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1

EA-0952: The Louisiana State University Waste-to Energy Incinerator, Baton  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: The Louisiana State University Waste-to Energy 2: The Louisiana State University Waste-to Energy Incinerator, Baton Rouge, Louisiana EA-0952: The Louisiana State University Waste-to Energy Incinerator, Baton Rouge, Louisiana SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal for incinerating combustible, non-recyclable office wastes from Louisiana State University (LSU) administrative/academic areas and combustible, non-renderable biological and potentially infectious wastes from the School of Veterinary Medicine and Student Health Center, both part of the LSU campus complex in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD October 24, 1994 EA-0952: Finding of No Significant Impact The Louisiana State University Waste-to Energy Incinerator

2

Waste to Energy – Energy Recovery of Green Bin Waste: Incineration/Biogas Comparison  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study presents how to determine marginal incinerator energy efficiencies. This concept should be applied in ... depend on the technical level, the surrounding energy system, and the waste type/heating value ...

Lasse Tobiasen; Kristian Kahle…

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Waste to energy: The case of the Bolzano solid urban waste incineration plant  

SciTech Connect

One of the most demanding problems of waste management was that of finding the means and the technology for converting, neutralizing and disposing of the refuse, without disturbing the delicate ecological equilibrium of the soil, water and air. Today, this problem is handled with the latest refuse incineration and Snamprogetti's combustion residue purification technologies, which in addition to substantial energy returns, also provide sufficient assurance of efficiency as well as health and environmental safety. In the present state of the art, these technologies make it possible to cut down on the use of dumps and landfills. In fact, such technologies permit to obtain an extremely small volume of inert residues, as well as very low dust and hydrochloric acid levels, and an infinitesimal concentration of micropollutants in the atmospheric emissions. Experience has shown that non-polluting incineration of unrecoverable wastes is feasible and the electricity obtained from the combustion heat is more than enough to run the plant and can be sold making the operation advantageous in economic terms. On the basis of this philosophy Snamprogetti designed and built an incineration at Bolzano on 1994, which was expanded in 1996 with a second line, for a total operating potential of 400 t/d of wastes. The plant included a heat recovery line with a steam boiler and a turbogenerator for the production of electricity. The steam turbine driving the generator could operate partly in the condensation mode, and partly in the bleeding mode to produce both electricity and steam. Implementation of the integrated program made provision for employment of the bled off steam to produce superheated water to feed the city's district heating network. A detailed assessment of the characteristics of the plant and its environmental efficiency is presented.

Nicolai, H.G.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Waste?to?Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Waste?to?Energy Roadmapping Workshop Waste?to?Energy Presentation by Jonathan Male, Director of the Bioenery Technolgies Office, Department of Energy

5

Ris DTU 09-06-08 Waste-to-energy technologies in TIMES models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Risø DTU 09-06-08 1 Waste-to-energy technologies in TIMES models Poul Erik Grohnheit, Kenneth DTU 09-06-08 2 Waste-to-energy technologies in TIMES models · European law 1999 Directive and current (focusing on Denmark) Long tradition for waste incineration for district heating · How to model waste-to-energy

6

Waste-to-Energy Workshop  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Waste to Energy Roadmapping Workshop was held on November 5, 2014, in Arlington, Virginia. This workshop gathered waste-to-energy experts to identify the key technical barriers to the commercial deployment of liquid transportation fuels from wet waste feedstocks.

7

Waste-to-Energy Forum  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The tenth in a series of planned U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy-sponsored strategic energy development forums, this Tribal Leader Forum will focus on waste-to-energy...

8

Waste-to-Energy Design Proposal for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

beneficially for construction purposes. Due to significant emission of pollutants from past incineration and Environmental Engineering, Columbia University Engineers: Zak Accuardi, Micah Babbitt, Rex Chen, Esther Lee, Tim and Themelis Client: John Quadrozzi, Gowanus Industrial Park, Red Hook, Brooklyn Draft: Final Submitted: 5

Columbia University

9

Waste-to-Energy Roadmapping Workshop Agenda | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste-to-Energy Roadmapping Workshop Agenda Waste-to-Energy Roadmapping Workshop Agenda Waste-to-Energy Roadmapping Workshop Agenda, November 5-6, 2014, Arlington, Virginia....

10

Waste-to-Energy Roadmapping Workshop Agenda  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Waste-to-Energy Workshop Agenda November 5-6, 2014 DoubleTree Hotel Crystal City Arlington, VA 22202 Day 1: Wednesday, November 5, 2014 Time Activity 7:30 am Registration and...

11

Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Wast-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Agency/Company /Organization: Wast-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Sector: Energy, Land, Climate Focus Area: Biomass, - Waste to Energy, Greenhouse Gas Phase: Create a Vision Resource Type: Dataset, Maps, Presentation, Publications, Guide/manual, Training materials, Case studies/examples User Interface: Website Website: www.seas.columbia.edu/earth/wtert Cost: Free The Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) brings together engineers, scientists and managers from universities and industry. The mission of WTERT is to identify and advance the best available

12

Incineration versus gasification: A comparison in waste to energy plants  

SciTech Connect

Waste thermodestruction has obvious advantages; nevertheless, it encounters problems not very easy to solve, such as those related to gas cleaning and to restricting standards for emission control. One important aspect is the possibility of heat recovery with production of valuable energy such as electric energy. A new technology, at least as far as its application to waste disposal (mainly municipal waste) is concerned, is represented by gasification. It becomes interesting to establish a comparison between this new technology and the traditional one. This comparison does not appear, however, to be very simple, since for gasification only few documented experiments can be found, and these are often difficult to relate to a common evaluation factor. The present paper describes the state of the art of the traditional technology in the thermodestruction field to define a comparison basis. Then, a general discussion is given for the gasification technology, emphasizing different possible solutions to allow for a quantitative evaluation. At last the various aspects of the problem (related to plant, environment, energy, economics, etc.) are specifically compared for the purpose of finding elements which allow for a quantitative evaluation or for emphasizing parameters useful for a final choice.

Ghezzi, U.; Pasini, S.; Ferri, L.D.A. [Politecnico di Milano (Italy). Dipt. di Energetica

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

13

Waste-to-Energy Technologies and Project Development | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste-to-Energy Technologies and Project Development Waste-to-Energy Technologies and Project Development Presentation at Waste-to-Energy using Fuel Cells Webinar, July 13, 2011...

14

Municipal solid waste combustion: Waste-to-energy technologies, regulations, and modern facilities in USEPA Region V  

SciTech Connect

Table of Contents: Incinerator operations (Waste preprocessing, combustion, emissions characterization and emission control, process monitoring, heat recovery, and residual ash management); Waste-to-energy regulations (Permitting requirements and operating regulations on both state and Federal levels); Case studies of EPA Region V waste-to-energy facilities (Polk County, Minnesota; Jackson County, Michigan; La Crosse, Wisconsin; Kent County, Michigan; Elk River, Minnesota; Indianapolis, Indiana); Evaluation; and Conclusions.

Sullivan, P.M.; Hallenbeck, W.H.; Brenniman, G.R.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

COST-BENEFIT ANALYSIS OF A WASTE TO ENERGY PLANT FOR MONTEVIDEO; AND WASTE TO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 COST-BENEFIT ANALYSIS OF A WASTE TO ENERGY PLANT FOR MONTEVIDEO; AND WASTE TO ENERGY IN SMALL OF COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY #12;2 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This thesis consists of two parts. The first is a cost of implementation. Part 1: Cost-Benefit Analysis of a WTE Plant for Montevideo In May-September 2011, the Earth

16

WASTE-TO-ENERGY ROADMAPPING WORKSHOP | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WASTE-TO-ENERGY ROADMAPPING WORKSHOP WASTE-TO-ENERGY ROADMAPPING WORKSHOP The Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) at the Department of Energy aims to identify and address key...

17

Waste-to-Energy Workshop Agenda  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) at the Department of Energy aims to identify and address key technical barriers to the commercial deployment of liquid transportation fuels from waste feedstocks. As a part of this effort, BETO is organizing a Waste-to-Energy Roadmapping workshop. Workshop participants will join facilitated breakout sessions to discuss anaerobic digestion, hydrothermal liquefaction, and other processes that make productive use of wastewater residuals, biosolids, foodstuffs, and organic municipal solid waste. These discussions will be synthesized and used in developing a waste-to-energy technology roadmap.

18

ISWA Study Tour WASTE-TO-ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Waste Treatment and Energy Recovery" Fundamentals of drying, pyrolysis, gasification, and combustionISWA Study Tour WASTE-TO-ENERGY Programme, June 22-27, 2014 Czech Republic Austria Seminar;Practice Seminar on Sustainable Waste Management in Europe based on Prevention, Recycling, Recovery

19

The 2010 ERC Directory of Waste-to-Energy Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 The 2010 ERC Directory of Waste-to-Energy Plants By Ted Michaels The 2010 ERC Directory of Waste-to-Energy Plants provides current information about the waste-to-energy sector in the United States. Since this Directory was last published in 2007, waste-to-energy capacity has increased for the first time in many

Columbia University

20

Energy Recovery Council (ERC) Wast to Energy (WTE) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Recovery Council (ERC) Wast to Energy (WTE) Energy Recovery Council (ERC) Wast to Energy (WTE) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Recovery Council (ERC) Wast to Energy (WTE) Agency/Company /Organization: Energy Recovery Council (ERC) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass, - Waste to Energy Phase: Create a Vision Resource Type: Dataset, Publications, Guide/manual User Interface: Website Website: www.wte.org/ Cost: Free The Energy Recovery Council is a national trade organization representing the waste-to-energy industry and communities that own waste-to-energy facilities. Overview The Energy Recovery Council is a national trade organization representing the waste-to-energy industry and communities that own waste-to-energy facilities. The website includes information on waste-to-energy basics

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university waste-to-energy incinerator" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities July 24, 2014 9:00AM to 3:30PM EDT U.S....

22

Waste-to-Energy Workshop | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste-to-Energy Workshop Waste-to-Energy Workshop November 5, 2014 9:00AM EST to November 6, 2014 12:00PM EST DoubleTree Hotel Crystal City 300 Army Navy Drive Arlington, VA 22202...

23

Waste-to-Energy Roadmapping Workshop | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste-to-Energy Roadmapping Workshop Waste-to-Energy Roadmapping Workshop November 5, 2014 9:00AM EST to November 6, 2014 12:00PM EST DoubleTree Hotel Crystal City 300 Army Navy...

24

Feasibility Study on Solid Waste to Energy Technological Aspects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feasibility Study on Solid Waste to Energy Technological Aspects Yuzhong Tan College of Engineering://www.funginstitute.berkeley.edu/sites/default/ les/SolidWasteToEnergy.pdf April 15, 2013 130 Blum Hall #5580 Berkeley, CA 94720-5580 | (510) 664 seeks to compare and evaluate each technology by reviewing waste to energy reports and seeking

Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

25

Global Waste to Energy Conversion Company GWECC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waste to Energy Conversion Company GWECC Waste to Energy Conversion Company GWECC Jump to: navigation, search Name Global Waste to Energy Conversion Company (GWECC) Place Washington, DC Product GWECC is a global alternative energy company headquartered in Washington DC, USA. References Global Waste to Energy Conversion Company (GWECC)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Global Waste to Energy Conversion Company (GWECC) is a company located in Washington, DC . References ↑ "Global Waste to Energy Conversion Company (GWECC)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Global_Waste_to_Energy_Conversion_Company_GWECC&oldid=345924" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

26

Waste-to-energy plants face costly emissions-control upgrades  

SciTech Connect

One treatment method of municipal solid waste, incineration, has fallen in and out of public favor. In the 1970s, emerging consciousness of the threat to groundwater posed by leaking landfills made incineration an attractive option. Prompted by disrupted energy supplies and steeply rising prices, more than 100 municipalities began to generate electricity from the heat produced by burning trash. In the 1990s, the pendulum of public enthusiasm has swung away from incineration. Energy prices have declined dramatically, and safety and siting concerns complicate new projects. A recent Supreme Court decision ruled that municipal incinerator ash must be tested as hazardous waste and disposed accordingly if levels of such pollutants as cadmium and lead exceed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act limits. So-called flow control regulations, which allowed municipalities to apportion garbage disposal to ensure steady supplies to incinerators, also have been struck down. EPA is tackling the issue of air emissions from waste-to-energy and non-energy-producing municipal waste combustors. Emissions guidelines for MWCs and new-source performance standards for new units, proposed Sept. 20 under Sec. 129 of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, are the culmination of a stalled and litigated initiative dating back to the CAA Amendments of 1977.

McIlvaine, R.W.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Waste-to-Energy and Fuel Cell Technologies Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation by Robert Remick, NREL, at the DOE-DOD Waste-to-Energy Using Fuel Cells Workshop held Jan. 13, 2011

28

Waste to Energy Developers WTED | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waste-to-Energy Developers (WTED) Place: California Sector: Services Product: WTED is an engineering company that provides services in the areas of industrial processes, electric...

29

(www.wtert.gr) Waste-to-Energy Research &  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­ WTERT (www.wtert.gr) 1 Waste-to-Energy Research & Technology Council WTERT Greece ­ SYNERGIA Dr. Efstratios Kalogirou is the President of Waste-to-Energy Research & Technology Council (WTERT.S.A. (cooperating with Professor N. Themelis) , in the scientific fields: energy recovery from solid wastes, potable

30

Waste-To-Energy Feasibility Analysis: A Simulation Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste- To- Energy Feasibility Analysis: A Simulation Model Viet- An Duong College of Engineering://www.funginstitute.berkeley.edu/sites/default/ les/WasteToEnergy.pdf May 1, 2014 130 Blum Hall #5580 Berkeley, CA 94720-5580 | (510) 664-4337 | www of the main battles of our generation. Using waste to produce electricity can be a major source of energy

Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

31

SMALL SCALE WASTE-TO-ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES Claudine Ellyin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 SMALL SCALE WASTE-TO-ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES Claudine Ellyin Advisor: Prof. Nickolas J. Themelis for large Waste-to-Energy (WTE) facilities is combustion on a moving grate of "as-received" municipal solid, in particular, the Energos technology. The Energos technology was developed in Norway, in order to provide

32

Kent County Waste to Energy Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kent County Waste to Energy Facility Biomass Facility Kent County Waste to Energy Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Kent County Waste to Energy Facility Biomass Facility Facility Kent County Waste to Energy Facility Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Kent County, Michigan Coordinates 43.0097027°, -85.520024° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.0097027,"lon":-85.520024,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

33

Waste-to-Energy using Fuel Cells Webinar  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Fuel Cell Technologies Office and the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) held a webinar on July 13, 2011, in Washington, DC, to discuss waste-to-energy for fuel...

34

Waste-to-Energy Projects at Army Installations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation by Franklin H. Holcomb, U.S. Army ERDC-CERL, at the DOE-DOD Waste-to-Energy using Fuel Cells Workshop held Jan. 13, 2011

35

Waste-to-Energy Evaluation: U.S. Virgin Islands  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

This report evaluates the environmental impact and fundamental economics of waste-to-energy (WTE) technology based on available data from commercially operating WTE facilities in the United States.

36

Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The ninth in a series of planned U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy-sponsored strategic energy development forums, this Tribal Leader Forum focused on waste-to-energy technology and project opportunities for Tribes.

37

Experience with FLS-GSA dry scrubbing technology for waste-to-energy applications  

SciTech Connect

The paper describes the gas suspension absorber (GSA) dry scrubbing technology developed by FLS miljo a/s, Denmark. The GSA is a new generation of semi-dry technology utilizing a circulating fast fluidized bed as absorber for acid gases (SO{sub 2}, HCI, HF) dioxins and heavy metals. The authors give a detailed description of the GSA which differs from conventional spray-dryer absorber systems in that it provides an extreme high dust concentration in the absorber. The high specific surface area of the dust combined with the quenching action of the atomized lime slurry provides excellent conditions for heat and mass transfer as well as secondary nucleation sites for the condensation/adsorption of dioxins and heavy metals. Attention is focused on the GSA as a retrofit technology for waste-to-energy plants. As retrofit the GSA is advantageous due to the compact design, small footprint and the ability to use the existing electrostatic precipitator (ESP) for particulate control. The grain loading leaving the GSA system and entering the ESP, is controlled by the efficiency of the GSA cyclone, and for this reasons the grain loading entering the ESP is less than or equal to the grain loading leaving the incinerator. The retrofit with a GSA system will furthermore reduce the actual flue gas volume to the ESP, which means an increased specific collection area. In addition the increased moisture content in the flue gas improves the collection efficiency. The authors compare this retrofit option to conventional spray-dryer absorption technology. They describe the operating experience with the GSA technology for waste-to-energy plants. Operating experience and performance test results for acid gases, dioxins and heavy metals, especially mercury, from several European waste-to-energy are reported.

Olsen, P.B.; Stuard, C.; Hsu, F.E.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Thermoeconomic optimization of sensible heat thermal storage for cogenerated waste-to-energy recovery  

SciTech Connect

This paper investigates the feasibility of employing thermal storage for cogenerated waste-to-energy recovery such as using mass-burning water-wall incinerators and topping steam turbines. Sensible thermal storage is considered in rectangular cross-sectioned channels through which is passed unused process steam at 1,307 kPa/250 C (175 psig/482 F) during the storage period and feedwater at 1,307 kPa/102 C (175 psig/216 F) during the recovery period. In determining the optimum storage configuration, it is found that the economic feasibility is a function of mass and specific heat of the material and surface area of the channel as well as cost of material and fabrication. Economic considerations included typical cash flows of capital charges, energy revenues, operation and maintenance, and income taxes. Cast concrete is determined to be a potentially attractive storage medium.

Abdul-Razzak, H.A. [Texas A and M Univ., Kingsville, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering; Porter, R.W. [Illinois Inst. of Tech., chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Engineering/design of a co-generation waste-to-energy facility  

SciTech Connect

Five hundred fifteen thousand tons of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) is being generated every day in America. At present 68% of this trash is dumped into landfill operations. As the amount of garbage is increasing daily, the amount of land reserved for landfills is diminishing rapidly. With the sentiment of the public that you produce it, you keep it, the import-export of waste between the counties and states for the landfills, no longer appears to be feasible, especially when combined with expensive disposal costs. One method of reducing the quantity of waste sent to landfills is through the use of waste-to-energy facilities - the technology of resource recovery - the technology of today INCINERATION. All cogeneration projects are not alike. This paper examines several aspects of the electrical system of a particular municipal solid waste-to-energy project at Charleston, S.C. which includes plant auxiliary loads as well as a utility interconnection through a step-up transformer.

Bajaj, K.S.; Virgilio, R.J. (Foster Wheeler USA Corp., Clinton, NJ (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Life cycle assessment of thermal Waste-to-Energy technologies: Review and recommendations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Life cycle assessment (LCA) has been used extensively within the recent decade to evaluate the environmental performance of thermal Waste-to-Energy (WtE) technologies: incineration, co-combustion, pyrolysis and gasification. A critical review was carried out involving 250 individual case-studies published in 136 peer-reviewed journal articles within 1995 and 2013. The studies were evaluated with respect to critical aspects such as: (i) goal and scope definitions (e.g. functional units, system boundaries, temporal and geographic scopes), (ii) detailed technology parameters (e.g. related to waste composition, technology, gas cleaning, energy recovery, residue management, and inventory data), and (iii) modeling principles (e.g. energy/mass calculation principles, energy substitution, inclusion of capital goods and uncertainty evaluation). Very few of the published studies provided full and transparent descriptions of all these aspects, in many cases preventing an evaluation of the validity of results, and limiting applicability of data and results in other contexts. The review clearly suggests that the quality of LCA studies of WtE technologies and systems including energy recovery can be significantly improved. Based on the review, a detailed overview of assumptions and modeling choices in existing literature is provided in conjunction with practical recommendations for state-of-the-art LCA of Waste-to-Energy.

Thomas Fruergaard Astrup; Davide Tonini; Roberto Turconi; Alessio Boldrin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university waste-to-energy incinerator" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Waste-to-Energy Evaluation: U.S. Virgin Islands  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste-to-Energy Evaluation: Waste-to-Energy Evaluation: U.S. Virgin Islands Jerry Davis, Scott Haase, and Adam Warren Technical Report NREL/TP-7A20-52308 August 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Waste-to-Energy Evaluation: U.S. Virgin Islands Jerry Davis, Scott Haase, and Adam Warren Prepared under Task No(s). IDVI.0000 and IDVI.0032 Technical Report NREL/TP-7A20-52308 August 2011 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

42

Waste-to-Energy and Fuel Cell Technologies Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste-to-Energy and Fuel Cell Waste-to-Energy and Fuel Cell T h l i O i Innovation for Our Energy Future Technologies Overview Presented to: DOD-DOE Waste-to- Energy Workshop Energy Workshop Dr. Robert J. Remick J 13 2011 January 13, 2011 Capital Hilton Hotel Washington, DC NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Global Approach for Using Biogas Innovation for Our Energy Future Anaerobic Digestion of Organic Wastes is a Good Source of Methane. Organic waste + methanogenic bacteria → methane (CH 4 ) Issues: High levels of contamination Time varying output of gas quantity and quality Innovation for Our Energy Future Photo courtesy of Dos Rios Water Recycling Center, San Antonio, TX

43

Waste-to-Energy Evaluation: U.S. Virgin Islands  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste-to-Energy Evaluation: U.S. Virgin Islands Jerry Davis, Scott Haase, and Adam Warren Technical Report NREL/TP-7A20-52308 August 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Waste-to-Energy Evaluation: U.S. Virgin Islands Jerry Davis, Scott Haase, and Adam Warren Prepared under Task No(s). IDVI.0000 and IDVI.0032 Technical Report NREL/TP-7A20-52308 August 2011 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

44

Waste to Energy Power Production at DOE and DOD Sites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste to Energy Power Production Waste to Energy Power Production at DOE and DOD Sites January 13, 2011 Overview - Federal Agency Innovations DOE: S avannah River S ite * Biomass Heat and Power US AF: Hill Air Force Base * Landfill Gas to Energy Generation Ameresco independent DOES avannah River S ite DOES avannah River S ite (DOE-S R) * Georgia / S outh Carolina border * 300+ sq miles extending into 3 counties * Began operations in 1950s Challenges faced by DOE-S R * Aging Infrastructure Ameresco independent * Coal and fuel oil power plants * Increased / new clean air requirements * New energy efficiency / sustainability requirements Business Case Analysis S ite need for both steam and power Repair, renovate, or replace Mandates and desire for renewable energy solution Appropriated funds not available

45

Waste-to-Energy using Fuel Cells Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste-to-Energy using Fuel Cells Workshop Capital Hilton Hotel, Washington DC January 13th, 2011 8:30 am to 5:00 pm Agenda 8:30 am Welcome, introductions and meeting logistics Pete Devlin, Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cell Technologies Program Overall Purpose * To identify DOD-DOE waste-to-energy and fuel cells opportunities * To identify challenges and determine actions to address them * To determine specific ways fuel cell and related technologies can help meet Executive Order 13514 requirements * To identify the next steps for collaboration Background Materials Provided * DOD-DOE MOU - http://www.energy.gov/news/documents/Enhance-Energy-Security-MOU.pdf * Executive Order 13514 - http://edocket.access.gpo.gov/2009/pdf/E9-24518.pdf

46

Waste-to-Energy Roadmapping Workshop: Attendee Networking Tool  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

For the Waste-to-Energy Workshop, this tool offers a concise listing of participants' background, areas of expertise, areas of need, and business contact information. Users can sort the information by clicking on the arrows in the header rows. Users can also filter by keywords by typing them into the search field in order to find individuals with skill sets complementary to their own.

47

Waste-to-Energy using Refuse-Derived Fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

At a mass-burn incinerator, Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) is ... vehicles or waste collection vehicles into a deep pit. There is no processing of the waste. Waste is removed from the pit by overhead crane and fed i...

Floyd Hasselriis MME; Dr. Patrick F. Mahoney

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Waste-to-Energy using Refuse-Derived Fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

At a mass-burn incinerator, Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) is ... vehicles or waste collection vehicles into a deep pit. There is no processing of the waste. Waste is removed from the pit by overhead crane and fed i...

Floyd Hasselriis MME; Dr. Patrick F. Mahoney

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Waste to Energy and Absorption Chiller: A Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

All measured performance characteristics corresponded well to manufacturer's specifications or were within the expected range for this type of incinerator. The simplified economic analysis showed a payback of period 4.5 years. An optimized payback...

Wolpert, J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Overview: 2011 Waste-to-Energy Using...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Overview: 2011 Waste-to-Energy Using Fuel Cells Workshop DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Overview: 2011 Waste-to-Energy Using Fuel Cells Workshop Presentation...

51

WASTE-TO-ENERGY RESEARCH & TECHNOLOGY COUNCIL www.wtert.gr PRESS RELEASE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WASTE-TO-ENERGY RESEARCH & TECHNOLOGY COUNCIL www.wtert.gr 1 PRESS RELEASE INTERNATIONAL INTENSIVE COURSE " Waste to Energy as an Integral Part of Sustainable Waste Management Worldwide: The case of Baku event focus on state of the art technologies for sustainable waste management, entitled "Waste to Energy

52

Waste-to-Energy Cogeneration Project, Centennial Park  

SciTech Connect

The Waste-to-Energy Cogeneration Project at Centennial Park has allowed methane from the closed Centennial landfill to export excess power into the the local utility’s electric grid for resale. This project is part of a greater brownfield reclamation project to the benefit of the residents of Munster and the general public. Installation of a gas-to-electric generator and waste-heat conversion unit take methane byproduct and convert it into electricity at the rate of about 103,500 Mwh/year for resale to the local utility. The sale of the electricity will be used to reduce operating budgets by covering the expenses for streetlights and utility bills. The benefits of such a project are not simply financial. Munster’s Waste-to Energy Cogeneration Project at Centennial Park will reduce the community’s carbon footprint in an amount equivalent to removing 1,100 cars from our roads, conserving enough electricity to power 720 homes, planting 1,200 acres of trees, or recycling 2,000 tons of waste instead of sending it to a landfill.

Johnson, Clay; Mandon, Jim; DeGiulio, Thomas; Baker, Ryan

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

53

The crucial role of Waste-to-Energy technologies in enhanced landfill mining: a technology review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The novel concepts Enhanced Waste Management (EWM) and Enhanced Landfill Mining (ELFM) intend to place landfilling of waste in a sustainable context. The state of the technology is an important factor in determining the most suitable moment to valorize – either as materials (Waste-to-Product, WtP) or as energy (Waste-to-Energy, WtE) – certain landfill waste streams. The present paper reviews thermochemical technologies (incineration, gasification, pyrolysis, plasma technologies, combinations) for energetic valorization of calorific waste streams, with focus on municipal solid waste (MSW), possibly processed into refuse derived fuel (RDF). The potential and suitability of these thermochemical technologies for ELFM applications are discussed. From this review it is clear that process and waste have to be closely matched, and that some thermochemical processes succeed in recovering both materials and energy from waste. Plasma gasification/vitrification is a viable candidate for combined energy and material valorization, its technical feasibility for MSW/RDF applications (including excavated waste) has been proven on installations ranging from pilot to full scale. The continued advances that are being made in process control and process efficiency are expected to improve the commercial viability of these advanced thermochemical conversion technologies in the near future.

A. Bosmans; I. Vanderreydt; D. Geysen; L. Helsen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Waste-to-energy: Decision making and the decisions made  

SciTech Connect

During the early 1980s, it was projected that waste-to-energy (WTE) facilities would manage as much as half of all municipal solid waste by the turn of the century. However, during the latter part of the 1980s, the cancellation rate for WTE facilities grew to the point that the portion of the waste stream WTE will handle in the long-term future is less certain. This study, conducted as part of a larger study, identifies factors that influence municipalities, decisions regarding WTE. This study takes a broad perspective about decision-making within communities, emphasizing the context within which decisions were made and the decision-making process. It does not seek to judge the correctness of the decisions.

Schexnayder, S.M. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)); Wolfe, A.K. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Waste-to-energy: Decision making and the decisions made  

SciTech Connect

During the early 1980s, it was projected that waste-to-energy (WTE) facilities would manage as much as half of all municipal solid waste by the turn of the century. However, during the latter part of the 1980s, the cancellation rate for WTE facilities grew to the point that the portion of the waste stream WTE will handle in the long-term future is less certain. This study, conducted as part of a larger study, identifies factors that influence municipalities, decisions regarding WTE. This study takes a broad perspective about decision-making within communities, emphasizing the context within which decisions were made and the decision-making process. It does not seek to judge the correctness of the decisions.

Schexnayder, S.M. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States); Wolfe, A.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

High efficiency waste to energy facility -- Pilot plant design  

SciTech Connect

Waste To Energy facilities are commonly acceptable to the environment and give benefits in two main areas: one is a hygienic waste disposal and another is waste heat energy recovery to save fossil fuel consumption. Recovered energy is used for electricity supply, and it is required to increase the efficiency of refuse to electric energy conversion, and to spread the plant construction throughout the country of Japan, by the government. The national project started in 1992, and pilot plant design details were established in 1995. The objective of the project is to get 30% of energy conversion efficiency through the measure by raising the steam temperature and pressure to 500 C and 9.8 MPa respectively. The pilot plant is operating under the design conditions, which verify the success of applied technologies. This paper describes key technologies which were used to design the refuse burning boiler, which generates the highest steam temperature and pressure steam.

Orita, Norihiko; Kawahara, Yuuzou; Takahashi, Kazuyoshi; Yamauchi, Toru; Hosoda, Takuo

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Boiler tube failures in municipal waste-to-energy plants  

SciTech Connect

Waste-to-energy plants experienced increased boiler tube failures when the design changed from waste-heat boilers to radiant furnace waterwalls using superheat. Fireside attack by chlorine and sulfur compounds in refuse combustion products caused many forced outages in early European plants operating at high steam temperatures and pressures. Despite conservative steam conditions in the first US plants, failures occurred. As steam temperatures increased, corrosion problems multiplied. The problems have been alleviated by covering the waterwalls with either refractory or weld overlays of nickel-based alloys and using high nickel-chromium alloys for superheater tubes. Changes in furnace design to provide uniform combustion and avoid reducing conditions in the waterwall zone and to lower the gas temperature in the superheater also have helped minimize corrosion.

Krause, H.H.; Wright, I.G. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Waste-to-Energy Evaluation: U.S. Virgin Islands  

SciTech Connect

This NREL technical report evaluates the environmental impact and fundamental economics of waste-to-energy (WTE) technology based on available data from commercially operating WTE facilities in the United States. In particular, it considers life-cycle impacts of WTE as compared to landfill disposal and various forms of electrical generation, as well as WTE impacts on source reduction or recycling programs. In addition, it evaluates the economics and potential environmental impact of WTE in the U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI) based on existing USVI waste stream characterization data, recycling challenges unique to the USVI, and the results of cost and environmental modeling of four municipal solid waste (MSW) management options, including landfill, refuse-derived fuel (RDF) production, recycling, and gassification plus RDF.

Davis, J.; Hasse, S.; Warren, A.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Waste to energy status in India: A short review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract India is one of the most rapidly developing countries in the world. It is witnessing growing industrialization and thus development. Such rapid development needs energy to progress, which further makes India an energy hungry nation. Currently India depends mainly upon fossil fuels and thus has to pay a huge bill at the end of every contractual period. These bills can be shortened and the expenditures brought down by using and exploiting non-conventional sources of energy. India holds a huge potential for such non-conventional sources of energy. The rapid development of India is not just pressing hard upon its resources but forcing expenditures on the same. There are also some neglected side effects of this development process like, generation of waste. A population of 1.2 billion is generating 0.5 kg per person every day. This, sums up to a huge pile of waste, which is mostly landfilled in the most unhygienic manner possible. Such unmanaged waste not only eats up resources but demands expenditure as well. This can lead to the downfall of an economy and degradation of the nation. Thus, the paper presents waste to energy as a solution to both the problems stated above, using which not only can we reduce the amount of waste, but also produce energy from the same, thus achieving our goal of waste management as well as energy security. The paper presents the current status, major achievements and future aspects of waste to energy in India which will help decision makers, planners and bodies involved in the management of municipal solid waste understand the current status challenges and barriers of MSWM in India for further better planning and management.

Khanjan Ajaybhai Kalyani; Krishan K. Pandey

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

T:\\013.ffentlichkeitsarbeit\\05.Vortrge\\32.NAWTEC 11 Florida 2003\\A_Ways to Improve the Efficiency of Waste to Energy Plants.doc Ways to Improve the Efficiency of Waste to Energy Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Waste to Energy Plants.doc Ways to Improve the Efficiency of Waste to Energy Plants for the Production@mvr-hh.de Abstract Up to now the emissions of waste-to-energy plants have been of major concern for the operators about CO2 reductions the efficiency of today's Waste to Energy (WTE) plants should be improved, even

Columbia University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university waste-to-energy incinerator" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Overview: 2011 Waste-to-Energy Using Fuel Cells Workshop  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation by Sunita Satyapal, DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Program, at the Waste-to-Energy Using Fuel Cells Workshop help January 13, 2011.

62

CEWEP -Confederation of European Waste-to-Energy Plants Boulevard Clovis 12A  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CEWEP - Confederation of European Waste-to- Energy Plants Boulevard Clovis 12A B-1000 Brussels Tel. : +32 (0)2 770 63 11 Fax : +32 (0)2 770 68 14 info@cewep.eu www.cewep.eu 1 Waste-to-Energy: towards recovery CEWEP welcomes that `energy recovery' should cover the use of waste for generating energy through

Columbia University

63

Waste-to-Energy 25 Years Later: Technology with a Past, Present  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solution Quite a Ride: UpsQuite a Ride: Ups MacArthur Resource Recovery Facility Islip, New York #12; Waste-to-energy Falls, New York #12; European Union: waste-to- energy preferable to landfills European Union directives and Consulting Federation of New York Solid Waste Associations Solid Waste/Recycling Conference Federation of New

Columbia University

64

Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) (Redirected from Wast-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT)) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Wast-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Agency/Company /Organization: Wast-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Sector: Energy, Land, Climate Focus Area: Biomass, - Waste to Energy, Greenhouse Gas Phase: Create a Vision Resource Type: Dataset, Maps, Presentation, Publications, Guide/manual, Training materials, Case studies/examples User Interface: Website

65

MacArthur Waste to Energy Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MacArthur Waste to Energy Facility Biomass Facility MacArthur Waste to Energy Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name MacArthur Waste to Energy Facility Biomass Facility Facility MacArthur Waste to Energy Facility Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Suffolk County, New York Coordinates 40.9848784°, -72.6151169° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.9848784,"lon":-72.6151169,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

66

Waste to Energy Power Production at DOE and DOD Sites | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

at DOE and DOD Sites Presentation by Joe Price, Ameresco, DOE-DOD Waste to Energy using Fuel Cells Workshop held Jan. 13, 2011 wasteprice.pdf More Documents & Publications...

67

1 Copyright 2009 by ASME Proceedings of the 17th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Copyright © 2009 by ASME Proceedings of the 17th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference

68

Copyright 2009 by ASME Proceedings of the 17th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Copyright © 2009 by ASME Proceedings of the 17th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference on the strengths of past research at Columbia and North Carolina State on recycling, composting, waste- to-energy of each technology has the potential 1 Proceedings of the 17th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy

Columbia University

69

National Master Plan for Development of Waste-to-Energy in India 1 The National Master Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 National Master Plan for Development of Waste-to-Energy in India 1 The National Master Plan a National Master Plan (NMP) for waste-to-energy as one of the activities under UNDP/GEF assisted project. The NMP provides a framework for waste-to-energy programme for the country besides a means of processing

Columbia University

70

Covanta Announces Contracts for Lee County, Florida Waste-to-Energy Facility Wednesday February 8, 3:51 pm ET  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Covanta Announces Contracts for Lee County, Florida Waste-to-Energy Facility Expansion Wednesday the construction of a 636 TPD (ton per day) capacity expansion to Lee County's 1,200 TPD waste-to-energy facility includes recycling, composting, waste-to- energy and landfilling. Covanta's service agreement, which

Columbia University

71

EA-1862: Oneida Seven Generation Corporation Waste-To-Energy System,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

62: Oneida Seven Generation Corporation Waste-To-Energy 62: Oneida Seven Generation Corporation Waste-To-Energy System, Ashwaubenon, Wisconsin EA-1862: Oneida Seven Generation Corporation Waste-To-Energy System, Ashwaubenon, Wisconsin Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal by Oneida's Energy Recovery Project to construct and operate a solid waste-to-electricity power plant on vacant property within the Bayport Industrial Center in the City of Green Bay, Brown County, Wisconsin. This energy recovery process would involve bringing municipal solid waste into the plant for sizing (shredding), sorting (removing recyclable material), and conveying into one of three pyrolytic gasification systems. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download

72

Proceedings of NAWTEC16 16th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) and over-burdened dumps. Improper disposal of solid wastes over several decades and open burning of garbageProceedings of NAWTEC16 16th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference May 19-21, 2008 is facing a solid waste management crisis. The infrastructure has been unable to keep pace with economic

Columbia University

73

Waste to energy facilities. (Latest citations from the NTIS database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning technical, economic, and environmental evaluations of facilities that convert waste to energy. Solid waste and municipal waste conversion facilities are highlighted. Feasibility studies, technical design, emissions studies, and markets for the resulting energy are discussed. Heat and electrical generation facilities are emphasized. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Waste to energy facilities. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning technical, economic, and environmental evaluations of facilities that convert waste to energy. Solid waste and municipal waste conversion facilities are highlighted. Feasibility studies, technical design, emissions studies, and markets for the resulting energy are discussed. Heat and electrical generation facilities are emphasized. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Waste to energy facilities. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning technical, economic, and environmental evaluations of facilities that convert waste to energy. Solid waste and municipal waste conversion facilities are highlighted. Feasibility studies, technical design, emissions studies, and markets for the resulting energy are discussed. Heat and electrical generation facilities are emphasized. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

CEWEP -Confederation of European Waste-to-Energy Plants Boulevard Clovis 12A  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recovered Fuel) as a fuel in both cement kilns and power plants, dedicated Biomass Energy Plants (BEP; BEP ­ Biomass Energy Plants; LFG ­ Landfill Gas; WtE ­ Waste-to-Energy 1 Excluding agricultural is considered biomass, thus a renewable energy source. Summary of the overall development of Renewable Energy

77

WASTE-TO-ENERGY RECONSIDERED IN SWEDEN By Waldemar Ingdahl (04/23/2003);  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WASTE-TO-ENERGY RECONSIDERED IN SWEDEN By Waldemar Ingdahl (04/23/2003); as reported in Swedish newspapers;Tech Central Station Sweden has for a long time been a bastion of "green" ideology, and the EU and the rest of the world has monitored Sweden's environmental policies closely for new ideas and inspiration

Columbia University

78

THERMAL TREATMENT REVIEW . WTE I THERMAL TREATMENT Since the beginning of this century, global waste-to-energy capacity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of new waste-to gasification process at an industrial scale The Waste-To-Energy Research and Technology waste-to-energy capacity has increased steadily at the rate of about four million tonnes of MSW per year solid waste (MSW). Three dominant ,technologies _ those developed by The only true A global perspective

Columbia University

79

Waste to energy facilities. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning technical, economic, and environmental evaluations of facilities that convert waste to energy. Solid waste and municipal waste conversion facilities are highlighted. Feasibility studies, technical design, emissions studies, and markets for the resulting energy are discussed. Heat and electrical generation facilities are emphasized. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Waste to energy facilities. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning technical, economic, and environmental evaluations of facilities that convert waste to energy. Solid waste and municipal waste conversion facilities are highlighted. Feasibility studies, technical design, emissions studies, and markets for the resulting energy are discussed. Heat and electrical generation facilities are emphasized. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university waste-to-energy incinerator" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

WTE (waste-to-energy) developers: What are they Who are they  

SciTech Connect

Recent case histories illustrate the diversity of development approaches available to communities. Developers discuss their relationships with communities, what to look for when deciding to build a waste-to-energy plant, and what the future holds for WTE. The following cities are used for illustration: Savannah, Georgia; Panama City, Florida; Fergus Falls, Minnesota; Millbury, Massachusetts; Newport, Minnesota; and Bristol, Connecticut. The paper briefly discusses community support and development in the future.

Kilgore, M.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

The Current and Future Marketplace for Waste-To-Energy Cogeneration Facilities in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

control systems. The more sophisticated control systems provide plant operators with ~tate-of-the-art monitoring and control capabilities. It also appears that fluidized bed incineration tech nology will find wider ap"lication within the waste...

Jacobs, S.

83

Haiti: Feasibility of Waste-to-Energy Options at the Trutier Waste Site  

SciTech Connect

This report provides further analysis of the feasibility of a waste-to-energy (WTE) facility in the area near Port-au-Prince, Haiti. NREL's previous analysis and reports identified anaerobic digestion (AD) as the optimal WTE technology at the facility. Building on the prior analyses, this report evaluates the conceptual financial and technical viability of implementing a combined waste management and electrical power production strategy by constructing a WTE facility at the existing Trutier waste site north of Port-au-Prince.

Conrad, M. D.; Hunsberger, R.; Ness, J. E.; Harris, T.; Raibley, T.; Ursillo, P.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Waste-to-Energy: Hawaii and Guam Energy Improvement Technology Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the U.S. Navy have worked together to demonstrate new or leading-edge commercial energy technologies whose deployment will support the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) in meeting its energy efficiency and renewable energy goals while enhancing installation energy security. This is consistent with the 2010 Quadrennial Defense Review report1 that encourages the use of 'military installations as a test bed to demonstrate and create a market for innovative energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies coming out of the private sector and DOD and Department of Energy laboratories,' as well as the July 2010 memorandum of understanding between DOD and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) that documents the intent to 'maximize DOD access to DOE technical expertise and assistance through cooperation in the deployment and pilot testing of emerging energy technologies.' As part of this joint initiative, a promising waste-to-energy (WTE) technology was selected for demonstration at the Hickam Commissary aboard the Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam (JBPHH), Hawaii. The WTE technology chosen is called high-energy densification waste-to-energy conversion (HEDWEC). HEDWEC technology is the result of significant U.S. Army investment in the development of WTE technology for forward operating bases.

Davis, J.; Gelman, R.; Tomberlin, G.; Bain, R.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

E-Print Network 3.0 - act incinerator wastewater Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

treatment... Flow Scheme 12;Gasification of Biosolids 12;Gasification 12;Gasification vs. Incineration Source: Stanford University - Department of Aeronautics and...

86

Incinerator Grate Combustion Phenomena  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The predominant MSW incinerators burn wastes of a wide range of calorific values on a moving grate, without any waste preprocessing. However, in some countries, these incineration systems suffer from unfavora...

Prof. J. Swithenbank; Prof. Vida N. Sharifi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Ris-R-Report Energy Systems Analysis of Waste to Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as upgraded biogas and petrol made from syngas. Biogas and thermal gasification technologies are interesting alternatives to waste incineration and it is recommended to support the use of biogas based on manure Centre Denmark, DONG Energy, Danish Energy Authority, DAKA, Lemvig Biogas Plant and Plan

88

Case Study- The Challenge: Improving the Performance of a Waste-To-Energy Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This case study examines how the City of Long Beach, California, was able to improve the operational efficiency of its Southeast Resource Recovery Facility (SERRF), a recycling and solid waste-to-energy plant. To replace inlet damper control and reduce energy consumption, variable frequency drives (VFDs) were installed on the induced draft fans of three boiler systems. As a result of the retrofit, facility energy consumption was reduced by more than 34 percent (3,661,200 kWh per year), and the facility saved more than $329,500 annually. Taking into consideration a $400,000 California Energy Commission grant, the simple net payback for this project was just under 10 months.

89

Boiler tube failures in municipal waste-to-energy plants: Case histories  

SciTech Connect

Waste-to-energy plants experienced boiler tube failures when the design changed from waste-heat boilers to radiant furnace waterwalls with superheat, adopted from coal-firing technology. The fireside attack by chlorine and sulfur compounds in the refuse combustion products caused many forced outages in early European plants with high steam temperatures and pressures. In spite of conservative steam conditions in the first US plants, some failures occurred. As steam temperatures increased in later US plants, corrosion problems multiplied. Over the years these problems have been alleviated by covering the waterwalls with either refractories or weld overlays of nickel-base alloys and using high nickel-chromium alloys for superheater tubes. Various changes in furnace design to provide uniform combustion and avoid reducing conditions in the waterwall zone and to lower the gas temperature in the superheater also have helped to minimize corrosion.

Krause, H.H.; Wright, I.G. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

A comparative assessment of waste incinerators in the UK  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: • We evaluate operational municipal solid waste incinerators in the UK. • The supply chain of four case study plants are examined and compared in detail. • Technical, financial and operational data has been gathered for the four plants. • We suggest the best business practices for waste incinerators. • Appropriate strategy choices are the major difficulties for waste to energy plants. - Abstract: The uptake in Europe of Energy from Waste (EfW) incinerator plants has increased rapidly in recent years. In the UK, 25 municipal waste incinerators with energy recovery are now in operation; however, their waste supply chains and business practices vary significantly. With over a hundred more plant developments being considered it is important to establish best business practices for ensuring efficient environmental and operational performance. By reviewing the 25 plants we identify four suitable case study plants to compare technologies (moving grate, fluidised bed and rotary kiln), plant economics and operations. Using data collected from annual reports and through interviews and site visits we provide recommendations for improving the supply chain for waste incinerators and highlight the current issues and challenges faced by the industry. We find that plants using moving grate have a high availability of 87–92%. However, compared to the fluidised bed and rotary kiln, quantities of bottom ash and emissions of hydrogen chloride and carbon monoxide are high. The uptake of integrated recycling practices, combined heat and power, and post incineration non-ferrous metal collections needs to be increased among EfW incinerators in the UK. We conclude that one of the major difficulties encountered by waste facilities is the appropriate selection of technology, capacity, site, waste suppliers and heat consumers. This study will be of particular value to EfW plant developers, government authorities and researchers working within the sector of waste management.

Nixon, J.D., E-mail: j.nixon@kingston.ac.uk [Sustainable Environment Research Group, School of Engineering and Applied Science, Aston University, Aston Triangle, Birmingham B4 7ET (United Kingdom); Wright, D.G.; Dey, P.K. [Aston Business School, Aston University, Aston Triangle, Birmingham B4 7ET (United Kingdom); Ghosh, S.K. [Mechanical Engineering Department, Centre for Quality Management System, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032 (India); Davies, P.A. [Sustainable Environment Research Group, School of Engineering and Applied Science, Aston University, Aston Triangle, Birmingham B4 7ET (United Kingdom)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

91

Energy implications of mechanical and mechanical–biological treatment compared to direct waste-to-energy  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: • Compared systems achieve primary energy savings between 34 and 140 MJ{sub primary}/100 MJ{sub input} {sub waste.} • Savings magnitude is foremost determined by chosen primary energy and materials production. • Energy consumption and process losses can be upset by increased technology efficiency. • Material recovery accounts for significant shares of primary energy savings. • Direct waste-to-energy is highly efficient if cogeneration (CHP) is possible. - Abstract: Primary energy savings potential is used to compare five residual municipal solid waste treatment systems, including configurations with mechanical (MT) and mechanical–biological (MBT) pre-treatment, which produce waste-derived fuels (RDF and SRF), biogas and/or recover additional materials for recycling, alongside a system based on conventional mass burn waste-to-energy and ash treatment. To examine the magnitude of potential savings we consider two energy efficiency levels (state-of-the-art and best available technology), the inclusion/exclusion of heat recovery (CHP vs. PP) and three different background end-use energy production systems (coal condensing electricity and natural gas heat, Nordic electricity mix and natural gas heat, and coal CHP energy quality allocation). The systems achieved net primary energy savings in a range between 34 and 140 MJ{sub primary}/100 MJ{sub input} {sub waste}, in the different scenario settings. The energy footprint of transportation needs, pre-treatment and reprocessing of recyclable materials was 3–9.5%, 1–18% and 1–8% respectively, relative to total energy savings. Mass combustion WtE achieved the highest savings in scenarios with CHP production, nonetheless, MBT-based systems had similarly high performance if SRF streams were co-combusted with coal. When RDF and SRF was only used in dedicated WtE plants, MBT-based systems totalled lower savings due to inherent system losses and additional energy costs. In scenarios without heat recovery, the biodrying MBS-based system achieved the highest savings, on the condition of SRF co-combustion. As a sensitivity scenario, alternative utilisation of SRF in cement kilns was modelled. It supported similar or higher net savings for all pre-treatment systems compared to mass combustion WtE, except when WtE CHP was possible in the first two background energy scenarios. Recovery of plastics for recycling before energy recovery increased net energy savings in most scenario variations, over those of full stream combustion. Sensitivity to assumptions regarding virgin plastic substitution was tested and was found to mostly favour plastic recovery.

Cimpan, Ciprian, E-mail: cic@kbm.sdu.dk; Wenzel, Henrik

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

92

Process aspects in combustion and gasification Waste-to-Energy (WtE) units  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The utilisation of energy in waste, Waste to Energy (WtE), has become increasingly important. Waste is a wide concept, and to focus, the feedstock dealt with here is mostly municipal solid waste. It is found that combustion in grate-fired furnaces is by far the most common mode of fuel conversion compared to fluidized beds and rotary furnaces. Combinations of pyrolysis in rotary furnace or gasification in fluidized or fixed bed with high-temperature combustion are applied particularly in Japan in systems whose purpose is to melt ashes and destroy dioxins. Recently, also in Japan more emphasis is put on WtE. In countries with high heat demand, WtE in the form of heat and power can be quite efficient even in simple grate-fired systems, whereas in warm regions only electricity is generated, and for this product the efficiency of boilers (the steam data) is limited by corrosion from the flue gas. However, combination of cleaned gas from gasification with combustion provides a means to enhance the efficiency of electricity production considerably. Finally, the impact of sorting on the properties of the waste to be fed to boilers or gasifiers is discussed. The description intends to be general, but examples are mostly taken from Europe.

Bo Leckner

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

The role of waste-to-energy in integrated waste management: A life cycle assessment perspective  

SciTech Connect

Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) management has become a major issue in terms of environmental impacts. It has become the focus of local, state and federal regulations, which generally tend to promote the reduce/re-use/recycle/incinerate/landfill environmental hierarchy. At the same time, the Waste Industry capital requirements have increased in order of magnitude since the beginning of the 80`s. The driving forces of further capital requirements for the Waste Management Industry will be the impact of public policies set today and goals set by politicians. Therefore, it appears extremely important for the Waste Industry to correctly analyze and forecast the real environmental and financial costs of waste management practices in order to: discuss with the local, state and federal agencies on more rational grounds; forecast the right investments in new technologies (recycling networks and plants, incinerators with heat recovery, modern landfill). The aim of this paper is to provide an example of a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) project in the waste management field that raised surprising issues on otherwise unchallenged waste management practices.

Besnainou, J. [Ecobalance, Rockville, MD (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

94

Field Test of High Temperature Corrosion Sensors in a Waste to Energy Plant  

SciTech Connect

A field trial of electrochemical corrosion rate sensors was conducted over a five month period to monitor fireside corrosion in a waste to energy (WTE) plant. The unique 3-electrode air-cooled corrosion sensors, each including a thermocouple to monitor sensor temperature, were installed in four different ports at approximately the same level of the WTE boiler. A total of twelve sensors were tested, six with electrodes using the carbon steel boiler tube material, and six using the nickel-chromium weld overlay alloy for the electrodes. Corrosion rates and temperatures of the sensors were monitored continuously through the trial. Measurements of sensor thickness loss were used to calibrate the electrochemical corrosion rates. Air cooling of the sensors was found to be necessary in order to bring the sensors to the temperature of the boiler tubes, to better match the corrosion rate of the tubes, and to increase survivability of the sensors and thermocouples. Varying the temperature of the sensors simulated corrosion rates of boiler tubes with steam temperatures above and below that in the actual WTE plant. Temperatures of two of the sensors were successfully held at various controlled temperatures close to the steam temperature for a three hour test period. Corrosion rates of the two materials tested were similar although of different magnitude. An expression relating the corrosion rate of the boiler tube material to the corrosion rate of weld overlay was determined for a 7 day period in the middle of the field trial. Results from the field trial suggest that corrosion rate sensors controlled to the outer waterwall temperature can successfully monitor fireside corrosion in WTE plants and be used as a process control variable by plant operators.

Matthes, S.A.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Williamson, K.M.

2008-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

95

Waste-to-energy in the United States: Socioeconomic factors and the decision-making process  

SciTech Connect

Municipal solid waste (MSW) combustion with energy recovery, commonly called waste-to-energy (WTE), was adopted by many US communities during the 1980s to manage their growing quantities of MSW. Although less than one percent of all US MSW was burned to retrieve its heat energy in 1970, WTE grew to account for 16 percent of MSW in 1990, and many experts forecasted that WTE would be used to manage as much as half of all garbage by the turn of the century. However, the growth of WTE has been reduced in recent years by project cancellations. This study takes an in-depth look at the socioeconomic factors that have played a role in the decisions of communities that have considered WTE as a component of their solid waste management strategies. More specifically, a three-pronged approach is adopted to investigate (1) the relationships between a municipality`s decision to consider and accept/reject WTE and key socioeconomic parameters, (2) the potential impacts of recent changes in financial markets on the viability of WTE, and (3) the WTE decision-making process and the socioeconomic parameters that are most important in the municipality`s decision. The first two objectives are met by the collection and analysis of aggregate data on all US WTE initiatives during the 1982 to 1990 time frame. The latter objective is met by way of four in-depth case studies -- two directed at communities that have accepted WTE and two that have cancelled WTE projects.

Curlee, T.R.; Schexnayder, S.M.; Vogt, D.P.; Wolfe, A.K.; Kelsay, M.P.; Feldman, D.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Ohio incinerator battle continues  

SciTech Connect

Waste Technologies Industries (WTI; East Liverpool, Ohio) is trying to wing what it hopes will be its final battle in a 13-year, $160 million war with the government, and community and environmental groups. The company since 1980 has sought EPA approval to operate a hazardous waste incinerator in East Liverpool, Ohio. WTI late last year conducted a pre-test burn, or shakedown, during which the incinerator burned certain types of hazardous waste. The test demonstrates the incinerator's performance under normal operating conditions, Regulatory authorities, including EPA and the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OEPA), monitored activity during the shakedown, which was limited to 720 hours of operation. In accordance with RCRA requirements, the company in March conducted a trial burn to demonstrate that the incinerator meets permit standards. WTI's permit specifies three performance parameters the incinerator must meet -- particulate and hydrogen chloride emissions limits, and destruction removal efficiencies (DREs).

Melody, M.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

CCA-Treated wood disposed in landfills and life-cycle trade-offs with waste-to-energy and MSW landfill disposal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CCA-Treated wood disposed in landfills and life-cycle trade-offs with waste-to-energy and MSW in waste-to-energy (WTE) facilities. In other countries, the predominant disposal option for wood, others have not, and the product continues to enter the waste stream from construction, demolition

Florida, University of

98

Daily Gazette, Schenectady NY Letters to the Editor for Thursday, July 10, 2008 Nothing to fear, and much to gain, from waste-to-energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and much to gain, from waste-to-energy Schenectady is one of those misguided cities that sends its municipal solid wastes to distant landfills, costing much money, wasting valuable energy and increasing global warming and pollution of our environment. Waste-to-energy (WTE) is safe. I advised the Israel

Columbia University

99

Energy implications of mechanical and mechanical–biological treatment compared to direct waste-to-energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Primary energy savings potential is used to compare five residual municipal solid waste treatment systems, including configurations with mechanical (MT) and mechanical–biological (MBT) pre-treatment, which produce waste-derived fuels (RDF and SRF), biogas and/or recover additional materials for recycling, alongside a system based on conventional mass burn waste-to-energy and ash treatment. To examine the magnitude of potential savings we consider two energy efficiency levels (state-of-the-art and best available technology), the inclusion/exclusion of heat recovery (CHP vs. PP) and three different background end-use energy production systems (coal condensing electricity and natural gas heat, Nordic electricity mix and natural gas heat, and coal CHP energy quality allocation). The systems achieved net primary energy savings in a range between 34 and 140 MJprimary/100 MJinput waste, in the different scenario settings. The energy footprint of transportation needs, pre-treatment and reprocessing of recyclable materials was 3–9.5%, 1–18% and 1–8% respectively, relative to total energy savings. Mass combustion WtE achieved the highest savings in scenarios with CHP production, nonetheless, MBT-based systems had similarly high performance if SRF streams were co-combusted with coal. When RDF and SRF was only used in dedicated WtE plants, MBT-based systems totalled lower savings due to inherent system losses and additional energy costs. In scenarios without heat recovery, the biodrying MBS-based system achieved the highest savings, on the condition of SRF co-combustion. As a sensitivity scenario, alternative utilisation of SRF in cement kilns was modelled. It supported similar or higher net savings for all pre-treatment systems compared to mass combustion WtE, except when WtE CHP was possible in the first two background energy scenarios. Recovery of plastics for recycling before energy recovery increased net energy savings in most scenario variations, over those of full stream combustion. Sensitivity to assumptions regarding virgin plastic substitution was tested and was found to mostly favour plastic recovery.

Ciprian Cimpan; Henrik Wenzel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Off-design performance of integrated waste-to-energy, combined cycle plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper focuses on the off-design operation of plants where a waste-to-energy (WTE) system fed with municipal solid waste (MSW) is integrated with a natural gas-fired combined cycle (CC). Integration is accomplished by sharing the steam cycle: saturated steam generated in a MSW grate combustor is exported to the heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) of the combined cycle, where it is superheated and then fed to a steam turbine serving both the CC and the WTE plant. Most likely, the WTE section and the natural gas-fired CC section are subject to different operation and maintenance schedules, so that the integrated plant operates in conditions different from those giving full power output. In this paper we discuss and give performance estimates for the two situations that delimit the range of operating conditions: (a) WTE plant at full power and gas turbine down; (b) WTE plant down and gas turbine at full power. This is done for two integrated plants having the same WTE section, i.e. grate combustors with an overall MSW combustion power of 180 MWLHV, coupled with Combined Cycles based on two different heavy-duty gas turbines: a medium-size, 70 MW class turbine and a large-size, 250 MW class turbine. For each situation we discuss the control strategy and the actions that can help to achieve safe and reliable off-design operation. Heat and mass balances and performances at off-design conditions are estimated by accounting for the constraints imposed by the available heat transfer areas in boilers, heaters and condenser, as well as the characteristic curve of the steam turbine. When the gas turbine is down the net electric efficiency of the WTE section is very close to the one of the stand-alone WTE plant; instead, when the WTE section is down, the efficiency of the CC is much below the one of a stand alone CC. These performances appear most congenial to what is likely to be the operational strategy of these plants, i.e. paramount priority to waste treatment and CC dispatched according to the requirements of the national grid.

Stefano Consonni; Paolo Silva

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university waste-to-energy incinerator" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Energy recovery from waste incineration: Assessing the importance of district heating networks  

SciTech Connect

Municipal solid waste incineration contributes with 20% of the heat supplied to the more than 400 district heating networks in Denmark. In evaluation of the environmental consequences of this heat production, the typical approach has been to assume that other (fossil) fuels could be saved on a 1:1 basis (e.g. 1 GJ of waste heat delivered substitutes for 1 GJ of coal-based heat). This paper investigates consequences of waste-based heat substitution in two specific Danish district heating networks and the energy-associated interactions between the plants connected to these networks. Despite almost equal electricity and heat efficiencies at the waste incinerators connected to the two district heating networks, the energy and CO{sub 2} accounts showed significantly different results: waste incineration in one network caused a CO{sub 2} saving of 48 kg CO{sub 2}/GJ energy input while in the other network a load of 43 kg CO{sub 2}/GJ. This was caused mainly by differences in operation mode and fuel types of the other heat producing plants attached to the networks. The paper clearly indicates that simple evaluations of waste-to-energy efficiencies at the incinerator are insufficient for assessing the consequences of heat substitution in district heating network systems. The paper also shows that using national averages for heat substitution will not provide a correct answer: local conditions need to be addressed thoroughly otherwise we may fail to assess correctly the heat recovery from waste incineration.

Fruergaard, T.; Christensen, T.H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Astrup, T., E-mail: tha@env.dtu.d [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

102

Electrochemical Membrane Incinerator  

SciTech Connect

Electrochemical incineration of benzoquinone was evaluated as a model for the mineralization of carbon in toxic aromatic compounds. A Ti or Pt anode was coated with a film of the oxides of Ti, Ru, Sn and Sb. This quaternary metal oxide film was stable; elemental analysis of the electrolyzed solution indicated the concentration of these metal ions to be 3 {micro}g/L or less. The anode showed good reactivity for the electrochemical incineration of benzoquinone. The use of a dissolved salt matrix as the so-called ''supporting electrolyte'' was eliminated in favor of a solid-state electrolyte sandwiched between the anode and cathode.

Johnson, Dennis C.; Houk, Linda L.; Feng, Jianren

1998-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

103

Proceedings of the 17th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference May 18-20, 2009, Chantilly, Virginia, USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the U.S. did not recover the heat of combustion generated via MSW incineration, until the mid seventies

Columbia University

104

Radioactive Waste Incineration: Status Report  

SciTech Connect

Incineration is generally accepted as a method of reducing the volume of radioactive waste. In some cases, the resulting ash may have high concentrations of materials such as Plutonium or Uranium that are valuable materials for recycling. Incineration can also be effective in treating waste that contains hazardous chemicals as well as radioactive contamination. Despite these advantages, the number of operating incinerators currently in the US currently appears to be small and potentially declining. This paper describes technical, regulatory, economic and political factors that affect the selection of incineration as a preferred method of treating radioactive waste. The history of incinerator use at commercial and DOE facilities is summarized, along with the factors that have affected each of the sectors, thus leading to the current set of active incinerator facilities. In summary: Incineration has had a long history of use in radioactive waste processing due to their ability to reduce the volume of the waste while destroying hazardous chemicals and biological material. However, combinations of technical, regulatory, economic and political factors have constrained the overall use of incineration. In both the Government and Private sectors, the trend is to have a limited number of larger incineration facilities that treat wastes from a multiple sites. Each of these sector is now served by only one or two incinerators. Increased use of incineration is not likely unless there is a change in the factors involved, such as a significant increase in the cost of disposal. Medical wastes with low levels of radioactive contamination are being treated effectively at small, local incineration facilities. No trend is expected in this group. (authors)

Diederich, A.R.; Akins, M.J. [WorleyParsons, Reading, PA (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Proceedings of the 17th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference May 18-20, 2009, Chantilly, Virginia, USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WASTE (MSW) GASIFICATION UNDER VARIOUS PRESSURES AND CO2 CONCENTRATION ATMOSPHERES Eilhann Kwon, Kelly J, New York, NY 10027 ABSTRACT The Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) gasification process is a promisingProceedings of the 17th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference NAWTEC17 May 18-20, 2009

Columbia University

106

Waste-to-energy facilities. January 1985-October 1991 (Citations from the NTIS Data Base). Rept. for Jan 85-Oct 91  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning technical, economic, and environmental evaluations of facilities that convert waste to energy. Solid waste and municipal waste conversion facilities are highlighted. Feasibility studies, technical design, emissions studies, and markets for the resulting energy are discussed. Heat and electrical generation facilities are emphasized. (Contains 187 citations with title list and subject index.)

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Cow2Joules: Distributed Conversion of Organic Waste to Energy Resources Background to the project THEY are undertaking at ESF DLJohnson, Feb. 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cow2Joules: Distributed Conversion of Organic Waste to Energy Resources Background to the project of anaerobic digestion (AD) techniques for the conversion of biomass-related organic waste materials to useful energy products. This approach to industrial ecology, or sustainability, is well advanced in Europe where

Chatterjee, Avik P.

108

How Much Does That Incinerator Cost?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biosecurity on poultry farms includes proper disposal of dead carcasses. In many cases, that means using an incinerator. Calculating the cost of an incinerator means considering long and short-term expenses and the cost of fuel. This publication...

Mukhtar, Saqib; Nash, Catherine; Harman, Wyatte; Padia, Reema

2008-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

109

I E N V I R O N M E N T A L A S S E S S M E N T T H E LOUISIANA STATE UNIVERSITY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

E/ EA- 0 9 5 E/ EA- 0 9 5 2 I E N V I R O N M E N T A L A S S E S S M E N T T H E LOUISIANA STATE UNIVERSITY WASTE-TO-ENERGY INCINERATOR October 26, 1994 T H E U.S. DEPARTMENT OF. ENERGY STATE ENERGY CONSERVATION PROGRAM DISCLAIMER T h i s report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsi- bility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information. apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Refer- ence herein to any specific commercial product. process, or service by trade name, trademark,

110

Generating Steam by Waste Incineration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combustible waste is a significant source of steam at the new John Deere Tractor Works assembly plant in Waterloo, Iowa. The incinerators, each rated to consume two tons of solid waste per hour, are expected to provide up to 100 percent of the full...

Williams, D. R.; Darrow, L. A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Rockwell develops PCB incineration method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This, in turn, promotes longer equipment life, permits the use of less-expensive materials of construction with greater safety, and provides the option of portability for the incinerator. ... The process, originally developed at Rockwell's Rocky Flats, Colo., nuclear weapons plant, first was intended to destroy low-level transuranic contaminated combustible waste, and later was adapted to the destruction of PCB's. ...

1981-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

112

Universal Entech LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Entech, LLC Place: Phoenix, Arizona Zip: 85041 Product: Project developer focused on waste-to-energy References: Universal Entech, LLC1 This article is a stub. You can help...

113

Controlled air incinerator conceptual design study  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a conceptual design study for a controlled air incinerator facility for incineration of low level combustible waste at Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2). The facility design is based on the use of a Helix Process Systems controlled air incinerator. Cost estimates and associated engineering, procurement, and construction schedules are also provided. The cost estimates and schedules are presented for two incinerator facility designs, one with provisions for waste ash solidification, the other with provisions for packaging the waste ash for transport to an undefined location.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Waste Not, Want Not: Analyzing the Economic and Environmental Viability of Waste-to-Energy (WTE) Technology for Site-Specific Optimization of Renewable Energy Options  

SciTech Connect

Waste-to-energy (WTE) technology burns municipal solid waste (MSW) in an environmentally safe combustion system to generate electricity, provide district heat, and reduce the need for landfill disposal. While this technology has gained acceptance in Europe, it has yet to be commonly recognized as an option in the United States. Section 1 of this report provides an overview of WTE as a renewable energy technology and describes a high-level model developed to assess the feasibility of WTE at a site. Section 2 reviews results from previous life cycle assessment (LCA) studies of WTE, and then uses an LCA inventory tool to perform a screening-level analysis of cost, net energy production, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and conventional air pollution impacts of WTE for residual MSW in Boulder, Colorado. Section 3 of this report describes the federal regulations that govern the permitting, monitoring, and operating practices of MSW combustors and provides emissions limits for WTE projects.

Funk, K.; Milford, J.; Simpkins, T.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Method and apparatus for incinerating hazardous waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An incineration apparatus and method for disposal of infectious hazardous waste including a fluidized bed reactor containing a bed of granular material. The reactor includes a first chamber, a second chamber, and a vertical partition separating the first and second chambers. A pressurized stream of air is supplied to the reactor at a sufficient velocity to fluidize the granular material in both the first and second chambers. Waste materials to be incinerated are fed into the first chamber of the fluidized bed, the fine waste materials being initially incinerated in the first chamber and subsequently circulated over the partition to the second chamber wherein further incineration occurs. Coarse waste materials are removed from the first chamber, comminuted, and recirculated to the second chamber for further incineration. Any partially incinerated waste materials and ash from the bottom of the second chamber are removed and recirculated to the second chamber for further incineration. This process is repeated until all infectious hazardous waste has been completely incinerated.

Korenberg, Jacob (York, PA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Alloy 45TM in waste incineration applications  

SciTech Connect

Industrial and municipal wastes produced in the western society are being increasingly destroyed and managed by controlled high temperature incineration. Depending on the chemical make-up of the waste stream and operational parameters of the incinerator, a variety of high temperature corrosive environments are generated. Typically most of the modern incineration systems consist of a high temperature incinerator chamber, a heat recovery system, a quench section to further reduce the temperature of the flue gas stream and a host of air pollution control equipment to scrub acidic gases and control the particulate emissions. This paper describes the development of a new nickel-base high chromium-high silicon alloy, which has shown good resistance to high temperature corrosion in incinerator environments. Some field test data are also presented.

Agarwal, D.C. [VDM Technologies, Houston, TX (United States); Kloewer, J.; Grossmann, G.K. [Krupp VDM GmbH, Werdohl (Germany)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Waste to Energy: Biogas CHP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Southside Wastewater Treatment Plant Biogas Cogeneration Project November 9, 2011 2011 Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference ?Turning Waste Into Energy? What to Expect ? ? Southside Overview ? Wastewater Treatment Process... gallons per day ? Processes and disposes over 150 tons of solids/day from both of the City?s wastewater treatment plants What is Biogas? ? Biogas is the methane (CH4) produced as a by-product of the anaerobic digestion process at the Southside...

Wagner, R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Waste Heat Boilers for Incineration Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Incineration is a widely used process for disposing of solid, liquid and gaseous wastes generated in various types of industries. In addition to destroying pollutants, energy may also be recovered from the waste gas streams in the form of steam...

Ganapathy, V.

119

Biosludge Incineration - A Program for Energy Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste biosludge generated in Shell's Deer Park Manufacturing Complex aqueous effluent treatment facilities is disposed of by on-site incineration. In 1981, an energy conservation program resulted in a 48 percent reduction in natural gas consumption...

Compernolle, R. V.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

A technical look at the WTI incinerator  

SciTech Connect

EPA has granted Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) temporary authorization to burn hazardous waste in its new incinerator in East Liverpool, Ohio. The approval is based on preliminary data showing that the incinerator was able to meet EPA`s emission standards for dioxins and furans in tests run this summer. WTI is allowed to continue burning waste pending final evaluation of its March 1993 performance tests. The action marks yet another hurdle cleared by WTI in its 11-year effort to construct and operate a commercial hazardous waste incinerator. The facility`s long-standing predicament as a target for environmental and public interest groups has made it the subject of numerous lawsuits and many legal reviews. In this article, however, we focus on the technical aspects of the system. The WTI incinerator is described in {open_quotes}Performance Testing of a Rotary Kiln Incinerator,{close_quotes} a paper by Alfred Sigg of Von Roll, Incorporated (Norcross, Georgia). The paper was presented at the 1993 Incineration Conference, which was held in Knoxville, Tennessee on May 3-7, 1993. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

NONE

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university waste-to-energy incinerator" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

An integrated analytical framework for quantifying the LCOE of waste-to-energy facilities for a range of greenhouse gas emissions policy and technical factors  

SciTech Connect

This study presents a novel integrated method for considering the economics of waste-to-energy (WTE) facilities with priced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions based upon technical and economic characteristics of the WTE facility, MSW stream, landfill alternative, and GHG emissions policy. The study demonstrates use of the formulation for six different policy scenarios and explores sensitivity of the results to ranges of certain technical parameters as found in existing literature. The study shows that details of the GHG emissions regulations have large impact on the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) of WTE and that GHG regulations can either increase or decrease the LCOE of WTE depending on policy choices regarding biogenic fractions from combusted waste and emissions from landfills. Important policy considerations are the fraction of the carbon emissions that are priced (i.e. all emissions versus only non-biogenic emissions), whether emissions credits are allowed due to reducing fugitive landfill gas emissions, whether biogenic carbon sequestration in landfills is credited against landfill emissions, and the effectiveness of the landfill gas recovery system where waste would otherwise have been buried. The default landfill gas recovery system effectiveness assumed by much of the industry yields GHG offsets that are very close to the direct non-biogenic GHG emissions from a WTE facility, meaning that small changes in the recovery effectiveness cause relatively larger changes in the emissions factor of the WTE facility. Finally, the economics of WTE are dependent on the MSW stream composition, with paper and wood being advantageous, metal and glass being disadvantageous, and plastics, food, and yard waste being either advantageous or disadvantageous depending upon the avoided tipping fee and the GHG emissions price.

Townsend, Aaron K., E-mail: aarontownsend@utexas.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C2200, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Webber, Michael E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C2200, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

122

Incinerator Completes Mission in Oak Ridge | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Incinerator Completes Mission in Oak Ridge Incinerator Completes Mission in Oak Ridge December 1, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis OAK RIDGE, Tenn. - After more than 18 years of operation...

123

Energy utilization: municipal waste incineration. Final report  

SciTech Connect

An assessment is made of the technical and economical feasibility of converting municipal waste into useful and useable energy. The concept presented involves retrofitting an existing municipal incinerator with the systems and equipment necessary to produce process steam and electric power. The concept is economically attractive since the cost of necessary waste heat recovery equipment is usually a comparatively small percentage of the cost of the original incinerator installation. Technical data obtained from presently operating incinerators designed specifically for generating energy, documents the technical feasibility and stipulates certain design constraints. The investigation includes a cost summary; description of process and facilities; conceptual design; economic analysis; derivation of costs; itemized estimated costs; design and construction schedule; and some drawings.

LaBeck, M.F.

1981-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

124

ISWA commitments on waste and climate ISWA General Secretariat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of renewable energy. Incineration and other thermal processes for waste-to-energy, landfill gas recovery

125

Modeling On-Grate MSW Incineration with Experimental Validation in a Batch Incinerator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This knowledge cannot be readily obtained from direct experimental studies on industrial-scale incinerators; in contrast, mathematical modeling and numerical simulation appear to be an attractive approach for quantitative insight into the mechanisms and variables of waste-bed incineration. ... This approach was successfully employed for grate(6) or rotary kiln(7) plants. ... Gasification of carbon (char or coke) by steam is a well-known process for producing syngas. ...

Abhishek Asthana; Yannick Me?nard; Philippe Sessiecq; Fabrice Patisson

2010-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

126

1. DET BEGYNDTE P FREDERIKSBERG INCINERATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PAGE 30 3. FROM DISTRICT HEATING TO COMBINED HEAT AND POWER 1990 - 2003 CHP AGAIN with district heating. The heat was produced on the basis of waste collected in the municipality. The original district heating plant was therefore also Denmark's first incineration plant, and waste has in fact been

Columbia University

127

Ohio incinerator given the go-ahead  

SciTech Connect

A federal judge has denied a request for an injunction against the startup of the long-stalled Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) commercial hazardous waste incinerator in East Liverpool, OH. The $140-million plant, owned by a US subsidiary of Swiss engineering group Von Roll Ltd. (Zuerich), will go through a startup stage and a seven-day trial burn during the next two months, according to WTI. In testimony in federal court in Huntington, WV, WTI had said it was losing $115,000/day in fixed costs because of the plant's startup delay. The company also said that long-term contracts with Chemical Waste Management (CWM; Oak Brook, IL), Du Pont (Wilmington, DE), and BASF Corp. (Parsippany, NJ) to use plant services could be jeopardized by the delay. WTI is believed to have 10-year service contracts with the three companies and also will use CWM to dispose of the ash from the incinerator.

Kemezis, P.

1992-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

128

Incinerator residue in bituminous base construction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tructio ~ of pavements is to form a bond between adjacent aggregate particles by coating them with an adhesive ductile film of bitumen and cementing the coated particles to the adjacent surfaces. Asphalt is a natural constituent of most petroleums... which consisted of 1 in. (2. 54 cm. ) to silt sized material from the Holmes Road incinerator plant in Houston, Texas, was collected and subjected to sieve analysis, approximate composition, loss on ignition and the optimum asphalt content determined...

Haynes, Joseph Anthony

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

'Incineration: A burning issue or a load of rubbish?’ Examining public attitudes to municipal solid waste incineration.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The author set out to investigate public attitudes to municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration. The area chosen for the study was Carlow town, a regional… (more)

Dillon, Rachel

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

THERMODYNAMIC STUDY OF HEAVY METALS BEHAVIOUR DURING MUNICIPAL WASTE INCINERATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, heat and mass transfer, drying, pyrolysis, combustion of pyrolysis gases, combustion and gasificationTHERMODYNAMIC STUDY OF HEAVY METALS BEHAVIOUR DURING MUNICIPAL WASTE INCINERATION Y. ME´ NARD, A Me´tallurgie (LSG2M) Nancy, France T he incineration of municipal solid waste (MSW) contributes

Boyer, Edmond

131

Incineration of hazardous wastes from the petroleum industry in Nigeria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Persistent hazardous wastes are produced in the recovery, processing and upgrading of crude petroleum in Nigeria. However, recent developments in environmental pollution control are drawing increasing attention to the problems of hazardous wastes. The ever-increasing need to control these wastes from the petroleum industry often compels the chemical engineer to specify methods of treatment and disposal. Present methods for disposal are becoming increasingly undesirable for a number of reasons, and incineration is being considered as an alternative. This paper reviews the extent of hazardous waste generation from the Nigerian petroleum industry and its environmental implications. It also examines the current disposal methods and the incineration technology option. The major chemical engineering concepts of the incineration process and the principles guiding their operations are discussed. The potential for the use of incineration is examined, as well as information that would aid the choice of incineration system for new applications.

O.O. Bello; J.A. Sonibare; S.R.A. Macaulay; A.O. Okelana; A.O. Durojaiye

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Gasification and Liquefaction Alternatives to Incineration in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The major technologies used in Japan for energy recovery from municipal solid waste (MSW) are mass burning incinerators combined with landfilling of ash. However, shortage of landfill space along with new re...

Dr. Kunio Yoshikawa

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Gasification and Liquefaction Alternatives to Incineration in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The major technologies used in Japan for energy recovery from municipal solid waste (MSW) are mass burning incinerators combined with landfilling of ash. However, shortage of landfill space along with new re...

Dr. Kunio Yoshikawa

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Waste-to-Energy Road Mapping Workshop  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Hydrothermal Liquefaction Heat, Char, Bio-oil, Syngas ANAEROBIC DIGESTION AND BIOGAS 7 * Biological, naturally occurring ANAEROBIC DIGESTION PROCESS 8 Anaerobic Digestion...

135

Waste To Energy -Strategies and Payoffs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, expanding the steam through back pressure turbines to generate electricity. Some plants used to gen erate so much power through cogeneration and hydro that they became power companies also. The hard ware involved in this type of cogeneration system has... the wastes to make steam? The answer is that under some circumstances the cost of the electric generation equipment would be marginally unattrac tive, but for the majority of American industry, the design of new waste to steam facilities should include...

Gilbert, J. S.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

The Conversion of Waste to Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Almost every industrial operation produces some combustible waste, but conversion of this to useful energy is often more difficult than with other energy recovery projects and requires careful attention to design, operating and maintaining...

John, T.; Cheek, L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Waste Growth Challenges Local Democracy. The Politics of Waste between Europe and the Mediterranean: a Focus on Italy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The new incinerator (or waste-to-energy plant) in the Alpinedecreasing. Indeed waste-to- energy plants and recyclingDerived Fuel) and sent to a waste-to- energy plants, are now

Mengozzi, Alessandro

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Environmental impacts of residual Municipal Solid Waste incineration: A comparison of 110 French incinerators using a life cycle approach  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: • 110 French incinerators are compared with LCA based on plant-specific data. • Environmental impacts vary as a function of plants energy recovery and NO{sub x} emissions. • E.g. climate change impact ranges from ?58 to 408 kg CO{sub 2}-eq/tonne of residual MSW. • Implications for LCA of waste management in a decision-making process are detailed. - Abstract: Incineration is the main option for residual Municipal Solid Waste treatment in France. This study compares the environmental performances of 110 French incinerators (i.e. 85% of the total number of plants currently in activity in France) in a Life Cycle Assessment perspective, considering 5 non-toxic impact categories: climate change, photochemical oxidant formation, particulate matter formation, terrestrial acidification and marine eutrophication. Mean, median and lower/upper impact potentials are determined considering the incineration of 1 tonne of French residual Municipal Solid Waste. The results highlight the relatively large variability of the impact potentials as a function of the plant technical performances. In particular, the climate change impact potential of the incineration of 1 tonne of waste ranges from a benefit of ?58 kg CO{sub 2}-eq to a relatively large burden of 408 kg CO{sub 2}-eq, with 294 kg CO{sub 2}-eq as the average impact. Two main plant-specific parameters drive the impact potentials regarding the 5 non-toxic impact categories under study: the energy recovery and delivery rate and the NO{sub x} process-specific emissions. The variability of the impact potentials as a function of incinerator characteristics therefore calls for the use of site-specific data when required by the LCA goal and scope definition phase, in particular when the study focuses on a specific incinerator or on a local waste management plan, and when these data are available.

Beylot, Antoine, E-mail: a.beylot@brgm.fr; Villeneuve, Jacques

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

139

Study on drying and combustion process in grate-CFB incinerator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The drying and combustion process in the combined grate and circulating fluidized bed (grate-CFB) municipal solid waste (MSW) incinerator was ... was proposed. A 260 t/d grate-CFB incinerator was modeled and the ...

QingHai Li; YanGuo Zhang; MeiQian Chen…

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Destruction and formation of PCDD/Fs in a fluidised bed combustor co-incinerating automotive shredder residue with refuse derived fuel and wastewater treatment sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During an eight day trial automotive shredder residue (ASR) was added to the usual waste feed of a Fluidized Bed Combustor (FBC) for waste-to-energy conversion; the input waste mix consisted of 25% ASR, 25% refuse-derived fuel (RDF) and 50% wastewater treatment (WWT) sludge. All inputs and outputs were sampled and the concentration of the 17 PCDD/Fs with TEF-values was determined in order to obtain “PCDD/F fingerprints”. The ASR contained approximately 9000 ng PCDD/Fs/kgDW, six times more than the RDF and 10 times more than the WWT sludge. The fingerprint of ASR and RDF was dominated by HpCDD and OCDD, which accounted for 90% of the total PDDD/F content, whereas the WWT sludge contained relatively more HpCDFs and OCDF (together 70%). The flue gas cleaning residue (FGCR) and fly and boiler ash contained approximately 30,000 and 2500 ng PCDD/Fs/kgDW, respectively. The fingerprints of these outputs were also dominated by HpCDFs and OCDF. The bottom ash contained only OCDD and OCDF, in total 8 ng PCDD/Fs/kgDW. From the comparison of the bottom ash fingerprints with the fingerprints of the other output fractions and of the inputs, it could be concluded that the PCDD/Fs in the waste were destroyed and new PCDD/Fs were formed in the post combustion process by de novo synthesis. During the ASR-co-incineration, the PCDD/F congener concentrations in the fly and boiler ash, FGCR and flue gas were 1.25–10 times higher compared to the same output fractions generated during incineration of the usual waste mix (70% RDF and 30% WWT sludge). The concentration of the higher chlorinated PCDD/Fs increased most. As these congeners have the lowest TEF-factors, the total PCDD/F output, expressed in kg TEQ/year, of the FBC did not increase significantly when ASR was co-incinerated. Due to the relatively high copper levels in the ASR, the copper concentrations in the \\{FBCs\\} outputs increased. As copper catalysis the de novo syntheses, this could explain the increase in PCDD/F concentrations in these outputs.

J. Van Caneghem; I. Vermeulen; C. Block; A. Van Brecht; P. Van Royen; M. Jaspers; G. Wauters; C. Vandecasteele

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university waste-to-energy incinerator" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Alternatives to incineration. Technical area status report  

SciTech Connect

Recently, the DOE`s Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP) (superseded by the Mixed Waste Focus Area) initiated an evaluation of alternatives to incineration to identify technologies capable of treating DOE organically contaminated mixed wastes and which may be more easily permitted. These technologies have the potential of alleviating stakeholder concerns by decreasing off-gas volurties and the associated emissions of particulates, volatilized metals and radionuclides, PICs, NO{sub x}, SO{sub x}, and recombination products (dioxins and furans). Ideally, the alternate technology would be easily permitted, relatively omnivorous and effective in treating a variety of wastes with varying constituents, require minimal pretreatment or characterization, and be easy to implement. In addition, it would produce secondary waste stream volumes significantly smaller than the original waste stream, and would minimize the environmental health and safety effects on workers and the public. The purpose of this report is to provide an up-to-date (as of early 1995) compendium of iternative technologies for designers of mixed waste treatment facilities, and to identify Iternate technologies that may merit funding for further development. Various categories of non-thermal and thermal technologies have been evaluated and are summarized in Table ES-1. Brief descriptions of these technologies are provided in Section 1.7 of the Introduction. This report provides a detailed description of approximately 30 alternative technologies in these categories. Included in the report are descriptions of each technology; applicable input waste streams and the characteristics of the secondary, or output, waste streams; the current status of each technology relative to its availability for implementation; performance data; and costs. This information was gleaned from the open literature, governments reports, and discussions with principal investigators and developers.

Schwinkendorf, W.E. [BDM Federal, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); McFee, J.; Devarakonda, M. [International Technology Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nenninger, L.L.; Fadullon, F.S. [Science Applications International Corp., Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Donaldson, T.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dickerson, K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); [Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, CO (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Resource recovery - a byproduct of hazardous waste incineration  

SciTech Connect

Three principal areas of a chlorinated hydrocarbon waste disposal system for a typical vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) facility are described: the incinerator, the energy-recovery system, and the byproduct-recovery system. The overall efficiency of the energy- and *byproduct-recovery systems is dependent on the optimization of the primary combustor. An example is presented in table form which lists typical waste quantities for the plant and operating costs, including utility requirements for the incinerator system, the quench, absorber and scrubber. Savings that can result by the addition of the energy- and acid-recovery systems can pay for the waste disposal system and return money to the plant.

Santoleri, J.J.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Development of risk assessment methodology for municipal sludge incineration  

SciTech Connect

This is one of a series of reports that present methodologies for assessing the potential risks to humans or other organisms from the disposal or reuse of municipal sludge. The sludge management practices addressed by the series include land application practices, distribution and marketing programs, landfilling, surface disposal, incineration and ocean disposal. In particular, these reports provide methods for evaluating potential health and environmental risks from toxic chemicals that may be present in sludge. The document addresses risks from chemicals associated with incineration of municipal sludge. These proposed risk assessment procedures are designed as tools to assist in the development of regulations for sludge management practices. The procedures are structured to allow calculation of technical criteria for sludge disposal/reuse options based on the potential for adverse health or environmental impacts. The criteria may address management practices (such as site design or process control specifications), limits on sludge disposal rates or limits on toxic chemical concentrations in the sludge.

Not Available

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Evaluation of open pit incineration for the disposal of hydrocarbon wastes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of hydrocarbon wastes using an open pit air curtain destructor (ACD) type incinerator was investigated. A prototype experi- mental incinerator was designed and constructed, and experiments were performed with it to determine the relationships among various... design and operational parameters (such as incinerator configuration, fuel flow- rate, and smoke emissions) and to further improve the design. The investigation was conducted in three phases. First air flow studies were performed using a full scale...

Bell, Stuart Ray

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Decommissioning of the TA-42 plutonium contaminated incinerator facility  

SciTech Connect

During 1978, a plutonium (/sup 239/Pu) contaminated incinerator facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, was decommissioned. The project involved dismantling the facility and burying the debris at an on-site radioactive solid waste disposal/storage area. Contaminated soil from the 5000 m/sup 2/ area was also buried. The facility was constructed in 1951 to incinerate /sup 239/Pu contaminated wastes. It was later used as a decontamination facility. The major features included a 185-m/sup 2/ floor area control building, incinerator, cyclone dust collector, spray cooler, venturi scrubber, air filter bank, ash separator, and two 140 000-liter ash storage tanks. Six-hundred cubic meters of debris and 1200 m/sup 3/ of soil contaminated with less than 10 nCi /sup 239/Pu per gram of soil were buried at the Laboratory disposal area. Five cubic meters of /sup 239/Pu contaminated ash residues containing more than 10 nCi /sup 239/Pu per gram of waste were packaged and stored to meet the Department of Energy's 20-year retrievable storage criteria. The operation consumed 80 work days and 5800 manhours at a cost of $150 000. This report presents the details concerning decommissioning procedures, the health physics, the waste management, the environmental surveillance results, and a cost breakdown for the operation.

Harper, J.R.; Garde, R.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Formation in Sludge Incineration by Fluidised Bed and Rotary Kiln Furnace  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are typical pollutants arising from incineration. They are produced in any incomplete combustion principally due to inhomogeneities in a combustion chamber. The effects ...

Giuseppe Mininni; Andrea Sbrilli; Ettore Guerriero…

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Incineration of Residue from Paint Stripping Operations Using Plastic Media Blasting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

i INCINERATION OF RESIDUE FROH PAINT STRIPPING OPERATIONS USING PLASTIC MEDIA BLASTING J. E. HELT N. MALLYA Group Leader Chemist Chemical Technology Division Chemical Technology Division Argonne National Laboratory Argonne National... Laboratory Argonne, Illinois Argonne, Illinois ABSTRACT A preliminary investigation has been performed on the environmental consequences of incinerating plastic-media-blasting (PHB) wastes from paint removal operations. PHB is similar to sandblasting...

Helt, J. E.; Mallya, N.

148

Completion of the INEEL's WERF Incinerator Trial Burn  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the successes and challenges associated with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitting of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's (INEEL) Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) hazardous and mixed waste incinerator. Topics to be discussed include facility modifications and problems, trial burn results and lessons learned in each of these areas. In addition, a number of challenges remain including completion and final issue of RCRA Permit and implementation of all the permit requirements. Results from the trial burn demonstrated that the operating conditions and procedures will result in emissions that are satisfactorily protective of human health, the environment, and are in compliance with Federal and State regulations.

Branter, Curtis Keith; Conley, Dennis Allen; Corrigan, Shannon James; Moser, David Roy

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Completion of the INEEL's WERF Incinerator Trial Burn  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the successes and challenges associated with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitting of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's (INEEL) Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) hazardous and mixed waste incinerator. Topics to be discussed include facility modifications and problems, trial burn results and lessons learned in each of these areas. In addition, a number of challenges remain including completion and final issue of the RCRA Permit and implementation of all the permit requirements. Results from the trial burn demonstrated that the operating conditions and procedures will result in emissions that are satisfactorily protective of human health, the environment, and are in compliance with Federal and State regulations.

C. K. Branter; D. A. Conley; D. R. Moser; S. J. Corrigan

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Evolution of WTE utilization - a global look. Asian perspective - waste incineration and it`s value in Japan  

SciTech Connect

Incineration carries significant weight in waste disposal in general. Seventy-five percent of the total quantity of municipal solid waste is incinerated. In the year 1994, there were a total of 1,854 incineration plants in Japan. Waste heat from MSW incineration is utilized for power generation at most large-scale incineration plants. In 1994, a total of 3,376 industrial waste incineration plants existed in Japan. They have been contributing much toward waste volume reduction, improvement of the quality of landfill materials through conversion of organic substances into inorganic substances which are more beneficial for landfill purposes, and conservation of resources by energy recovery. But air pollution by exhaust substances - especially dioxin - from incineration plants pose a problem. This may place a big hurdle before future incineration plant projects. Small batch-type incineration furnaces are slowly dying out. Some municipalities will jointly construct a large incineration plant among themselves while others will consider introducing RDF producing plant, which is getting popular. More efforts will be made to melt and solify the incineration residue, reduce the environmental load imposed by pollutants in the exhaust gas from now on.

Tanaka, Masaru [National Institute of Public Health, Tokyo (Japan)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Fossil and biogenic CO{sub 2} from waste incineration based on a yearlong radiocarbon study  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Yearlong radiocarbon study on the share of biogenic CO{sub 2} from waste incineration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Direct approach combining temporal integrating gas sampling and {sup 14}CO{sub 2} analysis by AMS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Significant differences between incinerators with 43% and 54%Fos C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer No annual cycle of fossil CO{sub 2} for all, except one, of the included incinerators. - Abstract: We describe the first long-term implementation of the radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) method to study the share of biogenic (%Bio C) and fossil (%Fos C) carbon in combustion CO{sub 2}. At five Swiss incinerators, a total of 24 three-week measurement campaigns were performed over 1 year. Temporally averaged bag samples were analyzed for {sup 14}CO{sub 2} by accelerator mass spectrometry. Significant differences between the plants in the share of fossil CO{sub 2} were observed, with annual mean values from 43.4 {+-} 3.9% to 54.5 {+-} 3.1%. Variations can be explained by the waste composition of the respective plant. Based on our dataset, an average value of 48 {+-} 4%Fos C was determined for waste incineration in Switzerland. No clear annual trend in %Fos C was observed for four of the monitored incinerators, while one incinerator showed considerable variations, which are likely due to the separation and temporary storage of bulky goods.

Mohn, J., E-mail: joachim.mohn@empa.ch [Empa, Laboratory for Air Pollution and Environmental Technology, Ueberlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Szidat, S. [University of Bern, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Oeschger Center for Climate Change Research, Freiestrasse 3, CH-3012 Berne (Switzerland); Zeyer, K.; Emmenegger, L. [Empa, Laboratory for Air Pollution and Environmental Technology, Ueberlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

152

Conception of a Refuse-Derived Fuel (RDF) incineration plant and its environmental benefit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Since landfill ban was realised in July 2009 in Germany, wastes that have a high and middle calorific value must be incinerated. Fossil fuels like oil and coal for the generation of electricity and/or heat can be substituted, so that approximately 4 million tons of CO2 could be avoided. Waste incineration is a possible partial solution for avoiding worst impacts of climate change. This paper explores the concept of an incineration plant for waste with a reference calorific value of 15,000 kJ/kg. The plant layout, energy usage, opportunities to reduce CO2 emissions and Germany's contribution to climate change are discussed.

Konstantin Haker; Jan Kruger; Kerstin Kuchta

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Electrochemical Corrosion Rate Sensors for Waste Incineration Applications  

SciTech Connect

Electrochemical corrosion rate sensors work in high temperature waste incineration applications where ash is deposited. The ash serves as the electrolyte for electrochemical measurements, such as liner polarization resistance, electrochemical noise, and harmonic distortion analyses. Results to date have shown that these types of sensors respond qualitatively to changes in temperature, gas composition, alloy composition, and type of ash. Several years of research have shown that high temperature corrosion rate probes need to be better understood before corrosion rate can be used as a process variable by power plant operators. More recent research has shown that electrochemical corrosion probes typically measure lower corrosion rates than those measured by standard mass loss techniques. While still useful for monitoring changes in corrosion rates, absolute probe corrosion rates will need a calibration factor to be useful. Ideas for research that may help resolve these issues are presented.

Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Matthes, S.A.; Holcomb, G.R.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Eden, D.A. (Honeywell Intercorr)

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Method for determining effective flame emissivity in a rotary kiln incinerator burning solid waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Temperature is the most important parameter for the improvement of combustion efficiency and the control of pollutants. In order to obtain accurate flame temperatures in a rotary kiln incinerator using non-int...

Jin-cai Du; Qun-xing Huang; Jian-hua Yan

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Integrated Waste Management in Sweden Where incineration is not a dirty word  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emissions dramatically, particularly in the case of dioxins. Fifteen years ago, 18 Swedish waste incineration plants emitted a total of about 100 grams of dioxins every year. Today, the collective dioxin

Columbia University

156

An overview of renewable energy utilization from municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration in Taiwan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

summarized in the paper. Finally, we present the regulatory system including Air Pollution Control Act . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 495 4. Air pollution control regulations on MSW-to-energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 497 4.1. MSW incinerator air pollutants emission standards

Columbia University

157

A framework for the evaluation of the environmental merits of waste co-incineration  

SciTech Connect

Co-incineration of waste in conventional power plants and industrial plants is increasingly gaining interest. In power stations, like in many dedicated waste incinerators, the calorific value of the waste is used to generate electricity. The energy is used more effectively in a power plant, however, because the energetic efficiency of the power plant is higher. Another promising option for waste treatment is co-incineration in a cement kiln. In that case, the energy in the waste serves to heat the materials to the desired temperature. In addition, the ashes that result from the incineration are incorporated in the cement, which means a reduction of both the primary material demand and the output waste flows. The amount of primary energy saved by the co-incineration is usually taken to be equal to the calorific value of the waste. However, that approach is not always justifiable. If, for example, waste is used in a cement kiln rather than treated in a waste incinerator with generation of electricity, the electricity must still be generated by a power plant, because the electricity demand is unchanged. Therefore, the energetic gain of co-incineration in a cement kiln should be corrected for the energy needed for the generation of electricity. In this paper, three processes are evaluated in an integrated systems approach: a dedicated waste incinerator combined with electricity generation, a power plant and a cement kiln. The effects of the incineration of three typical examples of waste are evaluated: mixed plastic waste, rubber, and sludge from a waste water treatment plant. The calorific value and the material contribution of the waste are compared with those of the primary fuel and the raw materials used in the processes. The integrated approach shows that the equivalent of one joule of waste saves 0.5 joule of primary fuel if the waste is burnt in either the power plant or the cement kiln rather than in the waste incinerator. The additional advantage of co-incineration in a cement kiln is the use of the material content of the waste. Even though the gain is less than often claimed, the substitution value can be substantial and application of waste in a power plant or a cement kiln can have considerable advantages, taken that other environmental criteria are met.

Bouwmans, I.; Hakvoort, R.A.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Fixation and partitioning of heavy metals in slag after incineration of sewage sludge  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The contents and partitioning of HMs in slag of sludge incineration were examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fixation rate decreases with residential time and finally keeps a constant. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Water mass fraction of 55% is optimal for the sediment for Ni, Mn, Zn, Cu and Cr. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Water mass fraction of 75% is optimal for the sediment for Pb. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found higher temperature versus lower non-residual fraction except that of Pb. - Abstract: Fixation of heavy metals in the slag produced during incineration of sewage sludge will reduce emission of the metals to the atmosphere and make the incineration process more environmentally friendly. The effects of incineration conditions (incineration temperature 500-1100 Degree-Sign C, furnace residence time 0-60 min, mass fraction of water in the sludge 0-75%) on the fixation rates and species partitioning of Cd, Pb, Cr, Cu, Zn, Mn and Ni in slag were investigated. When the incineration temperature was increased from 500 to 1100 Degree-Sign C, the fixation rate of Cd decreased from 87% to 49%, while the fixation rates of Cu and Mn were stable. The maximum fixation rates for Pb and Zn and for Ni and Cr were reached at 900 and 1100 Degree-Sign C, respectively. The fixation rates of Cu, Ni, Cd, Cr and Zn decreased as the residence time increased. With a 20 min residence time, the fixation rates of Pb and Mn were low. The maximum fixation rates of Ni, Mn, Zn, Cu and Cr were achieved when the mass fraction of water in the sludge was 55%. The fixation rate of Cd decreased as the water mass fraction increased, while the fixation rate of Pb increased. Partitioning analysis of the metals contained in the slag showed that increasing the incineration temperature and residence time promoted complete oxidation of the metals. This reduced the non-residual fractions of the metals, which would lower the bioavailability of the metals. The mass fraction of water in the sludge had little effect on the partitioning of the metals. Correlation analysis indicated that the fixation rates of heavy metals in the sludge and the forms of heavy metals in the incinerator slag could be controlled by optimization of the incineration conditions. These results show how the bioavailability of the metals can be reduced for environmentally friendly disposal of the incinerator slag.

Chen Tao [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100082 (China); Yan Bo, E-mail: yanbo2007@gig.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

159

'Burning for the Future'? A qualitative inquiry into the paradox of incineration as a waste management solution for "green" Denmark.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Paradoxically, despite its reputation as a “green” leader, Denmark has the highest levels of waste and incineration per capita, as well as low levels of… (more)

Husen, Betina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Utredning av primärluftförvärmning till två avfallseldade pannor; Investigation of primary air preheating for two waste incineration boilers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The purpose of this degree-project was to investigate the possibilities for primary air preheating into the two smallest waste incineration boilers of Halmstad Energy… (more)

Björkman, Mattias

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university waste-to-energy incinerator" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

DEMOLITION OF HANFORDS 232-Z WASTE INCINERATION FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

The 232-Z Plutonium Incinerator Facility was a small, highly alpha-contaminated, building situated between three active buildings located in an operating nuclear complex. Approximately 500 personnel worked within 250 meters (800 ft) of the structure and expectations were that the project would neither impact plant operations nor result in any restrictions when demolition was complete. Precision demolition and tight controls best describe the project. The team used standard open-air demolition techniques to take the facility to slab-on-grade. Several techniques were key to controlling contamination and confining it to the demolition area: spraying fixatives before demolition began; using misting systems, frequently applying fixatives, and using a methodical demolition sequence and debris load-out process. Detailed air modeling was done before demolition to determine necessary facility source-term levels, establish radiological boundaries, and confirm the adequacy of the proposed demolition approach. By only removing the major source term in equipment, HEPA filters, gloveboxes, and the like, and leaving fixed contamination on the walls, ceilings and floors, the project showed considerable savings and reduced worker hazards and exposure. The ability to perform this demolition safely and without the spread of contamination provides confidence that similar operations can be performed successfully. By removing the major source terms, fixing the remaining contamination in the building, and using controlled demolition and contamination control techniques, similar structures can be demolished cost effectively and safely.

LLOYD, E.R.

2006-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

162

Permeability of consolidated incinerator facility wastes stabilized with portland cement  

SciTech Connect

The Consolidated Incinerator Facility (CIF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) burns low-level radioactive wastes and mixed wastes as a method of treatment and volume reduction. The CIF generates secondary waste, which consists of ash and offgas scrubber solution. Currently the ash is stabilized/solidified in the Ashcrete process. The scrubber solution (blowdown) is sent to the SRS Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) for treatment as wastewater. In the past, the scrubber solution was also stabilized/solidified in the Ashcrete process as blowcrete, and will continue to be treated this way for listed waste burns and scrubber solutions that do not meet the ETF Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). The disposal plan for Ashcrete and special case blowcrete is to bury these containerized waste forms in shallow unlined trenches in E-Area. The WAC for intimately mixed, cement-based wasteforms intended for direct disposal specifies limits on compressive strength and permeability. Simulated waste and actual CIF ash and scrubber solution were mixed in the laboratory and cast into wasteforms for testing. Test results and related waste disposal consequences are given in this report.

Walker, B.W.

2000-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

163

Waste-to-Energy Biomass Digester with Decreased Water Consumption...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Applications and Industries Disposal of solid animal waste and generation of biogas Suitable for large-scale animal feeding operations that dry-scrape manure Especially...

164

Biomass and Waste-to-Energy | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

studies provided a detailed basis for understanding the current state of various conversion technologies for producing fuel ethanol. The studies also helped identify technical...

165

Waste to Energy Power Production at DOE and DOD Sites  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of its kind in the US AF DOD Utah * First Project Under DOEBiomass Alternative Methane Fuel ES PCProgram * Numerous awards and recognitions S olar Photovoltaic S ystem S olar...

166

Waste-to-Energy: Hawaii and Guam Energy Improvement Technology...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ESTCP Environmental Security Technology Certification Program FY fiscal year GEM Green Energy Machine H 2 S hydrogen sulfide HECO Hawaii Electric Company HEDWEC...

167

Waste to Energy Power Production at DOE and DOD Sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agency Innovations DOE: Savannah River Site · BiomassHeat and Power USAF: Hill Air Force Base · Landfill;Hill AFBRenewable Energy Initiatives Landfill Gasto Energy Electrical Generation (LFGTE) · First- LFGTE Air Force Base isadjacent to the DavisCounty Landfill Hi

168

Thermal treatment of historical radioactive solid and liquid waste into the CILVA incinerator  

SciTech Connect

Since the very beginning of the nuclear activities in Belgium, the incineration of radioactive waste was chosen as a suitable technique for achieving an optimal volume reduction of the produced waste quantities. Based on the 35 years experience gained by the operation of the old incinerator, a new industrial incineration plant started nuclear operation in May 1995, as a part of the Belgian Centralized Treatment/Conditioning Facility named CILVA. Up to the end of 2006, the CILVA incinerator has burnt 1660 tonne of solid waste and 419 tonne of liquid waste. This paper describes the type and allowable radioactivity of the waste, the incineration process, heat recovery and the air pollution control devices. Special attention is given to the treatment of several hundreds of tonne historical waste from former reprocessing activities such as alpha suspected solid waste, aqueous and organic liquid waste and spent ion exchange resins. The capacity, volume reduction, chemical and radiological emissions are also evaluated. BELGOPROCESS, a company set up in 1984 at Dessel (Belgium) where a number of nuclear facilities were already installed is specialized in the processing of radioactive waste. It is a subsidiary of ONDRAF/NIRAS, the Belgian Nuclear Waste Management Agency. According to its mission statement, the activities of BELGOPROCESS focus on three areas: treatment, conditioning and interim storage of radioactive waste; decommissioning of shut-down nuclear facilities and cleaning of contaminated buildings and land; operating of storage sites for conditioned radioactive waste. (authors)

Deckers, Jan; Mols, Ludo [Belgoprocess NV, Operations Department, Gravenstraat 73, B-2480 Dessel (Belgium)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) Hazardous Waste Incineration Facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 3. Characterization of the nature and magnitude of emissions  

SciTech Connect

Contents: Introduction; Data Used in Characterizing Emissions; Incinerator Stack Emissions; Fugitive Emissions; Uncertainty in Emissions Characterization; and References.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Waste Growth Challenges Local Democracy. The Politics of Waste between Europe and the Mediterranean: a Focus on Italy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

activities, such as waste burning versus waste dumping.and the Geographies of Waste Governance: A Burning Issue forEurope: • Burning oriented – Incineration (waste-to-energy)

Mengozzi, Alessandro

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced mixed waste Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

unskapssammanstllning om dioxiner"(Waste-to-energy, an inventory and review about... dioxins) Continuous efforts are being made to further improve waste incineration as a means...

172

Optimal Operation of a Waste Incineration Plant for District Heating Johannes Jaschke, Helge Smedsrud, Sigurd Skogestad*, Henrik Manum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimal Operation of a Waste Incineration Plant for District Heating Johannes J¨aschke, Helge@chemeng.ntnu.no off-line. This systematic approach is here applied to a waste incineration plant for district heating. In district heating networks, operators usually wish to ob- tain the lowest possible return temperature

Skogestad, Sigurd

173

ENVIRONMENTAL SURVEILLANCE OF INCINERATORS: 2006-2009 DATA ON DIOXIN/FURAN ATMOSPHERIC DEPOSITION AND ASSOCIATED THRESHOLDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENVIRONMENTAL SURVEILLANCE OF INCINERATORS: 2006-2009 DATA ON DIOXIN/FURAN ATMOSPHERIC DEPOSITION Orléans, France Introduction Dioxin/furan (PCDD/F) emission into the atmosphere has clearly diminished regulations, including those for MSW incineration plants which are a major source of dioxins. The collection

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

174

The estimation of N{sub 2}O emissions from municipal solid waste incineration facilities: The Korea case  

SciTech Connect

The greenhouse gases (GHGs) generated in municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration are carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane (CH{sub 4}), and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O). In South Korea case, the total of GHGs from the waste incineration facilities has been increasing at an annual rate 10%. In these view, waste incineration facilities should consider to reduce GHG emissions. This study is designed to estimate the N{sub 2}O emission factors from MSW incineration plants, and calculate the N{sub 2}O emissions based on these factors. The three MSW incinerators examined in this study were either stoker or both stoker and rotary kiln facilities. The N{sub 2}O concentrations from the MSW incinerators were measured using gas chromatography-electron capture detection (GC-ECD) equipment. The average of the N{sub 2}O emission factors for the M01 plant, M02 plant, and M03 plant are 71, 75, and 153 g-N{sub 2}O/ton-waste, respectively. These results showed a significant difference from the default values of the intergovernmental panel on climate change (IPCC), while approaching those values derived in Japan and Germany. Furthermore, comparing the results of this study to the Korea Energy Economics Institute (KEEI) (2007) data on waste incineration, N{sub 2}O emissions from MSW incineration comprised 19% of the total N{sub 2}O emissions.

Park, Sangwon; Choi, Jun-Ho [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Yonsei University, 262 Seongsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jinwon, E-mail: jwpark@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Yonsei University, 262 Seongsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

175

Finding of No Significant Impact, Consolidated Incineration Facility at the Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

92 WL 381301 (F.R.) 92 WL 381301 (F.R.) NOTICES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Finding of No Significant Impact, Consolidated Incineration Facility at the Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC Thursday, December 24, 1992 *61402 AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Finding of no significant impact. SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) (DOE/EA -0400) for the proposed construction and operation of the Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, South Carolina. The CIF would be for the treatment of hazardous, low- level radioactive, and mixed (both hazardous and radioactive) wastes from SRS. Incineration would reduce the volume and toxicity of these wastes. Construction and operation of the

176

Progress with heat resistant materials for waste incineration -- Alloy 45TM  

SciTech Connect

Heat resistant materials are used in a wide variety of modem industries such as metallurgical, chemical, petrochemical, heat treatment, heat recovery and waste incinerators and many others. The huge quantities of both municipal and industrial waste generated in the Western world has made ``controlled high temperature incineration`` a necessary technology for managing this problem. The evolution of this technology has not been without its cost. High temperature corrosion problems have led to many failures and unscheduled shutdowns. Proper materials of construction are vitally important for reliable, safe and cost effective operation of these systems. This paper describes the development of a new nickel based alloy, which combines the beneficial effects of high chromium and high silicon in combating these various corrosive environments encountered in incineration.

Agarwal, D.C. [VDM Technologies, Houston, TX (United States); Brill, U.; Kloewer, J. [Krupp-VDM GmbH, Werdohl (Germany)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Detailed studies of Minor Actinide transmutation-incineration in high-intensity neutron fluxes  

SciTech Connect

The Mini-INCA project is dedicated to the measurement of incineration-transmutation chains and potentials of minor actinides in high-intensity thermal neutron fluxes. In this context, new types of detectors and methods of analysis have been developed. The {sup 241}Am and {sup 232}Th transmutation-incineration chains have been studied and several capture and fission cross sections measured very precisely, showing some discrepancies with existing data or evaluated data. An impact study was made on different based-like GEN-IV reactors. It underlines the necessity to proceed to precise measurements for a large number of minor-actinides that contribute to these future incineration scenarios. (authors)

Bringer, O. [CEA/Saclay/DSM/DAPNIA, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Al Mahamid, I. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, E.H. and S. Div., CA (United States); Blandin, C. [CEA/Cadarache/DEN/DER/SPEX, Saint-Paul-lez-Durances (France); Chabod, S. [CEA/Saclay/DSM/DAPNIA, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Chartier, F. [CEA/Cadarache/DEN/DPC/SECR, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Dupont, E.; Fioni, G. [CEA/Saclay/DSM/DAPNIA, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Isnard, H. [CEA/Cadarache/DEN/DPC/SECR, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Letourneau, A.; Marie, F. [CEA/Saclay/DSM/DAPNIA, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Mutti, P. [Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble (France); Oriol, L. [CEA/Cadarache/DEN/DER/SPEX, Saint-Paul-lez-Durances (France); Panebianco, S.; Veyssiere, C. [CEA/Saclay/DSM/DAPNIA, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Strategies for continuous monitoring of hydrogen chloride emissions from municipal solid-waste incinerators  

SciTech Connect

The paper presents a discussion of sampling and analytical techniques for continuous monitoring of hydrogen chloride (HCl) emissions from incineration sources. The discussion focuses on commercially available systems for sample conditioning and measurement. Six HCl continuous-emission monitors were evaluated at a municipal facility for solid-waste incineration. Field-test results indicate that several techniques for continuous monitoring of HCl concentrations are available. Most of the analyzers tested, regardless of the detection or calibration techniques, indicated the same trend in the effluent HCl concentrations and produced data that was in good agreement with wet-chemistry results.

Jernigan, J.R.; Shanklin, S.; Rollins, R.; Logan, T.J.; Midgett, M.R.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Initial atmospheric-dispersion modeling in support of the multiple-site incineration study  

SciTech Connect

Several modeling series which estimate population exposure to stack emissions from incineration of hazardous organic materials at 22 commercial incinerator sites are presented. These modeling series can be divided into three groups. One group estimates long- and short-term atmospheric concentrations and population exposures for each of 22 sites. These modeling predictions can be used to assess chronic and acute exposure. The second group consists of sensitivity analyses which show the effect of changes in stack parameters on the number of people exposed to specified concentration levels. The third group compares concentration estimates of two atmospheric dispersion computer codes. Results of each modeling series are contained in the appendices of this report.

Holton, G.A.; Little, C.A.; O& #x27; Donnell, F.R.; Etnier, E.L.; Travis, C.C.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Performance of a municipal solid waste (MSW) incinerator predicted with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to investigate by the means of numerical simulation the performance of the MSW incinerator with of Vercelli (Italy). FLUENT, a finite-volumes commercial code for Fluid Dynamics has been used to predict the 3-D reacting flows (gaseous phase) within the incinerator geometry, in order to estimate if the three conditions settled by the Italian law (P.D. 915 / 82) are respected: (a) Flue gas temperature at the input of the secondary combustion chamber must exceed 950 C. (b) Oxygen concentration in the same section must exceed 6 %. (c) Residence time for the flue gas in the secondary combustion chamber must exceed 2 seconds. The model of the incinerator has been created using the software pre-processing facilities (wall, input, outlet and live cells), together with the set-up of boundary conditions. There are also imposed the combustion constants (stoichiometry, heat of combustion, air excess). The solving procedure transforms at the level of each live cell the partial derivative equations in algebraic equations, computing the velocities field, the temperatures, gases concentration, etc. These predicted values were compared with the design properties, and the conclusion was that the conditions (a), (b), (c), are respected in normal operation. The powerful graphic interface helps the user to visualize the magnitude of the computed parameters. These results may be successfully used for the design and operation improvements for MSW incinerators. This fact will substantially increase the efficiency, reduce pollutant emissions and optimize the plant overall performance.

Anglesio, P.; Negreanu, G.P.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university waste-to-energy incinerator" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

EIS-0084: Incineration Facility for Radioactively Contaminated PCBs and Other Wastes, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Uranium Enrichment and Assessment prepared this statement to assess the environmental impacts of the construction and operation of the proposed Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant, an incineration facility to dispose of radioactively contaminated polychlorinated biophenyls, as well as combustible waste from the Paducah, Portsmouth and Oak Ridge facilities.

182

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio)  

SciTech Connect

The report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. Volume I is a description of the components and methodologies used in the risk assessment and provides a summary of the major results from the three components of the assessment.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Mercury Emission from Co-Combustion of Sludge and Coal in a CFB Incinerator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An experimental study on co-combustion of sludge and coal were conducted in a circulating fluidized bed incinerator with the dense bed cross section area of 0.23m×0.23m and the height of 7m. The mercury mass b...

Y. F. Duan; C. S. Zhao; C. J. Wu; Y. J. Wang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Refuse Incinerator Particulate Emissions and Combustion Residues for New York City during the 20th Century  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Comparison of Selected Elemental Content in Earth's Crust and Coal Fly Ash to Products of Municipal Refuse Incinerationa ... We also thank Dr. Nickolas Themelis, Benjamin Miller, and Maneesha Aggarwal for producing the GIS map of incinerator locations and Ms. Debra Zetlan of the NYC Municipal Library. ...

Daniel C. Walsh; Steven N. Chillrud; H. James Simpson; Richard F. Bopp

2001-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

185

Energy recovery and cogeneration from an existing municipal incinerator: Phase IIA progress report on final design  

SciTech Connect

A feasibility study was prepared on energy recovery and cogeneration from and existing municipal incinerator in Wayne County, Michigan. The mechanical, electrical, structural, and instruments an controls equipment designs were established in sufficient depth to arrive at a construction cost estimate. The designs are described. All of the flue gas generated from each incinerator is directed into a waste heat boiler that will generate steam. A waste heat boiler will be provided for each of the three incinerators. Steam from these waste heat boilers will supply energy to two turbine-generators, which, in turn, will supply auxiliary power to the incinerator plant; the balance of the power will be sold to Detroit Edison Company (DEC). Exhaust steam from each turbine will be directed into a surface condenser operating under vacuum. The water to be supplied to each condenser will be recirculated water that has been cooled by means of a cooling tower. Other cooling water that could be subjected to oil contamination will be supplied from a separate recirculating water system. The water in this system will be cooled by an evaporative condenser. The main steam, boiler feedwater, and condensate systems will be similar to those used in central power stations. Flow diagrams for all systems, together with heat balances, electrical one-line diagrams, and plant layouts, are included in the Appendix. Also included in the Appendix are instruments and controls logic diagrams. (MCW)

Not Available

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Computational Fluid Dynamics Evaluation of Good Combustion Performance in Waste Incinerators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a legal requirement to minimize pollution in municipal solid waste incinerators. The conditions for in-furnace destruction of pollutants are stated as: good combustion is achieved when 2-second gas residence time at 850 C of potential pollutants. The residence time needs to be carefully determined based on the gas inlet position

Kim, Yong Jung

187

Renewable-Based Energy Secure Communities (RESCOs) University of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable-Based Energy Secure Communities (RESCOs) University of Renewable-Based Energy Secure Communities (RESCOs) University of California, Merced Jump to: navigation, search Name Renewable-Based Energy Secure Communities (RESCOs) University of California, Merced Agency/Company /Organization California Integrated Renewable Energy Systems Sector Energy Focus Area Buildings, Commercial, Residential, Energy Efficiency, Greenhouse Gas, Land Use, Renewable Energy, Biomass, Biomass - Waste To Energy Phase Create a Vision, Prepare a Plan, Develop Finance and Implement Projects Resource Type Case studies/examples Availability Free - Publicly Available Publication Date 4/13/2010 Website http://cal-ires.ucdavis.edu/fi Locality University of California, Merced References Renewable-Based Energy Secure Communities (RESCOs) University of California, Merced[1]

188

UV&P 2014 999_2014_Sofia_WTERT Presentation Neubacher 2014-03-06  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficiency: up to 90 % (co-generation of electricity and district heat) Steam production: 2 x 50 t / h (32 acceptance of Waste-to-Energy in Vienna For Waste-to-Energy with district heating Against incineration Source- equivalent [kg/ton waste] Reduction in household heating from Waste-to-Energy Plant (district heating

189

Laboratory scale studies on gaseous emissions generated by the incineration of an artificial automotive shredder residue presenting a critical composition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Car manufacturers must eliminate automotive shredder residues (ASR). Two ways of incineration are of interest: at 850°C in municipal waste incinerators or at higher temperatures, above 1100°C in cement plants. These processes reduce the mass and the volume of waste to be disposed of in landfills and energy recovery might be possible. Regulations govern the emission of gaseous effluents to control environmental risk. To determine gaseous effluents from a pilot sacle or an industrial incineration plant, an artificial ASR was made by mixing three representative organic polymers present in the real ASR, namely polyvinylchloride, polyurethane and rubber. This mixture was incinerated at 850 and 1100°C in laboratory experiments and the analyses of the principal gaseous effluents such as carbon oxides, nitrogen oxides, volatile organic compounds, hydrochloric and hydrocyanic acids and sulphur compounds are presented and discussed. Lastly, in order to simulate artificial ASR behaviour, the composition of the combustion gases at equilibrium was calculated using a Gibbs energy minimisation code.

D. Lanoir; G. Trouvé; L. Delfosse

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Experimental investigation into the incineration of wool scouring sludges in a novel rotating fluidised bed  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The main purpose of this research was to investigate the possibility of incineration of wool scouring sludges in a novel vertical axis rotating fluidised bed (RFB). A small-scale RFB was designed and constructed with an internal diameter (ID) of 200 mm and height of 50 mm to carry out the experiments. In phase one of the experiments, a cold test was conducted to investigate the fluidisation performance of the RFB, which eventually led to the optimisation of the operating parameters, i.e., sand particle size, rotation speed and bed loading (bed thickness) which ensures complete fluidisation and minimum particle elutriation. Sand particle size of 0.5 to 0.6 mm, rotation speed of 200 to 400 rpm and bed loading of 1 kg (equivalent to bed thickness of 27 mm) were found optimal. These information generated were useful for the second phase of the experiments, which was the hot test, in investigating the possibility of incinerating wool scouring sludges in the RFB. Nine wool sludges from different process routes generated from the wool scouring industries were analysed for their compositions. Most of these sludges were highly moist, had high volatile matter and high ash content with low level of fixed carbon. These characteristics made incineration difficult. Hence, the effect of varying the moisture content, rotation speed and sludge feed rate on the incineration of the three selected sludges were studied in the hot test. With 5% support methane, all sludges with a maximum moisture up to 70% as-received could be successfully burned in the RFB at rotating speeds of 200 and 300 rpm. The combustion was found to be intense with a high efficiency due to the good turbulence and mixing in the RFB. The combustion gases produced, i.e., CO, CO2 and \\{NOx\\} were reasonably low due to the high combustion intensity and efficiency. To study the dynamics of the bed and freeboard region in the RFB, the velocity flow field was simulated using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model to generate information of the flow pattern. The special advantages of swirling flow would benefit the gas combustion in the RFB. The experimental results obtained have suggested that the incineration was successful and the ash particles elutriated were fine due to the good mixing and turbulence in the RFB. This also reflects the RFB as an effective incinerator.

W.Y Wong; Y Lu; V.S Nasserzadeh; J Swithenbank; T Shaw; M Madden

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Evaluation of HC1 measurement techniques at municipal and hazardous-waste incinerators  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen chloride (HC1) emissions from hazardous waste incinerators are regulated by the EPA, and the Agency is considering HC1 regulations for municipal waste combustors. Until recently, techniques to adequately quantify these emissions using either instrumentation or wet-chemistry sampling methods have not been evaluated. The EPA has sponsored several field tests to assess the performance of commercially-available HC1 continuous emission monitoring systems (CEMS's) and a proposed manual sampling and analysis methodology for use at municipal and hazardous waste incinerators. Tests were performed (1) to determine the capability of HC1 CEMS's to provide valid measurement data, (2) to develop HC1 CEMS performance specifications, and (3) to develop a suitable performance test method.

Shanklin, S.A.; Steinsberger, S.C.; Logan, T.J.; Rollins, R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Oxygen-enriched multiple-hearth sewage sludge incineration demonstration. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Oxygen-enhanced multiple-hearth sludge incineration was the focus of a five-month joint study by Praxair and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority. Testing and demonstration were conducted in Rochester NY, at Monroe County`s Frank E. Van Lare Sewage Treatment Plant. A simple retrofit of high-momentum oxygen lances created a convection hearth in which convective heat and mass transfer with the drying sludge were greatly enhanced, while hearth temperatures were moderated by the wet sludge to prevent overheating. Based on the results of short- and long-term controlled tests discussed in this report, oxygen enhancement of multiple-hearth sludge incinerators can be economically viable, with a savings between $30 and $60 per hour at Van Lare based upon increased sludge throughput and reduced fuel consumption.

NONE

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Fluorination of incinerator ash by hydrofluorination or ammonium bifluoride fusion for plutonium recovery  

SciTech Connect

Incinerator ash containing small quantities of plutonium has been accumulating across the defense complex for many years. Although the total Pu inventory is small, the ash is a nondiscardable residue which presents storage and accountability difficulties. The work discussed here is the result of a joint exploratory effort between members of Savannah River Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory to compare two proposed pyrochemical pretreatments of incinerator ash prior to aqueous processing. These experiments attempted to determine the relative effectiveness of hydrofluorination and ammonium bifluoride fusion as head-end operations for a two step aqueous recovery method. The two pretreatments are being considered as possible second generation enhancements for the New Special Recovery Facility nearing operation at Savannah River Plant. Experimental results and potential engineering concerns are discussed. 3 figs.

Fink, S.D.; Gray, J.H.; Kent, S.J.; Apgar, S.A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Application of holographic neural networks for flue gas emissions prediction in the Burnaby incinerator  

SciTech Connect

This article describes the development of a parametric prediction system (PPS) for various emission species at the Burnaby incinerator. The continuous emissions monitoring system at the Burnaby incinerator is shared between three boilers and therefore actual results are only available 5 minutes out of every 15 minutes. The PPS was developed to fill in data for the 10 minutes when the Continuous Emission Monitor (CEM) is measuring the other boilers. It bases its prediction on the last few actual readings taken and parametrically predicts CO, SO2 and NOx. The Burnaby Incinerator is located in the commercial/industrial area of South Burnaby, British Columbia. It consists of three separate lines, each burning ten tonnes of garbage per hour and producing about three tonnes of steam for every tonne of garbage burned. The air pollution control system first cools the combustion products with water injection and then scrubs them with very fine hydrated lime. Carbon is added to the lime to enhance the scrubbing of the combustion products. The CEM monitors the levels of oxygen, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, sulphur dioxide and opacity. In 1996, an expert system was installed on one of boilers at the Burnaby Incinerator plant to determine if it could improve the plant=s operations and reduce overall emission. As part of the expert system, the PPS was developed. Holographic Neural Technology (HNeT), developed by AND Corporation of Toronto, Ontario, is a novel neural network technology using complex numbers in its architecture. Compared to the traditional neural networks, HNeT has some significant advantage. It is more resilient against converging on local minima; is faster training and executing; less prone to over fitting; and, in most cases, has significantly lower error. Selection of independent variabs, training set preparation, testing neural nets and other related issue will be discussed.

Zheng, L.; Dockrill, P.; Clements, B. [Natural Resources Canada, Nepean, Ontario (Canada). CANMET Energy Technology Centre

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

195

A chemical basis for the partitioning of radionuclides in incinerator operation  

SciTech Connect

Incineration as a method of treating radioactive or mixed waste is attractive because of volume reduction, but may result in high concentrations of some hazardous components. For safety reasons during operation, and because of the environmental impact of the plant, it is important to know how these materials partition between the furnace slay, the fly ash, and the stack emission. The chemistry of about 50 elements is discussed and through consideration of high temperature thermodynamic equilibria, an attempt is made to provide a basis for predicting how various radionuclides and heavy metals behave in a typical incinerator. The chemistry of the individual elements is first considered and a prediction of the most stable chemical species in the typical incinerator atmosphere is made. The treatment emphasizes volatility and the parameters considered are temperature, acidity, oxygen, sulfur, and halogen content, and the presence of several other key non-radioactive elements. A computer model is used to calculate equilibrium concentrations of many species in several systems at temperatures ranging from 500 to 1600{degrees}K. It is suggested that deliberate addition of various feed chemicals can have a major impact on the fate of many radionuclides and heavy metals. Several problems concerning limitations and application of the data are considered.

Burger, L.L.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Two stage, low temperature, catalyzed fluidized bed incineration with in situ neutralization for radioactive mixed wastes  

SciTech Connect

A two stage, low temperature, catalyzed fluidized bed incineration process is proving successful at incinerating hazardous wastes containing nuclear material. The process operates at 550{degrees}C and 650{degrees}C in its two stages. Acid gas neutralization takes place in situ using sodium carbonate as a sorbent in the first stage bed. The feed material to the incinerator is hazardous waste-as defined by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act-mixed with radioactive materials. The radioactive materials are plutonium, uranium, and americium that are byproducts of nuclear weapons production. Despite its low temperature operation, this system successfully destroyed poly-chlorinated biphenyls at a 99.99992% destruction and removal efficiency. Radionuclides and volatile heavy metals leave the fluidized beds and enter the air pollution control system in minimal amounts. Recently collected modeling and experimental data show the process minimizes dioxin and furan production. The report also discusses air pollution, ash solidification, and other data collected from pilot- and demonstration-scale testing. The testing took place at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a US Department of Energy facility, in the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s.

Wade, J.F.; Williams, P.M.

1995-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

197

Characterization, decontamination and health effects of fly ash from waste incinerators  

SciTech Connect

The aims of the present work are (a) to investigate the physical and chemical properties of incinerator ash which are of importance for its utilization and environmental impact; (b) to evaluate the occupational exposure of incinerator workers to trace metals; and (c) to develop a novel technology for the conversion of contaminated fly-ash from incinerators into a material which can be disposed of cheaply or used in the construction industry. The discussion is illustrated by results obtained through experiments. Morphologically, fly-ash consists of irregularly shaped material, of widely varying sizes. Some minerals are identified using powder X-ray diffraction, i.e., calcite, pyrite, halite and maghemite. The chemical composition of ash samples examined consist of Ca, Al, Si, K, Ti, Mg, Fe, K, Na and Mn as the major and minor elements. Trace elements such as Pb, Co, Cr, Ni, Cu, Se, Mo and Cd are also found. The samples tested are rich in Cl, Cr, Zn, Sn, and Pb, as compared to the earth`s crust values. About 50% of the fly-ash particles are smaller than 5.5 {micro}m. These particles can play an important role in transferring toxic metals into the human blood stream by inhalation, deposition and absorption.

Lee, P.H.; Delay, I.; Nasserzadeh, V.; Swithenbank, J.; McLeod, C.; Argent, B.B. [Sheffield Univ. (United Kingdom); Goodfellow, J. [Dyson-Hotwork Limited, Dewsbury (United Kingdom)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

198

Mercury mass balance at a wastewater treatment plant employing sludge incineration with offgas mercury control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Efforts to reduce the deliberate use of mercury (Hg) in modern industrialized societies have been largely successful, but the minimization and control of Hg in waste streams are of continuing importance. Municipal wastewater treatment plants are collection points for domestic, commercial, and industrial wastewaters, and Hg removal during wastewater treatment is essential for protecting receiving waters. Subsequent control of the Hg removed is also necessary to preclude environmental impacts. We present here a mass balance for Hg at a large metropolitan wastewater treatment plant that has recently been upgraded to provide for greater control of the Hg entering the plant. The upgrade included a new fluidized bed sludge incineration facility equipped with activated carbon addition and baghouse carbon capture for the removal of Hg from the incinerator offgas. Our results show that Hg discharges to air and water from the plant represented less than 5% of the mass of Hg entering the plant, while the remaining Hg was captured in the ash/carbon residual stream exiting the new incineration process. Sub-optimum baghouse operation resulted in some of the Hg escaping collection there and accumulating with the ash/carbon particulate matter in the secondary treatment tanks. Overall, the treatment process is effective in removing Hg from wastewater and sequestering it in a controllable stream for secure disposal.

Steven J. Balogh; Yabing H. Nollet

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

The effect of changing waste compositions on the incineration process of Municipal Solid Wastes in packed-bed systems: a CFD approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With the recent changes in waste management policy across many EU countries, more and more efforts are now being made on wastes recycling and minimisation. In this paper, the effects of the changing compositions of wastes on the operation of incineration plants are addressed. CFD technique is used to simulate the incineration processes in grate systems and advanced mathematical models are employed. The incineration characteristics have been expressed as functions of the percentage of combustible materials in wastes taken away for recycling. To offset the deteriorated performance of incineration in some cases, alternative operation modes have been suggested and simulated.

Yao Bin Yang; Vida N. Sharifi; Jim Swithenbank

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Destruction behavior of hexabromocyclododecanes during incineration of solid waste containing expanded and extruded polystyrene insulation foams  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs) have been used for flame retardation mainly in expanded polystyrene (EPS) and extruded polystyrene (XPS) insulation foams. Controlled incineration experiments with solid wastes containing each of EPS and XPS were conducted using a pilot-scale incinerator to investigate the destruction behavior of \\{HBCDs\\} and their influence on the formation of polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PBDD/DFs). EPS and XPS materials were respectively blended with refuse derived fuel (RDF) as input wastes for incineration. Concentrations of \\{HBCDs\\} contained in the EPS- and XPS-added RDFs, were 140 and 1100 mg kg?1, respectively. In which ?-HBCD was dominant (68% of the total HBCD content) in EPS-added RDF and ?-HBCD accounted for 73% of the total \\{HBCDs\\} in XPS-added RDF. During the incineration experiments with EPS and XPS, primary and secondary combustion zones were maintained at temperatures of 840 °C and 900 °C. The residence times of waste in the primary combustion zone and flue gas in the secondary combustion zone was 30 min and three seconds, respectively. \\{HBCDs\\} were steadily degraded in the combustion chambers and ?-, ?-, and ?-HBCD behaved similarly. Concentration levels of the total \\{HBCDs\\} in the bag filter exit gas for the two experiments with EPS and XPS were 0.7 and 0.6 ng  m N - 3 , respectively. \\{HBCDs\\} were also not detected (<0.2 ng g?1) in the bottom and fly ash samples. From the obtained results, it was calculated that \\{HBCDs\\} were sufficiently destroyed in the whole incineration process with destruction efficiencies of more than 99.9999 for both of EPS and XPS cases. For PBDD/DFs, the levels detected in the bottom and fly ash samples were very low (0.028 ng g?1 at maximum). In the case of XPS-added experiment, 2,3,7,8-TeBDD and 2,3,7,8-TeBDF were determined in the flue gas at levels (0.05–0.07 ng  m N - 3 ) slightly over the detection limits in the environmental emission gas samples, suggesting \\{HBCDs\\} in XPS are possibly a precursor of detected PBDD/DFs. Operational care should be taken when the ratio of HBCD-containing polystyrene is increased in the input wastes just to make sure of formation prevention and emission control of PBDD/DFs. The concentrations and congener patterns of PCDD/DFs and dl-PCBs in the samples during the three experiments were not affected by an addition of HBCDs.

Hidetaka Takigami; Mafumi Watanabe; Natsuko Kajiwara

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university waste-to-energy incinerator" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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201

Community Renewable Energy Deployment: University of California at at Davis  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

at at Davis at at Davis Project Jump to: navigation, search Name Community Renewable Energy Deployment: University of California at at Davis Project Agency/Company /Organization US Department of Energy Focus Area Energy Efficiency, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, Other, Renewable Energy, Biomass - Anaerobic Digestion, Solar - Concentrating Solar Power, Hydrogen and Fuel Cells, - Solar Pv, Biomass - Waste To Energy Phase Develop Finance and Implement Projects Resource Type Case studies/examples Availability Publicly available--Free Publication Date 2/2/2011 Website http://www1.eere.energy.gov/co Locality University of California at Davis References Community Renewable Energy Deployment: University of California at at Davis Project[1] Contents

202

Mass balance for \\{POPs\\} in a real scale fluidized bed combustor co-incinerating automotive shredder residue  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The European directive 2000/53/EC implies a “reuse and recovery” rate for end-of-life vehicles (ELVs) of 95% to be reached by the year 2015. One of the options to increase the actual average European “reuse and recovery” rate of approximately 78% (EU 15, 2008) is incineration of automotive shredder residue (ASR) with energy-recovery. The mass balance and the congener fingerprints for PCDD/Fs, dioxin-like PCBs, \\{PCBs\\} and \\{PAHs\\} in a real scale fluidized bed combustor (FBC) incinerating 25% ASR with 25% refuse derived fuel (RDF) and 50% waste water treatment sludge (WWT sludge) were investigated. The PCDD/F, dioxin-like PCB, PCB and PAH concentrations in this input waste mix were more than hundred times higher than in the usual waste feed of the incinerator (30% RFD and 70% WWT sludge). In the outputs of the FBC, however, the concentrations of these POP groups were comparable or only slightly higher than in the outputs generated during the incineration of the usual waste feed. The considered \\{POPs\\} in the waste were destroyed efficiently and the formation of new \\{POPs\\} during cooling of the flue gas appeared to a large extent independent of the POP concentrations in the incinerated waste.

J. Van Caneghem; C. Block; I. Vermeulen; A. Van Brecht; P. Van Royen; M. Jaspers; G. Wauters; C. Vandecasteele

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Los Alamos Controlled Air Incinerator for radioactive waste. Volume I. Rationale, process, equipment, performance, and recommendations  

SciTech Connect

This two-volume report is a detailed design and operating documentation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Controlled Air Incinerator (CAI) and is an aid to technology transfer to other Department of Energy contractor sites and the commercial sector. Volume I describes the CAI process, equipment, and performance, and it recommends modifications based on Los Alamos experience. It provides the necessary information for conceptual design and feasibility studies. Volume II provides descriptive engineering information such as drawing, specifications, calculations, and costs. It aids duplication of the process at other facilities.

Neuls, A.S.; Draper, W.E.; Koenig, R.A.; Newmyer, J.M.; Warner, C.L.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Stabilization of high and low solids Consolidated Incinerator Facility (CIF) waste with super cement  

SciTech Connect

This report details solidification activities using selected Mixed Waste Focus Area technologies with the High and Low Solid waste streams. Ceramicrete and Super Cement technologies were chosen as the best possible replacement solidification candidates for the waste streams generated by the SRS incinerator from a list of several suggested Mixed Waste Focus Area technologies. These technologies were tested, evaluated, and compared to the current Portland cement technology being employed. Recommendation of a technology for replacement depends on waste form performance, process flexibility, process complexity, and cost of equipment and/or raw materials.

Walker, B.W.

2000-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

205

Numerical Modeling of a Discontinuous Incineration Process with On-line Validation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The waste, coming from diverse collections, is transferred from the pit into a vertical hopper and enters into the furnace pushed by a discontinuous feeding grate. ... Also the burning waste is discontinuously moved through the primary combustion chamber by reciprocating grates. ... Latest data from FederAmbiente, the Italian environmental federation, show that 35 plants, having incineration capacities from 30000 to 300000 t/y, burn about 2400000 t/y of solid wastes.1 More stringent specifications for correct operation, adopted throughout the European community countries, call for a proper optimal control of those units. ...

Davide Manca; Maurizio Rovaglio

2005-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

206

Laboratory study on the behaviour of spent AA household alkaline batteries in incineration  

SciTech Connect

The quantitative evaluation of emissions from incineration is essential when Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) studies consider this process as an end-of-life solution for some wastes. Thus, the objective of this work is to quantify the main gaseous emissions produced when spent AA alkaline batteries are incinerated. With this aim, batteries were kept for 1 h at 1273 K in a refractory steel tube hold in a horizontal electric furnace with temperature control. At one end of the refractory steel tube, a constant air flow input assures the presence of oxygen in the atmosphere and guides the gaseous emissions to a filter system followed by a set of two bubbler flasks having an aqueous solution of 10% (v/v) nitric acid. After each set of experiments, sulphur, chlorides and metals (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, Tl and Zn) were analyzed in both the solutions obtained from the steel tube washing and from the bubblers. Sulphur, chlorides and metals were quantified, respectively, using barium sulfate gravimetry, the Volhard method and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). The emissions of zinc, the most emitted metal, represent about 6.5% of the zinc content in the batteries. Emissions of manganese (whose oxide is the main component of the cathode) and iron (from the cathode collector) are negligible when compared with their amount in AA alkaline batteries. Mercury is the metal with higher volatility in the composition of the batteries and was collected even in the second bubbler flask. The amount of chlorides collected corresponds to about 36% of the chlorine in the battery sleeve that is made from PVC. A considerable part of the HCl formed in PVC plastic sleeve incineration is neutralized with KOH, zinc and manganese oxides and, thus, it is not totally released in the gas. Some of the emissions are predictable through a thermodynamic data analysis at temperatures in the range of 1200-1300 K taking into account the composition of the batteries. This analysis was done for most of potential reactions between components in the batteries as well as between them and the surrounding atmosphere and it reasonably agrees the experimental results. The results obtained show the role of alkaline batteries at the acid gases cleaning process, through the neutralization reactions of some of their components. Therefore, LCA of spent AA alkaline batteries at the municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration process must consider this contribution.

Almeida, Manuel F. [LEPAE, Faculty of Engineering, University of Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal)], E-mail: mfa@fe.up.pt; Xara, Susana M.; Delgado, Julanda; Costa, Carlos A. [LEPAE, Faculty of Engineering, University of Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

207

Life-cycle-assessment of the historical development of air pollution control and energy recovery in waste incineration  

SciTech Connect

Incineration of municipal solid waste is a debated waste management technology. In some countries it is the main waste management option whereas in other countries it has been disregarded. The main discussion point on waste incineration is the release of air emissions from the combustion of the waste, but also the energy recovery efficiency has a large importance. The historical development of air pollution control in waste incineration was studied through life-cycle-assessment modelling of eight different air pollution control technologies. The results showed a drastic reduction in the release of air emissions and consequently a significant reduction in the potential environmental impacts of waste incineration. Improvements of a factor 0.85-174 were obtained in the different impact potentials as technology developed from no emission control at all, to the best available emission control technologies of today (2010). The importance of efficient energy recovery was studied through seven different combinations of heat and electricity recovery, which were modelled to substitute energy produced from either coal or natural gas. The best air pollution control technology was used at the incinerator. It was found that when substituting coal based energy production total net savings were obtained in both the standard and toxic impact categories. However, if the substituted energy production was based on natural gas, only the most efficient recovery options yielded net savings with respect to the standard impacts. With regards to the toxic impact categories, emissions from the waste incineration process were always larger than those from the avoided energy production based on natural gas. The results shows that the potential environmental impacts from air emissions have decreased drastically during the last 35 years and that these impacts can be partly or fully offset by recovering energy which otherwise should have been produced from fossil fuels like coal or natural gas.

Damgaard, Anders, E-mail: and@env.dtu.d [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Riber, Christian [Ramboll, Consulting Engineers, Teknikerbyen 31, DK-2830 Virum (Denmark); Fruergaard, Thilde [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Hulgaard, Tore [Ramboll, Consulting Engineers, Teknikerbyen 31, DK-2830 Virum (Denmark); Christensen, Thomas H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

208

Comparative thermodynamic and experimental study of some heavy metal behaviours during automotive shredder residues incineration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experimental and theoretical studies of the behaviour of some heavy metals were undertaken during Automotive Shredder Residues (ASR) incineration. A thermodynamic study at equilibrium was performed using a software minimizing the free Gibbs energy. The metals studied were barium, copper, lead and zinc. The studies were performed mostly at two temperatures: 1123 and 1373 K. The thermodynamic study showed that the chlorine content is the most important parameter influencing the volatility of the studied metals. It also showed that in default of chlorine in a system containing several metals, barium chloride in its condensed form is the most easily formed. Other metals remained in their metallic form or in the form of oxides. The presence of hydrogen in the system has a general limiting influence on the metal volatility because, especially at high temperatures, hydrogen chloride is more likely to be formed. In the experimental field, the behaviours of metals were studied using commercial polymers as waste models: a PVC mastic, a polyurethane mastic and a rubber powder. Copper and barium presented a non volatile behaviour during the incineration of waste matrixes as ASR, being present also in residual ash. On the other hand, lead was completely formed in the gas phase and zinc showed an equal partitioning between the two principal phases of the treatment. ©

G. Trouve; A. Kauffmann; L. Delfosse

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Decontamination and decommissioning assessment for the Waste Incineration Facility (Building 232-Z) Hanford Site, [Hanford], WA  

SciTech Connect

Building 232-Z is an element of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. From 1961 until 1972, plutonium-bearing combustible materials were incinerated in the building. Between 1972 and 1983, following shutdown of the incinerator, the facility was used for waste segregation activities. The facility was placed in retired inactive status in 1984 and classified as a Limited Control Facility pursuant to DOE Order 5480.5, Safety of Nuclear Facilities, and 6430.1A, General Design Criteria. The current plutonium inventory within the building is estimated to be approximately 848 grams, the majority of which is retained within the process hood ventilation system. As a contaminated retired facility, Building 232-Z is included in the DOE Surplus Facility Management Program. The objective of this Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) assessment is to remove Building 232-Z, thereby elmininating the radiological and environmental hazards associated with the plutonium inventory within the structure. The steps to accomplish the plan objectives are: (1) identifying the locations of the most significant amounts of plutonium, (2) removing residual plutonium, (3) removing and decontaminating remaining building equipment, (4) dismantling the remaining structure, and (5) closing out the project.

Dean, L.N. [Advanced Sciences, Inc., (United States)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

University of North Carolina at Charlotte Design and Construction Manual Section 3, Annex B Construction Waste Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

does not include burning, incinerating, or thermally destroying waste. Can be conducted on-site (as ­ Construction Waste Management ANNEX B WASTE REDUCTION & RECYCLING GUIDELINES #12;University of North Carolina at Charlotte Design and Construction Manual Section 3, Annex B ­ Construction Waste Management WASTE REDUCTION

Xie,Jiang (Linda)

211

High-temperature corrosion of ceramic-ceramic composites in a waste incinerator environment  

SciTech Connect

Three types of ceramic composite were exposed to flue gases of a hazardous waste incinerator to assess their corrosion behavior. One composite consisted of continuously wound filaments of Al{sub 2}0{sub 3}-23 wt % ZrO{sub 2} in an alumina matrix. This composite was tested, both uncoated and coated, with zirconia on the outer surface. The second composite type consisted of the same fiber but in a zirconia matrix The third composite consisted of an alumina matrix strengthened with silicon carbide particles. Tubes of these materials were exposed in the waste incinerator at about 900{degrees}C for times up to six months. Two principal results of exposure were revealed by optical microscopy and electron microprobe examinations: flue gas constituents either penetrated the uncoated alumina matrix of the filament-wound composite, apparently through porosity in the matrix, or deposited on the surfaces of the other composite types where reaction and bonding occurred. Neither event caused significant microstructural degradation although thereaction in the composite with a zirconia matrix suggests that degradation could be a problem under more severe conditions. Apparently, the concentration of penetrating species was too small to form a significant amount of new compounds that could cause degradation within the alumina matrix of the filament-wound composite, and the temperature was too low for the deposits on the surface of the other two types of composites to react significantly with the materials during the longest exposure of 6 months. The zirconia coating on the alumina matrix composite was not adherent enough to permit an assessment of its effect.

Keiser, J.R.; Federer, J.I.; Henson, T.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hindman, D.L. [Babcock and Wilcox Co., Lynchburg, VA (United States)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 3. Characterization of the nature and magnitude of emissions. Draft report  

SciTech Connect

This report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. Volume III of the report describes the methods used to estimate both stack and fugitive emission rates from the facility.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Solvated Electron Technology{sup TM}. Non-Thermal Alternative to Waste Incineration  

SciTech Connect

Solvated Electron Technology (SET{sup TM}) is a patented non-thermal alternative to incineration for treating Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) and other mixed waste by destroying organic hazardous components. SET{sup TM} is a treatment process that destroys the hazardous components in mixed waste by chemical reduction. The residual material meets land disposal restriction (LDR) and TSCA requirements for disposal. In application, contaminated materials are placed into a treatment cell and mixed with the solvated electron solution. In the case of PCBs or other halogenated contaminants, chemical reactions strip the halogen ions from the chain or aromatic ring producing sodium chloride and high molecular weight hydrocarbons. At the end of the reaction, ammonia within the treatment cell is removed and recycled. The reaction products (such as sodium salts) produced in the process remain with the matrix. The SET{sup TM} process is 99.999% effective in destroying: polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs); trichloroethane (TCA) and trichloroethene (TCE); dioxins; polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs); benzene, toluene, xylene (BTX); pesticides; fungicides; herbicides; chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs); hydro-chlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), explosives and chemical-warfare agents; and has successfully destroyed many of the wastes listed in 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 261. In September 2007, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a Research and Development permit for SET for chemical destruction of 'pure' Pyranol, which is 60% PCBs. These tests were completed in November 2007. SET{sup TM} is recognized by EPA as a non-thermal process equivalent to incineration and three SET{sup TM} systems have been permitted by EPA as commercial mobile PCB destruction units. This paper describes in detail the results of select bench-, pilot-, and commercial-scale treatment of hazardous and mixed wastes for EPA, Department of Energy (DOE), and the Department of Defense(DoD), and the applicability of SET{sup TM} to currently problematic waste streams that have very limited treatment alternatives. In summary: SET{sup TM} operates as a non-thermal destruction process under low pressure. The process occurs in a closed system producing no hazardous off-gases and no regulated by-products such as dioxins or furans or their precursors. Advantages of SET{sup TM} include: - Organic contaminants are destroyed, not just removed, diluted or concentrated. - Operates as a closed system - produces no regulated secondary wastes. - Holds an EPA permit for PCB destruction. - Operates at ambient temperatures (70 deg. F). - Portable and sets up quickly in less than 4000 square feet of space. - Scalable to accommodate any size waste stream. - Requires minimal amounts of power, water and infrastructure. - Applicable to heterogeneous waste streams in all phases. The SET{sup TM} process is 99.9999% effective in destroying organic constituents of RCRA and TSCA waste, explosives and chemical-warfare agents; and has successfully destroyed many of the wastes listed in 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 261. The residual material meets land disposal restriction (LDR) and TSCA requirements for disposal. In November 2007, Commodore completed a treatability study on Pyranol to determine the effectiveness of SET{sup TM} treatment on oil containing 600,000 PPM PCBs. Laboratory results proved destruction of PCBs to less than 1 PPM at low temperatures and pressures. SET{sup TM} is a proven, safe and cost-effective alternative to incineration for some of the most difficult waste treatment problems that exist today. (authors)

Foutz, W.L.; Rogers, J.E.; Mather, J.D. [Commodore Advanced Sciences, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Soil solution chemistry of sewage-sludge incinerator ash and phosphate fertilizer amended soil  

SciTech Connect

The chemical composition of the soil provides useful information on the feasibility of amending agricultural land with municipal and industrial waste, because the soil solution is the medium for most soil chemical reactions, the mobile phase in soils, and the medium for mineral adsorption by plant roots. The soil solutions studies in this research were from plots in a 4-yr field experiment conducted to evaluate the effects of the trace metals and P in sewage-sludge incinerator ash. Treatments compared ash with equivalent P rates from triple-superphosphate fertilizer and a control receiving no P application. Ash and phosphate fertilizer were applied annually at rates of 35, 70, and 140 kg citrate-soluble P ha{sup -1}. Cumulative ash applications during 4 yr amounted to 3.6, 7.2, and 14.4 Mg ash ha{sup -1}. Soil solutions were obtained by centrifugation-immiscible liquid displacement using a fluorocarbon displacing agent. Following chemical analysis, a chemical speciation model was used to determine possible solubility-controlling minerals for trace metals and P, and correlations between solution composition and plant uptake were analyzed. 37 refs., 5 tabs.

Bierman, P.M.; Rosen, C.J.; Bloom, P.R.; Nater, E.A. [Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Dioxins and furans formation in pilot incineration tests of sewage sludge spiked with organic chlorine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The factors affecting polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDD) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDF) formation were studied in sewage sludge incineration tests carried out on a demonstrative plant. The plant includes a circulating fluidised bed furnace (FBF) and a rotary kiln furnace (RKF), operating alternatively. During the tests sewage sludge was spiked with chlorinated hydrocarbons and the operating parameters of the afterburning chamber were varied. PCDD/F were sampled in each test before the bag filter, thus collecting the above contaminants before abatement systems. From the tests it appeared that PCDD/F were always produced in more abundance in the tests carried out by FBF than by RKF. The higher PCDD/F concentrations in the tests by FBF were reached when sewage sludge was spiked with a high dosage of a surrogate organic mixture of chlorinated hydrocarbons and when the afterburning chamber was used only as transit equipment with the burner off. The distribution of the different PCDD/F homologues was compared. \\{P5CDFs\\} were generally the prevalent fraction, with very few exceptions for the tests by RKF at high temperature of the afterburning chamber. As for FBF tests, it was found that the PCDD/F homologue profile depends on the afterburning chamber temperature.

Giuseppe Mininni; Andrea Sbrilli; Ettore Guerriero; Mauro Rotatori

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Greenhouse gas emissions from MSW incineration in China: Impacts of waste characteristics and energy recovery  

SciTech Connect

Determination of the amount of greenhouse gas (GHG) emitted during municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) is complex because both contributions and savings of GHGs exist in the process. To identify the critical factors influencing GHG emissions from MSWI in China, a GHG accounting model was established and applied to six Chinese cities located in different regions. The results showed that MSWI in most of the cities was the source of GHGs, with emissions of 25-207 kg CO{sub 2}-eq t{sup -1} rw. Within all process stages, the emission of fossil CO{sub 2} from the combustion of MSW was the main contributor (111-254 kg CO{sub 2}-eq t{sup -1} rw), while the substitution of electricity reduced the GHG emissions by 150-247 kg CO{sub 2}-eq t{sup -1} rw. By affecting the fossil carbon content and the lower heating value of the waste, the contents of plastic and food waste in the MSW were the critical factors influencing GHG emissions of MSWI. Decreasing food waste content in MSW by half will significantly reduce the GHG emissions from MSWI, and such a reduction will convert MSWI in Urumqi and Tianjin from GHG sources to GHG sinks. Comparison of the GHG emissions in the six Chinese cities with those in European countries revealed that higher energy recovery efficiency in Europe induced much greater reductions in GHG emissions. Recovering the excess heat after generation of electricity would be a good measure to convert MSWI in all the six cities evaluated herein into sinks of GHGs.

Yang Na [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Zhang Hua, E-mail: zhanghua_tj@tongji.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Chen Miao; Shao Liming [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); He Pinjing, E-mail: xhpjk@tongji.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

217

Report on the technical workshop on WTI incinerator risk issues. Held in Washington, DC on December 8-9, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The report includes information and materials from a peer review workshop organized by EPA's Risk Assessment Forum (RAF) for the Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response and Region 5. The meeting was held in Washington, DC, at the Holiday Inn Capitol on December 8-9, 1993. The subject of the peer review was a draft project plan prepared by EPA Region 5 for assessing risk at an incinerator operated by Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) in East Liverpool, Ohio. The peer review panel was convened to evaluate the project plan as the scientific foundation for a risk assessment, which will be used in setting final permit conditions for the WTI facility.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Preliminary screening of alternative technologies to incineration for treatment of chemical-agent-contaminated soil, Rocky Mountain Arsenal  

SciTech Connect

In support of the U.S. Army`s efforts to determine the best technologies for remediation of soils, water, and structures contaminated with pesticides and chemical agents, Argonne National Laboratory has reviewed technologies for treating soils contaminated with mustard, lewisite, sarin, o-ethyl s-(2- (diisopropylamino)ethyl)methyl-phosphonothioate (VX), and their breakdown products. This report focuses on assessing alternatives to incineration for dealing with these contaminants. For each technology, a brief description is provided, its suitability and constraints on its use are identified, and its overall applicability for treating the agents of concern is summarized. Technologies that merit further investigation are identified.

Shem, L.M.; Rosenblatt, D.H.; Smits, M.P.; Wilkey, P.L.; Ballou, S.W.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Burning mill sludge in a fluidized-bed incinerator and waste-heat-recovery system; Ten years of successful operation  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on burning mill sludge in a fluidized-bed incinerator and waste-heat-recovery system. In the late 1970s, the Lielahti sulfite mill of G.A. Serlachius Corp. (now Metsa Serla Oy) began investigating alternative methods of sludge disposal. The mill had an annual capacity of 100,000 tons of bleached pulp, generated 80,000 tons of by-product lignin sulfonates, and specialized in dissolving pulps. Because of the end product's high quality requirements, the mill had a low pulp yield and high losses in the form of both dissolved and suspended solids.

Nickull, O. (Metsa Serla, Oy (FI)); Lehtonen, O. (Tampella Ltd., Tampere (FI)); Mullen, J. (Tampella Keeler, Williamsport, PA (US))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Comparative assessment of municipal sewage sludge incineration, gasification and pyrolysis for a sustainable sludge-to-energy management in Greece  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: • The high output of MSS highlights the need for alternative routes of valorization. • Evaluation of 3 sludge-to-energy valorisation methods through SWOT analysis. • Pyrolysis is an energy and material recovery process resulting to ‘zero waste’. • Identification of challenges and barriers for MSS pyrolysis in Greece was investigated. • Adopters of pyrolysis systems face the challenge of finding new product markets. - Abstract: For a sustainable municipal sewage sludge management, not only the available technology, but also other parameters, such as policy regulations and socio-economic issues should be taken in account. In this study, the current status of both European and Greek Legislation on waste management, with a special insight in municipal sewage sludge, is presented. A SWOT analysis was further developed for comparison of pyrolysis with incineration and gasification and results are presented. Pyrolysis seems to be the optimal thermochemical treatment option compared to incineration and gasification. Sewage sludge pyrolysis is favorable for energy savings, material recovery and high added materials production, providing a ‘zero waste’ solution. Finally, identification of challenges and barriers for sewage sludge pyrolysis deployment in Greece was investigated.

Samolada, M.C. [Dept. Secretariat of Environmental and Urban Planning – Decentralized Area Macedonian Thrace, Taki Oikonomidi 1, 54008 Thessaloniki (Greece); Zabaniotou, A.A., E-mail: azampani@auth.gr [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, University Box 455, University Campus, 541 24 Thessaloniki (Greece)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university waste-to-energy incinerator" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Microsoft Word - Oneida Waste to Energy Project DOE Final EA 1862  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ONEIDA SEVEN GENERATIONS ONEIDA SEVEN GENERATIONS CORPORATION: ENERGY RECOVERY PROJECT, GREEN BAY, WISCONSIN U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Golden Field Office NOVEMBER 2011 DOE/EA-1862 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE ONEIDA SEVEN GENERATIONS CORPORATION: ENERGY RECOVERY PROJECT, GREEN BAY, WISCONSIN U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Golden Field Office NOVEMBER 2011 DOE/EA-1862 DOE/EA-1862 iii November 2011 COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy TITLE: Environmental Assessment for Oneida Seven Generations Corporation: Energy Recovery Project, Green Bay, Wisconsin (DOE/EA-1862) CONTACT: For more information on this Environmental Assessment (EA), please contact:

222

Waste-to-Energy and Fuel Cell T h l i O i  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. #12;Global Approach for Using Biogas Innovation for Our Energy Future #12;Anaerobic Digestion by Generator Type (based on 40-million SCF* of biogas per year**)( g p y ) Generator Type Megawatthours not come in an infinite range of sizes. Innovation for Our Energy Future #12;Contaminants in Biogas

223

Integrated municipal solid waste scenario model using advanced pretreatment and waste to energy processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper an Integrated Municipal Solid Waste scenario model (IMSW-SM) with a potential practical application in the waste management sector is analyzed. The model takes into account quantification and characterization of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) streams from different sources, selective collection (SC), advanced mechanical sorting, material recovery and advanced thermal treatment. The paper provides a unique chain of advanced waste pretreatment stages of fully commingled waste streams, leading to an original set of suggestions and future contributions to a sustainable IMSWS, taking into account real data and EU principles. The selection of the input data was made on MSW management real case studies from two European regions. Four scenarios were developed varying mainly SC strategies and thermal treatment options. The results offer useful directions for decision makers in order to calibrate modern strategies in different realities.

Gabriela Ionescu; Elena Cristina Rada; Marco Ragazzi; Cosmin M?rculescu; Adrian Badea; Tiberiu Apostol

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Bay County, Florida waste-to-energy facility air emission tests  

SciTech Connect

The Bay County Resource Management Center is located 10 miles Northeast of Panama City, Florida. Panama City is a resort community approximately 100 miles east of Pensacola, Florida, on the northwest coast of Florida's panhandle. The average population of this area is approximately 115,000. The average quantity of municipal solid (MSW) waste generated in Bay County during most of the year is 300 tons per day. However, during the summer months when the population increases to more than 150,000 the community must handle in excess of 350 tons of MSW per day. The County decided to design the facility to ultimately burn 510 tons of MSW to allow additional waste to be processed as the population and quantity of waste increases. Until other sources of MSW are procured, the facility is supplementing the 350 tpd of MSW with about 160 tpd of wood waste.The facility began initial start-up, equipment check-out, and instrument calibration in February 1987. Plant shakedown and systems operational checks were made from February through May. This paper discusses emission testing which was conducted from late April through early June. The emission compliance tests were completed on June 4-5, 1987. The facility acceptance test and emission compliance test were completed five months ahead of the original project schedule.

Beachler, D.S.; Pompelia, D.M.; Weldon, J. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (USA))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

E-Print Network 3.0 - american ref-fuel waste-to-energy Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 50 Leaching of Dioxins from Municipal Waste Combustor Residues Summary: 12, 12th North American...

226

E-Print Network 3.0 - american waste-to-energy conference Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 20 Leaching of Dioxins from Municipal Waste Combustor Residues Summary: 12, 12th North American...

227

Role of Thermochemical Conversion in Livestock Waste-to-Energy Treatments:? Obstacles and Opportunities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dry wastes like poultry litter and feedlot manures can be processed directly via pyrolysis and air/steam gasification technology. ... The net energy (ETotal) from gasifying swine waste is estimated as the summation of Erxn, EWs, and the energy value of product gas (EGas). ... The land disposal of waste from the poultry industry and subsequent environmental implications has stimulated interest into cleaner and more useful disposal options. ...

Keri Cantrell; Kyoung Ro; Devinder Mahajan; Mouzhgun Anjom; Patrick G. Hunt

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Proceedings of NAWTEC16 16th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

require pre-processing of the MSW, combust the resulting syngas to generate steam, and produce a vitrified used globally for energy recovery from municipal solid wastes is combustion of "as received" MSW combustion of solid wastes. In China, there have been some mass-burn new plants and also over forty

Columbia University

229

EA-1860: Richland Renewable Energy Waste-to-Energy Project, Richland, Wisconsin  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE is preparing a draft Environmental Assessment to analyze the potential environmental impacts of the proposed construction and operation of a new wastewater treatment facility and the alternative of not implementing this project.

230

Microsoft PowerPoint - Tribal Leader Forum Waste to Energy Introductio...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Fe 2 O 3 , and Al 2 O 3 Potential re-use Concrete, bricks, artificial reefs Air Modern air pollution control technology removes most contaminants Scrubbers, baghouse, ESP, etc....

231

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 1. Executive summary. Draft report  

SciTech Connect

This report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. Volume I is a description of the components and methodologies used in the risk assessment and provides a summary of the major results from the three components of the assessment.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 4. Atmospheric dispersion and deposition modeling of emissions. Draft report  

SciTech Connect

The report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. Volume IV describes the air dispersion model used to estimate air concentrations and particle deposition, as well as the results of the modeling exercise.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Emissions of PCDD/Fs from municipal solid waste incinerators in China Yuwen Ni, Haijun Zhang, Su Fan, Xueping Zhang, Qing Zhang, Jiping Chen *  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emissions of PCDD/Fs from municipal solid waste incinerators in China Yuwen Ni, Haijun Zhang, Su February 2009 Available online 21 March 2009 Keywords: MSWIs PCDD/Fs Congener patterns Emission factor a b s t r a c t Gas emission of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDD

Columbia University

234

Field Evaluation of MERCEM Mercury Emission Analyzer System at the Oak Ridge TSCA Incinerator East Tennessee Technology Park Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The authors reached the following conclusions: (1) The two-month evaluation of the MERCEM total mercury monitor from Perkin Elmer provided a useful venue in determining the feasibility of using a CEM to measure total mercury in a saturated flue gas. (2) The MERCEM exhibited potential at a mixed waste incinerator to meet requirements proposed in PS12 under conditions of operation with liquid feeds only at stack mercury concentrations in the range of proposed MACT standards. (3) Performance of the MERCEM under conditions of incinerating solid and liquid wastes simultaneously was less reliable than while feeding liquid feeds only for the operating conditions and configuration of the host facility. (4) The permeation tube calibration method used in this test relied on the CEM internal volumetric and time constants to relate back to a concentration, whereas a compressed gas cylinder concentration is totally independent of the analyzer mass flowmeter and flowrates. (5) Mercury concentration in the compressed gas cylinders was fairly stable over a 5-month period. (6) The reliability of available reference materials was not fully demonstrated without further evaluation of their incorporation into routine operating procedures performed by facility personnel. (7) The degree of mercury control occurring in the TSCA Incinerator off-gas cleaning system could not be quantified from the data collected in this study. (8) It was possible to conduct the demonstration at a facility incinerating radioactively contaminated wastes and to release the equipment for later unrestricted use elsewhere. (9) Experience gained by this testing answered additional site-specific and general questions regarding the operation and maintenance of CEMs and their use in compliance monitoring of total mercury emissions from hazardous waste incinerators.

None

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

An LCA model for waste incineration enhanced with new technologies for metal recovery and application to the case of Switzerland  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: • An enhanced process-based LCA model for MSWI is featured and applied in case study. • LCA modeling of recent technological developments for metal recovery from fly ash. • Net release from Swiss MSWI 133 kg CO{sub 2}-eq/tonne waste from attributional LCA perspective. • Net savings from a consequential LCA perspective reach up to 303 kg CO{sub 2}-eq/tonne waste. • Impacts according to ReCiPe and CExD show similar pattern to climate change. - Abstract: A process model of municipal solid waste incinerators (MSWIs) and new technologies for metal recovery from combustion residues was developed. The environmental impact is modeled as a function of waste composition as well as waste treatment and material recovery technologies. The model includes combustion with a grate incinerator, several flue gas treatment technologies, electricity and steam production from waste heat recovery, metal recovery from slag and fly ash, and landfilling of residues and can be tailored to specific plants and sites (software tools can be downloaded free of charge). Application of the model to Switzerland shows that the treatment of one tonne of municipal solid waste results on average in 425 kg CO{sub 2}-eq. generated in the incineration process, and 54 kg CO{sub 2}-eq. accrue in upstream processes such as waste transport and the production of operating materials. Downstream processes, i.e. residue disposal, generates 5 kg CO{sub 2}-eq. Savings from energy recovery are in the range of 67 to 752 kg CO{sub 2}-eq. depending on the assumptions regarding the substituted energy production, while the recovery of metals from slag and fly ash currently results in a net saving of approximately 35 kg CO{sub 2}-eq. A similar impact pattern is observed when assessing the MSWI model for aggregated environmental impacts (ReCiPe) and for non-renewable resource consumption (cumulative exergy demand), except that direct emissions have less and no relevance, respectively, on the total score. The study illustrates that MSWI plants can be an important element of industrial ecology as they provide waste disposal services and can help to close material and energetic cycles.

Boesch, Michael E. [Aveny GmbH, Schwandenholzstr. 212, CH-8046 Zürich (Switzerland); Vadenbo, Carl, E-mail: vadenbo@ifu.baug.ethz.ch [ETH Zurich, Institute of Environmental Engineering, Schafmattstrasse 6, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Saner, Dominik [Swiss Post, Communications, Politics and Social Responsibility, Viktoriastrasse 21, P.O. Box, CH-3030 Berne (Switzerland); Huter, Christoph [City of Zürich, ERZ Entsorgung - Recycling Zürich, Hagenholzstrasse 110, P.O. Box, CH-8050 Zürich (Switzerland); Hellweg, Stefanie [ETH Zurich, Institute of Environmental Engineering, Schafmattstrasse 6, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

236

Report on the US EPA technical workshop on WTI incinerator risk assessment issues. Held in Washington, DC on January 11, 1996  

SciTech Connect

This report presents information and materials from a peer review workshop organized by EPA`s Risk Assessment Forum for Region 5 and the Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response. The subject of the peer review was a draft document prepared by Region 5 assessing risk at an incinerator operated by Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) in East Liverpool, Ohio. This report summarizes the discussions that took place at the peer review workshop. The report opens with an overview of the workshop and a history of EPA`s WTI incinerator risk assessment activities (section 1), then presents the chairperson`s summary (section 2) and the five work group chairs` summaries (section 3). The body of the report ends with highlights of the peer reviewers` preliminary comments and of the comments offered by workshop observers (section 4).

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

K-1435 Wastewater Treatment System for the Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator Wastewater at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, TN  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the design and performance of a wastewater treatment system installed to support the operation of a hazardous waste incinerator. The Oak Ridge Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator (TSCAI), located at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), is designed and permitted to treat Resource ConservatioN and Recovery Act (RCRA) wastes including characteristic and listed wastes and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated mixed waste. the incinerator process generates acidic gases and particulates which consist of salts, metals, and radionuclides. These off-gases from the incinerator are treated with a wet off-gas scrubber system. The recirculated water is continuously purged (below down), resulting in a wastewater to be treated. Additional water sources are also collected on the site for treatment, including storm water that infiltrates into diked areas and fire water from the incinerator's suppression system. To meet regulatory requirements for discharge, a wastewater treatment system (WWTS) was designed, constructed, and operated to treat these water sources. The WWTS was designed to provide for periodic fluctuation of contaminant concentrations due to various feed streams to the incinverator. Blow down consists of total suspended solids (TSS) and total dissolved solids (TDS), encompassing metals, radionuclide contamination and trace organics. The system design flow rate range is 35 to 75 gallons per minute (gpm). The system is designed with redundancy to minimize time off-line and to reduce impacts to the TSCAI operations. A novel treatment system uses several unit operations, including chemical feed systems, two-stage chemical reaction treatment, microfiltration, sludge storage and dewatering, neutralization, granular activated carbon, effluent neutralization, and a complete programmable logic controller (PLC) and human-machine interface (HMI) control system. To meet the space requirements and to provide portability of the WWTS to other applications, the system was installed in three, over-the-road semi trailers, and interconnected with piping and power. Trailers were oriented on a small site footprint to facilitate ease of installation. A remote sump pump skid was provided to convey water from two holding sumps adjacent to the treatment process. An accumulation tank and pump were also provided to receive miscellaneous wastewaters for treatment if they meet the waste acceptance criteria. The paper includes details of the technology used in the design, the requirements for compliance, and the initial performance demonstration and jar testing results. The WWTS successfully allowed for highly efficient, high-volume treatment with compliant discharge to off-site surface water.

Swientoniewski M.D.

2008-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

238

Performance of two fluid bed sludge incinerators with air pollution control systems consisting of a venturi scrubber and wet electrostatic precipitator  

SciTech Connect

Performance tests were recently conducted on two new Hankin Fluid Bed Incineration Systems installed at publicly owned sewage treatment works in New Jersey. The purpose of the tests was to show that the systems met emission limits set by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection and Energy (NJDEPE), and that the systems met throughput and fuel consumption requirements. These systems, consisting of a fluid bed incinerator, heat exchanger, venturi scrubber, tray cooler, and wet electrostatic precipitator, were tested for emissions of heavy metals, sulfur oxides, nitrogen oxides, hydrogen chloride, carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds, and opacity. Both yielded emissions that were well within the stringent limits set by the NJDEPE in the operating permits. The incinerators exhibited a high level of fuel efficiency with fuel oil consumption averaging 5.5 and 6.0 gallons per ton of wet sludge. In addition, combustion efficiency was high, with a maximum average CO of 7.39 ppmvd and VOCs of 1.39 ppmvd (both corrected to 7% O{sub 2}). The air pollution control equipment showed very high removal efficiencies. Except for Mercury, collection efficiencies for all heavy metals fell within 98.7% to 99.999%. Particulate collection efficiency averaged 99.97 and 99.99%. Collection efficiency for HCl averaged 99.2% and 99.92%, and for SO{sub 2} averages were 97.1% and 94.8%. Finally, the level of NO{sub x} in the stack was extremely low with averages of 17.33 ppmvd and 14.19 ppmvd (corrected to 7% O{sub 2}) for the two systems.

Zaman, R.U. [Hankin Environmental Systems Inc., Somerville, NJ (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

239

Seattle University University Recreation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2013-2014 022113 Seattle University University Recreation Assumption of Risk, Waiver, and Release and recreation activities, services, equipment and/or facilities including, but not limited to, club and intramural sports, fitness programs, outdoor recreation, Connolly Center and Eisiminger Fitness Center, I

Carter, John

240

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 7. Accident analysis: Selection and assessment of potential release scenarios. Draft report  

SciTech Connect

This report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. The Accident Analysis is an evaluation of the likelihood of occurrence and resulting consequences from several general classes of accidents that could potentially occur during operation of the facility. The Accident Analysis also evaluates the effectiveness of existing mitigation measures in reducing off-site impacts. Volume VII describes in detail the methods used to conduct the Accident Analysis and reports the results of evaluations of likelihood and consequence for the selected accident scenarios.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university waste-to-energy incinerator" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 6. Screening ecological risk assessment (SERA). Draft report  

SciTech Connect

This report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. The Screening Ecological Risk Assessment (SERA) is an analysis of the potential significance of risks to ecological receptors (e.g., plants, fish, wildlife) from exposure to facility emissions. The SERA was performed using conservative assumptions and approaches to determine if a further, more refined analysis is warranted. Volume VI describes in detail the methods used in the SERA and reports the results of the SERA in terms of site-specific risks to ecological receptors.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Article in Wall Street Journal, December 6, 2008, (U.S. News,p.3) (excerpt also at  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

://online.wsj.com/article/SB122851537257083869.html#articleTabs%3Darticle Cities Give Waste-to-Energy Plants a Second Look Higher U.S. Landfill in the 1990s as protests mounted against trash-burning plants. But spurred by growing landfill costs existing waste-to-energy plants, and proposing new ones. Of the 87 U.S. incinerators that currently convert

Columbia University

243

Environmental impact of APC residues from municipal solid waste incineration: Reuse assessment based on soil and surface water protection criteria  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: > The Dutch Building Material Decree (BMD) was used to APC residues from MSWI. > BMD is a straightforward tool to calculate expectable loads to the environment of common pollutants. > Chloride load to the environment lead to classification of building material not allowed. > At least a pre-treatment (e.g. washing) is required in order to remove soluble salts. > The stabilization with phosphates or silicates eliminate the problem of heavy metals. - Abstract: Waste management and environmental protection are mandatory requirements of modern society. In our study, air pollution control (APC) residues from municipal solid waste incinerators (MSWI) were considered as a mixture of fly ash and fine particulate solids collected in scrubbers and fabric filters. These are hazardous wastes and require treatment before landfill. Although there are a number of treatment options, it is highly recommended to find practical applications rather than just dump them in landfill sites. In general, for using a construction material, beyond technical specifications also soil and surface water criteria may be used to ensure environmental protection. The Dutch Building Materials Decree (BMD) is a valuable tool in this respect and it was used to investigate which properties do not meet the threshold criteria so that APC residues can be further used as secondary building material. To this end, some scenarios were evaluated by considering release of inorganic species from unmoulded and moulded applications. The main conclusion is that the high amount of soluble salts makes the APC residues a building material prohibited in any of the conditions tested. In case of moulding materials, the limits of heavy metals are complied, and their use in Category 1 would be allowed. However, also in this case, the soluble salts lead to the classification of 'building material not allowed'. The treatments with phosphates or silicates are able to solve the problem of heavy metals, but difficulties with the soluble salts are still observed. This analysis suggests that for APC residues to comply with soil and surface water protection criteria to be further used as building material at least a pre-treating for removing soluble salts is absolutely required.

Quina, Margarida J., E-mail: guida@eq.uc.pt [Research Centre on Chemical Processes Engineering and Forest Products, Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Coimbra, Rua Silvio Lima, 3030-790 Coimbra (Portugal); Bordado, Joao C.M. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, IBB, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Quinta-Ferreira, Rosa M. [Research Centre on Chemical Processes Engineering and Forest Products, Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Coimbra, Rua Silvio Lima, 3030-790 Coimbra (Portugal)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

244

Environmental Assessments (EA) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

12, 1994 12, 1994 EA-0939: Final Environmental Assessment Blue Creek Winter Range: Wildlife Mitigation Project December 5, 1994 EA-0813: Final Environmental Assessment The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor Decontamination and Decommissioning Project and the Tokamak Physics Experiment at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory November 15, 1994 EA-1002: Final Environmental Assessment October 27, 1994 EA-0965: Final Environmental Assessment Cancer Research Center Indiana University School of Medicine October 27, 1994 EA-1001: Final Environmental Assessment Commercialization of the Mound Plant October 24, 1994 EA-0952: Final Environmental Assessment The Louisiana State University Waste-to-Energy Incinerator October 20, 1994 EA-0962: Final Environmental Assessment Construction and Routine Operation of a 12-kilovolt Overhead Powerline and

245

university of saskatchewan alumni handbook university of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

university of saskatchewan alumni handbook university of saskatchewan alumni handbook university of saskatchewan alumni handbook university of saskatchewan alumni handbook university of saskatchewan alumni handbook university of saskatchewan alumni handbook university of saskatchewan alumni handbook university

Saskatchewan, University of

246

University Library University of Saskatchewan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University Library University of Saskatchewan Core Competencies for University of Saskatchewan Librarians This document defines the basic knowledge and skills librarians at the University of Saskatchewan as reflected in Promise and Potential: The Third Integrated Plan 2012 to 2016 , University of Saskatchewan

Saskatchewan, University of

247

Report of the DOD-DOE Workshop on Converting Waste to Energy Using Fuel Cells: Workshop Summary and Action Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report discusses the results of a January 13, 2011, workshop that focused on utilizing biowaste as an energy feedstock and converting this feedstock into heat and/or power using fuel cells. DOD and DOE are collaborating under a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) to pursue technology-driven solutions that reduce petroleum use, among other objectives. One of the solutions being explored under the MOU is leveraging waste as feedstock for fuel cell applications in fixed and deployed military operations.

248

Copyright 2009 by ASME Proceedings of the 17th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

composition and high temperature corrosion in boiler that limit steam temperature and pressure and thus unit volume of combustion chamber; heat transfer rate per unit area of boiler surfaces; % excess air thermal efficiency; cost of APC (air pollution control) system because of the need to remove volatile

Columbia University

249

Robbins project - start-up and commercial operation at a leading-edge recycling, waste-to-energy plant  

SciTech Connect

On January 22, 1997, the Robbins Resource Recovery Facility began commercial operation in Robbins, Illinois, a suburb of Chicago, after a very successful start-up program. The first installation of its kind in the United States, the Robbins facility converts municipal solid waste (MSW) into refuse-derived fuel (RDF) that is fired in two circulating fluidized-bed boilers. Steam from the boilers powers a turbine generator that can produce enough electricity to service more than 50,000 homes. The Robbins facility processes a minimum of 1600 tons of MSW per day. Some 75 percent of the MSW is converted into RDF. In addition to compostable material, the balance yields reusable aluminum, ferrous materials, and glass. Even ash produced by the circulating fluidized-bed (CFB) boilers can be used to manufacture cement. The Robbins facility is operated by Foster Wheeler Illinois, Inc., a member of the Foster Wheeler Power Systems Group. The plant was engineered by Foster Wheeler USA Corporation and built by Foster Wheeler Constructors, Inc. Foster Wheeler Energy International, Inc. provided the circulating fluidized-bed boilers.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

250

Combustion and Incineration Engineering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In larger mass-burning plants, refuse is received and stored in a pit below ground level. A traveling bridge crane ... in new plants. The capacity of the pit is generally equivalent to the quantity of refuse that...

Walter R. Niessen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Final Report Waste Incineration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

regulations and the formation of dioxins, as well as a big effort is put into the treatment of solid residues

252

A Study of the Stability and Characterization Plutonium Dioxide and Chemical Characterization [of] Rocky Flats and Los Alamos Plutonium-Containing Incinerator Ash  

SciTech Connect

In the presentation ''A Study of the Stability and Characterization of Plutonium Dioxide'', the authors discuss their recent work on actinide stabilities and characterization, in particular, plutonium dioxide PuO{sub 2}. Earlier studies have indicated that PuO{sub 2} has the fluorite structure of CaF{sub 2} and typical oxide semiconductor properties. However, detailed results on the bulk electronic structure of this important actinide oxide have not been available. The authors have used all-electron, full potential linear combinations Gaussian type orbitals fitting function (LCGTO-FF) method to study PuO{sub 2}. The LCGTO-FF technique characterized by its use of three independent GTO basis sets to expand the orbitals, charge density, and exchange-correlation integral kernels. Results will be presented on zero pressure using both the Hedin-Lundquist local density approximation (LDA) model or the Perdew-Wang generalized gradient approximation (GGA) model. Possibilities of different characterizations of PuO{sub 2} will be explored. The paper ''Chemical Characterization Rocky Flats and Los Alamos Plutonium-Containing Incinerator Ash'' describes the results of a comprehensive study of the chemical characteristics of virgin, calcined and fluorinated incinerator ash produced at the Rocky Flats Plant and at the Los Alamos National Laboratory prior to 1988. The Rocky Flats and Los Alamos virgin, calcined, and fluorinated ashes were also dissolved using standard nitrate dissolution chemistry. Corresponding chemical evaluations were preformed on the resultant ash heel and the results compared with those of the virgin ash. Fluorination studies using FT spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool were also performed to evaluate the chemistry of phosphorus, sulfur, carbon, and silicon containing species in the ash. The distribution of plutonium and other chemical elements with the virgin ash, ash heel, fluorinated ash, and fluorinated ash heel particulates were studied in detail using microprobe analysis. Some of the more interesting results of these investigations are presented.

Ray, A.K.; Boettger, J.C.; Behrens, Robert G.

1999-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

253

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic thermophiles final Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for treating this waste stream since it results in two valuable final products, biogas and ... Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council...

254

E-Print Network 3.0 - active organosulfur compounds1woa Sample...  

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-added products (e.g., activated carbon and carbon black). In their process, char upgrading is implemented Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and...

255

E-Print Network 3.0 - analysis toluca basin Sample Search Results  

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in Toluca (population 0.82 million), the ... Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 5 Amer J of...

256

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid degradable plastics Sample Search...  

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Of this amount only 7% is recovered for recycling , mostly in the form of polyethylene Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council...

257

E-Print Network 3.0 - antimony sbfrom municipal Sample Search...  

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municipal... solid waste in a municipal waste combustor (MWC). In an attempt to "turn the tide", officials from Polk Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and...

258

E-Print Network 3.0 - automotive shredded residues Sample Search...  

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Shredded municipal refuse Refuse derived oil (Garrett process 3 ) Natural gas Waste gasifier product: air Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology...

259

E-Print Network 3.0 - automatic fire detection Sample Search...  

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off, the fire is normally so large... , Chantilly, VA, USA NAWTEC17-2338 SUPPLEMENTAL PIT ... Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council...

260

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminous cement Sample Search Results  

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and expanded shale (lightweight) aggregate Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 63 By-Products...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university waste-to-energy incinerator" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid combustion rate Sample Search Results  

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air flows are established to provide local and overall... content, and the combustion gas heat loss rate. ... Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology...

262

E-Print Network 3.0 - achieve high bed Sample Search Results  

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validation of our reacting bed modelling code (FLIC) has... predictions. Our new gasification concept offers the prospect of ... Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy...

263

E-Print Network 3.0 - air case study Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

classifiers 1-3 . However, these studies ... Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 3 Poster Design &...

264

E-Print Network 3.0 - air analysis Sample Search Results  

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covered three different air classifiers, ... Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 3 Improved...

265

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminum slag dross Sample Search Results  

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mast significant aspect of the IWPF feed mixtures Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 72 Zhang, L....

266

E-Print Network 3.0 - albina raanskiene rytis Sample Search Results  

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SCIENCE PUBLISHERS LTD. 10. Albina, D.O., Theory Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 70 STORING ARB...

267

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric presure arc Sample Search Results  

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the drying process takes place too. Here an ... Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 4 JOURNAL DE...

268

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinomycete salinispora arenicola Sample...  

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viable and non-viable, were determined with an Andersen six Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 56...

269

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid inertness studies Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of bacteria utilizing these short-chain organic ... Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 2...

270

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerial plant parts Sample Search Results  

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bulky waste. In large part, the location of the new ... Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 85...

271

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41 - 7350 of 28,560 results. 41 - 7350 of 28,560 results. Download EIS-0240: Amended Record of Decision Disposition of Surplus Highly Enriched Uranium http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0240-amended-record-decision Download EA-0952: Final Environmental Assessment The Louisiana State University Waste-to-Energy Incinerator http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/ea-0952-final-environmental-assessment Download December 3, 2012 Nor'Easter Situation Report The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability issues public Situation Reports during large scale energy emergencies. http://energy.gov/oe/downloads/december-3-2012-noreaster-situation-report Download Audit Report: IG-0559 Privatization of Safety Management Services at the Savannah River Site http://energy.gov/ig/downloads/audit-report-ig-0559

272

E-Print Network 3.0 - annual fluidized bed Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

University of Minnesota Collection: Engineering 16 POTENTIAL ADVANTAGES OF INCINERATION IN FLUIDIZED BEDS Summary: POTENTIAL ADVANTAGES OF INCINERATION IN FLUIDIZED BEDS...

273

Recommended surrogate PCB waste feed and fuel compositions to meet requirements given in Spec. K/D 5552 for test burns in the Martin Marietta Energy Systems Inc. incinerator  

SciTech Connect

Waste feed heats of combustion, principle organic hazardous constituents (POHCs), ash contents, and organic chlorine concentrations are specified in Table 3 of Spec. No. K/D-5552 for test burns 1 through 7 in the Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. incinerator. The first four tests are intended to demonstrate that the incinerator will meet RCRA emission standards, HCl removal efficiencies, and requirements for destruction of POHCs. A mix containing 1,2-dichloro-, 1,2,4-trichloro-, and 1,2,4,5-tetrachlorobenzenes with a small amount of hexachlorobenzene is recommended as a PCB surrogate for test burns 5 and 6 to simulate the destructibility of PCBs in plant wastes. The mix would be diluted with appropriate amounts of dimethyl malonate and kerosene to obtain a homogeneous solution having the required heat of combustion and chlorine content for the liquid waste feeds. For test burn 7 the polychlorinated benzene mix would contain a small amount of hexachlorobenzene with larger amounts of 1,2,4,5-tetrachloro- and 1,2,4-trichlorobenzenes. The composition of the polychlorinated mixes is such that they should be comparable to Aroclor 1254 in overall destructibility by incineration, and achievement of a DRE for hexachlorobenzene greater than 99.99% in the test burns should provide assurance that the incinerator will be able to destroy PCBs in Aroclor 1260, which is the most refractory PCB mix present in plant wastes. If hexachlorobenzene is not available for these tests, hexachlorocyclopentadiene is recommended as a substitute for hexachlorobenzene in tests 5-7, which involve a PCB surrogate, and hexachloroethane is recommended as the alternative solid waste feed for test 4. Solutions containing kerosene and methanol are recommended as liquid fuels for tests 1 and 4 to achieve the required heats of combustion, while a dimethyl malonate-methanol solution is recommended to achieve the 7000 Btu/lb heat of combustion for test burn 2.

Anderson, R.W.

1984-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

274

The Universe Adventure - Today's Universe  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4: Today's Accelerating Universe 4: Today's Accelerating Universe The Universe Today Dark matter has aided in forming the universe we see today; however, many questions regarding the cosmos remain. What is the status of the Universe today? We know the Universe is expanding... But what do we know about the expansion? Supernova survey. Surveys of supernova provide scientists with information about the history of the Universe. Classroom Cosmology Classroom Cosmology: Toilet Paper Cosmology In 1997 advances in telescope technology allowed astronomers to conduct redshift surveys of very distant type Ia supernovae. This enabled them to look further back into the Universe's history than previously possible. Their stunning results rivaled Hubble's original discovery and turned cosmology on its head. While most theoretical models predicted that the

275

Experimental research on emission and removal of dioxins in flue gas from a co-combustion of MSW and coal incinerator  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the experimental study of dioxins removal from flue gas from a co-combustion municipal solid waste and coal incinerator by means of a fluidized absorption tower and a fabric filter. A test rig has been set up. The flow rate of flue gas of the test rig is 150-2000 m{sup 3}/h. The system was composed of a humidification and cooling system, an absorption tower, a demister, a slurry make-up tank, a desilter, a fabric filter and a measurement system. The total height of the absorption tower was 6.5 m, and the diameter of the reactor pool was 1.2 m. When the absorbent was 1% limestone slurry, the recirculation ratio was 3, the jet rate was 5-15 m/s and the submerged depth of the bubbling pipe under the slurry was 0.14 m, the removal efficiency for dioxins was 99.35%. The concentration of dioxins in the treated flue gas was 0.1573 x 10{sup -13} kg/Nm{sup 3} and the concentration of oxygen was 11%. This concentration is comparable to the emission standards of other developed countries.

Zhong Zhaoping [Department of Power Engineering, Research Institute of Thermal Energy Engineering, Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of Ministry of Education, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China)]. E-mail: zzhong@seu.edu.cn; Jin Baosheng [Department of Power Engineering, Research Institute of Thermal Energy Engineering, Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of Ministry of Education, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Huang Yaji [Department of Power Engineering, Research Institute of Thermal Energy Engineering, Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of Ministry of Education, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Zhou Hongcang [Department of Power Engineering, Research Institute of Thermal Energy Engineering, Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of Ministry of Education, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Lan Jixiang [Department of Power Engineering, Research Institute of Thermal Energy Engineering, Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of Ministry of Education, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

ADMINISTRATIVE UNIVERSITY POLICY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ADMINISTRATIVE UNIVERSITY POLICY FACULTY UNIVERSITY POLICY STUDENT UNIVERSITY POLICY Issue stakeholder list "Log-In" of Proposed University Policy with the University Compliance Committee (UCC) UCC identifies which track (i.e., Administrative, Faculty, or Student) the proposed University Policy

277

University of Maine at Farmington University of Southern Maine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

State University Western State College of Colorado Southern Utah University Utah Valley University Colorado Mesa University University of Northern Colorado Southern University Louisiana State University Adams State College University of Colorado at Colorado Springs Colorado State University-Pueblo Northern

New Hampshire, University of

278

University Research  

Office of Science (SC) Website

university-research The Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, providing more than 40 percent of total...

279

University of Connecticut University Postdoctoral Fellow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of Connecticut University Postdoctoral Fellow The Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology at the University of Connecticut invites applications Schlichting at: schlicht@uconn.edu. The University of Connecticut is an EEO

Holsinger, Kent

280

University of Colorado University of Colorado Boulder  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of Colorado Boulder University of Colorado Boulder University of Colorado Boulder University of Colorado Boulder University of Colorado Boulder Catalog 2012­13 Redefining Teaching & Learning­13 UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO BOULDER CATALOG contains a summary of campus offerings, policies, and requirements

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university waste-to-energy incinerator" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Energy aspects of solid waste management: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

The Eighteenth Annual Illinois Energy Conference entitled ``Energy Aspects of Solid Waste Management`` was held in Chicago, Illinois on October 29--30, 1990. The conference program was developed by a planning committee that drew upon Illinois energy and environmental specialists from the major sectors including energy industries, environmental organizations, research universities, utility companies, federal, state and local government agencies, and public interest groups. Within this framework, the committee identified a number of key topic areas surrounding solid waste management in Illinois which were the focus of the conference. These issues included: review of the main components of the solid waste cycle in the Midwest and what the relative impact of waste reduction, recycling, incineration and land disposal might be on Illinois` and the Midwest`s solid waste management program. Investigation of special programs in the Midwest dealing with sewage sludge, combustion residuals and medical/infectious wastes. Review of the status of existing landfills in Illinois and the Midwest and an examination of the current plans for siting of new land disposal systems. Review of the status of incinerators and waste-to-energy systems in Illinois and the Midwest, as well as an update on activities to maximize methane production from landfills in the Midwest.

Not Available

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

282

University of Wisconsin Milwaukee University Recreation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of Wisconsin ­ Milwaukee University Recreation FALL Semester - Student Employee that either I (after a two week notice) or University Recreation (following UWM policy) may terminate my this application to: Jamie Grenoble ­ Assistant Director University Recreation University of Wisconsin ­ Milwaukee

Saldin, Dilano

283

University of Wisconsin Milwaukee University Recreation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of Wisconsin ­ Milwaukee University Recreation SUMMER Semester - Student Employee) or University Recreation(following UWM policy) may terminate my employment at any time. I further understand Director University Recreation University of Wisconsin ­ Milwaukee P.O. Box 413 Milwaukee, WI 53201 03

Saldin, Dilano

284

University of Rochester University Health Service  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to health care following graduation. · Students enrolled in the University-sponsored Aetna Student Health by the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care, Inc. 12University of Rochester University Health Service Insurance for Graduating Students Graduating

Mahon, Bradford Z.

285

Open University  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Michel Pentz est née en Afrique du Sud et venu au Cern en 1957 comme physicien et président de l'associaion du personnel. Il est également fondateur du mouvement Antiapartheid de Genève et a participé à la fondation de l'Open University en Grande-Bretagne. Il nous parle des contextes pédagogiques, culturels et nationaux dans lesquels la méthode peut s'appliquer.

None

2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

286

Participating University of Connecticut  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Participating Schools University of Connecticut Trinity College Yale University University of Bridgeport Southern Connecticut State University Participating Corporations United Technologies Research Coherent-DEOS JDS-Uniphase C-Cor ASML Jetek, LLC Connecticut Symposium on Microelectronics

Alpay, S. Pamir

287

University of Wisconsin Milwaukee University Recreation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of Wisconsin ­ Milwaukee University Recreation SUMMER Semester - Student Employee) or University Recreation(following UWM policy) may terminate my employment at any time. I further understand Director Recreational Sports & Facilities University of Wisconsin ­ Milwaukee P.O. Box 413 Milwaukee, WI

Saldin, Dilano

288

University of Wisconsin Milwaukee University Recreation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of Wisconsin ­ Milwaukee University Recreation SPRING Semester - Student Employee) or University Recreation (following UWM policy) may terminate my employment at any time. I further understand Director Recreational Sports & Facilities University of Wisconsin ­ Milwaukee P.O. Box 413 Milwaukee, WI

Saldin, Dilano

289

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee University Recreation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 07/16/2013 University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee University Recreation Emergency Action Plan #12;2 UWM University Recreation EMERGENCY ACTION PLAN INTRODUCTION 1. Purpose The purpose of the Emergency Action Plan, for the Department of University Recreation (UREC), is to provide an organizational

Saldin, Dilano

290

NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE AARHUS UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, biogas fuelled engines, natural gas fuelled gas turbines, gas oil fuelled reciprocating engines, gas oil fuelled gas turbines, steam turbines combusting residual oil and reciprocating engines combusting biomass (MSW) incineration plants, plants combusting straw or wood, natural gas fuelled reciprocating engines

291

German Company Offers to Transform Sofia Waste to Energy The German company AlphaKat has filed a bid at Sofia municipality to construct an  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is produced from 1.2kg waste and the expenses for 1 liter of diesel from an installation with power 2000 into diesel would cost EUR 65 M. Under their project Sofia would need two installations of that type. The company also claims that the diesel that will be produced from the waste would be of high quality

Columbia University

292

"Potential for Combined Heat and Power and District Heating and Cooling from Waste-to-Energy Facilities in the U.S. Learning from the Danish Experience"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is used for the generation of electricity. The advantages of district heating using WTE plants are heating and cooling system in Indianapolis. However, there are few U.S. hot water district heating systems,800 district heating and cooling systems, providing 320 million MWh of thermal energy. Currently, 28 of the 88

Shepard, Kenneth

293

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste-to-Energy Conversion, and Waste-to-Chemical Conversion with Industrial Gas and Chemical Manufacturing Processes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A project to develop a microbial heat recovery cell (MHRC) system prototype using wastewater effluent samples from candidate facilities to produce either electric power or hydrogen

294

Waste to energy by industrially integrated supercritical water gasification – Effects of alkali salts in residual by-products from the pulp and paper industry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Supercritical water gasification (SCWG) is a method by which biomass can be converted into a hydrogen-rich gas product. Wet industrial waste streams, which contain both organic and inorganic material, are well suited for treatment by SCWG. In this study, the gasification of two streams of biomass resulting from the pulp and paper industry, black liquor and paper sludge, has been investigated. The purpose is to convert these to useful products, both gaseous and solids, which can be used either in the papermaking process or in external applications. Simple compounds, such as glucose, have been fully gasified in SCWG, but gasification of more complex compounds, such as biomass and waste, have not reached as high conversions. The investigated paper sludge was not easily gasified. Improving gasification results with catalysts is an option and the use of alkali salts for this purpose was studied. The relationship between alkali concentration, temperature, and gasification yields was studied with the addition of KOH, K2CO3, NaOH and black liquor to the paper sludge. Addition of black liquor to the paper sludge resulted in similarly enhancing effects as when the alkali salts were added, which made it possible to raise the dry matter content and gasification yield without expensive additives.

I. Rönnlund; L. Myréen; K. Lundqvist; J. Ahlbeck; T. Westerlund

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Oak Ridge Associated Universities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BIBLIOGRAPHY Partnerships for Innovation Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) is a university consortium leveraging the scientific strength of major research institutions to...

296

Columbia University Biotechnology Association  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Columbia University Biotechnology Association Biotechnology Career Conference Friday, April 20th for members, Non-members fee $10 Sponsored by Columbia University GSAC and MA Biotechnology Program, Dept

Tong, Liang

297

University Partners Panel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Matt Tirrell, Pritzker Director and Professor, Institute for Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago Thomas Glasmacher, Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) Project Manager, Michigan State University

298

University of Tennessee, USA Georgia State University, USA Johns Hopkins Medicine Institute, USA University of Virginia, USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12; : University of Tennessee, USA Georgia State University, USA Johns Hopkins Medicine Institute, USA University of Virginia, USA Columbia University, USA Queen's University, Canada University of Akron, USA

Wang, Jianbo

299

Waste utilization as an energy source: Municipal wastes. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the utilization of municipal wastes as an energy source. Articles discuss energy derived from incineration/combustion, refuse-derived fuels, co-firing municipal waste and standard fuels, landfill gas production, sewage combustion, and other waste-to-energy technologies. Citations address economics and efficiencies of various schemes to utilize municipal waste products as energy sources. (Contains a minimum of 130 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

DIMACS Center Rutgers University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Eliana S. Antoniu, William Patterson University Mariah Birgen, Wartburg College Brad Chin, West Valley

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university waste-to-energy incinerator" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

PHILADELPHIA UNIVERSITY 160  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . 2005/2006 " " . 2004/2005 CNC . #12;PHILADELPHIA UNIVERSITY . : : - CNC. - . - . - . 2006 . . : (1281

302

University Park Data Dashboard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The data dashboard for University Park, Maryland, a partner in the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program.

303

University and Educational Intelligence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... of Jews to these universities is severely restricted by applying what is known as the “Numerus ...

1924-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

304

PHILADELPHIA UNIVERSITY 1995  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in King Talal Water Dam in Jordan) . #12;PHILADELPHIA UNIVERSITY

305

The Universe Adventure - The Modern Universe  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modern Universe Modern Universe Like astronomers throughout history, modern cosmologists are interested in making an accurate model of the Universe. Starting with the laws of physics which explain how fundamental particles and forces interact, physicists derive general equations describing the evolution of the Universe's structure. Cosmologists use experimental evidence to select a set of initial conditions enabling them to solve the general equations, and calculate the state of the Universe at times in the past, present, or future. This generates a possible model, which can be tested by comparing the phenomena it predicts with observational data. In this manner, following the rigorous scientific method, cosmologists work to build a successful Universal model. In the next section we will examine evidence for the current Big Bang

306

E-Print Network 3.0 - area steam line Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with an automatic crane... recovery. As stable steam supply to the paper mill and the district heating system needs to be assured Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy...

307

E-Print Network 3.0 - alo tnavots aarne Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the manner in which Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 20 Un modle de di alogue par les attentes du...

308

E-Print Network 3.0 - area sw finland Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BelgiumCzech Rep. Denm ark Finland France Germ any GreatBritain* Hungary ItalyNetherlands Norway Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council...

309

Colorado State University Colorado State University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Colorado State University _______________ 1.1 Page 1 Colorado State University In 1870, the Territorial Council and House of Representatives of the Territory of Colorado created the Colorado that same year as Colorado's land-grant college under the Morrill Act of 1862. The Morrill Act provided

Stephens, Graeme L.

310

Colorado State University Colorado State University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Colorado State University Colorado State University In 1870, the Territorial Council and House of Representatives of the Territory of Colorado created the Colorado Agricultural College. When the Territory became. The College admitted its first students in 1879 and received designation that same year as Colorado's land

Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

311

, UNIVERSITY Brigham Young University Geology Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, UNIVERSITY #12;Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 1 5 - 1968 Part 2 Studies; and depositing of sedi- ments in an Ice-Age lake called Lake Bonneville which intermittently filled the valley-transported sediment more than a mile in thickness (Text-fig. 2). At the;ery top of this accumulation of valley

Seamons, Kent E.

312

Engineering Waseda UniversityWaseda University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Science & Engineering Library Waseda UniversityWaseda University Library Guidance September 2013 #12;Contents 1 Overview of WU Libraries 2 Science & Engineering Library and the Student Reading Room 3 ImportantImportant And... so many Documents, Microfilm, Audio-Visual materials 22 National Treasures

Kaji, Hajime

313

DOE Solar Decathlon: Team Ontario: Queen's University, Carleton University,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Team Ontario: Queen's University, Carleton University, and Algonquin Team Ontario: Queen's University, Carleton University, and Algonquin College Team website: ontariosd.ca Photo of members of the Queen's University, Carleton University, and Algonquin College Solar Decathlon 2013 team on the deck of their partially constructed house. Several members are laughing and throwing snowballs. Enlarge image The Queen's University, Carleton University, and Algonquin College Solar Decathlon 2013 team (Courtesy of the Queen's University, Carleton University, and Algonquin College Solar Decathlon 2013 team) he Queen's University, Carleton University, and Algonquin College audiovisual presentation Jury Feedback Architecture Contest Market Appeal Contest Engineering Contest Communications Contest Team Deliverables Project Manual Construction Drawings

314

University of Nebraska-Lincoln and University of Florida (Building...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nebraska-Lincoln and University of Florida (Building Energy Efficient Homes for America) Jump to: navigation, search Name: University of Nebraska-Lincoln and University of Florida...

315

The Universe Adventure - Expansion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Expansion: Chunk-by-Chunk Expansion: Chunk-by-Chunk A sample of the Universe. A very small portion of the Universe. In order to better understand the significance of expansion, let's look at a cubic sample of space. By considering a finite volume we can follow changes in the size of the Universe as we move forwards and backwards in time. Remember, only the size of the cube will change. The galaxies inside the cube stay the same size. This animation illustrates how our cubic piece of the Universe changes with time. If the Universe followed the simplest expansionary models, its size would increase linearly with time. The Universe would continue to expand at a constant rate forever. If you look at only a narrow time-slice of the Universe's history, it does, in fact, appear that this is how the Universe

316

CAMPUS RECREATION CLEMSON UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CAMPUS RECREATION CLEMSON UNIVERSITY sponsorship program #12;From acquiring new customers to developing long-term relationships with the Clemson University community, Clemson Campus Recreation can market research � Support wellness through fitness and recreation Clemson Campus Recreation boasts one

Stuart, Steven J.

317

Environmental State University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biology Water Science Nursery Management Plant Breeding Biofuel Feedstocks OUR DEPARTMENT The PLANT specialties, including plant breeding, genetic engineering, sustainable agriculture, ornamental production State University is the only land-grant, Hispanic serving university in the contiguous United States

318

University Services Pamela Wheelock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Engineering Jerome Malmquist open position Business Services * Bruce Gritters September 2013 Public SafetyUniversity Services Pamela Wheelock Vice President MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS University Services Human Resources Linda Bjornberg Director open position CIO OPERATIONS Auxiliary Services Laurie Scheich

Amin, S. Massoud

319

Mathematical Statistics Stockholm University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, University of Dar es Salaam, Postal address: Box 35062, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. E-mail: shabanmbare

Britton, Tom

320

UNIVERSITY OF SUSSEX Advertisement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Vice-Chancellors. The Registrar and Secretary heads the Professional Services of the University. In addition, under the UniversityUNIVERSITY OF SUSSEX Advertisement Ref: 297 School of Life Sciences - Genome Damage and Stability the three Pro-Vice-Chancellors, the Registrar and Secretary, the Director of Finance and the Director

Jensen, Max

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321

University Buildings Landmark Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

KEY University Buildings Landmark Buildings The Lanyon Building Roads Footpath Cafe University Accommodation Queen's University Belfast Campus Map The Lanyon Building The Students' Union The David Keir Building School Offices A Biological Sciences B Chemistry and Chemical Engineering C Education D

Müller, Jens-Dominik

322

BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY FACULTY SENATE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Brandeis's story to the public. When questioned about the University's brand and identity, Ms. Miles answered that the logo is the University's brand identity. Brandeis is a research university with a long to the marketing of his image. Ms. Miles said that Brandeis had a real connection with Albert Einstein. She added

Fraden, Seth

323

The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Department of University Recreation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Department of University Recreation Agreement for Assumption, ________________________________________ (print name), age ________, desire to participate voluntarily in recreational activities and programs for programming, by the University of Wisconsin ­ Milwaukee, Department of University Recreation. I UNDERSTAND

Saldin, Dilano

324

ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY STETSON UNIVERSITY Phoenix, AZ Deland, FL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

English Literature English BOWLING GREEN STATE UNIVERSITY Bowling Green, OH SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY Industrial OF BRISTOL Mount Pleasant, MI Bristol, UK Communication/English Cinema Studies EASTERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY STATE UNIVERSITY Technical Communication Murfreesboro, TN Theater Mass Communications Visual Language

Wu, Shin-Tson

325

UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER HUMAN STEM CELL RESEARCH COST.....................................................................................12 #12;University of Connecticut and the University of Connecticut Health Center Human Stem Cell that is ineligible for federal support. The University of Connecticut and the University of Connecticut Health Center

Kim, Duck O.

326

Measuring Excellence at Concordia University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measuring Excellence at Concordia University Prepared by the Institutional Planning Office May 2006 #12;Concordia University May 2006 Measuring Excellence at Concordia] #12;Concordia University May 2006 Measuring Excellence at Concordia University First Annual Report

Chvátal, Va�ek

327

UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA ENGINEERING FOUNDATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA ENGINEERING FOUNDATION I __________________________________________ pledge to contribute or make possible a gift to the University of Virginia Engineering Foundation for the University: ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________ Please make check payable to the Engineering Foundation and return to the University of Virginia

Acton, Scott

328

University Advancement | University Communications and Marketing University Events & Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

England Center, 15 Strafford Ave., Durham, New Hampshire, 03824 ph.: 603 -862-1461 fax: 603 The Pease Greeters Scholarship in memory of Charles Nichols recognizes a University of New Hampshire student for public service and an affiliation with the U.S. military. This scholarship is established with the intent

New Hampshire, University of

329

University Connections | .EDUconnections  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Research on the "Go" with OSTI mobile Research on the "Go" with OSTI mobile Research on the "Go" with OSTI mobile Get the EDUconnections widget and many other great free widgets at Widgetbox! University Spotlight Program The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) connects with university research departments and libraries across the nation to increase awareness of DOE's valuable scientific and technical information. OSTI "spotlights" individual universities with connections to DOE scientific research programs. Visit our spotlight below to see examples of universities that are supporting and advancing scientific research and discovery! University Spotlight Visit our Spotlight Archive to learn about great colleges and universities

330

Canadian university research reactors  

SciTech Connect

In Canada there are seven university research reactors: one medium-power (2-MW) swimming pool reactor at McMaster University and six low-power (20-kW) SLOWPOKE reactors at Dalhousie University, Ecole Polytechnique, the Royal Military College, the University of Toronto, the University of Saskatchewan, and the University of Alberta. This paper describes primarily the McMaster Nuclear Reactor (MNR), which operates on a wider scale than the SLOWPOKE reactors. The MNR has over a hundred user groups and is a very broad-based tool. The main applications are in the following areas: (1) neutron activation analysis (NAA); (2) isotope production; (3) neutron beam research; (4) nuclear engineering; (5) neutron radiography; and (6) nuclear physics.

Ernst, P.C.; Collins, M.F.

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

KYUSHU UNIVERSITY FINANCIAL REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

KYUSHU UNIVERSITY FINANCIAL REPORT 200992009 #12;1 Kyushu University FINANCIAL REPORT 2009 Kyushu University FINANCIAL REPORT 2009 2 1 3 4 2 5 6 7 9 11 13 14 15 16 3 17 18 19 20 21 22 4 23 24 25 26 5 27 28 6 29 30 FINANCIAL REPORT index2009 #12;1,300 1,200 1,100 1,000 900 800 700 600 500 400 300 200 100 0 1

Nakamura, Iku

332

Terrorism And The University  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Terrorism And The University ... introduced legislation to help prevent terrorists from entering the U.S. through loopholes in the U.S. immigration and visa system. ...

MADELEINE JACOBS

2001-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

333

CONTRACTING UNIVERSITY COUNSEL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONTRACTING GUIDELINES HANDBOOK OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY COUNSEL The College of William & Mary #12................................................................................................................2 Contract Basics Office of Procurement....................................................................................................4 Contract Basics

Swaddle, John

334

harvard university financial report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

auditors 15 financial statements 19 notes to financial statements #12 is a university community of remarkable resilience and energy. It is a community with an uncommon capacity

335

Universal Quantum Circuits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We define and construct efficient depth-universal and almost-size-universal quantum circuits. Such circuits can be viewed as general-purpose simulators for central classes of quantum circuits and can be used to capture the computational power of the circuit class being simulated. For depth we construct universal circuits whose depth is the same order as the circuits being simulated. For size, there is a log factor blow-up in the universal circuits constructed here. We prove that this construction is nearly optimal.

Debajyoti Bera; Stephen Fenner; Frederic Green; Steve Homer

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

336

THE REGISTRAR WITTENBERG UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FOR STUDENTS TRANSFERRING FROM LORAIN COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE TO WITTENBERG UNIVERSITY Based on the 2010-2011 Lorain County Community College Catalog and the 2010-2011 Wittenberg University Catalog LCCC LCCC COURSE NUMBER COURSE TITLE LORAIN CREDITS WITTENBERG DEPT WITTENBERG COURSE WITTENBERG CREDITS (CONVERTED) MEETS

Bogaerts, Steven

337

AALTO UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION CONSTITUTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AALTO UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION CONSTITUTION Section 1. Name and domicile of the Foundation The Foundation shall be called Aalto-korkeakoulusäätiö (Swedish: Stiftelsen för Aaltohögskolan, English: Aalto University Foundation) and its domicile shall be the City of Helsinki. Section 2. Purpose of the Foundation

Kaski, Samuel

338

Valley Road University Drive  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WATER AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE BUILDING (WE) THE BREEZEWAY THE GROVE THE QUAD UNIVERSITY HALL (UH and Teaching (Trading Room) · Faculty of Health Sciences · Faculty of Management · Simulation Health Centre Centre · Science Labs · Subway · The Urban Market · Tim Hortons · University of Calgary Faculty of Social

Seldin, Jonathan P.

339

Universal software safety standard  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper identifies the minimum subset required for a truly universal safety-critical software standard. This universal software standard could be used in but is not limited to the following application domains: commercial, military and space ... Keywords: software safety, system safety, validation, verification

P. V. Bhansali

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Macquarie University Description  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

resorts. Learn to surf, get student rush tickets for the Opera House, climb the Sydney Harbour Bridge in volunteering. The university is located 30 minutes from the centre of Sydney; a new underground station at the university was opened in 2009, and regular buses mean it's easy to get into the city. Surrounding Area Sydney

Bristol, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university waste-to-energy incinerator" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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341

Syracuse University Tutor Handbook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Syracuse University Tutor Handbook Literacy Corps Edited by Michael Curato Marissa Gold Jennifer as a fundamental part of the teaching and learning experience for students, faculty, and staff. The first section, Syracuse University joined forces with Say Yes to Education, Inc. and the Syracuse City School District

Segraves, Kari A.

342

University Buildings Landmark Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

KEY University Buildings Landmark Buildings The Lanyon Building Roads Footpath Cafe Grass Queen's University Belfast Campus Map The Lanyon Building The Students' Union The David Keir Building School Offices and Sonic Arts Q Nursing and Midwifery R Pharmacy S Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering T Politics

Paxton, Anthony T.

343

University Buildings Landmark Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

KEY University Buildings Landmark Buildings The Lanyon Building Roads Footpath Cafe University Engineering N Medicine, Dentistry and Biomedical Sciences P Music and Sonic Arts Q Nursing and Midwifery R and Student Affairs 3 Administration Building 32 Ashby Building 27 Belfast City Hospital 28 Bernard Crossland

Paxton, Anthony T.

344

University Communications and Marketing University Events & Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a University of New Hampshire student for public service and an affiliation with the U.S. military Strafford Ave., Durham, New Hampshire, 03824 ph.: 603 -862-1461 fax: 603-862-1188 Pease Greeters Scholarship Events & Programs New England Center, 15 Strafford Ave., Durham, New Hampshire, 03824 ph.: 603 -862

New Hampshire, University of

345

University of Hawaii ________________UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Typical Laser Classes (from ANSI) 37 Appendix J ­ Laser Warning Signs (from ANSI) 38 Appendix K ­ Laser, the University has adopted the American National Standard for the Safe Use of Lasers, ANSI Z136.1, and ANSI Z136

Browder, Tom

346

GEORGIA SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY University System of Georgia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University invites nominations and applications for the position of Assistant Professor of Coaching Education Sciences, the Allen E. Paulson College of Engineering and Information Technology, Liberal Arts and Social the benefits of higher education, offering both campus-based and a number of online degree programs

Hutcheon, James M.

347

GEORGIA SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY University System of Georgia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Health and Human Sciences, the Allen E. Paulson College of Engineering and Information Technology the state of Georgia and the region through the benefits of higher education, offering both campus of Education / Curriculum, Foundations, and Reading Georgia Southern University invites nominations

Hutcheon, James M.

348

GEORGIA SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY University System of Georgia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Business Administration, Education, Health and Human Sciences, Information Technology, Liberal Arts the State of Georgia and the region through the benefits of higher education, offering both campus institution of the University System of Georgia, invites nominations and applications for a tenure track

Hutcheon, James M.

349

University of Bath -Ordinances UNIVERSITY OF BATH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/School as set out in the Quality Assurance Code of Practice; have further responsibilities where delegated, Regulations and Rules of the University, words shall have the same meaning as in the Charter and Statutes/School as required; have general responsibility for quality management and support to students within the Faculty

Burton, Geoffrey R.

350

Seattle University Recreation Position Description  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seattle University Recreation Position Description Title: University Recreation ST.A.R.T Member will assist in the promotion and awareness of the University Recreation Brand and programs to the students of all University Recreation Employees. ST.A.R.T Members are comprised of members of the University

Carter, John

351

Seattle University Recreation Position Description  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seattle University Recreation Position Description Title: University Recreation Office Manager Date: 8/2/12 Purpose of the Position The University Recreation Office Manager is an integral part of the University Recreation department and will work with the Assistant Director of University Recreation

Carter, John

352

Seattle University Recreation Position Description  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seattle University Recreation Position Description Title: University Recreation Office Manager Date: 7/23/2013 Purpose of the Position The University Recreation Office Manager is an integral part of the University Recreation department and will work with the Assistant Director of University Recreation

Carter, John

353

BFUFall 2012 BICYCLE FRIENDLY UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 BFUFall 2012 BICYCLE FRIENDLY UNIVERSITY FEEDBACK REPORT University of Kansas, Lawrence #12;While the University of Kansas at Lawrence was not selected as a Bicycle Friendly University this year, reviewers hope recommendations to further promote bicycling at the University of Kansas at Lawrence and a menu of additional pro

354

Norwegian Language description of Jacobs University Hva er Jacobs University?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

underviser tverrfaglig og deltar i forskningen ved Description of Jacobs University. Jacobs University tilbyr 2006 tilbyr Jacobs University mangfoldige muligheter til å lære av hverandre og leve sammen. Fordelen

355

Seattle University Recreation Position Description  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seattle University Recreation Position Description Title: University Recreation Fitness Center Recreation in the William F. Eisiminger Fitness Center and Archbishop Connolly Complex. Primary Duties all University Recreation and Fitness Center Policies · Educate members on proper Fitness Center

Carter, John

356

Seattle University Recreation Position Description  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seattle University Recreation Position Description Title: Connolly Complex Lifeguard Date: 7/or participants by enforcing the policies and procedures of the University Recreation Department. Primary Duties efficient and competent manner to the satisfaction of the Assistant Director of University Recreation

Carter, John

357

FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION, INC.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION, INC. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION June 30, 2011 and 2010 #12;FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION, INC. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AUDITORS' REPORT To the Board of Directors Florida Atlantic University Foundation, Inc. Boca Raton, Florida

Fernandez, Eduardo

358

FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION, INC.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION, INC. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION June 30, 2010 and 2009 #12;FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION, INC. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS To the Board of Directors Florida Atlantic University Foundation, Inc. Boca Raton, Florida We have audited

Fernandez, Eduardo

359

University of Lethbridge Annual Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of Lethbridge Annual Report 2011/12 #12; i University of Lethbridge 2011/12 Annual Report ACCOUNTABILITY STATEMENT The University of Lethbridge Annual Report for the year ended March 31, 2012 was prepared

Seldin, Jonathan P.

360

University of Missouri | .EDUconnections  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Missouri Missouri Research Research at Mizzou Vice Chancellor for Research Core Facilities Research Centers Undergraduate Research Research News & Multimedia DOE Research Reports UM Researchers in E-print Network Illumination Magazine Harnessing Radioactivity for Cancer Therapy Scientists from the University of Missouri, Oak Ridge National Lab and the University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine harness alpha particles for radiation cancer therapy. Gold Coated Lanthanide Phosphate Nanoparticles for Targeted Alpha Generator Radiotherapy, PLOS ONE Alpha Particle Therapy, Credit: Nathan Hurst Search this site: Search UM Columbia has a reputation of excellence in teaching and research and is the flagship campus of the four-campus University of Missouri System. Resources

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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Bagley University Classroom Building  

Duluth, MN, MN LEED PLATINUM CERTIFIED AND PASSIVHAUS ( certification pending) CLASSROOM BUILDING The Nature Preserve where this building is located is a contiguous natural area, 55 acres in size, deeded to the University in the 1950's for educational and recreational use. The site has hiking trails through old growth hard woods frequented by the university students as well as the public. We were charged with designing a facility to serve eight different departments for the nature portions of their teaching and study at a regional University.

362

The universal radiative transport equation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE UNIVERSAL RADIATIVE TRANSPORT EQUATION Rudolph W.The Universal Radiative Transport Equation Rudolph W.The various radiative transport equations used in general

Preisendorfer, Rudolph W

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT STORRS CAMPUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT STORRS CAMPUS FREIGHT DELIVERY CENTRAL STORES Disclaimer for Freight Delivery of Large Items Your signature below authorizes the University of Connecticut (UConn) to accept

Alpay, S. Pamir

364

Split University | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Croatia-based electrical engineering faculty of Split University. Involved in developing small hydro and solar energy projects. References: Split University1 This article is a...

365

University of Delaware | Contact CCEI  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory (ISE Lab) at the University of Delaware. Address Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation University of Delaware 221 Academy Street Newark, DE 19716 Phone Number...

366

University | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

University University Dataset Summary Description Provides annual energy usage for years 1989 through 2010 for UT at Austin; specifically, electricity usage (kWh), natural gas usage (Mcf), associated costs. Also provides water consumption for 2005 through 2010. Source University of Texas (UT) at Austin, Utilities & Energy Management Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords Electricity Consumption Natural Gas Texas Unit Cost Electricity Unit Cost Natural Gas University Water Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Energy and Water Use Data for UT-Austin (xls, 32.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Assume data was reviewed by someone at UT-Austin prior to adding to website. Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 1989 - 2010

367

Delaware State University | .EDUconnections  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Delaware State University Delaware State University Research Office of the Associate Provost for Research General Research Capability Center for Integrated Biological & Environmental Research Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research Delaware IDeA Network of Biomedical Research Excellence Faculty Research DSU Leads the Way in Better Buildings DSU is one of the first university partners in the US to join the Department of Energy's Better Buildings inititative to reduce its carbon footprint by 25% by 2015. Secretary of Energy Chu participated in the DSU kick-off program to commemorate the school's efforts in July 2012. Read more about this showcase project. Search this site: Search Prestigious research projects underway by Delaware State University (DSU) serve to enhance DSU's land-grant mission and its contributions to the

368

THE UNIVERSITY' OF CHICAGO  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

.G: THE UNIVERSITY' OF CHICAGO DATE December 28, 194s I TO C. F. Hiskey DLP*Rr"LNT MUCtft+-3I DEPARTMENT This document ConhtS Of...2, IN RE: Bloaaningtcn' Experiments pages and...

369

Oak Ridge Associ Universities  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ir. "'t-"' , i 'Prepared by Oak Ridge Associ Universities Prepared for Division of Remedial Action Proiects 'U.S. Department of Energy 5 : l :;"i r l ,iri, t . r ' i , , . 1...

370

NASA Defends University Programs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

NASA Defends University Programs ... Predoctoral fellowships, research and facilities grants are essential to the space effort, NASA says ... The Senate Appropriations Committee has questioned the propriety and legality of NASA's academic grant program (C&EN, Nov. 11, page 21). ...

1963-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

371

China's private universities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1949, the young nation embraced public ownership, and private higher education was abolished. As China embarked on an era of reform in the 1970s, the cash-strapped central government gradually enabled the reestablishment of private universities to meet...

Huiqing Jin

2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

372

Deakin University Victoria, Australia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Financial Planning Human Resources Management Interactive Marketing International Business International than 4.5 million people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. Deakin University and Construction Management Architecture Construction Management Design Facilities Management Arts Anthropology

Duchowski, Andrew T.

373

STUDY ABROAD @ ULM UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Carnot processes for energy conversion, in particular on electrochemical energy conversion (fuel cells as Energy Carrier Polymeric Materials Colloid Chemistry Introduction to Quantum Chemistry SurfacesSTUDY ABROAD @ ULM UNIVERSITY CHEMISTRY CHEMISTRY AND MANAGEMENT ENERGY SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY Ulm

Pfeifer, Holger

374

FINANCIAL ASSISTANT Binghamton University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of purchases, assigning general ledger accounts to employee labor records as well as purchase orders and workFINANCIAL ASSISTANT Binghamton University Physical Facilities - Finance & Resources Job Description purchasing functionality, accounts payable and receivable functionality and our employee labor distribution

Suzuki, Masatsugu

375

Thermodynamics of Fractal Universe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the thermodynamical properties of the apparent horizon in a fractal universe. We find that one can always rewrite the Friedmann equation of the fractal universe in the form of the entropy balance relation $ \\delta Q=T_h d{S_h}$, where $ \\delta Q $ and $ T_{h} $ are the energy flux and Unruh temperature seen by an accelerated observer just inside the apparent horizon. We find that the entropy $S_h$ consists two terms, the first one which obeys the usual area law and the second part which is the entropy production term due to nonequilibrium thermodynamics of fractal universe. This shows that in a fractal universe, a treatment with nonequilibrium thermodynamics of spacetime may be needed. We also study the generalized second law of thermodynamics in the framework of fractal universe. When the temperature of the apparent horizon and the matter fields inside the horizon are equal, i.e. $T=T_h$, the generalized second law of thermodynamics can be fulfilled provided the deceleration and the equation of state parameters ranges either as $-1 \\leq q thermodynamics can be secured in a fractal universe by suitably choosing the fractal parameter $\\beta$.

Ahmad Sheykhi; Zeinab Teimoori; Bin Wang

2012-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

376

Nottingham Trent University Quality Handbook Nottingham Trent University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nottingham Trent University Quality Handbook Section1 Nottingham Trent University Quality Handbook University Quality Handbook Part A Section 1: Academic quality governance December 2013 page 1 Section1 and research degree programmes........ 19 #12;Nottingham Trent University Quality Handbook Part A Section 1

Evans, Paul

377

UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN NOMINATION TO THE UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN SENATE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN NOMINATION TO THE UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN SENATE The University of Saskatchewan Act 1995 (24.3) provides for membership on the University of Saskatchewan Senate by professional to the social, economic and cultural welfare of Saskatchewan; and (b) have a demonstrated interest in furthering

Saskatchewan, University of

378

HARVARD UNIVERSITY FINANCIAL POLICY Responsible Office: University Financial Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Purchasing Card Page 2 of 7 #12;HARVARD UNIVERSITY FINANCIAL POLICY Responsible Office: University FinancialHARVARD UNIVERSITY FINANCIAL POLICY Responsible Office: University Financial Services Date First Effective: 4/1/2010 Revision Date: 6/30/2013 Purchasing Card Policy Statement Harvard Purchasing Cards

379

Southeast Asia and Kyoto University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Kyoto University opened its ASEAN Center in Bangkok, Thailand (p.11), the latest development in over

Takada, Shoji

380

University of California, San Francisco  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the University to conduct its operations in conformance with applicable laws, regulations, and rel- evant

Oliver, Douglas L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university waste-to-energy incinerator" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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381

University of Rostock INTERNATIONAL OFFICE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The University offers a balanced range of subjects with innovative programmes of study and excellent research of "Life, Light and Matter", "Maritime Systems", "Ageing Science and Humanities" and "Knowledge and Fraunhofer institutes. #12;University of Rostock University of Rostock We here at the University of Rostock

Rostock, Universität

382

Minor Actinides: Partitioning, Transmutation and Incineration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This pyrometallurgical and electrochemical process is developed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in USA in combination with the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) programme [33]. It is an evolution of the pyroprocessing

Günter Kessler

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Georgetown University A Bicycle Friendly University In November 2013, Georgetown University was  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Georgetown University ­ A Bicycle Friendly University In November 2013, Georgetown University was designated a Bronze-level Bicycle Friendly University (BFU) by the League of American Bicyclists. By sharing the information below on what we are doing to support bicycling and on our BFU assessment and application process

Riesenhuber, Maximilian

384

Universe Adventure Web Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Universe Universe Adventure Web Standards for the Smart Physics Student Author: Patrick Lii - plii@ugastro.berkeley.edu Date: August 3, 2007 ABSTRACT You may be wondering: why are the Universe Adventure web standards so impor- tant? And why do I have to read this stupid document about them? The old versions of our site were plagued with messy (and faulty) coding: the pages were littered with broken links, missing images, broken flash files, and all sorts of other problems which made the site highly inaccessible. When we tried to fix these errors, we found that the coding was so incredibly messy that a simple edit like changing some of the words in a paragraph or adding an image took hours rather than minutes. In fact, the coding was so horrific that we simply constructed an entirely new site rather than making the laborious attempt to fix the old one. In order to make sure that future students working

385

Oak Ridge Associated Universities  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Facility and Site Decommissioning U.S. Department of Energy ORAU 89lA-42 VERIFICATION OF REMEDIAL ACTION ON VENTILATION SYSTEMS JONES CHEMICAL LABORATORY UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO CHICAGO, ILLINOIS M. R. LANDIS Radiological Site Assessment Program Manpower Education, Research, and Training Division FINAL REPORT JANUARY 1989 ORAU 89IA-42 3 VERIFICATION OF REMEDIAL ACTION ON VENTILATION SYSTEMS JONES CHEMICAL LABORATORY UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO CHICAGO, ILLINOIS Prepared by M.R. Landis Radiological Site Assessment Program Manpower Education, Research, and Training Division Oak Ridge Associated Universities Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0117 Project Staff J.D. Berger R.D. Condra J.F. Lisco C.F. Weaver Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites -

386

The Dark Energy Universe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some seventy five years ago, the concept of dark matter was introduced by Zwicky to explain the anomaly of galactic rotation curves, though there is no clue to its identity or existence to date. In 1997, the author had introduced a model of the universe which went diametrically opposite to the existing paradigm which was a dark matter assisted decelarating universe. The new model introduces a dark energy driven accelarating universe though with a small cosmological constant. The very next year this new picture was confirmed by the Supernova observations of Perlmutter, Riess and Schmidt. These astronomers got the 2011 Nobel Prize for this dramatic observation. All this is discussed briefly, including the fact that dark energy may obviate the need for dark matter.

Burra G. Sidharth

2015-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

387

University Location Project Description  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Location Project Description Location Project Description Boise State University Boise, Idaho Boise State University has undertaken a study of the structural setting and geothermal potential at Neal Hot Springs that will integrate geology, geochemistry, and geophysics to analyze the site on the western Snake River plain. Boise State will determine if Neal Hot Springs sustains the necessary rock dilation and conduit pathways for hydrothermal fluid flow and successful geothermal development. The result will be new data acquisition, including a deep geophysical survey and fault surface data. Colorado School of Mines Golden, Colorado Colorado School of Mines will conduct an investigation near Homedale, Idaho, an area that straddles volcanic rock and unconsolidated sediments.

388

Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies October 7, 2013 - 9:28am Addthis Black and white photo of a bulldozer pushing a large mound of trash in a landfill. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's high-solids digester converts wastes to biogas and compost for energy production. This page provides a brief overview of municipal solid waste energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply waste to energy within the Federal sector. Overview Municipal solid waste, also known as waste to energy, generates electricity by burning solid waste as fuel. This generates renewable electricity while also incinerating landfill and other municipal waste products such as trash, yard clippings and debris, furniture, food scraps, and other

389

Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies October 7, 2013 - 9:28am Addthis Black and white photo of a bulldozer pushing a large mound of trash in a landfill. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's high-solids digester converts wastes to biogas and compost for energy production. This page provides a brief overview of municipal solid waste energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply waste to energy within the Federal sector. Overview Municipal solid waste, also known as waste to energy, generates electricity by burning solid waste as fuel. This generates renewable electricity while also incinerating landfill and other municipal waste products such as trash, yard clippings and debris, furniture, food scraps, and other

390

University Services Management Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

system U Services Finance organized a workforce planning process resulting in a team with better capacity > 3 Primary Services Human Resources Workforce Planning Recruitment and Selection Employee and Labor, and strategic planning efforts. In addition to supporting the University Services enterprise, the Management

Webb, Peter

391

undergraduate BRAC UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Publisher: BRAC University 66, Mohakhali Dhaka 1212, Bangladesh Telephone: (88 02) 882 4051-4 (PABX) Fax xi Schools, Departments, Institutes & Centre xiii Partners in Education xviii Resources, Facilities and Services Resources at BRACU xx Facilities for Learning xxi Student Activities xxvi Academic System xxix

Petriu, Emil M.

392

Columbia University Medical Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Epidemiology Program Prevention, Control and Disparities Program SHARED RESOURCES EDUCATION ADMINISTRATION HOW spirit and the superior resources of a world-class multi-campus university, this combination sets on West 168th Street work so hard to understand why people in Bangladesh are developing skin cancer from

Grishok, Alla

393

Mathematics Department Cornell University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mathematics Department Cornell University K-12 Education & Outreach Committee Report August 2011 Ilyashenko Edward Swartz #12;i Overview During the 2011-2012 academic year the Mathematics Department by faculty members, graduate students, and undergraduate students in Mathematics and the Center for Applied

Keinan, Alon

394

HARVARD UNIVERSITY CHEMICAL BIOLOGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HARVARD UNIVERSITY CHEMICAL BIOLOGY PHD PROGRAM 2013-2014 Student Handbook #12;Program Contacts at the beginning of each semester. Laboratory Rotations Students in the Chemical Biology Program are expected an interest in having Chemical Biology Program Students in their labs. Students may rotate in the labs

Church, George M.

395

Rutgers University Environmental Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, chemical use, water use, and sustainable materials management into MTCO2e. The EPA WARM Model which helpsRutgers University Environmental Assessment: MOU SemiAnnual Report May 31, 2013 Environmental) pledging to become an environmental steward by implementing a number of green initiatives that would reduce

Hanson, Stephen José

396

Rutgers University Environmental Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for electricity, green energy, fuel use, chemical use, water use, and sustainable materials management into MTCO2eRutgers University Environmental Assessment: MOU SemiAnnual Report November 4, 2011 Environmental) pledging to become an environmental steward by implementing a number of green initiatives that would reduce

Delgado, Mauricio

397

Cornell University Cooperative Extension  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cornell University Cooperative Extension Oneida County 4-H Poultry Project Record Book Member Name from year to year. #12;3 Awards and Recognition One of the goals of many 4-Hers is to earn a County Medal at the end of the 4-H year. In order to be eligible for a Poultry County

New Hampshire, University of

398

The Universe as Calorimeter  

SciTech Connect

The maturation of very high energy astrophysics has enabled many novel physics applications. Among these is the investigation of extragalactic photon fields, which in some cases encode specific calorimetric information about such things as the formation of large-scale structure and the total high-energy luminosity of the universe. The origins of these backgrounds, and techniques for probing them will be discussed.

Wakely, Scott P. [Enrico Fermi Institute, Dept. of Physics, University of Chicago, Chicago IL 60637 (United States); Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago, Chicago IL 60637 (United States)

2006-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

399

California State University,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Appendices report CLA outcomes in detail and technical information underpinning your results. Power presents Collegiate Learning Assessment (CLA) results for colleges and universities that tested freshmen (page 2) Results (page 3) Moving Forward (page 3) II Attachments Technical Appendices The Technical

de Lijser, Peter

400

Northwestern University Transportation Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Northwestern University Transportation Center 2011 Business Advisory Committee NUTC #12;#12;I have the pleasure of presenting our Business Advisory Committee members--a distinguished group of transportation industry lead- ers who have partnered with the Transportation Center in advancing the state of knowledge

Bustamante, Fabián E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university waste-to-energy incinerator" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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401

University Center Breakfast Menu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Includes iced water and your choice of iced tea or lemonade Choice of two salads: Tossed Green, CaliforniaUniversity Center Breakfast Menu Buffets Includes coffee, decaf, hot tea service, iced water Center Deli Buffet Includes iced water and your choice of iced tea or lemonade Choice of two salads

Lee, Herbie

402

Purdue University & Kelly Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Purdue University & Kelly Services Higher quality staffing for higher education 765.448.6676 #12;Kelly's Key Strengths & Values · Respected global company · Dedicated branch network with Kelly: Contact Information · Our Local Kelly Services Branch is Located at: 3530 State Rd 26 E Lafayette

Fernández-Juricic, Esteban

403

Northwestern University February 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is Radiation? 9.0 What is Radiation? 9.1 Definitions 9.2 Ionization 9.3 Range in Matter 9.4 Radioactive Decay 9 for Gamma Photons 13.0 Radiation Standards 13.1 Occupational Radiation Dose Limits 13.2 Occupational DoseNorthwestern University Radiation Safety Handbook February 2010 Office for Research Safety Office

Shahriar, Selim

404

University and Educational Intelligence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... of agricultural teaching in Yorkshire has been taken by the Board of Agriculture as the model for all other parts of England, and the rapid growth of the agricultural courses ... Trust for the development of the Scottish Universities. This department has been erected at a cost, including equipment, of about 15,50??. Owing to the completion in 1910 ...

1913-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

405

university of Financial Statements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the University Report of the Auditors 8 Consolidated Income and 9 Expenditure Account Statement of Consolidated of the underlying changes from last year: · HEFCE income, excluding the release of deferred capital grants, has E T R E A S U R E R RESULTS FOR THE YEAR - INCOME AND EXPENDITURE ACCOUNT The summarised

Mumby, Peter J.

406

Cornell University Facilities Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

requirements, building code, and sustainability objectives. This plan takes a long- term view, projecting workCornell University Facilities Services Contract Colleges Facilities Fernow and Rice Hall in Fernow, Rice, Bruckner, Bradfield and Plant Science buildings. It includes a surging and phasing plan

Manning, Sturt

407

ABOUT TRUMAN STATE UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. In addition, the physical setting of the campus itself promotes the synergy of students and teachers by facil of Accountancy, and the Master of Science. PURPOSE OF HANDBOOK This Faculty Handbook is intended to serve. The University is an "at-will" employer; therefore, the Handbook does not serve as a contract for employment

Gering, Jon C.

408

nagoya university handbook for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nagoya university handbook for foreign researchers #12; contents Before coming to Japan Before prizes in Physics and Chemistry. In 2009, we celebrated our 70th anniversary, looking back on the past on Health Sciences. This handbook provides information to assist you in the three stages of preparing your

Takahashi, Ryo

409

Graduate Handbook Clemson University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and their physical environments, and to develop in them the wisdom and skills needed to assume responsibility of our built environment. Many engineering and science faculty work closely together in research............................................................................................................................3 The University and the Community College of Engineering and Science Glenn Department of Civil

Duchowski, Andrew T.

410

University of Chicago Description  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

? The first self-sustaining, synthetic nuclear reaction occurred in an underground racket ball court or in International House (a private entity affiliated with the University) and housing is guaranteed for students who submit their application on time. Details are available on the Housing Office website. Courses

Bristol, University of

411

Syracuse University Electrical Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Syracuse University Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Tenure Track Faculty Position in Electrical Engineering The Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science is seeking applicants for a tenure track position in Electrical Engineering starting in August 2014 or January 2015. The department

Mather, Patrick T.

412

The University Advertising Guidelines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

advertisements 21 A4 advertisements with image 22 On-line ­ brand advertising 23 On-line leaderboards and MPUs to these on page 48 in the Heriot-Watt University brand guidelines. Images Images should use the whole area) advertisements 6 Small space (5cms x 2cols) advertisements with image 8 A5 advertisements 9 A5 advertisements

Painter, Kevin

413

Modernize Ukraine's university system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... A paucity of publications in international peer-reviewed journals also stems from Ukraine's academic promotion system, which fosters inertia among research scientists, and from poorly developed ... which fosters inertia among research scientists, and from poorly developed skills in foreign languages. Ukraine's universities need to adopt internationally recognized standards, promote autonomy under democratic and competent ...

Alexander Gorobets

2011-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

414

UNIVERSITY of STRATHCLYDE TECHNOLOGY &  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNIVERSITY of STRATHCLYDE TECHNOLOGY & INNOVATION CENTRE #12;#12;#12;The Technology and Innovation HEALTH TECHNOLOGIES ADVANCED MANUFACTURING #12;Inspiring research and innovation with industry-by-side on innovative technology programmes aimed at addressing major challenges in: Low Carbon Power and Energy

Mottram, Nigel

415

Graduate Programs Auburn University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/Forest Harvesting Forest Products and Wood Science and Urban Forestry http://www.clemson.edu/for/for_prog.html#grad Colorado State University Fort Collins, Colorado 805230015 Program: Forestry Wood Engineering Wood 97331 Programs: Forest Engineering, Wood Science and Engineering, Forest Resources, and Forest Science

416

University of London Buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... to the provision of an open space on part of the site of the new buildings of the University of London at Bloomsbury. He informs us that since his election ... by Mr. Humberstone that this undertaking was not carried out by the layout of the buildings. Representations were therefore made, with the result that a new design and layout have ...

1935-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

417

College/University: 1998 -2004 University of Kaiserslautern (Germany)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Education College/University: 1998 - 2004 University of Kaiserslautern (Germany) Diploma in Biology, billard, card-games, soccer, First name: Niels Last name: Heinz Date of birth: 07.02.1978 Country: Germany

Manstein, Dietmar J.

418

Montana State University Administration and Finance University Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Disposal Engineering & Utilities Engineering Services Utilities Acquisitions Heating Plant OperationMontana State University Administration and Finance University Services Associate Vice President Bob Lashaway Facilities Services Budget & IT Services Budgeting & Accounting IT Services

Maxwell, Bruce D.

419

Montana State University -Administration and Finance University Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Disposal Engineering & Utilities Engineering Services Utilities Acquisitions Heating Plant OperationMontana State University - Administration and Finance University Services Associate Vice President Bob Lashaway Facilities Services Budget & IT Services Budgeting & Accounting IT Services

Lawrence, Rick L.

420

The Universe Adventure - The Homogenous and Isotropic Universe  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Our View of the Universe Our View of the Universe All observations that have been made using the most powerful telescopes show that the universe looks the same in all directions. The average density of galaxies is the same throughout the universe and does not change with distance or direction. This is called the Cosmological Principle. Distribution of Galaxies On average and at large scales, the distribution of galaxies is the same throughout the universe. Since the expansion of space occurs evenly at every point in the universe, galaxies are separating from each other at about the same pace, giving the universe a nearly uniform density and structure. As a result, the universe appears smooth at large distance scales. In scientific terms, it is said to be homogeneous and isotropic.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university waste-to-energy incinerator" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Rodrigo BauelosRodrigo Bauelos, Purdue University, USA, Purdue University, USA Krzysztof BogdanKrzysztof Bogdan, Wroclaw University of Technology, Poland, Wroclaw University of Technology, Poland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rodrigo BañuelosRodrigo Bañuelos, Purdue University, USA, Purdue University, USA Krzysztof BogdanZhen-Qing Chen, University of Washington, USA, University of Washington, USA HyeongIn ChoiHyeongIn Choi, Seoul, Japan, Ritsumeikan University, Japan Renming SongRenming Song, University of Illinois, USA, University

Kim, Panki

422

Haskell Indian Nations University Transfer Program to University of Kansas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Haskell Indian Nations University Transfer Program to University of Kansas B.A. in Architectural to PHYS 114) and have overall grade-point average of 3.5. All complete applications for summer and fall and Writing 3 ENGL 102 English 2 3 Outcome 2 GE22 #12;Haskell Indian Nations University Architecture Updated 8

423

West Virginia University 1 Oak Ridge Associated Universities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

West Virginia University 1 Oak Ridge Associated Universities Oak Ridge Associated Universities and a contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. ORAU works with its, and research appointments; and to organize research alliances among its members. Through the Oak Ridge

Mohaghegh, Shahab

424

University Policy Process Style Guidelines for University Policy Documents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University Policy Process Style Guidelines for University Policy Documents 1 S:\\4every1\\Policy\\Univ Policy Improvement\\Final Docs\\Style Guidelines-UPP.docx Policy Name Do not include "Policy" or "Policy on specific applications such as "anyone operating university owned or operated vehicles". POLICY (required

Jones, Michelle

425

UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER UNIVERSITY HEALTH PROFESSIONALS (UHP)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER UNIVERSITY HEALTH PROFESSIONALS (UHP) TUITION REIMBURSEMENT is permitted under the following conditions: 1. According to the University of Connecticut Laws and By of Connecticut Health Center will benefit from participation in this program (i.e., that the course work

Oliver, Douglas L.

426

S.BERETANIASTREET UNIVERSITY AVENUE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hall Hawai`i Hall Crawford Hall Architecture School Gartley Hall Saunders Hall Queen Lili University High School 3 University Ave. Annexes Sustainability Courtyard 0 H1 Dance Building Agricultural

427

University of Connecticut Health Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of Connecticut Health Center UCONN Medical Group Comprehensive Spine Center (Patient: ____________________ AGE: _____ SEX: M / F Referring Physician: ___________ Primary Care Physician: _____________ 1. Where your symptoms begin? __/__/__/ *HCH2199* #12;University of Connecticut Health Center UCONN Medical

Oliver, Douglas L.

428

TOKYO INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGYINTERNATIONALCOLLABORATION University/Institute Concluded  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carlsberg Laboratory and University of Copenhagen Aalto University Lappeenranta University of Technology

429

2009 University Coal Research Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2009 University Coal Research Program 2009 University Coal Research Program Description The University Coal Research (UCR) Program provides grants to U.S. colleges and universities to support fundamental research and to develop efficient and environmentally responsible fossil energy technologies. Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE), the program is carried out by DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL).

430

Sustainability Framework 1 Queen's University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sustainability Framework 1 Queen's University Sustainability Strategic Framework #12;Sustainability Framework 2 Contents Introduction .................................................................................................................................................. 2 Queen's Sustainability Mission

Abolmaesumi, Purang

431

INDIANA UNIVERSITY William Sherman Senior Technology Advisor...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INDIANA UNIVERSITY William Sherman Senior Technology Advisor, Indiana University William Sherman is a senior technical advisor at Indiana University. He is the scientific...

432

University of Cape Town | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Town Jump to: navigation, search Name: University of Cape Town Place: South Africa Product: Teaching and research university. References: University of Cape Town1 This article is...

433

The Universe Adventure - Redshift  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Expansion of the Universe Expansion of the Universe Redshift Expansion of Space Redshifts Light The expansion of space redshifts light. As space expands, light waves get stretched and their wavelengths shift. The more that light is stretched, the longer its wavelengths become, and the color of each wave shifts toward the red end of the light spectrum. We say that this light is redshifted. The Doppler Effect in action. A moving fire truck's siren changes pitch as it moves past you. This is known as the Doppler Effect. To get a better idea of how this actually works, we'll look at a common phenomenon: the Doppler Effect. Imagine you hear a fire truck coming right toward you. As the truck approaches, the pitch of the siren gets higher and higher. As soon as the truck passes you however, the pitch drops lower as

434

Nuclear Energy University Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NEUP FY2011 Process Presentation to NEAC December 9, 2010 Marsha Lambregts, NEUP-IO Manager FUNDED R&D PROPOSALS BY STATE 2010 * Awards/Full Submissions - 42/128 * Awards to PIs for first time - 29 * Awards to junior faculty - 20 * Awards that are experimental - 30 * Awards in materials and waste - 30 * Awards to Nuclear Engineering Faculty - 18 * Number of universities receiving awards - 26 * Number of awards with lab partners - 20 * Number of universities receiving awards for first time - 8 2 2010 INFRASTRUCTURE * Major Reactor: 4 awards for a total of $3.75 M * Minor Reactor: 12 awards for $1.95 M * General Scientific Infrastructure: 33 award for $7.47 M * Since 2009, $ 19.438 M has been awarded in General Scientific Infrastructure (did not issue Major or Minor Reactor calls in 2009).

435

Principles of Quantum Universe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The present monograph is devoted to the theory of gravitation derived consequently as joint nonlinear realization of conformal and affine symmetries by means of Cartan differential forms. In the framework of the joint nonlinear realization of conformal and affine symmetries the interpretation of the last cosmological observational data of Ia Supernovae, anisotropy of the primordial radiation temperature and the mass spectrum of electroweak bosons, including the Higgs particle mass in the expected region ~ 125 GeV, is given. All these observational and experimental data testify to the vacuum energy dominance. The vacuum Casimir energy is a source of intensive cosmological quantum creation gravitons and electroweak bosons including Higgs particles from the empty Universe during the first 10^(-12) sec. The products of decay of the electroweak bosons give the matter content of the present day Universe, including primordial radiation and its baryon asymmetry.

V. N. Pervushin; A. E. Pavlov

2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

436

Seattle University Recreation Position Description  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seattle University Recreation Position Description Title: University Recreation Operations Manager Date: 8/3/2012 Purpose of the Position The University Recreation Operations Manager assists walkthroughs of the Fitness Center · Provide on-site staff supervision in recreation facilities · Assist

Carter, John

437

Seattle University Recreation Position Description  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seattle University Recreation Position Description Title: Marketing Manager Date: 8/6/12 Purpose of Position To manage and coordinate all marketing efforts for University Recreation with primary Content Development · Info boards and frames · Promotional materials #12;Seattle University Recreation

Carter, John

438

Seattle University Recreation Position Description  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seattle University Recreation Position Description Title: Marketing Manager Date: 7/23/2013 Purpose of Position To manage and coordinate all marketing efforts for University Recreation with primary;Seattle University Recreation Position Description Title: Marketing Manager Date: 7/23/2013 Minimum

Carter, John

439

Seattle University Recreation Position Description  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seattle University Recreation Position Description Title: Aquatic Manager Date: 7/19/2012 Purpose/or participants by enforcing the policies and procedures of the University Recreation Department. Primary Duties of University Recreation - Aquatics & Risk Management and the lifeguard team · Assign tasks to staff when

Carter, John

440

Seattle University Recreation Position Description  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seattle University Recreation Position Description Title: Aquatic Manager Date: 7/23/2013 Purpose/or participants by enforcing the policies and procedures of the University Recreation Department. Primary Duties of University Recreation - Aquatics & Risk Management and the lifeguard team · Assign tasks to staff when

Carter, John

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university waste-to-energy incinerator" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Seattle University Recreation Position Description  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seattle University Recreation Position Description Title: Outdoor Adventure Recreation Program- inclusive. Duties may be added, deleted and assigned based on Assistant Director of University Recreation/patrons in a timely manner via email, phone, or other communication methods o Update University Recreation's Facebook

Carter, John

442

Seattle University Recreation Position Description  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seattle University Recreation Position Description Title: University Recreation Operations Manager Date: 7/23/2013 Purpose of the Position The University Recreation Operations Manager assists walkthroughs of the Fitness Center · Provide on-site staff supervision in recreation facilities · Assist

Carter, John

443

Colorado State University Career Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Colorado State University Career Center Director The Division of Student Affairs at Colorado State body of approximately 26,700 at a major state land grant university. Colorado State University blend of metropolitan advantages and small town friendliness. Located at the western edge of the Great

444

University of Bamberg Bamberg, Germany  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of Bamberg Bamberg, Germany About: The University of Bamberg (German: Otto-Friedrich-Universität Bamberg) in Bamberg, Germany, is simultaneously one of the oldest and one of the newest universities://www.uni-bamberg.de/?id=2697 FUN FACTS ABOUT BAMBERG The working week in Germany also includes Saturday. So, when looking

Duchowski, Andrew T.

445

Decoherence in an accelerated universe  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we study the decoherence of the semiclassical branches of an accelerated universe. We use a third quantization formalism to analyze the decoherence between two branches of a parent universe caused by their interaction with the vacuum fluctuations of the space-time and with other parent universes in a multiverse scenario.

S. Robles-Pérez; A. Alonso-Serrano; P. F. González-Díaz

2012-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

446

TRUMAN STATE UNIVERSITY ADVERTISING POLICIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TRUMAN STATE UNIVERSITY ADVERTISING POLICIES The intent of these policies is to provide Truman State University students, faculty and staff with maximum opportunity and space to advertise approved or other methods of advertising. Anything publicized on the University campus by a student organization

Gering, Jon C.

447

TRUMAN STATE UNIVERSITY ADVERTISING POLICIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TRUMAN STATE UNIVERSITY ADVERTISING POLICIES The intent of these policies is to provide Truman State University students, faculty and staff with maximum opportunity and space to advertise approved or other methods of advertising. Advertising of events at Truman State University is limited to recognized

Gering, Jon C.

448

Student Awards Simon Fraser University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Student Awards Simon Fraser University #12;SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY Simon Fraser University (SFU ­ gifts that will engage over 30,000 students and 6,500 researchers across three campuses, and strengthen our power to engage communities for the next 50 years. As part of this campaign, our goal for student

449

Annual Report University of Lethbridge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Annual Report 2012-13 University of Lethbridge #12;i University of Lethbridge 2012-13 Annual Report ACCOUNTABILITY STATEMENT The University of Lethbridge Annual Report for the year ended March 31, 2013, or fiscal implications of which we are aware have been considered in preparing this report. Original signed

Morris, Joy

450

Regional University Alliance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alliance Alliance Developed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory in collaboration with NETL-Regional University Alliance WVU National Research Center for Coal and Energy Fossil Consulting Services, Inc. The AVESTAR(tm) Center provides a state-of- the-art, highly realistic, dynamic simulator for a coal-fired power plant using Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) technology with CO 2 capture. The system is based on Invensys' DYNSIM ® software

451

University Science Highlights  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

universities/highlights/ The Office of Science is universities/highlights/ The Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, providing more than 40 percent of total funding for this vital area of national importance. It oversees - and is the principal federal funding agency of - the Nation's research programs in high-energy physics, nuclear physics, and fusion energy sciences. en {B0DFBA1D-D6A0-4920-8E73-4779F8F5ACEA}http://science.energy.gov/np/highlights/2013/np-2013-12-a/ Modeling Cosmic Nucleosynthesis First measurements of isotopes produced by Argonne's new CARIBU facility provide insight into the creation of the elements in the universe. Thu, 09

452

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminum particle combustion Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Physics, Stanford University Collection: Physics 43 POTENTIAL ADVANTAGES OF INCINERATION IN FLUIDIZED BEDS Summary: compact method for combustion of solid particles. The...

453

The Future of University Nuclear Engineering Programs and University  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Future of University Nuclear Engineering Programs and The Future of University Nuclear Engineering Programs and University Research and Training Reactors The Future of University Nuclear Engineering Programs and University Research and Training Reactors Nuclear engineering programs and departments with an initial emphasis in fission were formed in the late 1950's and 1960's from interdisciplinary efforts in many of the top research universities, providing the manpower for this technical discipline. In the same time period, for many of these programs, university nuclear reactors were constructed and began their operation, providing some of the facilities needed for research and training of students engaged in this profession. However, over the last decade, the U.S. nuclear science and engineering educational structure has not only stagnated but has reached a state of

454

The Future of University Nuclear Engineering Programs and University  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Future of University Nuclear Engineering Programs and The Future of University Nuclear Engineering Programs and University Research and Training Reactors The Future of University Nuclear Engineering Programs and University Research and Training Reactors Nuclear engineering programs and departments with an initial emphasis in fission were formed in the late 1950's and 1960's from interdisciplinary efforts in many of the top research universities, providing the manpower for this technical discipline. In the same time period, for many of these programs, university nuclear reactors were constructed and began their operation, providing some of the facilities needed for research and training of students engaged in this profession. However, over the last decade, the U.S. nuclear science and engineering educational structure has not only stagnated but has reached a state of

455

Collaborative University Research Education | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collaborative University Research Collaborative University Research SHARE Collaborative University Research ORNL scientist Jonathan Mielenz works in an anaerobic chamber used to handle biomass-degrading microbes at the Joint Institute for Biological Sciences.Source: ORNL Flickr site With a strong commitment to education, ORNL maintains relationships with many educational institutions and organizations. Many student and faculty programs are administered through Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) and include opportunities for undergraduates, graduates, postgraduates, faculty, and some pre-college students. The lab also partners with the University of Tennessee in several joint research efforts and though programs aimed at training the next generation of interdisciplinary scientists. These collaborations include:

456

University of Colorado at Boulder | University Libraries | University Libraries Staff Association LIBRARY-SPEAK CHEAT SHEET  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of Colorado at Boulder | University Libraries | University Libraries Staff Association 1 of information resources in a dynamic, collaborative environment." http://www.ala.org/alcts/ Alliance Colorado "AMRC is a rare music repository dedicated to exploring the rich tradition of American music." http://ucblibraries.colorado

Stowell, Michael

457

MARKETING GRADUATE ASSISTANT Georgia Southern University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MARKETING GRADUATE ASSISTANT Georgia Southern University Department of University Housing Job Analysis General Description: The Marketing Graduate Assistant is a University Housing staff member who is enrolled in a Georgia Southern University graduate program. The Marketing Graduate Assistant provides vital

Hutcheon, James M.

458

University of Saskatchewan Workplace Responsibilities System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of Saskatchewan Workplace Responsibilities System Department of Health, Safety & Environment University of Saskatchewan Workplace Responsibilities System Department of Health, Safety of the University of Saskatchewan (herein referred to as University), as well as its visitors, is of utmost concern

Saskatchewan, University of

459

University of Connecticut School of Medicine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of Connecticut School of Medicine Department of Psychiatry University of Connecticut Health Center, John Dempsey Hospital, Farmington CT University of Connecticut School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, UHP Outpatient Clinic, West Hartford CT University of Connecticut School

Oliver, Douglas L.

460

NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Waste-to-Energy Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency in South Korea, fueled by industrial waste (mainly fabric, wood, plastic, packaging materials

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university waste-to-energy incinerator" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Oak Ridge Associated Universities Procurement Questionnaire Applicatio...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Oak Ridge Associated Universities Procurement Questionnaire Application System Supplier Profile PIA, Oak ridge Operations Office Oak Ridge Associated Universities Procurement...

462

Toronto University Innovation Foundation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Toronto University Innovation Foundation Jump to: navigation, search Name: Toronto University Innovation Foundation Place: Canada Sector: Services Product: General Financial &...

463

Florida International University Science and Technology Workforce...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

About Us Jobs & Internships Florida International University Science and Technology Workforce Development Program Florida International University Science and Technology...

464

University at Albany Office of International Education  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Dar es Salaam: University of Dar es Salaam Trinidad and Tobago, St. Augustine: University of the West

Suzuki, Masatsugu

465

Designing Cyclic Universe Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent advances in understanding the propagation of perturbations through the transition from big crunch to big bang (esp. Tolley et al. hep-th/0306109) make it possible for the first time to consider the full set of phenomenological constraints on the scalar field potential in cyclic models of the universe. We show that cyclic models require a comparable degree of tuning to that needed for inflationary models. The constraints are reduced to a set of simple design rules including "fast-roll" parameters analogous to the "slow-roll" parameters in inflation.

Justin Khoury; Paul J. Steinhardt; Neil Turok

2003-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

466

Drexel University Temperature Sensors  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes background information and presents results related to temperature measurements in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) Drexel University Project 31091 irradiation. The objective of this test was to assess the radiation performance of new ceramic materials for advanced reactor applications. Accordingly, irradiations of transition metal carbides and nitrides were performed using the Hydraulic Shuttle Irradiation System (HSIS) in the B-7 position and in static capsules inserted into the A-3 and East Flux Trap Position 5 locations of the ATR.

K. L. Davis; D. L. Knudson; J. L. Rempe; B. M. Chase

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

MEMORANDUM OF AGREEMENT THE UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MEMORANDUM OF AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT AND THE UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT into between the University of Connecticut ("University") and the UniversityofConnecticutChapterof the American Agreement This is an agreement between the University ofConnecticut ("University') and ("Faculty Member

Alpay, S. Pamir

468

DOE Solar Decathlon: Norwich University  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Norwich University Norwich University Team website: www.nusd2013.org Photo of members of the Norwich University Solar Decathlon 2013 team standing in front of a building on campus. Enlarge image The Norwich University Solar Decathlon 2013 team (Courtesy of the Norwich University Solar Decathlon 2013 team) he Norwich University audiovisual presentation Jury Feedback Architecture Contest Market Appeal Contest Engineering Contest Communications Contest Team Deliverables Project Manual Construction Drawings Menu and Recipes Neither the United States, nor the Department of Energy, nor the Alliance for Sustainable Energy LLC, nor any of their contractors, subcontractors, or their employees make any warranty, express or implied, or assume any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or

469

NUMERICAL EXPERIMENTS WITH UNIVERSAL BARRIER ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

class of convex optimization problems, one tantalizing tool is the universal ...... of inequality constraints describing the cone Km is 30n (i.e. greater than in table.

2006-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

470

Universe creation on a computer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to provide an account of the epistemology and metaphysics of universe creation on a computer.

Gordon McCabe

2005-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

471

Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory : 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tenure-Track Position in Experimental Nuclear Physics The Department of Physics at NC State University is seeking qualified applicants for a tenure-track position in experimental...

472

Bisfuel links - Arizona State University  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arizona State University ASU Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry ASU Global Institute of Sustainability ASU Lightworks ASU School of Life Sciences Biodesign Institute Biofuels...

473

University of Delaware | About CCEI  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation About CCEI The Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation (CCEI) is a multi-institutional research center at the University of Delaware. It was...

474

University of Delaware | CCEI Partners  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Its Partner Institutions The Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation (CCEI) is a partnership between the University of Delaware, 8 academic institutions and 1 national...

475

University of Connecticut Health Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of Connecticut Health Center John Dempsey Hospital Epidemiology (Patient Identification __________________ Before the procedure, did the operator: Obtain informed consent Notify direct patient care nurse

Oliver, Douglas L.

476

NEUP Approved Universities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NEUP Approved Universities NEUP Approved Universities NEUP Approved Universities U.S. universities and colleges must apply to the U.S. Department of Energy to administer NEUP scholarships and fellowships. That is done through a separate solicitation operated by the Department of Energy's Idaho field office. If your university is not listed below, contact NEUP@inl.gov. Approved Universities Auburn University Boise State University Clemson University College of Southern Maryland Colorado School of Mines Duke University Francis Marion University Georgia Institute of Technology Idaho State University Illinois Institute of Technology Kansas State University Lakeshore Community College Linn State Technical College Massachusetts Institute of Technology Miami Dade College Missouri University of Science & Technology

477

Nuclear Energy University Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 Status 1 Status Presentation to Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee (NEAC) June 15, 2011 Michael Worley, NEUP Program Manager NEUP Funding is Program Driven Program Directed Funding Program Supported Funding Mission Supported Funding Natl. Labs Universities DOE-NE HQ Peer Review DOE NE Program Drivers 2 3 Summary of Improvements and New Programs for FY 2011 * Expand "Blue Sky" Research and Development (R&D) * Initiate Integrated Research Projects (IRP) * Expand and improve peer review data base * Evaluate adoption of NRC and NNSA Metrics as appropriate to NEUP * Conduct peer review at pre-application stage for R&D 2011 Proposed NEUP Budget - $61.8M * Program Directed Integrated Research Projects (IRP) - $12.0M (NEW)

478

Pennsylvania State University | .EDUconnections  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Old Main, Credit: George Chriss Old Main, Credit: George Chriss Research Research at Penn State Capabilities and Projects Institutes of Energy and the Environment Huck Institutes of Life Sciences Materials Research Institute Eberly College of Science Alternative Energy Research Research Publications Faculty Expertise Database Research News DOE Research Results Penn State Commencement 2012 United States Secretary of Energy Dr. Steven Chu was the commencement speaker at Penn State's Eberly College of Science 2012 spring graduation ceremony held May 5 at the Bryce Jordan Center on the University Park campus. Read more. Search this site: Search Over the past ten years, more than 28,000 graduate degrees were conferred by Penn State, including over 6,300 doctoral degrees. Resources About Penn State

479

Iowa State University | .EDUconnections  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Beardshear Hall Beardshear Hall Research Research & Economic Development Research Units ISU Technology Search Students & Research at ISU DOE ARPA-E Biofuel Project DOE Office of Science Funding ISU & Ames Lab Tech Marketing Summaries ISU research in Energy Citations Database ISU research in E-print Network Ames Laboratory is a DOE National Laboratory operated under contract by Iowa State University Physicist developing, improving designer optical materials Chemists discover proton mechanism used by flu virus to infect cells ISU, Ames Lab's Bryden & McCorkle win 2010 R&D 100 Award New tool for cell research may help unravel secrets of disease Search this site: Search ISU's vision is to lead the world in advancing the land-grant ideas of putting science, technology, and human creativity to work.

480

The Universe Adventure - Composition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Elemental Abundances Elemental Abundances Understanding Our History A Star is Born An accretion disk forms during the birth of a star. There are precise physical and chemical processes that govern the evolution of planets, stars, and galaxies. By analyzing the structure and chemical content of astronomical objects, scientists can garner valuable information about what the universe's conditions must have been like long ago in order to account for currently observed elemental ratios. Formation of a Galaxy A forming galaxy. The Composition of the Earth We can begin in our own backyard. Geologists have determined that the Earth is composed primarily of heavy elements (those containing many protons and neutrons). The crust and mantle are made up of compounds containing large traces of oxygen, nickel, aluminum, magnesium, iron, silicon, and sulfur.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university waste-to-energy incinerator" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

The Universe Adventure - Feedback  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contact Us Contact Us First Name (optional): Simpson Last Name (optional): Homer E-Mail Address (if you would like to hear back from us): How can we contact you? Occupation (high school student, physics teacher, cosmologist, et cetera): What is your occupation? Type: Type of Feedback Organization/Format Content Fundamentals of Cosmology Evidence for the Big Bang Eras of the Cosmos The Final Frontier Glossary Other Comments and Feedback: We appreciate your comments! - The Universe Adventure Team submit reset [ top ] Site Content National Science Foundation Department of Energy S.D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation [ Site Map ] optimized for Firefox [ UC Berkeley ] [ UC Berkeley Physics ] [ Particle Adventure! ] [ Contact Us ] Copyright © 2005 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Physics Division |

482

Oak Ridge Associated Universities  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

the the Office of Environmental Restoration U.S. Department of Energy RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE FORMER BLISS AND LAUGHLIN STEEL COMPANY FACILITY BUFFALO, NEW YORK J. D. BERGER Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program Energy/Environment Systems Division DRAFT REPORT APRIL 1992 c -. ..". FlLS\COPY x_.. --. RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE FORMER BLISS AND LAUGHLIN STEEL COMPANY FACILITY 110 HOPKINS STREET BUFFALO, NEW YORK Prepared by J. D. Berger Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program Energy/Environmental Systems Division Oak Ridge Associated Universities/Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-0117 Project Staff R. D. Condra D. A. Gibson M. J. Laudernan R. B. Slaten Prepared for Department of Energy

483

Florida International University | .EDUconnections  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Spotlight Archive Spotlight Archive Contact Florida International University Professors and Faculty of Interest Prof. Osama Mohammed receives IEEE Energy Conversion Award Prof. Osama Mohammed receives IEEE Energy Conversion Award Prof. Madhavan Nair's groundbreading research may lead to new hope in the battle Prof. Madhavan Nair's groundbreading research may lead to new hope in the battle against Neuro-AIDS Asst. Prof. Vagelis Hristidis awarded Google Research Award Asst. Prof. Vagelis Hristidis awarded Google Research Award Exceptional Students and Alumnus DOE Fellow Duriem Calderin on his way to DOE's Hanford Site DOE Fellow Duriem Calderin on his way to DOE's Hanford Site DOE Fellow, Rosa Ramirez hired by DOE's Environmental Management Professional De DOE Fellow, Rosa Ramirez hired by DOE's Environmental Management Professional Development Corps

484

The Universe Adventure - Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Links Links Cosmology and Space Cosmic Journey A site chronicling the history of scientific cosmology, presented by the American Institute of Physics. Hubble Ultra-Deep Field Skywalker Lets you explore the famous Hubble Deep Field photo, which is the deepest view (in the visible spectrum) into the sky to date. QuietBay Constellation Tutorial A fun and easy tutorial to familiarize yourself with the night sky. Astronomy Picture of the Day Astronomy Picture of the Day features a new image from the universe every day, with short explanations written by professional astronomers. The Solar System NASA site that includes images and profiles of the planets (plus Pluto). Earth Guide An Earth planetary science site created by the Japan Science and Technology Agency describing many of the features of Earth and its place in the

485

NANYANG TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Naing Naing Aung, Xingbo Liu Naing Naing Aung, Xingbo Liu 03-12-2012 Development of Self-Powered Wireless-Ready High Temperature Electrochemical Sensors for In-Situ Corrosion Monitoring of Boiler Tubes WestVirginiaUniversity College of Engineering and Mineral Resources DoE Award No. DE- FE0005717 Project Objectives  To develop in-situ corrosion monitoring sensors for corrosion of USC boiler tubes in next generation coal-based power systems  To develop thermal-electric based energy harvesting and telecommunication devices for the self-powered wireless ready sensor system Current Milestones July to September 2011 Initiate preliminary high-temperature electrochemical corrosion rate (ECR) probe design October to December 2011 To complete the design and construction of (ECR)

486

The Universe Adventure - Atoms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Matter and Atoms Matter and Atoms Richard Feynman "If, in some cataclysm, all of scientific knowledge were to be destroyed, and only one sentence passed on to the next generations of creatures, what statement would contain the most information in the fewest words? I believe it is that...all things are made of atoms." -Richard P. Feynman, winner of the 1965 Nobel Prize in Physics All is atoms Matter is made of atoms, and atoms are comprised of protons, neutrons, and electrons. Everything in the Universe is made of matter. Though matter exists in many different forms, each form is made out of the same basic constituents: small particles called atoms. Atoms themselves are made of smaller particles: protons, neutrons, and electrons. Protons and neutrons are composed of even smaller particles called quarks.

487

The University of Chicago,  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

a?-&= a?-&= d -j-his document consists Of............--- -,...figures pages an_d...~.....~~.....--.-----~--~~es k --ye.. No ,.... &...ot /u cople:s, 3' . . . . . . . . . . . . SERVICE & supply SUBCONTRACT # 740~37-m 115 This subcontract entered into this 1st day of.Agril 1944 by and between The University of Chicago, a corporation not for pecuniary profit organized under the laws of the State of Illinois, of Chica,o, Yontractorfl and R. Krasberg & Sons ALif Illinois (hereinafter called the g. co. a corpration organized under the laws of the State 6f. llllnols , of Chicago, llllnols (hereinafter called the ltSubcorltractorlt. VW?REAS, the Contractor has heretofore entered into a contract with the United States of America (represented by its duly designated contracting officer) under

488

Universal RFP 11202k  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AND OBJECTIVES AND OBJECTIVES UNIVERSAL MUSIC GROUP (UMG) is seeking proposals from qualified energy service providers (ESP) and generators interested in assisting us in an effort to protect the environment through the consumption of renewable electricity and to reliably meet the electrical needs of our facilities. We hope to reduce emissions and alleviate other negative environmental impacts of our energy consumption. Therefore UMG is seeking to purchase 100% green power for our facility in Santa Monica, CA. Our preference is to purchase a product with the greatest amount of new renewable generation. UMG is looking to spend the same amount it currently spends on electricity or as close to that as possible. UMG wants a fixed rate product that is not tied to the PX price. UMG will only switch electricity providers if

489

Singularity Free Rainbow Universe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Isotropic quantum cosmological perfect fluid model is studied in the formalism of Rainbow gravity. It is found that the only surviving matter degree of freedom played the role of cosmic time. It is possible to find the wave packet naturally with a suitable choice of the Rainbow functions which resulted from the superposition of the wave functions of the Schr$\\ddot{o}$dinger-Wheeler-deWitt equation. The many-worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics is applied to investigate the behavior of the scale factor and the behaviour is found to depend on the operator ordering. It is shown that the model in the Rainbow framework naturally avoids singularity and a bouncing non-singular universe is found.

Majumder, Barun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

THE UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO, MOSCOW, IDAHO The University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, a new Science building and a great ball team. #12;#12;The place to be in '63. The University o( Maho and the College of Agriculture wereorg'lnil.cd in 1901 to provide the first spokes of the University Wheel. Following. Engineering, in 190;; Law, in 1909: Mines, Forestry. Education and Business, in 1953; the wheel

O'Laughlin, Jay

491

Photo courtesy of Appalachian State University Appalachian State University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4 Report from the Appalachian State University Office of Sustainability to the American College of Sustainability Matt Parsons, Graduate Assistant Published spring 2010 A comparative survey of emissions from year to the greenhouse gas inventory completed fall 2009 by per the requirements of the American College and University

Rose, Annkatrin

492

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA The University of Southern California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

operations, in- cluding personnel matters, fiscal matters, planning, and stewardship of university re- ficer of the university. He or she is selected by, and serves at the pleasure of, the USC Board at the post- graduate level. USC also supports 350 postdoctoral fellows and trains more than 900 medical

Southern California, University of

493

National Taiwan University NTU's institutional predecessor was Taihoku Imperial University,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

students there; this fact shows that NTU has effectively transformed into a research university, and has National Taiwan University 2008/2009 #12; NTU's institutional predecessor was Taihoku Imperial-diversity Research Center. #12;331715 The total number of students at NTU, including those enrolled at the School

Wu, Yih-Min

494

1 Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden 2 Aalto University, Finland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden 2 Aalto University, Finland 3 Airbus, Spain 4 Aixtron, Sweden 36 Max Planck Society, Germany 37 Nokia Finland, Finland 38 Nokia UK, United Kingdom 39 NPL of Technology, Austria 74 VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Finland 2 / 2 #12;

Bachtold, Adrian

495

Florida Atlantic University Regulation 5.011 University Ethics.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Ethics for Public Officers and Employees, Chapter 112, Part 3, F.S., is a part of the law of the State of the collective bargaining agreement shall prevail. (3) Purchasing Activities. (a) Application. Transactions of the University and the taxpayers of the State of Florida. All University personnel engaged in purchasing

Richman, Fred

496

THE UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER UNIVERSITY HEALTH PROFESSIONALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONTRACT Between THE UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER and UNIVERSITY HEALTH PROFESSIONALS................................................................17 MATERNITY LEAVE DISABILITY LEAVE 11A CHILD CARE CALL-BACK PATIENT CARE EMERGENCIES ON-CALL URGENT SHIFT AVAILABILITY(USA) ON-CALL/CALL-BACK PROCEDURES

Oliver, Douglas L.

497

UNIVERSITY OF YORK COMMUNICATIONS OFFICE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNIVERSITY OF YORK COMMUNICATIONS OFFICE WEB OFFICE Web Strategy Date 4 February, 2003 Version 4, Press and PR Officer William Mackintosh, Web Manager #12;Web Strategy 4.4 ©University of York Page 2............................................................................................... 6 3.2 Objectives of the Web Strategy

Wirosoetisno, Djoko

498

Nottingham Trent University Financial Statements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Financial Review Regulatory Regulatory environment The University is a Higher Education Corporation Financial statements 31 July 2010 Contents Operating and Financial Review 3 Independent auditors' reportCity Limited of which the University owns one-third. Strategy When the original Strategic Plan was launched six

Evans, Paul

499

Submitted to *Xidian University, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THESIS Submitted to *Xidian University, China *Institut National des Sciences Appliquées de Rouen, France To obtain China-France Joint PhD in Discipline: PHYSICS Speciality: Energy by WANG Jiajie Shaped.09.2011 Members of the jury: Reviewers: Bai Jintao Professor, Northwest University, Xi'an, China Liu Weidong

Boyer, Edmond

500

University of Calgary Philosophy Club  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of Calgary Philosophy Club Conference Saturday November 23rd , 2013, University. SUBMISSION GUIDELINES: Please address all submissions to Walter Reid and Niall Roe at: CalgaryPhilosophy to Walter Reid and Niall Roe at CalgaryPhilosophyClub@gmail.com #12;

Calgary, University of