor pressure of liquid water at room temperature. In addition, the Scienta HiPP-2 R4000 energy analyzer of this new endstation allows for XPS measurements up to 7000 eV electron kinetic energy that will enable electronic structure measurements of bulk solutions and buried interfaces from liquid microjet samples. The endstation is designed to operate at the soft X-ray SIM beamline and at the tender X-ray Phoenix beamline. The endstation can also be operated using a Scienta 5 K ultraviolet helium lamp for dedicated UPS measurements at the vapor-liquid interface using either He I or He II ? lines. The design concept, first results from UPS, soft X-ray XPS, and partial electron yield XAS measurements, and an outlook to the potential of this endstation are presented.

  4. Soft x-ray capabilities for investigating the strongly correlated...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-ray, aiming to understand their sciences for applying a new material. In particular, soft x-ray capabilities have been used to obtain microscopic-level understanding of the...

  5. Dawn of x-ray nonlinear optics | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dawn of x-ray nonlinear optics Wednesday, July 8, 2015 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: David Reis, PULSE Program Description X-ray free electron lasers...

  6. ALS X-Rays Shine a New Light on Catalysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    times science has used high-brilliance x-rays to look so closely at these reactions. Lead author Dr. David Mueller at the ALS using x-rays to characterize working fuel cells....

  7. A World's Top-10 X-ray Crystal Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A World's Top-10 X-ray Crystal Structure October 7, 2014 Bookmark and Share Philip Coppens An x-ray crystal structure solved by Philip Coppens has been chosen as one of the world's...

  8. Nanofabrication of Diffractive X-ray Optics for Synchrotrons...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the soft x-ray range and down to 15 nm in the multi keV range. For use at x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) sources, diffractive optics must be capable of withstanding extreme...

  9. Installation of soft X-ray array diagnostics and its application to tomography reconstruction using synthetic KSTAR X-ray images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Seung Hun; Jang, Juhyeok; Hong, Joohwan; Jang, Siwon; Choe, Wonho, E-mail: wchoe@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Impurity and Edge Research Center, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Pacella, D.; Romano, A.; Gabellieri, L. [Associazione Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione, C.R. Frascati 00044 (Italy); Kim, Junghee [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Major of Nuclear Fusion and Plasma Science Department, Korea University of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Four-array system of soft X-ray diagnostics was installed on KSTAR tokamak. Each array has 32 viewing chords of two photo-diode array detectors with spatial resolution of 2 cm. To estimate signals from the soft X-ray radiation power, typical n{sub e}, T{sub e}, and argon impurity line radiation profiles in KSTAR are chosen. The photo-diodes were absolutely calibrated as a function of the incident photon energy in 2–40 keV range with a portable X-ray tube. Two-dimensional T{sub e} image properties by multi-energy method were simulated and visualized with six combinations of beryllium filter sets within the dynamic range of signal ratio.

  10. Beyond Chandra - the X-ray Surveyor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weisskopf, Martin C; Tananbaum, Harvey; Vikhlinin, Alexey

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past 16 years, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has provided an unparalleled means for exploring the universe with its half-arcsecond angular resolution. Chandra studies have deepened our understanding of galaxy clusters, active galactic nuclei, galaxies, supernova remnants, planets, and solar system objects addressing almost all areas of current interest in astronomy and astrophysics. As we look beyond Chandra, it is clear that comparable or even better angular resolution with greatly increased photon throughput is essential to address even more demanding science questions, such as the formation and subsequent growth of black hole seeds at very high redshift; the emergence of the first galaxy groups; and details of feedback over a large range of scales from galaxies to galaxy clusters. Recently, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, together with the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, has initiated a concept study for such a mission named the X-ray Surveyor. This study starts with a baseline payloa...

  11. Brighter Screens for Nondestructive Digital X-ray Radiography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Jr., A. C.; Bell, Z. W.; Carpenter, D. A.

    2003-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Fine resolution, bright X-ray screens are needed for digital radiography and material characterization at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12). Current technology is simply not adequate for transferring high-energy X-ray images to visible light for demanding digital applications. Low energy radiography and especially emerging tomographic technologies are severely hampered for Y-12 nondestructive evaluation (NDE) applications by dim screens with poor resolution. Also, the development of more advanced materials characterization techniques, such as electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), is driven by a design agency desire for tighter specifications and more uniform materials. Brighter screens would allow us to probe materials on a finer scale, leading to a better understanding of material behavior. A number of X-ray screen materials were studied that would be suitable for direct replacement in existing digital imaging systems. Spectroscopic evaluations were first made for a several candidates and indicated that lutetium orthosilicate (LSO) would be a promising candidate for MeV images. A relative comparison of brightness at various energies was then completed which showed that cesium iodide (CsI) could increase brightness by over an order of magnitude. Since image quality is also important for better screens, the resolving capabilities of candidate materials were measured. Resolution measurements were completed at X-ray peak energies up to 420KeV with magnified optical imaging systems, and indicated that LSO and Industrial Quality Incorporated glass (IQI) exhibited higher resolution than the CsI screen. The results give a choice of materials that can be tailored to the particular test under consideration. If high-speed images are necessary and some resolution can be sacrificed, the CsI screen will be a good choice. The screen can be replaced by an IQI or LSO unit if higher resolution is needed later, for instance to focus in on a region of interest. A number of significant findings were obtained from this study. Most important of the findings was that materials are commercially available that are much brighter than screens currently in use. This finding meets the original objective of the project. Two objectives of the study; however, were not met. We hoped to evaluate a 'quantum dot' (nanometer-sized particles of semiconductor material) wavelength conversion screen, but the manufacturer ceased production of the screen shortly before the project was started. The dot screen could be efficient in converting ultraviolet light to visible light which would have proved important for utilizing a Cherenkov screen. Since this was a very new, cutting-edge technology, an alternative supplier was not found during the study. Also, high-energy testing of a Cherenkov light screen was not performed due to difficulties in obtaining appropriate approvals for locating test equipment in the high-energy X-ray vault at Y-12. The test is still important, and is being pursued through follow-on funding sources. Although many film shots will be eliminated by the availability of high quality digital images, the largest potential gains result from the availability of clearer images that show fine detail in the parts under analysis. Digital radiographic data also offers the possibility of easily sharing data with other sites. This could prove invaluable when critical material, placement, assembly, or quality issues are pressing. Also, increased throughput in the NDE facility allows statistically significant numbers of units to be analyzed. Digital technologies may in fact be needed just to meet minimum requirements of future demands. Increased brightness screens allow for such innovations as 3-D tomographic images to be acquired in a reasonable time. Much of the skill required to interpret 'flattened' X-ray images is not needed to maneuver around the reconstructed tomogram. This study showed that several commercially available materials are much brighter than screens currently in use. The study also showed that materials othe

  12. X-rays from Supernova Remnants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Aschenbach

    2002-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A summary of X-ray observations of supernova remnants is presented including the explosion fragment A of the Vela SNR, Tycho, N132D, RX J0852-4622, the Crab Nebula and the 'bulls eye', and SN 1987A, high-lighting the progress made with Chandra and XMM-Newton and touching upon the questions which arise from these observations and which might inspire future research.

  13. Dynamic screening x-ray energy shifts and collisional line broadening of 2p-1s transitions in 2 MeV/AMU H- and He-like Ne, Mg, and S ions traveling in solids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maurer, Richard Jay

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for reflectivity) of the np-1s and 1snp-ls peaks vs quantum number for n 2 to 6. . . . ~ . . . . . 130 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION The earliest report of Ku x-rays from few-electron heavy iona was found in the pioneering work of Edlen and Tyzen ~ Using a vacuum.... Hopkins et al. 2 also observed line broadening when they measured x-rays emitted from 4 ' 0 NeV Ne moving in solid targets. The line broadening is thought to arise because of the large cross-sections for ionization, excitation, and decay processes...

  14. Bright X-ray galaxies in SDSS filaments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tugay, A V

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Eighteen bright X-ray emitting galaxies were found in nearby filaments within SDSS region. Basic X-ray spectral parameters were estimated for these galaxies using power law model with photoelectric absorption. A close pair of X-ray galaxies was found.

  15. Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) Laboratory Learning Experiences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meagher, Mary

    .A. & Svergun D.I. (1987). Structure Analysis by Small-Angle X-Ray and Neutron Scattering. NY: Plenum PressSmall Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) Laboratory Learning Experiences o - Use of small angle X-ray scattering instrumentation o - Programs that you will use SAXS (BRUKER AXS) PRIMUS (Konarev, Volkov, Koch

  16. Femtosecond laser-electron x-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hartemann, Frederic V.; Baldis, Hector A.; Barty, Chris P.; Gibson, David J.; Rupp, Bernhard

    2004-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A femtosecond laser-electron X-ray source. A high-brightness relativistic electron injector produces an electron beam pulse train. A system accelerates the electron beam pulse train. The femtosecond laser-electron X-ray source includes a high intra-cavity power, mode-locked laser and an x-ray optics system.

  17. X-ray and Optical Variations in the Classical Be Star gamma Cas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard D. Robinson; Myron A. Smith; Gregory W. Henry

    2002-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    gamma Cas (B0.5e) is known to be a unique X-ray source because ot its moderate L_x, hard X-ray spectrum, and light curve punctuated by ubiquitous flares and slow undulations. Its X-ray peculiarities have led to a controversy concerning their origin: either from wind infall onto a putative degenerate companion, as for typical Be/X-ray binaries, or from the Be star per se. Recent progress has been made to address this: (1) the discovery that gamma Cas is an eccentric binary system (P = 203.59 d) with unknown secondary type, (2) the accumulation of RXTE data at 9 epochs in 1996-2000, and (3) the collation of robotic telescope B, V-band photometric observations over 4 seasons. The latter show a 3%, cyclical flux variation with cycle lengths 55-93 days. We find that X-ray fluxes at all 9 epochs show random variations with orbital phase. This contradicts the binary accretion model, which predicts a substantial modulation. However,these fluxes correlate well with the cyclical optical variations. Also, the 6 flux measurements in 2000 closely track the interpolated optical variations between the 2000 and 2001 observing seasons. Since the optical variations represent a far greater energy than that emitted as X-rays, the optical variability cannot arise from X-ray reprocessing. However, the strong correlation between the two suggests that they are driven by a common mechanism. We propose that this mechanism is a cyclical magnetic dynamo excited by a Balbus-Hawley instability located within the inner part of the circumstellar disk. In our model, variations in the field strength directly produce the changes in the magnetically related X-ray activity. Turbulence associated with the dynamo results in changes to the density distribution within the disk and creates the observed optical variations.

  18. Enhanced X-ray variability from V1647 Ori, the young star in outburst illuminating McNeil's Nebula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grosso, N; Ozawa, H; Richmond, M; Simon, T; Weintraub, D A; Hamaguchi, K; Frank, A

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a ~38 ks X-ray observation of McNeil's Nebula obtained with XMM on 2004 April 4. V1647 Ori, the young star in outburst illuminating McNeil's Nebula, is detected with XMM and appears variable in X-rays. We investigate the hardness ratio variability and time variations of the event energy distribution with quantile analysis, and show that the large increase of the count rate from V1647 Ori observed during the second half of the observation is not associated with any large plasma temperature variations as for typical X-ray flares from young low-mass stars. X-ray spectral fitting shows that the bulk (~75%) of the intrinsic X-ray emission in the 0.5-8 keV energy band comes from a soft plasma component (0.9 keV) reminiscent of the X-ray spectrum of the classical T Tauri star TW Hya, for which X-ray emission is believed to be generated by an accretion shock onto the photosphere of a low-mass star. The hard plasma component (4.2 keV) contributes ~25% of the total X-ray emission, and can be understood only i...

  19. Investigating high speed phenomena in laser plasma interactions using dilation x-ray imager (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagel, S. R., E-mail: nagel7@llnl.gov; Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Ayers, M. J.; Piston, K.; Felker, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Hilsabeck, T. J.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Chung, T.; Sammuli, B. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Hares, J. D.; Dymoke-Bradshaw, A. K. L. [Kentech Instruments Ltd., Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The DIlation X-ray Imager (DIXI) is a new, high-speed x-ray framing camera at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) sensitive to x-rays in the range of ?2–17 keV. DIXI uses the pulse-dilation technique to achieve a temporal resolution of less than 10 ps, a ?10× improvement over conventional framing cameras currently employed on the NIF (?100 ps resolution), and otherwise only attainable with 1D streaked imaging. The pulse-dilation technique utilizes a voltage ramp to impart a velocity gradient on the signal-bearing electrons. The temporal response, spatial resolution, and x-ray sensitivity of DIXI are characterized with a short x-ray impulse generated using the COMET laser facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. At the NIF a pinhole array at 10 cm from target chamber center (tcc) projects images onto the photocathode situated outside the NIF chamber wall with a magnification of ?64×. DIXI will provide important capabilities for warm-dense-matter physics, high-energy-density science, and inertial confinement fusion, adding important capabilities to temporally resolve hot-spot formation, x-ray emission, fuel motion, and mix levels in the hot-spot at neutron yields of up to 10{sup 17}. We present characterization data as well as first results on electron-transport phenomena in buried-layer foil experiments.

  20. Growing Cutting-edge X-ray Optics

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ray Conley

    2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Ever imagined that an Xbox controller could help open a window into a world spanning just one billionth of a meter? Brookhaven Lab's Ray Conley grows cutting-edge optics called multilayer Laue lenses (MLL) one atomic layer at a time to focus high-energy x-rays to within a single nanometer. To achieve this focusing feat, Ray uses a massive, custom-built atomic deposition device, an array of computers, and a trusty Xbox controller. These lenses will be deployed at the Lab's National Synchrotron Light Source II, due to begin shining super-bright light on pressing scientific puzzles in 2015

  1. Nuclear surface studies with antiprotonic atom X-rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wycech, S; Jastrzebski, J J; Klos, B; Trzcinska, A; Von Egidy, T

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent and older level shifts and widths in pbar atoms are analyzed. The results are fitted by an antiproton-nucleus optical potential with two basic complex strength parameters. These parameters are related to average S and P wave scattering parameters in the subthreshold energy region. A fair consistency of the X-ray data for all Z values, stopping pbar data and the Nbar-N scattering data has been achieved. The determination of neutron density profiles at the nuclear surface is undertaken, and the determination of the neutron R_{rms} radii is attempted. Uncertainties due to the input data and the procedure are discussed.

  2. GaN for x-ray detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duboz, Jean-Yves; Lauegt, Marguerite; Schenk, David [CRHEA, CNRS, rue Bernard Gregory, Sophia Antipolis, F-06560 Valbonne (France); Beaumont, Bernard [Lumilog, 2720 chemin de saint Bernard, F-06220 Vallauris (France); Reverchon, Jean-Luc [THALES R and T, route departementale 128, F-91767 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Wieck, Andreas D.; Zimmerling, Tino [Fakultaet fuer Physik und Astronomie, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential of GaN based materials for x-ray detection is investigated. The absorption coefficient in GaN is measured as a function of photon energy between 6 and 40 keV. Metal-semiconductor-metal photodetectors are fabricated and characterized. The response dependence on bias, the temporal dynamics, and the response dependence on detector geometry all together point toward a mixing of photovoltaic and photoconductive effects. Thanks to a large photoconductive gain, the detector has a decent responsivity at the expense of a large response time.

  3. ALS X-Rays Shine a New Light on Catalysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See theDoctoral FellowshipALS X-Rays Shine a New Light

  4. ALS X-Rays Shine a New Light on Catalysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See theDoctoral FellowshipALS X-Rays Shine a New

  5. ALS X-Rays Shine a New Light on Catalysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See theDoctoral FellowshipALS X-Rays Shine a NewALS

  6. ALS X-Rays Shine a New Light on Catalysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See theDoctoral FellowshipALS X-Rays Shine a NewALSALS

  7. Anomalous X-ray Diffraction Studies for Photovoltaic Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Anomalous X-ray Diffraction (AXRD) has become a useful technique in characterizing bulk and nanomaterials as it provides specific information about the crystal structure of materials. In this project we present the results of AXRD applied to materials for photovoltaic applications: ZnO loaded with Ga and ZnCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel. The X-ray diffraction data collected for various energies were plotted in Origin software. The peaks were fitted using different functions including Pseudo Voigt, Gaussian, and Lorentzian. This fitting provided the integrated intensity data (peaks area values), which when plotted as a function of X-ray energies determined the material structure. For the first analyzed sample, Ga was not incorporated into the ZnO crystal structure. For the ZnCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel Co was found in one or both tetrahedral and octahedral sites. The use of anomalous X-ray diffraction (AXRD) provides element and site specific information for the crystal structure of a material. This technique lets us correlate the structure to the electronic properties of the materials as it allows us to probe precise locations of cations in the spinel structure. What makes it possible is that in AXRD the diffraction pattern is measured at a number of energies near an X-ray absorption edge of an element of interest. The atomic scattering strength of an element varies near its absorption edge and hence the total intensity of the diffraction peak changes by changing the X-ray energy. Thus AXRD provides element specific structural information. This method can be applied to both crystalline and liquid materials. One of the advantages of AXRD in crystallography experiments is its sensitivity to neighboring elements in the periodic tables. This method is also sensitive to specific crystallographic phases and to a specific site in a phase. The main use of AXRD in this study is for transparent conductors (TCs) analysis. TCs are considered to be important materials because of their efficiency and low risk of environmental pollution. These materials are important to solar cells as a result of their remarkable combination of optical and electrical properties, including high electrical conductivity and high optical transparency in the spectrum of visible light. TCs provide a transparent window, which allows sunlight to pass through while also allowing electricity to conduct out of the cell. Spinel materials have the chemical form AB{sub 2}O{sub 4}, and are made of a face-centered cubic (FCC) lattice of oxygen anions and cations in specific interstitial sites. A normal spinel has all A cations on tetrahedral sites and B cations on octahedral sites. In contrast; an inverse spinel has the A and half of the B cations on octahedral sites and the other half of the B cations on tetrahedral sites; a mixed spinel lies between. In the spinel structure, 8 of 64 possible tetrahedral sites and 16 of 32 possible octahedral sites are filled. Normal spinels have particularly high conduction as the linear octahedral chains of B cations likely serve as conduction paths. In this paper we present how the data obtained with AXRD is used to analyze TCs properties as they apply to photovoltaic applications. One of the materials used for this analysis is zinc oxide. It has been loaded with 5% and 10% of Ga, which has an absorption edge of 10367 eV. The peak (100) was measured for the zinc oxide loaded with 10% Ga. In the case of 5% Ga, we measured peaks (100) and (101). With the information provided by the AXRD we can identify if Ga is being incorporated in the ZnO crystal structure. The analysis of 311 plane in the ZnCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel shows if Co is in tetrahedral or octahedral site.

  8. Proceedings of the workshop on X-ray computed microtomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report consists of vugraphs from the nine presentations at the conference. Titles of the presentations are: CMT: Applications and Techniques; Computer Microtomography Using X-rays from Third Generation Synchrotron X-ray; Approaches to Soft-X-ray Nanotomography; Diffraction Enhanced Tomography; X-ray Computed Microtomography Applications at the NSLS; XCMT Applications in Forestry and Forest Products; 3DMA: Investigating Three Dimensional Pore Geometry from High Resolution Images; X-ray Computed Microtomography Studies of Volcanic Rock; and 3-D Visualization of Tomographic Volumes.

  9. Calibrating X-ray Imaging Devices for Accurate Intensity Measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haugh, M. J.

    2011-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the project presented is to develop methods to accurately calibrate X-ray imaging devices. The approach was to develop X-ray source systems suitable for this endeavor and to develop methods to calibrate solid state detectors to measure source intensity. NSTec X-ray sources used for the absolute calibration of cameras are described, as well as the method of calibrating the source by calibrating the detectors. The work resulted in calibration measurements for several types of X-ray cameras. X-ray camera calibration measured efficiency and efficiency variation over the CCD. Camera types calibrated include: CCD, CID, back thinned (back illuminated), front illuminated.

  10. Earth X-ray albedo for cosmic X-ray background radiation in the 1--1000 keV band

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Churazov; S. Sazonov; R. Sunyaev; M. Revnivtsev

    2008-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We present calculations of the reflection of the cosmic X-ray background (CXB) by the Earth's atmosphere in the 1--1000 keV energy range. The calculations include Compton scattering and X-ray fluorescent emission and are based on a realistic chemical composition of the atmosphere. Such calculations are relevant for CXB studies using the Earth as an obscuring screen (as was recently done by INTEGRAL). The Earth's reflectivity is further compared with that of the Sun and the Moon -- the two other objects in the Solar system subtending a large solid angle on the sky, as needed for CXB studies.

  11. Generation of Coherent X-Ray Radiation Through Modulation Compression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiang, Ji

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this letter, we propose a scheme to generate tunable coherent X-ray radiation for future light source applications. This scheme uses an energy chirped electron beam, a laser modulators, a laser chirper and two bunch compressors to generate a prebunched kilo-Ampere current electron beam from a few tens Ampere electron beam out of a linac. The initial modulation energy wavelength can be compressed by a factor of $1+h_b R_{56}^a$ in phase space, where $h_b$ is the energy bunch length chirp introduced by the laser chirper, $R_{56}^a$ is the momentum compaction factor of the first bunch compressor. As an illustration, we present an example to generate more than $400$ MW, $170$ atto-seconds pulse, $1$ nm coherent X-ray radiation using a $60$ Ampere electron beam out of the linac and $200$ nm laser seed. Both the final wavelength and the radiation pulse length in the proposed scheme are tunable by adjusting the compression factor and the laser parameters.

  12. Generation of Coherent X-Ray Radiation Through Modulation Compression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qiang, Ji; Wu, Juhao

    2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In this letter, we propose a scheme to generate tunable coherent X-ray radiation for future light source applications. This scheme uses an energy chirped electron beam, a laser modulators, a laser chirper and two bunch compressors to generate a prebunched kilo-Ampere current electron beam from a few tens Ampere electron beam out of a linac. The initial modulation energy wavelength can be compressed by a factor of 1 + h{sub b}R{sub 56}{sup a} phase space, where h{sub b} is the energy bunch length chirp introduced by the laser chirper, R{sub 56}{sup a} is the momentum compaction factor of the first bunch compressor. As an illustration, we present an example to generate more than 400 MW, 170 atto-seconds pulse, 1 nm coherent X-ray radiation using a 60 Ampere electron beam out. of the linac and 200 nm laser seed. Both the final wavelength and the radiation pulse length in the proposed scheme are tunable by adjusting the compression factor and the laser parameters.

  13. X-Ray Synchrotron Emitting Fe-Rich Ejecta in SNR RCW 86

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeonghee Rho; Kristy K. Dyer; Kazimierz J. Borkowski; Stephen P. Reynolds

    2002-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Supernova remnants may exhibit both thermal and nonthermal X-ray emission. We present Chandra observations of RCW 86. Striking differences in the morphology of X-rays below 1 keV and above 2 keV point to a different physical origin. Hard X-ray emission is correlated fairly well with the edges of regions of radio emission, suggesting that these are the locations of shock waves at which both short-lived X-ray emitting electrons, and longer-lived radio-emitting electrons, are accelerated. Soft X-rays are spatially well-correlated with optical emission from nonradiative shocks, which are almost certainly portions of the outer blast wave. These soft X-rays are well fit with simple thermal plane-shock models. Harder X-rays show Fe K alpha emission and are well described with a similar soft thermal component, but a much stronger synchrotron continuum dominating above 2 keV, and a strong Fe K alpha line. Quantitative analysis of this line and the surrounding continuum shows that it cannot be produced by thermal emission from a cosmic-abundance plasma; the ionization time is too short, as shown both by the low centroid energy (6.4 keV) and the absence of oxygen lines below 1 keV. Instead, a model of a plane shock into Fe-rich ejecta, with a synchrotron continuum, provides a natural explanation. This requires that reverse shocks into ejecta be accelerating electrons to energies of order 50 TeV. We show that maximum energies of this order can be produced by radiation-limited diffusive shock acceleration at the reverse shocks.

  14. Apparatus for monitoring X-ray beam alignment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinmeyer, P.A.

    1991-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A self-contained, hand-held apparatus is provided for monitoring alignment of an X-ray beam in an instrument employing an X-ray source. The apparatus includes a transducer assembly containing a photoresistor for providing a range of electrical signals responsive to a range of X-ray beam intensities from the X-ray beam being aligned. A circuit, powered by a 7.5 VDC power supply and containing an audio frequency pulse generator whose frequency varies with the resistance of the photoresistor, is provided for generating a range of audible sounds. A portion of the audible range corresponds to low X-ray beam intensity. Another portion of the audible range corresponds to high X-ray beam intensity. The transducer assembly may include an a photoresistor, a thin layer of X-ray fluorescent material, and a filter layer transparent to X-rays but opaque to visible light. X-rays from the beam undergoing alignment penetrate the filter layer and excite the layer of fluorescent material. The light emitted from the fluorescent material alters the resistance of the photoresistor which is in the electrical circuit including the audio pulse generator and a speaker. In employing the apparatus, the X-ray beam is aligned to a complete alignment by adjusting the X-ray beam to produce an audible sound of the maximum frequency. 2 figures.

  15. Accretion Disk Boundary Layers Around Neutron Stars: X-ray Production in Low-Mass X-ray Binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Popham; Rashid Sunyaev

    2000-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We present solutions for the structure of the boundary layer where the accretion disk meets the neutron star, which is expected to be the dominant source of high-energy radiation in low-mass X-ray binaries which contain weakly magnetized accreting neutron stars. We find that the main portion of the boundary layer gas is hot (> ~10^8 K), low in density, radially and vertically extended, and optically thick to scattering but optically thin to absorption. It will produce large X-ray luminosity by Comptonization. Energy is transported inward by viscosity, concentrating the energy dissipation in the dense, optically thick zone close to the stellar surface. We explore the dependence of the boundary layer structure on the mass accretion rate, the rotation rate of the star, the alpha viscosity parameter and the viscosity prescription. Radiation pressure is the dominant source of pressure in the boundary layer; the flux is close to the Eddington limiting flux even for luminosities well below (~0.01 times) L(Edd). At luminosities near L(Edd), the boundary layer expands radially, and has a radial extent larger than one stellar radius. Based on the temperatures and optical depths which characterize the boundary layer, we expect that Comptonization will produce a power-law spectrum at low source luminosities. At high luminosities, a Planckian spectrum will be produced in the dense region where most of the energy is released, and modified by Comptonization as the radiation propagates outward.

  16. X-ray server : an outline resource for simulations of x-ray diffraction and scattering.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stepanov, S.; Biosciences Division

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray Server is a public project operational at the APS since 1997 with the goals to explore novel network technologies for providing wide scientific community with access to personal research results, establishing scientific collaborations, and refining scientific software. The Server provides Web-based access to a number of programs developed by the author in the field of X-ray diffraction and scattering. The software code operates directly on the Server available for use without downloading. Currently seven programs are accessible that have been used more than 85,000 times. This report discusses the Server philosophy, provides an overview of the physical models and algorithms beneath the codes and demonstrates some applications of the programs. It is shown with examples and statistics how the Server goals are achieved. The plans for further X-ray Server development are outlined.

  17. HgMn Stars as apparent X-ray emitters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubrig, S; Mathys, G

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the ROSAT all-sky survey 11 HgMn stars were detected as soft X-ray emitters (Berghoefer, Schmitt & Cassinelli 1996). Prior to ROSAT, X-ray observations with the Einstein Observatory had suggested that stars in the spectral range B5-A7 are devoid of X-ray emission. Since there is no X-ray emitting mechanism available for these stars (also not for HgMn stars), the usual argument in the case of an X-ray detected star of this spectral type is the existence of an unseen low-mass companion which is responsible for the X-ray emission. The purpose of the present work is to use all available data for our sample of X-ray detected HgMn stars and conclude on the nature of possible companions.

  18. X-ray emission properties of galaxies in Abell 3128

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell J. Smith

    2003-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We use archival Chandra X-ray Observatory data to investigate X-ray emission from early-type galaxies in the rich z=0.06 cluster Abell 3128. By combining the X-ray count-rates from an input list of optically-selected galaxies, we obtain a statistical detection of X-ray flux, unbiased by X-ray selection limits. Using 87 galaxies with reliable Chandra data, X-ray emission is detected for galaxies down to M_B ~ -19.0, with only an upper limit determined for galaxies at M_B ~ -18.3. The ratio of X-ray to optical luminosities is consistent with recent determinations of the low-mass X-ray binary content of nearby elliptical galaxies. Taken individually, in contrast, we detect significant (3sigma) flux for only six galaxies. Of these, one is a foreground galaxy, while two are optically-faint galaxies with X-ray hardness ratios characteristic of active galactic nuclei. The remaining three detected galaxies are amongst the optically-brightest cluster members, and have softer X-ray spectra. Their X-ray flux is higher than that expected from X-ray binaries, by a factor 2-10; the excess suggests these galaxies have retained their hot gaseous haloes. The source with the highest L_X / L_B ratio is of unusual optical morphology with prominent sharp-edged shells. Notwithstanding these few exceptions, the cluster population overall exhibits X-ray properties consistent with their emission being dominated by X-ray binaries. We conclude that in rich cluster environments, interaction with the ambient intra-cluster medium acts to strip most galaxies of their hot halo gas.

  19. X-ray generation using carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parmee, Richard J.; Collins, Clare M.; Milne, William I.; Cole, Matthew T.

    2015-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    of these sys- tems are illustrated in Figure 2(b) also outlines the principle mode of operation. Here, sealed in an inexpensive and eas- ily fabricated evacuated glass or ceramic envelope, the elec- trons are liberated from a metallic filament, often made... - ment of CNT-based FE sources is provided in [152]. Here we provide a condensed review of the progress, as it pertains to X-ray sources, since then. CNTs have some of the highest attainable aspect ratios, high thermal conductivity, low chemical...

  20. The BMW X-ray Cluster Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alberto Moretti; Luigi Guzzo; Sergio Campana; Stefano Covino; Davide Lazzati; Marcella Longhetti; Emilio Molinari; Maria Rosa Panzera; Gianpiero Tagliaferri; Ian Dell'Antonio

    2001-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the main features of the BMW survey of serendipitous X-ray clusters, based on the still unexploited ROSAT-HRI archival observations. The sky coverage, surface density and first deep optical CCD images of the candidates indicate that this sample can represent an excellent complement to the existing PSPC deep cluster surveys and will provide us with a fully independent probe of the evolution of the cluster abundance, in addition to significantly increasing the number of clusters known at z>0.6.

  1. The BMW X-ray Cluster Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moretti, A; Campana, S; Covino, S; Lazzati, D; Longhetti, M; Molinari, E; Panzera, M R; Tagliaferri, G; Dell'Antonio, I P; Moretti, Alberto; Guzzo, Luigi; Campana, Sergio; Covino, Stefano; Lazzati, Davide; Longhetti, Marcella; Molinari, Emilio; Panzera, Maria Rosa; Tagliaferri, Gianpiero; Antonio, Ian Dell'

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the main features of the BMW survey of serendipitous X-ray clusters, based on the still unexploited ROSAT-HRI archival observations. The sky coverage, surface density and first deep optical CCD images of the candidates indicate that this sample can represent an excellent complement to the existing PSPC deep cluster surveys and will provide us with a fully independent probe of the evolution of the cluster abundance, in addition to significantly increasing the number of clusters known at z>0.6.

  2. X-ray emission from the planet pulsar B1257+12

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. G. Pavlov; O. Kargaltsev; G. P. Garmire; A. Wolszczan

    2007-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the detection of the millisecond pulsar B1257+12 with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. In a 20 ks exposure we detected 25 photons from the pulsar, with energies between 0.4 and 2.0 keV, corresponding to the flux F_X=(4.4+/- 0.9)*10^{-15} ergs s^{-1} cm^{-2} in this energy range. The X-ray spectrum can be described by a power-law model with photon index Gamma = 2.8 and luminosity L_X \\approx 2.5*10^{29} ergs s^{-1} in the 0.3--8 keV band, for a plausible distance of 500 pc and hydrogen column density N_H=3*10^{20} cm^{-2}. Alternatively, the spectrum can be fitted by a blackbody model with kT ~ 0.22 keV and projected emitting area ~2000 m^2. If the thermal X-rays are emitted from two symmetric polar caps, the bolometric luminosity of the two caps is 2 L_bol ~ 3*10^{29} ergs s^{-1}. We compared our results with the data on other 30 millisecond pulsars observed in X-rays and found that the apparent X-ray efficiency of PSR B1257+12, L_X/Edot ~ 3*10^{-5} for d=500 pc, is lower than those of most of millisecond pulsars. This might be explained by an unfavorable orientation of the X-ray pulsar beam if the radiation is magnetospheric, or by strong asymmetry of polar caps if the radiation is thermal (e.g., one of the polar caps is much brighter than the other and remains invisible for most part of the pulsar period). Alternatively, it could be attributed to absorption of X-rays in circumpulsar matter, such as a flaring debris disk left over after formation of the planetary system around the pulsar.

  3. Soft x-ray generation in gases with an ultrashort pulse laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ditmire, T.R.

    1996-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental investigation of soft x-ray production resulting from the interaction of intense near infra-red laser radiation with gases is presented in this thesis. Specifically, soft x-ray generation through high order harmonic generation or exploiting intense inverse bremsstrahlung heating is examined. Most of these studies are conducted with femtosecond, terawatt class Cr:LiSrAlF{sub 6} (LiSAF) laser, though results derived from studies with other laser systems are presented as well. The majority of this work is devoted to experimental investigations, however, theoretical and computational models are developed to interpret the data. These studies are motivated by the possibility of utilizing the physics of intense laser/matter interactions as a potential compact source of bright x-rays. Consequently, the thrust of many of the experiments conducted is aimed at characterizing the x-rays produced for possible use in applications. In general, the studies of this manuscript fall into three categories. First, a unique 130 fs, 8 TW laser that is based on chirped pulse amplification, is described, and its performance is evaluated. The generation of x-rays through high order harmonics is then discussed with emphasis on characterizing and optimizing harmonic generation. Finally, the generation of strong, incoherent x-ray radiation by the intense irradiation of large (>1,000 atom) clusters in gas jets, is explored. The physics of laser energy absorption by clusters illuminated with intensities of 10{sup 15} to 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2} is considered in detail. X-ray spectroscopy of the hot plasmas that result from the irradiation of the clusters is conducted, and energy transport and kinetics issues in these plasmas are discussed.

  4. Spectral Formation in X-Ray Pulsars: Bulk Comptonization in the Accretion Shock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter A. Becker; Michael T. Wolff

    2005-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Accretion-powered X-ray pulsars are among the most luminous X-ray sources in the Galaxy. However, despite decades of theoretical and observational work since their discovery, no satisfactory model for the formation of the observed X-ray spectra has emerged. In particular, the previously available theories are unable to reproduce the power-law variation observed at high energies in many sources. In this paper, we present the first self-consistent calculation of the spectrum emerging from a pulsar accretion column that includes an explicit treatment of the energization occurring in the shock. Using a rigorous eigenfunction expansion method based on the exact dynamical solution for the velocity profile in the column, we obtain a closed-form expression for the Green's function describing the upscattering of radiation injected into the column from a monochromatic source located at the top of the thermal mound, near the base of the flow. The Green's function is convolved with a Planck distribution to calculate the radiation spectrum resulting from the reprocessing of blackbody photons emitted by the thermal mound. We demonstrate that the energization of the photons in the shock naturally produces an X-ray spectrum with a power-law shape at high energies and a blackbody shape at low energies, in agreement with many observations of accreting X-ray pulsars.

  5. Feasibility of x ray fluorescence for spent fuel safeguards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, Corey Ross [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mozin, Vladimir [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Stephen J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fensin, Michael L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; White, Julia M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Croft, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stafford, Alissa [TAMU; Charlton, William [TAMU

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantifying the Pu content in spent nuclear fuel is necessary for many reasons, in particular to verify that diversion or other illicit activities have not occurred. Therefore, safeguarding the world's nuclear fuel is paramount to responsible nuclear regulation and public acceptance, but achieving this goal presents many difficulties from both a technical and economic perspective. The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) of NA-24 is funding a large collaborative effort between multiple laboratories and universities to improve spent nuclear fuel safeguards methods and equipment. This effort involves the current work of modeling several different nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques. Several are being researched, because no single NDA technique, in isolation, has the potential to properly characterize fuel assemblies and offer a robust safeguards measure. The insights gained from this research, will be used to down-select from the original set a few of the most promising techniques that complement each other. The goal is to integrate the selected instruments to create an accurate measurement system for fuel verification that is also robust enough to detect diversions. These instruments will be fabricated and tested under realistic conditions. This work examines one of the NDA techniques; the feasibility of using x ray emission peaks from Pu and U to gather information about their relative quantities in the spent fuel. X Ray Fluorescence (XRF), is unique compared to the investigated techniques in that it is the only one able to give the elemental ratio of Pu to U, allowing the possibility of a Pu gram quantity for the assembly to be calculated. XRF also presents many challenges, mainly its low penetration, since the low energy x rays of interest are effectively shielded by the first few millimeters of a fuel pin. This paper will explore the results of Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) transport code calculations of spent fuel x ray peaks. The MCNPX simulations will be benchmarked against measurements taken at Oak Ridge. Analysis of the feasibility of XRFs role in spent nuclear fuel safeguards efforts, particularly in the context of the overall NGSI effort will be discussed.

  6. First results from the high-brightness x-ray spectroscopy beamline 9. 3.1 at ALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ng, W.; Jones, G.; Perera, R.C.C.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Beamline 9.3.1 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a windowless beamline, covering the 1-6 keV photon-energy range. This beamline is designed to achieve the goal of high brightness at the sample for use in the X-ray Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy (XAMS) science, surface and interface science, biology, and x-ray optical development programs at ALS. X-ray absorption and time of flight photoemission measurements in 2 - 5 keV photon energy along with the flux, resolution, spot size and stability of the beamline will be discussed. Prospects for future XAMS measurements will also be presented.

  7. A kpc-scale X-ray jet in the BL Lac source S5 2007+777

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rita M. Sambruna; Davide Donato; C. C. Cheung; F. Tavecchio; L. Maraschi

    2008-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray jets in AGN are commonly observed in FRII and FRI radio-galaxies, but rarely in BL Lacs, most probably due to their orientation close to the line of sight and the ensuing foreshortening effects. Only three BL Lacs are known so far to contain a kpc-scale X-ray jet. In this paper, we present the evidence for the existence of a fourth extended X-ray jet in the classical radio-selected source S5 2007+777, which for its hybrid FRI/II radio morphology has been classified as a HYMOR (HYbrid MOrphology Radio source). Our Chandra ACIS-S observations of this source revealed an X-ray counterpart to the 19"-long radio jet. Interestingly, the X-ray properties of the kpc-scale jet in S5 2007+777 are very similar to those observed in FRII jets. First, the X-ray morphology closely mirrors the radio one, with the X-rays being concentrated in the discrete radio knots. Second, the X-ray continuum of the jet/brightest knot is described by a very hard power law, with photon index Gamma_x~1, although the uncertainties are large. Third, the optical upper limit from archival HST data implies a concave radio-to-X-ray SED. If the X-ray emission is attributed to IC/CMB with equipartition, strong beaming (delta=13) is required, implying a very large scale (Mpc) jet. The beaming requirement can be somewhat relaxed assuming a magnetic field lower than equipartition. Alternatively, synchrotron emission from a second population of very high-energy electrons is viable. Comparison to other HYMOR jets detected with Chandra is discussed, as well as general implications for the origin of the FRI/II division.

  8. X-ray emission from Saturn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ness, J U; Wolk, S J; Dennerl, K; Burwitz, V

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first unambiguous detection of X-ray emission originating from Saturn with a Chandra observation, duration 65.5 ksec with ACIS-S3. Beyond the pure detection we analyze the spatial distribution of X-rays on the planetary surface, the light curve, and some spectral properties. The detection is based on 162 cts extracted from the ACIS-S3 chip within the optical disk of Saturn. We found no evidence for smaller or larger angular extent. The expected background level is 56 cts, i.e., the count rate is (1.6 +- 0.2) 10^-3 cts/s. The extracted photons are rather concentrated towards the equator of the apparent disk, while both polar caps have a relative photon deficit. The inclination angle of Saturn during the observation was -27 degrees, so that the northern hemisphere was not visible during the complete observation. In addition, it was occulted by the ring system. We found a small but significant photon excess at one edge of the ring system. The light curve shows a small dip twice at identical phases,...

  9. The variability properties of X-ray steep and X-ray flat quasars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrizio Fiore; Ari Laor; Martin Elvis; Fabrizio Nicastro; Emanuele Giallongo

    1998-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied the variability of 6 low redshift, radio quiet `PG' quasars on three timescales (days, weeks, and months) using the ROSAT HRI. The quasars were chosen to lie at the two extreme ends of the ROSAT PSPC spectral index distribution and hence of the H$\\beta$ FWHM distribution. The observation strategy has been carefully designed to provide even sampling on these three basic timescales and to provide a uniform sampling among the quasars We have found clear evidence that the X-ray steep, narrow H_beta, quasars systematically show larger amplitude variations than the X-ray flat broad H_beta quasars on timescales from 2 days to 20 days. On longer timescales we do not find significant differences between steep and flat quasars, although the statistics are poorer. We suggest that the above correlation between variability properties and spectral steepness can be explained in a scenario in which the X-ray steep, narrow line objects are in a higher L/L_Edd state with respect to the X-ray flat, broad line objects. We evaluated the power spectrum of PG1440+356 (the brigthest quasar in our sample) between 2E-7 and 1E-3 Hz, where it goes into the noise. The power spectrum is roughly consistent with a 1/f law between 1E-3 and 2E-6 Hz. Below this frequency it flattens significantly.

  10. SANDIA REPORT SAND2014-9040 Unlimited Release

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited Release Printed March 2012 2nd

  11. Crushing of interstellar gas clouds in supernova remnants II. X-ray emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Orlando; F. Bocchino; G. Peres; F. Reale; T. Plewa; R. Rosner

    2006-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    AIMS. We study and discuss the time-dependent X-ray emission predicted by hydrodynamic modeling of the interaction of a SNR shock wave with an interstellar gas cloud. The scope includes: 1) to study the correspondence between modeled and X-ray emitting structures, 2) to explore two different physical regimes in which either thermal conduction or radiative cooling plays a dominant role, and 3) to investigate the effects of the physical processes at work on the emission of the shocked cloud in the two different regimes. METHODS. We use a detailed hydrodynamic model, including thermal conduction and radiation, and explore two cases characterized by different Mach numbers of the primary shock: M = 30 in which the cloud dynamics is dominated by radiative cooling and M = 50 dominated by thermal conduction. From the simulations, we synthesize the expected X-ray emission, using available spectral codes. RESULTS. The morphology of the X-ray emitting structures is significantly different from that of the flow structures originating from the shock-cloud interaction. The hydrodynamic instabilities are never clearly visible in the X-ray band. Shocked clouds are preferentially visible during the early phases of their evolution. Thermal conduction and radiative cooling lead to two different phases of the shocked cloud: a cold cooling dominated core emitting at low energies and a hot thermally conducting corona emitting in the X-ray band. The thermal conduction makes the X-ray image of the cloud smaller, more diffuse, and shorter-lived than that observed when thermal conduction is neglected.

  12. X-ray tests of a two-dimensional stigmatic imaging scheme with variable magnifications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, J., E-mail: jlu@pppl.gov [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Technology and System of Ministry of Education, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Delgado-Aparicio, L. F.; Efthimion, P. C.; Pablant, N. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Beiersdorfer, P. [Physics Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Caughey, T. A.; Brunner, J. [Inrad Optics, 181 Legrand Avenue, Northvale, New Jersey 07647 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A two-dimensional stigmatic x-ray imaging scheme, consisting of two spherically bent crystals, one concave and one convex, was recently proposed [M. Bitter et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 10E527 (2012)]. The Bragg angles and the radii of curvature of the two crystals of this imaging scheme are matched to eliminate the astigmatism and to satisfy the Bragg condition across both crystal surfaces for a given x-ray energy. In this paper, we consider more general configurations of this imaging scheme, which allow us to vary the magnification for a given pair of crystals and x-ray energy. The stigmatic imaging scheme has been validated for the first time by imaging x-rays generated by a micro-focus x-ray source with source size of 8.4 ?m validated by knife-edge measurements. Results are presented from imaging the tungsten L?1 emission at 8.3976 keV, using a convex Si-422 crystal and a concave Si-533 crystal with 2d-spacings of 2.21707 Å and 1.65635 Å and radii of curvature of 500 ± 1 mm and 823 ± 1 mm, respectively, showing a spatial resolution of 54.9 ?m. This imaging scheme is expected to be of interest for the two-dimensional imaging of laser produced plasmas.

  13. Dissociation of the benzene molecule by UV and soft X-rays in circumstellar environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. M. Boechat-Roberty; R. Neves; S. Pilling; A. F. Lago; G. G. B. de Souza

    2008-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Benzene molecules, present in the proto-planetary nebula CRL 618, are ionized and dissociated by UV and X-ray photons originated from the hot central star and by its fast wind. Ionic species and free radicals produced by these processes can lead to the formation of new organic molecules. The aim of this work is to study the photoionization and photodissociation processes of the benzene molecule, using synchrotron radiation and time of flight mass spectrometry. Mass spectra were recorded at different energies corresponding to the vacuum ultraviolet (21.21 eV) and soft X-ray (282-310 eV) spectral regions. The production of ions from the benzene dissociative photoionization is here quantified, indicating that C6H6 is more efficiently fragmented by soft X-ray than UV radiation, where 50% of the ionized benzene molecules survive to UV dissociation while only about 4% resist to X-rays. Partial ion yields of H+ and small hydrocarbons such as C2H2+, C3H3+ and C4H2+ are determined as a function of photon energy. Absolute photoionization and dissociative photoionization cross sections have also been determined. From these values, half-life of benzene molecule due to UV and X-ray photon fluxes in CRL 618 were obtained.

  14. The BMW Deep X-ray Cluster Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guzzo, L; Campana, S; Covino, S; Dell'Antonio, I P; Lazzati, D; Longhetti, M; Molinari, E; Panzera, M R; Tagliaferri, G

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We briefly describe the main features of the Brera Multi-Wavelet (BMW) survey of serendipitous X-ray clusters, based on the still unexploited ROSAT-HRI archival observations. Cluster candidates are selected from the general BMW catalogue of 20,000 sources based exclusively on their X-ray extension. Contrary to common wisdom, a clever selection of the HRI energy channels allows us to significantly reduce the background noise, thus greatly improving the ability to detect low surface-brightness sources as clusters. The resulting sample of ~250 candidates shows a very good sky coverage down to a flux \\~3x10^-14 erg/s/cm^2 ([0.5-2.0] keV band), i.e comparable to existing PSPC-based deep survey, with a particularly interesting area of ~100 sq.deg. around fluxes ~10^-13 erg/s/cm^2, i.e. where highly-luminous, rare systems at z~0.6-1 can be detected. At the same time, the superior angular resolution of the instrument should avoid biases against intrinsically small systems, while easing the identification process (e.g...

  15. The BMW Deep X-ray Cluster Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Guzzo; A. Moretti; S. Campana; S. Covino; I. Dell'Antonio; D. Lazzati; M. Longhetti; E. Molinari; M. R. Panzera; G. Tagliaferri

    2001-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We briefly describe the main features of the Brera Multi-Wavelet (BMW) survey of serendipitous X-ray clusters, based on the still unexploited ROSAT-HRI archival observations. Cluster candidates are selected from the general BMW catalogue of 20,000 sources based exclusively on their X-ray extension. Contrary to common wisdom, a clever selection of the HRI energy channels allows us to significantly reduce the background noise, thus greatly improving the ability to detect low surface-brightness sources as clusters. The resulting sample of ~250 candidates shows a very good sky coverage down to a flux \\~3x10^-14 erg/s/cm^2 ([0.5-2.0] keV band), i.e comparable to existing PSPC-based deep survey, with a particularly interesting area of ~100 sq.deg. around fluxes ~10^-13 erg/s/cm^2, i.e. where highly-luminous, rare systems at z~0.6-1 can be detected. At the same time, the superior angular resolution of the instrument should avoid biases against intrinsically small systems, while easing the identification process (e.g. by spotting blends and AGN contaminants). While about 20% of the candidates are already identified with groups/clusters at z0.5) bonafide cluster counterpart for ~80% of the targets.

  16. The Interaction of Radio Sources and X-ray-Emitting Gas in Cooling Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elizabeth L. Blanton

    2004-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent observations of the interactions between radio sources and the X-ray-emitting gas in cooling flows in the cores of clusters of galaxies are reviewed. The radio sources inflate bubbles in the X-ray gas, which then rise buoyantly outward in the clusters transporting energy to the intracluster medium (ICM). The bright rims of gas around the radio bubbles are cool, rather than hot, and do not show signs of being strongly shocked. Energy deposited into the ICM over the lifetime of a cluster through several outbursts of a radio source helps to account for at least some of the gas that is missing in cooling flows at low temperatures.

  17. X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsingWhat isJoin theanniversaryI 1 0 3 P 0 d dX-RayX-Ray

  18. X-RAY AND NEAR-INFRARED OBSERVATIONS OF THE OBSCURED ACCRETING PULSAR IGR J18179–1621

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paizis, A.

    IGR J18179–1621 is an obscured accreting X-ray pulsar discovered by INTEGRAL on 2012 February 29. We report on our 20 ks Chandra-High Energy Transmission Gratings Spectrometer observation of the source performed on 2012 ...

  19. USING THE X-RAY DUST SCATTERING HALO OF CYGNUS X-1 TO DETERMINE DISTANCE AND DUST DISTRIBUTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiang, Jingen

    We present a detailed study of the X-ray dust scattering halo of the black hole candidate Cygnus X-1 based on two Chandra High Energy Transmission Gratings Spectrometer observations. Using 18 different dust models, including ...

  20. Development of all-solid-state flash x-ray generator with photoconductive semiconductor switches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xun, Ma; Jianjun, Deng; Hongwei, Liu; Jianqiang, Yuan; Jinfeng, Liu; Bing, Wei; Yanling, Qing; Wenhui, Han; Lingyun, Wang; Pin, Jiang; Hongtao, Li [Key Laboratory of Pulsed Power, Institute of Fluid Physics, CAEP, P.O. Box 919-108, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact, low-jitter, and high repetitive rate all-solid-state flash x-ray generator making use of photo conductive semiconductor switches was developed recently for the diagnostic purpose of some hydrokinetical experiments. The generator consisted of twelve stages of Blumlein pulse forming networks, and an industrial cold cathode diode was used to generate intense x-ray radiations with photon energy up to 220 keV. Test experiments showed that the generator could produce >1 kA electron beam currents and x-ray pulses with ?40 ns duration under 100 Hz repetitive rates at least (limited by the triggering laser on hand), also found was that the delay time of the cathode explosive emission is crucial to the energy transfer efficiency of the whole system. In addition, factors affecting the diode impedance, how the switching synchronization and diode impedance determining the allowable operation voltage were discussed.

  1. HETE-2 Observations of the X-Ray Flash XRF 040916

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arimoto, M; Yoshida, A; Tamagawa, T; Shirasaki, Y; Suzuki, M; Matsuoka, M; Kotoku, J; Sato, R; Shimokawabe, T; Pazmino, N V; Ishimura, T; Nakagawa, Y; Ishikawa, N; Kobayashi, A; Sugita, S; Takahashi, I; Kuwahara, M; Yamauchi, M; Takagishi, K; Hatsukade, I; Atteia, J L; Pelangeon, A; Vanderspek, R; Graziani, C; Prigozhin, G Y; Villasenor, J; Jernigan, J G; Crew, G B; Hurley, K; Sakamoto, T; Ricker, G R; Woosley, S E; Butler, N; Levine, A; Doty, J P; Donaghy, T Q; Lamb, D Q; Fenimore, E E; Galassi, M; Boër, M; Dezalay, J P; Olive, J F; Braga, J; Manchanda, R; Pizzichini, G; Arimoto, Makoto; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Yoshida, Atsumasa; Tamagawa, Toru; Shirasaki, Yuji; Suzuki, Motoko; Matsuoka, Masaru; Kotoku, Jun'ichi; Sato, Rie; Shimokawabe, Takashi; Pazmino, Nicolas Vasquez; Ishimura, Takuto; Nakagawa, Yujin; Ishikawa, Nobuyuki; Kobayashi, Akina; Sugita, Satoshi; Takahashi, Ichiro; Kuwahara, Makoto; Yamauchi, Makoto; Takagishi, Kunio; Hatsukade, Isamu; Atteia, Jean-Luc; Pelangeon, Alexandre; Vanderspek, Roland; Graziani, Carlo; Prigozhin, Gregory; Villasenor, Joel; Crew, Geoffrey B.; Hurley, Kevin; Sakamoto, Takanori; Ricker, George R.; Woosley, Stanford E.; Butler, Nat; Levine, Al; Doty, John P.; Donaghy, Timothy Q.; Lamb, Donald Q.; Fenimore, Edward E.; Galassi, Mark; Boer, Michel; Dezalay, Jean-Pascal; Olive, Jean-Francios; Braga, Joao; Manchanda, Ravi; Pizzichini, Graziella

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A long X-ray flash was detected and localized by the instruments aboard the High Energy Transient Explorer II (HETE-2) at 00:03:30 UT on 2004 September 16. The position was reported to the GRB Coordinates Network (GCN) approximately 2 hours after the burst. This burst consists of two peaks separated by 200 s, with durations of 110 s and 60 s. We have analyzed the energy spectra of the 1st and 2nd peaks observed with the Wide Field X-Ray Monitor (WXM) and the French Gamma Telescope (FREGATE). We discuss the origin of the 2nd peak in terms of flux variabilities and timescales. We find that it is most likely part of the prompt emission, and is explained by the long-acting engine model. This feature is similar to some bright X-ray flares detected in the early afterglow phase of bursts observed by the Swift satellite.

  2. PUBLISHED VERSION Study of runaway electrons with Hard X-ray spectrometry of tokamak plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and DEMO, HXR spectrometry will be useful providing information on runaway electron energy, runaway beam as high as tens of MeV and the runaway current is more than 1 MA. The final runaway energy can becomePUBLISHED VERSION Study of runaway electrons with Hard X-ray spectrometry of tokamak plasmas

  3. Soft x-ray reduction camera for submicron lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hawryluk, Andrew M. (2708 Rembrandt Pl., Modesto, CA 95356); Seppala, Lynn G. (7911 Mines Rd., Livermore, CA 94550)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soft x-ray projection lithography can be performed using x-ray optical components and spherical imaging lenses (mirrors), which form an x-ray reduction camera. The x-ray reduction is capable of projecting a 5x demagnified image of a mask onto a resist coated wafer using 4.5 nm radiation. The diffraction limited resolution of this design is about 135 nm with a depth of field of about 2.8 microns and a field of view of 0.2 cm.sup.2. X-ray reflecting masks (patterned x-ray multilayer mirrors) which are fabricated on thick substrates and can be made relatively distortion free are used, with a laser produced plasma for the source. Higher resolution and/or larger areas are possible by varying the optic figures of the components and source characteristics.

  4. Density gradient free electron collisionally excited X-ray laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, Edward M. (Pleasanton, CA); Rosen, Mordecai D. (Berkeley, CA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An operational X-ray laser (30) is provided that amplifies 3p-3s transition X-ray radiation along an approximately linear path. The X-ray laser (30) is driven by a high power optical laser. The driving line focused optical laser beam (32) illuminates a free-standing thin foil (34) that may be associated with a substrate (36) for improved structural integrity. This illumination produces a generally cylindrically shaped plasma having an essentially uniform electron density and temperature, that exists over a long period of time, and provides the X-ray laser gain medium. The X-ray laser (30) may be driven by more than one optical laser beam (32, 44). The X-ray laser (30) has been successfully demonstrated to function in a series of experimental tests.

  5. Soft x-ray reduction camera for submicron lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hawryluk, A.M.; Seppala, L.G.

    1991-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Soft x-ray projection lithography can be performed using x-ray optical components and spherical imaging lenses (mirrors), which form an x-ray reduction camera. The x-ray reduction is capable of projecting a 5x demagnified image of a mask onto a resist coated wafer using 4.5 nm radiation. The diffraction limited resolution of this design is about 135 nm with a depth of field of about 2.8 microns and a field of view of 0.2 cm[sup 2]. X-ray reflecting masks (patterned x-ray multilayer mirrors) which are fabricated on thick substrates and can be made relatively distortion free are used, with a laser produced plasma for the source. Higher resolution and/or larger areas are possible by varying the optic figures of the components and source characteristics. 9 figures.

  6. Density gradient free electron collisionally excited x-ray laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, E.M.; Rosen, M.D.

    1984-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An operational x-ray laser is provided that amplifies 3p-3s transition x-ray radiation along an approximately linear path. The x-ray laser is driven by a high power optical laser. The driving line focused optical laser beam illuminates a free-standing thin foil that may be associated with a substrate for improved structural integrity. This illumination produces a generally cylindrically shaped plasma having an essentially uniform electron density and temperature, that exists over a long period of time, and provides the x-ray laser gain medium. The x-ray laser may be driven by more than one optical laser beam. The x-ray laser has been successfully demonstrated to function in a series of experimental tests.

  7. Ultra-short wavelength x-ray system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Umstadter, Donald (Ann Arbor, MI); He, Fei (Ann Arbor, MI); Lau, Yue-Ying (Potomac, MD)

    2008-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus to generate a beam of coherent light including x-rays or XUV by colliding a high-intensity laser pulse with an electron beam that is accelerated by a synchronized laser pulse. Applications include x-ray and EUV lithography, protein structural analysis, plasma diagnostics, x-ray diffraction, crack analysis, non-destructive testing, surface science and ultrafast science.

  8. Legacy of the X-Ray Laser Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nilsen, J.

    1993-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The X-Ray Laser Program has evolved from a design effort focusing on developing a Strategic Defense Initiative weapon that protects against Soviet ICBMs to a scientific project that is producing new technologies for industrial and medical research. While the great technical successes and failures of the X-ray laser itself cannot be discussed, this article presents the many significant achievements made as part of the X-ray laser effort that are now being used for other applications at LLNL.

  9. Sum rules for polarization-dependent x-ray absorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ankudinov, A.; Rehr, J.J. (Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States))

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A complete set of sum rules is obtained for polarization-dependent x-ray-absorption fine structure and x-ray circular magnetic dichroism (CMD), analogous to those for CMD derived by Thole [ital et] [ital al]. These sum rules relate x-ray-absorption coefficients to the ground-state expectation values of various operators. Problems with applying these sum rules are discussed.

  10. ASCA Observations of the Sgr B2 Cloud: An X-Ray Reflection Nebula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Murakami; K. Koyama; M. Sakano; M. Tsujimoto; Y. Maeda

    1999-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the ASCA results of imaging spectroscopy of the giant molecular cloud Sgr B2. The X-ray spectrum is found to be very peculiar; it exhibits a strong emission line at 6.4 keV, a low energy cutoff below about 4 keV and a pronounced edge-structure at 7.1 keV. The X-ray image is extended and its peak position is shifted from the core of the molecular cloud toward the Galactic center by about 1--2 arcminute. The X-ray spectrum and the morphology are well reproduced by a scenario that X-rays from an external source located in the Galactic center direction are scattered by the molecular cloud Sgr B2, and come into our line of sight. Thus Sgr B2 may be called an X-ray reflection nebula. Possible implications of the Galactic center activity related to this unique source are presented.

  11. A novel instrument for quantitative nanoanalytics involving complementary X-ray methodologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lubeck, J.; Beckhoff, B.; Fliegauf, R.; Holfelder, I.; Hoenicke, P.; Mueller, M.; Pollakowski, B.; Reinhardt, F.; Weser, J. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Abbestr. 2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel ultra-high vacuum instrument for X-ray reflectometry and spectrometry-related techniques for nanoanalytics by means of synchrotron radiation has been constructed and commissioned. This versatile instrument was developed by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Germany's national metrology institute, and includes a 9-axis manipulator that allows for an independent alignment of the samples with respect to all degrees of freedom. In addition, a rotational and translational movement of several photodiodes as well as a translational movement of an aperture system in and out of the beam is provided. Thus, the new instrument enables various analytical techniques based on energy dispersive X-ray detectors such as reference-free X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF), total-reflection XRF, grazing-incidence XRF in addition to optional X-ray reflectometry measurements or polarization-dependent X-ray absorption fine structure analyses. With this instrument samples having a size of up to 100 mm Multiplication-Sign 100 mm can be analyzed with respect to their mass deposition, elemental or spatial composition, or the species in order to probe surface contamination, layer composition and thickness, the depth profile of matrix elements or implants, the species of nanolayers, nanoparticles or buried interfaces as well as the molecular orientation of bonds. Selected applications of this advanced ultra-high vacuum instrument demonstrate both its flexibility and capability.

  12. Constraints on the Bulk Lorentz Factors of GRB X-Ray Flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi, Shuang-Xi; Wang, Fa-Yin; Dai, Zi-Gao

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray flares were discovered in the afterglow phase of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) by the {\\em Swift} satellite a decade ago and known as a canonical component in GRB X-ray afterglows. In this paper, we constrain the Lorentz factors of GRB X-ray flares using two different methods. For the first method, we estimate the lower limit on the bulk Lorentz factor with the flare duration and jet break time. In the second method, the upper limit on the Lorentz factor is derived by assuming that the X-ray flare jet has undergone saturated acceleration. We also re-estimate the initial Lorentz factor with GRB afterglow onsets, and find the coefficient of the theoretical Lorentz factor is 1.67 rather than the commonly used 2 for interstellar medium (ISM) and 1.44 for the wind case. We find that the correlation between the limited Lorentz factor and the isotropic radiation energy of X-ray flares in the ISM case is more consistent with that of prompt emission than the wind case in a statistical sense. For a comparison, the lowe...

  13. UNIVERSAL BEHAVIOR OF X-RAY FLARES FROM BLACK HOLE SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, F. Y.; Dai, Z. G.; Yi, S. X. [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Xi, S. Q., E-mail: fayinwang@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: dzg@nju.edu.cn [Department of Physics and GXU-NAOC Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray flares have been discovered in black hole systems such as gamma-ray bursts, the tidal disruption event Swift J1644+57, the supermassive black hole Sagittarius A* at the center of our Galaxy, and some active galactic nuclei. Occurrences of X-ray flares are always accompanied by relativistic jets. However, it is still unknown whether or not there is a physical analogy among such X-ray flares produced in black hole systems spanning nine orders of magnitude in mass. Here, we report observed data of X-ray flares and show that they have three statistical properties similar to solar flares, including power-law distributions of their energies, durations, and waiting times, which can be explained by a fractal-diffusive, self-organized criticality model. These statistical similarities, together with the fact that solar flares are triggered by a magnetic reconnection process, suggest that all of the X-ray flares are consistent with magnetic reconnection events, implying that their concomitant relativistic jets may be magnetically dominated.

  14. X-RAY PHOTOIONIZED BUBBLE IN THE WIND OF VELA X-1 PULSAR SUPERGIANT COMPANION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krticka, Jiri; Skalicky, Jan [Ustav teoreticke fyziky a astrofyziky, Masarykova univerzita, Kotlarska 2, CZ-611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Kubat, Jiri [Astromomicky ustav Akademie ved Ceske republiky, Fricova 298, CZ-251 65 Ondrejov (Czech Republic)

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vela X-1 is the archetype of high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs), composed of a neutron star and a massive B supergiant. The supergiant is a source of a strong radiatively driven stellar wind. The neutron star sweeps up this wind and creates a huge amount of X-rays as a result of energy release during the process of wind accretion. Here, we provide detailed NLTE models of the Vela X-1 envelope. We study how the X-rays photoionize the wind and destroy the ions responsible for the wind acceleration. The resulting decrease of the radiative force explains the observed reduction of the wind terminal velocity in a direction to the neutron star. The X-rays create a distinct photoionized region around the neutron star filled with a stagnating flow. The existence of such photoionized bubbles is a general property of HMXBs. We unveil a new principle governing these complex objects, according to which there is an upper limit to the X-ray luminosity the compact star can have without suspending the wind due to inefficient line driving.

  15. Pair Production from Vacuum at the Focus of an X-Ray Free Electron Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Ringwald

    2001-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    There are definite plans for the construction of X-ray free electron lasers (FEL), both at DESY, where the so-called XFEL is part of the design of the electron-positron linear collider TESLA, as well as at SLAC, where the so-called Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) has been proposed. Such an X-ray laser would allow for high-field science applications: One could make use of not only the high energy and transverse coherence of the X-ray beam, but also of the possibility of focusing it to a spot with a small radius, hopefully in the range of the laser wavelength. Along this route one obtains very large electric fields, much larger than those obtainable with any optical laser of the same power. In this letter we discuss the possibility of obtaining an electric field so high that electron-positron pairs are spontaneously produced in vacuum (Schwinger pair production). We find that if X-ray optics can be improved to approach the diffraction limit of focusing, and if the power of the planned X-ray FELs can be increased to the terawatt region, then there is ample room for an investigation of the Schwinger pair production mechanism.

  16. H-beta Line Width and the UV-X-ray Spectra of Luminous AGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. J. Wills; Z. Shang; J. M. Yuan

    2000-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The width of the broad H-beta emission line is the primary defining characteristic of the NLS1 class. This parameter is also an important component of Boroson and Green's optical Eigenvector 1 (EV1), which links steeper soft X-ray spectra with narrower H-beta emission, stronger H-beta blue wing, stronger optical Fe II emission, and weaker [O III] lambda 5007. Potentially, EV1 represents a fundamental physical process linking the dynamics of fueling and outflow with the accretion rate. We attempted to understand these relationships by extending the optical spectra into the UV for a sample of 22 QSOs with high quality soft-X-ray spectra, and discovered a whole new set of UV relationships that suggest that high accretion rates are linked to dense gas and perhaps nuclear starbursts. While it has been argued that narrow (BLR) H-beta means low Black Hole mass in luminous NLS1s, the C IV, lambda 1549 and Ly alpha emission lines are broader, perhaps the result of outflows driven by their high Eddington accretion rates. We present some new trends of optical-UV with X-ray spectral energy distributions. Steeper X-ray spectra appear associated with stronger UV relative to optical continua, but the presence of strong UV absorption lines is associated with depressed soft X-rays and redder optical-UV continua.

  17. Pixel array detector for time-resolved x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodricks, B.G. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Barna, S.L.; Gruner, S.M.; Shepherd, J.A.; Tate, M.W.; Wixted, R.L. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the development of a large-area hybrid pixel detector designed for time-resolved synchrotron x-ray scattering experiments where limited frames, with a high framing rate, is required. The final design parameters call for a 1024{times}1O24 pixel array device with 150-micron pixels that is 100% quantum efficient for x-rays with energy up to 20 keV, with a framing rate in the microsecond range. The device will consist of a fully depleted diode array bump bonded to a CMOS electronic storage capacitor array with eight frames per pixel. The two devices may be separated by a x-ray blocking layer that protects the radiation-sensitive electronics layer from damage. The signal is integrated in the electronics layer and stored in one of eight CMOS capacitors. After eight frames are taken, the data are then read out, using clocking electronics external to the detector, and stored in a RAM disk. Results will be presented on the development of a prototype 4{times}4 pixel electronics layer that is capable of storing at least 10,000 12-keV x-ray photons for a capacity of over 50 million electrons with a noise corresponding to 2 x-ray photons per pixel. The diode detective layer, electronics storage layer along with the radiation damage and blocking layers will be discussed.

  18. Analysis of Off-Nuclear X-Ray Sources in Galaxy NGC 4945

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, Sarah M.; /MIT /SLAC

    2006-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, X-ray astronomy has been used to investigate objects such as galaxies, clusters of galaxies, Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), quasars, starburst superbubbles of hot gas, X-ray binary systems, stars, supernova remnants, and interstellar and intergalactic material. By studying the x-ray emission patterns of these objects, we can gain a greater understanding of their structure and evolution. We analyze X-ray emission from the galaxy NGC 4945 using data taken by the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The Chandra Interactive Analysis of Observations (CIAO) software package was used to extract and fit energy spectra and to extract light curves for the brightest off-nuclear sources in two different observations of NGC 4945 (January, 2000 and May, 2004). A majority of sources were closely fit by both absorbed power law and absorbed bremsstrahlung models, with a significantly poorer {chi}{sup 2}/dof for the absorbed blackbody model, and most sources had little variability. This indicates that the sources are accreting binary systems with either a neutron star or black hole as the compact object. The calculated luminosities were about 10{sup 38} erg/s, which implies that the mass of the accreting object is close to 10 solar masses and must be a black hole.

  19. Titanium and germanium lined hohlraums and halfraums as multi-keV x-ray radiators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Girard, F.; Primout, M.; Villette, B.; Stemmler, Ph.; Jacquet, L.; Babonneau, D. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Fournier, K. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    As multi-keV x-ray radiators, hohlraums and halfraums with inner walls coated with metallic materials (called liner) have been tested for the first time with laser as the energy drive. For titanium, conversion efficiencies (CEs) are up to {approx}14% for emission into 4{pi}, integrating between 4.6 and 6.5 keV when a large diameter hohlraum is used. Germanium CE is {approx}0.8% into 4{pi} between 9 and 13 keV. The highest CEs have been obtained with a 1 ns squared pulse and phase plates giving laser absorption near 99%. These high CEs are due to long-lasting, good plasma conditions for multi-keV x-ray production maintained by plasma confinement inside the plastic cylinder and plasma collision leading to a burst of x rays at a time that depends on target size. As photon emitters at 4.7 keV, titanium-lined hohlraums are the most efficient solid targets and data are close to CEs for gas targets, which are considered as the upper limit for x-ray yields since their low density allows good laser absorption and low kinetics losses. As 10.3 keV x-ray emitters, exploded germanium foils give best results one order of magnitude more efficient than thick targets; doped aerogels and lined hohlraums give similar yields, about three times lower than those from exploded foils.

  20. Coherent multiple-foil x-ray transition radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moran, M.J.; Chang, B.; Schneider, M.B.

    1993-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Intense x-ray transition radiation can be generated when relativistic electrons pass through a multiple-foil target. When the foil spacing is periodic, the transition radiation can be spatially coherent with respect to the target period. The spatial coherence can be evident in the spectra and angular distributions of transition radiation from such targets. A series of experiments has measured coherent transition radiation distributions from multiple-foil targets (up to six foils) with spacings of 50 {mu}m and 100 {mu}m. The electron energy was about 75 MeV and the photon energies were about 200 eV. Agreement between calculation and experimental data is excellent.

  1. X-ray compass for determining device orientation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Matthews, Dennis L. (Moss Beach, CA); Fitch, Joseph P. (Livermore, CA); Everett, Matthew J. (Pleasanton, CA); Colston, Billy W. (Livermore, CA); Stone, Gary F. (Livermore, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for determining the orientation of a device with respect to an x-ray source. In one embodiment, the present invention is coupled to a medical device in order to determine the rotational orientation of the medical device with respect to the x-ray source. In such an embodiment, the present invention is comprised of a scintillator portion which is adapted to emit photons upon the absorption of x-rays emitted from the x-ray source. An x-ray blocking portion is coupled to the scintillator portion. The x-ray blocking portion is disposed so as to vary the quantity of x-rays which penetrate the scintillator portion based upon the particular rotational orientation of the medical device with respect to the x-ray source. A photon transport mechanism is also coupled to the scintillator portion. The photon transport mechanism is adapted to pass the photons emitted from the scintillator portion to an electronics portion. By analyzing the quantity of the photons, the electronics portion determines the rotational orientation of the medical device with respect to the x-ray source.

  2. X-ray compass for determining device orientation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Da Silva, L.B.; Matthews, D.L.; Fitch, J.P.; Everett, M.J.; Colston, B.W.; Stone, G.F.

    1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for determining the orientation of a device with respect to an x-ray source are disclosed. In one embodiment, the present invention is coupled to a medical device in order to determine the rotational orientation of the medical device with respect to the x-ray source. In such an embodiment, the present invention is comprised of a scintillator portion which is adapted to emit photons upon the absorption of x-rays emitted from the x-ray source. An x-ray blocking portion is coupled to the scintillator portion. The x-ray blocking portion is disposed so as to vary the quantity of x-rays which penetrate the scintillator portion based upon the particular rotational orientation of the medical device with respect to the x-ray source. A photon transport mechanism is also coupled to the scintillator portion. The photon transport mechanism is adapted to pass the photons emitted from the scintillator portion to an electronics portion. By analyzing the quantity of the photons, the electronics portion determines the rotational orientation of the medical device with respect to the x-ray source. 25 figs.

  3. Unexpected Angular Dependence of X-Ray Magnetic Linear Dichroism

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    axes must be taken into account for accurate interpretation of XMLD data. Magnetism and X Rays The ancient Greeks and also the Chinese knew about strange and rare...

  4. Generation of Coherent X-Ray Radiation Through Modulation Compression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiang, Ji

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ultra-short coherent X-ray radiation by controlling the fraction of the beam that can be properly unchirped using a few-cycle laser

  5. The Daguerreotype and the X-ray: A Deep Look

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - likely will play a crucial role in future scientific breakthroughs. Last week, hers was the first daguerreotype to undergo powerful x-ray analysis in a collaboration...

  6. 0.5-4 Å X-RAY BRIGHTENINGS IN THE MAGNETOSPHERE OBSERVED BY THE GEOSTATIONARY OPERATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL SATELLITES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamamoto, Tetsuya T.; Miyoshi, Y., E-mail: tyamamot@stelab.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Aichi (Japan)

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We found 217 X-ray brightening events in Earth's magnetosphere. These events occur in the high-energy band (0.5-4 Å) of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) X-ray light curves, although GOES X-ray light curves are frequently used as indices of solar flare magnitudes. We found that (1) brightening events are absent in the low-energy band (1-8 Å), unlike those associated with solar flares; and (2) the peak fluxes, durations, and onset times of these events depend on the magnetic local time (MLT). The events were detected in 2006, 2010, and 2011 at around 19-10 MLT, that is, from night to morning. They typically lasted for 2-3 hr. Their peak fluxes are less than 3 × 10{sup –8} W m{sup –2} in the 0.5-4 Å band and are maximized around 0-5 MLT. From these MLT dependencies, we constructed an MLT time profile of X-ray brightening events. Because 0.5-4 and 1-8 Å fluxes were observed and had the same order of magnitude when GOES 14 passed through Earth's shadow, we expected that X-ray brightening events in the 1-8 Å band are obscured by high-background X-ray fluxes coming from the Sun. We also found coincidence between X-ray brightening events and aurora substorms. In the majority of our events, the minimum geomagnetic field values (AL index) are below –400 nT. From these results and consideration of the GOES satellite orbit, we expect that these X-ray brightening events occur in the magnetosphere. We cannot, however, clarify the radiative process of the observed X-ray brightening events.

  7. The Focusing Optics x-ray Solar Imager: FOXSI Sam Kruckera,b, Steven Christec, Lindsay Glesenera,d, Shin-nosuke Ishikawaa, Stephen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601, Japan ABSTRACT The Focusing Optics x-ray Solar Imager. Today's leading solar HXR instrument, the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI, solar physics, solar flares, silicon strip detectors, grazing-incidence optics, high-energy x-ray optics

  8. ON THE COOLING TAILS OF THERMONUCLEAR X-RAY BURSTS: THE IGR J17480-2446 LINK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linares, M.; Chakrabarty, D. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Van der Klis, M. [Astronomical Institute 'Anton Pannekoek', University of Amsterdam and Center for High-Energy Astrophysics, P.O. Box 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutron star transient and 11 Hz X-ray pulsar IGR J17480-2446, recently discovered in the globular cluster Terzan 5, showed unprecedented bursting activity during its 2010 October-November outburst. We analyzed all X-ray bursts detected with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer and find strong evidence that they all have a thermonuclear origin, despite the fact that many do not show the canonical spectral softening along the decay imprinted on type I X-ray bursts by the cooling of the neutron star photosphere. We show that the persistent-to-burst power ratio is fully consistent with the accretion-to-thermonuclear efficiency ratio along the whole outburst, as is typical for type I X-ray bursts. The burst energy, peak luminosity, and daily-averaged spectral profiles all evolve smoothly throughout the outburst, in parallel with the persistent (non-burst) luminosity. We also find that the peak-burst to persistent luminosity ratio determines whether or not cooling is present in the bursts from IGR J17480-2446, and argue that the apparent lack of cooling is due to the 'non-cooling' bursts having both a lower peak temperature and a higher non-burst (persistent) emission. We conclude that the detection of cooling along the decay is a sufficient, but not a necessary condition to identify an X-ray burst as thermonuclear. Finally, we compare these findings with X-ray bursts from other rapidly accreting neutron stars.

  9. 2D and 3D Refraction Based X-ray Imaging Suitable for Clinical and Pathological Diagnosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ando, Masami [Institute of Science and Technology, Tokyo Univ. of Science, Yamasaki 2641, Noda, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan); Photon Factory, IMSS, KEK, Oho 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Dept. of Photo-Science, GUAS, Shonan, Hayama, Kanagawa 240-0193 (Japan); Bando, Hiroko; Ueno, Ei [Dept. of Breast-Thyroid-Endocrine Surgery, Univ. of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan)] (and others)

    2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The first observation of micro papillary (MP) breast cancer by x-ray dark-field imaging (XDFI) and the first observation of the 3D x-ray internal structure of another breast cancer, ductal carcinoma in-situ (DCIS), are reported. The specimen size for the sheet-shaped MP was 26 mm x 22 mm x 2.8 mm, and that for the rod-shaped DCIS was 3.6 mm in diameter and 4.7 mm in height. The experiment was performed at the Photon Factory, KEK: High Energy Accelerator Research Organization. We achieved a high-contrast x-ray image by adopting a thickness-controlled transmission-type angular analyzer that allows only refraction components from the object for 2D imaging. This provides a high-contrast image of cancer-cell nests, cancer cells and stroma. For x-ray 3D imaging, a new algorithm due to the refraction for x-ray CT was created. The angular information was acquired by x-ray optics diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI). The number of data was 900 for each reconstruction. A reconstructed CT image may include ductus lactiferi, micro calcification and the breast gland. This modality has the possibility to open up a new clinical and pathological diagnosis using x-ray, offering more precise inspection and detection of early signs of breast cancer.

  10. The puzzling temporally variable optical and X-ray afterglow of GRB 101024A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gendre, B; Laas-Bourez\\inst, M; Coward, D M; Klotz, A; Cutini, S; Boer, M; Stockdale, C

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aim: To present the optical observations of the afterglow of GRB 101024A and to try to reconcile these observations with the X-ray afterglow data of GRB 101024A using current afterglow models Method: We employ early optical observations using the Zadko Telescope combined with X-ray data and compare with the reverse shock/forward shock model. Results: The early optical light curve reveals a very unusual steep decay index of alpha~5. This is followed by a flattening and possibly a plateau phase coincident with a similar feature in the X-ray. We discuss these observations in the framework of the standard reverse shock/forward shock model and energy injection.We note that the plateau phase might also be the signature of the formation of a new magnetar.

  11. Experimental Demonstration of a Soft X-ray Self-seeded Free-electron Laser

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ratner, D. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Abela, R. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Amann, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Behrens, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Bohler, D. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Bouchard, G. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Bostedt, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Boyes, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Chow, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Cocco, D. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Decker, F. J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Ding, Y. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Eckman, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Emma, P. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Fairley, D. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Feng, Y. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Field, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Flechsig, U. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Gassner, G. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hastings, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Heimann, P. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Huang, Z. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Kelez, N. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Krzywinski, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Loos, H. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Lutman, A. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Marinelli, A. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Marcus, G. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Maxwell, T. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Moeller, S. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Morton, D. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Nuhn, H. D. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Rodes, N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Schlotter, W. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Serkez, S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Stevens, T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Turner, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Walz, D. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Welch, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Wu, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) has added self-seeding capability to the soft x-ray range using a grating monochromator system. We report demonstration of soft x-ray self-seeding with a measured resolving power of 2000-5000, wavelength stability of 10-4, and an increase in peak brightness by a factor of 2-5 across the photon energy range of 500-1000 eV. By avoiding the need for a monochromator at the experimental station, the self-seeded beam can deliver as much as 50 fold higher brightness to users.

  12. Lag-luminosity relation in gamma-ray burst X-ray flares

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margutti, R.

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In strict analogy to prompt pulses, X-ray flares observed by Swift-XRT in long Gamma-Ray Bursts define a lag-luminosity relation: L{sub p,iso}{sup 0.3-10} k{sup eV} {infinity}t{sub lag}{sup -0.95{+-}0.23}. The lag-luminosity is proven to be a fundamental law extending {approx}5 decades in time and {approx}5 in energy. This is direct evidence that GRB X-ray flares and prompt gamma-ray pulses are produced by the same mechanism.

  13. Small angle X-ray scattering study of coal soot formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winans, R. E.; Parker, J. T.; Seifert, S.; Fletcher, T. H.

    2000-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study is to examine, by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), the formation of soot from individual coal particle combustion in a methane flat flame burner. The SAXS instrument at the Basic Energy Sciences Synchrotron Radiation Center (BESSRC) at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) can be used to observe both the formation of spherules and clusters since it can access length scales of 6--6000 {angstrom}. The high X-ray flux enables rapid acquisition of scattering data of various regions of the flame. SAXS data reveal particle size, shape, surface areas, and surface roughness.

  14. Maskelynite formation via solid-state transformation: Evidence of infrared and x-ray anisotropy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jaret, Steven J.; Ehm, Lars; Woerner, William R.; Phillips, Brian L.; Nekvasil, Hanna; Wright, Shawn P.; Glotch, Timothy D.

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present optical microscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, high-energy X-ray total scattering experiments, and micro-Fourier transform infrared (micro-FTIR) spectroscopy on shocked labradorite from the Lonar Crater, India. We show that maskelynite of shock class 2 is structurally more similar to fused glass than to crystalline plagioclase. However, there are slight but significant differences – preservation of original pre-impact igneous zoning, anisotropy at Infrared wavelengths, X-ray anisotropy, and preservation of some intermediate range order – which are all consistent with a solid-state transformation formation of maskelynite.

  15. NOVEL INTEGRATING SOLID STATE DETECTOR WITH SEGMENTATION FOR SCANNING TRANSMISSION SOFT X-RAY MICROSCOPY.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FESER,M.; JACOBSEN,C.; REHAK,P.; DE GERONIMO,G.; HOLL,P.; STUDER,L.

    2001-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrating solid state detector with segmentation has been developed that addresses the needs in scanning transmission x-ray microscopy below 1 keV photon energy. The detector is not cooled and can be operated without an entrance window which leads to a total photon detection efficiency close to 100%. The chosen segmentation with 8 independent segments is matched to the geometry of the STXM to maximize image mode flexibility. In the bright field configuration for 1 ms integration time and 520 eV x-rays the rms noise is 8 photons per integration.

  16. X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfires may contribute more toConsensusX-Ray DiagnosticsX-Ray

  17. X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfires may contribute more toConsensusX-RayX-Ray Imaging of the

  18. X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfires may contribute more toConsensusX-RayX-Ray Imaging of

  19. Nonquasineutral relativistic current filaments and their X-ray emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordeev, A. V. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Losseva, T. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Geosphere Dynamics (Russian Federation)

    2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonquasineutral electron current filaments with the azimuthal magnetic field are considered that arise due to the generation of electron vorticity in the initial (dissipative) stage of evolution of a current-carrying plasma, when the Hall number is small ({sigma}B/en{sub e}c << 1) because of the low values of the plasma conductivity and magnetic field strength. Equilibrium filamentary structures with both zero and nonzero net currents are considered. Structures with a zero net current type form on time scales of t < t{sub sk} = (r{sub 0{omega}pe}/c){sup 2}t{sub st}, where t{sub sk} is the skin time, t{sub st} is the typical time of electron-ion collisions, and r{sub 0} is the radius of the filament. It is shown that, in nonquasineutral filaments in which the current is carried by electrons drifting in the crossed electric (E{sub r}) and magnetic (B{sub {theta}}) fields, ultrarelativistic electron beams on the typical charge-separation scale r{sub B} = B/(4{pi}en{sub e}) (the so-called magnetic Debye radius) can be generated. It is found that, for comparable electron currents, the characteristic electron energy in filaments with a nonzero net current is significantly lower than that in zero-net-current filaments that form on typical time scales of t < t{sub sk}. This is because, in the latter type of filaments, the oppositely directed electron currents repel one another; as a result, both the density and velocity of electrons increase near the filament axis, where the velocities of relativistic electrons are maximum. Filaments with a zero net current can emit X rays with photon energies h {omega} up to 10 MeV. The electron velocity distributions in filaments, the X-ray emission spectra, and the total X-ray yield per unit filament length are calculated as functions of the current and the electron number density in the filament. Analytical estimates of the characteristic lifetime of a radiating filament and the typical size of the radiating region as functions of the plasma density are obtained. The results of calculations are compared with the available experimental data.

  20. X-ray laser system, x-ray laser and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    London, Richard A. (Oakland, CA); Rosen, Mordecai D. (Berkeley, CA); Strauss, Moshe (Omer, IL)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is an x-ray laser system comprising a laser containing generating means for emitting short wave length radiation, and means external to said laser for energizing said generating means, wherein when the laser is in an operative mode emitting radiation, the radiation has a transverse coherence length to width ratio of from about 0.05 to 1. Also disclosed is a method of adjusting the parameters of the laser to achieve the desired coherence length to laser width ratio.

  1. 2011 X-Ray Science Gordon Research Conference (August 7-12, 2011, Colby, College. Waterville, ME)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory Stephenson

    2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2011 Gordon Research Conference on X-ray Science will feature forefront x-ray-based science enabled by the rapid improvements in synchrotron and x-ray laser sources. Across the world, x-ray sources are playing an increasingly important role in physics, materials, chemistry, and biology, expanding into ever broadening areas of science and engineering. With the first hard x-ray free electron laser source beginning operation and with other advanced x-ray sources operational and planned, it is a very exciting and pivotal time for exchange ideas about the future of x-ray science and applications. The Conference will provide the forum for this interaction. An international cast of speakers will illuminate sessions on ultrafast science, coherence, imaging, in situ studies, extreme conditions, new developments in optics, sources, and detectors, inelastic scattering, nanoscience, life science, and energy sciences. The Conference will bring together investigators at the forefront of these areas, and will provide a venue for young scientists entering a career in x-ray research to present their research in poster format, hold discussions in a friendly setting, and exchange ideas with leaders in the field. Some poster presenters will be selected for short talks. The collegial atmosphere of this Conference, with ample time for discussion as well as opportunities for informal gatherings in the afternoons and evenings, will provide an avenue for scientists from different disciplines to exchange ideas about forefront x-ray techniques and will promote cross-fertilization between the various research areas represented.

  2. Constraints on jet X-ray emission in low/hard state X-ray binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas J. Maccarone

    2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the combination of the similarities between the X-ray properties of low luminosity accreting black holes and accreting neutron stars, combined with the differences in their radio properties argues that the X-rays from these systems are unlikely to be formed in the relativistic jets. Specifically, the spectra of extreme island state neutron stars and low/hard state black holes are known to be indistinguishable, while the power spectra from these systems are known to show only minor differences beyond what would be expected from scaling the characteristic variability frequencies by the mass of the compact object. The spectral and temporal similarities thus imply a common emission mechanism that has only minor deviations from having all key parameters scaling linearly with the mass of the compact object, while we show that this is inconsistent with the observations that the radio powers of neutron stars are typically about 30 times lower than those of black holes at the same X-ray luminosity. We also show that an abrupt luminosity change would be expected when a system makes a spectral state transition from a radiatively inefficient jet dominated accretion flow to a thin disk dominated flow, but that such a change is not seen.

  3. Total x-ray power measurements in the Sandia LIGA program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malinowski, Michael E. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Ting, Aili (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Total X-ray power measurements using aluminum block calorimetry and other techniques were made at LIGA X-ray scanner synchrotron beamlines located at both the Advanced Light Source (ALS) and the Advanced Photon Source (APS). This block calorimetry work was initially performed on the LIGA beamline 3.3.1 of the ALS to provide experimental checks of predictions of the LEX-D (LIGA Exposure- Development) code for LIGA X-ray exposures, version 7.56, the version of the code in use at the time calorimetry was done. These experiments showed that it was necessary to use bend magnet field strengths and electron storage ring energies different from the default values originally in the code in order to obtain good agreement between experiment and theory. The results indicated that agreement between LEX-D predictions and experiment could be as good as 5% only if (1) more accurate values of the ring energies, (2) local values of the magnet field at the beamline source point, and (3) the NIST database for X-ray/materials interactions were used as code inputs. These local magnetic field value and accurate ring energies, together with NIST database, are now defaults in the newest release of LEX-D, version 7.61. Three dimensional simulations of the temperature distributions in the aluminum calorimeter block for a typical ALS power measurement were made with the ABAQUS code and found to be in good agreement with the experimental temperature data. As an application of the block calorimetry technique, the X-ray power exiting the mirror in place at a LIGA scanner located at the APS beamline 10 BM was measured with a calorimeter similar to the one used at the ALS. The overall results at the APS demonstrated the utility of calorimetry in helping to characterize the total X-ray power in LIGA beamlines. In addition to the block calorimetry work at the ALS and APS, a preliminary comparison of the use of heat flux sensors, photodiodes and modified beam calorimeters as total X-ray power monitors was made at the ALS, beamline 3.3.1. This work showed that a modification of a commercially available, heat flux sensor could result in a simple, direct reading beam power meter that could be a useful for monitoring total X-ray power in Sandia's LIGA exposure stations at the ALS, APS and Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL).

  4. Hard X-ray Microscopic Images of the Human Hair

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goo, Jawoong; Jeon, Soo Young; Oh, Tak Heon; Hong, Seung Phil; Lee, Won-Soo [Department of Dermatology and Institute of Hair and Cosmetic Medicine, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Yon, Hwa Shik [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The better visualization of the human organs or internal structure is challenging to the physicist and physicians. It can lead to more understanding of the morphology, pathophysiology and the diagnosis. Conventionally used methods to investigate cells or architectures, show limited value due to sample processing procedures and lower resolution. In this respect, Zernike type phase contrast hard x-ray microscopy using 6.95keV photon energy has advantages. We investigated hair fibers of the normal healthy persons. Coherence based phase contrast images revealed three distinct structures of hair, medulla, cortex, and cuticular layer. Some different detailed characters of each sample were noted. And further details would be shown and these results would be utilized as basic data of morphologic study of human hair.

  5. Planets and X-rays: a radiation diet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanz-Forcada, J; Micela, G; Pollock, A; Garcia-Alvarez, D; Solano, E; Eiroa, C

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    According to theory, high energy emission from the coronae of cool stars can severely erode the atmosphere of orbiting planets. To test the long term effects of the erosion we study a large sample of planet-hosting stars observed in X-rays. The results reveal that massive planets (Mp sin i > 1.5 Mj) may survive only if exposed to low accumulated coronal radiation. The planet HD 209458 b might have lost more than 1 Mj already, and other cases, like tau Boo b, could be losing mass at a rate of 3.4 Earth masses per Gyr. The strongest erosive effects would take place during the first stages of the stellar life, when the faster rotation generates more energetic coronal radiation. The planets with higher density seem to resist better the radiation effects, as foreseen by models. Current models need to be improved to explain the observed distribution of planetary masses with the coronal radiation received.

  6. Theoretical X-ray Line Profiles from Colliding Wind Binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henley, D B; Pittard, J M

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present theoretical X-ray line profiles from a range of model colliding wind systems. In particular, we investigate the effects of varying the stellar mass-loss rates, the wind speeds, and the viewing orientation. We find that a wide range of theoretical line profile shapes is possible, varying with orbital inclination and phase. At or near conjunction, the lines have approximately Gaussian profiles, with small widths (HWHM ~ 0.1 v_infty) and definite blue- or redshifts (depending on whether the star with the weaker wind is in front or behind). When the system is viewed at quadrature, the lines are generally much broader (HWHM ~ v_infty), flat-topped and unshifted. Local absorption can have a major effect on the observed profiles - in systems with mass-loss rates of a few times 10^{-6} Msol/yr the lower energy lines (E wind of the primary. The orbital variation ...

  7. Residual stress measurement using X-ray diffraction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderoglu, Osman

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    .3.6.2. Synchrotron Diffraction.........................................................................9 II. FUNDAMENTAL CONCEPTS IN X-RAY DIFFRACTION.....................................12 2.1. X-ray Source... radiations ...................................................................16 Table 2.2 Structure factors and reflection conditions ...................................................20 Table 4.1 Chemical composition of SS316...

  8. Ultrafast x-rays: radiographing magnetism Project overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haviland, David

    , head of the ultrafast magnetism group. Stanford PULSE is a worldwide renowned centre for ultrafast1 Ultrafast x-rays: radiographing magnetism Project overview The main purpose of the proposed, it is now possible to achieve x-ray pulses that are a few femtoseconds long and that are focused within

  9. Residual stress measurement using X-ray diffraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderoglu, Osman

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    -rays..............................................................................................16 2.4. Bragg's Law ..........................................................................................................18 2.5. Diffractometer Geometry... Figure 2.2 Schematic showing the basic components of a modern x-ray tube. Beryllium window is highly transparent to x-rays...............................15 Figure 2.3 Coherent scattering from an electron to a point P...

  10. Shad-o-Snap X-Ray Camera Hardware Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -o-Snap x-ray camera is a complete, stand-alone x-ray imaging device featuring "smart" microprocessor-controlled camera electronics and a convenient USB interface. The plug- and-play interface allows easy control by the silicon photodiodes. The Shad-o-Snap camera also includes electronics to digitize the video signal

  11. Measurement and characterization of x-ray spot size

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, K.H.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In planning an x-ray imaging experiment one must have an accurate model of the imaging system to obtain optimum results. The blurring caused by the finite size of the x-ray source is often the least understood element in the system. We have developed experimental and analytical methods permitting accurate measurement and modeling of the x-ray source. The model offers a simple and accurate way to optimize the radiographic geometry for any given experimental requirement (i.e., resolution and dose at detector). Any text on radiography will mention the effects of the finite size of the x-ray source on image quality and how one can minimize this influence by the choice of a small radiographic magnification. The film blur (independent of the source blur) is often treated as a single number and combined with an effective blur dimension for the x-ray source to give a total blur on the film. In this paper, we will develop a treatment of x-ray sources based on the modulation transfer function (MTF). This approach allows us to infer the spatial distribution function of the electron beam that produces the bremsstrahlung x-rays and to predict the performance of an x-ray imaging system if we know the MTF of the detector. This treatment is much more accurate than a single number characterization. 4 refs., 7 figs.

  12. Fourteenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Fourteenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering August 12 - 25, 2012 at Argonne National of the National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering is to educate graduate students on the utilization of major Ridge National Laboratory's Neutron Scattering Science Division. Scientific Directors: Jonathan C. Lang

  13. Neutron and X-ray Scattering Study of Magnetic Manganites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boothroyd, Andrew

    Neutron and X-ray Scattering Study of Magnetic Manganites Graeme Eoin Johnstone A Thesis submitted are performed using a variety of neutron scattering and x-ray scattering techniques. The electronic ground for analysing the results of the polarised neutron scattering experiment. There are a large number of people who

  14. Tenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Tenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering September 24 - October 11, 2008 at Argonne of the National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering is to educate graduate students on the utilization of major National Laboratory's Neutron Scattering Science Division. Scientific Directors: Jonathan C. Lang, Suzanne

  15. National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    15th National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering August 10 - 24, 2013 at Argonne National of the National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering is to educate graduate students on the utilization of major Ridge National Laboratory's Neutron Scattering Science Division. Scientific Directors: Jonathan C. Lang

  16. Thirteenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thirteenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering June 11 ­ June 25, 2011 at Argonne of the National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering is to educate graduate students on the utilization of major National Laboratory's Neutron Scattering Science Division. Scientific Directors: Jonathan C. Lang, Suzanne

  17. Sixteenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Sixteenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering June 14-28, 2014 at Argonne National of the National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering is to educate graduate students on the utilization of major's Neutron Scattering Science Division. Scientific Directors: Suzanne G.E. te Velthuis, Esen Ercan Alp

  18. Twelfth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Twelfth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering June 12 ­ June 26, 2010 at Argonne National of the National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering is to educate graduate students on the utilization of major National Laboratory's Neutron Scattering Science Division. Scientific Directors: Jonathan C. Lang, Suzanne

  19. National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering May 30 ­ June 13, 2009 at Argonne National of the National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering is to educate graduate students on the utilization of major National Laboratory's Neutron Scattering Science Division. Scientific Directors: Jonathan C. Lang, Suzanne

  20. Chandra X-ray Analysis of Galaxy Cluster A168

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanbin Yang; Zhiying Huo; Xu Zhou; Suijian Xue; Shude Mao; Jun Ma; Jiansheng Chen

    2004-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We present Chandra X-ray observations of galaxy cluster A168 (z=0.045). Two X-ray peaks with a projected distance of 676 kpc are found to be located close to two dominant galaxies, respectively. Both peaks are significantly offset from the peak of the number density distribution of galaxies. This suggests that A168 consists of two subclusters, a northern subcluster (A168N) and a southern subcluster (A168S). Further X-ray imaging analysis reveals that (1) the X-ray isophotes surrounding the two X-ray peaks are heavily distorted, (2) an elongated and ontinuous filament connects the two X-ray peaks. These suggest that strong interactions have occurred between the two subclusters. Spectral analysis shows that A168 has a mean temperature of 2.53 +/- 0.09 keV and a mean metallicity of 0.31 +/- 0.04 Z_{solar}. The metallicity is roughly a constant across the cluster but the temperature shows some systematic variations. Most X-ray, optical and radio properties of A168 are consistent with it being an off-axis merger several Gyrs after a core passage, although detailed numerical simulations are required to see whether the observed properties, in particular the significant offset between the optical and X-ray centers, can be reproduced in such a scenario.