Sample records for university waste-to-energy incinerator

  1. EA-0952: The Louisiana State University Waste-to Energy Incinerator, Baton Rouge, Louisiana

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal for incinerating combustible, non-recyclable office wastes from Louisiana State University (LSU) administrative/academic areas and...

  2. T:\\013.ffentlichkeitsarbeit\\05.Vortrge\\32.NAWTEC 11 Florida 2003\\A_Ways to Improve the Efficiency of Waste to Energy Plants.doc Ways to Improve the Efficiency of Waste to Energy Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    of Waste to Energy Plants.doc Ways to Improve the Efficiency of Waste to Energy Plants for the Production@mvr-hh.de Abstract Up to now the emissions of waste-to-energy plants have been of major concern for the operators of waste incineration plants and the public. In Germany the emission standards for waste incineration

  3. Waste to Energy Time Activities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SEMINAR Waste to Energy Time Activities 9:30-9:40 Brief introduction of participants 9:40-10:10 Presentation of Dr. Kalogirou, "Waste to Energy: An Integral Part of Worldwide Sustainable Waste Management" 10. Sofia Bethanis, "Production of synthetic aggregates for use in structural concrete from waste to energy

  4. Waste-To-Energy Feasibility Analysis: A Simulation Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

    -4337 | www.funginstitute.berkeley.edu #12;Abstract: The search for renewable and clean energies is one to lack of credits for renewable energy sources and improper incineration technologies with high CO2 in renewable energies, with very low CO2 emis- sions, making waste- to- energy a clean source of energy

  5. CEWEP -Confederation of European Waste-to-Energy Plants Boulevard Clovis 12A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    CEWEP - Confederation of European Waste-to- Energy Plants Boulevard Clovis 12A B-1000 Brussels Tel incineration. That means that Waste-to-Energy (WtE) plants would be considered as performing energy recovery). Classifying WtE plants as recovery operations would in no way reduce these protection levels. Brussels, 13th

  6. The Current and Future Marketplace for Waste-To-Energy Cogeneration Facilities in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobs, S.

    , it is believed that 425 plants and projects will be in existence by the end of 1996. Representing a total capacity of 260,000 tons per day, by 1996 over 36% of all municipal solid waste generated in the United States will be incinerated by waste-to-energy...

  7. Air pollution control technology for municipal solid waste-to-energy conversion facilities: capabilities and research needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynch, J F; Young, J C

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three major categories of waste-to-energy conversion processes in full-scale operation or advanced demonstration stages in the US are co-combustion, mass incineration, and pyrolysis. These methods are described and some information on US conversion facilities is tabulated. Conclusions and recommendations dealing with the operation, performance, and research needs for these facilities are given. Section II identifies research needs concerning air pollution aspects of the waste-to-energy processes and reviews significant operating and research findings for the co-combustion, mass incinceration, and pyrolysis waste-to-energy systems.

  8. Waste-to-Energy Workshop Agenda

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) at the Department of Energy aims to identify and address key technical barriers to the commercial deployment of liquid transportation fuels from waste feedstocks. As a part of this effort, BETO is organizing a Waste-to-Energy Roadmapping workshop. Workshop participants will join facilitated breakout sessions to discuss anaerobic digestion, hydrothermal liquefaction, and other processes that make productive use of wastewater residuals, biosolids, foodstuffs, and organic municipal solid waste. These discussions will be synthesized and used in developing a waste-to-energy technology roadmap.

  9. AUSTRIA SHOWCASE WASTE-to-ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    &P #12;7 Waste Prevention: The Danube begins here ... © EbS, Austria #12;8 Treatment of Municipal Solid1 AUSTRIA SHOWCASE WASTE-to-ENERGY in AUSTRIA AECC Aberdeen Exhibition & Conference Center (M.I.T.) #12;2 Table of Content · Development of waste management in Austria · Status-Quo of waste

  10. Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities July 24, 2014 9:00AM to 3:30PM EDT U.S....

  11. Feasibility Study on Solid Waste to Energy Technological Aspects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

    Feasibility Study on Solid Waste to Energy Technological Aspects Yuzhong Tan College of Engineering seeks to compare and evaluate each technology by reviewing waste to energy reports and seeking.funginstitute.berkeley.edu #12; Feasibility Study on Solid Waste to Energy Technological

  12. ISWA Study Tour WASTE-TO-ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .30 pm ­ 2.00 pm Development of Municipal Solid Waste Management and Treatment Facilities in Vienna, Treatment, and Intermediate Storage - without any disposal of untreated wastes exceeding 5 % TOC and public acceptance of hazardous waste treatment and waste incineration plants (typical "lulu" projects

  13. The Conversion of Waste to Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John, T.; Cheek, L.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    quent slagging of cyclones and boilers. (3) Large fan power requirements. The gasification of solid wastes may be advantageous especially when converting equipment designed to burn oil or gas. Fixed bed gasifiers have been found to be a problem... costing $78,000 and saving $33,000/year. Fluidized beds are used for a variety of combustion applications including wood and agricultural wastes, waste treatment sludge, and chemical incineration. A fluidized bed can be used to recover non...

  14. 10/12/2009 www.wtert.gr 1 Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    The Earth Engineering Center of Columbia University, New York Members of the Thermodynamics and Transport10/12/2009 www.wtert.gr 1 Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council SYNERGIA Dr. Efstratios MANAGEMENT IN GREECE & POTENTIAL FOR WASTE - TO - ENERGY ISWA Beacon Conference - Strategic Waste Management

  15. THERMAL TREATMENT REVIEW . WTE I THERMAL TREATMENT Since the beginning of this century, global waste-to-energy capacity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    of new waste-to gasification process at an industrial scale The Waste-To-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT), headquartered at Columbia University in New York City, keeps a close watch on the thermal waste-to-energy capacity has increased steadily at the rate of about four million tonnes of MSW per year

  16. Waste-to-energy permitting sourcebook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Longwell, D.; Wegrecki, A.; Williams, D. (Bechtel Group, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States))

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental issues, regulatory processes and approvals important in obtaining a permit to construct and/or operate a waste-to-energy (WTE) facility are identified and discussed. Environmental issues include: (1) air emission levels, their control and potential impacts, (2) ash leachability, treatment, and disposal, (3) potential health risks from emissions, and (4) other issues such as need/benefit and public perception of WTE. Laws, regulations and approvals that can affect project development are identified and listed, and potential regulatory trends are discussed. A general permit acquisition plan is also presented. An analysis of environmental and regulatory data obtained from the literature, regulatory agencies, and specific projects is presented. California and Massachusetts, both with regulations generally more stringent than federal regulations and considered environmentally conservative, were selected for detailed state regulatory review. Two project case histories (Commerce Refuse-to-Energy (RTE) Project in California and SEMASS WTE Project in Massachusetts) were selected to illustrate: (1) how regulations are actually applied to a project, (2) project-specific permit and operating conditions, and (3) project-specific environmental issues. Modern WTE plots employ state-of-the-art air emission control technologies and strategies to reduce air emission is to levels below regulatory requirements and to reduce estimated health risks to within EPA's acceptable risk range. WTE ash leachate can exhibit hazardous waste characteristics, primarily lead and cadmium. However, modern landfills utilize liners and leachate collection systems to prevent infiltration of leachate into the groundwater supply. Modern WTE plants employ dry systems and have zero process wastewater discharge.

  17. The 2010 ERC Directory of Waste-to-Energy Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    . Several communities are also in the process of developing greenfield waste-to-energy facilities. The development of new capac- ity reflects the desire of local governments to exercise control of solid waste de- creased waste-to-energy capacity. In fact, policymakers are looking at the development of waste

  18. Cow2Joules: Distributed Conversion of Organic Waste to Energy Resources Background to the project THEY are undertaking at ESF DLJohnson, Feb. 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatterjee, Avik P.

    and commercial restaurant food waste supplies, offering an alternative to the composting, incineration or land for simple, stable, small-scale operations. 1 http://www.iea-biogas.net/ 2 http://www.epa.gov/epawaste/conserve/materials/organics/foodCow2Joules: Distributed Conversion of Organic Waste to Energy Resources Background to the project

  19. Residue disposal from waste-to-energy facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, P.; O'Leary, P.; Cross, F.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When considering a waste-to-energy project, some local officials believe that waste-to-energy is a complete alternative to landfilling. While these projects can reduce waste volume substantially, the process will still produce residues that must be properly handled in order to protect the environment. All systems produce fly ash and bottom ash, and some systems also produce wastewater. This article discusses alternative methods for addressing these residue control problems.

  20. Microsoft PowerPoint - Tribal Leader Forum Waste to Energy Introductio...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    LLC Tribal Leader Forum: Waste-to-Energy Introduction July 24, 2014 Randy Hunsberger Waste-to-energy Introduction Feedstocks Recycling Conversion Products and Pathways Major...

  1. Camargo Waste to Energy Power Plant Hamed Zamenian1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    are discarded in landfills. The Camargo Waste to Energy (WTE) power station is an opportunity to continue pyrolysis technology to convert organic-based wastes into valuable products like pyro-gas, pyro products. This facility provides a nearly zero-landfill carbon neutral solution to the waste management

  2. Operation and maintenance considerations for waste-to-energy systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cross, F.; O'Leary, P.; Walsh, P.

    1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article, the author discusses environmental and safety issues surrounding waste-to-energy systems. A facility can be safe and compatible with the surrounding community if management has an ethic to provide for the disposal of refuse in an economic, safe, and environmentally sound manner and the operator is trained in the proper procedures for facility operation, maintenance, troubleshooting and repair.

  3. An overview of renewable energy utilization from municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration in Taiwan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    An overview of renewable energy utilization from municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration in Taiwan by imported fuels. In this regard, renewable energy like waste-to-energy is become attractive. The objective to promote the use of MSW-to-energy. q 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Waste-to-energy

  4. Pretreatment options for waste-to-energy facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diaz, L.F.; Savage, G.M. [CalRecovery, Inc., Hercules, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes various options available for processing MSW before the material is introduced to waste-to-energy facilities. Specifically, the paper reviews the type of equipment currently available for the recovery of resources from the waste stream. In addition, the paper discusses other matters which in many cases are ignored but are extremely important for the design of the processes. Some of these matters include the use of reliable waste characterization data during conceptual design and definition of the properties and specifications of the recovered materials and/or energy forms (e.g., RDF). Finally, the paper discusses other factors that have a critical impact on the facility such as potential environmental consequences of pretreatment of the waste prior to its combustion in waste-to-energy facilities.

  5. Waste to Energy and Absorption Chiller: A Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolpert, J.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    All measured performance characteristics corresponded well to manufacturer's specifications or were within the expected range for this type of incinerator. The simplified economic analysis showed a payback of period 4.5 years. An optimized payback...

  6. Waste to Energy Developers WTED | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTED Jump to: navigation, search Name: Waste-to-Energy Developers

  7. Waste to Energy Market | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTED Jump to: navigation, search Name: Waste-to-Energy

  8. DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Overview: 2011 Waste-to-Energy Using...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Overview: 2011 Waste-to-Energy Using Fuel Cells Workshop DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Overview: 2011 Waste-to-Energy Using Fuel Cells Workshop Presentation...

  9. Report of the DOD-DOE Workshop on Converting Waste to Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DOD-DOE Workshop on Converting Waste to Energy Using Fuel Cells: Workshop Summary and Action Plan Report of the DOD-DOE Workshop on Converting Waste to Energy Using Fuel Cells:...

  10. WASTE-TO-ENERGY RESEARCH & TECHNOLOGY COUNCIL www.wtert.gr PRESS RELEASE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WASTE-TO-ENERGY RESEARCH & TECHNOLOGY COUNCIL www.wtert.gr 1 PRESS RELEASE INTERNATIONAL INTENSIVE event focus on state of the art technologies for sustainable waste management, entitled "Waste to Energy Industrial Park). About WTERT Greece (SYNERGIA): The Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council

  11. COST-BENEFIT ANALYSIS OF A WASTE TO ENERGY PLANT FOR MONTEVIDEO; AND WASTE TO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,000 hours per year), that is, a total of 640,000 tons of solid wastes per year. Montevideo, in 20101 COST-BENEFIT ANALYSIS OF A WASTE TO ENERGY PLANT FOR MONTEVIDEO; AND WASTE TO ENERGY IN SMALL-benefit analysis by the author of a waste to energy (WTE) plant in Montevideo, Uruguay; the second part

  12. Waste-to-Energy Cogeneration Project, Centennial Park

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Clay; Mandon, Jim; DeGiulio, Thomas; Baker, Ryan

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Waste-to-Energy Cogeneration Project at Centennial Park has allowed methane from the closed Centennial landfill to export excess power into the the local utility’s electric grid for resale. This project is part of a greater brownfield reclamation project to the benefit of the residents of Munster and the general public. Installation of a gas-to-electric generator and waste-heat conversion unit take methane byproduct and convert it into electricity at the rate of about 103,500 Mwh/year for resale to the local utility. The sale of the electricity will be used to reduce operating budgets by covering the expenses for streetlights and utility bills. The benefits of such a project are not simply financial. Munster’s Waste-to Energy Cogeneration Project at Centennial Park will reduce the community’s carbon footprint in an amount equivalent to removing 1,100 cars from our roads, conserving enough electricity to power 720 homes, planting 1,200 acres of trees, or recycling 2,000 tons of waste instead of sending it to a landfill.

  13. Integrated assessment of a new Waste-to-Energy facility in Central Greece in the context of regional perspectives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perkoulidis, G. [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Box 483, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Papageorgiou, A., E-mail: giou6@yahoo.g [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Box 483, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Karagiannidis, A. [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Box 483, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Kalogirou, S. [Waste to Energy Research and Technology Council (Greece)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The main aim of this study is the integrated assessment of a proposed Waste-to-Energy facility that could contribute in the Municipal Solid Waste Management system of the Region of Central Greece. In the context of this paper alternative transfer schemes for supplying the candidate facility were assessed considering local conditions and economical criteria. A mixed-integer linear programming model was applied for the determination of optimum locations of Transfer Stations for an efficient supplying chain between the waste producers and the Waste-to-Energy facility. Moreover different Regional Waste Management Scenarios were assessed against multiple criteria, via the Multi Criteria Decision Making method ELECTRE III. The chosen criteria were total cost, Biodegradable Municipal Waste diversion from landfill, energy recovery and Greenhouse Gas emissions and the analysis demonstrated that a Waste Management Scenario based on a Waste-to-Energy plant with an adjacent landfill for disposal of the residues would be the best performing option for the Region, depending however on the priorities of the decision makers. In addition the study demonstrated that efficient planning is necessary and the case of three sanitary landfills operating in parallel with the WtE plant in the study area should be avoided. Moreover alternative cases of energy recovery of the candidate Waste-to-Energy facility were evaluated against the requirements of the new European Commission Directive on waste in order for the facility to be recognized as recovery operation. The latter issue is of high significance and the decision makers in European Union countries should take it into account from now on, in order to plan and implement facilities that recover energy efficiently. Finally a sensitivity check was performed in order to evaluate the effects of increased recycling rate, on the calorific value of treated Municipal Solid Waste and the gate fee of the candidate plant and found that increased recycling efforts would not diminish the potential for incineration with energy recovery from waste and neither would have adverse impacts on the gate fee of the Waste-to-Energy plant. In general, the study highlighted the need for efficient planning in solid waste management, by taking into account multiple criteria and parameters and utilizing relevant tools and methodologies into this context.

  14. Waste-to-Energy Evaluation: U.S. Virgin Islands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, J.; Hasse, S.; Warren, A.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This NREL technical report evaluates the environmental impact and fundamental economics of waste-to-energy (WTE) technology based on available data from commercially operating WTE facilities in the United States. In particular, it considers life-cycle impacts of WTE as compared to landfill disposal and various forms of electrical generation, as well as WTE impacts on source reduction or recycling programs. In addition, it evaluates the economics and potential environmental impact of WTE in the U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI) based on existing USVI waste stream characterization data, recycling challenges unique to the USVI, and the results of cost and environmental modeling of four municipal solid waste (MSW) management options, including landfill, refuse-derived fuel (RDF) production, recycling, and gassification plus RDF.

  15. Ris-R-Report Energy Systems Analysis of Waste to Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø-R-Report Energy Systems Analysis of Waste to Energy Technologies by use of EnergyPLAN Marie Münster Risø-R-1667(EN) April 2009 #12;Author: Marie Münster Title: Energy Systems Analysis of Waste to Energy Technologies by use of EnergyPLAN Division: Systems Analysis Division Risø-R-1667(EN) April 2009

  16. Waste-to-Energy 25 Years Later: Technology with a Past, Present

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    solution Quite a Ride: UpsQuite a Ride: Ups MacArthur Resource Recovery Facility Islip, New York #12; Waste-to-energy Falls, New York #12; European Union: waste-to- energy preferable to landfills European Union directives and Consulting Federation of New York Solid Waste Associations Solid Waste/Recycling Conference Federation of New

  17. Proceedings of NAWTEC16 16th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Proceedings of NAWTEC16 16th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference May 19-21, 2008 city population, Mumbai ranks first, while Tokyo comes in eighth at over 8 million. [8] Proceedings

  18. CEWEP -Confederation of European Waste-to-Energy Plants Boulevard Clovis 12A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recovered Fuel) as a fuel in both cement kilns and power plants, dedicated Biomass Energy Plants (BEP in Renewable Electricity and Heat in TWh across Europe AD ­ Anaerobic Digestion; SRF ­ Solid Recovered Fuel; BEP ­ Biomass Energy Plants; LFG ­ Landfill Gas; WtE ­ Waste-to-Energy 1 Excluding agricultural

  19. Ris DTU 09-06-08 Waste-to-energy technologies in TIMES models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (focusing on Denmark) Long tradition for waste incineration for district heating · How to model waste that supply base-load district heating. #12;Risø DTU 09-06-08 13 Modelling new Waste for Energy Technologies-to-energy technologies in the Pan-European NEEDS- TIMES model Waste incineration for electricity and heat, landfill gas

  20. National Master Plan for Development of Waste-to-Energy in India 1 The National Master Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    by the local body. #12;2 National Master Plan for Development of Waste-to-Energy in India Out of these projects1 National Master Plan for Development of Waste-to-Energy in India 1 The National Master Plan The National Bio-energy Board (NBB), Ministry of Non-Conventional Energy Sources (MNES), is developing

  1. Copyright 2009 by ASME Proceedings of the 17th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Copyright © 2009 by ASME Proceedings of the 17th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference of each technology has the potential 1 Proceedings of the 17th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference NAWTEC17 May 18-20, 2009, Chantilly, Virginia, USA NAWTEC17-2356 #12;Copyright © 2009 by ASME

  2. Visit of Professor Avraam Karagiannidis to the Toulon Waste-to-Energy plant Toulon-France, December 11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    correspondingly). - Some heat is also being sold to a local (small) district heating network. More `heat' clientsVisit of Professor Avraam Karagiannidis to the Toulon Waste-to-Energy plant Toulon-France, December 11, 2009 The Toulon Waste-to-Energy (WTE) plant was built in 1984 and retrofitted in 1993

  3. The waste-to-energy industry`s perspective on EPA`s proposed MACT regulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferraro, F.A. [Wheelabrator Technologies Inc., Hampton, NH (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    On September 1, 1994, the US Environmental Protection Agency, under Section 129 of the Clean Air Act, proposed New Source Performance standards and Emissions guidelines for Municipal Waste Combustors. This paper will provide an overview of the proposed MACT regulations as they relate to large, mass-burn Municipal Waste Combustors. This paper will also present a view of the proposed regulations from the perspective the waste-to-energy industry as represented by the industry association, the Integrated Waste Services Association.

  4. Water-related environmental control requirements at municipal solid waste-to-energy conversion facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, J C; Johnson, L D

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water use and waste water production, water pollution control technology requirements, and water-related limitations to their design and commercialization are identified at municipal solid waste-to-energy conversion systems. In Part I, a summary of conclusions and recommendations provides concise statements of findings relative to water management and waste water treatment of each of four municipal solid waste-to-energy conversion categories investigated. These include: mass burning, with direct production of steam for use as a supplemental energy source; mechanical processing to produce a refuse-derived fuel (RDF) for co-firing in gas, coal or oil-fired power plants; pyrolysis for production of a burnable oil or gas; and biological conversion of organic wastes to methane. Part II contains a brief description of each waste-to-energy facility visited during the subject survey showing points of water use and wastewater production. One or more facilities of each type were selected for sampling of waste waters and follow-up tests to determine requirements for water-related environmental controls. A comprehensive summary of the results are presented. (MCW)

  5. Haiti: Feasibility of Waste-to-Energy Options at the Trutier Waste Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conrad, M. D.; Hunsberger, R.; Ness, J. E.; Harris, T.; Raibley, T.; Ursillo, P.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides further analysis of the feasibility of a waste-to-energy (WTE) facility in the area near Port-au-Prince, Haiti. NREL's previous analysis and reports identified anaerobic digestion (AD) as the optimal WTE technology at the facility. Building on the prior analyses, this report evaluates the conceptual financial and technical viability of implementing a combined waste management and electrical power production strategy by constructing a WTE facility at the existing Trutier waste site north of Port-au-Prince.

  6. Air pollution control systems and technologies for waste-to-energy facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Getz, N.P.; Amos, C.K. Jr.; Siebert, P.C. (Roy F. Weston, Inc., Burlington, MA (US))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the primary topics of concern to those planning, developing, and operating waste-to-energy (W-T-E) (also known as municipal waste combustors (MWCs)) facilities is air emissions. This paper presents a description of the state-of-the-art air pollution control (APC) systems and technology for particulate, heavy metals, organics, and acid gases control for W-T-E facilities. Items covered include regulations, guidelines, and control techniques as applied in the W-T-E industry. Available APC technologies are viewed in detail on the basis of their potential removal efficiencies, design considerations, operations, and maintenance costs.

  7. Waste-to-Energy and Fuel Cell Technologies Overview | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and03/02ReportWaste-to-Energy and Fuel Cell Technologies

  8. Waste-to-Energy using Fuel Cells Workshop | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and03/02ReportWaste-to-Energy and Fuel Cell Technologiesusing

  9. Waste-to-Energy: Hawaii and Guam Energy Improvement Technology Demonstration Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1DOE AwardsDNitrate Saltmilestone,Waste-to-Energy

  10. Report of the DOD-DOE Workshop on Converting Waste to Energy Using Fuel

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy at Waste-to-Energy using Fues Cells Webinar,Verizon andNo.theCells: Workshop

  11. A comparative assessment of waste incinerators in the UK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nixon, J.D., E-mail: j.nixon@kingston.ac.uk [Sustainable Environment Research Group, School of Engineering and Applied Science, Aston University, Aston Triangle, Birmingham B4 7ET (United Kingdom); Wright, D.G.; Dey, P.K. [Aston Business School, Aston University, Aston Triangle, Birmingham B4 7ET (United Kingdom); Ghosh, S.K. [Mechanical Engineering Department, Centre for Quality Management System, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032 (India); Davies, P.A. [Sustainable Environment Research Group, School of Engineering and Applied Science, Aston University, Aston Triangle, Birmingham B4 7ET (United Kingdom)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • We evaluate operational municipal solid waste incinerators in the UK. • The supply chain of four case study plants are examined and compared in detail. • Technical, financial and operational data has been gathered for the four plants. • We suggest the best business practices for waste incinerators. • Appropriate strategy choices are the major difficulties for waste to energy plants. - Abstract: The uptake in Europe of Energy from Waste (EfW) incinerator plants has increased rapidly in recent years. In the UK, 25 municipal waste incinerators with energy recovery are now in operation; however, their waste supply chains and business practices vary significantly. With over a hundred more plant developments being considered it is important to establish best business practices for ensuring efficient environmental and operational performance. By reviewing the 25 plants we identify four suitable case study plants to compare technologies (moving grate, fluidised bed and rotary kiln), plant economics and operations. Using data collected from annual reports and through interviews and site visits we provide recommendations for improving the supply chain for waste incinerators and highlight the current issues and challenges faced by the industry. We find that plants using moving grate have a high availability of 87–92%. However, compared to the fluidised bed and rotary kiln, quantities of bottom ash and emissions of hydrogen chloride and carbon monoxide are high. The uptake of integrated recycling practices, combined heat and power, and post incineration non-ferrous metal collections needs to be increased among EfW incinerators in the UK. We conclude that one of the major difficulties encountered by waste facilities is the appropriate selection of technology, capacity, site, waste suppliers and heat consumers. This study will be of particular value to EfW plant developers, government authorities and researchers working within the sector of waste management.

  12. Incinerability Index: A measure of incinerator performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thurnau, R.C.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of ten incineration tests were performed on a synthetic hazardous waste containing tetrachloroethylene, toluene, chlorobenzene, and pentachlorobenzene as principal organic hazardous components (POHCs). Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) was also injected into the mixture just prior to incineration and the resulting destruction removal efficiencies (DRE) were measured. Primary combustion chamber temperature was varied from 871C to 1249C and the oxygen concentration from 1.3 to 9.2 percent. The test data indicated poor correlations between the variables of temperature and oxygen with POHC DRE. A temperature/SF6 DRE linear relationship was observed. The research also indicated that SF6 was more difficult to incinerate than any of the other POHCs, and might represent a lower boundary for evaluating incinerator performance.

  13. Waste-to-Energy: Hawaii and Guam Energy Improvement Technology Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, J.; Gelman, R.; Tomberlin, G.; Bain, R.

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the U.S. Navy have worked together to demonstrate new or leading-edge commercial energy technologies whose deployment will support the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) in meeting its energy efficiency and renewable energy goals while enhancing installation energy security. This is consistent with the 2010 Quadrennial Defense Review report1 that encourages the use of 'military installations as a test bed to demonstrate and create a market for innovative energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies coming out of the private sector and DOD and Department of Energy laboratories,' as well as the July 2010 memorandum of understanding between DOD and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) that documents the intent to 'maximize DOD access to DOE technical expertise and assistance through cooperation in the deployment and pilot testing of emerging energy technologies.' As part of this joint initiative, a promising waste-to-energy (WTE) technology was selected for demonstration at the Hickam Commissary aboard the Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam (JBPHH), Hawaii. The WTE technology chosen is called high-energy densification waste-to-energy conversion (HEDWEC). HEDWEC technology is the result of significant U.S. Army investment in the development of WTE technology for forward operating bases.

  14. Volatilisation and oxidation of aluminium scraps fed into incineration furnaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biganzoli, Laura, E-mail: laura.biganzoli@mail.polimi.it [Politecnico di Milano, Piazza L. Da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Gorla, Leopoldo; Nessi, Simone; Grosso, Mario [Politecnico di Milano, Piazza L. Da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aluminium packaging partitioning in MSW incineration residues is evaluated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The amount of aluminium packaging recoverable from the bottom ashes is evaluated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aluminium packaging oxidation rate in the residues of MSW incineration is evaluated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 80% of aluminium cans, 51% of trays and 27% of foils can be recovered from bottom ashes. - Abstract: Ferrous and non-ferrous metal scraps are increasingly recovered from municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash and used in the production of secondary steel and aluminium. However, during the incineration process, metal scraps contained in the waste undergo volatilisation and oxidation processes, which determine a loss of their recoverable mass. The present paper evaluates the behaviour of different types of aluminium packaging materials in a full-scale waste to energy plant during standard operation. Their partitioning and oxidation level in the residues of the incineration process are evaluated, together with the amount of potentially recoverable aluminium. About 80% of post-consumer cans, 51% of trays and 27% of foils can be recovered through an advanced treatment of bottom ash combined with a melting process in the saline furnace for the production of secondary aluminium. The residual amount of aluminium concentrates in the fly ash or in the fine fraction of the bottom ash and its recovery is virtually impossible using the current eddy current separation technology. The average oxidation levels of the aluminium in the residues of the incineration process is equal to 9.2% for cans, 17.4% for trays and 58.8% for foils. The differences between the tested packaging materials are related to their thickness, mechanical strength and to the alloy.

  15. Final Report Waste Incineration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    solid waste, the composition and com- bustion of it. A main focus is on the European emission from municipal solid waste incineration. In the latter area, concepts of treatment, such as physical with municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) and the problems that occur in connection to this. The emphasis

  16. Ohio incinerator battle continues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melody, M.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste Technologies Industries (WTI; East Liverpool, Ohio) is trying to wing what it hopes will be its final battle in a 13-year, $160 million war with the government, and community and environmental groups. The company since 1980 has sought EPA approval to operate a hazardous waste incinerator in East Liverpool, Ohio. WTI late last year conducted a pre-test burn, or shakedown, during which the incinerator burned certain types of hazardous waste. The test demonstrates the incinerator's performance under normal operating conditions, Regulatory authorities, including EPA and the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OEPA), monitored activity during the shakedown, which was limited to 720 hours of operation. In accordance with RCRA requirements, the company in March conducted a trial burn to demonstrate that the incinerator meets permit standards. WTI's permit specifies three performance parameters the incinerator must meet -- particulate and hydrogen chloride emissions limits, and destruction removal efficiencies (DREs).

  17. Nuclear waste incineration technology status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ziegler, D.L.; Lehmkuhl, G.D.; Meile, L.J.

    1981-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The incinerators developed and/or used for radioactive waste combustion are discussed and suggestions are made for uses of incineration in radioactive waste management programs and for incinerators best suited for specific applications. Information on the amounts and types of radioactive wastes are included to indicate the scope of combustible wastes being generated and in existence. An analysis of recently developed radwaste incinerators is given to help those interested in choosing incinerators for specific applications. Operating information on US and foreign incinerators is also included to provide additional background information. Development needs are identified for extending incinerator applications and for establishing commercial acceptance.

  18. Energy implications of mechanical and mechanical–biological treatment compared to direct waste-to-energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cimpan, Ciprian, E-mail: cic@kbm.sdu.dk; Wenzel, Henrik

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • Compared systems achieve primary energy savings between 34 and 140 MJ{sub primary}/100 MJ{sub input} {sub waste.} • Savings magnitude is foremost determined by chosen primary energy and materials production. • Energy consumption and process losses can be upset by increased technology efficiency. • Material recovery accounts for significant shares of primary energy savings. • Direct waste-to-energy is highly efficient if cogeneration (CHP) is possible. - Abstract: Primary energy savings potential is used to compare five residual municipal solid waste treatment systems, including configurations with mechanical (MT) and mechanical–biological (MBT) pre-treatment, which produce waste-derived fuels (RDF and SRF), biogas and/or recover additional materials for recycling, alongside a system based on conventional mass burn waste-to-energy and ash treatment. To examine the magnitude of potential savings we consider two energy efficiency levels (state-of-the-art and best available technology), the inclusion/exclusion of heat recovery (CHP vs. PP) and three different background end-use energy production systems (coal condensing electricity and natural gas heat, Nordic electricity mix and natural gas heat, and coal CHP energy quality allocation). The systems achieved net primary energy savings in a range between 34 and 140 MJ{sub primary}/100 MJ{sub input} {sub waste}, in the different scenario settings. The energy footprint of transportation needs, pre-treatment and reprocessing of recyclable materials was 3–9.5%, 1–18% and 1–8% respectively, relative to total energy savings. Mass combustion WtE achieved the highest savings in scenarios with CHP production, nonetheless, MBT-based systems had similarly high performance if SRF streams were co-combusted with coal. When RDF and SRF was only used in dedicated WtE plants, MBT-based systems totalled lower savings due to inherent system losses and additional energy costs. In scenarios without heat recovery, the biodrying MBS-based system achieved the highest savings, on the condition of SRF co-combustion. As a sensitivity scenario, alternative utilisation of SRF in cement kilns was modelled. It supported similar or higher net savings for all pre-treatment systems compared to mass combustion WtE, except when WtE CHP was possible in the first two background energy scenarios. Recovery of plastics for recycling before energy recovery increased net energy savings in most scenario variations, over those of full stream combustion. Sensitivity to assumptions regarding virgin plastic substitution was tested and was found to mostly favour plastic recovery.

  19. Life cycle assessment of the environmental emissions of waste-to-energy facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Besnainou, J.; Landfield, A. [Ecobalance, Inc., Rockville, MD (United States)

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past ten years, environmental issues have become an increasing priority for both government and industry alike. In the U.S. as well as in Europe, the emphasis has gradually shifted from a site specific focus to a product specific focus. For this reason, tools are needed to scientifically assess the overall environmental performance of products and/or industrial systems. Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) belongs to that category of tools, and is used to perform this study. In numerous industrial countries, LCA is now recognized, and is rapidly becoming the tool of preference, to successfully provide quantitative and scientific analyses of the environmental impacts of industrial systems. By providing an unbiased analysis of entire systems, LCA has shown that the reality behind widely held beliefs regarding {open_quotes}green{close_quotes} issues, such as reusable vs. one way products, and {open_quotes}natural{close_quotes} vs. synthetic products, were far more complex than expected, and sometimes not as {open_quotes}green{close_quotes} as assumed. This paper describes the modeling and assumptions of an LCA, commissioned by the Integrated Waste Services Association (IWSA), that summarizes the environmental emissions of waste-to-energy facilities, and compares them to the environmental emissions generated by major combustible energy sources of the northeast part of the United States (NE). The geographical boundary for this study is, therefore, the NE US.

  20. Digital Gas Joins Asian Waste-to-Energy Consortium: To Eliminate Coal as a Power Plant Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Energy's patented technology produces a clean-burning by-product from the widest variety of processed-efficient technology represented by the coal-substitute technology. The same technology will be deployed by DIGGDigital Gas Joins Asian Waste-to-Energy Consortium: To Eliminate Coal as a Power Plant Fuel Digital

  1. Daily Gazette, Schenectady NY Letters to the Editor for Thursday, July 10, 2008 Nothing to fear, and much to gain, from waste-to-energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    , and much to gain, from waste-to-energy Schenectady is one of those misguided cities that sends its municipal solid wastes to distant landfills, costing much money, wasting valuable energy and increasing global warming and pollution of our environment. Waste-to-energy (WTE) is safe. I advised the Israel

  2. Electrochemical membrane incinerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Dennis C. (Ames, IA); Houk, Linda L. (Ames, IA); Feng, Jianren (Ames, IA)

    2001-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrochemical incineration of p-benzoquinone was evaluated as a model for the mineralization of carbon in toxic aromatic compounds. A Ti or Pt anode was coated with a film of the oxides of Ti, Ru, Sn and Sb. This quaternary metal oxide film was stable; elemental analysis of the electrolyzed solution indicated the concentration of these metal ions to be 3 .mu.g/L or less. The anode showed good reactivity for the electrochemical incineration of benzoquinone. The use of a dissolved salt matrix as the so-called "supporting electrolyte" was eliminated in favor of a solid-state electrolyte sandwiched between the anode and cathode.

  3. Electrochemical Membrane Incinerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Dennis C.; Houk, Linda L.; Feng, Jianren

    1998-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrochemical incineration of benzoquinone was evaluated as a model for the mineralization of carbon in toxic aromatic compounds. A Ti or Pt anode was coated with a film of the oxides of Ti, Ru, Sn and Sb. This quaternary metal oxide film was stable; elemental analysis of the electrolyzed solution indicated the concentration of these metal ions to be 3 {micro}g/L or less. The anode showed good reactivity for the electrochemical incineration of benzoquinone. The use of a dissolved salt matrix as the so-called ''supporting electrolyte'' was eliminated in favor of a solid-state electrolyte sandwiched between the anode and cathode.

  4. Proceedings of NAWTEC16 16th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    ) INDIA Perinaz Bhada Nickolas .J. Themelis, Department of Earth and Environmental Engineering, and Earth Engineering Center, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 ABSTRACT The city of Mumbai (Bombay), India for landfilling. When the present waste dumps were constructed they were at the outskirts of the city, but now

  5. Assessing recycling versus incineration of key materials in municipal waste: The importance of efficient energy recovery and transport distances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merrild, Hanna [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Larsen, Anna W., E-mail: awla@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Christensen, Thomas H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We model the environmental impact of recycling and incineration of household waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recycling of paper, glass, steel and aluminium is better than incineration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recycling and incineration of cardboard and plastic can be equally good alternatives. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recyclables can be transported long distances and still have environmental benefits. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Paper has a higher environmental benefit than recyclables found in smaller amounts. - Abstract: Recycling of materials from municipal solid waste is commonly considered to be superior to any other waste treatment alternative. For the material fractions with a significant energy content this might not be the case if the treatment alternative is a waste-to-energy plant with high energy recovery rates. The environmental impacts from recycling and from incineration of six material fractions in household waste have been compared through life cycle assessment assuming high-performance technologies for material recycling as well as for waste incineration. The results showed that there are environmental benefits when recycling paper, glass, steel and aluminium instead of incinerating it. For cardboard and plastic the results were more unclear, depending on the level of energy recovery at the incineration plant, the system boundaries chosen and which impact category was in focus. Further, the environmental impact potentials from collection, pre-treatment and transport was compared to the environmental benefit from recycling and this showed that with the right means of transport, recyclables can in most cases be transported long distances. However, the results also showed that recycling of some of the material fractions can only contribute marginally in improving the overall waste management system taking into consideration their limited content in average Danish household waste.

  6. Copenhagen Waste Management and Incineration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ownership of treatment facilities · Incineration plants · Land fill · Disposal of hazardous waste · Source waste prevention · Focus areas · Changes in behaviour among consumers and producers · City schemes almost fully developed · Collection of hazardous substances, paper, cardboard, gardening and bulky

  7. WASTE-TO-ENERGY RESEARCH & TECHNOLOGY COUNCIL www.wtert.gr Pre-feasibility study of a Solid Recovered Fuel (SRF) WTE Power Plant in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WASTE-TO-ENERGY RESEARCH & TECHNOLOGY COUNCIL www.wtert.gr 1 Pre-feasibility study of a Solid Recovered Fuel (SRF) WTE Power Plant in North Greece Presentation by Dr. Efstratios Kalogirou, 5 PM Friday of WTERT-Greece / SYNERGIA A pre-feasibility study will be presented of a state-of-the-art WTE power plant

  8. CCA-Treated wood disposed in landfills and life-cycle trade-offs with waste-to-energy and MSW landfill disposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    CCA-Treated wood disposed in landfills and life-cycle trade-offs with waste-to-energy and MSW February 2007 Available online 9 April 2007 Abstract Chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood is a preservative treated wood construction product that grew in use in the 1970s for both residential

  9. How Much Does That Incinerator Cost?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib; Nash, Catherine; Harman, Wyatte; Padia, Reema

    2008-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Biosecurity on poultry farms includes proper disposal of dead carcasses. In many cases, that means using an incinerator. Calculating the cost of an incinerator means considering long and short-term expenses and the cost of fuel. This publication...

  10. Waste incineration and the community -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    , metals, plastics, paper and hazardous materials from the organic portion of household waste, together the volumes collected have often exceeded the recycling capacity. Composting the organic portion has also beenWaste incineration and the community - The Amsterdam experience The successful community relations

  11. Generating Steam by Waste Incineration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, D. R.; Darrow, L. A.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Combustible waste is a significant source of steam at the new John Deere Tractor Works assembly plant in Waterloo, Iowa. The incinerators, each rated to consume two tons of solid waste per hour, are expected to provide up to 100 percent of the full...

  12. Evaluation of open pit incineration for the disposal of hydrocarbon wastes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, Stuart Ray

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Department) December 1981 ABSTRACT Evaluation of Open Pit Incine. ration For the Disposal of Hydrocarbon i&astes. (December 1981) Stuart Ray Bell, B. S. , Texas ASH University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Thomas R. Lalk The disposal... of hydrocarbon wastes using an open pit air curtain destructor (ACD) type incinerator was investigated. A prototype experi- mental incinerator was designed and constructed, and experiments were performed with it to determine the relationships among various...

  13. Controlled air incinerator conceptual design study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a conceptual design study for a controlled air incinerator facility for incineration of low level combustible waste at Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2). The facility design is based on the use of a Helix Process Systems controlled air incinerator. Cost estimates and associated engineering, procurement, and construction schedules are also provided. The cost estimates and schedules are presented for two incinerator facility designs, one with provisions for waste ash solidification, the other with provisions for packaging the waste ash for transport to an undefined location.

  14. Method and apparatus for incinerating hazardous waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korenberg, Jacob (York, PA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An incineration apparatus and method for disposal of infectious hazardous waste including a fluidized bed reactor containing a bed of granular material. The reactor includes a first chamber, a second chamber, and a vertical partition separating the first and second chambers. A pressurized stream of air is supplied to the reactor at a sufficient velocity to fluidize the granular material in both the first and second chambers. Waste materials to be incinerated are fed into the first chamber of the fluidized bed, the fine waste materials being initially incinerated in the first chamber and subsequently circulated over the partition to the second chamber wherein further incineration occurs. Coarse waste materials are removed from the first chamber, comminuted, and recirculated to the second chamber for further incineration. Any partially incinerated waste materials and ash from the bottom of the second chamber are removed and recirculated to the second chamber for further incineration. This process is repeated until all infectious hazardous waste has been completely incinerated.

  15. Ash Chemistry in MSW Incineration Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ash Chemistry in MSW Incineration Plants: Advanced Characterization and Thermodynamic Introduction to Municipal Solid Waste Incineration 2 Chapter 2 Plants Considered and Samples Collected 5 Chapter 3 Mapping of Ash Chemistry in MSWI Plants 8 Chapter 4 Advanced Characterization Methods 12 4

  16. Apparatus for incinerating hazardous waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, R.C.W.

    1994-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus is described for incinerating wastes, including an incinerator having a combustion chamber, a fluid-tight shell enclosing the combustion chamber, an afterburner, an off-gas particulate removal system and an emergency off-gas cooling system. The region between the inner surface of the shell and the outer surface of the combustion chamber forms a cavity. Air is supplied to the cavity and heated as it passes over the outer surface of the combustion chamber. Heated air is drawn from the cavity and mixed with fuel for input into the combustion chamber. The pressure in the cavity is maintained at least approximately 2.5 cm WC higher than the pressure in the combustion chamber. Gases cannot leak from the combustion chamber since the pressure outside the chamber (inside the cavity) is higher than the pressure inside the chamber. The apparatus can be used to treat any combustible wastes, including biological wastes, toxic materials, low level radioactive wastes, and mixed hazardous and low level transuranic wastes. 1 figure.

  17. Apparatus for incinerating hazardous waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Robert C. W. (Martinez, GA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for incinerating wastes, including an incinerator having a combustion chamber, a fluidtight shell enclosing the combustion chamber, an afterburner, an off-gas particulate removal system and an emergency off-gas cooling system. The region between the inner surface of the shell and the outer surface of the combustion chamber forms a cavity. Air is supplied to the cavity and heated as it passes over the outer surface of the combustion chamber. Heated air is drawn from the cavity and mixed with fuel for input into the combustion chamber. The pressure in the cavity is maintained at least approximately 2.5 cm WC (about 1" WC) higher than the pressure in the combustion chamber. Gases cannot leak from the combustion chamber since the pressure outside the chamber (inside the cavity) is higher than the pressure inside the chamber. The apparatus can be used to treat any combustible wastes, including biological wastes, toxic materials, low level radioactive wastes, and mixed hazardous and low level transuranic wastes.

  18. Characterization of ash residues from 15 waste-to-energy facilities pursuant to the May, 1994 U.S. EPA ``Sampling and analysis of municipal refuse incineration ash`` guidance document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, J.; Lyons, M. [Wheelabrator Environmental Systems Inc., Hampton, NH (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Wheelabrator Environmental Systems Inc. (Wheelabrator) currently owns and/or operates 21 power plants, 15 of which are municipal waste combustion (MWC) facilities. In response to a May, 1994 US Supreme Court decision, all MWC facilities are required by the US Environmental Protection (EPA) to determine if the facility ash residues are hazardous waste. This paper presents the results of ash characterizations done at Wheelabrator MWC facilities. All Wheelabrator MWC facilities are equipped with WES-PHix{reg_sign} ash stabilization systems. The ash from these facilities consistently yields test results well below regulatory thresholds. However, installing a state-of-the-art ash stabilization system does not guarantee that ash is accurately characterized. Proper sampling protocols and proper analytical technique are critical to insuring accurate characterization. This paper identifies typical issues encountered during sample collection, sample preparation, an toxicity test extraction procedures. The consistently low toxicity test results for ash from Wheelabrator facilities can be attributed to the effectiveness of the WES-PHix{reg_sign} ash stabilization process. The sample collection protocols developed by Wheelabrator, and proper toxicity test extraction and analytical procedures followed by the laboratories, ensure accurate characterization.

  19. Quantifying capital goods for waste incineration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brogaard, L.K., E-mail: lksb@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Building 115, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Riber, C. [Ramboll, Consulting Engineers, Hannemanns Allé 53, DK-2300 Copenhagen S (Denmark); Christensen, T.H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Building 115, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • Materials and energy used for the construction of waste incinerators were quantified. • The data was collected from five incineration plants in Scandinavia. • Included were six main materials, electronic systems, cables and all transportation. • The capital goods contributed 2–3% compared to the direct emissions impact on GW. - Abstract: Materials and energy used for the construction of modern waste incineration plants were quantified. The data was collected from five incineration plants (72,000–240,000 tonnes per year) built in Scandinavia (Norway, Finland and Denmark) between 2006 and 2012. Concrete for the buildings was the main material used amounting to 19,000–26,000 tonnes per plant. The quantification further included six main materials, electronic systems, cables and all transportation. The energy used for the actual on-site construction of the incinerators was in the range 4000–5000 MW h. In terms of the environmental burden of producing the materials used in the construction, steel for the building and the machinery contributed the most. The material and energy used for the construction corresponded to the emission of 7–14 kg CO{sub 2} per tonne of waste combusted throughout the lifetime of the incineration plant. The assessment showed that, compared to data reported in the literature on direct emissions from the operation of incinerators, the environmental impacts caused by the construction of buildings and machinery (capital goods) could amount to 2–3% with respect to kg CO{sub 2} per tonne of waste combusted.

  20. Waste Not, Want Not: Analyzing the Economic and Environmental Viability of Waste-to-Energy (WTE) Technology for Site-Specific Optimization of Renewable Energy Options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Funk, K.; Milford, J.; Simpkins, T.

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste-to-energy (WTE) technology burns municipal solid waste (MSW) in an environmentally safe combustion system to generate electricity, provide district heat, and reduce the need for landfill disposal. While this technology has gained acceptance in Europe, it has yet to be commonly recognized as an option in the United States. Section 1 of this report provides an overview of WTE as a renewable energy technology and describes a high-level model developed to assess the feasibility of WTE at a site. Section 2 reviews results from previous life cycle assessment (LCA) studies of WTE, and then uses an LCA inventory tool to perform a screening-level analysis of cost, net energy production, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and conventional air pollution impacts of WTE for residual MSW in Boulder, Colorado. Section 3 of this report describes the federal regulations that govern the permitting, monitoring, and operating practices of MSW combustors and provides emissions limits for WTE projects.

  1. Biosludge Incineration - A Program for Energy Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Compernolle, R. V.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste biosludge generated in Shell's Deer Park Manufacturing Complex aqueous effluent treatment facilities is disposed of by on-site incineration. In 1981, an energy conservation program resulted in a 48 percent reduction in natural gas consumption...

  2. Waste Heat Boilers for Incineration Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganapathy, V.

    Incineration is a widely used process for disposing of solid, liquid and gaseous wastes generated in various types of industries. In addition to destroying pollutants, energy may also be recovered from the waste gas streams in the form of steam...

  3. A technical look at the WTI incinerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EPA has granted Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) temporary authorization to burn hazardous waste in its new incinerator in East Liverpool, Ohio. The approval is based on preliminary data showing that the incinerator was able to meet EPA`s emission standards for dioxins and furans in tests run this summer. WTI is allowed to continue burning waste pending final evaluation of its March 1993 performance tests. The action marks yet another hurdle cleared by WTI in its 11-year effort to construct and operate a commercial hazardous waste incinerator. The facility`s long-standing predicament as a target for environmental and public interest groups has made it the subject of numerous lawsuits and many legal reviews. In this article, however, we focus on the technical aspects of the system. The WTI incinerator is described in {open_quotes}Performance Testing of a Rotary Kiln Incinerator,{close_quotes} a paper by Alfred Sigg of Von Roll, Incorporated (Norcross, Georgia). The paper was presented at the 1993 Incineration Conference, which was held in Knoxville, Tennessee on May 3-7, 1993. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  4. Waste to Energy: Biogas CHP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fuel to generate electricity, DWU?s Biogas has the potential to reduce the City of Dallas? total grid derived electricity consumption by almost 4% DWU 7% Reduction (30,000,000 kWh/Year) 430,000,000 kWh / Year 60% Reduction (30,000,000 kWh/Year...) 50,000,000 kWh / Year CITY 790,000,000 kWh/Year 4% Reduction (30,000,000 kWh / Year) SOUTHSIDE WWTP Benefits of the Project to the City ? The City will reduce its grid derived electricity needs by approximately 30,000,000 kWh per year...

  5. Technology documentation for selected radwaste incineration systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ziegler, D.L. (comp.)

    1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several incineration systems have been developed and demonstrated on a production scale for combustion of radioactive waste from contractor operated Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Demonstrated operating information and engineered design information is documented in this report on four of these systems; the Cyclone Incinerator (CI), Fluidized Bed Incinerator (FBI), Controlled-Air Incinerator (CAI) and Electric Controlled Air Incinerator (ECAI). The CI, FBI and CAI have been demonstrated with actual contaminated plant waste and the ECAI has been demonstrated with simulated waste using dysprosium oxide as a stand-in for plutonium oxide. The weight and volume reduction that can be obtained by each system processing typical solid plant transuranic (TRU) waste has been presented. Where a given system has been tested for other applications, such as combustion of resins, TBP-solvent mixtures, organic liquids, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB), resuts of these experiments have been included. This document is a compilation of reports prepared by the operating contractor personnel responsible for development of each of the systems. In addition, as a part of the program management responsibility, the Transuranic Waste System Office (TWSO) has provided an overview of the contractor supplied information.

  6. As of: September 2005 Waste Incineration --A Potential Danger?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    As of: September 2005 Waste Incineration -- A Potential Danger? Bidding Farewell to Dioxin Spouting #12;2 Waste Incineration -- A Potential Danger? Bidding Farewell to Dioxin Spouting In the eighties

  7. Energy utilization: municipal waste incineration. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaBeck, M.F.

    1981-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    An assessment is made of the technical and economical feasibility of converting municipal waste into useful and useable energy. The concept presented involves retrofitting an existing municipal incinerator with the systems and equipment necessary to produce process steam and electric power. The concept is economically attractive since the cost of necessary waste heat recovery equipment is usually a comparatively small percentage of the cost of the original incinerator installation. Technical data obtained from presently operating incinerators designed specifically for generating energy, documents the technical feasibility and stipulates certain design constraints. The investigation includes a cost summary; description of process and facilities; conceptual design; economic analysis; derivation of costs; itemized estimated costs; design and construction schedule; and some drawings.

  8. Process converts incineration slag into stabilized residue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thauront, J.; Deneux-Mustin, S. (EMC-Services, Paris (France)); Durecu, S. (EMC-Services, Vandoeuvre-Les Nancy (France)); Fraysse, G. (EMC-Services, Saint-Vulbas (France)); Berthelin, J. (Centre de Pedologie Biologique, Vandoeuvre-Les Nancy (France))

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During 1973 and 1974, EMC-Services designed and built a physico-chemical treatment plant in Hombourg, in France's Alsatian region. The plant is still in operation. Since then, EMC-Services has developed substantial experience in environmental projects, becoming one of the top companies internationally with experience and practice in designing, building and operating hazardous waste treatment plants. EMC-Services operates in France in Salaise, Strasbourg, Mitry-Mory, and Saint-Vulbas, where eight incinerators treat solid, liquid, highly halogenated and nonhazardous industrial waste. The incinerators, built or updated by EMC-Services, have a total capacity of about 200,000 tons per year. In the new process, incineration of special industrial wastes produces non-volatilized solid residue or slag, which is sent for disposal, in compliance with regulations, to special disposal plants. Future European regulations will incorporate landfilling criteria requiring such slag to be stabilized.

  9. Waste incinerator to be built on campus By GAVIN WILSON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Anthony P.

    I::---- - - . . Waste incinerator to be built on campus ~~~ By GAVIN WILSON UBC hasapplied streaming of other waste products." The incinerators will be used to dispose of waste solvents and bio. "It is the sensible thing to bring these materials to UBC rather than building three incinerators

  10. An integrated analytical framework for quantifying the LCOE of waste-to-energy facilities for a range of greenhouse gas emissions policy and technical factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Townsend, Aaron K., E-mail: aarontownsend@utexas.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C2200, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Webber, Michael E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C2200, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This study presents a novel integrated method for considering the economics of waste-to-energy (WTE) facilities with priced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions based upon technical and economic characteristics of the WTE facility, MSW stream, landfill alternative, and GHG emissions policy. The study demonstrates use of the formulation for six different policy scenarios and explores sensitivity of the results to ranges of certain technical parameters as found in existing literature. The study shows that details of the GHG emissions regulations have large impact on the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) of WTE and that GHG regulations can either increase or decrease the LCOE of WTE depending on policy choices regarding biogenic fractions from combusted waste and emissions from landfills. Important policy considerations are the fraction of the carbon emissions that are priced (i.e. all emissions versus only non-biogenic emissions), whether emissions credits are allowed due to reducing fugitive landfill gas emissions, whether biogenic carbon sequestration in landfills is credited against landfill emissions, and the effectiveness of the landfill gas recovery system where waste would otherwise have been buried. The default landfill gas recovery system effectiveness assumed by much of the industry yields GHG offsets that are very close to the direct non-biogenic GHG emissions from a WTE facility, meaning that small changes in the recovery effectiveness cause relatively larger changes in the emissions factor of the WTE facility. Finally, the economics of WTE are dependent on the MSW stream composition, with paper and wood being advantageous, metal and glass being disadvantageous, and plastics, food, and yard waste being either advantageous or disadvantageous depending upon the avoided tipping fee and the GHG emissions price.

  11. 1. DET BEGYNDTE P FREDERIKSBERG INCINERATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    with district heating. The heat was produced on the basis of waste collected in the municipality. The original district heating plant was therefore also Denmark's first incineration plant, and waste has in fact been . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PAGE 30 3. FROM DISTRICT HEATING TO COMBINED HEAT AND POWER 1990 - 2003 CHP AGAIN

  12. Incineration of biological sludge in a fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ku, W.C.P.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Incineration rate, ash properties, and percentage destruction of the combustible material were evaluated under different operating conditions. Experimental measurements were made for temperature, air flow rate, sludge size, ash size and sludge composition. A model based on the heat transfer consideration was derived to describe the drying and devolatilization process during sludge incineration. The model assumes that the drying and devolatilization of a sludge particle is manly caused by the heat flowing into the sludge particle from the bed. Parameters affecting the simulation results included sludge size, inert particle size, sludge heat capacity, sludge heat conductivity, operating flow rate and incinerator temperature. A model developed to simulate a batch type air-sand fluidized bed considered the incineration process as being composed of three consecutive operations, namely, drying, devolatilization, and char combustion. The simulation model predicted the dynamic characteristics of sludge incineration in the bed including its percentage completion and the incinerator temperature. The effects of sludge moisture level, sludge size and incinerator operating conditions on the incinerator behavior were also evaluated. The model developed to simulate the behavior of a fluidized bed incinerator under continuous operation was capable of predicting the time to reach steady state, the stack gas composition, the percentage combustion and the auxiliary heat required under various operating conditions, including sludge feed rate and size, air feed rate, and incinerator temperature.

  13. Ohio incinerator given the go-ahead

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kemezis, P.

    1992-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A federal judge has denied a request for an injunction against the startup of the long-stalled Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) commercial hazardous waste incinerator in East Liverpool, OH. The $140-million plant, owned by a US subsidiary of Swiss engineering group Von Roll Ltd. (Zuerich), will go through a startup stage and a seven-day trial burn during the next two months, according to WTI. In testimony in federal court in Huntington, WV, WTI had said it was losing $115,000/day in fixed costs because of the plant's startup delay. The company also said that long-term contracts with Chemical Waste Management (CWM; Oak Brook, IL), Du Pont (Wilmington, DE), and BASF Corp. (Parsippany, NJ) to use plant services could be jeopardized by the delay. WTI is believed to have 10-year service contracts with the three companies and also will use CWM to dispose of the ash from the incinerator.

  14. Waste IncIneratIon and Waste PreventIon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and heat. In 2005/2006, German waste incineration plants provided some 6 terawatt hours (TWh-/Abfallgesetz) continues to hold: Waste prevention has priority over recovery and disposal. Nevertheless, the use of waste for en- ergy recovery is an indispensable element of sus- tainable waste management. Waste incineration

  15. THERMODYNAMIC STUDY OF HEAVY METALS BEHAVIOUR DURING MUNICIPAL WASTE INCINERATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    THERMODYNAMIC STUDY OF HEAVY METALS BEHAVIOUR DURING MUNICIPAL WASTE INCINERATION Y. ME´ NARD, A Me´tallurgie (LSG2M) Nancy, France T he incineration of municipal solid waste (MSW) contributes occurring during waste combustion. Second, results from the bed model were taken as boundary conditions

  16. Metal volatilization and separation during incineration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ho, T.C.; Chu, H.W.; Hopper, J.R. (Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) has reported that metals can account for almost all of the identified risks from a thermal treatment process. Fundamental research leading to better understanding of their behavior and improved control of their emissions is greatly needed. This paper reports studies on metal volatilization and separation during incineration. Metal volatilization studies were carried out in two separate experiments. In the first experiment, the dynamic volatilization characteristics of various metals during the combustion of metal-containing wood pellets were investigated in a high-temperature electric furnace. In addition to uncontrolled volatilization, the potential of employing chemical additives to bind metals and prevent them from volatilizing during combustion was also investigated. The second experiment involved the investigation of metal volatilization characteristics during the thermal treatment of metal-contaminated clay in a fluidized bed unit. The metal species tested in both experiments were compounds of lead and cadmium. Metal capture/separation studies were also carried out in two separate experiments. The first involved the use of sorbents in the combustion chamber to capture metals during the fluidized bed incineration of metal-containing wood pellets. The second experiments, however, employed sorbents to absorb metal vapors in a fluidized-bed waste-heat boiler. The objective of both the experiments is to characterize the metal absorption efficiency associated with the processes.

  17. Waste Incineration in China page 1 Figure 1: Visit to MWI in Harbin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Waste Incineration in China page 1 Figure 1: Visit to MWI in Harbin Waste Incineration in China Balz Solenthaler, Rainer Bunge Summary China currently operates 19 municipal waste incinerators (MWI of the low calorific value of the waste (approx. 5 MJ/kg), incineration on a fluidized bed and the addition

  18. Hot Issue and Burning Options in Waste Management: A Social Cost Benefit Analysis of Waste-to-Energy in the UK.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jamasb, Tooraj; Kiamil, H; Nepal, R

    transportation = €0.163 Total = €0.47 - €2.65 f) Coal fired plant generating electricity Investment and O&M = €25.642 CO2 = €9.5 (low) - €44.89 (high)4 Damage from other pollutants = €13.744 Total = €23.24 - €58.63 Notes: 1. European Commission (2000... Rabindra Nepal Bremer Energie Institut, Jacobs University Bremen 3 January 2008 Acknowledgements We acknowledge the support of the ESRC Electricity Policy Research Group. Authors are grateful for constructive comments from an anonymous...

  19. The Control of NOx Emissions from Combustion and Incinerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heap, M. P.; Chen, S. L.; Seeker, W. R.; Pershing, D. W.

    control technologies such as staged combustion and flue gas recirculation may not be applicable to waste incinerators since these control methods tend to increase emissions of potentially toxic organics. This paper summarizes the results of a study...THE CONTROL OF NO x EMISSIONS FROM COMBUSTORS AND INCINERATORS M. P. HEAP, S. L. CHEN, W. R. SEEKER, AND D. W. PERSHING Energy and Environmental Research Corporation 18 Mason, Irvine, California 92718 ABSTRACT The effectiveness...

  20. Stabilization/solidification of TSCA incinerator ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spence, R.D.; Trotter, D.R.; Francis, C.L.; Morgan, I.L.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stabilization/solidification is a well-known waste treatment technique that utilizes different additives and processes. The Phoenix Ash Technology of the Technical Innovation Development Engineering Company is such a technique that uses Cass C fly ash and mechanical pressure to make brick waste forms out of solid wastes, such as the bottom ash from the Toxic Substances Control Act incinerator at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site. One advantage of this technique is that no volume increase over the bulk volume of the bottom ash occurs. This technique should have the same high pH stabilization for Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals as similar techniques. Also, consolidation of the bottom ash minimizes the potential problems of material dispersion and container corrosion. The bottom ash was spiked with {sup 99}{Tc} to test the effectiveness of the bricks as a physical barrier. The {sup 99}{Tc} leachability index measured for these bricks was 6.8, typical for the pertechnetate anion in cementitious waste forms, indicating that these bricks have accessible porosity as high as that of other cementitious waste forms, despite the mechanical compression, higher waste form density, and water resistant polymer coating.

  1. Environmental impacts of residual Municipal Solid Waste incineration: A comparison of 110 French incinerators using a life cycle approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beylot, Antoine, E-mail: a.beylot@brgm.fr; Villeneuve, Jacques

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • 110 French incinerators are compared with LCA based on plant-specific data. • Environmental impacts vary as a function of plants energy recovery and NO{sub x} emissions. • E.g. climate change impact ranges from ?58 to 408 kg CO{sub 2}-eq/tonne of residual MSW. • Implications for LCA of waste management in a decision-making process are detailed. - Abstract: Incineration is the main option for residual Municipal Solid Waste treatment in France. This study compares the environmental performances of 110 French incinerators (i.e. 85% of the total number of plants currently in activity in France) in a Life Cycle Assessment perspective, considering 5 non-toxic impact categories: climate change, photochemical oxidant formation, particulate matter formation, terrestrial acidification and marine eutrophication. Mean, median and lower/upper impact potentials are determined considering the incineration of 1 tonne of French residual Municipal Solid Waste. The results highlight the relatively large variability of the impact potentials as a function of the plant technical performances. In particular, the climate change impact potential of the incineration of 1 tonne of waste ranges from a benefit of ?58 kg CO{sub 2}-eq to a relatively large burden of 408 kg CO{sub 2}-eq, with 294 kg CO{sub 2}-eq as the average impact. Two main plant-specific parameters drive the impact potentials regarding the 5 non-toxic impact categories under study: the energy recovery and delivery rate and the NO{sub x} process-specific emissions. The variability of the impact potentials as a function of incinerator characteristics therefore calls for the use of site-specific data when required by the LCA goal and scope definition phase, in particular when the study focuses on a specific incinerator or on a local waste management plan, and when these data are available.

  2. Alternatives to incineration. Technical area status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwinkendorf, W.E. [BDM Federal, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); McFee, J.; Devarakonda, M. [International Technology Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nenninger, L.L.; Fadullon, F.S. [Science Applications International Corp., Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Donaldson, T.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dickerson, K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); [Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, the DOE`s Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP) (superseded by the Mixed Waste Focus Area) initiated an evaluation of alternatives to incineration to identify technologies capable of treating DOE organically contaminated mixed wastes and which may be more easily permitted. These technologies have the potential of alleviating stakeholder concerns by decreasing off-gas volurties and the associated emissions of particulates, volatilized metals and radionuclides, PICs, NO{sub x}, SO{sub x}, and recombination products (dioxins and furans). Ideally, the alternate technology would be easily permitted, relatively omnivorous and effective in treating a variety of wastes with varying constituents, require minimal pretreatment or characterization, and be easy to implement. In addition, it would produce secondary waste stream volumes significantly smaller than the original waste stream, and would minimize the environmental health and safety effects on workers and the public. The purpose of this report is to provide an up-to-date (as of early 1995) compendium of iternative technologies for designers of mixed waste treatment facilities, and to identify Iternate technologies that may merit funding for further development. Various categories of non-thermal and thermal technologies have been evaluated and are summarized in Table ES-1. Brief descriptions of these technologies are provided in Section 1.7 of the Introduction. This report provides a detailed description of approximately 30 alternative technologies in these categories. Included in the report are descriptions of each technology; applicable input waste streams and the characteristics of the secondary, or output, waste streams; the current status of each technology relative to its availability for implementation; performance data; and costs. This information was gleaned from the open literature, governments reports, and discussions with principal investigators and developers.

  3. A solution to level 3 dismantling of gas-cooled reactors: Graphite incineration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubourg, M. [FRAMATOME, Paris-La Defense (France)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an approach developed to solve the specific decommissioning problems of the G2 and G3 gas cooled reactors at Marcoule and the strategy applied with emphasis in incinerating the graphite core components, using a fluidized-bed incinerator developed jointly between the CEA and FRAMATOME. The incineration option was selected over subsurface storage for technical and economic reasons. Studies have shown that gaseous incineration releases are environmentally acceptable.

  4. Design and performance of a fluidized-bed incinerator for TRU combustible wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meile, L.J.; Meyer, F.G.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Problems encountered in the incineration of glovebox generated waste at Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) led to the development of a fluidized-bed incineration (FBI) system for transuranic (TRU) combustible wastes. Laboratory and pilot-scale testing of the process preceded the installation of an 82-kg/h production demonstration incinerator at RFP. The FBI process is discussed, and the design of the demonstration incinerator is described. Operating experience and process performance for both the pilot and demonstration units are presented.

  5. Control Engineering Practice 10 (2002) 315326 MIMO closed-loop identification of an MSW incinerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van den Hof, Paul

    incinerator M. Leskensa, *, L.B.M. Van Kessela , P.M.J. Van den Hof b a TNO Environment, Energy and Process of a specific system identification procedure to a municipal solid waste (MSW) incinerator is discussed that with the proposed identification procedure a model of the MSW incinerator is obtained which, according to system

  6. Spatial analysis of health effects of large industrial incinerators in England,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diggle, Peter J.

    Spatial analysis of health effects of large industrial incinerators in England, 1998­2008: a study of large industrial incinerators in England, 1998­2008: a study using matched case­control areas. BMJ Open to industrial incinerators in England is associated with increased risk of cancer incidence and mortality

  7. Dechlorination ability of municipal waste incineration fly ash for polychlorinated phenols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirkva, Vladimir

    Dechlorination ability of municipal waste incineration fly ash for polychlorinated phenols Leona incineration fly ash at 200 °C under nitrogen atmosphere. Thermodynamic calculations have been carried out ash produced by municipal waste incineration (MWI) have clearly demonstrated that MWI fly ash can

  8. Waste-to-Energy Road Mapping Workshop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to fueling station Pipeline Injection Users must purchase fuel at generation site - Wholesale or retail pricing, limited market Users can purchase fuel at convenient site;...

  9. Waste-to-Energy Design Proposal for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    and the amount of waste exported out of New York City by truck, train or barge to out-of-state landfills would be reduced by 15%. The installation of state-of-the-art emission control technologies at the facility would reduce gaseous emissions well below standards established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

  10. Waste To Energy -Strategies and Payoffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, J. S.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    :lIlior There has been a tremendous interest over the past few years in gas turbine based systems. Aircraft derivative engines are now available that can rival utility electric generation heat rates. We have even heard of hardware designed to run on gas ified... of system is a combined cycle power generation system. An example is shown in Figure 4. Gas-Turbine-Based System Schematic _lng_ G?? or 0" Domestic Unheated W.ler _S.!!~J Hoi W.ler I I~Coollng IHoIElthllust -~ - W.let AI, N.tur.1 Otis or Fuel OM...

  11. Waste-to-Energy | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradley Nickell Director ofDepartmentDRAFT -WasteinThisThis

  12. Waste to Energy Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTED Jump to: navigation, search Name: Waste-to-Energyto Energy

  13. Waste to Energy | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTED Jump to: navigation, search Name: Waste-to-Energyto

  14. Waste to Energy Technology | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening aTurbulenceUtilizeRural PublicRatesAbout Us >

  15. Rubber lining for FGD scrubbers for waste incinerator plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rullmann, H.E. [Smith Corrosion Services, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flue gas desulfurization scrubbers for waste incineration plants can be lined with soft rubber or hard rubber for corrosion protection. Hard rubber is cured under high temperature and pressure in an autoclave. The advantage of hard rubber is the excellent temperature and chemical resistance. The authors have experience with hard rubber lined scrubbers that are in service without failures for over 20 years.

  16. Evaluation of Vitrification Processing Step for Rocky Flats Incinerator Ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wigent, W.L.; Luey, J.K.; Scheele, R.D.; Li, H.

    1999-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1997, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) staff developed a processing option for incinerator ash at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Sites (RFETS). This work was performed with support from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Safe Sites of Colorado (SSOC). A description of the remediation needs for the RFETS incinerator ash is provided in a report summarizing the recommended processing option for treatment of the ash (Lucy et al. 1998). The recommended process flowsheet involves a calcination pretreatment step to remove carbonaceous material followed by a vitrification processing step for a mixture of glass tit and calcined incinerator ash. Using the calcination pretreatment step to remove carbonaceous material reduced process upsets for the vitrification step, allowed for increased waste loading in the final product, and improved the quality of the final product. Figure 1.1 illustrates the flow sheet for the recommended processing option for treatment of RFETS incinerator ash. In 1998, work at PNNL further developed the recommended flow sheet through a series of studies to better define the vitrification operating parameters and to address secondary processing issues (such as characterizing the offgas species from the calcination process). Because a prototypical rotary calciner was not available for use, studies to evaluate the offgas from the calcination process were performed using a benchtop rotary calciner and laboratory-scale equipment (Lucy et al. 1998). This report focuses on the vitrification process step after ash has been calcined. Testing with full-scale containers was performed using ash surrogates and a muffle furnace similar to that planned for use at RFETS. Small-scale testing was performed using plutonium-bearing incinerator ash to verify performance of the waste form. Ash was not obtained from RFETS because of transportation requirements to calcine the incinerator ash prior to shipment of the material. Because part of PNNL's work was to characterize the ash prior to calcination and to investigate the effect of calcination on product quality, representative material was obtained from LANL. Ash obtained from LANL was selected based on its similarity to that currently stored at RFETS. The plutonium-bearing ashes obtained from LANL are likely from a RFETS incinerator, but the exact origin was not identified.

  17. Siting landfills and incinerators in areas of historic unpopularity: Surveying the views of the next generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Feo, Giovanni, E-mail: g.defeo@unisa.it [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II 132, 84084 Fisciano (Italy); Williams, Ian D. [Waste Management Research Group, Faculty of Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • Opinions and knowledge of young people in Italy about waste were studied. • Historic opposition to construction of waste facilities is difficult to overcome. • Awareness of waste management develops with knowledge of environmental issues. • Many stakeholders’ views are needed when siting a new waste management facility. • Respondents’ opinions were influenced by their level of environmental knowledge. - Abstract: The Campania Region in Southern Italy has suffered many problems with municipal solid waste management since the mid-1990s, leading to significant public disturbances and subsequent media coverage. This paper reports on the current views and knowledge of young people (university students) in this region about waste management operations and facilities, specifically the siting of landfills and incinerators. By means of a structured questionnaire, opinion and knowledge were systematically examined by degree type and course year. The study took place in 2011 at the University of Salerno campus. A sample of 900 students, comprising 100 students for each of the nine considered faculties, and 20 students for every academic course year, was randomly selected. Only about a quarter of respondents were not opposed to the siting of a landfill or an incinerator in their city. This clearly highlights that historic opposition to the construction of waste facilities is difficult to overcome and that distrust for previous poor management or indiscretions is long-lived and transcends generations. Students from technical faculties expressed the most reasonable opinion; opinion and knowledge were statistically related (Chi-square test, p < 0.05) to the attended faculty, and the knowledge grew linearly with progression through the university. This suggests that awareness of waste management practices develops with experience and understanding of environmental issues. There is general acceptance that many stakeholders – technicians, politicians and citizens – all have to be part of the decision process when siting a new waste management facility. The opinions of the young respondents were significantly influenced by their level of environmental knowledge.

  18. Development and testing of prototype alpha waste incinerator off-gas systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freed, E J; Becker, G W

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A test program is in progress at Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to confirm and develop incinerator design technology for an SRP production Alpha Waste Incinerator (AWI) to be built in the mid-1980's. The Incinerator Components Test Facility (ICTF) is a full-scale (5 kg/h), electrically heated, controlled-air prototype incinerator built to burn nonradioactive solid waste. The incinerator has been operating successfully at SRL since March 1979 and has met or exceeded all design criteria. During the first 1-1/2 years of operation, liquid scrubbers were used to remove particulates and hydrochloric acid from the incinerator exhaust gases. A dry off-gas system is currently being tested to provide data to Savannah River Plant's proposed AWI.

  19. Review of organic nitrile incineration at the Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (LMES) operates the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), formerly called the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, where uranium was enriched under contract with the US Department of Energy (DOE). Currently, ETTP missions include environmental management, waste management (WM), and the development of new technologies. As part of its WM mission, ETTP operates the TSCA (Toxic Substances Control Act) Incinerator (TSCAI) for treatment of hazardous waste and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) contaminated with low-level radioactivity. Beginning in the autumn of 1995, employees from diverse ETTP buildings and departments reported experiencing headaches, fatigue, depression, muscle aches, sleeplessness, and muscle tremors. These symptoms were judged by a physician in the ETTP Health Services Department to be consistent with chronic exposures to hydrogen cyanide (HCN). The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) was called in to perform a health hazard evaluation to ascertain whether the employees` illnesses were in fact caused by occupational exposure to HCN. The NIOSH evaluation found no patterns for employees` reported symptoms with respect to work location or department. NIOSH also conducted a comprehensive air sampling study, which did not detect airborne cyanides at the ETTP. Employees, however, expressed concerns that the burning of nitrile-bearing wastes at the TSCAI might have produced HCN as a combustion product. Therefore, LMES and DOE established a multidisciplinary team (TSCAI Technical Review Team) to make a more detailed review of the possibility that combustion of nitrile-bearing wastes at the TSCAI might have either released nitriles or created HCN as a product of incomplete combustion (PIC).

  20. Waste-to-Energy Projects at ArmyWaste to Energy Projects at Army Installations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Now!)p ( gy ) 2009 RDECOM WTE Technology Assessment Selected Army WTE Projects ERDC F l C ll D ERDC natural gas and steam by Oct 2016 [EISA 2007] Electricity use for federal government from renewable, NDAA 2007] Total consumption from renewable sources · At least 50% of required annual renewable energy

  1. Computational Fluid Dynamics Evaluation of Good Combustion Performance in Waste Incinerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Yong Jung

    -furnace destruction of pollutants are stated as: good combustion is achieved when 2-second gas residence time at 850 C1 Computational Fluid Dynamics Evaluation of Good Combustion Performance in Waste Incinerators waste incinerators, good combustion practices(GCP or GOP) have been established. These operating (and

  2. MULTIPLE-SCALE DYNAMIC LEACHING OF A MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE INCINERATION ASH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 MULTIPLE-SCALE DYNAMIC LEACHING OF A MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE INCINERATION ASH Waste Management (in source such as municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration ash, requires a knowledge of the so percolating through waste evolve over time, for a given percolation scenario (infiltration rate, waste source

  3. Completion of the INEEL's WERF Incinerator Trial Burn

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. K. Branter; D. A. Conley; D. R. Moser; S. J. Corrigan

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the successes and challenges associated with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitting of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's (INEEL) Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) hazardous and mixed waste incinerator. Topics to be discussed include facility modifications and problems, trial burn results and lessons learned in each of these areas. In addition, a number of challenges remain including completion and final issue of the RCRA Permit and implementation of all the permit requirements. Results from the trial burn demonstrated that the operating conditions and procedures will result in emissions that are satisfactorily protective of human health, the environment, and are in compliance with Federal and State regulations.

  4. Completion of the INEEL's WERF Incinerator Trial Burn

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Branter, Curtis Keith; Conley, Dennis Allen; Corrigan, Shannon James; Moser, David Roy

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the successes and challenges associated with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitting of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's (INEEL) Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) hazardous and mixed waste incinerator. Topics to be discussed include facility modifications and problems, trial burn results and lessons learned in each of these areas. In addition, a number of challenges remain including completion and final issue of RCRA Permit and implementation of all the permit requirements. Results from the trial burn demonstrated that the operating conditions and procedures will result in emissions that are satisfactorily protective of human health, the environment, and are in compliance with Federal and State regulations.

  5. ENVIRONMENTAL SURVEILLANCE OF INCINERATORS: 2006-2009 DATA ON DIOXIN/FURAN ATMOSPHERIC DEPOSITION AND ASSOCIATED THRESHOLDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ENVIRONMENTAL SURVEILLANCE OF INCINERATORS: 2006-2009 DATA ON DIOXIN/FURAN ATMOSPHERIC DEPOSITION over about the last 20 years with the closure of non-standard municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration estimated at 101 g TEQ-NATO1 . Since 28 November 20052, all MSW incinerators have to respect the limitation

  6. Caracteristiques et determination de la matiere organique dans les mchefers d'incineration d'ordures menageres (MIOM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2001-80 Caracteristiques et determination de la matiere organique dans les mächefers d'incineration matiere organique dans les Residus de Procedes Thermiques dont les Mächefers d'incineration d, bois...). Bien que l'efficacite de combustion des equipements collectifs d'incineration ne cesse de

  7. Incineration of DOE offsite mixed waste at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, J.D.; Harvego, L.A.; Jacobs, A.M. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Willcox, M.V. [Dept. of Energy Idaho Operations Office, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) incinerator at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is one of three incinerators in the US Department of Energy (DOE) Complex capable of incinerating mixed low-level waste (MLLW). WERF has received MLLW from offsite generators and is scheduled to receive more. The State of Idaho supports receipt of offsite MLLW waste at the WERF incinerator within the requirements established in the (INEEL) Site Treatment Plan (STP). The incinerator is operating as a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Interim Status Facility, with a RCRA Part B permit application currently being reviewed by the State of Idaho. Offsite MLLW received from other DOE facilities are currently being incinerated at WERF at no charge to the generator. Residues associated with the incineration of offsite MLLW waste that meet the Envirocare of Utah waste acceptance criteria are sent to that facility for treatment and/or disposal. WERF is contributing to the treatment and reduction of MLLW in the DOE Complex.

  8. Electrochemical Corrosion Rate Sensors for Waste Incineration Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Matthes, S.A.; Holcomb, G.R.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Eden, D.A. (Honeywell Intercorr)

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrochemical corrosion rate sensors work in high temperature waste incineration applications where ash is deposited. The ash serves as the electrolyte for electrochemical measurements, such as liner polarization resistance, electrochemical noise, and harmonic distortion analyses. Results to date have shown that these types of sensors respond qualitatively to changes in temperature, gas composition, alloy composition, and type of ash. Several years of research have shown that high temperature corrosion rate probes need to be better understood before corrosion rate can be used as a process variable by power plant operators. More recent research has shown that electrochemical corrosion probes typically measure lower corrosion rates than those measured by standard mass loss techniques. While still useful for monitoring changes in corrosion rates, absolute probe corrosion rates will need a calibration factor to be useful. Ideas for research that may help resolve these issues are presented.

  9. Treatment technologies for hazardous ashes generated from possible incineration of navy waste. Technical note

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torres, T.

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Navy recognizes that thermal treatment of Navy hazardous wastes (HW) should, under the terms of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976, be avoided. Combustion waste disposal may nonetheless become unavoidable in certain cases, even after all possible process enhancements that avoid HW production are implemented. Even then, some toxic constituents that may be present in the waste will not be destroyed by incineration and will persist in the ash residue produced by incineration. Such incinerator ashes will have to be disposed of in HW landfills. The Navy is thus evaluating methods of treatment of such ash to remove or immobilize the toxic constituents that persist following incineration in order to render the waste treatment residue nonhazardous. Appropriate technology identified in this work can be applied to ash produced by HW combuster operated by the Navy, if any, or be required for ash produced by commercial generators handling Navy HWs.

  10. Incineration of Residue from Paint Stripping Operations Using Plastic Media Blasting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helt, J. E.; Mallya, N.

    i INCINERATION OF RESIDUE FROH PAINT STRIPPING OPERATIONS USING PLASTIC MEDIA BLASTING J. E. HELT N. MALLYA Group Leader Chemist Chemical Technology Division Chemical Technology Division Argonne National Laboratory Argonne National... potentially be classified as a hazardous waste. One possible alternative to depositing the waste residue directly into a hazardous waste landfill is inciner ation. Incineration would provide desirable volume reduction. However. the fate of heavy metals...

  11. Assessment of incineration and melting treatment technologies for RWMC buried waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geimer, R.; Hertzler, T.; Gillins, R. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Anderson, G.L. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides an identification, description, and ranking evaluation of the available thermal treatment technologies potentially capable of treating the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) buried mixed waste. The ranking evaluation focused separately upon incinerators for treatment of combustible wastes and melters for noncombustible wastes. The highest rank incinerators are rotary kilns and controlled air furnaces, while the highest rank melters are the hearth configuration plasma torch, graphite electrode arc, and joule-heated melters. 4 refs.

  12. Permeability of consolidated incinerator facility wastes stabilized with portland cement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, B.W.

    2000-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Consolidated Incinerator Facility (CIF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) burns low-level radioactive wastes and mixed wastes as a method of treatment and volume reduction. The CIF generates secondary waste, which consists of ash and offgas scrubber solution. Currently the ash is stabilized/solidified in the Ashcrete process. The scrubber solution (blowdown) is sent to the SRS Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) for treatment as wastewater. In the past, the scrubber solution was also stabilized/solidified in the Ashcrete process as blowcrete, and will continue to be treated this way for listed waste burns and scrubber solutions that do not meet the ETF Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). The disposal plan for Ashcrete and special case blowcrete is to bury these containerized waste forms in shallow unlined trenches in E-Area. The WAC for intimately mixed, cement-based wasteforms intended for direct disposal specifies limits on compressive strength and permeability. Simulated waste and actual CIF ash and scrubber solution were mixed in the laboratory and cast into wasteforms for testing. Test results and related waste disposal consequences are given in this report.

  13. Effluent testing for the Oak Ridge mixed waste incinerator: Emissions test for August 27, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bostick, W.D.; Bunch, D.H.; Gibson, L.V.; Hoffmann, D.P.; Shoemaker, J.L.

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On August 27, 1990, a special emissions test was performed at the K-1435 Toxic Substance Control Act Mixed Waste Incinerator. A sampling and analysis plan was implemented to characterize the incinerator waste streams during a 6 hour burn of actual mixed waste. The results of this characterization are summarized in the present report. Significant among the findings is the observation that less than 3% of the uranium fed to the incinerator kiln was discharged as stack emission. This value is consistent with the estimate of 4% or less derived from long-term mass balance of previous operating experience and with the value assumed in the original Environmental Impact Statement. Approximately 1.4% of the total uranium fed to the incinerator kiln appeared in the aqueous scrubber blowdown; about 85% of the total uranium in the aqueous waste was insoluble (i.e., removable by filtration). The majority of the uranium fed to the incinerator kiln appeared in the ash material, apparently associated with phosphorous as a sparingly-soluble species. Many other metals of potential regulatory concern also appeared to concentrate in the ash as sparingly-soluble species, with minimal partition to the aqueous waste. The aqueous waste was discharged to the Central Neutralization Facility where it was effectively treated by coprecipitation with iron. The treated, filtered aqueous effluent met Environmental Protection Agency interim primary drinking water standards for regulated metals.

  14. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) Hazardous Waste Incineration Facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 3. Characterization of the nature and magnitude of emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contents: Introduction; Data Used in Characterizing Emissions; Incinerator Stack Emissions; Fugitive Emissions; Uncertainty in Emissions Characterization; and References.

  15. Optimal Operation of a Waste Incineration Plant for District Heating Johannes Jaschke, Helge Smedsrud, Sigurd Skogestad*, Henrik Manum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Optimal Operation of a Waste Incineration Plant for District Heating Johannes J¨aschke, Helge@chemeng.ntnu.no off-line. This systematic approach is here applied to a waste incineration plant for district heating. In district heating networks, operators usually wish to ob- tain the lowest possible return temperature

  16. The environmental comparison of landfilling vs. incineration of MSW accounting for waste diversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Assamoi, Bernadette [Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, University of Toronto, 200 College Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3E5 (Canada); Lawryshyn, Yuri, E-mail: yuri.lawryshyn@utoronto.ca [Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, University of Toronto, 200 College Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3E5 (Canada)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Residential waste diversion initiatives are more successful with organic waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using a incineration to manage part of the waste is better environmentally. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Incineration leads to more power plant emission offsets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Landfilling all of the waste would be preferred financially. - Abstract: This study evaluates the environmental performance and discounted costs of the incineration and landfilling of municipal solid waste that is ready for the final disposal while accounting for existing waste diversion initiatives, using the life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology. Parameters such as changing waste generation quantities, diversion rates and waste composition were also considered. Two scenarios were assessed in this study on how to treat the waste that remains after diversion. The first scenario is the status quo, where the entire residual waste was landfilled whereas in the second scenario approximately 50% of the residual waste was incinerated while the remainder is landfilled. Electricity was produced in each scenario. Data from the City of Toronto was used to undertake this study. Results showed that the waste diversion initiatives were more effective in reducing the organic portion of the waste, in turn, reducing the net electricity production of the landfill while increasing the net electricity production of the incinerator. Therefore, the scenario that incorporated incineration performed better environmentally and contributed overall to a significant reduction in greenhouse gas emissions because of the displacement of power plant emissions; however, at a noticeably higher cost. Although landfilling proves to be the better financial option, it is for the shorter term. The landfill option would require the need of a replacement landfill much sooner. The financial and environmental effects of this expenditure have yet to be considered.

  17. EIS-0084: Incineration Facility for Radioactively Contaminated PCBs and Other Wastes, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Uranium Enrichment and Assessment prepared this statement to assess the environmental impacts of the construction and operation of the proposed Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant, an incineration facility to dispose of radioactively contaminated polychlorinated biophenyls, as well as combustible waste from the Paducah, Portsmouth and Oak Ridge facilities.

  18. A Strategy for Quantifying Radioactive Material in a Low-Level Waste Incineration Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hochel, R.C. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the methods proposed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for the volume reduction and stabilization of a variety of low-level radioactive wastes (LLW) is incineration. Many commercial incinerators are in operation treating both non-hazardous and hazardous wastes. These can obtain volume reductions factors of 50 or more for certain wastes, and produce a waste (ash) that can be easily stabilized if necessary by vitrification or cementation. However, there are few incinerators designed to accommodate radioactive wastes. One has been recently built at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, SC and is burning non-radioactive hazardous waste and radioactive wastes in successive campaigns. The SRS Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) is RCRA permitted as a Low Chemical Hazard, Radiological facility as defined by DOE criteria (Ref. 1). Accordingly, the CIF must operate within specified chemical, radionuclide, and fissile material inventory limits (Ref. 2). The radionuclide and fissile material limits are unique to radiological or nuclear facilities, and require special measurement and removal strategies to assure compliance, and the CIF may be required to shut down periodically in order to clean out the radionuclide inventory which builds up in various parts of the facility.

  19. Mixed-waste treatment -- What about the residuals? A comparative analysis of MSO and incineration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines the issues concerning final waste forms, or residuals, that result from the treatment of mixed waste in molten salt oxidation (MSO) and incinerator systems. MSO is a technology with the potential to treat a certain segment of the waste streams at US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. MSO was compared with incineration because incineration is the best demonstrated available technology (BDAT) for the same waste streams. The Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) prepared this report for the DOE Office of Environmental Restoration (OER). The goals of this study are to objectively evaluate the anticipated residuals from MSO and incineration, examine regulatory issues for these final waste forms, and determine secondary treatment options. This report, developed to address concerns that MSO residuals present unique disposal difficulties, is part of a larger effort to successfully implement MSO as a treatment technology for mixed and hazardous waste. A Peer Review Panel reviewed the MSO technology in November 1991, and the implementation effort is ongoing under the guidance of the MSO Task Force.

  20. Life cycle assessment of a national policy proposal - The case of a Swedish waste incineration tax

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bjoerklund, Anna E. [Division of Environmental Strategies Research - fms, Royal Institute of Technology, Drottning Kristinas vaeg 30 III, SE-100 44, Stockholm (Sweden)], E-mail: annab@infra.kth.se; Finnveden, Goeran [Division of Environmental Strategies Research - fms, Royal Institute of Technology, Drottning Kristinas vaeg 30 III, SE-100 44, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the core of EU and Swedish waste policy is the so-called waste hierarchy, according to which waste should first be prevented, but should otherwise be treated in the following order of prioritisation: reuse, recycling when environmentally motivated, energy recovery, and last landfilling. Some recent policy decisions in Sweden aim to influence waste management in the direction of the waste hierarchy. In 2001 a governmental commission assessed the economic and environmental impacts of introducing a weight-based tax on waste incineration, the purpose of which would be to encourage waste reduction and increase materials recycling and biological treatment. This paper presents the results of a life cycle assessment (LCA) of the waste incineration tax proposal. It was done in the context of a larger research project concerning the development and testing of a framework for Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA). The aim of this paper is to assess the life cycle environmental impacts of the waste incineration tax proposal, and to investigate whether there are any possibilities of more optimal design of such a tax. The proposed design of the waste incineration tax results in increased recycling, but only in small environmental improvements. A more elaborate tax design is suggested, in which the tax level would partly be related to the fossil carbon content of the waste.

  1. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. Volume I is a description of the components and methodologies used in the risk assessment and provides a summary of the major results from the three components of the assessment.

  2. Waste to Energy: Escalating Energy Concerns to Push Global Market...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Concerns to Push Global Market to Grow at 8.1% CAGR from 2013 to 2019 Oil Shale Market is Estimated to Reach USD 7,400.70 Million by 2022 more Group members (32)...

  3. SMALL SCALE WASTE-TO-ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES Claudine Ellyin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    they are fully combusted and the generated heat is transferred to a heat recovery system where steam is produced, one in Germany, and one in the UK; they range in capacity from 30 tons/day per unit to a high of 118 tons/day per unit. As expected, the capital cost per ton of annual ton of capacity increases

  4. Waste to Energy Power Production at DOE and DOD Sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Challengesfaced by DOE-SR · AgingInfrastructure Ameresco independent · Coal and fuel oil power plants · Increased will replace existingcoal-fired cogen plant · Located closer to end user · Will operate 24/7/365 · Includesacentral fuel yard for all three plants Measure 2 replaced afuel oil-fired packaged boiler plant

  5. (www.wtert.gr) Waste-to-Energy Research &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .S.A. (cooperating with Professor N. Themelis) , in the scientific fields: energy recovery from solid wastes, potable that owns intellectual property in the production of synthetic construction aggregates from solid waste technologies for the treatment of various waste materials, conduct additional academic research as required

  6. UPGRADING OF WASTE-TO-ENERGY PLANT IN BRESCIA, ITALY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    and district heating, gas supply, waste collection, treatment and disposal, and wastewa- ter treatment. Brescia was one of the first cities to have a well-established district heating net- work. Today, the waste

  7. Waste-to-Energy Workshop Summary Report | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradley Nickell Director ofDepartmentDRAFT -WasteinThisThis report

  8. Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradley Nickell Director ofDepartmentDRAFT

  9. Global Waste to Energy Conversion Company GWECC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAddInformationEnergyEnergyGWECC Jump to:

  10. Waste-to-Energy Evaluation: U.S. Virgin Islands

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the environmental impact and fundamental economics of WTE technology based on available data from commercially operating WTE facilities in the United States. In particular, it...

  11. Biomass and Waste-to-Energy | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 RussianBy:WhetherNovember 13, 2009OakDepartmentBillBelow are resources for Tribes

  12. Energy Recovery Council (ERC) Wast to Energy (WTE) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJump to:Emminol Jump to:EnergEnergyEnergy PlusInformation

  13. Kent County Waste to Energy Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtelInteriasIowa: EnergyKanabecKenduskeag,Connecticut: EnergyNewKent

  14. Waste-to-Energy Workshop | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartment of Energy MicrosoftVOLUMEWORKFORCENovember 5, 2014 9:00AM EST

  15. Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartment of Energy MicrosoftVOLUMEWORKFORCENovember 5, 2014 9:00AM

  16. NREL: Technology Deployment - Biopower and Waste-to-Energy Solutions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: Grid Integration NRELCost

  17. Waste-to-Energy Workshop | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and03/02Report

  18. Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste-to-Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform isEnergyMeeting | Department of EnergyConversion, and

  19. Testing fluidized bed incinerators for energy-efficient operation for the Southtowns Sewage Treatment Agency. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two methods for improving the energy efficiency of fluidized bed sludge incinerators were evaluated. The first method used paper pulp and polymer as conditioning agents for municipal sludge instead of lime and ferric chloride. Automatic control of the incinerator was the second method evaluated for energy savings. To evaluate the use of paper pulp and polymer as conditioning agents, varying quantities of paper pulp were added to the liquid sludge to determine the optimal sludge-to-paper pulp ratio. The effect of the paper pulp and polymer-conditioned sludge on plant operations also was evaluated. When compared to sludge conditioned with lime and ferric chloride, the paper pulp and polymer-conditioned sludge had similar cake release and feed characteristics, higher BTU values for the dry sludge solids, required less auxiliary fuel for incineration, and generated less ash for disposal. The paper pulp and polymer did not have any appreciable negative effects on the operation of the wastewater treatment plant. It was estimated that processing and incinerating the sludge conditioned with paper pulp and polymer resulted in a cost savings of up to $91.73 per dry ton of activated sludge solids. To evaluate the effect of automatic control, all the incinerator operating parameters including air flow rates, fuel oil feed rates, and sludge feed rates, were automatically monitored and controlled to minimize auxiliary fuel oil use and to keep the incinerator running at optimal conditions. Although effective, the estimated cost savings for automatic control of the incinerator were small.

  20. Waste energy: Feasibility study for Portage County and the University of Wisconsin, Stevens Point

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abubakr, S.

    1988-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Concerning solid waste management, Portage County is in a better condition than the many other counties that are currently facing a solid waste disposal crisis. The landfill serving Portage County is relatively new and environmentally safe and has a life expectancy of about 15 more years. A waste-to-energy facility would effectively extend that life two to three times while at the same time reduce the cost of disposing the solid waste. Waupaca County does not have a landfill. This preliminary feasibility study will analyze the possibility of constructing a waste-to-energy facility in Portage County with the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point serving as the major market for the recovered energy. 57 refs., 23 figs., 23 tabs.

  1. National Dioxin Study Tier 4 - combustion sources: final test report - Site 6, wire reclamation incinerator WRI-A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, L.E.; McReynolds, J.R.; Benson, D.J.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of a dioxin/furan emissions test of a wire-reclamation incinerator equipped with an afterburner for hydrocarbon emissions control. The wire reclamation incinerator is used for recovery of copper from coated copper wire and drained transformer cores. The test was the sixth in a series of several dioxin/furan emissions tests conducted under Tier 4 of the National Dioxin Study. The primary objective of Tier 4 is to determine if various combustion sources are sources of dioxin and/or furan emissions. If any of the combustion sources are found to emit dioxin or furan, the secondary objective of Tier 4 is to quantify these emissions. Wire reclamation incinerators are one of 8 combustion-source categories that have been tested in the Tier 4 program. The tested incinerator WRI-A was selected for the test after an initial information screening and a one-day pretest survey visit. Incinerator WRI-A is considered representative of the wire-reclamation incinerator population in the United States. Data presented in the report include dioxin (tetra through octa homologue + 2378 TCDD) and furan (tetra through octa homologue + 2378 TCDF) results for both stack samples and ash samples. In addition, process data collected during sampling are also presented.

  2. High temperature materials for radioactive waste incineration and vitrification. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bickford, D F; Ondrejcin, R S; Salley, L

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Incineration or vitrification of radioactive waste subjects equipment to alkaline or acidic fluxing, oxidation, sulfidation, carburization, and thermal shock. It is necessary to select appropriate materials of construction and control operating conditions to avoid rapid equipment failure. Nickel- and cobalt-based alloys with high chromium or aluminum content and aluminum oxide/chromium oxide refractories with high chromium oxide content have provided the best service in pilot-scale melter tests. Inconel 690 and Monofrax K-3 are being used for waste vitrification. Haynes 188 and high alumina refractory are undergoing pilot scale tests for incineration equipment. Laboratory tests indicate that alloys and refractories containing still higher concentrations of chromium or chromium oxide, such as Inconel 671 and Monofrax E, may provide superior resistance to attack in glass melter environments.

  3. Field demonstration of the Linde Oxygen Combustion System on the EPA mobile incinerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minda Ho (Union Carbide Industrial Gases, Inc., Tarrytown, NY (United States)); Perdek, J.M. (Environmental Protection Agency, Edison, NJ (United States)); Stumbar, J.P.; Sawyer, R.H. (Foster Wheeler Enviresponse, Inc., Edison, NJ (United States))

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes the various system performance tests and the long-term operating experience of the LINDE Oxygen Combustion System installed on the US Environmental Protection Agency's Mobile Incineration System (MIS) when it was in operation at the Denney Farm site in southwestern Missouri. The LINDE OCS was installed on the MIS as part of a major modification program in 1987. The modified system was first demonstrated for three months in 1987 when various system performance tests were conducted. Test burns of the modified MIS showed destruction and removal efficiencies (DRE) surpassing both Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and Toxic Substances February 1988 to continue the incineration of dioxin-contaminated materials from sites in southwestern Missouri. After implementation of the modifications, over ten million pounds of dioxin-contaminated material including soil, lagoon sludge, plastics, trash, protective clothing, wood, etc., were processed. MIS operations at Denney Farm ceased in April 1989.

  4. Oxygen-enriched multiple-hearth sewage sludge incineration demonstration. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxygen-enhanced multiple-hearth sludge incineration was the focus of a five-month joint study by Praxair and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority. Testing and demonstration were conducted in Rochester NY, at Monroe County`s Frank E. Van Lare Sewage Treatment Plant. A simple retrofit of high-momentum oxygen lances created a convection hearth in which convective heat and mass transfer with the drying sludge were greatly enhanced, while hearth temperatures were moderated by the wet sludge to prevent overheating. Based on the results of short- and long-term controlled tests discussed in this report, oxygen enhancement of multiple-hearth sludge incinerators can be economically viable, with a savings between $30 and $60 per hour at Van Lare based upon increased sludge throughput and reduced fuel consumption.

  5. Solid waste disposal options: an optimum disposal model for the management of municipal solid waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haney, Brenda Ann

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    management from landfill disposal to incineration and other technologies. An increase in the number of operating incinerators and the average plant capacity has increased since 1980. Incineration with waste-to-energy recovery replaced traditional... that are considered in- clude: composting, recycling, landfills and incineration with waste-to-energy recovery. The model evaluates disposal options based on the percentage of the total waste stream eliminated by each method. Once the amount of waste is determined...

  6. District heating from electric-generating plants and municipal incinerators: local planner's assessment guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pferdehirt, W.; Kron, N. Jr.

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This guide is designed to aid local government planners in the preliminary evaluation of the feasibility of district heating using heat recovered from electric generating plants and municipal incinerators. System feasibility is indicated by: (1) the existence of an adequate supply of nearby waste heat, (2) the presence of a sufficiently dense and large thermal load, and (3) a favorable cost comparison with conventional heating methods. 34 references.

  7. Operational experience of the Juelich incineration system in the treatment of radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halaszovich, S.; Jablonski, W. [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); Lins, W.; Wurster, W.; Kaufmann, K.H. [Kraftanlagen Aktiengesellschaft, Heidelberg (Germany)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    After ten years spent on development and testing of a prototype incinerator in the Juelich Research Center, a new industrial scale unit has been built. The paper gives a short description of the plant design and operation characteristics. The major part of the paper deals with the experience gained from the treatment of 355 Mg low-level radioactive waste during the last four years.

  8. Design considerations for sludge fired fluidized bed incinerator-cum-boiler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bapat, D.W.; Vishwanathan, K. [Thermax Ltd., Pune (India). Research and Development Centre

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal Limited, a major player in the field of Fluidized Bed Boilers in India, has supplied on a turnkey basis, three boilers each of 22.5 tons per hour capacity as a part of Cogeneration system for PT. South Pacific Viscose, Indonesia. The plant generates huge volumes of sludge from its effluent Treatment Plant (ETP). The sludge produced from the ETP has a moisture content of about 98%, which is subsequently reduced to about 78% using a decanter before feeding the sludge into the boiler. The waste sludge has a negative heating value ({minus}150 kcal/kg on NCV basis) and required coal as support fuel for burning. The plant`s requirement was to incinerate the entire sludge generated in the plant, which meant that nearly 50% of the fuel fed to the boiler consisted of the waste sludge. Additional requirements were to burn coal and oil as back-up fuels. This paper deals with the challenges encountered and various design features provided in the configuration of the incinerator-cum-boiler including conveying, feeding and spreading arrangement of the waste sludge for effective incineration in addition to burning coal and oil. Also included in the paper is a brief description of the automatic control logics for combustion control and bed temperature control.

  9. Field demonstration of the LINDE Oxygen Combustion System on the EPA mobile incinerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ho, M.D.; Perdek, J.M.; Stumbar, J.P.; Sawyer, R.H.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper summarizes the various system performance tests and the long-term operating experience of the LINDE Oxygen Combustion System (OCS) installed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Mobile Incineration System (MIS) when it was in operation at the Denney Farm site in southwestern Missouri. The LINDE OCS was installed on the MIS as part of a major modification program in 1987. The modified system was first demonstrated for three months in 1987 when various system performance tests were conducted. Test burns of the modified MIS showed destruction and removal efficiencies (DRE) surpassing both Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) standards. The system resumed operation in February 1988 to continue the incineration of dioxin-contaminated materials from sites in southwestern Missouri. This was the first application of an oxygen burner in a hazardous waste incineration system. The microprocessor-based controls of the oxygen system have exhibited excellent response, reducing the number of feed shutdowns due to low oxygen and high carbon monoxide contents in the stack gas which resulted from variations in the BTU content of the waste feed. It was also shown that nitrogen oxides emissions from the oxygen enriched operation compare favorably with the previous air-based operation.

  10. Encapsulation of mixed radioactive and hazardous waste contaminated incinerator ash in modified sulfur cement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalb, P.D.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Some of the process waste streams incinerated at various Department of Energy (DOE) facilities contain traces of both low-level radioactive (LLW) and hazardous constituents, thus yielding ash residues that are classified as mixed waste. Work is currently being performed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to develop new and innovative materials for encapsulation of DOE mixed wastes including incinerator ash. One such material under investigation is modified sulfur cement, a thermoplastic developed by the US Bureau of Mines. Monolithic waste forms containing as much as 55 wt % incinerator fly ash from Idaho national Engineering Laboratory (INEL) have been formulated with modified sulfur cement, whereas maximum waste loading for this waste in hydraulic cement is 16 wt %. Compressive strength of these waste forms exceeded 27.6 MPa. Wet chemical and solid phase waste characterization analyses performed on this fly ash revealed high concentrations of soluble metal salts including Pb and Cd, identified by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as toxic metals. Leach testing of the ash according to the EPA Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) resulted in concentrations of Pb and Cd above allowable limits. Encapsulation of INEL fly ash in modified sulfur cement with a small quantity of sodium sulfide added to enhance retention of soluble metal salts reduced TCLP leachate concentrations of Pb and Cd well below EPA concentration criteria for delisting as a toxic hazardous waste. 12 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. RCRA, superfund and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Hazardous waste incinerators (40 cfr parts 264/265, subpart o) updated July 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The module introduces the concept of burning hazardous wastes in units regulated under RCRA and outlines the requirements for one type of device - the incinerator. It explains what an incinerator is and how incinerators are regulated, and states the conditions under which an owner/operator may be exempt from subpart O. It defines principal organic hazardous constituent (POHC) and describes the criteria under which a POHC is selected. It defines destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) and describes the interaction between compliance with performance standards and compliance with incinerator operating conditions established in the permit. It defines and explains the purpose of a `trial burn`.

  12. RCRA/UST, superfund, and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Hazardous waste incinerators (40 CFR parts 264/265, subpart O) updated as of July 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The module introduces the concept of burning hazardous wastes in units regulated under RCRA and outlines the requirements for one type of device - the incinerator. It explains what an incinerator is and how incinerators are regulated and states the conditions under which an owner/operator may be exempt from Subpart O. It defines principal organic hazardous constituent (POHC) and describes the criteria under which a POHC is selected and defines destruction and removal efficiency (DRE). It describes the interaction between compliance with performance standards and compliance with incinerator operating conditions established in the permit. It also defines and explains the purpose of a trial burn.

  13. Toxicity mitigation and solidification of municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash using alkaline activated coal ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivan Diaz-Loya, E. [Alternative Cementitious Binders Laboratory (ACBL), Department of Civil Engineering, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States); Allouche, Erez N., E-mail: allouche@latech.edu [Alternative Cementitious Binders Laboratory (ACBL), Department of Civil Engineering, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States); Eklund, Sven; Joshi, Anupam R. [Department of Chemistry, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States); Kupwade-Patil, Kunal [Alternative Cementitious Binders Laboratory (ACBL), Department of Civil Engineering, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Incinerator fly ash (IFA) is added to an alkali activated coal fly ash (CFA) matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Means of stabilizing the incinerator ash for use in construction applications. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Concrete made from IFA, CFA and IFA-CFA mixes was chemically characterized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Environmentally friendly solution to IFA disposal by reducing its toxicity levels. - Abstract: Municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration is a common and effective practice to reduce the volume of solid waste in urban areas. However, the byproduct of this process is a fly ash (IFA), which contains large quantities of toxic contaminants. The purpose of this research study was to analyze the chemical, physical and mechanical behaviors resulting from the gradual introduction of IFA to an alkaline activated coal fly ash (CFA) matrix, as a mean of stabilizing the incinerator ash for use in industrial construction applications, where human exposure potential is limited. IFA and CFA were analyzed via X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Inductive coupled plasma (ICP) to obtain a full chemical analysis of the samples, its crystallographic characteristics and a detailed count of the eight heavy metals contemplated in US Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR). The particle size distribution of IFA and CFA was also recorded. EPA's Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) was followed to monitor the leachability of the contaminants before and after the activation. Also images obtained via Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), before and after the activation, are presented. Concrete made from IFA, CFA and IFA-CFA mixes was subjected to a full mechanical characterization; tests include compressive strength, flexural strength, elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio and setting time. The leachable heavy metal contents (except for Se) were below the maximum allowable limits and in many cases even below the reporting limit. The leachable Chromium was reduced from 0.153 down to 0.0045 mg/L, Arsenic from 0.256 down to 0.132 mg/L, Selenium from 1.05 down to 0.29 mg/L, Silver from 0.011 down to .001 mg/L, Barium from 2.06 down to 0.314 mg/L and Mercury from 0.007 down to 0.001 mg/L. Although the leachable Cd exhibited an increase from 0.49 up to 0.805 mg/L and Pd from 0.002 up to 0.029 mg/L, these were well below the maximum limits of 1.00 and 5.00 mg/L, respectively.

  14. Los Alamos Controlled Air Incinerator for radioactive waste. Volume I. Rationale, process, equipment, performance, and recommendations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neuls, A.S.; Draper, W.E.; Koenig, R.A.; Newmyer, J.M.; Warner, C.L.

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This two-volume report is a detailed design and operating documentation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Controlled Air Incinerator (CAI) and is an aid to technology transfer to other Department of Energy contractor sites and the commercial sector. Volume I describes the CAI process, equipment, and performance, and it recommends modifications based on Los Alamos experience. It provides the necessary information for conceptual design and feasibility studies. Volume II provides descriptive engineering information such as drawing, specifications, calculations, and costs. It aids duplication of the process at other facilities.

  15. Laboratory study on the behaviour of spent AA household alkaline batteries in incineration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Almeida, Manuel F. [LEPAE, Faculty of Engineering, University of Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal)], E-mail: mfa@fe.up.pt; Xara, Susana M.; Delgado, Julanda; Costa, Carlos A. [LEPAE, Faculty of Engineering, University of Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal)

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The quantitative evaluation of emissions from incineration is essential when Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) studies consider this process as an end-of-life solution for some wastes. Thus, the objective of this work is to quantify the main gaseous emissions produced when spent AA alkaline batteries are incinerated. With this aim, batteries were kept for 1 h at 1273 K in a refractory steel tube hold in a horizontal electric furnace with temperature control. At one end of the refractory steel tube, a constant air flow input assures the presence of oxygen in the atmosphere and guides the gaseous emissions to a filter system followed by a set of two bubbler flasks having an aqueous solution of 10% (v/v) nitric acid. After each set of experiments, sulphur, chlorides and metals (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, Tl and Zn) were analyzed in both the solutions obtained from the steel tube washing and from the bubblers. Sulphur, chlorides and metals were quantified, respectively, using barium sulfate gravimetry, the Volhard method and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). The emissions of zinc, the most emitted metal, represent about 6.5% of the zinc content in the batteries. Emissions of manganese (whose oxide is the main component of the cathode) and iron (from the cathode collector) are negligible when compared with their amount in AA alkaline batteries. Mercury is the metal with higher volatility in the composition of the batteries and was collected even in the second bubbler flask. The amount of chlorides collected corresponds to about 36% of the chlorine in the battery sleeve that is made from PVC. A considerable part of the HCl formed in PVC plastic sleeve incineration is neutralized with KOH, zinc and manganese oxides and, thus, it is not totally released in the gas. Some of the emissions are predictable through a thermodynamic data analysis at temperatures in the range of 1200-1300 K taking into account the composition of the batteries. This analysis was done for most of potential reactions between components in the batteries as well as between them and the surrounding atmosphere and it reasonably agrees the experimental results. The results obtained show the role of alkaline batteries at the acid gases cleaning process, through the neutralization reactions of some of their components. Therefore, LCA of spent AA alkaline batteries at the municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration process must consider this contribution.

  16. Stabilization of high and low solids Consolidated Incinerator Facility (CIF) waste with super cement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, B.W.

    2000-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details solidification activities using selected Mixed Waste Focus Area technologies with the High and Low Solid waste streams. Ceramicrete and Super Cement technologies were chosen as the best possible replacement solidification candidates for the waste streams generated by the SRS incinerator from a list of several suggested Mixed Waste Focus Area technologies. These technologies were tested, evaluated, and compared to the current Portland cement technology being employed. Recommendation of a technology for replacement depends on waste form performance, process flexibility, process complexity, and cost of equipment and/or raw materials.

  17. Multicomponent aerosol dynamic of the Pb-O[sub 2] system in a bench scale flame incinerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, W.Y.; Sethi, V.; Biswas, P.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The article gives results of a study to understand the formation and growth of lead particles in a flame incinerator. A bench scale flame incinerator was used to perform controlled experiments with lead acetate as a test compound. A dilution probe (in conjunction with real-time aerosol instruments) was used to measure the evolution of the particle size distribution at different locations in the flame region. A multicomponent lognormal aerosol model was developed accounting for the chemistry of the lead-oxygen system, and for such aerosol dynamic phenomena as nucleation, coagulation, and condensation. Reasonable agreement was obtained between the predictions of the model using appropriate kinetic parameters and the experimental results.

  18. Decontamination and decommissioning assessment for the Waste Incineration Facility (Building 232-Z) Hanford Site, [Hanford], WA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dean, L.N. [Advanced Sciences, Inc., (United States)

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Building 232-Z is an element of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. From 1961 until 1972, plutonium-bearing combustible materials were incinerated in the building. Between 1972 and 1983, following shutdown of the incinerator, the facility was used for waste segregation activities. The facility was placed in retired inactive status in 1984 and classified as a Limited Control Facility pursuant to DOE Order 5480.5, Safety of Nuclear Facilities, and 6430.1A, General Design Criteria. The current plutonium inventory within the building is estimated to be approximately 848 grams, the majority of which is retained within the process hood ventilation system. As a contaminated retired facility, Building 232-Z is included in the DOE Surplus Facility Management Program. The objective of this Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) assessment is to remove Building 232-Z, thereby elmininating the radiological and environmental hazards associated with the plutonium inventory within the structure. The steps to accomplish the plan objectives are: (1) identifying the locations of the most significant amounts of plutonium, (2) removing residual plutonium, (3) removing and decontaminating remaining building equipment, (4) dismantling the remaining structure, and (5) closing out the project.

  19. Fast neutron incineration in the energy amplifier as alternative to geologic storage the case of Spain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubbia, Carlo; Kadi, Y; Rubio, Juan Antonio

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In previous reports [1][2] we have presented the conceptual design of a fast neutron driven sub-critical device (Energy Amplifier) designed both for energy amplification (production) and for the incineration of unwanted ³waste² from Nuclear Light Water Reactors (LWR). The latter scheme is here applied to the specific case of Spain, where 9 large LWR¹s are presently in operation. It is shown that a cluster of 5 EA¹s is a very effective and realistic solution to the elimination (in 37 years) of the present and foreseen (till 2029) LWR-Waste stockpiles of Spain, but with major improvements over Geologic Storage, since: (1) only a Low Level Waste (LLW) surface repository of reasonable size is ultimately required; (2) the large amount of energy stored in the trans-Uranics is recovered, amounting for each of the 37 years of incineration to a saving of about 8% of the present primary energy demand of Spain (100 MTep/y); (3) the slightly enriched (1.1%) Uranium, unburned by LWR¹s, can be recovered for further us...

  20. Community Renewable Energy Deployment: University of California...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Pv, Biomass - Waste To Energy Phase Develop Finance and Implement Projects Resource Type Case studiesexamples Availability Publicly available--Free Publication Date 222011...

  1. Uranium effluent testing for the Oak Ridge Toxic Substances Control Act mixed waste incinerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shor, J.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Bostick, W.D.; Hoffmann, D.P.; Gibson, L.V. Jr. [Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States); Ho, T.C. [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oak Ridge K-25 Site Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Incinerator has been undergoing a series of routine tests to determine uranium partitioning to the stack, scrubber waters, and bottom ash. This paper discusses the results of the most recent experiment in which relatively high rates of uranium stack gas emissions were identified: 6.11 g/h or 8 wt % based on the uranium feed. These data are compared with earlier data, and an empirical correlation is suggested between the stack emissions of uranium and the product of the uranium and chlorine concentration of the feed. This is consistent with certain findings with other metals, in which increasing chlorine feed contents led to increasing emissions.

  2. Rocky Flats Plant fluidized-bed incinerator. Engineering design and reference manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meile, L.J.

    1982-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The information in this manual is being presented to complete the documentation of the fluidized-bed incineration (FBI) process development at the Rocky Flats Plant. The information pertains to the 82-kg/hour demonstration unit at the Rocky Flats Plant. This document continues the presentation of design reference material in the aeas of equipment drawings, space requirements, and unit costs. In addition, appendices contain an operating procedure and an operational safety analysis of the process. The cost figures presented are based on 1978 dollars and have not been converted to a current dollar value. Also, the cost of modifications are not included, since they would be insignificant if they were incorporated into a new installation.

  3. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 3. Characterization of the nature and magnitude of emissions. Draft report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. Volume III of the report describes the methods used to estimate both stack and fugitive emission rates from the facility.

  4. The correlation of SF6 destruction with principal organic hydrocarbon destruction in incineration processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    England, W.G.; Teuscher, L.H.; Quon, S.L. (Tracer Technologies, San Diego, CA (US))

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this research effort was to determine the suitability of Sulfur Hexafluoride (SF6) as a surrogate compound to measure DREs for POHCs. SF6 is relatively inexpensive and can be accurately monitored in real time by portable gas chromatography. For SF6 to be an appropriate surrogate for DRE measurement, three criteria must be met. The first is that the destruction of SF6 must be conservative when compared to other POHCs up to a POHC DRE limit of 0.9999. This would show that, given a certain amount of SF6 destruction, there would be at least that much POHC destruction. Secondly, it would be desirable to establish a relationship between SF6 destruction and POHC destruction. This would indicate that given a certain level of SF6 destruction, a corresponding level of POHC destruction would be known, Thirdly, given that a relationship is developed, it must be predictable for a variety of incinerator conditions for it to be useful. The goals of this project were to try to establish these criteria for POHCs by varying the combustor operating conditions of temperature and residence time. These are the two parameters that Tsang and Shaub predict affect DRE. The test program which was conducted consisted of burning SF6 concurrently with a POHC for three different temperature conditions at three different residence times; a total of nine conditions for each POHC. Three POHCs were chosen and tested: 1,1,1 Trichloroethane, Carbon Tetrachloride, and Chloroform.

  5. Examination of Babcock and Wilcox tubes after exposure in an industrial waste incinerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keiser, J.R.; Ferber, M.K.; Longmire, H.F.; Walker, L.R.; Hindman, D.L.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seven ceramic tubes provided by, and in most cases manufactured by, Babcock and Wilcox were exposed in E. I. DuPont`s Wilmington, Delaware, hazardous waste incinerator. These tubes were subsequently examined at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to determine the effect of exposure on the strength and microstructural integrity of the tube materials. An unexposed tube section of one of the materials was also examined. Evaluation methods included c-ring compression tests, light microscopy, and electron microprobe spectroscopy. The c-ring compression tests revealed a very wide range in the strengths of the materials tested; the strongest was DuPont Lanxide Composites (DLC) silicon carbide particulate-strengthened alumina, and the weakest was the DLC Type B mixed-oxide material. The only material for which data on unexposed samples were available showed lower strength than the exposed material. Microstructural examination of the samples yielded minimal evidence of interaction of most of the tube materials with the components of the environment. Microprobe examination showed some segregation of yttrium in the matrix and along the surface of one of the PRD166/zirconia tubes and limited interaction of the fibers in the same tube with the components of the environment.

  6. Mineralogy and pore water chemistry of a boiler ash from a MSW fluidized-bed incinerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodenan, F., E-mail: f.bodenan@brgm.f [BRGM - French Geological Survey, Environment and Processes Division, BP 36009, 3 Av. C. Guillemin, 45060 Orleans Cedex (France); Guyonnet, D.; Piantone, P.; Blanc, P. [BRGM - French Geological Survey, Environment and Processes Division, BP 36009, 3 Av. C. Guillemin, 45060 Orleans Cedex (France)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an investigation of the mineralogy and pore water chemistry of a boiler ash sampled from a municipal solid waste fluidized-bed incinerator, subject to 18 months of dynamic leaching in a large percolation column experiment. A particular focus is on the redox behaviour of Cr(VI) in relation to metal aluminium Al{sup 0}, as chromium may represent an environmental or health hazard. The leaching behaviour and interaction between Cr(VI) and Al{sup 0} are interpreted on the basis of mineralogical evolutions observed over the 18-month period and of saturation indices calculated with the geochemical code PhreeqC and reviewed thermodynamic data. Results of mineralogical analyses show in particular the alteration of mineral phases during leaching (e.g. quartz and metal aluminium grains), while geochemical calculations suggest equilibria of percolating fluids with respect to specific mineral phases (e.g. monohydrocalcite and aluminium hydroxide). The combination of leaching data on a large scale and mineralogical analyses document the coupled leaching behaviour of aluminium and chromium, with chromium appearing in the pore fluids in its hexavalent and mobile state once metal aluminium is no longer available for chromium reduction.

  7. Sorption of cadmium and lead by clays from municipal incinerator ash-water suspensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, W.R.; Krapac, I.G.; Steele, J.D. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of Cl complexation in extracts of a flue gas-scrubber incinerator fly ash sample on the sorption of Cd and Ph by kaolinite and illite was investigated using batch-sorption methods. In the pH range of 5 to 9, Cl complexation may reduce sorption and thus increase the mobility of these metals. When an ash-water suspension was acidified to pH 6.85, the dissolution of Cl and Ca essentially eliminated Cd sorption because of complexation and cationic competition. Cadmium would be considered as either mobile or very mobile under these conditions. Lead was not soluble in the pH-6.85 suspension. At pH 12, the approximate pH of water in contact with flue gas-scrubber fly ash, Cd was essentially insoluble and Ph occurred as anionic Ph hydroxide. Anionic Ph was sorbed by the two clays, and the extent of sorption was not influenced by Cl or carbonate complexation. Sorption constants, derived from isotherms, suggested that Ph would be relatively immobile in saturated soil-water systems. The recent concern that highly alkaline, flue gas-scrubber fly ash may release environmentally significant concentrations of mobile Ph when placed in an ash-disposal site with a soil liner should be reevaluated in light of this study. 37 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Brandeis University Brown University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    Institute of Technology McGill University Michigan State University New York University Northwestern University of Kansas University of Maryland, College Park University of Michigan University of MinnesotaBrandeis University Brown University California Institute of Technology Carnegie Mellon University

  9. Greenhouse gas emissions from MSW incineration in China: Impacts of waste characteristics and energy recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang Na [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Zhang Hua, E-mail: zhanghua_tj@tongji.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Chen Miao; Shao Liming [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); He Pinjing, E-mail: xhpjk@tongji.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Determination of the amount of greenhouse gas (GHG) emitted during municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) is complex because both contributions and savings of GHGs exist in the process. To identify the critical factors influencing GHG emissions from MSWI in China, a GHG accounting model was established and applied to six Chinese cities located in different regions. The results showed that MSWI in most of the cities was the source of GHGs, with emissions of 25-207 kg CO{sub 2}-eq t{sup -1} rw. Within all process stages, the emission of fossil CO{sub 2} from the combustion of MSW was the main contributor (111-254 kg CO{sub 2}-eq t{sup -1} rw), while the substitution of electricity reduced the GHG emissions by 150-247 kg CO{sub 2}-eq t{sup -1} rw. By affecting the fossil carbon content and the lower heating value of the waste, the contents of plastic and food waste in the MSW were the critical factors influencing GHG emissions of MSWI. Decreasing food waste content in MSW by half will significantly reduce the GHG emissions from MSWI, and such a reduction will convert MSWI in Urumqi and Tianjin from GHG sources to GHG sinks. Comparison of the GHG emissions in the six Chinese cities with those in European countries revealed that higher energy recovery efficiency in Europe induced much greater reductions in GHG emissions. Recovering the excess heat after generation of electricity would be a good measure to convert MSWI in all the six cities evaluated herein into sinks of GHGs.

  10. Paper waste - Recycling, incineration or landfilling? A review of existing life cycle assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villanueva, A. [European Topic Centre on Resource and Waste Management, Hojbro Plads 4, DK-1200 Copenhagen K (Denmark)], E-mail: alejandro@villanueva.dk; Wenzel, H. [Department of Manufacturing Engineering and Management, Technical University of Denmark, Building 424, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of existing life cycle assessments (LCAs) on paper and cardboard waste has been undertaken. The objectives of the review were threefold. Firstly, to see whether a consistent message comes out of published LCA literature on optimum disposal or recycling solutions for this waste type. Such message has implications for current policy formulation on material recycling and disposal in the EU. Secondly, to identify key methodological issues of paper waste management LCAs, and enlighten the influence of such issues on the conclusions of the LCA studies. Thirdly, in light of the analysis made, to discuss whether it is at all valid to use the LCA methodology in its current development state to guide policy decisions on paper waste. A total of nine LCA studies containing altogether 73 scenarios were selected from a thorough, international literature search. The selected studies are LCAs including comparisons of different management options for waste paper. Despite claims of inconsistency, the LCAs reviewed illustrate the environmental benefits in recycling over incineration or landfill options, for paper and cardboard waste. This broad consensus was found despite differences in geographic location and definitions of the paper recycling/disposal systems studied. A systematic exploration of the LCA studies showed, however, important methodological pitfalls and sources of error, mainly concerning differences in the definition of the system boundaries. Fifteen key assumptions were identified that cover the three paper cycle system areas: raw materials and forestry, paper production, and disposal/recovery. It was found that the outcome of the individual LCA studies largely depended on the choices made in some of these assumptions, most specifically the ones concerning energy use and generation, and forestry.

  11. Report on the technical workshop on WTI incinerator risk issues. Held in Washington, DC on December 8-9, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report includes information and materials from a peer review workshop organized by EPA's Risk Assessment Forum (RAF) for the Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response and Region 5. The meeting was held in Washington, DC, at the Holiday Inn Capitol on December 8-9, 1993. The subject of the peer review was a draft project plan prepared by EPA Region 5 for assessing risk at an incinerator operated by Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) in East Liverpool, Ohio. The peer review panel was convened to evaluate the project plan as the scientific foundation for a risk assessment, which will be used in setting final permit conditions for the WTI facility.

  12. Springer Publishers has just published the monumental (12,500 pages) Encyclopedia of Sustainability Science and Technology (ed. Robert Meyers). Prof. Nickolas Themelis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waste-to-Energy for District Heating Kamuk and Tobiasen To see the publication reference: http Science and Technology (ed. Robert Meyers). Prof. Nickolas Themelis is Editor of the Waste to Energy and Liquefaction Alternatives to Incineration in Japan Kunio Yoshikawa 2 Greenhouse gas emission reduction by Waste

  13. REPORT from 1st Annual World Congress of BIOENERGY ,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ordering for Dalian urban solid waste to Energy plant . It marks the first solid waste incineration project sessions . Dr. Kalogirou was the chair of the special WTE session entitled: «Integrated Municipal Solid Waste Management: Recycling and Waste to Energy», with co Chair Professor Carlo Va der Casteele from

  14. Comparative assessment of municipal sewage sludge incineration, gasification and pyrolysis for a sustainable sludge-to-energy management in Greece

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samolada, M.C. [Dept. Secretariat of Environmental and Urban Planning – Decentralized Area Macedonian Thrace, Taki Oikonomidi 1, 54008 Thessaloniki (Greece); Zabaniotou, A.A., E-mail: azampani@auth.gr [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, University Box 455, University Campus, 541 24 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • The high output of MSS highlights the need for alternative routes of valorization. • Evaluation of 3 sludge-to-energy valorisation methods through SWOT analysis. • Pyrolysis is an energy and material recovery process resulting to ‘zero waste’. • Identification of challenges and barriers for MSS pyrolysis in Greece was investigated. • Adopters of pyrolysis systems face the challenge of finding new product markets. - Abstract: For a sustainable municipal sewage sludge management, not only the available technology, but also other parameters, such as policy regulations and socio-economic issues should be taken in account. In this study, the current status of both European and Greek Legislation on waste management, with a special insight in municipal sewage sludge, is presented. A SWOT analysis was further developed for comparison of pyrolysis with incineration and gasification and results are presented. Pyrolysis seems to be the optimal thermochemical treatment option compared to incineration and gasification. Sewage sludge pyrolysis is favorable for energy savings, material recovery and high added materials production, providing a ‘zero waste’ solution. Finally, identification of challenges and barriers for sewage sludge pyrolysis deployment in Greece was investigated.

  15. Deactivation and cleanout of the 308 Fuels Laboratory and the 232-Z Incinerator at the Hanford site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerber, M.S.; Bliss, R.J.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the deactivation and source term reduction activities conducted over the recent past in two plutonium-contaminated Hanford Site buildings: the 308 Fuels Development Laboratory and the 232-Z Incinerator. Both of these facilities belong to the U.S. Department of Energy, and the projects are unique success stories carried out in direct support of EM-60 functions and requirements. In both cases the buildings, for different reasons, contained unacceptable amounts of plutonium, and were stabilized and placed in a safe, pre-D&D (decontamination and decommissioning) mode. The concept of deactivation as the last step in the operating life of a facility will be discussed. The need for and requirements of EM-60 transition between operations and D&D, the costs savings, techniques, regulations and lessons learned also will be discussed. This paper describes the strategies that led to successful source term reduction: accurate characterization, cooperation among different divisions within DOE and the Hanford Site, attention to regulations (especially unique in this case since the 232-Z Incinerator has been nominated as a Historic Structure to the National Register of Historic Places), and stakeholder concerns involving the proximity of the 308 Building to the Columbia River. The paper also weaves in the history, missions, and plutonium accumulation of the two buildings. The lessons learned are cogent to many other present and future deactivation activities across the DOE complex and indeed across the world.

  16. Emissions of PCDD/Fs from municipal solid waste incinerators in China Yuwen Ni, Haijun Zhang, Su Fan, Xueping Zhang, Qing Zhang, Jiping Chen *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Emissions of PCDD/Fs from municipal solid waste incinerators in China Yuwen Ni, Haijun Zhang, Su February 2009 Available online 21 March 2009 Keywords: MSWIs PCDD/Fs Congener patterns Emission factor a b s t r a c t Gas emission of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDD

  17. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 4. Atmospheric dispersion and deposition modeling of emissions. Draft report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. Volume IV describes the air dispersion model used to estimate air concentrations and particle deposition, as well as the results of the modeling exercise.

  18. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 1. Executive summary. Draft report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. Volume I is a description of the components and methodologies used in the risk assessment and provides a summary of the major results from the three components of the assessment.

  19. Field Evaluation of MERCEM Mercury Emission Analyzer System at the Oak Ridge TSCA Incinerator East Tennessee Technology Park Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors reached the following conclusions: (1) The two-month evaluation of the MERCEM total mercury monitor from Perkin Elmer provided a useful venue in determining the feasibility of using a CEM to measure total mercury in a saturated flue gas. (2) The MERCEM exhibited potential at a mixed waste incinerator to meet requirements proposed in PS12 under conditions of operation with liquid feeds only at stack mercury concentrations in the range of proposed MACT standards. (3) Performance of the MERCEM under conditions of incinerating solid and liquid wastes simultaneously was less reliable than while feeding liquid feeds only for the operating conditions and configuration of the host facility. (4) The permeation tube calibration method used in this test relied on the CEM internal volumetric and time constants to relate back to a concentration, whereas a compressed gas cylinder concentration is totally independent of the analyzer mass flowmeter and flowrates. (5) Mercury concentration in the compressed gas cylinders was fairly stable over a 5-month period. (6) The reliability of available reference materials was not fully demonstrated without further evaluation of their incorporation into routine operating procedures performed by facility personnel. (7) The degree of mercury control occurring in the TSCA Incinerator off-gas cleaning system could not be quantified from the data collected in this study. (8) It was possible to conduct the demonstration at a facility incinerating radioactively contaminated wastes and to release the equipment for later unrestricted use elsewhere. (9) Experience gained by this testing answered additional site-specific and general questions regarding the operation and maintenance of CEMs and their use in compliance monitoring of total mercury emissions from hazardous waste incinerators.

  20. Aachen RWTH Aarhus University Aberdeen University Adelaide University Alabama University Alberta University Amsterdam University Arizona University Auckland University Australian National University Bath University Beijing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tisdell, Chris

    Massachusetts University Massey University McGill University McMaster University Melbourne University Michigan State University Michigan University Minnesota University Monash University Montpellier UniversityAachen RWTH Aarhus University Aberdeen University Adelaide University Alabama University Alberta

  1. Lessons learned from an installation perspective for chemical demilitarization plant start-up at four operating incineration sites.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Motz, L.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2011-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This study presents the lessons learned by chemical storage installations as they prepared for the start of chemical demilitarization plant operations at the four current chemical incinerator sites in Alabama, Arkansas, Oregon, and Utah. The study included interviews with persons associated with the process and collection of available documents prepared at each site. The goal was to provide useful information for the chemical weapons storage sites in Colorado and Kentucky that will be going through plant start-up in the next few years. The study is not a compendium of what to do and what not to do. The information has been categorized into ten lessons learned; each is discussed individually. Documents that may be useful to the Colorado and Kentucky sites are included in the appendices. This study should be used as a basis for planning and training.

  2. EA-1862: Oneida Seven Generation Corporation Waste-To-Energy System, Ashwaubenon, Wisconsin

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Oneida’s Energy Recovery Project would construct and operate a solid waste-to-electricity power plant on vacant property within the Bayport Industrial Center in the City of Green Bay, Brown County, Wisconsin. This energy recovery process would involve bringing municipal solid waste into the plant for sizing (shredding), sorting (removing recyclable material), and conveying into one of three pyrolytic gasification systems.

  3. EA-1860: Richland Renewable Energy Waste-to-Energy Project, Richland, Wisconsin

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE is preparing a draft Environmental Assessment to analyze the potential environmental impacts of the proposed construction and operation of a new wastewater treatment facility and the alternative of not implementing this project.

  4. BIZKAIA WASTE TO ENERGY PLANT PROJECT February, 2005 SUMMARY REPORT Page 1 of 7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Gas turbine generator with 43 MW power output. e) 1 Heat recovery steam generator at 100 bars. #12 a) Thermal power exhaust gases from the gas turbine. b) Superheated steam (538 ºC 100 bar) to the steam turbine. c) Natural gas burners using fresh air to replace thermal energy in case of a gas turbine

  5. Continuous mercury monitor for thermal treatment and waste-to-energy operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlager, R.J.; Wilson, K.G.; Sappey, A.D.; Anderson, G.L.; Sagan, F.J. [ADA Technologies, Inc., Englewood, CO (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Treating wastes by thermal means offers benefits in terms of reducing waste volumes and in recovering energy values from the wastes. Thermal treatment has been an effective technology for a number of years, and is being used more in the US. Significant sources of waste in the US are municipal solid waste, hospital wastes, hazardous wastes, and wastes generated form the DOE complex. Mercury is found in these wastes and is emitted as a pollutant from sources that treat these materials thermally. Because of mercury`s toxicity, there is a considerable amount of activity aimed at its regulation and control. One of the key elements to effectively control the release of mercury is the ability to continuously monitor its concentration from emitting sources. ADA Technologies is developing a continuous monitoring system for measuring these emissions in real time. A real-time analyzer will assure that compliance limits are met and that emissions are kept as low as possible. Because mercury is emitted from sources in several different forms, such as elemental mercury and mercuric chloride, provisions have been incorporated in the analyzer that will allow for the measurement of all mercury compounds. The system will provide a number of advantages over existing test methods: (1) it will provide a real-time measure of emissions rates; (2) it will assure facility operators, regulators, and the public that emissions control systems are working at peak efficiency; and (3) it will provide information as to the nature of the emitted mercury (elemental mercury or speciated compounds).

  6. Proceedings of NAWTEC16 16th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    used globally for energy recovery from municipal solid wastes is combustion of "as received" MSW require pre-processing of the MSW, combust the resulting syngas to generate steam, and produce a vitrified indust relativ as $50 minus 40-50% report mature main Bed ( units a of the value Th China about treated

  7. Waste-to-Energy and Fuel Cell T h l i O i

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . #12;Global Approach for Using Biogas Innovation for Our Energy Future #12;Anaerobic Digestion natural gas. Additi l l i t bi fAdditional cleanup is necessary to use biogas from anaerobic digesters Production via Anaerobic Digestion · Breweries (~73 Watts per barrel of beer) · Municipal Waste Water

  8. Current MSW Management and Waste-to-Energy Status in the Republic of Korea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    factor, WTE plants can contribute to the national energy supply and CO2 emission reduction. From to the nation in the form of district heat and electricity, corresponding to only 0.24% of the total primary an emissions standpoint, all Korean WTE plants are excellent performers, with very low air emissions levels

  9. american waste-to-energy conference: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biomass Fuels Renewable Energy Websites Summary: of the decomposition of various biomass feedstocks and their conversion to gaseous fuels such as hydrogen. The steam studied. The...

  10. american ref-fuel waste-to-energy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biomass Fuels Renewable Energy Websites Summary: of the decomposition of various biomass feedstocks and their conversion to gaseous fuels such as hydrogen. The steam studied. The...

  11. Waste-to-Energy Evaluation: U.S. Virgin Islands | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradley Nickell Director ofDepartmentDRAFT -WasteinThis report

  12. Waste-to-Energy Technologies and Project Development | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradley Nickell Director ofDepartmentDRAFT -WasteinThis

  13. MacArthur Waste to Energy Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther, Oklahoma:EnergyECO AugerMaan Development CompanyMaazama

  14. Case Study - The Challenge: Improving the Performance of a Waste-To-Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platformBuilding RemovalCSS Letter -SeptemberWorkshopby: AlanCasa Diablo09in

  15. Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTED Jump to: navigation, search Name:

  16. Waste to Energy: Escalating Energy Concerns to Push Global Market to Grow

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri GlobalJump to: navigation, search Contents 1 FinancialWashtenaw

  17. Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri GlobalJump to: navigation, search Contents 1

  18. DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Overview: 2011 Waste-to-Energy Using Fuel Cells

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave theJulyD&D Project|StatementDOEDepartmentWorkshop | Department

  19. "Wet" Waste-to-Energy in the Bioenergy Technologies Office | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of Bad CholesteroliManage Presentation3|Regulatory5,000 CubicEnergy

  20. Microsoft PowerPoint - Tribal Leader Forum Waste to Energy Introduction

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311, 3312),Microgrid Set-Top BoxSS-2 SANS SCADALLC Tribal Leader

  1. Waste to Energy Power Production at DOE and DOD Sites | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and03/02Report |toVEHICLEofConservationDepartment ofBalance

  2. Waste-to-Energy Projects at Army Installations | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and03/02Report |toVEHICLEofConservationDepartmentProjects at

  3. Waste-to-Energy using Fuel Cells Webinar | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: SinceDevelopment | Department ofPartnerships ToolkitWaste Heat Waste Heat - - to

  4. Waste-to-Energy using Fuel Cells Workshop | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: SinceDevelopment | Department ofPartnerships ToolkitWaste Heat Waste Heat - - toWorkshop

  5. Waste-to-Energy Biomass Digester with Decreased Water Consumption - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1DOE AwardsDNitrate Saltmilestone,

  6. A Feasibility Study of H{sub 2}S Abatement by Incineration of Noncondensable Gases in Vented Steam Flow from Davies-State 5206-1 Geothermal Steam Well, Geysers Geothermal Steam Field, Lake County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2006-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Determine feasibility of using an incineration-type device to accomplish the required reduction in vent steam H{sub 2}S content to meet ICAPCO rules. This approach is to be the only method considered in this feasibility study.

  7. Report on the US EPA technical workshop on WTI incinerator risk assessment issues. Held in Washington, DC on January 11, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents information and materials from a peer review workshop organized by EPA`s Risk Assessment Forum for Region 5 and the Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response. The subject of the peer review was a draft document prepared by Region 5 assessing risk at an incinerator operated by Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) in East Liverpool, Ohio. This report summarizes the discussions that took place at the peer review workshop. The report opens with an overview of the workshop and a history of EPA`s WTI incinerator risk assessment activities (section 1), then presents the chairperson`s summary (section 2) and the five work group chairs` summaries (section 3). The body of the report ends with highlights of the peer reviewers` preliminary comments and of the comments offered by workshop observers (section 4).

  8. JAPAN'S TAKUMA BUILDING BEIJING WTE PLANT TOKYO, Nov 11

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    , GSE is constructing a municipal solid waste (MSW) incinerator in Gao-an-tun (Beijing) at an existing for the effective treatment of hazardous wastes, the technology employed by this facility includes rotary kiln a trash incineration plant in Beijing. Soon to be the largest municipal waste-to-energy facility in China

  9. K-1435 Wastewater Treatment System for the Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator Wastewater at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, TN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swientoniewski M.D.

    2008-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the design and performance of a wastewater treatment system installed to support the operation of a hazardous waste incinerator. The Oak Ridge Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator (TSCAI), located at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), is designed and permitted to treat Resource ConservatioN and Recovery Act (RCRA) wastes including characteristic and listed wastes and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated mixed waste. the incinerator process generates acidic gases and particulates which consist of salts, metals, and radionuclides. These off-gases from the incinerator are treated with a wet off-gas scrubber system. The recirculated water is continuously purged (below down), resulting in a wastewater to be treated. Additional water sources are also collected on the site for treatment, including storm water that infiltrates into diked areas and fire water from the incinerator's suppression system. To meet regulatory requirements for discharge, a wastewater treatment system (WWTS) was designed, constructed, and operated to treat these water sources. The WWTS was designed to provide for periodic fluctuation of contaminant concentrations due to various feed streams to the incinverator. Blow down consists of total suspended solids (TSS) and total dissolved solids (TDS), encompassing metals, radionuclide contamination and trace organics. The system design flow rate range is 35 to 75 gallons per minute (gpm). The system is designed with redundancy to minimize time off-line and to reduce impacts to the TSCAI operations. A novel treatment system uses several unit operations, including chemical feed systems, two-stage chemical reaction treatment, microfiltration, sludge storage and dewatering, neutralization, granular activated carbon, effluent neutralization, and a complete programmable logic controller (PLC) and human-machine interface (HMI) control system. To meet the space requirements and to provide portability of the WWTS to other applications, the system was installed in three, over-the-road semi trailers, and interconnected with piping and power. Trailers were oriented on a small site footprint to facilitate ease of installation. A remote sump pump skid was provided to convey water from two holding sumps adjacent to the treatment process. An accumulation tank and pump were also provided to receive miscellaneous wastewaters for treatment if they meet the waste acceptance criteria. The paper includes details of the technology used in the design, the requirements for compliance, and the initial performance demonstration and jar testing results. The WWTS successfully allowed for highly efficient, high-volume treatment with compliant discharge to off-site surface water.

  10. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 7. Accident analysis: Selection and assessment of potential release scenarios. Draft report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. The Accident Analysis is an evaluation of the likelihood of occurrence and resulting consequences from several general classes of accidents that could potentially occur during operation of the facility. The Accident Analysis also evaluates the effectiveness of existing mitigation measures in reducing off-site impacts. Volume VII describes in detail the methods used to conduct the Accident Analysis and reports the results of evaluations of likelihood and consequence for the selected accident scenarios.

  11. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 6. Screening ecological risk assessment (SERA). Draft report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. The Screening Ecological Risk Assessment (SERA) is an analysis of the potential significance of risks to ecological receptors (e.g., plants, fish, wildlife) from exposure to facility emissions. The SERA was performed using conservative assumptions and approaches to determine if a further, more refined analysis is warranted. Volume VI describes in detail the methods used in the SERA and reports the results of the SERA in terms of site-specific risks to ecological receptors.

  12. Progress report and technology status development of an EG and G Berthold LB-150 alpha/beta particulate monitor for use on the East Tennessee Technology Park Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shor, J.T.; Singh, S.P.N. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical Technology Div.; Gibson, L.V. Jr. [East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, TN (United States). ASO Customer Services Div.

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project was to modify and evaluate a commercially available EG and G Berthold LB-150 alpha-beta radionuclide particulate monitor for the high-temperature and moisture-saturation conditions of the East Tennessee Technology Park (formerly K-25 Site) Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Incinerator stack. The monitor was originally outfitted for operation at gas temperatures of 150 F on the defunct Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) controlled air incinerator, and the objective was to widen its operating envelope. A laboratory apparatus was constructed that simulated the effects of water-saturated air at the TSCA Incinerator stack-gas temperatures, 183 F. An instrumented set of heat exchangers was constructed to then condition the gas so that the radionuclide monitor could be operated without condensation. Data were collected under the conditions of the elevated temperatures and humidities and are reported herein, and design considerations of the apparatus are provided. The heat exchangers and humidification equipment performed as designed, the Mylar film held, and the instrument suffered no ill effects. However, for reasons as yet undetermined, the sensitivity of the radionuclide detection diminishes as the gas temperature is elevated, whether the gas is humidified or not. The manufacturer has had no experience with (a) the operation of the monitor under these conditions and (b) any commercial market that might exist for an instrument that operates under these conditions. The monitor was not installed into the radiologically contaminated environment of the TSCA Incinerator stack pending resolution of this technical issue.

  13. PUTTING KNOWLEDGE TO WORK The University of Georgia and Ft. Valley State College, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and counties of the state cooperating.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navara, Kristen

    to poultry producers, including: burial, incineration, rendering, and composting. Available options. The use of incineration is now popular and is used by a large number of poultry producers where pits of fuel globally is making incineration a very expensive method of disposal. Incineration also poses

  14. Waste-to-Energy Facilities in Taiwan by Shang-Hsiu Lee, WTERT/Earth Engineering Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    stage Operator 1 Neihwu, Taipei City 900 144 Mass Burn Fixed bed (Takuma) Sinotech Engineering 2 Muja, Taipei City 1,500 324 Mass Burn Fixed bed (Takuma) SEC Takuma Co. Ltd completed July, 1994 EPB of Taipei City 3 Beitou, Taipei City 1,800 1,080 Mass Burn Fixed bed (Von Roll) SEC Marubeni Co

  15. 1 Copyright 2009 by ASME Proceedings of the 17th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    models. On the other hand, full-scale grate models have not been used for examining solid waste mixing these phenomena, a full-scale physical model of the reverse acting grate was built and used for investigating residence time analysis using clay, wood and ceramic spheres in a small-scale model of the reverse acting

  16. Technical Report for the MVB (MSW & Biomass) Waste to Energy Plants and the AVG Hazardous WTE Plant in Hamburg, Germany

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    is circulating fluidised bed having an efficiency rate of 92.24 % · The flowrate of the produced steam is 90 tph's residuals are 6,417 tpa fine combusted bed ash (4% of the initial feed), 4,967 tpa rough combusted bed ash

  17. Copyright 2009 by ASME Proceedings of the 17th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    and in some cases nearly tripled, (b) energy recovery per unit of carbon dioxide emitted has become unit volume of combustion chamber; heat transfer rate per unit area of boiler surfaces; % excess air composition and high temperature corrosion in boiler that limit steam temperature and pressure and thus

  18. Covanta Announces Contracts for Lee County, Florida Waste-to-Energy Facility Wednesday February 8, 3:51 pm ET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    serves as an integral component of the comprehensive solid waste management plan of Lee County, which of a community's integrated solid waste management plan. Lee County's decision to expand its facility reinforces and commercial solid waste generated in the County. Waste is converted first to steam and then to electricity

  19. 16th North American Waste to Energy Conference-May 2008 CO2 Enhanced Steam Gasification of Biomass Fuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the decomposition of various biomass feedstocks and their conversion to gaseous fuels such as hydrogen. The steam studied. The biomass feedstocks were studied through the use of Thermo Gravimetric Analysis (TGA), Gas of biomass feedstocks can also aid in the processing of MSW. Gas evolution as a function of temperature

  20. Waste-To-Energy Techno-Economic Analysis and Life-Cycle Analysis Presentation for BETO 2015 Project Peer Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and03/02Report |toVEHICLEofConservationDepartment

  1. Advanced Manufacturing Office: Case Study - The Challenge: Improving the Performance of a Waste-To-Energy Facility

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of1 AAcceleratedDepartment of Energy LWR AdvancedMunicipalRefuse

  2. Experimental research on emission and removal of dioxins in flue gas from a co-combustion of MSW and coal incinerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhong Zhaoping [Department of Power Engineering, Research Institute of Thermal Energy Engineering, Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of Ministry of Education, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China)]. E-mail: zzhong@seu.edu.cn; Jin Baosheng [Department of Power Engineering, Research Institute of Thermal Energy Engineering, Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of Ministry of Education, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Huang Yaji [Department of Power Engineering, Research Institute of Thermal Energy Engineering, Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of Ministry of Education, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Zhou Hongcang [Department of Power Engineering, Research Institute of Thermal Energy Engineering, Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of Ministry of Education, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Lan Jixiang [Department of Power Engineering, Research Institute of Thermal Energy Engineering, Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of Ministry of Education, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the experimental study of dioxins removal from flue gas from a co-combustion municipal solid waste and coal incinerator by means of a fluidized absorption tower and a fabric filter. A test rig has been set up. The flow rate of flue gas of the test rig is 150-2000 m{sup 3}/h. The system was composed of a humidification and cooling system, an absorption tower, a demister, a slurry make-up tank, a desilter, a fabric filter and a measurement system. The total height of the absorption tower was 6.5 m, and the diameter of the reactor pool was 1.2 m. When the absorbent was 1% limestone slurry, the recirculation ratio was 3, the jet rate was 5-15 m/s and the submerged depth of the bubbling pipe under the slurry was 0.14 m, the removal efficiency for dioxins was 99.35%. The concentration of dioxins in the treated flue gas was 0.1573 x 10{sup -13} kg/Nm{sup 3} and the concentration of oxygen was 11%. This concentration is comparable to the emission standards of other developed countries.

  3. Vincennes University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julie Napier

    2015-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    150 N. University Street. West Lafayette IN, 47907-2067 ... Highest degree from an accredited college/university ... ______ Library professional staff. ______ ...

  4. RVF The Swedish Association of Waste Management www.rvf.se of the Swedish report "Frbrnning av avfall en

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    "Förbränning av avfall ­ en kunskapssammanställning om dioxiner"(Waste­to-energy, an inventory and review about with household waste and other combustible material, while also producing valuable energy. The main aims the field of waste, and the role of waste incineration in waste processing and energy generation. This first

  5. Ryerson University Â… Harvest Home

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy at Waste-to-Energy usingofRetrofittingFundA l iRuralDepartmentRyerson

  6. Effluent testing for the Oak Ridge Toxic Substances Control Act mixed waste incinerator emissions tests of January 16 and 18, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shor, J.T. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Bostick, W.D.; Coroneos, A.C.; Bunch, D.H.; Gibson, L.V.; Hoffmann, D.P.; Shoemaker, J.L. (Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States))

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On January 16 and 18, 1991, special emissions tests were conducted at the Oak Ridge, K-25 Site Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Incinerator. Both tests were approximately 6 h long and were performed at TSCA temperatures (1200{degrees}C, secondary combustion chamber (SSC)). Liquid feed and effluent samples were collected every 30 min. A filter was used to collect particles from stack gases to study morphology and composition during the first test. Isokinetic air samples were also taken during the second test. Metals emissions from the second test were evaluated using the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 5 sampling train. The aqueous waste was collected and fed in batches to the Central Neutralization Facility (CNF), where it was treated by iron coprecipitation and polymer flocculation and data were collected. In the first test (1-16-91), the aqueous and organic wastes were fed directly to the kiln or primary combustion chamber (PCC). In the second test (1-18-91), the remaining organic waste from the first test was fed into the SSC, and other organic waste was fed into the PCC. One objective of the two tests was to determine if feeding the same organic waste into the two combustion chambers made a difference in a partitioning of uranium and other metals. No evaluation of radionuclides other than uranium was made. The partition coefficient of uranium to the quench water was 0.3 on January 16 and 0.35 on January 18; so directing Tank 306A to the feed to the primary vs the secondary combustion chamber appears to have made little difference. The partition coefficient of uranium to the stack on January 18 was 0.0039. 5 refs., 15 figs., 26 tabs.

  7. Effluent testing for the Oak Ridge Toxic Substances Control Act mixed waste incinerator emissions tests of January 16 and 18, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shor, J.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Bostick, W.D.; Coroneos, A.C.; Bunch, D.H.; Gibson, L.V.; Hoffmann, D.P.; Shoemaker, J.L. [Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States)

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On January 16 and 18, 1991, special emissions tests were conducted at the Oak Ridge, K-25 Site Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Incinerator. Both tests were approximately 6 h long and were performed at TSCA temperatures [1200{degrees}C, secondary combustion chamber (SSC)]. Liquid feed and effluent samples were collected every 30 min. A filter was used to collect particles from stack gases to study morphology and composition during the first test. Isokinetic air samples were also taken during the second test. Metals emissions from the second test were evaluated using the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 5 sampling train. The aqueous waste was collected and fed in batches to the Central Neutralization Facility (CNF), where it was treated by iron coprecipitation and polymer flocculation and data were collected. In the first test (1-16-91), the aqueous and organic wastes were fed directly to the kiln or primary combustion chamber (PCC). In the second test (1-18-91), the remaining organic waste from the first test was fed into the SSC, and other organic waste was fed into the PCC. One objective of the two tests was to determine if feeding the same organic waste into the two combustion chambers made a difference in a partitioning of uranium and other metals. No evaluation of radionuclides other than uranium was made. The partition coefficient of uranium to the quench water was 0.3 on January 16 and 0.35 on January 18; so directing Tank 306A to the feed to the primary vs the secondary combustion chamber appears to have made little difference. The partition coefficient of uranium to the stack on January 18 was 0.0039. 5 refs., 15 figs., 26 tabs.

  8. Toxic species emissions from controlled combustion of selected automotive rubber components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shalkowski, Mark Henry

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to change significantly in the future. It is estimated that by the year 2010, about one half of the MSW in the United States will be incinerated in energy-recovery facilities (8). With this much of our MSW to be incinerated, the issue of toxic species... being introduced to the environment through incinerator emissions and ash must be addressed. Over the last 20 years, more than 100 waste-to-energy plants have been built in the United States. There are almost that many plants currently either...

  9. Charles Darwin University Flinders University Griffith University James Cook University La Trobe University Murdoch University The University of Newcastle Biography for GLOVER, Professor Barney

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University Murdoch University The University of Newcastle Biography for GLOVER, Professor Barney Vice Chancellor, Charles Darwin University Professor Barney Glover is Vice-Chancellor of Charles Darwin University

  10. University Profile University of Canterbury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    University Profile 2007­2009 #12;University of Canterbury PROFILE 2007 - 2009 Submitted to the Tertiary Education Commission, 31 October, 2006 #12;University of Canterbury Profile 2007-2009 Page 2 of 64 #12;Contents Page Profile Purpose and Structure 4 Part A: Strategic Direction 5 Part B: Key Strategic

  11. Energy aspects of solid waste management: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Eighteenth Annual Illinois Energy Conference entitled ``Energy Aspects of Solid Waste Management`` was held in Chicago, Illinois on October 29--30, 1990. The conference program was developed by a planning committee that drew upon Illinois energy and environmental specialists from the major sectors including energy industries, environmental organizations, research universities, utility companies, federal, state and local government agencies, and public interest groups. Within this framework, the committee identified a number of key topic areas surrounding solid waste management in Illinois which were the focus of the conference. These issues included: review of the main components of the solid waste cycle in the Midwest and what the relative impact of waste reduction, recycling, incineration and land disposal might be on Illinois` and the Midwest`s solid waste management program. Investigation of special programs in the Midwest dealing with sewage sludge, combustion residuals and medical/infectious wastes. Review of the status of existing landfills in Illinois and the Midwest and an examination of the current plans for siting of new land disposal systems. Review of the status of incinerators and waste-to-energy systems in Illinois and the Midwest, as well as an update on activities to maximize methane production from landfills in the Midwest.

  12. Energy aspects of solid waste management: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Eighteenth Annual Illinois Energy Conference entitled Energy Aspects of Solid Waste Management'' was held in Chicago, Illinois on October 29--30, 1990. The conference program was developed by a planning committee that drew upon Illinois energy and environmental specialists from the major sectors including energy industries, environmental organizations, research universities, utility companies, federal, state and local government agencies, and public interest groups. Within this framework, the committee identified a number of key topic areas surrounding solid waste management in Illinois which were the focus of the conference. These issues included: review of the main components of the solid waste cycle in the Midwest and what the relative impact of waste reduction, recycling, incineration and land disposal might be on Illinois' and the Midwest's solid waste management program. Investigation of special programs in the Midwest dealing with sewage sludge, combustion residuals and medical/infectious wastes. Review of the status of existing landfills in Illinois and the Midwest and an examination of the current plans for siting of new land disposal systems. Review of the status of incinerators and waste-to-energy systems in Illinois and the Midwest, as well as an update on activities to maximize methane production from landfills in the Midwest.

  13. OLD DOMINION UNIVERSITY University Policies and Procedures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AND ADMINISTRATOR RECRUITMENT FUNDING PROCEDURE Statement: University Recruitment Budget (1) The university6010 - 1 OLD DOMINION UNIVERSITY University Policies and Procedures 6010 - FACULTY maintains a central budget, called the University Recruitment Budget, for the support of essential

  14. 1 Columbia University--The University Seminars COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Champagne, Frances A.

    1 Columbia University--The University Seminars COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY T H E U N I V E R S I T Y S E M. Belknap Professor Emeritus of Russian, Columbia University, Director Emeritus of The University Seminars, Columbia University Susan Boynton Associate Professor of Music, Columbia University Ester Fuchs Professor

  15. DIMACS Center Rutgers University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins University Andrew Patrick, NRC Canada Norman Sadeh, Carnegie Mellon University Working Group University Mark Ackerman, University of Michigan Fabian Monrose, Johns Hopkins University Andrew Patrick, NRC Canada Norman Sadeh, Carnegie Mellon University Workshop: Cryptography: Theory Meets Practice Dates

  16. ADMINISTRATIVE UNIVERSITY POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ADMINISTRATIVE UNIVERSITY POLICY FACULTY UNIVERSITY POLICY STUDENT UNIVERSITY POLICY Issue stakeholder list "Log-In" of Proposed University Policy with the University Compliance Committee (UCC) UCC identifies which track (i.e., Administrative, Faculty, or Student) the proposed University Policy

  17. CONSORTIUM MEMBERS EU Universities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heermann, Dieter W.

    coordinator > University of Tirana, Albania > University of Sarajevo, Bosnia & Herzegovina > South East Foundation, Belgium > University of Tuzla, Bosnia & Herzegovina > Roma Virtual Network, Israel > University

  18. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Indiana University, Bloomington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    / 1 #12; 2005 4 University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Indiana University, Bloomington University of Illinois, Urbana-Champagne University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 19 Center University of Michigan, Georgetown University, University of Nebraska, University of Kansas University

  19. Montgomery, *University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zink+, Doug Montgomery, Jin Ho Hahm# National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) *University Label table Label table APIs Label routing APIs RSVP label APIs user level kernel level NIST Switch 6

  20. University Archives University of Missouri at Columbia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Jerry

    University Archives University of Missouri at Columbia 703 Lewis Hall University of Missouri-Columbia Archives of the University of Missouri at Columbia reserves the right to refuse permission to individuals agree to credit the University Archives of the University of Missouri at Columbia in accordance

  1. UNIVERSITY STANDARDS AND REGULATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royer, Dana

    2014­2015 UNIVERSITY STANDARDS AND REGULATIONS #12;Wesleyan University does not discriminate STANDARDS OF CONDUCT

  2. UNIVERSITY STANDARDS AND REGULATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royer, Dana

    2013­2014 UNIVERSITY STANDARDS AND REGULATIONS #12;Wesleyan University does not discriminate STANDARDS OF CONDUCT

  3. UNIVERSITY OF ABERDEEN UNIVERSITY COURT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levi, Ran

    from Talisman towards student scholarships and from a number of oil companies towards a centre to be a post-doctoral researcher. The University had been ranked as one of the top twenty institutions outside

  4. Recycling universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaume Garriga; Alexander Vilenkin

    1997-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    If the effective cosmological constant is non-zero, our observable universe may enter a stage of exponential expansion. In such case, regions of it may tunnel back to the false vacuum of an inflaton scalar field, and inflation with a high expansion rate may resume in those regions. An ``ideal'' eternal observer would then witness an infinite succession of cycles from false vacuum to true, and back. Within each cycle, the entire history of a hot universe would be replayed. If there were several minima of the inflaton potential, our ideal observer would visit each one of these minima with a frequency which depends on the shape of the potential. We generalize the formalism of stochastic inflation to analyze the global structure of the universe when this `recycling' process is taken into account.

  5. University Partnerships

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrinceton Plasma Physics Lab UniqueFeet)UniversityUniversity

  6. Digital Gas Notified That Entropic Consortium Has Approval to Commercialize a Waste-to-Energy Plant in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    technology produces a clean-burning by-product from the widest variety of processed waste. The product has represented by the coal-substitute technology and the utilization of its advanced farming and other to a final design, technology and administrative review by the Ho Chi Minh City Environmental Protection

  7. German Company Offers to Transform Sofia Waste to Energy The German company AlphaKat has filed a bid at Sofia municipality to construct an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    and might be used for vehicles and heating. AlphaKat explained that under that technology 1liter of diesel of the offered technology include the fact that there would be no need for waste depots and baling systems

  8. Energy Recovery from Municipal Solid WasteEnergy Recovery from Municipal Solid Waste WASTE TO ENERGY PLANT AT VIJAYAWADAWASTE TO ENERGY PLANT AT VIJAYAWADA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    TO ENERGY PLANT AT VIJAYAWADAWASTE TO ENERGY PLANT AT VIJAYAWADA #12;UNIQUE PROCESSUNIQUE PROCESS DEVELOPED BY TIFAC ,Govt of IndiaDEVELOPED BY TIFAC ,Govt of India M S W SOLAR DRYING SCREENING AIR CLASSI - FICATION WASTES #12;ENERGY FROM SOLID WASTESENERGY FROM SOLID WASTES VIJAYAWADA PLANTVIJAYAWADA PLANT #12;Pusher

  9. "Potential for Combined Heat and Power and District Heating and Cooling from Waste-to-Energy Facilities in the U.S. Learning from the Danish Experience"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepard, Kenneth

    "Potential for Combined Heat and Power and District Heating and Cooling from Waste- to Engineering Center and the Henry Krumb School of Mines May 2007 #12;1 Executive Summary In District Heating is used for the generation of electricity. The advantages of district heating using WTE plants are

  10. Proceedings of the 17th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference May 18-20, 2009, Chantilly, Virginia, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    out on gasification of various feedstocks from biomass[5, 6] and coal[4, 7-12]. Recently, according WASTE (MSW) GASIFICATION UNDER VARIOUS PRESSURES AND CO2 CONCENTRATION ATMOSPHERES Eilhann Kwon, Kelly J, New York, NY 10027 ABSTRACT The Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) gasification process is a promising

  11. Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste-to-Energy Conversion, and Waste-to-Chemical Conversion with Industrial Gas and Chemical Manufacturing Processes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyand SustainedBio-Oil DeploymentCombustion |

  12. First waste-to-energy power station put into operation in Vietnam has successfully produced electricity from household and industrial waste as a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    electricity from household and industrial waste as a newly-generated power supply has come online, its average cost per watt would be about half the price of electricity produced by other plants with the national electricity grid. On Wednesday, August 3, the Ho Chi Minh City Urban Environment Management

  13. Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste-to-Energy Conversion, and Waste-to-Chemical Conversion with Industrial Gas and Chemical Manufacturing Processes

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S. Department ofJune 2,The Big Green Bus rolled intoShannon Brescher SheaJohn

  14. University Archives University of Missouri at Columbia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Jerry

    University Archives University of Missouri at Columbia 703 Lewis Hall Columbia, Missouri 65211 of Missouri at Columbia, may be loaned out to University personnel. All items on loan will be listed below on loan from the University Archives, University of Missouri at Columbia. He/She further acknowledges full

  15. University of Maryland University Health Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milchberg, Howard

    special care is taken, should the extracts be lost or damaged, the University Health Center cannot assumeUniversity of Maryland University Health Center ALLERGY INJECTION POLICY The University Health to effectively use our service, we require your cooperation. INSTRUCTIONS Because the University Health Center

  16. UNIVERSITY SPACE POLICY ALLOCATION OF UNIVERSITY SPACE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UNIVERSITY COLLEGE DUBLIN UNIVERSITY SPACE POLICY #12;ALLOCATION OF UNIVERSITY SPACE I Purpose To provide a methodology for the allocation of space across the University II Background Due to the university's success in attracting research funding, the need for space and facilities has grown

  17. NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE AARHUS UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , biogas fuelled engines, natural gas fuelled gas turbines, gas oil fuelled reciprocating engines, gas oil fuelled gas turbines, steam turbines combusting residual oil and reciprocating engines combusting biomass (MSW) incineration plants, plants combusting straw or wood, natural gas fuelled reciprocating engines

  18. UNIVERSITY OF ABERDEEN UNIVERSITY COURT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levi, Ran

    of catering and residential services. Any proposals on the future direction of the company would be received that there remained a considerable number of areas within the University that depended on the future success had been scrutinised by the Audit Committee, and forwarded by the Joint Planning Finance & Estates

  19. Open University

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Michel Pentz est née en Afrique du Sud et venu au Cern en 1957 comme physicien et président de l'associaion du personnel. Il est également fondateur du mouvement Antiapartheid de Genève et a participé à la fondation de l'Open University en Grande-Bretagne. Il nous parle des contextes pédagogiques, culturels et nationaux dans lesquels la méthode peut s'appliquer.

  20. University Profile The University of Canterbury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    05 University Profile 2005-2007 #12;The University of Canterbury Te Whare Wnanga o Waitaha PROFILE Profile 2005-2007 Page 1 of 66 #12;University of Canterbury Profile 2005-2007 Page 2 of 66 #12;University of Canterbury PROFILE 2005-2007 Part A Overview of Strategic Direction and relationship to the Tertiary

  1. University Library AMSTERDAM UNIVERSITY LIBRARY USER REGULATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Rooij, Robert

    University Library AMSTERDAM UNIVERSITY LIBRARY USER REGULATIONS Regulations for the users of the libraries of the University of Amsterdam General 1. The Amsterdam University Library (from hereon: the library) is understood to mean the whole body of faculty libraries and facilities of the Library

  2. Participating Colleges & Universities (2008--2010)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Participating Colleges & Universities (2008--2010) Bowling Green State University Capital University Capital University (Center for Lifelong Learning) DeVry University Fairmount State University Franklin University Heidelberg University Indiana Wesleyan University Kent State University (College

  3. DIMACS Center Rutgers University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Johns Hopkins University Andrew Patrick, NRC Canada Norman Sadeh, Carnegie Mellon University Other Cranor, AT&T Mark Ackerman, University of Michigan Fabian Monrose, Johns Hopkins University Andrew Patrick, NRC Canada Norman Sadeh, Carnegie Mellon University Working Group: Usable Privacy and Security

  4. University Libraries Technology Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Paul A.

    Libraries Bowling Green State University #12;Table of Contents Introduction ..................................................................19 Page 2 of 19 Technology Plan, 2003-2005 University Libraries Bowling Green State University #12University Libraries Technology Plan 2003-2005 Page 1 of 19 Technology Plan, 2003-2005 University

  5. Henri Dwyer Address: 39 Highview Drive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) - Ecole Polytechnique, Paris, France Engineering program in one of France's leading schools - present Administrator/Consulting - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council, New York, NY, USA Part Research Internship - Segawa Laboratory, RCAST, Tokyo University, Tokyo, Japan Research internship

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced technology cogeneration Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Columbia University... ) A future must for WTEs: Co-generation of electricity and district heating or cooling Brescia 12;Waste... -to-Energy Plant (1998) Co-generation Power plant...

  7. University Services Pamela Wheelock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    University Services Pamela Wheelock Vice President MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS University Services Human Resources Linda Bjornberg Director open position CIO OPERATIONS Auxiliary Services Laurie Scheich Berthelsen Associate VP Public Safety Gregory Hestness Assistant VP University Health & Safety Craig Moody

  8. university-logo Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Raymond L.

    university-logo Introduction Spatial Prediction Bayesian Spatial Prediction: BTG Benjamin Kedem Prediction: BTG #12;university-logo Introduction Spatial Prediction Stationary isotropic Gaussian random Kriging BTG Benjamin Kedem Bayesian Spatial Prediction: BTG #12;university-logo Introduction Spatial

  9. University Partners Panel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Matt Tirrell, Pritzker Director and Professor, Institute for Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago Thomas Glasmacher, Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) Project Manager, Michigan State University

  10. ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY STETSON UNIVERSITY Phoenix, AZ Deland, FL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    English Literature English BOWLING GREEN STATE UNIVERSITY Bowling Green, OH SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY IndustrialARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY STETSON UNIVERSITY Phoenix, AZ Deland, FL Interdisciplinary Studies Leadership FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY Instructional Systems Design Tallahassee, FL Interdisciplinary Studies

  11. Graduate Programs Auburn University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forestry Graduate Programs Auburn University Auburn University, Alabama 368495414 Programs://www.forestry.auburn.edu/graduate/ University of California, Berkeley Berkeley, California 947203114 Program: Forestry http://espm.berkeley.edu/gradprograms/grad_programs_mf.html Clemson University Clemson, South Carolina 29634 Program: Forest Resources http

  12. Columbia University Postdoctoral Officers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grishok, Alla

    Columbia University Postdoctoral Officers Handbook 2013 #12;Greetings! I am excited to welcome you to the Columbia University community of scholars and investigators. The Columbia University Office of Postdoctoral Director, Office of Postdoctoral Affairs Columbia University in the city of new york office of postdoctoral

  13. Columbia University Postdoctoral Officers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grishok, Alla

    Columbia University Postdoctoral Officers Handbook 2011 #12;Greetings! I am excited to welcome you to the Columbia University community of scholars and investigators. The Columbia University Office of Postdoctoral of Postdoctoral Affairs Columbia university in the City of new york offiCe of postdoCtoral affairs 840 Interchurch

  14. Renewing University Base Funding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renewing University Base Funding The Priority Issues 29 February 2012 e conor funding to universities as an immediate goal. It has already put in place increases worth 3.5%. 2 undergraduate or postgraduate, be funded at the same rate. #12;3 Charles Darwin University Flinders University

  15. PHILADELPHIA UNIVERSITY 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in King Talal Water Dam in Jordan) . #12;PHILADELPHIA UNIVERSITY

  16. Residential Learning University Housing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rusu, Adrian

    Residential Learning & University Housing Handbook 2008 - 2009 A Guide for Residential Living on the Campus of Rowan University #12;Welcome to Residential Learning & University Housing! The primary purpose of the Office of Residential Life & University Housing is to assist and support students in the pursuit

  17. Robert Blankenship Director Washington University Dewey Holten

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Washington University David Bocian, University of California, Riverside Donald Bryant, Pennsylvania State University Richard Cogdell, University of Glasgow P. Leslie...

  18. University of Nebraska-Lincoln and University of Florida (Building...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nebraska-Lincoln and University of Florida (Building Energy Efficient Homes for America) Jump to: navigation, search Name: University of Nebraska-Lincoln and University of Florida...

  19. University Housing University of South Carolina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almor, Amit

    at the University of South Carolina. It is designed to be a sustainable living and learning environment and employs a more sustainable campus and society. These programming efforts are a collaboration among University Housing, Sustainable Carolina and other campus partners. Community Features · Attending events

  20. , UNIVERSITY Brigham Young University Geology Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    , UNIVERSITY #12;Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 1 5 - 1968 Part 2 Studies for Students No. 1 Guide to the Geology of the Wasatch Mountain Front, Between Provo Canyon and Y Mountain, Northeast of Provo, Utah by J. Keith Rigby and Lehi F. Hintze #12;A publication of the Department of Geology

  1. Incinerator residue in bituminous base construction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haynes, Joseph Anthony

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for use of the material in a bituminous base. Preliminary investigation on the optimum mix design included Hveem stability, Marshall stability and Durability tests, A test section consisting of the experimental hot-mixed pavement, littercrete, and a... for flexural fatigue tests, Hveem and Marshall stabilities, thermal expansion, direct tension, splitting tensile and Schmidt tests. Four in. (10. 2 cm. ) diameter cores were taken after compaction (before traffic) and after six months in service. Samples...

  2. Detonation and incineration products of PBX explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fletcher, M.A.; Loughran, E.D.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of experiments are planned to determine detonation product gases that are released into the environment when high explosives are tested. These experiments will be done in a 1.8-m-diam confinement vessel at ambient air pressure and partial vacuum. A matrix of four shots of PBX 9501, three shots of PBX 9502 and one shot of LX-10 are analyzed to determine the reproducibility and mass balance of materials in the detonation. This paper will only report on the detonation product gases as other experiments are planned.

  3. Incineration of radioactive waste in shaft furnace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dmitriev, S.A.; Knyasev, I.A.; Kobelev, A.P. [Moscow SIA Radon, Sergiev Posad (Russian Federation). Dept. of Engineering Supply

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of nuclear technology depends greatly on solving the problems, concerning the treatment of waste, arising from power station activity. A great deal of waste will arise in the process of atomic power station decommissioning. One of the methods for radioactive waste treatment is a method of combustion. The volume reduction factor of the final product is 60--100. In the process of combustion, the organic radwaste is transported into gaseous wastes and ash. For better environmental protection, one must achieve the minimal release of nuclides from partially burned products in the gaseous phase, and maximize the waste in ash form suitable for final disposal.

  4. Stanford University Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University Hearing Conservation Program April 2006 #12;Stanford University HEARING CONSERVATION PROGRAM CONTENTS PAGE 1.0 INTRODUCTION.2 Environmental Health and Safety (EH&S)..............................................4 3.3 Employees

  5. University Research Summaries

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Idaho National Laboratory published the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Geothermal Technologies Office 2001 University Research Summaries. 

  6. University Library Employee Recognition Event 2012 University Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    University Library Employee Recognition Event ­ 2012 University Library 2012 Employee Recognition Marken #12;University Library Employee Recognition Event ­ 2012 Successful Professional Development Years of Library Service Darlene Fichter Lois Thorne Carolyn Marud 25 Years of University Service Twyla

  7. Michigan State University Alumni Association MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michigan State University Alumni Association Bylaws #12;2 MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY ALUMNI of the organization shall be the Michigan State University Alumni Association (hereinafter, the "Association"). Section 2 Mission Statement The Michigan State University Alumni Association supports and enhances

  8. Guillaume Bal Columbia University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bal, Guillaume

    Guillaume Bal Columbia University 500 W. 120th St, New York, NY 10027, U.S.A. (212) 854 4731 - 1993 Professional Experience · Professor, Columbia University, 2008-present. · Associate Professor, Columbia University, 2003-2008. · Visiting scholar, Institute for Pure and Applied Mathematics, UCLA campus

  9. Keimyung University South Korea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheon, James M.

    ) · Completion of a minimum of 45 hours in good academic standing at Georgia Southern University · Previous practical knowledge of the Korean language, economy and business. Other courses taught in English the university's Korean Language Institute. Keimyung University has strong and proud reputation of having well

  10. MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY INTRODUCTIONi.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;2 MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY INTRODUCTIONi. Welcome to the Online Professional Master of Science), and the College of Veterinary Medicine (CVM) at Michigan State University (MSU). This booklet contains important, Program Director Online Master of Science in Food Safety Michigan State University 1129 Farm Lane, Rm B 51

  11. Universal Prediction Neri Merhav

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merhav, Neri

    Universal Prediction Neri Merhav y Meir Feder z July 23, 1998 Abstract This paper consists of an overview on universal prediction from an information-theoretic perspective. Special attention is given of the universal prediction problem are described with emphasis on the analogy and the di erences between results

  12. INTRODUCTION UNIVERSITY LOGO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Steven C.

    6.4.12 #12;INTRODUCTION UNIVERSITY LOGO COLOR PALETTE TYPOGRAPHY NOMENCLATURE TONE OF VOICE IMAGERY. The University of California, Irvine #12;#12;UNIVERSITY LOGO Overview As one of the world's leading institutions of higher learning, it is crucial for UC Irvine to consistently display a clear and unified logo. This guide

  13. university-logo Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Saporta, Benoîte

    university-logo Introduction Our Model Optimal Portfolio Allocation Comparisons of Strategies, February 2006 Benoîte de Saporta Technical Analysis vs Mathematical Models #12;university-logo Introduction Saporta Technical Analysis vs Mathematical Models #12;university-logo Introduction Our Model Optimal

  14. Bowling Green State University Coordinator of Library Instruction, University Libraries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Paul A.

    Bowling Green State University Coordinator of Library Instruction, University Libraries The University Libraries (UL) at Bowling Green State University (BGSU) invites applications and nominations and the University of Toledo, is managed by the University Libraries. Established in 1910, BGSU has received

  15. Oklahoma State University Purchasing Card

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    Oklahoma State University Purchasing Card Guidelines Oklahoma State University Fiscal and Administrative Compliance 306 Whitehurst Stillwater, OK 74078 http://faac.okstate.edu August 2011 Oklahoma State University Purchasing Card Guidelines Fiscal and Administrative Compliance Oklahoma State University #12;Page

  16. OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY MEDICAL AUTHORITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY MEDICAL AUTHORITY June 30, 2010 #12;OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY MEDICAL Authority Members Oklahoma State University Medical Authority Tulsa, Oklahoma We have audited the accompanying statements of financial position of the Oklahoma State University Medical Authority (the

  17. OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY MEDICAL AUTHORITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY MEDICAL AUTHORITY June 30, 2009 #12;OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY MEDICAL Authority Members Oklahoma State University Medical Authority Tulsa, Oklahoma We have audited the accompanying statements of financial position of the Oklahoma State University Medical Authority (the

  18. University of Toronto Governing Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boonstra, Rudy

    fiVO AR BO R VELUT University of Toronto Governing Council W eb C opy UNIVERSITY FUNDS INVESTMENT://www.governingcouncil.utoronto.ca/ #12;UNIVERSITY FUNDS INVESTMENT POLICY June 21, 2007 Table of Contents 1. DESCRIPTION OF UNIVERSITY.....................................................................................................6 W eb C opy University of Toronto Governing Council--Web version 2 #12;UNIVERSITY FUNDS INVESTMENT

  19. Bulletin 2001-2003 Indiana University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polly, David

    Indianapolis Indiana University East (Richmond) Indiana University­Purdue University Fort Wayne Indiana University Kokomo Indiana University Northwest (Gary) Indiana University South Bend Indiana University University­Purdue University Fort Wayne RUTH J. PERSON, Ph.D., Chancellor of Indiana University Kokomo BRUCE

  20. e conor.king@iru.edu.au t 0434 601 691 w iru.edu.au Charles Darwin University Flinders University Griffith University James Cook University La Trobe University Murdoch University The University of Newcastle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    e conor.king@iru.edu.au t 0434 601 691 w iru.edu.au Charles Darwin University Flinders University Griffith University James Cook University La Trobe University Murdoch University The University of Newcastle Response to the Base Funding Review Recommendations 29 February 2012 #12;2 The purpose of base

  1. Heidelberg University Allemagne | Germany

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petriu, Emil M.

    Heidelberg University Allemagne | Germany Équivalences - Course Equivalencies «NOTE IMPORTANTE : Ce Sciences sociales Social Sciences The Political System of Germany 180511301 POL3XXX Sciences sociales

  2. Technische Universiteit University oflechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franssen, Michael

    TU/e Technische Universiteit Eindhoven University oflechnology Besluitenlijst van de 1630e. Blauwdruk Eindhoven Graduate School Het College stelt de blauwdruk van de Eindhoven Graduate School vast

  3. McMaster University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mar 2, 2004 ... McMaster University. Advanced Optimization Laboratory ...... library for convex optimization based on an analytic center cutting plane method,.

  4. Purdue University Probability Seminar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wroclaw University of Technology, Heat kernel estimates for unimodal Lévy .... we establish the same scaling limit in the critical regime for three families of ...

  5. Yale University Mechanical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dollar, Aaron M.

    ) ­ #92474A029 (4x) #12;OpenHand Yale University Mechanical Engineering 3D Printer Requirements · Current · Majority of parts are designed to not require support material · Authors do not know how well alternate 3D printers will produce adequate components #12;OpenHand Yale University Mechanical Engineering Finger

  6. University Library Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brierley, Andrew

    and a recognition of the need to provide zones within the building for different types of library user behaviourUniversity Library Annual Report 2011-2012 #12;Academic Year 2011-12 brought with it another period of turbulent change ­ most of it positive ­ for the University Library. The major and very tangible difference

  7. Utrecht University September 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Utrecht University September 2011 Faculty of Geosciences Welcome International Students #12;GEO.30 at the StudiePunt international@geo.uu.nl #12;Universiteit Utrecht Outline International Programme · General Orientation by Utrecht University (last Friday: 2 September 2011) · Social Orientation by ESN (last Saturday

  8. Portland State UNIVERSITY HOUSING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    Portland State UNIVERSITY HOUSING FAMILY MEMBER CONFIRMATION FORM *UNIVERSITY HOUSING OFFICE *625 SW JACKSON ST. #210, PORTLAND, OR 97201 *PHONE (503) 725-4375 *FAX (503) 725-4394 *HOUSING@PDX.EDU *WWW.PDX.EDU/HOUSING * For Office Use Only Res Services Assign Accts Badge # RESIDENT INFORMATION

  9. Dynamics of Anisotropic Universes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jerome Perez

    2006-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a general study of the dynamical properties of Anisotropic Bianchi Universes in the context of Einstein General Relativity. Integrability results using Kovalevskaya exponents are reported and connected to general knowledge about Bianchi dynamics. Finally, dynamics toward singularity in Bianchi type VIII and IX universes are showed to be equivalent in some precise sence.

  10. COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY AN OVERVIEW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Junfeng

    COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY AN OVERVIEW #12;COLUMBIA COLLEGE www.college.columbia.edu Columbia College UNIVERSITY SCHOOLS, #12;COLLEGES, AND AFFILIATES SCHOOL OF LAW www.law.columbia.edu Columbia Law School, philosophy, history, music, art, and science. THE FU FOUNDATION SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIENCE www.engineering.columbia

  11. UNIVERSITY POLICE ANNUAL SECURITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kulp, Mark

    UNIVERSITY POLICE 2013 ANNUAL SECURITY AND FIRE SAFETY GUIDE In compliance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act The University of New Orleans. Please take a moment to read the following information. #12;ANNUAL SECURITY AND FIRE SAFETY GUIDE 2013

  12. SEATTLE UNIVERSITY ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, John

    SEATTLE UNIVERSITY ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING STUDENT HANDBOOK Eighteenth Edition July 2011 Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Seattle University 901 12th Avenue P.O. Box 222000 Seattle, WA 98122.seattleu.edu The electrical engineering program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http

  13. University Materials Institute INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escolano, Francisco

    University Materials Institute INTRODUCTION The University Materials Science Institute of Alicante the needed multidisciplinary character of the materials area. It is important to highlight the fact participate in the Materials Science PhD program which is imparted at the UA. Scientific research

  14. University of Operations Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Management Plan Office of Campus and Public Safety University of Delaware Critical Incident Management Plan Management Plan Office of Campus and Public Safety - 4 - University of Delaware Critical Incident Management and Public Safety - 5 - County of New Castle CD-30 911 Center/Communications CD-31 Department of Police CD-32

  15. Iowa State University Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhiqun

    1 Iowa State University Engineering Student Clubs Engineering Student CouncilIowa State University #12;2 AirISU Pg. 4 Alpha Pi Mu Industrial Engineering Honor Society (APM) Pg. 4 American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) Pg. 5 American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE) Pg

  16. WESTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY STUDENT CODE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Doncker, Elise

    WESTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY STUDENT CODE Approved by The Western Michigan University Board Michigan University Kalamazoo, MI 49008 Effective August 2008 #12;A UNIVERSITY COMMUNITY IS... ...a for the Advancement of Teaching; Ernest L. Boyer (frwd.); Princeton, New Jersey; 1990 #12;WESTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY

  17. University of Leoben, Austria University Info

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuchs, Clemens

    to partner university by International Office Is on-campus accomodation available to exchange students? Yes-campus accomodation One or two semesters Cost of on-campus accomodation per month Varies depending on residence hall, approximately 250 - 300 /month Off-campus accomodation Costs depend on type of accommodation, 250 -300 /month

  18. OLD DOMINION UNIVERSITY University Policies and Procedures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and operational activities, hazardous waste streams, including chemical, radioactive, and regulated medical wastes Office will be responsible for collecting hazardous waste for consolidated storage in the waste storage facility and for overseeing the storage of waste in university facilities. The Environmental Health

  19. University Life Strategic Plan UNIVERSITY LIFE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the demands of work, social responsibility, and life in an ever-changing global society. Through a range well-being, post-graduation success Increased retention and timely degree completion Increased Engagement) #12;2 University Life is committed to preparing students for the demands of work, social

  20. University of Michigan -Traveler Contact Information Name __________________________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    University of Michigan - Traveler Contact Information Name __________________________________ Phone __________________________________ Email __________________________________ University of Michigan/Clinic __________________________________ Address __________________________________ Phone __________________________________ University of Michigan

  1. University Libraries University of Nevada, Las Vegas University of Nevada, Las Vegas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemmers, Oliver

    University Libraries University of Nevada, Las Vegas University of Nevada, Las Vegas Center of How Las Vegas Developers Compete with Architectural Design." #12;University Libraries University did not sustain. Unique marketing case studies are identified throughout. View the paper here (pdf

  2. Bulletin 2001-2003 Indiana University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polly, David

    University East (Richmond) Indiana University­Purdue University Fort Wayne Indiana University Kokomo Indiana University Northwest (Gary) Indiana University South Bend Indiana University Southeast (New Albany) Quality, Ph.D., Chancellor of Indiana University­Purdue University Fort Wayne RUTH J. PERSON, Ph

  3. COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Computer Engineering Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Junfeng

    COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Computer Engineering Program The Fu Foundation School of Engineering Zukowski (caz@columbia.edu) Acting Chair, Computer Engineering Program #12;COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Computer interdepartmental major within Engineering School #12;COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Computer Engineering Program The Fu

  4. UNIVERSITY of NEW HAMPSHIRE ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    University Research interests: Computational Biophysics, Biomolecular Simulations, Molecular Transport, Cell University Research interests: Biocatalysis, Biofuels, Bioengineering Kang Wu, Assistant Professor Ph.D. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Research interests: Synthetic Biology, Protein Secretion, Biofuels

  5. MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY PHILANTHROPIST AWARD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY PHILANTHROPIST AWARD The MSU Alumni Association annually seeks and accepts nominations for the Michigan State University PHILANTHROPIST AWARD. This award is presented-going financial support and leadership to Michigan State University. The candidates will have demonstrated

  6. university-logo Graph Expansions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    St Andrews, University of

    university-logo Graph Expansions Green's Relations Closing Remarks Semigroup Graph Expansions January 2009 Rebecca Noonan Heale Semigroup Graph Expansions: #12;university-logo Graph Expansions Green;university-logo Graph Expansions Green's Relations Closing Remarks History Definitions Graph Expansions

  7. Bagley University Classroom Building

    High Performance Buildings Database

    Duluth, MN, MN LEED PLATINUM CERTIFIED AND PASSIVHAUS ( certification pending) CLASSROOM BUILDING The Nature Preserve where this building is located is a contiguous natural area, 55 acres in size, deeded to the University in the 1950's for educational and recreational use. The site has hiking trails through old growth hard woods frequented by the university students as well as the public. We were charged with designing a facility to serve eight different departments for the nature portions of their teaching and study at a regional University.

  8. UNIVERSALITY IS Martin Davis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O F 1 #12;Alan Turing's universal machine: Code of M Input to M It provides a model of a memory amazing coincidence I have ever encountered." #12;Alan Turing 1947 (Address delivered to the London

  9. Indiana University Cognitive Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indiana University

    Indiana University Cognitive Science Exploring the Science of Learning Representations Simulations in science. How can simulations best be designed to enhance science learning and transfer? Computer Modeling Transfer Complex Systems Perception Which representations might help your students learn about

  10. Northwestern University Information Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shull, Kenneth R.

    ... Integrated Technology Classrooms Online Lectures Collaborative Course Management Tools ...in any teaching environment Classroom Laptop Mobile Device www.it.northwestern.edu NUITAcademic&ResearchTechnologiesNorthwestern University Information Technology (NUIT) is committed to supporting faculty research

  11. NEUP Approved Universities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. universities and colleges must apply to the U.S. Department of Energy to administer NEUP scholarships and fellowships.  That is done through a separate solicitation operated by the Department...

  12. Michigan State University Press

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Taosheng

    Michigan State University Press FALL/ WINTER 2013 #12;MICHIGANSTATEUNIVERSITYPRESS This symbol:PALEOLITHICANIMALART.CAVELIONSATGROTTECHAUVET.PHOTO:DONHITCHCOCKFROMANIMALSASNEIGHBORS. INSIDECOVERIMAGE:STENAANECHRISTINE.BORNINDENMARKOCTOBER26,1864.SHEWASARESIDENTOFDIXON,AKENTCOUNTY,MICHIGAN,COMMUNITYCLOSETOTHEDANISHSETTLEMENTOF TRUFANTINMONTCALMCOUNTY.COURTESYOFTHEFLATRIVERHISTORICALSOCIETY,GREENVILLE,MICHIGAN,FROMDANESANDICELANDERSINMICHIGAN. NEW

  13. Simon Fraser University's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a happy second home in the Indigenous Student Centre. Simon Fraser University recognizes the value graduated from Fraser Valley College in 1980 with a diploma in Social Services. Theresa feels her strength

  14. General Announcements Rice University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    as "Audit" or vice versa Deadline: Last day anticipated aid for fall shows as a credit on student accounts, or employment of faculty or staff.In employment, the university seeks to recruit, hire, and advance women

  15. Universal Extra Dimension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anirban Kundu

    2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a brief discussion of the following features of the Universal Extra Dimension (UED) model: (i) Formulation, (ii) Indirect bounds, (iii) Collider search and the Inverse Problem, (iv) Astrophysical bounds, and (v) UED with two extra dimensions.

  16. EPCglobal : a universal standard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aguirre, Juan Ignacio

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis evaluates the likelihood of EPCglobal becoming the universal RFID standard by presenting a framework of ten factors used to analyze and determine if EPCglobal is moving in the right direction. The ten factors ...

  17. Einstein's static universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Domingos Soares

    2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Einstein's static model is the first relativistic cosmological model. The model is static, finite and of spherical spatial symmetry. I use the solution of Einstein's field equations in a homogeneous and isotropic universe -- Friedmann's equation -- to calculate the radius of curvature of the model (also known as "Einstein's universe"). Furthermore, I show, using a Newtonian analogy, the model's mostly known feature, namely, its instability under small perturbations on the state of equilibrium.

  18. Representation of Universal Algebra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aleks Kleyn

    2015-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Theory of representations of universal algebra is a natural development of the theory of universal algebra. Morphism of the representation is the map that conserve the structure of the representation. Exploring of morphisms of the representation leads to the concepts of generating set and basis of representation. In the book I considered the notion of tower of representations of $F_i$-algebras, i=1 ..., n, as the set of coordinated representations of $F_i$-algebras.

  19. University of Northern British Columbia The University Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    1 University of Northern British Columbia The University Plan 2010 #12;1 2 Our Values We excel and responsive to student and community needs. #12;3 4 T he University of Northern British Columbia was born of northern British Columbia motivated 16,000 citizens to pay $5 each and petition government for a university

  20. UNIVERSITY-INDUSTRY LIAISON OFFICE THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ollivier-Gooch, Carl

    UNIVERSITY-INDUSTRY LIAISON OFFICE THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA BREAKTHROUGHRESEARCHBUSINESSRESULTS 2005|06 ANNUAL REPORT UILO #12;The University of British Columbia, aspiring to be one of the world, Canada, and the world. TREK 2010: UBC'S VISION FOR THE 21ST CENTURY The University of British Columbia

  1. NONSINGULAR REGENERATING INFLATIONARY UNIVERSE University of Cambridge, DAMTP, Silver St.,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linde, Andrei

    July 1982 NONSINGULAR REGENERATING INFLATIONARY UNIVERSE A.D. Linde University of Cambridge, DAMTP, Silver St., .*) Cambr~dge CB3 9EW, England Abstract A new version of the inflationary universe scenario now in the inflationary universe scenario (1- 12), which may provide us with a solution of many

  2. MILLERSVILLE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE CATALOG 2005-06 MILLERSVILLE UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardy, Christopher R.

    MILLERSVILLE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE CATALOG 2005-06 1 MILLERSVILLE UNIVERSITY P.O. BOX 1002 Find Your Future. Here. #12;MILLERSVILLE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE CATALOG 2005-06 2 GOVERNING BOARDS GRADUATE CATALOG 2005-06 3 TABLE OF CONTENTS UNIVERSITY ADMINISTRATION

  3. Western Michigan University -Extended University Programs How to Get Started

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Doncker, Elise

    Western Michigan University - Extended University Programs How to Get Started Interested in takingThe first toWestern Michigan University, Office of Admissions,1903W. Michigan Ave,Kalamazoo,MI 49008Western Michigan University,Office of Admissions,1903W.Michigan Ave, Kalamazoo,MI 49008-5211;the other

  4. University AdvAncement Bowling Green State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Paul A.

    University AdvAncement Bowling Green State University Office of Alumni and Development Bowling Green State University Mileti Alumni Center Bowling Green, Ohio 43403-0054 advance.bgsu.edu B O W L I N load. As Bowling Green State University progresses toward achieving its vision of being the premier

  5. University College Annual Report Written by Staff of University College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    .................................................................................................. 17 Scholastic Standards................................................................... 98 International Student Advising..................................................................................... 115 Appendix B: University College Organization Chart

  6. University of New Mexico Chapter University of New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishna, Sanjay

    Sigma Xi University of New Mexico Chapter University of New Mexico Albuquerque, NM 87131 May 13, 2011 Mr. Ajit Barve University of New Mexico Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001 Dear Mr. Barve, On behalf to attend monthly scientific presentations at the University of New Mexico, and participation in the annual

  7. Thermodynamics of Fractal Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad Sheykhi; Zeinab Teimoori; Bin Wang

    2013-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the thermodynamical properties of the apparent horizon in a fractal universe. We find that one can always rewrite the Friedmann equation of the fractal universe in the form of the entropy balance relation $ \\delta Q=T_h d{S_h}$, where $ \\delta Q $ and $ T_{h} $ are the energy flux and Unruh temperature seen by an accelerated observer just inside the apparent horizon. We find that the entropy $S_h$ consists two terms, the first one which obeys the usual area law and the second part which is the entropy production term due to nonequilibrium thermodynamics of fractal universe. This shows that in a fractal universe, a treatment with nonequilibrium thermodynamics of spacetime may be needed. We also study the generalized second law of thermodynamics in the framework of fractal universe. When the temperature of the apparent horizon and the matter fields inside the horizon are equal, i.e. $T=T_h$, the generalized second law of thermodynamics can be fulfilled provided the deceleration and the equation of state parameters ranges either as $-1 \\leq q thermodynamics can be secured in a fractal universe by suitably choosing the fractal parameter $\\beta$.

  8. University contracts summary book

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal objectives of the Fossil Energy Program are to seek new ideas, new data, fundamental knowledge that will support the ongoing programs, and new processes to better utilize the nation's fossil energy resources with greater efficiency and environmental acceptability. Toward this end, the Department of Energy supports research projects conducted by universities and colleges to: Ensure a foundation for innovative technology through the use of the capabilities and talents in our academic institutions; provide an effective, two-way channel of communication between the Department of Energy and the academic community; and ensure that trained technical manpower is developed to carry out basic and applied research in support of DOE's mission. Fossil Energy's university activities emphasize the type of research that universities can do best - research to explore the potential of novel process concepts, develop innovative methods and materials for improving existing processes, and obtain fundamental information on the structure of coal and mechanisms of reactions of coal, shale oil, and other fossil energy sources. University programs are managed by different Fossil Energy technical groups; the individual projects are described in greater detail in this book. It is clear that a number of research areas related to the DOE Fossil Energy Program have been appropriate for university involvement, and that, with support from DOE, university scientific and technical expertise can be expected to continue to play a significant role in the advancement of fossil energy technology in the years to come.

  9. Carnegie Mellon University Research Showcase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spirtes, Peter

    the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to Carnegie Mellon University and to the Florida Institute

  10. The Universe Sultana N. Nahar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nahar, Sultana Nurun

    The Universe Sultana N. Nahar Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA E-mail: nahar@astronomy.ohio-state.edu Abstract. We are part of the universe. Creation. The universe started as an infinitesimally small, infinitely hot, infinitely dense, energy source, with one

  11. University of Oklahoma Norman Campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma, University of

    University of Oklahoma Norman Campus Parking and Traffic Regulations 2011/2012 Academic Year Visit of the University of Oklahoma has determined that it is in the best interest of the University of Oklahoma stated herein have been adopted by the Board of Regents of the University of Oklahoma effective beginning

  12. University of Oklahoma Norman Campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma, University of

    University of Oklahoma Norman Campus Parking and Traffic Regulations 2012/2013 Academic Year Visit of the University of Oklahoma has determined that it is in the best interest of the University of Oklahoma stated herein have been adopted by the Board of Regents of the University of Oklahoma effective beginning

  13. University of Oklahoma Norman Campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma, University of

    University of Oklahoma Norman Campus Parking and Traffic Regulations 2010/2011 Academic Year Visit of the University of Oklahoma has determined that it is in the best interest of the University of Oklahoma stated herein have been adopted by the Board of Regents of the University of Oklahoma effective beginning

  14. THE TRUSTEES OF PRINCETON UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .............................................. 32 The Princeton University Investment Company (PRINCO).. 33 Financial Planning ................................................ 34 The Cost

  15. Student Awards Simon Fraser University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Student Awards Simon Fraser University #12;SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY Simon Fraser University (SFU-changing and challenging world. SCHOLARSHIPS, BURSARIES AND AWARDS A student award is an investment in people, in education from university because of financial reasons. A bursary is a financial award that is given to a student

  16. UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS Amherst Campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    ......................................................................................................................... Page 3 E. Use of University Parking Facilities...................................... Page 12 U. Abandoned Vehicles

  17. Explicit construction of universal structures Jan Hubicka

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    St Andrews, University of

    Explicit construction of universal structures Jan Hubicka Charles University Prague Joint work with Jarik Nesetril Workshop on Homogeneous Structures 2011 Jan Hubicka Explicit construction of universal Explicit construction of universal structures #12;Universal relational structures By relational structures

  18. SUSTAINABLE A university for sustainable development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johannesson, Henrik

    THE SUSTAINABLE UNIVERSITY #12;A university for sustainable development The University. The University of Gothenburg believes the future is important. We want to ensure sustainable development universities in Europe for research and education in sustainable development. Sustainable education

  19. NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Waste-to-Energy Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Future Primary Feedstock ProductsGasification Biomass MSW Others Syngas (CO+H2) Syngas to Liquids Syngas

  20. The Classification of Universes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bjorken, J.D. (SLAC) [SLAC

    2004-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We define a universe as the contents of a spacetime box with comoving walls, large enough to contain measurable phenomena, but not much larger. This allows the construction of a local ensemble of such universes, given modest extrapolations of the observed properties of the cosmos. We then assume that further out similar universes can be constructed, but with different standard model parameters, strongly correlated with the size in a definite way, where by size is meant the Hubble scale at late times. This allows an estimate of the range of sizes supporting life as we know it. The result allows some understanding of the hierarchy problems of particle physics. Other possible implications of the assumptions made will be discussed, including a possible connection between the QCD vacuum structure and cosmological horizon structure. In all cases, our approach is as bottoms-up and as phenomenological as possible, suggesting that theories of the multiverse may eventually lay some claim of being scientific.

  1. The Dark Energy Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burra G. Sidharth

    2015-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Some seventy five years ago, the concept of dark matter was introduced by Zwicky to explain the anomaly of galactic rotation curves, though there is no clue to its identity or existence to date. In 1997, the author had introduced a model of the universe which went diametrically opposite to the existing paradigm which was a dark matter assisted decelarating universe. The new model introduces a dark energy driven accelarating universe though with a small cosmological constant. The very next year this new picture was confirmed by the Supernova observations of Perlmutter, Riess and Schmidt. These astronomers got the 2011 Nobel Prize for this dramatic observation. All this is discussed briefly, including the fact that dark energy may obviate the need for dark matter.

  2. Ruth Fine, The Hebrew University of Konstanze Fliedl, University of Vienna

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    Greiner, Eberhard Karls University Tübingen Jonathan Lear, University of Chicago Eveline List, University of Jerusalem Ethical Implications of the Unheimliche Eveline List, University of Vienna Mass Psychology

  3. GROUP THERAPY Syracuse University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McConnell, Terry

    your individual needs. In a group, up to eight students meet with one or two group therapists. MostGROUP THERAPY Syracuse University Counseling Center 200 Walnut Place Phone: 315-443-4715 Fax: 315-443-4276 counselingcenter.syr.edu WHAT STUDENTS SAY ABOUT GROUP THERAPY I was really anxious about joining a group

  4. Utrecht University September 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Utrecht University September 2011 Faculty of Geosciences Welcome New GeoSciences Students #12;GEO@geo.uu.nl #12;Universiteit Utrecht Faculty Orientation 10.00 Practical Matters at GeoSciences - Important placesSciences Plenary Kick-off 13.30 Into the Departments #12;Universiteit Utrecht SOLIS-ID / UU LOG-IN · Masterstudents

  5. harvard university financial report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -oriented long- term planning for Harvard's future in Allston, and started developing priorities for our coming the president 3 financial overview 8 message from the ceo of harvard management company 13 report of independent important investments in the University's future as we prepared to celebrate Harvard's 375th anniversary. We

  6. SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY MAIN CAMPUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohan, Chilukuri K.

    SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY MAIN CAMPUS To Interstates 81, 690, and 90 (NYS Thruway). To ComArt, Lampe From Downtown Syracuse, Interstates 81, 690, and 90 (NYS Thruway) 10016P M ADISON STREET M ADISON Laboratory 49 Hinds Hall, School of Information Studies 40 Holden Observatory 47 Hoople Building 23

  7. ?engineering columbia university

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ?engineering why engineeri columbia university engineering engineering why engineering for the world to use. The images below represent technological innovations pioneered by Columbia engineers. Can Parsons graduated from Columbia in 1882. 2.) Flat panel TV--Columbia Professor James Im developed

  8. harvard university financial report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    portfolio earned an invest- ment return of 11.0% and had a year-end value of $27.6 billion. In the wake the president 3 financial overview 8 message from the ceo of harvard management company 14 report of independent;3 harvarduniversityfinancialoverview In its fiscal year ended June 30, 2010, the University made significant progress in managing

  9. SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY Graduate School

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mather, Patrick T.

    SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY Graduate School 2012 GRADUATE SCHOOL MARSHAL NOMINATION FORM NAME: (Last Name): (EXPECTED) DEGREE COMPLETE TERM (month/year): The Graduate School marshal must complete all degree School Marshal. Please provide a brief letter of nomination for the Name (please print): Title: Nominator

  10. SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY Graduate School

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mather, Patrick T.

    SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY Graduate School 2015 GRADUATE SCHOOL MARSHAL NOMINATION FORM NAME: SUID: EMAIL School marshal must complete all degree requirements by April 22, 2015. All applicants must submit a memo: I hereby nominate this student as a candidate for 2015 Graduate School Marshal. Name: Title

  11. Computational University of Leeds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berzins, M.

    of the key application areas is reactive fluid flow, including atmospheric chemistry, combustion, hydraulics reality systems. Software The Unit has an extensive and evolving library of multi-purpose PDE software times. Overview University of Leeds Computational PDEs Unit http://www.comp.leeds.ac.uk/cpde/ #12

  12. Syracuse University Electrical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mather, Patrick T.

    Syracuse University Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Tenure Track Faculty Position in Electrical Engineering The Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science is seeking applicants for a tenure track position in Electrical Engineering starting in August 2014 or January 2015. The department

  13. UNIVERSITIES IN TEXAS, PRIVATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boas, Harold P.

    . And Vision 2020 research shows the best U.S. universities are currently receiving twice as much state funding (Ph.D. only), physics · statistics We also offer interdisciplinary graduate training programs, astronomy, atomic physics, condensed matter physics, high energy physics, nuclear physics, quantum optics

  14. Northwestern University Transportation Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bustamante, Fabián E.

    Northwestern University Transportation Center 2011 Business Advisory Committee NUTC #12;#12;I have the pleasure of presenting our Business Advisory Committee members--a distinguished group of transportation industry lead- ers who have partnered with the Transportation Center in advancing the state of knowledge

  15. Saugata Basu - Purdue University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Jun 15, 2009 ... July 1996. Doctoral Student at the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sci- ... School Faculty Fellowship for Research, University of. Michigan .... Robotics, K.Y. Goldberg, D. Halperin, J.-C. Latombe, R.H. Wilson, Eds., A.K.. Peters ...

  16. Fondren Library Rice University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fondren Library Rice University Digital Preservation Strategy DRAFT Last revised September 12, 2007 materials will be preserved. Digital resources are part of Fondren Library's Collections and, are subject decisions are made on the basis of these recommendations, Fondren Library's strategic Plan?, the digital

  17. The Classification of Universes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bjorken, J

    2004-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We define a universe as the contents of a spacetime box with comoving walls, large enough to contain essentially all phenomena that can be conceivably measured. The initial time is taken as the epoch when the lowest CMB modes undergo horizon crossing, and the final time taken when the wavelengths of CMB photons are comparable with the Hubble scale, i.e. with the nominal size of the universe. This allows the definition of a local ensemble of similarly constructed universes, using only modest extrapolations of the observed behavior of the cosmos. We then assume that further out in spacetime, similar universes can be constructed but containing different standard model parameters. Within this multiverse ensemble, it is assumed that the standard model parameters are strongly correlated with size, i.e. with the value of the inverse Hubble parameter at the final time, in a manner as previously suggested. This allows an estimate of the range of sizes which allow life as we know it, and invites a speculation regarding the most natural distribution of sizes. If small sizes are favored, this in turn allows some understanding of the hierarchy problems of particle physics. Subsequent sections of the paper explore other possible implications. In all cases, the approach is as bottoms up and as phenomenological as possible, and suggests that theories of the multiverse so constructed may in fact lay some claim of being scientific.

  18. Nevis Laboratories Columbia University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Detector 27 4 Data Selection 40 5 Majorana Neutrino Search Results 75 6 General Neutrino Search Results 79#12; Nevis Laboratories Columbia University Physics Department Irvington­on­Hudson, New York Search for an O(100 GeV ) Mass Right­Handed Electron Neutrino at the HERA Electron­Proton Collider Using the ZEUS

  19. Sophia University Tokyo, Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    Sophia University Tokyo, Japan About: Located in the center of Tokyo, Sophia offers a very diverse and vibrant atmosphere. Students who attend Sophia can go for any discipline within their Faculty of Liberal Offerings 3. Accommodations 4. Application Materials For more information visit: http://www.sophia

  20. CURTIN UNIVERSITY INFORMATION STATEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Information Act 1992) July 2013 Published by: Records & Information Management Curtin University Kent Street be found at Curtin's Library [http://library.curtin.edu.au/]. RECORDS AND INFORMATION MANAGEMENT Curtin's Record and Information Management service is responsible for the development and maintenance of Curtin

  1. Carbon Footprint Towson University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fath, Brian D.

    Carbon Footprint Towson University GHG Inventory for Educational Institutes Getting Starting.TM The Carbon Footprint 8 The Constellation Experience A Broad Inventory 1. Scope I-Direct Emissions works.TM The Carbon Footprint 10 The Constellation Experience A Broad Inventory 3. Scope III

  2. An Ever Expanding Universe?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. G. Sidharth

    1998-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    It is pointed out that very recent results based on supernovae observations that the universe will accelerate and expand for ever with ever decreasing density have been predicted in a recent cosmological model which also deduces hitherto purely empirical features like the mysterious relation between the pion mass and the Hubble Constant.

  3. OPERATIONAL PROCEDURE Swansea University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harman, Neal.A.

    . To achieve this it undertakes the following: maintain an asbestos register derived from a management survey to the Asbestos Manager to determine whether there is adequate information within the management survey Department: Estates & Facilities Management Site: Swansea University Author: Jeff Davies Approved by

  4. UNIVERSITY AVENUE ROLLINS STREET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Jerry

    PROVIDENCERD University of Missouri: Main Campus Lemone Industrial Park South Farm Discovery Ridge Women Campus MU Power Plant A 34 kW solar photovoltaic (PV) system has been installed on the new fuel unloading building as part of the biomass boiler project. The solar PV system provides additional renewable energy

  5. University Activities Courses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keinan, Alon

    · Journal Reviewing: Bioinformatics, IEEE/ACM Transactions on Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, PLo and the Center for Bioinformatics and Computational Biology at the University of Maryland, 3/08 · ComputerS Computational Biology · Conference Reviewing: SODA 2008, Recomb 2008, GIW 2008 · Other Reviewing: Israeli

  6. College/University: 1998 -2004 University of Kaiserslautern (Germany)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manstein, Dietmar J.

    Education College/University: 1998 - 2004 University of Kaiserslautern (Germany) Diploma in Biology, billard, card-games, soccer, First name: Niels Last name: Heinz Date of birth: 07.02.1978 Country: Germany

  7. College/University: University of Indonesia; Jakarta, Indonesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manstein, Dietmar J.

    Education College/University: University of Indonesia; Jakarta, Indonesia Highest degree: B, under revision First name: Meta Last name: Djojosubroto Date of birth: 21.11.1975 Country: Indonesia E

  8. THE UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO, MOSCOW, IDAHO The University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Laughlin, Jay

    281 #12;, Nestled awa} in the Palouse hills, a setting of unequaled beauty is found for we University

  9. Texas Tech University MUSEUM OF TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelfond, Michael

    remains related to West Texas area. · Increase the range of specimens in the Natural Science CollectionTexas Tech University 11/25/08 1 MUSEUM OF TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY STRATEGIC PLAN MISSION STATEMENT The Museum of Texas Tech University, as an education resource for a diverse audience, collects, researches

  10. NEVADA UNIVERSITY TRANSPORTATION CENTER UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA, LAS VEGAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemmers, Oliver

    NEVADA UNIVERSITY TRANSPORTATION CENTER UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA, LAS VEGAS 2011-2012 ANNUAL REPORT #12 University Transportation Center (NUTC) Vision: The NUTC will strive to become a nationally recognized center of excellence for research in planning, operations and management of sustainable transportation systems

  11. University of Pittsburgh University Center for International Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machery, Edouard

    University of Pittsburgh University Center for International Studies Asian Studies Center Foreign to announce a competition for Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellowships (FLASF) for the University time to graduate study. PLEASE NOTE: Awarding of FLAS Fellowships is contingent on receipt of funding

  12. UNIVERSITY HEALTH SERVICES UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-MADISON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scharer, John E.

    are pre-paid by the Student Health Fee. I understand that I will be informed if a health care providerUNIVERSITY HEALTH SERVICES UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-MADISON 333 East Campus Mall Madison, WI 53715-1381 http://www.uhs.wisc.edu MR# Name BD Gender ID# Date University Health Services (UHS) Information

  13. UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA University Staff Sign-on Bonus Agreement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA University Staff Sign-on Bonus Agreement This Agreement is made between a sign-on bonus as an incentive for the Employee to accept employment at the University and remain to bestow upon the Employee the amount of $_____________ as a Sign-on Bonus ("Sign-on Bonus") in return

  14. 1 Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden 2 Aalto University, Finland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bachtold, Adrian

    1 Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden 2 Aalto University, Finland 3 Airbus, Spain 4 Aixtron, Spain 8 Avanzare, Spain 9 Catholic University of Louvain, Belgium 10 CEA French Alternative Energies of Technology, Germany 13 CIC energiGUNE, Spain 14 CIC NanoGUNE, Spain 15 CNR National Research Council, Italy

  15. University Policy Process Style Guidelines for University Policy Documents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Michelle

    University Policy Process Style Guidelines for University Policy Documents 1 S:\\4every1\\Policy\\Univ Policy Improvement\\Final Docs\\Style Guidelines-UPP.docx Policy Name Do not include "Policy" or "Policy on specific applications such as "anyone operating university owned or operated vehicles". POLICY (required

  16. Trinity University Portland State University Updated 3/21/2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caughman, John

    Trinity University Portland State University Updated 3/21/2013 Transfer Worksheet College-level transferable academic courses taken at the Trinity University (Trinity) will transfer to Portland State and to help in planning your transfer. PSU is on a quarter system. Since Trinity is on a semester system, your

  17. Mercury Replacement Program It is the policy of California State University, Fullerton to remove mercury containing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    decomposes. As a liquid metal at room temperature, mercury has been widely used throughout industry. Man, smelting, scrap metal processing and incineration or land disposal of mercury products or waste. #12 occurring element. This silver-colored liquid metal can be found in rocks, soil and the ocean. Mercury can

  18. City of Allentown, assessment of a district heating system. Final report, 1981-1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliker, I.; Tamayne, T.

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The City of Allentown has designed a district heating system in three separate parts. Two of these will serve the central business district with high temperature hot water using natural gas as the fuel source. A large industrial area needing process steam will be served from another plant 50 MWe (37.5 MWt) cogenerating fluidized bed combustion units. It will occupy the site of a former waste incinerator and will use western Pennsylvania coal as fuel. The construction is phased to cover the period from 1983 to 1991, and is able to provide a substantial number of new jobs while reducing consumer costs for heat. Although a solid waste to energy incinerator at first seemed to be a good source of heat and an assist in waste disposal now using a remote location for sanitary land-fill, the idea was abandoned in the face of opposition to a perceived problem in air pollution from its emissions.

  19. Charles Darwin University Flinders University Griffith University James Cook University La Trobe University Murdoch University The University of Newcastle IRU STATEMENT 13/2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the various bodies involved must be better" said Professor Barney Glover, Vice-Chancellor of Charles Darwin on improving higher education" Professor Glover commented. "The IRU also supports a thorough analysis to universities" Professor Glover concluded. Contact Professor Barney Glover Conor King Chair IRU, Vice

  20. Charles Darwin University Flinders University Griffith University James Cook University La Trobe University Murdoch University The University of Newcastle IRU MEDIA RELEASE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    missed" said Professor Barney Glover, IRU Chair and Vice-Chancellor Charles Darwin University. "The will continue to argue for additional investment" Professor Glover concluded. Contact Professor Barney Glover Conor King Chair IRU Executive Director IRU 08 8946 6040 0434 601 691 0418 954 052 03 9479 5181 barney.glover

  1. University Research Management: An Exploratory Literature Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuetzenmeister, Falk

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    requirements of universities and funding programs as well aschanges in the university funding policies. A preliminary2005. Industry funding and university professors research

  2. University Coal Research | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Research University Coal Research University Coal Research Universities frequently win Fossil Energy research competitions or join with private companies to submit successful...

  3. COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pullman, Seth L.

    COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY RESEARCH RESOURCES GUIDE Prepared by Minu Chaudhuri, Ph.edu/research/gcp.htm. The Columbia University Health Sciences Division requirement is the demonstration of knowledge ............................................................................. 3 IV ) Columbia Funding Resources

  4. Professor Jay Sethuraman Columbia University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Xiaodong

    Professor Jay Sethuraman Columbia University Monday April 2, 2012, Time: 1:00 pm 1 Washington Park Research at Columbia University. His research interests are in scheduling theory, discrete optimization

  5. The University of Tokyo Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miyashita, Yasushi

    The University of Tokyo Environmental Report 2009 #12; 4 2005 7 4 4 ...... ...KIRIN : SOLAR ......................................................................................................... 50 1 ......2009 The University of Tokyo Environmental Report 2009 2 CONTENTS 5 2 2009

  6. University of Connecticut Health Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    University of Connecticut Health Center UCONN Medical Group Comprehensive Spine Center (Patient: ____________________ AGE: _____ SEX: M / F Referring Physician: ___________ Primary Care Physician: _____________ 1. Where your symptoms begin? __/__/__/ *HCH2199* #12;University of Connecticut Health Center UCONN Medical

  7. HUMAN RESOURCES SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    funding priorities, budget consideration, application requirements, University policies and proceduresHUMAN RESOURCES SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY ADMINISTRATIVE & PROFESSIONAL JOB DESCRIPTION Position to Canadian and international funding agencies. The incumbent will assist with the writing and reviewing

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

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    Digital Library Initiative Rice University Project Management General guidelines for digital projects Contact: dli (at) rice (dot) edu October, 2007 #12;Digital Library Initiative, Rice University................................................................................................8 #12;Guidelines for managing digital projects Page 2 STATEMENT OF PURPOSE We recognized

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    MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION JOB TITLE: CUSTODIAN (12 month/40 and clean fixtures. Maintain building entrances according to conditions by removing snow and ice, applying be exercised over seasonal/temporary university employees and student assistants. QUALIFICATION REQUIREMENTS

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    MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION JOB TITLE: CUSTODIAN (12 month and ice, applying sand and salt, and removing debris. Adhere to current department uniform policy supervision may be exercised over seasonal/temporary university employees and student assistants

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION JOB TITLE: CUSTODIAN (12 mos and clean fixtures. Maintain building entrances according to conditions by removing snow and ice, applying be exercised over seasonal/temporary university employees and student assistants. QUALIFICATION REQUIREMENTS

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    Abolmaesumi, Purang

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boonstra, Rudy

    committed both to its public role as a leader in the discovery, preservation and sharing of knowledge at the University of Toronto is driven by the pursuit of knowledge and academic inquiry. The University is deeply, the research itself, reports and publications. University policies and procedures address and manage both

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GIS Graduate Programs University of Arizona Tucson, Arizona Program: Renewable Natural://www.srnr.arizona.edu/ucgis/gradprogram.html Ball State University Muncie, IN 473060470 Program: Geography http://www.bsu.edu/geog/ Boston University Boston, MA 02215 Program: Remote Sensing and Geographic Information Systems http

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    MURDOCH UNIVERSITY PERTH, WESTERN AUSTRALIA INAUGRATION CEREMONY 17TH SEPTEMBER, 1974 #12;ORDER Murdoch University, the second university to be established in Western Australia, and the eighteenth in Australia, was constituted 25 July 1973 by an Act of the Parliament of Western Australia. The initial

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    Duchowski, Andrew T.

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    Young, Paul Thomas

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    de Lijser, Peter

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millis, Andrew

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    Jia, Songtao

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millis, Andrew

    Department of Physics Columbia University Copyright A. J. Millis 2012 Dynamical Mean Field Theory: Basic ideas and cluster extensions A. J. Millis Department of Physics Columbia University Support: NSF DMR 10006282, DOE ER-046169 and ARO 056032PH #12;Department of Physics Columbia University Copyright A

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millis, Andrew

    Department of Physics Columbia University Copyright A. J. Millis 2010 Correlated Electron Compounds: from real materials to model systems and back again A. J. Millis Columbia University Boulder 2010 #12;Department of Physics Columbia University Copyright A. J. Millis 2010 Stereotypical theoretical physicist

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    Qian, Ning

    Columbia University THE ITALIAN ACADEMY FOR ADVANCED STUDIES IN AMERICA Annual Report 2007­2008 #12 for a variety of conferences, concerts, films, and exhibitions. #12;#12;Columbia University THE ITALIAN ACADEMY of Italy and of Columbia University. The Director is the Head of the Acad- emy. The Chairman of the Board

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millis, Andrew

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indiana University

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    Ferrara, Katherine W.

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takada, Shoji

    in the historical city of Kyoto in 1897, Kyoto University is the second oldest research university in Japan. Today and Development Kyoto University's Mission Statement declares its intention to sustain and develop its historical, and a unique balance is achieved between tradition and innovation. While preserving its rich cultural heritage

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    de Doncker, Elise

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LON-CAPA Gerd Kortemeyer Michigan State University January 2008 #12;LON-CAPA · Course Management Management: Use same material in different courses Universities can share online content #12;Online Content · Growth of shared content pool #12;Open Source, Free · No licensing cost · Universities can

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Doncker, Elise

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauzerall, Denise

    Engineering, 1988 Brown University Sc.B., with honors, Chemistry, 1985 HONORS Intergovernmental Panel) Stanford University School of Engineering Fellowship, tuition. (1987 - 1988) Elected to Sigma Xi (1985) Sc.B 402d Development of Policy Initiatives for the Sustainable Use of Energy at Princeton University

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Paul A.

    Bowling Green State University Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee Policy/Procedure Manual animal research at Bowling Green State University. Reading over the first three policies will provide #12;309A University Hall Bowling Green, OH 43403-0183 Phone 419-372-7716 Fax 419-372-6916 email hsrb

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    Oklahoma, University of

    University of Oklahoma Norman Campus Parking and Traffic Regulations 2014/2015 Academic Year Visit The Board of Regents of the University of Oklahoma has determined that it is in the best interest of the University of Oklahoma that rules and regulations be promulgated and adopted governing the keeping and use

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    Oklahoma, University of

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma, University of

    2015-2016 University of Oklahoma Scholarship Guide Updated on November 14, 2014 #12;2 WELCOME LETTER Dear Students: The University of Oklahoma is committed to making available to current of student scholarships. The University of Oklahoma has pledged to make available as many financial resources

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma, University of

    2015-2016 University of Oklahoma Scholarship Guide Updated on September 29, 2014 #12;2 WELCOME LETTER Dear Students: The University of Oklahoma is committed to making available to current of student scholarships. The University of Oklahoma has pledged to make available as many financial resources

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma, University of

    University of Oklahoma Norman Campus Parking and Traffic Regulations 2013/2014 Academic Year Visit The Board of Regents of the University of Oklahoma has determined that it is in the best interest of the University of Oklahoma that rules and regulations be promulgated and adopted governing the keeping and use

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCullagh, Peter

    university-logo Bayes's theorem Poisson processes Improper mixtures and Bayes's theorem Peter Mc McCullagh Improper mixtures #12;university-logo Bayes's theorem Poisson processes Outline 1 BayesCullagh Improper mixtures #12;university-logo Bayes's theorem Poisson processes Improper mixtures Bayes's theorem

  5. university-logo Maximum likelihood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCullagh, Peter

    university-logo Maximum likelihood Applications and examples REML and residual likelihood Peter McCullagh REML #12;university-logo Maximum likelihood Applications and examples JAN: Some personal remarks... IC #12;university-logo Maximum likelihood Applications and examples Outline 1 Maximum likelihood REML

  6. NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY ACCIDENT REPORT FORM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahriar, Selim

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    Columbia University

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  8. WMAPping the Inflationary Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raghavan Rangarajan

    2007-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An epoch of accelerated expansion, or inflation, in the early universe solves several cosmological problems. While there are many models of inflation only recently has it become possible to discriminate between some of the models using observations of the cosmic microwave background radiation and large-scale structure. In this talk, we discuss inflation and its observational consequences, and then the status of current cosmological observations and their implications for different models of inflation.

  9. SWANSEA UNIVERSITY REPORT SERIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant, P. W.

    in Fragments of Bounded Arithmetic by Arnold Beckmann and Samuel R. Buss Report # CSR 15-2008 #12;Polynomial.beckmann@swansea.ac.uk Samuel R. Buss Department of Mathematics University of California, San Diego La Jolla, CA 92093-0112, USA by polynomial time algorithms that make O(log n) witness queries to a p k-1 -oracle. Buss and Kraj´icek [8

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    Utrecht, Universiteit

    #12;Strategic Plan - Performance Agreements for Utrecht University - page 2 © Utrecht University, 2012 Structure of this document 1. Introduction 2. Performance agreements for Utrecht University 3. Utrecht University's position in a changing environment 4. Utrecht University's mission, core values

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a considered view about its three key questions: · what is the overall quantum of funding that universities operating grant. The CGS is the main university source of funding for all operations across all activitiese: director@iru.edu.au w iru.edu.au Charles Darwin University Flinders University Griffith

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Newcastle A system of capped funding? What does it mean to change university funding to a capped funding the requirements on universities about use of those funds is light. The CGS is to be spent on university activities education to all students and use the funds available to achieve this as best possible. But universities

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johannesson, Henrik

    THE SUSTAINABLE UNIVERSITY #12;A university for sustainable development The University contribution to a sustainable future. By systematically integrating sustainable development into research. The University of Gothenburg's Vision 2020 confirms that sustainable development is important; we always consider

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polly, David

    , Northwest, and South Bend Campuses K N O W L E D G E O N C E G A I N E D CASTS A LIGHT BEYOND ITS OWN I M M) Indiana University­Purdue University Fort Wayne Indiana University Kokomo Indiana University Northwest (Gary) Indiana University South Bend Indiana University Southeast (New Albany) Quality Education

  15. University of Puerto Rico Mayagez Campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cruz-Pol, Sandra L.

    University of Puerto Rico Mayagüez Campus Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering UPRM University of Texas-Austin Iow a State University of Michigan ***University of Puerto Rico North Carolina STATE UNIV. OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY CORNELL UNIV UNIVERSITY OF PUERTO RICO STUDENTS Number of Engineering

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radev, Dragomir R.

    MEAD Documentation v3.09 Dragomir Radev, University of Michigan John Blitzer, University of Pennsylvania Adam Winkel, University of Michigan Tim Allison, University of Michigan Michael Topper, University of Michigan With contributions by: Arda C¸ elebi, USC/ISI Matthew Craig, University of Michigan Stanko

  17. Aiming for Unique and Outstanding Collections: Retrospective and Prospective Analysis of East Asian Collection Development at the University of California, San Diego

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Jim

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    University of Arts, University of Michigan, University ofUniversity, the University of Michigan, Oxford University,

  18. Our Mathematical Universe?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeremy Butterfield

    2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a discussion of some themes in Max Tegmark's recent book, Our Mathematical Universe. It was written as a review for Plus Magazine, the online magazine of the UK's national mathematics education and outreach project, the Mathematics Millennium Project. Since some of the discussion (about symmetry breaking, and Pythagoreanism in the philosophy of mathematics) went beyond reviewing Tegmark's book, the material was divided into three online articles. This version combines those three articles, and adds some other material, in particular a brief defence of quidditism about properties. It also adds some references, to other Plus articles as well as academic articles. But it retains the informal style of Plus.

  19. Drexel University Temperature Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. L. Davis; D. L. Knudson; J. L. Rempe; B. M. Chase

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes background information and presents results related to temperature measurements in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) Drexel University Project 31091 irradiation. The objective of this test was to assess the radiation performance of new ceramic materials for advanced reactor applications. Accordingly, irradiations of transition metal carbides and nitrides were performed using the Hydraulic Shuttle Irradiation System (HSIS) in the B-7 position and in static capsules inserted into the A-3 and East Flux Trap Position 5 locations of the ATR.

  20. Attractors, Universality and Inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sean Downes; Bhaskar Dutta; Kuver Sinha

    2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies of the initial conditions for inflation have conflicting predictions from exponential suppression to inevitability. At the level of phase space, this conflict arises from the competing intuitions of CPT invariance and thermodynamics. After reviewing this conflict, we enlarge the ensemble beyond phase space to include scalar potential data. We show how this leads to an important contribution from inflection point inflation, enhancing the likelihood of inflation to an inverse cubic power law. In the process, we emphasize the attractor dynamics of the gravity-scalar system and the existence of universality classes from inflection point inflation. Finally, we comment on the predictivity of inflation in light of these results.

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5LetLooking5investsLouis Baker,University Morgan

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  3. Fermilab Today | Vanderbilt University

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  4. Bowling Green State University University Policy on Purchasing, Sales and Disposal of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Paul A.

    Bowling Green State University University Policy on Purchasing, Sales and Disposal of University and Administration, or his/her designee. #12;Bowling Green State University University Policy on Purchasing, Sales contracts, Inter-University Council contracts, Bowling Green State University contracts or other

  5. Universe creation on a computer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon McCabe

    2005-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an account of the epistemology and metaphysics of universe creation on a computer.

  6. UNIVERSITY OF CANADA FIRST NATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Argerami, Martin

    UNIVERSITY DRIVE NORTH UNIVERSITYDRIVEEAST LIFT STATION BASEBALL DIAMOND FIRST NATIONS WAY FIRST NATIONS WAY G UNIVERSITYDRIVEWEST ENGINEERING GARAGE ARTIFICIAL TURF FIELD EASTLOOPROAD PLAYING FIELD 1

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    Breu, Ruth

    ! "monk-it" Prism++ Documentation University of Erlangen Computer Networks and Communication.2.1. Correlation engine management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 2.2.2. Analysis of collected events

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    Oliver, Douglas L.

    University of Connecticut Health Center John Dempsey Hospital Epidemiology (Patient Identification __________________ Before the procedure, did the operator: Obtain informed consent Notify direct patient care nurse

  9. MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Endres. William J.

    MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION JOB TITLE: CUSTODIAN (Regular; Twelve and ledges and clean fixtures. Maintain building entrances according to conditions by removing snow and ice

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION JOB TITLE: CUSTODIAN (9 month, part according to conditions by removing snow and ice, applying sand and salt, and removing debris. Adhere

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION JOB TITLE: CUSTODIAN (9 month, full according to conditions by removing snow and ice, applying sand and salt, and removing debris. Adhere

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION JOB TITLE: CUSTODIAN (9 month, full and clean fixtures. Maintain building entrances according to conditions by removing snow and ice, applying

  13. MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION JOB TITLE: CUSTODIAN (Regular; Twelve according to conditions by removing snow and ice, applying sand and salt, and removing debris. Adhere

  14. MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION JOB TITLE: CUSTODIAN (12-month, full according to conditions by removing snow and ice, applying sand and salt, and removing debris. Adhere

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION JOB TITLE: BUILDING MECHANIC II (Pay, parking lots, elevators, snow conditions, HVAC equipment temperature control systems, pool systems, ice

  16. MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION

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    MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION JOB TITLE: CUSTODIAN/EVENT ASSOCIATE entrances according to conditions by removing snow and ice, applying sand and salt, and removing debris

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    MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION JOB TITLE: CUSTODIAN (12-month, full and clean fixtures. Maintain building entrances according to conditions by removing snow and ice, applying

  18. MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

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    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leitner, Robert; Wenglarz, Richard

    2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary areas of university research were combustion, aerodynamics/heat transfer, and materials, with a few projects in the area of instrumentation, sensors and life (ISL).

  20. BRILLIANT Researchers from the University of Illinois, Northwestern University, the Institute of High

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    of High Performance Computing in Singapore, and Tsinghua University in Beijing report having found University, the Institute of High Performance Computing in Singapore, and Tsinghua University in Beijing