Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university waste-to-energy incinerator" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

EA-0952: The Louisiana State University Waste-to Energy Incinerator, Baton Rouge, Louisiana  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal for incinerating combustible, non-recyclable office wastes from Louisiana State University (LSU) administrative/academic areas and...

2

Waste to energy: The case of the Bolzano solid urban waste incineration plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the most demanding problems of waste management was that of finding the means and the technology for converting, neutralizing and disposing of the refuse, without disturbing the delicate ecological equilibrium of the soil, water and air. Today, this problem is handled with the latest refuse incineration and Snamprogetti's combustion residue purification technologies, which in addition to substantial energy returns, also provide sufficient assurance of efficiency as well as health and environmental safety. In the present state of the art, these technologies make it possible to cut down on the use of dumps and landfills. In fact, such technologies permit to obtain an extremely small volume of inert residues, as well as very low dust and hydrochloric acid levels, and an infinitesimal concentration of micropollutants in the atmospheric emissions. Experience has shown that non-polluting incineration of unrecoverable wastes is feasible and the electricity obtained from the combustion heat is more than enough to run the plant and can be sold making the operation advantageous in economic terms. On the basis of this philosophy Snamprogetti designed and built an incineration at Bolzano on 1994, which was expanded in 1996 with a second line, for a total operating potential of 400 t/d of wastes. The plant included a heat recovery line with a steam boiler and a turbogenerator for the production of electricity. The steam turbine driving the generator could operate partly in the condensation mode, and partly in the bleeding mode to produce both electricity and steam. Implementation of the integrated program made provision for employment of the bled off steam to produce superheated water to feed the city's district heating network. A detailed assessment of the characteristics of the plant and its environmental efficiency is presented.

Nicolai, H.G.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

AUSTRIA SHOWCASE WASTE-to-ENERGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 AUSTRIA SHOWCASE WASTE-to-ENERGY in AUSTRIA AECC Aberdeen Exhibition & Conference Center management in EU countries · Separated collection: Recycling and Waste-to-Energy · Development of emission standards for waste incineration · Examples for Waste-to-Energy projects in Austria · Waste-to-Energy

4

Waste to Energy Time Activities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEMINAR Waste to Energy Time Activities 9:30-9:40 Brief introduction of participants 9:40-10:10 Presentation of Dr. Kalogirou, "Waste to Energy: An Integral Part of Worldwide Sustainable Waste Management" 10. Sofia Bethanis, "Production of synthetic aggregates for use in structural concrete from waste to energy

5

Waste-to-Energy Forum  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The tenth in a series of planned U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy-sponsored strategic energy development forums, this Tribal Leader Forum will focus on waste-to-energy...

6

Waste-to-Energy Design Proposal for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

beneficially for construction purposes. Due to significant emission of pollutants from past incineration and Environmental Engineering, Columbia University Engineers: Zak Accuardi, Micah Babbitt, Rex Chen, Esther Lee, Tim and Themelis Client: John Quadrozzi, Gowanus Industrial Park, Red Hook, Brooklyn Draft: Final Submitted: 5

Columbia University

7

Waste-to-Energy Roadmapping Workshop Agenda | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Waste-to-Energy Roadmapping Workshop Agenda Waste-to-Energy Roadmapping Workshop Agenda Waste-to-Energy Roadmapping Workshop Agenda, November 5-6, 2014, Arlington, Virginia....

8

Waste-to-Energy Roadmapping Workshop Agenda  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Waste-to-Energy Workshop Agenda November 5-6, 2014 DoubleTree Hotel Crystal City Arlington, VA 22202 Day 1: Wednesday, November 5, 2014 Time Activity 7:30 am Registration and...

9

Incineration versus gasification: A comparison in waste to energy plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste thermodestruction has obvious advantages; nevertheless, it encounters problems not very easy to solve, such as those related to gas cleaning and to restricting standards for emission control. One important aspect is the possibility of heat recovery with production of valuable energy such as electric energy. A new technology, at least as far as its application to waste disposal (mainly municipal waste) is concerned, is represented by gasification. It becomes interesting to establish a comparison between this new technology and the traditional one. This comparison does not appear, however, to be very simple, since for gasification only few documented experiments can be found, and these are often difficult to relate to a common evaluation factor. The present paper describes the state of the art of the traditional technology in the thermodestruction field to define a comparison basis. Then, a general discussion is given for the gasification technology, emphasizing different possible solutions to allow for a quantitative evaluation. At last the various aspects of the problem (related to plant, environment, energy, economics, etc.) are specifically compared for the purpose of finding elements which allow for a quantitative evaluation or for emphasizing parameters useful for a final choice.

Ghezzi, U.; Pasini, S.; Ferri, L.D.A. [Politecnico di Milano (Italy). Dipt. di Energetica

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

10

Municipal solid waste combustion: Waste-to-energy technologies, regulations, and modern facilities in USEPA Region V  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Table of Contents: Incinerator operations (Waste preprocessing, combustion, emissions characterization and emission control, process monitoring, heat recovery, and residual ash management); Waste-to-energy regulations (Permitting requirements and operating regulations on both state and Federal levels); Case studies of EPA Region V waste-to-energy facilities (Polk County, Minnesota; Jackson County, Michigan; La Crosse, Wisconsin; Kent County, Michigan; Elk River, Minnesota; Indianapolis, Indiana); Evaluation; and Conclusions.

Sullivan, P.M.; Hallenbeck, W.H.; Brenniman, G.R.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

WASTE-TO-ENERGY ROADMAPPING WORKSHOP | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

WASTE-TO-ENERGY ROADMAPPING WORKSHOP WASTE-TO-ENERGY ROADMAPPING WORKSHOP The Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) at the Department of Energy aims to identify and address key...

12

Air pollution control technology for municipal solid waste-to-energy conversion facilities: capabilities and research needs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three major categories of waste-to-energy conversion processes in full-scale operation or advanced demonstration stages in the US are co-combustion, mass incineration, and pyrolysis. These methods are described and some information on US conversion facilities is tabulated. Conclusions and recommendations dealing with the operation, performance, and research needs for these facilities are given. Section II identifies research needs concerning air pollution aspects of the waste-to-energy processes and reviews significant operating and research findings for the co-combustion, mass incinceration, and pyrolysis waste-to-energy systems.

Lynch, J F; Young, J C

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Waste-to-Energy Workshop Agenda  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) at the Department of Energy aims to identify and address key technical barriers to the commercial deployment of liquid transportation fuels from waste feedstocks. As a part of this effort, BETO is organizing a Waste-to-Energy Roadmapping workshop. Workshop participants will join facilitated breakout sessions to discuss anaerobic digestion, hydrothermal liquefaction, and other processes that make productive use of wastewater residuals, biosolids, foodstuffs, and organic municipal solid waste. These discussions will be synthesized and used in developing a waste-to-energy technology roadmap.

14

ISWA Study Tour WASTE-TO-ENERGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Waste Treatment and Energy Recovery" Fundamentals of drying, pyrolysis, gasification, and combustionISWA Study Tour WASTE-TO-ENERGY Programme, June 22-27, 2014 Czech Republic Austria Seminar;Practice Seminar on Sustainable Waste Management in Europe based on Prevention, Recycling, Recovery

15

The 2010 ERC Directory of Waste-to-Energy Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 The 2010 ERC Directory of Waste-to-Energy Plants By Ted Michaels The 2010 ERC Directory of Waste-to-Energy Plants provides current information about the waste-to-energy sector in the United States. Since this Directory was last published in 2007, waste-to-energy capacity has increased for the first time in many

Columbia University

16

The Conversion of Waste to Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technology Conference Houston, TX, April 13-16, 1980 and 10% combustibles (hydrogen and hydro carbons) is incinerated at 1400?F. ~ecause of the quantity of inerts, supplemental natural gas firing with a grid burner is required to maintain the required... thermocouples. A Wobbe index analyzer compensates fuel gas flow measure ment for changes in composition. A three element feedwater control system maintai~s water level. Modular, controlled air solid waste incinerators/heat recovery systems are now...

John, T.; Cheek, L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities July 24, 2014 9:00AM to 3:30PM EDT U.S....

18

Waste-to-Energy Roadmapping Workshop | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Waste-to-Energy Roadmapping Workshop Waste-to-Energy Roadmapping Workshop November 5, 2014 9:00AM EST to November 6, 2014 12:00PM EST DoubleTree Hotel Crystal City 300 Army Navy...

19

Feasibility Study on Solid Waste to Energy Technological Aspects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Feasibility Study on Solid Waste to Energy Technological Aspects Yuzhong Tan College of Engineering://www.funginstitute.berkeley.edu/sites/default/ les/SolidWasteToEnergy.pdf April 15, 2013 130 Blum Hall #5580 Berkeley, CA 94720-5580 | (510) 664 seeks to compare and evaluate each technology by reviewing waste to energy reports and seeking

Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

20

Camargo Waste to Energy Power Plant Hamed Zamenian1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Camargo Waste to Energy Power Plant Hamed Zamenian1 , Eminou Nasser 1 , Matt Ray2 , Tom Iseley3 1 and Technology, IUPUI The Camargo Waste to Energy Power plant project is being proposed to dispose of Municipal are discarded in landfills. The Camargo Waste to Energy (WTE) power station is an opportunity to continue

Zhou, Yaoqi

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university waste-to-energy incinerator" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Waste-to-energy plants face costly emissions-control upgrades  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One treatment method of municipal solid waste, incineration, has fallen in and out of public favor. In the 1970s, emerging consciousness of the threat to groundwater posed by leaking landfills made incineration an attractive option. Prompted by disrupted energy supplies and steeply rising prices, more than 100 municipalities began to generate electricity from the heat produced by burning trash. In the 1990s, the pendulum of public enthusiasm has swung away from incineration. Energy prices have declined dramatically, and safety and siting concerns complicate new projects. A recent Supreme Court decision ruled that municipal incinerator ash must be tested as hazardous waste and disposed accordingly if levels of such pollutants as cadmium and lead exceed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act limits. So-called flow control regulations, which allowed municipalities to apportion garbage disposal to ensure steady supplies to incinerators, also have been struck down. EPA is tackling the issue of air emissions from waste-to-energy and non-energy-producing municipal waste combustors. Emissions guidelines for MWCs and new-source performance standards for new units, proposed Sept. 20 under Sec. 129 of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, are the culmination of a stalled and litigated initiative dating back to the CAA Amendments of 1977.

McIlvaine, R.W.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

(www.wtert.gr) Waste-to-Energy Research &  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­ WTERT (www.wtert.gr) 1 Waste-to-Energy Research & Technology Council WTERT Greece ­ SYNERGIA Dr. Efstratios Kalogirou is the President of Waste-to-Energy Research & Technology Council (WTERT.S.A. (cooperating with Professor N. Themelis) , in the scientific fields: energy recovery from solid wastes, potable

23

Waste-To-Energy Feasibility Analysis: A Simulation Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waste- To- Energy Feasibility Analysis: A Simulation Model Viet- An Duong College of Engineering://www.funginstitute.berkeley.edu/sites/default/ les/WasteToEnergy.pdf May 1, 2014 130 Blum Hall #5580 Berkeley, CA 94720-5580 | (510) 664-4337 | www of the main battles of our generation. Using waste to produce electricity can be a major source of energy

Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

24

Experience with FLS-GSA dry scrubbing technology for waste-to-energy applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper describes the gas suspension absorber (GSA) dry scrubbing technology developed by FLS miljo a/s, Denmark. The GSA is a new generation of semi-dry technology utilizing a circulating fast fluidized bed as absorber for acid gases (SO{sub 2}, HCI, HF) dioxins and heavy metals. The authors give a detailed description of the GSA which differs from conventional spray-dryer absorber systems in that it provides an extreme high dust concentration in the absorber. The high specific surface area of the dust combined with the quenching action of the atomized lime slurry provides excellent conditions for heat and mass transfer as well as secondary nucleation sites for the condensation/adsorption of dioxins and heavy metals. Attention is focused on the GSA as a retrofit technology for waste-to-energy plants. As retrofit the GSA is advantageous due to the compact design, small footprint and the ability to use the existing electrostatic precipitator (ESP) for particulate control. The grain loading leaving the GSA system and entering the ESP, is controlled by the efficiency of the GSA cyclone, and for this reasons the grain loading entering the ESP is less than or equal to the grain loading leaving the incinerator. The retrofit with a GSA system will furthermore reduce the actual flue gas volume to the ESP, which means an increased specific collection area. In addition the increased moisture content in the flue gas improves the collection efficiency. The authors compare this retrofit option to conventional spray-dryer absorption technology. They describe the operating experience with the GSA technology for waste-to-energy plants. Operating experience and performance test results for acid gases, dioxins and heavy metals, especially mercury, from several European waste-to-energy are reported.

Olsen, P.B.; Stuard, C.; Hsu, F.E.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Thermoeconomic optimization of sensible heat thermal storage for cogenerated waste-to-energy recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper investigates the feasibility of employing thermal storage for cogenerated waste-to-energy recovery such as using mass-burning water-wall incinerators and topping steam turbines. Sensible thermal storage is considered in rectangular cross-sectioned channels through which is passed unused process steam at 1,307 kPa/250 C (175 psig/482 F) during the storage period and feedwater at 1,307 kPa/102 C (175 psig/216 F) during the recovery period. In determining the optimum storage configuration, it is found that the economic feasibility is a function of mass and specific heat of the material and surface area of the channel as well as cost of material and fabrication. Economic considerations included typical cash flows of capital charges, energy revenues, operation and maintenance, and income taxes. Cast concrete is determined to be a potentially attractive storage medium.

Abdul-Razzak, H.A. [Texas A and M Univ., Kingsville, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering; Porter, R.W. [Illinois Inst. of Tech., chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Engineering/design of a co-generation waste-to-energy facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Five hundred fifteen thousand tons of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) is being generated every day in America. At present 68% of this trash is dumped into landfill operations. As the amount of garbage is increasing daily, the amount of land reserved for landfills is diminishing rapidly. With the sentiment of the public that you produce it, you keep it, the import-export of waste between the counties and states for the landfills, no longer appears to be feasible, especially when combined with expensive disposal costs. One method of reducing the quantity of waste sent to landfills is through the use of waste-to-energy facilities - the technology of resource recovery - the technology of today INCINERATION. All cogeneration projects are not alike. This paper examines several aspects of the electrical system of a particular municipal solid waste-to-energy project at Charleston, S.C. which includes plant auxiliary loads as well as a utility interconnection through a step-up transformer.

Bajaj, K.S.; Virgilio, R.J. (Foster Wheeler USA Corp., Clinton, NJ (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Waste to Energy Power Production at DOE and DOD Sites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waste to Energy Power Production at DOE and DOD Sites January 13, 2011 #12;Overview ­ Federal renewable ESPC Largest biomassoperation in Federal government #12;BiomassAvailability in U.S. Ameresco logo Agency Innovations DOE: Savannah River Site · BiomassHeat and Power USAF: Hill Air Force Base · Landfill

28

SMALL SCALE WASTE-TO-ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES Claudine Ellyin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in operation. The investigation included both existing grate combustion plants and novel processes. The Energos grate gasification and combustion technology is currently in operation at six plants in Norway1 SMALL SCALE WASTE-TO-ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES Claudine Ellyin Advisor: Prof. Nickolas J. Themelis

29

COST-BENEFIT ANALYSIS OF A WASTE TO ENERGY PLANT FOR MONTEVIDEO; AND WASTE TO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 COST-BENEFIT ANALYSIS OF A WASTE TO ENERGY PLANT FOR MONTEVIDEO; AND WASTE TO ENERGY IN SMALL-benefit analysis by the author of a waste to energy (WTE) plant in Montevideo, Uruguay; the second part are that it is the most proven waste- to-energy technology in the world, has demonstrated high plant availability (>90

30

Waste to Energy and Absorption Chiller: A Case Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

All measured performance characteristics corresponded well to manufacturer's specifications or were within the expected range for this type of incinerator. The simplified economic analysis showed a payback of period 4.5 years. An optimized payback...

Wolpert, J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Proceedings of NAWTEC16 16th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings of NAWTEC16 16th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference May 19-21, 2008 Proceedings of NAWTEC16 16th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference May 19-21, 2008, Philadelphia

Columbia University

32

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Overview: 2011 Waste-to-Energy Using...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Overview: 2011 Waste-to-Energy Using Fuel Cells Workshop DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Overview: 2011 Waste-to-Energy Using Fuel Cells Workshop Presentation...

33

Waste-to-Energy Cogeneration Project, Centennial Park  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste-to-Energy Cogeneration Project at Centennial Park has allowed methane from the closed Centennial landfill to export excess power into the the local utilitys electric grid for resale. This project is part of a greater brownfield reclamation project to the benefit of the residents of Munster and the general public. Installation of a gas-to-electric generator and waste-heat conversion unit take methane byproduct and convert it into electricity at the rate of about 103,500 Mwh/year for resale to the local utility. The sale of the electricity will be used to reduce operating budgets by covering the expenses for streetlights and utility bills. The benefits of such a project are not simply financial. Munsters Waste-to Energy Cogeneration Project at Centennial Park will reduce the communitys carbon footprint in an amount equivalent to removing 1,100 cars from our roads, conserving enough electricity to power 720 homes, planting 1,200 acres of trees, or recycling 2,000 tons of waste instead of sending it to a landfill.

Johnson, Clay; Mandon, Jim; DeGiulio, Thomas; Baker, Ryan

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

34

WASTE-TO-ENERGY RESEARCH & TECHNOLOGY COUNCIL www.wtert.gr PRESS RELEASE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WASTE-TO-ENERGY RESEARCH & TECHNOLOGY COUNCIL www.wtert.gr 1 PRESS RELEASE INTERNATIONAL INTENSIVE COURSE " Waste to Energy as an Integral Part of Sustainable Waste Management Worldwide: The case of Baku event focus on state of the art technologies for sustainable waste management, entitled "Waste to Energy

35

Integrated assessment of a new Waste-to-Energy facility in Central Greece in the context of regional perspectives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main aim of this study is the integrated assessment of a proposed Waste-to-Energy facility that could contribute in the Municipal Solid Waste Management system of the Region of Central Greece. In the context of this paper alternative transfer schemes for supplying the candidate facility were assessed considering local conditions and economical criteria. A mixed-integer linear programming model was applied for the determination of optimum locations of Transfer Stations for an efficient supplying chain between the waste producers and the Waste-to-Energy facility. Moreover different Regional Waste Management Scenarios were assessed against multiple criteria, via the Multi Criteria Decision Making method ELECTRE III. The chosen criteria were total cost, Biodegradable Municipal Waste diversion from landfill, energy recovery and Greenhouse Gas emissions and the analysis demonstrated that a Waste Management Scenario based on a Waste-to-Energy plant with an adjacent landfill for disposal of the residues would be the best performing option for the Region, depending however on the priorities of the decision makers. In addition the study demonstrated that efficient planning is necessary and the case of three sanitary landfills operating in parallel with the WtE plant in the study area should be avoided. Moreover alternative cases of energy recovery of the candidate Waste-to-Energy facility were evaluated against the requirements of the new European Commission Directive on waste in order for the facility to be recognized as recovery operation. The latter issue is of high significance and the decision makers in European Union countries should take it into account from now on, in order to plan and implement facilities that recover energy efficiently. Finally a sensitivity check was performed in order to evaluate the effects of increased recycling rate, on the calorific value of treated Municipal Solid Waste and the gate fee of the candidate plant and found that increased recycling efforts would not diminish the potential for incineration with energy recovery from waste and neither would have adverse impacts on the gate fee of the Waste-to-Energy plant. In general, the study highlighted the need for efficient planning in solid waste management, by taking into account multiple criteria and parameters and utilizing relevant tools and methodologies into this context.

Perkoulidis, G. [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Box 483, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Papageorgiou, A., E-mail: giou6@yahoo.g [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Box 483, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Karagiannidis, A. [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Box 483, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Kalogirou, S. [Waste to Energy Research and Technology Council (Greece)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

36

Waste-to-Energy Evaluation: U.S. Virgin Islands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This NREL technical report evaluates the environmental impact and fundamental economics of waste-to-energy (WTE) technology based on available data from commercially operating WTE facilities in the United States. In particular, it considers life-cycle impacts of WTE as compared to landfill disposal and various forms of electrical generation, as well as WTE impacts on source reduction or recycling programs. In addition, it evaluates the economics and potential environmental impact of WTE in the U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI) based on existing USVI waste stream characterization data, recycling challenges unique to the USVI, and the results of cost and environmental modeling of four municipal solid waste (MSW) management options, including landfill, refuse-derived fuel (RDF) production, recycling, and gassification plus RDF.

Davis, J.; Hasse, S.; Warren, A.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Waste-to-energy: Decision making and the decisions made  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the early 1980s, it was projected that waste-to-energy (WTE) facilities would manage as much as half of all municipal solid waste by the turn of the century. However, during the latter part of the 1980s, the cancellation rate for WTE facilities grew to the point that the portion of the waste stream WTE will handle in the long-term future is less certain. This study, conducted as part of a larger study, identifies factors that influence municipalities, decisions regarding WTE. This study takes a broad perspective about decision-making within communities, emphasizing the context within which decisions were made and the decision-making process. It does not seek to judge the correctness of the decisions.

Schexnayder, S.M. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)); Wolfe, A.K. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Waste-to-energy: Decision making and the decisions made  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the early 1980s, it was projected that waste-to-energy (WTE) facilities would manage as much as half of all municipal solid waste by the turn of the century. However, during the latter part of the 1980s, the cancellation rate for WTE facilities grew to the point that the portion of the waste stream WTE will handle in the long-term future is less certain. This study, conducted as part of a larger study, identifies factors that influence municipalities, decisions regarding WTE. This study takes a broad perspective about decision-making within communities, emphasizing the context within which decisions were made and the decision-making process. It does not seek to judge the correctness of the decisions.

Schexnayder, S.M. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States); Wolfe, A.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

High efficiency waste to energy facility -- Pilot plant design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste To Energy facilities are commonly acceptable to the environment and give benefits in two main areas: one is a hygienic waste disposal and another is waste heat energy recovery to save fossil fuel consumption. Recovered energy is used for electricity supply, and it is required to increase the efficiency of refuse to electric energy conversion, and to spread the plant construction throughout the country of Japan, by the government. The national project started in 1992, and pilot plant design details were established in 1995. The objective of the project is to get 30% of energy conversion efficiency through the measure by raising the steam temperature and pressure to 500 C and 9.8 MPa respectively. The pilot plant is operating under the design conditions, which verify the success of applied technologies. This paper describes key technologies which were used to design the refuse burning boiler, which generates the highest steam temperature and pressure steam.

Orita, Norihiko; Kawahara, Yuuzou; Takahashi, Kazuyoshi; Yamauchi, Toru; Hosoda, Takuo

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Boiler tube failures in municipal waste-to-energy plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste-to-energy plants experienced increased boiler tube failures when the design changed from waste-heat boilers to radiant furnace waterwalls using superheat. Fireside attack by chlorine and sulfur compounds in refuse combustion products caused many forced outages in early European plants operating at high steam temperatures and pressures. Despite conservative steam conditions in the first US plants, failures occurred. As steam temperatures increased, corrosion problems multiplied. The problems have been alleviated by covering the waterwalls with either refractory or weld overlays of nickel-based alloys and using high nickel-chromium alloys for superheater tubes. Changes in furnace design to provide uniform combustion and avoid reducing conditions in the waterwall zone and to lower the gas temperature in the superheater also have helped minimize corrosion.

Krause, H.H.; Wright, I.G. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university waste-to-energy incinerator" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

T:\\013.ffentlichkeitsarbeit\\05.Vortrge\\32.NAWTEC 11 Florida 2003\\A_Ways to Improve the Efficiency of Waste to Energy Plants.doc Ways to Improve the Efficiency of Waste to Energy Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Waste to Energy Plants.doc Ways to Improve the Efficiency of Waste to Energy Plants for the Production@mvr-hh.de Abstract Up to now the emissions of waste-to-energy plants have been of major concern for the operators about CO2 reductions the efficiency of today's Waste to Energy (WTE) plants should be improved, even

Columbia University

42

Waste-to-Energy 25 Years Later: Technology with a Past, Present  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solution Quite a Ride: UpsQuite a Ride: Ups MacArthur Resource Recovery Facility Islip, New York #12; Waste-to-energy Falls, New York #12; European Union: waste-to- energy preferable to landfills European Union directives and Consulting Federation of New York Solid Waste Associations Solid Waste/Recycling Conference Federation of New

Columbia University

43

Proceedings of NAWTEC16 16th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Proceedings of NAWTEC16 16th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference May 19-21, 2008 of commercial tubing in Waste-to-Energy (WTE) boilers, a corrosion test was made by altering the HCl composition analysis of corrosion products by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive

Columbia University

44

CEWEP -Confederation of European Waste-to-Energy Plants Boulevard Clovis 12A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CEWEP - Confederation of European Waste-to- Energy Plants Boulevard Clovis 12A B-1000 Brussels Tel energy from waste Waste-to-Energy A cost effective and reliable sustainable energy source Waste for additional renewable energy which can be exploited from municipal solid waste (MSW) and comparable waste

45

CEWEP -Confederation of European Waste-to-Energy Plants Boulevard Clovis 12A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CEWEP - Confederation of European Waste-to- Energy Plants Boulevard Clovis 12A B-1000 Brussels Tel. : +32 (0)2 770 63 11 Fax : +32 (0)2 770 68 14 info@cewep.eu www.cewep.eu 1 Waste-to-Energy: towards recovery CEWEP welcomes that `energy recovery' should cover the use of waste for generating energy through

Columbia University

46

Current MSW Management and Waste-to-Energy Status in the Republic of Korea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(WTE) in Korea and the potential for improvement. Despite growth of per capita GDP of nearly 501 Current MSW Management and Waste-to-Energy Status in the Republic of Korea By Yoonjung Seo of the generally accepted hierarchy of waste management. The study also investigated the status of waste-to-energy

Columbia University

47

Proceedings of NAWTEC16 16th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings of NAWTEC16 16th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference May 19-21, 2008 city population, Mumbai ranks first, while Tokyo comes in eighth at over 8 million. [8] Proceedings

Columbia University

48

Copyright 2009 by ASME Proceedings of the 17th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Copyright © 2009 by ASME Proceedings of the 17th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference on the strengths of past research at Columbia and North Carolina State on recycling, composting, waste- to-energy of each technology has the potential 1 Proceedings of the 17th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy

Columbia University

49

National Master Plan for Development of Waste-to-Energy in India 1 The National Master Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 National Master Plan for Development of Waste-to-Energy in India 1 The National Master Plan a National Master Plan (NMP) for waste-to-energy as one of the activities under UNDP/GEF assisted project. The NMP provides a framework for waste-to-energy programme for the country besides a means of processing

Columbia University

50

10/12/2009 www.wtert.gr 1 Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

10/12/2009 www.wtert.gr 1 Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council SYNERGIA Dr. Efstratios MANAGEMENT IN GREECE & POTENTIAL FOR WASTE - TO - ENERGY ISWA Beacon Conference - Strategic Waste Management Planning in SEE, Middle East and Mediterranean Region #12;10/12/2009 www.wtert.gr 2 The Waste-to-Energy

Columbia University

51

Covanta Announces Contracts for Lee County, Florida Waste-to-Energy Facility Wednesday February 8, 3:51 pm ET  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Covanta Announces Contracts for Lee County, Florida Waste-to-Energy Facility Expansion Wednesday the construction of a 636 TPD (ton per day) capacity expansion to Lee County's 1,200 TPD waste-to-energy facility includes recycling, composting, waste-to- energy and landfilling. Covanta's service agreement, which

Columbia University

52

Hot Issue and Burning Options in Waste Management: A Social Cost Benefit Analysis of Waste-to-Energy in the UK.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Miranda and Hale, 1997). 20 4.3 External Costs and Benefits WtE plants emit some pollutants, which include sulphur dioxide, lead, and dioxins which are linked with damage to health and the environment if they occur in high enough concentrations... Hot Issue and Burning Options in Waste Management: A Social Cost Benefit Analysis of Waste-to-Energy in the UK Tooraj Jamasb* Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge Hande Kiamil Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge...

Jamasb, Tooraj; Kiamil, H; Nepal, R

53

WASTE-TO-ENERGY RECONSIDERED IN SWEDEN By Waldemar Ingdahl (04/23/2003);  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WASTE-TO-ENERGY RECONSIDERED IN SWEDEN By Waldemar Ingdahl (04/23/2003); as reported in Swedish newspapers;Tech Central Station Sweden has for a long time been a bastion of "green" ideology, and the EU and the rest of the world has monitored Sweden's environmental policies closely for new ideas and inspiration

Columbia University

54

Waste to energy facilities. (Latest citations from the NTIS database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning technical, economic, and environmental evaluations of facilities that convert waste to energy. Solid waste and municipal waste conversion facilities are highlighted. Feasibility studies, technical design, emissions studies, and markets for the resulting energy are discussed. Heat and electrical generation facilities are emphasized. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Waste to energy facilities. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning technical, economic, and environmental evaluations of facilities that convert waste to energy. Solid waste and municipal waste conversion facilities are highlighted. Feasibility studies, technical design, emissions studies, and markets for the resulting energy are discussed. Heat and electrical generation facilities are emphasized. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Waste to energy facilities. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning technical, economic, and environmental evaluations of facilities that convert waste to energy. Solid waste and municipal waste conversion facilities are highlighted. Feasibility studies, technical design, emissions studies, and markets for the resulting energy are discussed. Heat and electrical generation facilities are emphasized. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

THERMAL TREATMENT REVIEW . WTE I THERMAL TREATMENT Since the beginning of this century, global waste-to-energy capacity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of new waste-to gasification process at an industrial scale The Waste-To-Energy Research and Technology waste-to-energy capacity has increased steadily at the rate of about four million tonnes of MSW per year solid waste (MSW). Three dominant ,technologies _ those developed by The only true A global perspective

Columbia University

58

Waste to energy facilities. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning technical, economic, and environmental evaluations of facilities that convert waste to energy. Solid waste and municipal waste conversion facilities are highlighted. Feasibility studies, technical design, emissions studies, and markets for the resulting energy are discussed. Heat and electrical generation facilities are emphasized. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Waste to energy facilities. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning technical, economic, and environmental evaluations of facilities that convert waste to energy. Solid waste and municipal waste conversion facilities are highlighted. Feasibility studies, technical design, emissions studies, and markets for the resulting energy are discussed. Heat and electrical generation facilities are emphasized. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Water-related environmental control requirements at municipal solid waste-to-energy conversion facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water use and waste water production, water pollution control technology requirements, and water-related limitations to their design and commercialization are identified at municipal solid waste-to-energy conversion systems. In Part I, a summary of conclusions and recommendations provides concise statements of findings relative to water management and waste water treatment of each of four municipal solid waste-to-energy conversion categories investigated. These include: mass burning, with direct production of steam for use as a supplemental energy source; mechanical processing to produce a refuse-derived fuel (RDF) for co-firing in gas, coal or oil-fired power plants; pyrolysis for production of a burnable oil or gas; and biological conversion of organic wastes to methane. Part II contains a brief description of each waste-to-energy facility visited during the subject survey showing points of water use and wastewater production. One or more facilities of each type were selected for sampling of waste waters and follow-up tests to determine requirements for water-related environmental controls. A comprehensive summary of the results are presented. (MCW)

Young, J C; Johnson, L D

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university waste-to-energy incinerator" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Waste-to-Energy Technologies and Project Development | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Owned SmallOf The 2012NuclearBradley Nickell02-03Waste-to-Energy Technologies and

62

Haiti: Feasibility of Waste-to-Energy Options at the Trutier Waste Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides further analysis of the feasibility of a waste-to-energy (WTE) facility in the area near Port-au-Prince, Haiti. NREL's previous analysis and reports identified anaerobic digestion (AD) as the optimal WTE technology at the facility. Building on the prior analyses, this report evaluates the conceptual financial and technical viability of implementing a combined waste management and electrical power production strategy by constructing a WTE facility at the existing Trutier waste site north of Port-au-Prince.

Conrad, M. D.; Hunsberger, R.; Ness, J. E.; Harris, T.; Raibley, T.; Ursillo, P.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Waste-to-Energy using Fuel Cells Webinar | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment of Dept.| DepartmentVolvo TrucksofPostWasteWebinar Waste-to-Energy

64

Waste-to-Energy: Hawaii and Guam Energy Improvement Technology Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the U.S. Navy have worked together to demonstrate new or leading-edge commercial energy technologies whose deployment will support the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) in meeting its energy efficiency and renewable energy goals while enhancing installation energy security. This is consistent with the 2010 Quadrennial Defense Review report1 that encourages the use of 'military installations as a test bed to demonstrate and create a market for innovative energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies coming out of the private sector and DOD and Department of Energy laboratories,' as well as the July 2010 memorandum of understanding between DOD and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) that documents the intent to 'maximize DOD access to DOE technical expertise and assistance through cooperation in the deployment and pilot testing of emerging energy technologies.' As part of this joint initiative, a promising waste-to-energy (WTE) technology was selected for demonstration at the Hickam Commissary aboard the Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam (JBPHH), Hawaii. The WTE technology chosen is called high-energy densification waste-to-energy conversion (HEDWEC). HEDWEC technology is the result of significant U.S. Army investment in the development of WTE technology for forward operating bases.

Davis, J.; Gelman, R.; Tomberlin, G.; Bain, R.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Ris DTU 09-06-08 Waste-to-energy technologies in TIMES models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(focusing on Denmark) Long tradition for waste incineration for district heating How to model waste that supply base-load district heating. #12;Ris DTU 09-06-08 13 Modelling new Waste for Energy Technologies station for households and businesses. Some electricity is generated, but most energy is used for district

66

Ris-R-Report Energy Systems Analysis of Waste to Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as upgraded biogas and petrol made from syngas. Biogas and thermal gasification technologies are interesting alternatives to waste incineration and it is recommended to support the use of biogas based on manure Centre Denmark, DONG Energy, Danish Energy Authority, DAKA, Lemvig Biogas Plant and Plan

67

E-Print Network 3.0 - act incinerator wastewater Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

treatment... Flow Scheme 12;Gasification of Biosolids 12;Gasification 12;Gasification vs. Incineration Source: Stanford University - Department of Aeronautics and...

68

Boiler tube failures in municipal waste-to-energy plants: Case histories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste-to-energy plants experienced boiler tube failures when the design changed from waste-heat boilers to radiant furnace waterwalls with superheat, adopted from coal-firing technology. The fireside attack by chlorine and sulfur compounds in the refuse combustion products caused many forced outages in early European plants with high steam temperatures and pressures. In spite of conservative steam conditions in the first US plants, some failures occurred. As steam temperatures increased in later US plants, corrosion problems multiplied. Over the years these problems have been alleviated by covering the waterwalls with either refractories or weld overlays of nickel-base alloys and using high nickel-chromium alloys for superheater tubes. Various changes in furnace design to provide uniform combustion and avoid reducing conditions in the waterwall zone and to lower the gas temperature in the superheater also have helped to minimize corrosion.

Krause, H.H.; Wright, I.G. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

The Current and Future Marketplace for Waste-To-Energy Cogeneration Facilities in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sector are learning difficult lessons in dealing with municipalities on politically sensitive issues. Like the municipal solid waste which these plants inciner ate, each facility and set of business relationships is dif ferent -- with the keys...-fired boiler, the incineration of MSW requires close control of a fuel source which can vary significantly in thermal con tent. Early plants constructed were quite prone to down time, with several decommissioned due to unattractive operating economics...

Jacobs, S.

70

A comparative assessment of waste incinerators in the UK  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: We evaluate operational municipal solid waste incinerators in the UK. The supply chain of four case study plants are examined and compared in detail. Technical, financial and operational data has been gathered for the four plants. We suggest the best business practices for waste incinerators. Appropriate strategy choices are the major difficulties for waste to energy plants. - Abstract: The uptake in Europe of Energy from Waste (EfW) incinerator plants has increased rapidly in recent years. In the UK, 25 municipal waste incinerators with energy recovery are now in operation; however, their waste supply chains and business practices vary significantly. With over a hundred more plant developments being considered it is important to establish best business practices for ensuring efficient environmental and operational performance. By reviewing the 25 plants we identify four suitable case study plants to compare technologies (moving grate, fluidised bed and rotary kiln), plant economics and operations. Using data collected from annual reports and through interviews and site visits we provide recommendations for improving the supply chain for waste incinerators and highlight the current issues and challenges faced by the industry. We find that plants using moving grate have a high availability of 8792%. However, compared to the fluidised bed and rotary kiln, quantities of bottom ash and emissions of hydrogen chloride and carbon monoxide are high. The uptake of integrated recycling practices, combined heat and power, and post incineration non-ferrous metal collections needs to be increased among EfW incinerators in the UK. We conclude that one of the major difficulties encountered by waste facilities is the appropriate selection of technology, capacity, site, waste suppliers and heat consumers. This study will be of particular value to EfW plant developers, government authorities and researchers working within the sector of waste management.

Nixon, J.D., E-mail: j.nixon@kingston.ac.uk [Sustainable Environment Research Group, School of Engineering and Applied Science, Aston University, Aston Triangle, Birmingham B4 7ET (United Kingdom); Wright, D.G.; Dey, P.K. [Aston Business School, Aston University, Aston Triangle, Birmingham B4 7ET (United Kingdom); Ghosh, S.K. [Mechanical Engineering Department, Centre for Quality Management System, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032 (India); Davies, P.A. [Sustainable Environment Research Group, School of Engineering and Applied Science, Aston University, Aston Triangle, Birmingham B4 7ET (United Kingdom)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

71

Energy implications of mechanical and mechanicalbiological treatment compared to direct waste-to-energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Compared systems achieve primary energy savings between 34 and 140 MJ{sub primary}/100 MJ{sub input} {sub waste.} Savings magnitude is foremost determined by chosen primary energy and materials production. Energy consumption and process losses can be upset by increased technology efficiency. Material recovery accounts for significant shares of primary energy savings. Direct waste-to-energy is highly efficient if cogeneration (CHP) is possible. - Abstract: Primary energy savings potential is used to compare five residual municipal solid waste treatment systems, including configurations with mechanical (MT) and mechanicalbiological (MBT) pre-treatment, which produce waste-derived fuels (RDF and SRF), biogas and/or recover additional materials for recycling, alongside a system based on conventional mass burn waste-to-energy and ash treatment. To examine the magnitude of potential savings we consider two energy efficiency levels (state-of-the-art and best available technology), the inclusion/exclusion of heat recovery (CHP vs. PP) and three different background end-use energy production systems (coal condensing electricity and natural gas heat, Nordic electricity mix and natural gas heat, and coal CHP energy quality allocation). The systems achieved net primary energy savings in a range between 34 and 140 MJ{sub primary}/100 MJ{sub input} {sub waste}, in the different scenario settings. The energy footprint of transportation needs, pre-treatment and reprocessing of recyclable materials was 39.5%, 118% and 18% respectively, relative to total energy savings. Mass combustion WtE achieved the highest savings in scenarios with CHP production, nonetheless, MBT-based systems had similarly high performance if SRF streams were co-combusted with coal. When RDF and SRF was only used in dedicated WtE plants, MBT-based systems totalled lower savings due to inherent system losses and additional energy costs. In scenarios without heat recovery, the biodrying MBS-based system achieved the highest savings, on the condition of SRF co-combustion. As a sensitivity scenario, alternative utilisation of SRF in cement kilns was modelled. It supported similar or higher net savings for all pre-treatment systems compared to mass combustion WtE, except when WtE CHP was possible in the first two background energy scenarios. Recovery of plastics for recycling before energy recovery increased net energy savings in most scenario variations, over those of full stream combustion. Sensitivity to assumptions regarding virgin plastic substitution was tested and was found to mostly favour plastic recovery.

Cimpan, Ciprian, E-mail: cic@kbm.sdu.dk; Wenzel, Henrik

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

72

Life cycle assessment of the environmental emissions of waste-to-energy facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the past ten years, environmental issues have become an increasing priority for both government and industry alike. In the U.S. as well as in Europe, the emphasis has gradually shifted from a site specific focus to a product specific focus. For this reason, tools are needed to scientifically assess the overall environmental performance of products and/or industrial systems. Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) belongs to that category of tools, and is used to perform this study. In numerous industrial countries, LCA is now recognized, and is rapidly becoming the tool of preference, to successfully provide quantitative and scientific analyses of the environmental impacts of industrial systems. By providing an unbiased analysis of entire systems, LCA has shown that the reality behind widely held beliefs regarding {open_quotes}green{close_quotes} issues, such as reusable vs. one way products, and {open_quotes}natural{close_quotes} vs. synthetic products, were far more complex than expected, and sometimes not as {open_quotes}green{close_quotes} as assumed. This paper describes the modeling and assumptions of an LCA, commissioned by the Integrated Waste Services Association (IWSA), that summarizes the environmental emissions of waste-to-energy facilities, and compares them to the environmental emissions generated by major combustible energy sources of the northeast part of the United States (NE). The geographical boundary for this study is, therefore, the NE US.

Besnainou, J.; Landfield, A. [Ecobalance, Inc., Rockville, MD (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

The role of waste-to-energy in integrated waste management: A life cycle assessment perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) management has become a major issue in terms of environmental impacts. It has become the focus of local, state and federal regulations, which generally tend to promote the reduce/re-use/recycle/incinerate/landfill environmental hierarchy. At the same time, the Waste Industry capital requirements have increased in order of magnitude since the beginning of the 80`s. The driving forces of further capital requirements for the Waste Management Industry will be the impact of public policies set today and goals set by politicians. Therefore, it appears extremely important for the Waste Industry to correctly analyze and forecast the real environmental and financial costs of waste management practices in order to: discuss with the local, state and federal agencies on more rational grounds; forecast the right investments in new technologies (recycling networks and plants, incinerators with heat recovery, modern landfill). The aim of this paper is to provide an example of a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) project in the waste management field that raised surprising issues on otherwise unchallenged waste management practices.

Besnainou, J. [Ecobalance, Rockville, MD (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

74

Digital Gas Joins Asian Waste-to-Energy Consortium: To Eliminate Coal as a Power Plant Fuel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy's patented technology produces a clean-burning by-product from the widest variety of processed-efficient technology represented by the coal-substitute technology. The same technology will be deployed by DIGGDigital Gas Joins Asian Waste-to-Energy Consortium: To Eliminate Coal as a Power Plant Fuel Digital

Columbia University

75

Visit of Professor Avraam Karagiannidis to the Toulon Waste-to-Energy plant Toulon-France, December 11, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

organizes recycling in the greater Toulon area. The Toulon WTE facility is being used also as an argument to promote prevention, reuse and recycling of municipal solid wastes! All recycling and waste collectionVisit of Professor Avraam Karagiannidis to the Toulon Waste-to-Energy plant Toulon-France, December

Columbia University

76

Waste-to-energy in the United States: Socioeconomic factors and the decision-making process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Municipal solid waste (MSW) combustion with energy recovery, commonly called waste-to-energy (WTE), was adopted by many US communities during the 1980s to manage their growing quantities of MSW. Although less than one percent of all US MSW was burned to retrieve its heat energy in 1970, WTE grew to account for 16 percent of MSW in 1990, and many experts forecasted that WTE would be used to manage as much as half of all garbage by the turn of the century. However, the growth of WTE has been reduced in recent years by project cancellations. This study takes an in-depth look at the socioeconomic factors that have played a role in the decisions of communities that have considered WTE as a component of their solid waste management strategies. More specifically, a three-pronged approach is adopted to investigate (1) the relationships between a municipality`s decision to consider and accept/reject WTE and key socioeconomic parameters, (2) the potential impacts of recent changes in financial markets on the viability of WTE, and (3) the WTE decision-making process and the socioeconomic parameters that are most important in the municipality`s decision. The first two objectives are met by the collection and analysis of aggregate data on all US WTE initiatives during the 1982 to 1990 time frame. The latter objective is met by way of four in-depth case studies -- two directed at communities that have accepted WTE and two that have cancelled WTE projects.

Curlee, T.R.; Schexnayder, S.M.; Vogt, D.P.; Wolfe, A.K.; Kelsay, M.P.; Feldman, D.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Waste incineration and the community -  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

strategy followed by the operator of Amsterdam's waste-to- energy plant has convinced the public and other growing amounts of waste In 1992, the City of Amsterdam created Afval Energie Bedrijf (AEB), a waste-to-energy as much energy and materials as possible from municipal waste while protecting the environment. It seeks

Columbia University

78

Ohio incinerator battle continues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste Technologies Industries (WTI; East Liverpool, Ohio) is trying to wing what it hopes will be its final battle in a 13-year, $160 million war with the government, and community and environmental groups. The company since 1980 has sought EPA approval to operate a hazardous waste incinerator in East Liverpool, Ohio. WTI late last year conducted a pre-test burn, or shakedown, during which the incinerator burned certain types of hazardous waste. The test demonstrates the incinerator's performance under normal operating conditions, Regulatory authorities, including EPA and the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OEPA), monitored activity during the shakedown, which was limited to 720 hours of operation. In accordance with RCRA requirements, the company in March conducted a trial burn to demonstrate that the incinerator meets permit standards. WTI's permit specifies three performance parameters the incinerator must meet -- particulate and hydrogen chloride emissions limits, and destruction removal efficiencies (DREs).

Melody, M.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

CCA-Treated wood disposed in landfills and life-cycle trade-offs with waste-to-energy and MSW landfill disposal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CCA-Treated wood disposed in landfills and life-cycle trade-offs with waste-to-energy and MSW in waste-to-energy (WTE) facilities. In other countries, the predominant disposal option for wood, others have not, and the product continues to enter the waste stream from construction, demolition

Florida, University of

80

Daily Gazette, Schenectady NY Letters to the Editor for Thursday, July 10, 2008 Nothing to fear, and much to gain, from waste-to-energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and much to gain, from waste-to-energy Schenectady is one of those misguided cities that sends its municipal solid wastes to distant landfills, costing much money, wasting valuable energy and increasing global warming and pollution of our environment. Waste-to-energy (WTE) is safe. I advised the Israel

Columbia University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university waste-to-energy incinerator" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Nuclear waste incineration technology status  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The incinerators developed and/or used for radioactive waste combustion are discussed and suggestions are made for uses of incineration in radioactive waste management programs and for incinerators best suited for specific applications. Information on the amounts and types of radioactive wastes are included to indicate the scope of combustible wastes being generated and in existence. An analysis of recently developed radwaste incinerators is given to help those interested in choosing incinerators for specific applications. Operating information on US and foreign incinerators is also included to provide additional background information. Development needs are identified for extending incinerator applications and for establishing commercial acceptance.

Ziegler, D.L.; Lehmkuhl, G.D.; Meile, L.J.

1981-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

82

Energy recovery from waste incineration: Assessing the importance of district heating networks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Municipal solid waste incineration contributes with 20% of the heat supplied to the more than 400 district heating networks in Denmark. In evaluation of the environmental consequences of this heat production, the typical approach has been to assume that other (fossil) fuels could be saved on a 1:1 basis (e.g. 1 GJ of waste heat delivered substitutes for 1 GJ of coal-based heat). This paper investigates consequences of waste-based heat substitution in two specific Danish district heating networks and the energy-associated interactions between the plants connected to these networks. Despite almost equal electricity and heat efficiencies at the waste incinerators connected to the two district heating networks, the energy and CO{sub 2} accounts showed significantly different results: waste incineration in one network caused a CO{sub 2} saving of 48 kg CO{sub 2}/GJ energy input while in the other network a load of 43 kg CO{sub 2}/GJ. This was caused mainly by differences in operation mode and fuel types of the other heat producing plants attached to the networks. The paper clearly indicates that simple evaluations of waste-to-energy efficiencies at the incinerator are insufficient for assessing the consequences of heat substitution in district heating network systems. The paper also shows that using national averages for heat substitution will not provide a correct answer: local conditions need to be addressed thoroughly otherwise we may fail to assess correctly the heat recovery from waste incineration.

Fruergaard, T.; Christensen, T.H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Astrup, T., E-mail: tha@env.dtu.d [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

83

Copenhagen Waste Management and Incineration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Copenhagen Waste Management and Incineration Florence, April 24 2009 Julie B. Svendsen incentives · Waste Management plan 2012 · Incineration plants #12;Florence, April 24 20093 Copenhagen Waste ownership of treatment facilities · Incineration plants · Land fill · Disposal of hazardous waste · Source

84

Proceedings of the 17th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference May 18-20, 2009, Chantilly, Virginia, USA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the U.S. did not recover the heat of combustion generated via MSW incineration, until the mid seventies

Columbia University

85

Proceedings of NAWTEC16 16th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) INDIA Perinaz Bhada Nickolas .J. Themelis, Department of Earth and Environmental Engineering, and Earth Engineering Center, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 ABSTRACT The city of Mumbai (Bombay), India for landfilling. When the present waste dumps were constructed they were at the outskirts of the city, but now

Columbia University

86

Electrochemical membrane incinerator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Electrochemical incineration of p-benzoquinone was evaluated as a model for the mineralization of carbon in toxic aromatic compounds. A Ti or Pt anode was coated with a film of the oxides of Ti, Ru, Sn and Sb. This quaternary metal oxide film was stable; elemental analysis of the electrolyzed solution indicated the concentration of these metal ions to be 3 .mu.g/L or less. The anode showed good reactivity for the electrochemical incineration of benzoquinone. The use of a dissolved salt matrix as the so-called "supporting electrolyte" was eliminated in favor of a solid-state electrolyte sandwiched between the anode and cathode.

Johnson, Dennis C. (Ames, IA); Houk, Linda L. (Ames, IA); Feng, Jianren (Ames, IA)

2001-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

87

E-Print Network 3.0 - air bags compared Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

secondary air to the center of the vortex. Air follows... in the flue gas. The present vortex incinerator was ... Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and...

88

E-Print Network 3.0 - alloys approaching ideal Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in incineration plants, The key consideration in approaching an issue of mate rials corrosion Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council...

89

Energy Recovery from Municipal Solid WasteEnergy Recovery from Municipal Solid Waste WASTE TO ENERGY PLANT AT VIJAYAWADAWASTE TO ENERGY PLANT AT VIJAYAWADA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Recovery from Municipal Solid WasteEnergy Recovery from Municipal Solid Waste WASTE TO ENERGY PLANT AT VIJAYAWADAWASTE TO ENERGY PLANT AT VIJAYAWADA #12;UNIQUE PROCESSUNIQUE PROCESS DEVELOPED PRIMARY SIZE REDUCTION Stones / Inert Soil Enricher COARSE FLUFF SORTING Large stone, Tyres etc. HOT AIR

Columbia University

90

WASTE-TO-ENERGY RESEARCH & TECHNOLOGY COUNCIL www.wtert.gr Pre-feasibility study of a Solid Recovered Fuel (SRF) WTE Power Plant in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WASTE-TO-ENERGY RESEARCH & TECHNOLOGY COUNCIL www.wtert.gr 1 Pre-feasibility study of a Solid Recovered Fuel (SRF) WTE Power Plant in North Greece Presentation by Dr. Efstratios Kalogirou, 5 PM Friday of WTERT-Greece / SYNERGIA A pre-feasibility study will be presented of a state-of-the-art WTE power plant

91

Cow2Joules: Distributed Conversion of Organic Waste to Energy Resources Background to the project THEY are undertaking at ESF DLJohnson, Feb. 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cow2Joules: Distributed Conversion of Organic Waste to Energy Resources Background to the project of anaerobic digestion (AD) techniques for the conversion of biomass-related organic waste materials to useful energy products. This approach to industrial ecology, or sustainability, is well advanced in Europe where

Chatterjee, Avik P.

92

Proceedings of the 17th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference May 18-20, 2009, Chantilly, Virginia, USA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WASTE (MSW) GASIFICATION UNDER VARIOUS PRESSURES AND CO2 CONCENTRATION ATMOSPHERES Eilhann Kwon, Kelly J, New York, NY 10027 ABSTRACT The Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) gasification process is a promisingProceedings of the 17th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference NAWTEC17 May 18-20, 2009

Columbia University

93

Waste-to-energy facilities. January 1985-October 1991 (Citations from the NTIS Data Base). Rept. for Jan 85-Oct 91  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning technical, economic, and environmental evaluations of facilities that convert waste to energy. Solid waste and municipal waste conversion facilities are highlighted. Feasibility studies, technical design, emissions studies, and markets for the resulting energy are discussed. Heat and electrical generation facilities are emphasized. (Contains 187 citations with title list and subject index.)

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Assessing recycling versus incineration of key materials in municipal waste: The importance of efficient energy recovery and transport distances  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We model the environmental impact of recycling and incineration of household waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recycling of paper, glass, steel and aluminium is better than incineration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recycling and incineration of cardboard and plastic can be equally good alternatives. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recyclables can be transported long distances and still have environmental benefits. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Paper has a higher environmental benefit than recyclables found in smaller amounts. - Abstract: Recycling of materials from municipal solid waste is commonly considered to be superior to any other waste treatment alternative. For the material fractions with a significant energy content this might not be the case if the treatment alternative is a waste-to-energy plant with high energy recovery rates. The environmental impacts from recycling and from incineration of six material fractions in household waste have been compared through life cycle assessment assuming high-performance technologies for material recycling as well as for waste incineration. The results showed that there are environmental benefits when recycling paper, glass, steel and aluminium instead of incinerating it. For cardboard and plastic the results were more unclear, depending on the level of energy recovery at the incineration plant, the system boundaries chosen and which impact category was in focus. Further, the environmental impact potentials from collection, pre-treatment and transport was compared to the environmental benefit from recycling and this showed that with the right means of transport, recyclables can in most cases be transported long distances. However, the results also showed that recycling of some of the material fractions can only contribute marginally in improving the overall waste management system taking into consideration their limited content in average Danish household waste.

Merrild, Hanna [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Larsen, Anna W., E-mail: awla@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Christensen, Thomas H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

95

How Much Does That Incinerator Cost?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biosecurity on poultry farms includes proper disposal of dead carcasses. In many cases, that means using an incinerator. Calculating the cost of an incinerator means considering long and short-term expenses and the cost of fuel. This publication...

Mukhtar, Saqib; Nash, Catherine; Harman, Wyatte; Padia, Reema

2008-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

96

Generating Steam by Waste Incineration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Combustible waste is a significant source of steam at the new John Deere Tractor Works assembly plant in Waterloo, Iowa. The incinerators, each rated to consume two tons of solid waste per hour, are expected to provide up to 100 percent of the full...

Williams, D. R.; Darrow, L. A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Waste Not, Want Not: Analyzing the Economic and Environmental Viability of Waste-to-Energy (WTE) Technology for Site-Specific Optimization of Renewable Energy Options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste-to-energy (WTE) technology burns municipal solid waste (MSW) in an environmentally safe combustion system to generate electricity, provide district heat, and reduce the need for landfill disposal. While this technology has gained acceptance in Europe, it has yet to be commonly recognized as an option in the United States. Section 1 of this report provides an overview of WTE as a renewable energy technology and describes a high-level model developed to assess the feasibility of WTE at a site. Section 2 reviews results from previous life cycle assessment (LCA) studies of WTE, and then uses an LCA inventory tool to perform a screening-level analysis of cost, net energy production, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and conventional air pollution impacts of WTE for residual MSW in Boulder, Colorado. Section 3 of this report describes the federal regulations that govern the permitting, monitoring, and operating practices of MSW combustors and provides emissions limits for WTE projects.

Funk, K.; Milford, J.; Simpkins, T.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Recover heat from waste incineration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using these guidelines, engineers can address critical design problems associated with burning process-waste streams and select cost-effective waste-heat boilers. Incinerating contaminant streams is a win-win situation: (1) complete destruction of pollutant(s) is attained and (2) valuable thermal energy is recovered as steam and returned to process, thus conserving energy. However, recovering thermal energy from incinerated flue-gas streams contains some caveats. This treatment method creates a large high-temperature flue gas from which valuable thermal energy is recovered as saturated or superheated steam. Unfortunately, because a process-waste stream is used as feed, this stream will have variations in contaminant and component concentrations which influence the load on the boiler. Also, burning contaminants may create acid gases which will accelerate corrosion problems for the boiler at elevated temperatures. The following guidelines and checklist clarify the do`s and don`ts when designing waste-heat boilers.

Ganapathy, V. [ABCO Industries, Abilene, TX (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Controlled air incinerator conceptual design study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a conceptual design study for a controlled air incinerator facility for incineration of low level combustible waste at Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2). The facility design is based on the use of a Helix Process Systems controlled air incinerator. Cost estimates and associated engineering, procurement, and construction schedules are also provided. The cost estimates and schedules are presented for two incinerator facility designs, one with provisions for waste ash solidification, the other with provisions for packaging the waste ash for transport to an undefined location.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Method and apparatus for incinerating hazardous waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An incineration apparatus and method for disposal of infectious hazardous waste including a fluidized bed reactor containing a bed of granular material. The reactor includes a first chamber, a second chamber, and a vertical partition separating the first and second chambers. A pressurized stream of air is supplied to the reactor at a sufficient velocity to fluidize the granular material in both the first and second chambers. Waste materials to be incinerated are fed into the first chamber of the fluidized bed, the fine waste materials being initially incinerated in the first chamber and subsequently circulated over the partition to the second chamber wherein further incineration occurs. Coarse waste materials are removed from the first chamber, comminuted, and recirculated to the second chamber for further incineration. Any partially incinerated waste materials and ash from the bottom of the second chamber are removed and recirculated to the second chamber for further incineration. This process is repeated until all infectious hazardous waste has been completely incinerated.

Korenberg, Jacob (York, PA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university waste-to-energy incinerator" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Alloy 45TM in waste incineration applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Industrial and municipal wastes produced in the western society are being increasingly destroyed and managed by controlled high temperature incineration. Depending on the chemical make-up of the waste stream and operational parameters of the incinerator, a variety of high temperature corrosive environments are generated. Typically most of the modern incineration systems consist of a high temperature incinerator chamber, a heat recovery system, a quench section to further reduce the temperature of the flue gas stream and a host of air pollution control equipment to scrub acidic gases and control the particulate emissions. This paper describes the development of a new nickel-base high chromium-high silicon alloy, which has shown good resistance to high temperature corrosion in incinerator environments. Some field test data are also presented.

Agarwal, D.C. [VDM Technologies, Houston, TX (United States); Kloewer, J.; Grossmann, G.K. [Krupp VDM GmbH, Werdohl (Germany)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Waste to Energy: Biogas CHP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Southside Wastewater Treatment Plant Biogas Cogeneration Project November 9, 2011 2011 Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference ?Turning Waste Into Energy? What to Expect ? ? Southside Overview ? Wastewater Treatment Process... gallons per day ? Processes and disposes over 150 tons of solids/day from both of the City?s wastewater treatment plants What is Biogas? ? Biogas is the methane (CH4) produced as a by-product of the anaerobic digestion process at the Southside...

Wagner, R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Apparatus for incinerating hazardous waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for incinerating wastes, including an incinerator having a combustion chamber, a fluidtight shell enclosing the combustion chamber, an afterburner, an off-gas particulate removal system and an emergency off-gas cooling system. The region between the inner surface of the shell and the outer surface of the combustion chamber forms a cavity. Air is supplied to the cavity and heated as it passes over the outer surface of the combustion chamber. Heated air is drawn from the cavity and mixed with fuel for input into the combustion chamber. The pressure in the cavity is maintained at least approximately 2.5 cm WC (about 1" WC) higher than the pressure in the combustion chamber. Gases cannot leak from the combustion chamber since the pressure outside the chamber (inside the cavity) is higher than the pressure inside the chamber. The apparatus can be used to treat any combustible wastes, including biological wastes, toxic materials, low level radioactive wastes, and mixed hazardous and low level transuranic wastes.

Chang, Robert C. W. (Martinez, GA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Apparatus for incinerating hazardous waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus is described for incinerating wastes, including an incinerator having a combustion chamber, a fluid-tight shell enclosing the combustion chamber, an afterburner, an off-gas particulate removal system and an emergency off-gas cooling system. The region between the inner surface of the shell and the outer surface of the combustion chamber forms a cavity. Air is supplied to the cavity and heated as it passes over the outer surface of the combustion chamber. Heated air is drawn from the cavity and mixed with fuel for input into the combustion chamber. The pressure in the cavity is maintained at least approximately 2.5 cm WC higher than the pressure in the combustion chamber. Gases cannot leak from the combustion chamber since the pressure outside the chamber (inside the cavity) is higher than the pressure inside the chamber. The apparatus can be used to treat any combustible wastes, including biological wastes, toxic materials, low level radioactive wastes, and mixed hazardous and low level transuranic wastes. 1 figure.

Chang, R.C.W.

1994-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

105

Quantifying capital goods for waste incineration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Materials and energy used for the construction of waste incinerators were quantified. The data was collected from five incineration plants in Scandinavia. Included were six main materials, electronic systems, cables and all transportation. The capital goods contributed 23% compared to the direct emissions impact on GW. - Abstract: Materials and energy used for the construction of modern waste incineration plants were quantified. The data was collected from five incineration plants (72,000240,000 tonnes per year) built in Scandinavia (Norway, Finland and Denmark) between 2006 and 2012. Concrete for the buildings was the main material used amounting to 19,00026,000 tonnes per plant. The quantification further included six main materials, electronic systems, cables and all transportation. The energy used for the actual on-site construction of the incinerators was in the range 40005000 MW h. In terms of the environmental burden of producing the materials used in the construction, steel for the building and the machinery contributed the most. The material and energy used for the construction corresponded to the emission of 714 kg CO{sub 2} per tonne of waste combusted throughout the lifetime of the incineration plant. The assessment showed that, compared to data reported in the literature on direct emissions from the operation of incinerators, the environmental impacts caused by the construction of buildings and machinery (capital goods) could amount to 23% with respect to kg CO{sub 2} per tonne of waste combusted.

Brogaard, L.K., E-mail: lksb@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Building 115, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Riber, C. [Ramboll, Consulting Engineers, Hannemanns All 53, DK-2300 Copenhagen S (Denmark); Christensen, T.H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Building 115, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

106

An integrated analytical framework for quantifying the LCOE of waste-to-energy facilities for a range of greenhouse gas emissions policy and technical factors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study presents a novel integrated method for considering the economics of waste-to-energy (WTE) facilities with priced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions based upon technical and economic characteristics of the WTE facility, MSW stream, landfill alternative, and GHG emissions policy. The study demonstrates use of the formulation for six different policy scenarios and explores sensitivity of the results to ranges of certain technical parameters as found in existing literature. The study shows that details of the GHG emissions regulations have large impact on the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) of WTE and that GHG regulations can either increase or decrease the LCOE of WTE depending on policy choices regarding biogenic fractions from combusted waste and emissions from landfills. Important policy considerations are the fraction of the carbon emissions that are priced (i.e. all emissions versus only non-biogenic emissions), whether emissions credits are allowed due to reducing fugitive landfill gas emissions, whether biogenic carbon sequestration in landfills is credited against landfill emissions, and the effectiveness of the landfill gas recovery system where waste would otherwise have been buried. The default landfill gas recovery system effectiveness assumed by much of the industry yields GHG offsets that are very close to the direct non-biogenic GHG emissions from a WTE facility, meaning that small changes in the recovery effectiveness cause relatively larger changes in the emissions factor of the WTE facility. Finally, the economics of WTE are dependent on the MSW stream composition, with paper and wood being advantageous, metal and glass being disadvantageous, and plastics, food, and yard waste being either advantageous or disadvantageous depending upon the avoided tipping fee and the GHG emissions price.

Townsend, Aaron K., E-mail: aarontownsend@utexas.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C2200, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Webber, Michael E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C2200, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

107

Ash Chemistry in MSW Incineration Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ash Chemistry in MSW Incineration Plants: Advanced Characterization and Thermodynamic to analyze MSW-derived ashes by use of CCSEM. Representative samples of 2nd -3rd pass and ESP/E-filter ashes

108

Waste Heat Boilers for Incineration Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Incineration is a widely used process for disposing of solid, liquid and gaseous wastes generated in various types of industries. In addition to destroying pollutants, energy may also be recovered from the waste gas streams in the form of steam...

Ganapathy, V.

109

Biosludge Incineration - A Program for Energy Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waste biosludge generated in Shell's Deer Park Manufacturing Complex aqueous effluent treatment facilities is disposed of by on-site incineration. In 1981, an energy conservation program resulted in a 48 percent reduction in natural gas consumption...

Compernolle, R. V.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

A technical look at the WTI incinerator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

EPA has granted Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) temporary authorization to burn hazardous waste in its new incinerator in East Liverpool, Ohio. The approval is based on preliminary data showing that the incinerator was able to meet EPA`s emission standards for dioxins and furans in tests run this summer. WTI is allowed to continue burning waste pending final evaluation of its March 1993 performance tests. The action marks yet another hurdle cleared by WTI in its 11-year effort to construct and operate a commercial hazardous waste incinerator. The facility`s long-standing predicament as a target for environmental and public interest groups has made it the subject of numerous lawsuits and many legal reviews. In this article, however, we focus on the technical aspects of the system. The WTI incinerator is described in {open_quotes}Performance Testing of a Rotary Kiln Incinerator,{close_quotes} a paper by Alfred Sigg of Von Roll, Incorporated (Norcross, Georgia). The paper was presented at the 1993 Incineration Conference, which was held in Knoxville, Tennessee on May 3-7, 1993. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

NONE

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

On-line monitoring of incinerator emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of efforts to develop an on-line emissions monitor to detect specific organic compounds for incinerators, the authors tested a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) coupled with a long-path cell (LPC). A mixture of toluene, chlorobenzene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and trichloroethylene with elemental ratio C:H:Cl = 3:3.1:0.9 was incinerated in a methane/air flame. The effluent was continuously passed through a heated long-path cell. Eleven target compounds were simultaneously analyzed: methane, toluene, chlorobenzene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, trichloroethylene, benzene, ethylene, hydrogen chloride, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and water. During the testing, the incinerator temperature and the excess air ratio were deliberately changed to simulate both complete and incomplete combustion conditions in the incinerator. Test results indicate that the FTIR/LPC system can successfully follow concentration changes in the emissions that are associated with the change in the incinerator operations. In addition to carbon monoxide, methane, ethylene, and benzene have been found to be major products of incomplete combustion of the mixture. In this paper, the authors also discuss problems related to obtaining representative calibration standards and to developing adequate methods for continuous monitoring of emissions.

Mao, Zhuoxiong; Demirgian, J.C.; Hwang, E.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Technology documentation for selected radwaste incineration systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several incineration systems have been developed and demonstrated on a production scale for combustion of radioactive waste from contractor operated Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Demonstrated operating information and engineered design information is documented in this report on four of these systems; the Cyclone Incinerator (CI), Fluidized Bed Incinerator (FBI), Controlled-Air Incinerator (CAI) and Electric Controlled Air Incinerator (ECAI). The CI, FBI and CAI have been demonstrated with actual contaminated plant waste and the ECAI has been demonstrated with simulated waste using dysprosium oxide as a stand-in for plutonium oxide. The weight and volume reduction that can be obtained by each system processing typical solid plant transuranic (TRU) waste has been presented. Where a given system has been tested for other applications, such as combustion of resins, TBP-solvent mixtures, organic liquids, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB), resuts of these experiments have been included. This document is a compilation of reports prepared by the operating contractor personnel responsible for development of each of the systems. In addition, as a part of the program management responsibility, the Transuranic Waste System Office (TWSO) has provided an overview of the contractor supplied information.

Ziegler, D.L. (comp.)

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Waste incinerator to be built on campus By GAVIN WILSON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I::---- - - . . Waste incinerator to be built on campus ~~~ By GAVIN WILSON UBC hasapplied streaming of other waste products." The incinerators will be used to dispose of waste solvents and bio. "It is the sensible thing to bring these materials to UBC rather than building three incinerators

Farrell, Anthony P.

114

As of: September 2005 Waste Incineration --A Potential Danger?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As of: September 2005 Waste Incineration -- A Potential Danger? Bidding Farewell to Dioxin Spouting #12;2 Waste Incineration -- A Potential Danger? Bidding Farewell to Dioxin Spouting In the eighties of the previous century, waste incineration plants (WIPs) came to be the symbol of environmental contamination

Columbia University

115

Process converts incineration slag into stabilized residue  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During 1973 and 1974, EMC-Services designed and built a physico-chemical treatment plant in Hombourg, in France's Alsatian region. The plant is still in operation. Since then, EMC-Services has developed substantial experience in environmental projects, becoming one of the top companies internationally with experience and practice in designing, building and operating hazardous waste treatment plants. EMC-Services operates in France in Salaise, Strasbourg, Mitry-Mory, and Saint-Vulbas, where eight incinerators treat solid, liquid, highly halogenated and nonhazardous industrial waste. The incinerators, built or updated by EMC-Services, have a total capacity of about 200,000 tons per year. In the new process, incineration of special industrial wastes produces non-volatilized solid residue or slag, which is sent for disposal, in compliance with regulations, to special disposal plants. Future European regulations will incorporate landfilling criteria requiring such slag to be stabilized.

Thauront, J.; Deneux-Mustin, S. (EMC-Services, Paris (France)); Durecu, S. (EMC-Services, Vandoeuvre-Les Nancy (France)); Fraysse, G. (EMC-Services, Saint-Vulbas (France)); Berthelin, J. (Centre de Pedologie Biologique, Vandoeuvre-Les Nancy (France))

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Energy utilization: municipal waste incineration. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An assessment is made of the technical and economical feasibility of converting municipal waste into useful and useable energy. The concept presented involves retrofitting an existing municipal incinerator with the systems and equipment necessary to produce process steam and electric power. The concept is economically attractive since the cost of necessary waste heat recovery equipment is usually a comparatively small percentage of the cost of the original incinerator installation. Technical data obtained from presently operating incinerators designed specifically for generating energy, documents the technical feasibility and stipulates certain design constraints. The investigation includes a cost summary; description of process and facilities; conceptual design; economic analysis; derivation of costs; itemized estimated costs; design and construction schedule; and some drawings.

LaBeck, M.F.

1981-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

117

1. DET BEGYNDTE P FREDERIKSBERG INCINERATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PAGE 30 3. FROM DISTRICT HEATING TO COMBINED HEAT AND POWER 1990 - 2003 CHP AGAIN with district heating. The heat was produced on the basis of waste collected in the municipality. The original district heating plant was therefore also Denmark's first incineration plant, and waste has in fact been

Columbia University

118

Incineration of biological sludge in a fluidized bed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Incineration rate, ash properties, and percentage destruction of the combustible material were evaluated under different operating conditions. Experimental measurements were made for temperature, air flow rate, sludge size, ash size and sludge composition. A model based on the heat transfer consideration was derived to describe the drying and devolatilization process during sludge incineration. The model assumes that the drying and devolatilization of a sludge particle is manly caused by the heat flowing into the sludge particle from the bed. Parameters affecting the simulation results included sludge size, inert particle size, sludge heat capacity, sludge heat conductivity, operating flow rate and incinerator temperature. A model developed to simulate a batch type air-sand fluidized bed considered the incineration process as being composed of three consecutive operations, namely, drying, devolatilization, and char combustion. The simulation model predicted the dynamic characteristics of sludge incineration in the bed including its percentage completion and the incinerator temperature. The effects of sludge moisture level, sludge size and incinerator operating conditions on the incinerator behavior were also evaluated. The model developed to simulate the behavior of a fluidized bed incinerator under continuous operation was capable of predicting the time to reach steady state, the stack gas composition, the percentage combustion and the auxiliary heat required under various operating conditions, including sludge feed rate and size, air feed rate, and incinerator temperature.

Ku, W.C.P.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Ohio incinerator given the go-ahead  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A federal judge has denied a request for an injunction against the startup of the long-stalled Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) commercial hazardous waste incinerator in East Liverpool, OH. The $140-million plant, owned by a US subsidiary of Swiss engineering group Von Roll Ltd. (Zuerich), will go through a startup stage and a seven-day trial burn during the next two months, according to WTI. In testimony in federal court in Huntington, WV, WTI had said it was losing $115,000/day in fixed costs because of the plant's startup delay. The company also said that long-term contracts with Chemical Waste Management (CWM; Oak Brook, IL), Du Pont (Wilmington, DE), and BASF Corp. (Parsippany, NJ) to use plant services could be jeopardized by the delay. WTI is believed to have 10-year service contracts with the three companies and also will use CWM to dispose of the ash from the incinerator.

Kemezis, P.

1992-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

120

THERMODYNAMIC STUDY OF HEAVY METALS BEHAVIOUR DURING MUNICIPAL WASTE INCINERATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, heat and mass transfer, drying, pyrolysis, combustion of pyrolysis gases, combustion and gasificationTHERMODYNAMIC STUDY OF HEAVY METALS BEHAVIOUR DURING MUNICIPAL WASTE INCINERATION Y. ME´ NARD, A Me´tallurgie (LSG2M) Nancy, France T he incineration of municipal solid waste (MSW) contributes

Boyer, Edmond

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university waste-to-energy incinerator" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Metal volatilization and separation during incineration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) has reported that metals can account for almost all of the identified risks from a thermal treatment process. Fundamental research leading to better understanding of their behavior and improved control of their emissions is greatly needed. This paper reports studies on metal volatilization and separation during incineration. Metal volatilization studies were carried out in two separate experiments. In the first experiment, the dynamic volatilization characteristics of various metals during the combustion of metal-containing wood pellets were investigated in a high-temperature electric furnace. In addition to uncontrolled volatilization, the potential of employing chemical additives to bind metals and prevent them from volatilizing during combustion was also investigated. The second experiment involved the investigation of metal volatilization characteristics during the thermal treatment of metal-contaminated clay in a fluidized bed unit. The metal species tested in both experiments were compounds of lead and cadmium. Metal capture/separation studies were also carried out in two separate experiments. The first involved the use of sorbents in the combustion chamber to capture metals during the fluidized bed incineration of metal-containing wood pellets. The second experiments, however, employed sorbents to absorb metal vapors in a fluidized-bed waste-heat boiler. The objective of both the experiments is to characterize the metal absorption efficiency associated with the processes.

Ho, T.C.; Chu, H.W.; Hopper, J.R. (Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Waste To Energy -Strategies and Payoffs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, expanding the steam through back pressure turbines to generate electricity. Some plants used to gen erate so much power through cogeneration and hydro that they became power companies also. The hard ware involved in this type of cogeneration system has... the wastes to make steam? The answer is that under some circumstances the cost of the electric generation equipment would be marginally unattrac tive, but for the majority of American industry, the design of new waste to steam facilities should include...

Gilbert, J. S.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Waste to Energy Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov PtyInformationSEDS dataIndiana:CoopWaspa Jump to: navigation,

124

Waste-to-Energy Road Mapping Workshop  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Hydrothermal Liquefaction Heat, Char, Bio-oil, Syngas ANAEROBIC DIGESTION AND BIOGAS 7 * Biological, naturally occurring ANAEROBIC DIGESTION PROCESS 8 Anaerobic Digestion...

125

Waste to Energy Technology | GE Global Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption byAbout Printable VersionProtective

126

Waste-to-Energy | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of| Department of EnergyDepartmentDepartmentofTechnologiesusing Fuel

127

Waste Growth Challenges Local Democracy. The Politics of Waste between Europe and the Mediterranean: a Focus on Italy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The new incinerator (or waste-to-energy plant) in the Alpinedecreasing. Indeed waste-to- energy plants and recyclingDerived Fuel) and sent to a waste-to- energy plants, are now

Mengozzi, Alessandro

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Environmental impacts of residual Municipal Solid Waste incineration: A comparison of 110 French incinerators using a life cycle approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: 110 French incinerators are compared with LCA based on plant-specific data. Environmental impacts vary as a function of plants energy recovery and NO{sub x} emissions. E.g. climate change impact ranges from ?58 to 408 kg CO{sub 2}-eq/tonne of residual MSW. Implications for LCA of waste management in a decision-making process are detailed. - Abstract: Incineration is the main option for residual Municipal Solid Waste treatment in France. This study compares the environmental performances of 110 French incinerators (i.e. 85% of the total number of plants currently in activity in France) in a Life Cycle Assessment perspective, considering 5 non-toxic impact categories: climate change, photochemical oxidant formation, particulate matter formation, terrestrial acidification and marine eutrophication. Mean, median and lower/upper impact potentials are determined considering the incineration of 1 tonne of French residual Municipal Solid Waste. The results highlight the relatively large variability of the impact potentials as a function of the plant technical performances. In particular, the climate change impact potential of the incineration of 1 tonne of waste ranges from a benefit of ?58 kg CO{sub 2}-eq to a relatively large burden of 408 kg CO{sub 2}-eq, with 294 kg CO{sub 2}-eq as the average impact. Two main plant-specific parameters drive the impact potentials regarding the 5 non-toxic impact categories under study: the energy recovery and delivery rate and the NO{sub x} process-specific emissions. The variability of the impact potentials as a function of incinerator characteristics therefore calls for the use of site-specific data when required by the LCA goal and scope definition phase, in particular when the study focuses on a specific incinerator or on a local waste management plan, and when these data are available.

Beylot, Antoine, E-mail: a.beylot@brgm.fr; Villeneuve, Jacques

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

129

A solution to level 3 dismantling of gas-cooled reactors: Graphite incineration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents an approach developed to solve the specific decommissioning problems of the G2 and G3 gas cooled reactors at Marcoule and the strategy applied with emphasis in incinerating the graphite core components, using a fluidized-bed incinerator developed jointly between the CEA and FRAMATOME. The incineration option was selected over subsurface storage for technical and economic reasons. Studies have shown that gaseous incineration releases are environmentally acceptable.

Dubourg, M. [FRAMATOME, Paris-La Defense (France)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

130

Design and performance of a fluidized-bed incinerator for TRU combustible wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Problems encountered in the incineration of glovebox generated waste at Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) led to the development of a fluidized-bed incineration (FBI) system for transuranic (TRU) combustible wastes. Laboratory and pilot-scale testing of the process preceded the installation of an 82-kg/h production demonstration incinerator at RFP. The FBI process is discussed, and the design of the demonstration incinerator is described. Operating experience and process performance for both the pilot and demonstration units are presented.

Meile, L.J.; Meyer, F.G.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Spatial analysis of health effects of large industrial incinerators in England,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spatial analysis of health effects of large industrial incinerators in England, 1998­2008: a study of large industrial incinerators in England, 1998­2008: a study using matched case­control areas. BMJ Open to industrial incinerators in England is associated with increased risk of cancer incidence and mortality

Diggle, Peter J.

132

Dechlorination ability of municipal waste incineration fly ash for polychlorinated phenols  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dechlorination ability of municipal waste incineration fly ash for polychlorinated phenols Leona incineration fly ash at 200 °C under nitrogen atmosphere. Thermodynamic calculations have been carried out ash produced by municipal waste incineration (MWI) have clearly demonstrated that MWI fly ash can

Cirkva, Vladimir

133

MULTIPLE-SCALE DYNAMIC LEACHING OF A MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE INCINERATION ASH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 MULTIPLE-SCALE DYNAMIC LEACHING OF A MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE INCINERATION ASH Waste Management (in source such as municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration ash, requires a knowledge of the so is proposed. Key words: Leaching, Waste, Incineration ash, Chromium, L/S ratio, Modelling. hal-00656672

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

134

Waste Incineration in China page 1 Figure 1: Visit to MWI in Harbin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of hard coal is also wide-spread. The flue gas cleaning is done using dry or semi dry systemsWaste Incineration in China page 1 Figure 1: Visit to MWI in Harbin Waste Incineration in China Balz Solenthaler, Rainer Bunge Summary China currently operates 19 municipal waste incinerators (MWI

Columbia University

135

Alternatives to incineration. Technical area status report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently, the DOE`s Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP) (superseded by the Mixed Waste Focus Area) initiated an evaluation of alternatives to incineration to identify technologies capable of treating DOE organically contaminated mixed wastes and which may be more easily permitted. These technologies have the potential of alleviating stakeholder concerns by decreasing off-gas volurties and the associated emissions of particulates, volatilized metals and radionuclides, PICs, NO{sub x}, SO{sub x}, and recombination products (dioxins and furans). Ideally, the alternate technology would be easily permitted, relatively omnivorous and effective in treating a variety of wastes with varying constituents, require minimal pretreatment or characterization, and be easy to implement. In addition, it would produce secondary waste stream volumes significantly smaller than the original waste stream, and would minimize the environmental health and safety effects on workers and the public. The purpose of this report is to provide an up-to-date (as of early 1995) compendium of iternative technologies for designers of mixed waste treatment facilities, and to identify Iternate technologies that may merit funding for further development. Various categories of non-thermal and thermal technologies have been evaluated and are summarized in Table ES-1. Brief descriptions of these technologies are provided in Section 1.7 of the Introduction. This report provides a detailed description of approximately 30 alternative technologies in these categories. Included in the report are descriptions of each technology; applicable input waste streams and the characteristics of the secondary, or output, waste streams; the current status of each technology relative to its availability for implementation; performance data; and costs. This information was gleaned from the open literature, governments reports, and discussions with principal investigators and developers.

Schwinkendorf, W.E. [BDM Federal, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); McFee, J.; Devarakonda, M. [International Technology Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nenninger, L.L.; Fadullon, F.S. [Science Applications International Corp., Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Donaldson, T.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dickerson, K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); [Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, CO (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Resource recovery - a byproduct of hazardous waste incineration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three principal areas of a chlorinated hydrocarbon waste disposal system for a typical vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) facility are described: the incinerator, the energy-recovery system, and the byproduct-recovery system. The overall efficiency of the energy- and *byproduct-recovery systems is dependent on the optimization of the primary combustor. An example is presented in table form which lists typical waste quantities for the plant and operating costs, including utility requirements for the incinerator system, the quench, absorber and scrubber. Savings that can result by the addition of the energy- and acid-recovery systems can pay for the waste disposal system and return money to the plant.

Santoleri, J.J.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Waste-to-Energy Projects at ArmyWaste to Energy Projects at Army Installations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Now!)p ( gy ) 2009 RDECOM WTE Technology Assessment Selected Army WTE Projects ERDC F l C ll D ERDC natural gas and steam by Oct 2016 [EISA 2007] Electricity use for federal government from renewable, NDAA 2007] Total consumption from renewable sources · At least 50% of required annual renewable energy

138

Evaluation of Vitrification Processing Step for Rocky Flats Incinerator Ash  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1997, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) staff developed a processing option for incinerator ash at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Sites (RFETS). This work was performed with support from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Safe Sites of Colorado (SSOC). A description of the remediation needs for the RFETS incinerator ash is provided in a report summarizing the recommended processing option for treatment of the ash (Lucy et al. 1998). The recommended process flowsheet involves a calcination pretreatment step to remove carbonaceous material followed by a vitrification processing step for a mixture of glass tit and calcined incinerator ash. Using the calcination pretreatment step to remove carbonaceous material reduced process upsets for the vitrification step, allowed for increased waste loading in the final product, and improved the quality of the final product. Figure 1.1 illustrates the flow sheet for the recommended processing option for treatment of RFETS incinerator ash. In 1998, work at PNNL further developed the recommended flow sheet through a series of studies to better define the vitrification operating parameters and to address secondary processing issues (such as characterizing the offgas species from the calcination process). Because a prototypical rotary calciner was not available for use, studies to evaluate the offgas from the calcination process were performed using a benchtop rotary calciner and laboratory-scale equipment (Lucy et al. 1998). This report focuses on the vitrification process step after ash has been calcined. Testing with full-scale containers was performed using ash surrogates and a muffle furnace similar to that planned for use at RFETS. Small-scale testing was performed using plutonium-bearing incinerator ash to verify performance of the waste form. Ash was not obtained from RFETS because of transportation requirements to calcine the incinerator ash prior to shipment of the material. Because part of PNNL's work was to characterize the ash prior to calcination and to investigate the effect of calcination on product quality, representative material was obtained from LANL. Ash obtained from LANL was selected based on its similarity to that currently stored at RFETS. The plutonium-bearing ashes obtained from LANL are likely from a RFETS incinerator, but the exact origin was not identified.

Wigent, W.L.; Luey, J.K.; Scheele, R.D.; Li, H.

1999-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

139

Siting landfills and incinerators in areas of historic unpopularity: Surveying the views of the next generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Opinions and knowledge of young people in Italy about waste were studied. Historic opposition to construction of waste facilities is difficult to overcome. Awareness of waste management develops with knowledge of environmental issues. Many stakeholders views are needed when siting a new waste management facility. Respondents opinions were influenced by their level of environmental knowledge. - Abstract: The Campania Region in Southern Italy has suffered many problems with municipal solid waste management since the mid-1990s, leading to significant public disturbances and subsequent media coverage. This paper reports on the current views and knowledge of young people (university students) in this region about waste management operations and facilities, specifically the siting of landfills and incinerators. By means of a structured questionnaire, opinion and knowledge were systematically examined by degree type and course year. The study took place in 2011 at the University of Salerno campus. A sample of 900 students, comprising 100 students for each of the nine considered faculties, and 20 students for every academic course year, was randomly selected. Only about a quarter of respondents were not opposed to the siting of a landfill or an incinerator in their city. This clearly highlights that historic opposition to the construction of waste facilities is difficult to overcome and that distrust for previous poor management or indiscretions is long-lived and transcends generations. Students from technical faculties expressed the most reasonable opinion; opinion and knowledge were statistically related (Chi-square test, p < 0.05) to the attended faculty, and the knowledge grew linearly with progression through the university. This suggests that awareness of waste management practices develops with experience and understanding of environmental issues. There is general acceptance that many stakeholders technicians, politicians and citizens all have to be part of the decision process when siting a new waste management facility. The opinions of the young respondents were significantly influenced by their level of environmental knowledge.

De Feo, Giovanni, E-mail: g.defeo@unisa.it [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II 132, 84084 Fisciano (Italy); Williams, Ian D. [Waste Management Research Group, Faculty of Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

140

Development of risk assessment methodology for municipal sludge incineration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is one of a series of reports that present methodologies for assessing the potential risks to humans or other organisms from the disposal or reuse of municipal sludge. The sludge management practices addressed by the series include land application practices, distribution and marketing programs, landfilling, surface disposal, incineration and ocean disposal. In particular, these reports provide methods for evaluating potential health and environmental risks from toxic chemicals that may be present in sludge. The document addresses risks from chemicals associated with incineration of municipal sludge. These proposed risk assessment procedures are designed as tools to assist in the development of regulations for sludge management practices. The procedures are structured to allow calculation of technical criteria for sludge disposal/reuse options based on the potential for adverse health or environmental impacts. The criteria may address management practices (such as site design or process control specifications), limits on sludge disposal rates or limits on toxic chemical concentrations in the sludge.

Not Available

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university waste-to-energy incinerator" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

The Control of NOx Emissions from Combustion and Incinerators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of combustion modifications, including staged combustion and reburning, for the control of nitrogen oxide emissions from coal fired combustors is most often limited by problems due to carbon burnout or flame impingement. This paper presents new data... emissions from waste incineration facilities. The major focus has been on minimizing emissions of potentially toxic organics and trace metals. There is growing concern over emissions of NO x from these facilities as well. However, traditional NO x...

Heap, M. P.; Chen, S. L.; Seeker, W. R.; Pershing, D. W.

142

Evaluation of open pit incineration for the disposal of hydrocarbon wastes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of hydrocarbon wastes using an open pit air curtain destructor (ACD) type incinerator was investigated. A prototype experi- mental incinerator was designed and constructed, and experiments were performed with it to determine the relationships among various... design and operational parameters (such as incinerator configuration, fuel flow- rate, and smoke emissions) and to further improve the design. The investigation was conducted in three phases. First air flow studies were performed using a full scale...

Bell, Stuart Ray

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Decommissioning of the TA-42 plutonium contaminated incinerator facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During 1978, a plutonium (/sup 239/Pu) contaminated incinerator facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, was decommissioned. The project involved dismantling the facility and burying the debris at an on-site radioactive solid waste disposal/storage area. Contaminated soil from the 5000 m/sup 2/ area was also buried. The facility was constructed in 1951 to incinerate /sup 239/Pu contaminated wastes. It was later used as a decontamination facility. The major features included a 185-m/sup 2/ floor area control building, incinerator, cyclone dust collector, spray cooler, venturi scrubber, air filter bank, ash separator, and two 140 000-liter ash storage tanks. Six-hundred cubic meters of debris and 1200 m/sup 3/ of soil contaminated with less than 10 nCi /sup 239/Pu per gram of soil were buried at the Laboratory disposal area. Five cubic meters of /sup 239/Pu contaminated ash residues containing more than 10 nCi /sup 239/Pu per gram of waste were packaged and stored to meet the Department of Energy's 20-year retrievable storage criteria. The operation consumed 80 work days and 5800 manhours at a cost of $150 000. This report presents the details concerning decommissioning procedures, the health physics, the waste management, the environmental surveillance results, and a cost breakdown for the operation.

Harper, J.R.; Garde, R.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Review of organic nitrile incineration at the Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (LMES) operates the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), formerly called the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, where uranium was enriched under contract with the US Department of Energy (DOE). Currently, ETTP missions include environmental management, waste management (WM), and the development of new technologies. As part of its WM mission, ETTP operates the TSCA (Toxic Substances Control Act) Incinerator (TSCAI) for treatment of hazardous waste and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) contaminated with low-level radioactivity. Beginning in the autumn of 1995, employees from diverse ETTP buildings and departments reported experiencing headaches, fatigue, depression, muscle aches, sleeplessness, and muscle tremors. These symptoms were judged by a physician in the ETTP Health Services Department to be consistent with chronic exposures to hydrogen cyanide (HCN). The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) was called in to perform a health hazard evaluation to ascertain whether the employees` illnesses were in fact caused by occupational exposure to HCN. The NIOSH evaluation found no patterns for employees` reported symptoms with respect to work location or department. NIOSH also conducted a comprehensive air sampling study, which did not detect airborne cyanides at the ETTP. Employees, however, expressed concerns that the burning of nitrile-bearing wastes at the TSCAI might have produced HCN as a combustion product. Therefore, LMES and DOE established a multidisciplinary team (TSCAI Technical Review Team) to make a more detailed review of the possibility that combustion of nitrile-bearing wastes at the TSCAI might have either released nitriles or created HCN as a product of incomplete combustion (PIC).

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Control Engineering Practice 10 (2002) 315326 MIMO closed-loop identification of an MSW incinerator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Control Engineering Practice 10 (2002) 315­326 MIMO closed-loop identification of an MSW of a specific system identification procedure to a municipal solid waste (MSW) incinerator is discussed that with the proposed identification procedure a model of the MSW incinerator is obtained which, according to system

Van den Hof, Paul

146

Incineration of Residue from Paint Stripping Operations Using Plastic Media Blasting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i INCINERATION OF RESIDUE FROH PAINT STRIPPING OPERATIONS USING PLASTIC MEDIA BLASTING J. E. HELT N. MALLYA Group Leader Chemist Chemical Technology Division Chemical Technology Division Argonne National Laboratory Argonne National... Laboratory Argonne, Illinois Argonne, Illinois ABSTRACT A preliminary investigation has been performed on the environmental consequences of incinerating plastic-media-blasting (PHB) wastes from paint removal operations. PHB is similar to sandblasting...

Helt, J. E.; Mallya, N.

147

Computational Fluid Dynamics Evaluation of Good Combustion Performance in Waste Incinerators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-furnace destruction of pollutants are stated as: good combustion is achieved when 2-second gas residence time at 850 C1 Computational Fluid Dynamics Evaluation of Good Combustion Performance in Waste Incinerators waste incinerators, good combustion practices(GCP or GOP) have been established. These operating (and

Kim, Yong Jung

148

Caracteristiques et determination de la matiere organique dans les mchefers d'incineration d'ordures menageres (MIOM)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2001-80 Caracteristiques et determination de la matiere organique dans les mächefers d'incineration matiere organique dans les Residus de Procedes Thermiques dont les Mächefers d'incineration d, bois...). Bien que l'efficacite de combustion des equipements collectifs d'incineration ne cesse de

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

149

Using Linear Genetic Programming to Develop a C/C++ Simulation Model of a Waste Incinerator. Larry M Deschaine PE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using Linear Genetic Programming to Develop a C/C++ Simulation Model of a Waste Incinerator. Larry incinerator accurately. Human expert written simulation models are used worldwide in a variety of industrial waste incinerator. This process is a difficult problem to model. Previously, in a well-conducted study

Fernandez, Thomas

150

Completion of the INEEL's WERF Incinerator Trial Burn  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the successes and challenges associated with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitting of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's (INEEL) Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) hazardous and mixed waste incinerator. Topics to be discussed include facility modifications and problems, trial burn results and lessons learned in each of these areas. In addition, a number of challenges remain including completion and final issue of the RCRA Permit and implementation of all the permit requirements. Results from the trial burn demonstrated that the operating conditions and procedures will result in emissions that are satisfactorily protective of human health, the environment, and are in compliance with Federal and State regulations.

C. K. Branter; D. A. Conley; D. R. Moser; S. J. Corrigan

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Completion of the INEEL's WERF Incinerator Trial Burn  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the successes and challenges associated with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitting of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's (INEEL) Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) hazardous and mixed waste incinerator. Topics to be discussed include facility modifications and problems, trial burn results and lessons learned in each of these areas. In addition, a number of challenges remain including completion and final issue of RCRA Permit and implementation of all the permit requirements. Results from the trial burn demonstrated that the operating conditions and procedures will result in emissions that are satisfactorily protective of human health, the environment, and are in compliance with Federal and State regulations.

Branter, Curtis Keith; Conley, Dennis Allen; Corrigan, Shannon James; Moser, David Roy

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Evolution of WTE utilization - a global look. Asian perspective - waste incineration and it`s value in Japan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Incineration carries significant weight in waste disposal in general. Seventy-five percent of the total quantity of municipal solid waste is incinerated. In the year 1994, there were a total of 1,854 incineration plants in Japan. Waste heat from MSW incineration is utilized for power generation at most large-scale incineration plants. In 1994, a total of 3,376 industrial waste incineration plants existed in Japan. They have been contributing much toward waste volume reduction, improvement of the quality of landfill materials through conversion of organic substances into inorganic substances which are more beneficial for landfill purposes, and conservation of resources by energy recovery. But air pollution by exhaust substances - especially dioxin - from incineration plants pose a problem. This may place a big hurdle before future incineration plant projects. Small batch-type incineration furnaces are slowly dying out. Some municipalities will jointly construct a large incineration plant among themselves while others will consider introducing RDF producing plant, which is getting popular. More efforts will be made to melt and solify the incineration residue, reduce the environmental load imposed by pollutants in the exhaust gas from now on.

Tanaka, Masaru [National Institute of Public Health, Tokyo (Japan)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Incineration of DOE offsite mixed waste at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) incinerator at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is one of three incinerators in the US Department of Energy (DOE) Complex capable of incinerating mixed low-level waste (MLLW). WERF has received MLLW from offsite generators and is scheduled to receive more. The State of Idaho supports receipt of offsite MLLW waste at the WERF incinerator within the requirements established in the (INEEL) Site Treatment Plan (STP). The incinerator is operating as a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Interim Status Facility, with a RCRA Part B permit application currently being reviewed by the State of Idaho. Offsite MLLW received from other DOE facilities are currently being incinerated at WERF at no charge to the generator. Residues associated with the incineration of offsite MLLW waste that meet the Envirocare of Utah waste acceptance criteria are sent to that facility for treatment and/or disposal. WERF is contributing to the treatment and reduction of MLLW in the DOE Complex.

Harris, J.D.; Harvego, L.A.; Jacobs, A.M. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Willcox, M.V. [Dept. of Energy Idaho Operations Office, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Cleaning of municipal-waste incinerator flue gas in Europe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper gives an overview of a substantial ongoing air-pollution-control program in West Germany, as it relates to emission of acid gases and other pollutants from municipal-refuse incineration. It details emission regulations, control means used, and technical advancements accomplished and foreseen. It gives results and the approximate effectiveness of various controls in reducing acid gas, trace organic, trace heavy metal, and particulate-matter emissions. Available data indicate that lime spray dryer/electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and spray-dryer/fabric-filter systems can attain 70-90% acid-gas removal and 97% or more control of dioxins and furans, while limiting mercury emissions to about 0.01-0.07 mg/N-cu m (dry). In comparison, some wet-scrubber systems can attain 90-plus % acid-gas removal with substantial removal of NOx and comparable control of dioxins and furans, while possibly providing consistently lower mercury emissions.

Brna, T.G.; Ellison, W.; Jorgensen, C.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Electrochemical Corrosion Rate Sensors for Waste Incineration Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electrochemical corrosion rate sensors work in high temperature waste incineration applications where ash is deposited. The ash serves as the electrolyte for electrochemical measurements, such as liner polarization resistance, electrochemical noise, and harmonic distortion analyses. Results to date have shown that these types of sensors respond qualitatively to changes in temperature, gas composition, alloy composition, and type of ash. Several years of research have shown that high temperature corrosion rate probes need to be better understood before corrosion rate can be used as a process variable by power plant operators. More recent research has shown that electrochemical corrosion probes typically measure lower corrosion rates than those measured by standard mass loss techniques. While still useful for monitoring changes in corrosion rates, absolute probe corrosion rates will need a calibration factor to be useful. Ideas for research that may help resolve these issues are presented.

Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Matthes, S.A.; Holcomb, G.R.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Eden, D.A. (Honeywell Intercorr)

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Integrated Waste Management in Sweden Where incineration is not a dirty word  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

emissions dramatically, particularly in the case of dioxins. Fifteen years ago, 18 Swedish waste incineration plants emitted a total of about 100 grams of dioxins every year. Today, the collective dioxin

Columbia University

157

An overview of renewable energy utilization from municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration in Taiwan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

summarized in the paper. Finally, we present the regulatory system including Air Pollution Control Act . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 495 4. Air pollution control regulations on MSW-to-energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 497 4.1. MSW incinerator air pollutants emission standards

Columbia University

158

A framework for the evaluation of the environmental merits of waste co-incineration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Co-incineration of waste in conventional power plants and industrial plants is increasingly gaining interest. In power stations, like in many dedicated waste incinerators, the calorific value of the waste is used to generate electricity. The energy is used more effectively in a power plant, however, because the energetic efficiency of the power plant is higher. Another promising option for waste treatment is co-incineration in a cement kiln. In that case, the energy in the waste serves to heat the materials to the desired temperature. In addition, the ashes that result from the incineration are incorporated in the cement, which means a reduction of both the primary material demand and the output waste flows. The amount of primary energy saved by the co-incineration is usually taken to be equal to the calorific value of the waste. However, that approach is not always justifiable. If, for example, waste is used in a cement kiln rather than treated in a waste incinerator with generation of electricity, the electricity must still be generated by a power plant, because the electricity demand is unchanged. Therefore, the energetic gain of co-incineration in a cement kiln should be corrected for the energy needed for the generation of electricity. In this paper, three processes are evaluated in an integrated systems approach: a dedicated waste incinerator combined with electricity generation, a power plant and a cement kiln. The effects of the incineration of three typical examples of waste are evaluated: mixed plastic waste, rubber, and sludge from a waste water treatment plant. The calorific value and the material contribution of the waste are compared with those of the primary fuel and the raw materials used in the processes. The integrated approach shows that the equivalent of one joule of waste saves 0.5 joule of primary fuel if the waste is burnt in either the power plant or the cement kiln rather than in the waste incinerator. The additional advantage of co-incineration in a cement kiln is the use of the material content of the waste. Even though the gain is less than often claimed, the substitution value can be substantial and application of waste in a power plant or a cement kiln can have considerable advantages, taken that other environmental criteria are met.

Bouwmans, I.; Hakvoort, R.A.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Assessment of incineration and melting treatment technologies for RWMC buried waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides an identification, description, and ranking evaluation of the available thermal treatment technologies potentially capable of treating the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) buried mixed waste. The ranking evaluation focused separately upon incinerators for treatment of combustible wastes and melters for noncombustible wastes. The highest rank incinerators are rotary kilns and controlled air furnaces, while the highest rank melters are the hearth configuration plasma torch, graphite electrode arc, and joule-heated melters. 4 refs.

Geimer, R.; Hertzler, T.; Gillins, R. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Anderson, G.L. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Fixation and partitioning of heavy metals in slag after incineration of sewage sludge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The contents and partitioning of HMs in slag of sludge incineration were examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fixation rate decreases with residential time and finally keeps a constant. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Water mass fraction of 55% is optimal for the sediment for Ni, Mn, Zn, Cu and Cr. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Water mass fraction of 75% is optimal for the sediment for Pb. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found higher temperature versus lower non-residual fraction except that of Pb. - Abstract: Fixation of heavy metals in the slag produced during incineration of sewage sludge will reduce emission of the metals to the atmosphere and make the incineration process more environmentally friendly. The effects of incineration conditions (incineration temperature 500-1100 Degree-Sign C, furnace residence time 0-60 min, mass fraction of water in the sludge 0-75%) on the fixation rates and species partitioning of Cd, Pb, Cr, Cu, Zn, Mn and Ni in slag were investigated. When the incineration temperature was increased from 500 to 1100 Degree-Sign C, the fixation rate of Cd decreased from 87% to 49%, while the fixation rates of Cu and Mn were stable. The maximum fixation rates for Pb and Zn and for Ni and Cr were reached at 900 and 1100 Degree-Sign C, respectively. The fixation rates of Cu, Ni, Cd, Cr and Zn decreased as the residence time increased. With a 20 min residence time, the fixation rates of Pb and Mn were low. The maximum fixation rates of Ni, Mn, Zn, Cu and Cr were achieved when the mass fraction of water in the sludge was 55%. The fixation rate of Cd decreased as the water mass fraction increased, while the fixation rate of Pb increased. Partitioning analysis of the metals contained in the slag showed that increasing the incineration temperature and residence time promoted complete oxidation of the metals. This reduced the non-residual fractions of the metals, which would lower the bioavailability of the metals. The mass fraction of water in the sludge had little effect on the partitioning of the metals. Correlation analysis indicated that the fixation rates of heavy metals in the sludge and the forms of heavy metals in the incinerator slag could be controlled by optimization of the incineration conditions. These results show how the bioavailability of the metals can be reduced for environmentally friendly disposal of the incinerator slag.

Chen Tao [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100082 (China); Yan Bo, E-mail: yanbo2007@gig.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university waste-to-energy incinerator" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Utredning av primrluftfrvrmning till tv avfallseldade pannor; Investigation of primary air preheating for two waste incineration boilers.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The purpose of this degree-project was to investigate the possibilities for primary air preheating into the two smallest waste incineration boilers of Halmstad Energy (more)

Bjrkman, Mattias

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

UPGRADING OF WASTE-TO-ENERGY PLANT IN BRESCIA, ITALY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and district heating, gas supply, waste collection, treatment and disposal, and wastewa- ter treatment. Brescia was one of the first cities to have a well-established district heating net- work. Today, the waste

Columbia University

163

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste-to-Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: Top Five EEREDepartment ofEnergyEnergyBetterMake Fuels andBiodiesel

164

Biomass and Waste-to-Energy | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: Top Five EEREDepartmentFebruary 4, 2014Biogas andManaged by

165

Waste to Energy Developers WTED | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov PtyInformationSEDS dataIndiana:CoopWaspa Jump to: navigation, search

166

Waste-to-Energy Evaluation: U.S. Virgin Islands  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and conditioning of synthetic gas (syngas) products of thermochemical conversion and biogas products of biological conversion-These efforts are directed at making the gases more...

167

Kent County Waste to Energy Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429 Throttled (botOpen6 ClimateKamas,KelseyMichigan: Energy Resources Jump

168

Waste-to-Energy Workshop | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of| Department of EnergyDepartmentDepartmentofTechnologies and

169

Energy Recovery Council (ERC) Wast to Energy (WTE) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power Basics (The followingDirectLowDiscussion Page

170

Waste-to-Energy Workshop | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment of Dept.| DepartmentVolvo TrucksofPostWaste

171

Global Waste to Energy Conversion Company GWECC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat Jump to: navigation,GigaCreteInformation| OpenEnergy

172

Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities |  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of EnergyofProject is onModelingFederal EnergyWaste Heat WasteDepartment of

173

NREL: Technology Deployment - Biopower and Waste-to-Energy Solutions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andData and Resources NREL resourceEnergyTransportationBiopower and

174

Permeability of consolidated incinerator facility wastes stabilized with portland cement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Consolidated Incinerator Facility (CIF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) burns low-level radioactive wastes and mixed wastes as a method of treatment and volume reduction. The CIF generates secondary waste, which consists of ash and offgas scrubber solution. Currently the ash is stabilized/solidified in the Ashcrete process. The scrubber solution (blowdown) is sent to the SRS Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) for treatment as wastewater. In the past, the scrubber solution was also stabilized/solidified in the Ashcrete process as blowcrete, and will continue to be treated this way for listed waste burns and scrubber solutions that do not meet the ETF Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). The disposal plan for Ashcrete and special case blowcrete is to bury these containerized waste forms in shallow unlined trenches in E-Area. The WAC for intimately mixed, cement-based wasteforms intended for direct disposal specifies limits on compressive strength and permeability. Simulated waste and actual CIF ash and scrubber solution were mixed in the laboratory and cast into wasteforms for testing. Test results and related waste disposal consequences are given in this report.

Walker, B.W.

2000-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

175

Thermal treatment of historical radioactive solid and liquid waste into the CILVA incinerator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the very beginning of the nuclear activities in Belgium, the incineration of radioactive waste was chosen as a suitable technique for achieving an optimal volume reduction of the produced waste quantities. Based on the 35 years experience gained by the operation of the old incinerator, a new industrial incineration plant started nuclear operation in May 1995, as a part of the Belgian Centralized Treatment/Conditioning Facility named CILVA. Up to the end of 2006, the CILVA incinerator has burnt 1660 tonne of solid waste and 419 tonne of liquid waste. This paper describes the type and allowable radioactivity of the waste, the incineration process, heat recovery and the air pollution control devices. Special attention is given to the treatment of several hundreds of tonne historical waste from former reprocessing activities such as alpha suspected solid waste, aqueous and organic liquid waste and spent ion exchange resins. The capacity, volume reduction, chemical and radiological emissions are also evaluated. BELGOPROCESS, a company set up in 1984 at Dessel (Belgium) where a number of nuclear facilities were already installed is specialized in the processing of radioactive waste. It is a subsidiary of ONDRAF/NIRAS, the Belgian Nuclear Waste Management Agency. According to its mission statement, the activities of BELGOPROCESS focus on three areas: treatment, conditioning and interim storage of radioactive waste; decommissioning of shut-down nuclear facilities and cleaning of contaminated buildings and land; operating of storage sites for conditioned radioactive waste. (authors)

Deckers, Jan; Mols, Ludo [Belgoprocess NV, Operations Department, Gravenstraat 73, B-2480 Dessel (Belgium)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) Hazardous Waste Incineration Facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 3. Characterization of the nature and magnitude of emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contents: Introduction; Data Used in Characterizing Emissions; Incinerator Stack Emissions; Fugitive Emissions; Uncertainty in Emissions Characterization; and References.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced mixed waste Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

unskapssammanstllning om dioxiner"(Waste-to-energy, an inventory and review about... dioxins) Continuous efforts are being made to further improve waste incineration as a means...

178

China's Trash Incinerators Loom as Global Pollution Hazard Timothy O'Rourke for The New York Times  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

China's Trash Incinerators Loom as Global Pollution Hazard Timothy O'Rourke for The New York Times By KEITH BRADSHER Published: August 12, 2009 SHENZHEN, China In this sprawling metropolis in southeastern China stand two hulking brown buildings erected by a private company, the Longgang trash incinerators

Columbia University

179

ENVIRONMENTAL SURVEILLANCE OF INCINERATORS: 2006-2009 DATA ON DIOXIN/FURAN ATMOSPHERIC DEPOSITION AND ASSOCIATED THRESHOLDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENVIRONMENTAL SURVEILLANCE OF INCINERATORS: 2006-2009 DATA ON DIOXIN/FURAN ATMOSPHERIC DEPOSITION Orléans, France Introduction Dioxin/furan (PCDD/F) emission into the atmosphere has clearly diminished regulations, including those for MSW incineration plants which are a major source of dioxins. The collection

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

180

Optimal Operation of a Waste Incineration Plant for District Heating Johannes Jaschke, Helge Smedsrud, Sigurd Skogestad*, Henrik Manum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimal Operation of a Waste Incineration Plant for District Heating Johannes Jaschke, Helge@chemeng.ntnu.no off-line. This systematic approach is here applied to a waste incineration plant for district heating. In district heating networks, operators usually wish to ob- tain the lowest possible return temperature

Skogestad, Sigurd

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university waste-to-energy incinerator" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Electrostatic-precipitator efficiency on a multiple-hearth incinerator burning sewage sludge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pilot-scale electrostatic precipitator (ESP) was evaluated for its removal performance of 23 metals and for sulfur-containing particles when fitted to a multiple hearth incinerator burning sewage sludge. The small-scale ESP was installed to take a slipstream of about 3% of the total incinerator emissions. Particle size fractions were collected from the gas streams entering and leaving the ESP. Each particle was evaluated for overall removal efficiency, size-fraction removal efficiency, and selective removal of specific metals. Total concentrations of each element in the controlled emission stream was determined as well as the proportionate concentration of species in the solid and volatile states. Concentrations of each metal in the emission stream were compared with the concentration in the sludge residue. To obtain comparisons of ESP performance with a more typical emission-control device, the performance of the incinerator's full-scale wet scrubber was also evaluated.

Adams, R.C.; Bockol, G.; Maddox, J.A.; Robb, E.V.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Progress with heat resistant materials for waste incineration -- Alloy 45TM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heat resistant materials are used in a wide variety of modem industries such as metallurgical, chemical, petrochemical, heat treatment, heat recovery and waste incinerators and many others. The huge quantities of both municipal and industrial waste generated in the Western world has made ``controlled high temperature incineration`` a necessary technology for managing this problem. The evolution of this technology has not been without its cost. High temperature corrosion problems have led to many failures and unscheduled shutdowns. Proper materials of construction are vitally important for reliable, safe and cost effective operation of these systems. This paper describes the development of a new nickel based alloy, which combines the beneficial effects of high chromium and high silicon in combating these various corrosive environments encountered in incineration.

Agarwal, D.C. [VDM Technologies, Houston, TX (United States); Brill, U.; Kloewer, J. [Krupp-VDM GmbH, Werdohl (Germany)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

The environmental comparison of landfilling vs. incineration of MSW accounting for waste diversion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Residential waste diversion initiatives are more successful with organic waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using a incineration to manage part of the waste is better environmentally. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Incineration leads to more power plant emission offsets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Landfilling all of the waste would be preferred financially. - Abstract: This study evaluates the environmental performance and discounted costs of the incineration and landfilling of municipal solid waste that is ready for the final disposal while accounting for existing waste diversion initiatives, using the life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology. Parameters such as changing waste generation quantities, diversion rates and waste composition were also considered. Two scenarios were assessed in this study on how to treat the waste that remains after diversion. The first scenario is the status quo, where the entire residual waste was landfilled whereas in the second scenario approximately 50% of the residual waste was incinerated while the remainder is landfilled. Electricity was produced in each scenario. Data from the City of Toronto was used to undertake this study. Results showed that the waste diversion initiatives were more effective in reducing the organic portion of the waste, in turn, reducing the net electricity production of the landfill while increasing the net electricity production of the incinerator. Therefore, the scenario that incorporated incineration performed better environmentally and contributed overall to a significant reduction in greenhouse gas emissions because of the displacement of power plant emissions; however, at a noticeably higher cost. Although landfilling proves to be the better financial option, it is for the shorter term. The landfill option would require the need of a replacement landfill much sooner. The financial and environmental effects of this expenditure have yet to be considered.

Assamoi, Bernadette [Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, University of Toronto, 200 College Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3E5 (Canada); Lawryshyn, Yuri, E-mail: yuri.lawryshyn@utoronto.ca [Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, University of Toronto, 200 College Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3E5 (Canada)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

184

Initial atmospheric-dispersion modeling in support of the multiple-site incineration study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several modeling series which estimate population exposure to stack emissions from incineration of hazardous organic materials at 22 commercial incinerator sites are presented. These modeling series can be divided into three groups. One group estimates long- and short-term atmospheric concentrations and population exposures for each of 22 sites. These modeling predictions can be used to assess chronic and acute exposure. The second group consists of sensitivity analyses which show the effect of changes in stack parameters on the number of people exposed to specified concentration levels. The third group compares concentration estimates of two atmospheric dispersion computer codes. Results of each modeling series are contained in the appendices of this report.

Holton, G.A.; Little, C.A.; O& #x27; Donnell, F.R.; Etnier, E.L.; Travis, C.C.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. Volume I is a description of the components and methodologies used in the risk assessment and provides a summary of the major results from the three components of the assessment.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Performance of a municipal solid waste (MSW) incinerator predicted with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to investigate by the means of numerical simulation the performance of the MSW incinerator with of Vercelli (Italy). FLUENT, a finite-volumes commercial code for Fluid Dynamics has been used to predict the 3-D reacting flows (gaseous phase) within the incinerator geometry, in order to estimate if the three conditions settled by the Italian law (P.D. 915 / 82) are respected: (a) Flue gas temperature at the input of the secondary combustion chamber must exceed 950 C. (b) Oxygen concentration in the same section must exceed 6 %. (c) Residence time for the flue gas in the secondary combustion chamber must exceed 2 seconds. The model of the incinerator has been created using the software pre-processing facilities (wall, input, outlet and live cells), together with the set-up of boundary conditions. There are also imposed the combustion constants (stoichiometry, heat of combustion, air excess). The solving procedure transforms at the level of each live cell the partial derivative equations in algebraic equations, computing the velocities field, the temperatures, gases concentration, etc. These predicted values were compared with the design properties, and the conclusion was that the conditions (a), (b), (c), are respected in normal operation. The powerful graphic interface helps the user to visualize the magnitude of the computed parameters. These results may be successfully used for the design and operation improvements for MSW incinerators. This fact will substantially increase the efficiency, reduce pollutant emissions and optimize the plant overall performance.

Anglesio, P.; Negreanu, G.P.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

EIS-0084: Incineration Facility for Radioactively Contaminated PCBs and Other Wastes, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Uranium Enrichment and Assessment prepared this statement to assess the environmental impacts of the construction and operation of the proposed Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant, an incineration facility to dispose of radioactively contaminated polychlorinated biophenyls, as well as combustible waste from the Paducah, Portsmouth and Oak Ridge facilities.

188

Life cycle assessment of a national policy proposal - The case of a Swedish waste incineration tax  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the core of EU and Swedish waste policy is the so-called waste hierarchy, according to which waste should first be prevented, but should otherwise be treated in the following order of prioritisation: reuse, recycling when environmentally motivated, energy recovery, and last landfilling. Some recent policy decisions in Sweden aim to influence waste management in the direction of the waste hierarchy. In 2001 a governmental commission assessed the economic and environmental impacts of introducing a weight-based tax on waste incineration, the purpose of which would be to encourage waste reduction and increase materials recycling and biological treatment. This paper presents the results of a life cycle assessment (LCA) of the waste incineration tax proposal. It was done in the context of a larger research project concerning the development and testing of a framework for Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA). The aim of this paper is to assess the life cycle environmental impacts of the waste incineration tax proposal, and to investigate whether there are any possibilities of more optimal design of such a tax. The proposed design of the waste incineration tax results in increased recycling, but only in small environmental improvements. A more elaborate tax design is suggested, in which the tax level would partly be related to the fossil carbon content of the waste.

Bjoerklund, Anna E. [Division of Environmental Strategies Research - fms, Royal Institute of Technology, Drottning Kristinas vaeg 30 III, SE-100 44, Stockholm (Sweden)], E-mail: annab@infra.kth.se; Finnveden, Goeran [Division of Environmental Strategies Research - fms, Royal Institute of Technology, Drottning Kristinas vaeg 30 III, SE-100 44, Stockholm (Sweden)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Energy recovery and cogeneration from an existing municipal incinerator: Phase IIA progress report on final design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A feasibility study was prepared on energy recovery and cogeneration from and existing municipal incinerator in Wayne County, Michigan. The mechanical, electrical, structural, and instruments an controls equipment designs were established in sufficient depth to arrive at a construction cost estimate. The designs are described. All of the flue gas generated from each incinerator is directed into a waste heat boiler that will generate steam. A waste heat boiler will be provided for each of the three incinerators. Steam from these waste heat boilers will supply energy to two turbine-generators, which, in turn, will supply auxiliary power to the incinerator plant; the balance of the power will be sold to Detroit Edison Company (DEC). Exhaust steam from each turbine will be directed into a surface condenser operating under vacuum. The water to be supplied to each condenser will be recirculated water that has been cooled by means of a cooling tower. Other cooling water that could be subjected to oil contamination will be supplied from a separate recirculating water system. The water in this system will be cooled by an evaporative condenser. The main steam, boiler feedwater, and condensate systems will be similar to those used in central power stations. Flow diagrams for all systems, together with heat balances, electrical one-line diagrams, and plant layouts, are included in the Appendix. Also included in the Appendix are instruments and controls logic diagrams. (MCW)

Not Available

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Mixed-waste treatment -- What about the residuals? A comparative analysis of MSO and incineration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines the issues concerning final waste forms, or residuals, that result from the treatment of mixed waste in molten salt oxidation (MSO) and incinerator systems. MSO is a technology with the potential to treat a certain segment of the waste streams at US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. MSO was compared with incineration because incineration is the best demonstrated available technology (BDAT) for the same waste streams. The Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) prepared this report for the DOE Office of Environmental Restoration (OER). The goals of this study are to objectively evaluate the anticipated residuals from MSO and incineration, examine regulatory issues for these final waste forms, and determine secondary treatment options. This report, developed to address concerns that MSO residuals present unique disposal difficulties, is part of a larger effort to successfully implement MSO as a treatment technology for mixed and hazardous waste. A Peer Review Panel reviewed the MSO technology in November 1991, and the implementation effort is ongoing under the guidance of the MSO Task Force.

NONE

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

UV&P 2014 999_2014_Sofia_WTERT Presentation Neubacher 2014-03-06  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficiency: up to 90 % (co-generation of electricity and district heat) Steam production: 2 x 50 t / h (32 acceptance of Waste-to-Energy in Vienna For Waste-to-Energy with district heating Against incineration Source- equivalent [kg/ton waste] Reduction in household heating from Waste-to-Energy Plant (district heating

192

Oxygen-enriched multiple-hearth sewage sludge incineration demonstration. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oxygen-enhanced multiple-hearth sludge incineration was the focus of a five-month joint study by Praxair and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority. Testing and demonstration were conducted in Rochester NY, at Monroe County`s Frank E. Van Lare Sewage Treatment Plant. A simple retrofit of high-momentum oxygen lances created a convection hearth in which convective heat and mass transfer with the drying sludge were greatly enhanced, while hearth temperatures were moderated by the wet sludge to prevent overheating. Based on the results of short- and long-term controlled tests discussed in this report, oxygen enhancement of multiple-hearth sludge incinerators can be economically viable, with a savings between $30 and $60 per hour at Van Lare based upon increased sludge throughput and reduced fuel consumption.

NONE

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Fluorination of incinerator ash by hydrofluorination or ammonium bifluoride fusion for plutonium recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Incinerator ash containing small quantities of plutonium has been accumulating across the defense complex for many years. Although the total Pu inventory is small, the ash is a nondiscardable residue which presents storage and accountability difficulties. The work discussed here is the result of a joint exploratory effort between members of Savannah River Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory to compare two proposed pyrochemical pretreatments of incinerator ash prior to aqueous processing. These experiments attempted to determine the relative effectiveness of hydrofluorination and ammonium bifluoride fusion as head-end operations for a two step aqueous recovery method. The two pretreatments are being considered as possible second generation enhancements for the New Special Recovery Facility nearing operation at Savannah River Plant. Experimental results and potential engineering concerns are discussed. 3 figs.

Fink, S.D.; Gray, J.H.; Kent, S.J.; Apgar, S.A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

High temperature materials for radioactive waste incineration and vitrification. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Incineration or vitrification of radioactive waste subjects equipment to alkaline or acidic fluxing, oxidation, sulfidation, carburization, and thermal shock. It is necessary to select appropriate materials of construction and control operating conditions to avoid rapid equipment failure. Nickel- and cobalt-based alloys with high chromium or aluminum content and aluminum oxide/chromium oxide refractories with high chromium oxide content have provided the best service in pilot-scale melter tests. Inconel 690 and Monofrax K-3 are being used for waste vitrification. Haynes 188 and high alumina refractory are undergoing pilot scale tests for incineration equipment. Laboratory tests indicate that alloys and refractories containing still higher concentrations of chromium or chromium oxide, such as Inconel 671 and Monofrax E, may provide superior resistance to attack in glass melter environments.

Bickford, D F; Ondrejcin, R S; Salley, L

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Application of holographic neural networks for flue gas emissions prediction in the Burnaby incinerator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article describes the development of a parametric prediction system (PPS) for various emission species at the Burnaby incinerator. The continuous emissions monitoring system at the Burnaby incinerator is shared between three boilers and therefore actual results are only available 5 minutes out of every 15 minutes. The PPS was developed to fill in data for the 10 minutes when the Continuous Emission Monitor (CEM) is measuring the other boilers. It bases its prediction on the last few actual readings taken and parametrically predicts CO, SO2 and NOx. The Burnaby Incinerator is located in the commercial/industrial area of South Burnaby, British Columbia. It consists of three separate lines, each burning ten tonnes of garbage per hour and producing about three tonnes of steam for every tonne of garbage burned. The air pollution control system first cools the combustion products with water injection and then scrubs them with very fine hydrated lime. Carbon is added to the lime to enhance the scrubbing of the combustion products. The CEM monitors the levels of oxygen, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, sulphur dioxide and opacity. In 1996, an expert system was installed on one of boilers at the Burnaby Incinerator plant to determine if it could improve the plant=s operations and reduce overall emission. As part of the expert system, the PPS was developed. Holographic Neural Technology (HNeT), developed by AND Corporation of Toronto, Ontario, is a novel neural network technology using complex numbers in its architecture. Compared to the traditional neural networks, HNeT has some significant advantage. It is more resilient against converging on local minima; is faster training and executing; less prone to over fitting; and, in most cases, has significantly lower error. Selection of independent variabs, training set preparation, testing neural nets and other related issue will be discussed.

Zheng, L.; Dockrill, P.; Clements, B. [Natural Resources Canada, Nepean, Ontario (Canada). CANMET Energy Technology Centre

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

196

District heating from electric-generating plants and municipal incinerators: local planner's assessment guide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This guide is designed to aid local government planners in the preliminary evaluation of the feasibility of district heating using heat recovered from electric generating plants and municipal incinerators. System feasibility is indicated by: (1) the existence of an adequate supply of nearby waste heat, (2) the presence of a sufficiently dense and large thermal load, and (3) a favorable cost comparison with conventional heating methods. 34 references.

Pferdehirt, W.; Kron, N. Jr.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Operational experience of the Juelich incineration system in the treatment of radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After ten years spent on development and testing of a prototype incinerator in the Juelich Research Center, a new industrial scale unit has been built. The paper gives a short description of the plant design and operation characteristics. The major part of the paper deals with the experience gained from the treatment of 355 Mg low-level radioactive waste during the last four years.

Halaszovich, S.; Jablonski, W. [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); Lins, W.; Wurster, W.; Kaufmann, K.H. [Kraftanlagen Aktiengesellschaft, Heidelberg (Germany)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

198

Encapsulation of mixed radioactive and hazardous waste contaminated incinerator ash in modified sulfur cement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some of the process waste streams incinerated at various Department of Energy (DOE) facilities contain traces of both low-level radioactive (LLW) and hazardous constituents, thus yielding ash residues that are classified as mixed waste. Work is currently being performed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to develop new and innovative materials for encapsulation of DOE mixed wastes including incinerator ash. One such material under investigation is modified sulfur cement, a thermoplastic developed by the US Bureau of Mines. Monolithic waste forms containing as much as 55 wt % incinerator fly ash from Idaho national Engineering Laboratory (INEL) have been formulated with modified sulfur cement, whereas maximum waste loading for this waste in hydraulic cement is 16 wt %. Compressive strength of these waste forms exceeded 27.6 MPa. Wet chemical and solid phase waste characterization analyses performed on this fly ash revealed high concentrations of soluble metal salts including Pb and Cd, identified by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as toxic metals. Leach testing of the ash according to the EPA Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) resulted in concentrations of Pb and Cd above allowable limits. Encapsulation of INEL fly ash in modified sulfur cement with a small quantity of sodium sulfide added to enhance retention of soluble metal salts reduced TCLP leachate concentrations of Pb and Cd well below EPA concentration criteria for delisting as a toxic hazardous waste. 12 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Kalb, P.D.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

RCRA, superfund and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Hazardous waste incinerators (40 cfr parts 264/265, subpart o) updated July 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The module introduces the concept of burning hazardous wastes in units regulated under RCRA and outlines the requirements for one type of device - the incinerator. It explains what an incinerator is and how incinerators are regulated, and states the conditions under which an owner/operator may be exempt from subpart O. It defines principal organic hazardous constituent (POHC) and describes the criteria under which a POHC is selected. It defines destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) and describes the interaction between compliance with performance standards and compliance with incinerator operating conditions established in the permit. It defines and explains the purpose of a `trial burn`.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

RCRA/UST, superfund, and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Hazardous waste incinerators (40 CFR parts 264/265, subpart O) updated as of July 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The module introduces the concept of burning hazardous wastes in units regulated under RCRA and outlines the requirements for one type of device - the incinerator. It explains what an incinerator is and how incinerators are regulated and states the conditions under which an owner/operator may be exempt from Subpart O. It defines principal organic hazardous constituent (POHC) and describes the criteria under which a POHC is selected and defines destruction and removal efficiency (DRE). It describes the interaction between compliance with performance standards and compliance with incinerator operating conditions established in the permit. It also defines and explains the purpose of a trial burn.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university waste-to-energy incinerator" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Life-cycle-assessment of the historical development of air pollution control and energy recovery in waste incineration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Incineration of municipal solid waste is a debated waste management technology. In some countries it is the main waste management option whereas in other countries it has been disregarded. The main discussion point on waste incineration is the release of air emissions from the combustion of the waste, but also the energy recovery efficiency has a large importance. The historical development of air pollution control in waste incineration was studied through life-cycle-assessment modelling of eight different air pollution control technologies. The results showed a drastic reduction in the release of air emissions and consequently a significant reduction in the potential environmental impacts of waste incineration. Improvements of a factor 0.85-174 were obtained in the different impact potentials as technology developed from no emission control at all, to the best available emission control technologies of today (2010). The importance of efficient energy recovery was studied through seven different combinations of heat and electricity recovery, which were modelled to substitute energy produced from either coal or natural gas. The best air pollution control technology was used at the incinerator. It was found that when substituting coal based energy production total net savings were obtained in both the standard and toxic impact categories. However, if the substituted energy production was based on natural gas, only the most efficient recovery options yielded net savings with respect to the standard impacts. With regards to the toxic impact categories, emissions from the waste incineration process were always larger than those from the avoided energy production based on natural gas. The results shows that the potential environmental impacts from air emissions have decreased drastically during the last 35 years and that these impacts can be partly or fully offset by recovering energy which otherwise should have been produced from fossil fuels like coal or natural gas.

Damgaard, Anders, E-mail: and@env.dtu.d [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Riber, Christian [Ramboll, Consulting Engineers, Teknikerbyen 31, DK-2830 Virum (Denmark); Fruergaard, Thilde [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Hulgaard, Tore [Ramboll, Consulting Engineers, Teknikerbyen 31, DK-2830 Virum (Denmark); Christensen, Thomas H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

202

Laboratory study on the behaviour of spent AA household alkaline batteries in incineration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The quantitative evaluation of emissions from incineration is essential when Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) studies consider this process as an end-of-life solution for some wastes. Thus, the objective of this work is to quantify the main gaseous emissions produced when spent AA alkaline batteries are incinerated. With this aim, batteries were kept for 1 h at 1273 K in a refractory steel tube hold in a horizontal electric furnace with temperature control. At one end of the refractory steel tube, a constant air flow input assures the presence of oxygen in the atmosphere and guides the gaseous emissions to a filter system followed by a set of two bubbler flasks having an aqueous solution of 10% (v/v) nitric acid. After each set of experiments, sulphur, chlorides and metals (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, Tl and Zn) were analyzed in both the solutions obtained from the steel tube washing and from the bubblers. Sulphur, chlorides and metals were quantified, respectively, using barium sulfate gravimetry, the Volhard method and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). The emissions of zinc, the most emitted metal, represent about 6.5% of the zinc content in the batteries. Emissions of manganese (whose oxide is the main component of the cathode) and iron (from the cathode collector) are negligible when compared with their amount in AA alkaline batteries. Mercury is the metal with higher volatility in the composition of the batteries and was collected even in the second bubbler flask. The amount of chlorides collected corresponds to about 36% of the chlorine in the battery sleeve that is made from PVC. A considerable part of the HCl formed in PVC plastic sleeve incineration is neutralized with KOH, zinc and manganese oxides and, thus, it is not totally released in the gas. Some of the emissions are predictable through a thermodynamic data analysis at temperatures in the range of 1200-1300 K taking into account the composition of the batteries. This analysis was done for most of potential reactions between components in the batteries as well as between them and the surrounding atmosphere and it reasonably agrees the experimental results. The results obtained show the role of alkaline batteries at the acid gases cleaning process, through the neutralization reactions of some of their components. Therefore, LCA of spent AA alkaline batteries at the municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration process must consider this contribution.

Almeida, Manuel F. [LEPAE, Faculty of Engineering, University of Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal)], E-mail: mfa@fe.up.pt; Xara, Susana M.; Delgado, Julanda; Costa, Carlos A. [LEPAE, Faculty of Engineering, University of Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

203

Los Alamos Controlled Air Incinerator for radioactive waste. Volume I. Rationale, process, equipment, performance, and recommendations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This two-volume report is a detailed design and operating documentation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Controlled Air Incinerator (CAI) and is an aid to technology transfer to other Department of Energy contractor sites and the commercial sector. Volume I describes the CAI process, equipment, and performance, and it recommends modifications based on Los Alamos experience. It provides the necessary information for conceptual design and feasibility studies. Volume II provides descriptive engineering information such as drawing, specifications, calculations, and costs. It aids duplication of the process at other facilities.

Neuls, A.S.; Draper, W.E.; Koenig, R.A.; Newmyer, J.M.; Warner, C.L.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Toxicity mitigation and solidification of municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash using alkaline activated coal ash  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Incinerator fly ash (IFA) is added to an alkali activated coal fly ash (CFA) matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Means of stabilizing the incinerator ash for use in construction applications. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Concrete made from IFA, CFA and IFA-CFA mixes was chemically characterized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Environmentally friendly solution to IFA disposal by reducing its toxicity levels. - Abstract: Municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration is a common and effective practice to reduce the volume of solid waste in urban areas. However, the byproduct of this process is a fly ash (IFA), which contains large quantities of toxic contaminants. The purpose of this research study was to analyze the chemical, physical and mechanical behaviors resulting from the gradual introduction of IFA to an alkaline activated coal fly ash (CFA) matrix, as a mean of stabilizing the incinerator ash for use in industrial construction applications, where human exposure potential is limited. IFA and CFA were analyzed via X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Inductive coupled plasma (ICP) to obtain a full chemical analysis of the samples, its crystallographic characteristics and a detailed count of the eight heavy metals contemplated in US Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR). The particle size distribution of IFA and CFA was also recorded. EPA's Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) was followed to monitor the leachability of the contaminants before and after the activation. Also images obtained via Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), before and after the activation, are presented. Concrete made from IFA, CFA and IFA-CFA mixes was subjected to a full mechanical characterization; tests include compressive strength, flexural strength, elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio and setting time. The leachable heavy metal contents (except for Se) were below the maximum allowable limits and in many cases even below the reporting limit. The leachable Chromium was reduced from 0.153 down to 0.0045 mg/L, Arsenic from 0.256 down to 0.132 mg/L, Selenium from 1.05 down to 0.29 mg/L, Silver from 0.011 down to .001 mg/L, Barium from 2.06 down to 0.314 mg/L and Mercury from 0.007 down to 0.001 mg/L. Although the leachable Cd exhibited an increase from 0.49 up to 0.805 mg/L and Pd from 0.002 up to 0.029 mg/L, these were well below the maximum limits of 1.00 and 5.00 mg/L, respectively.

Ivan Diaz-Loya, E. [Alternative Cementitious Binders Laboratory (ACBL), Department of Civil Engineering, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States); Allouche, Erez N., E-mail: allouche@latech.edu [Alternative Cementitious Binders Laboratory (ACBL), Department of Civil Engineering, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States); Eklund, Sven; Joshi, Anupam R. [Department of Chemistry, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States); Kupwade-Patil, Kunal [Alternative Cementitious Binders Laboratory (ACBL), Department of Civil Engineering, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

205

Brandeis University Brown University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Institute of Technology McGill University Michigan State University New York University Northwestern University of Kansas University of Maryland, College Park University of Michigan University of MinnesotaBrandeis University Brown University California Institute of Technology Carnegie Mellon University

Jiang, Huiqiang

206

Multicomponent aerosol dynamic of the Pb-O[sub 2] system in a bench scale flame incinerator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The article gives results of a study to understand the formation and growth of lead particles in a flame incinerator. A bench scale flame incinerator was used to perform controlled experiments with lead acetate as a test compound. A dilution probe (in conjunction with real-time aerosol instruments) was used to measure the evolution of the particle size distribution at different locations in the flame region. A multicomponent lognormal aerosol model was developed accounting for the chemistry of the lead-oxygen system, and for such aerosol dynamic phenomena as nucleation, coagulation, and condensation. Reasonable agreement was obtained between the predictions of the model using appropriate kinetic parameters and the experimental results.

Lin, W.Y.; Sethi, V.; Biswas, P.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Evaluation of air pollution abatement systems for multiple-hearth sewage sludge incinerators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Capital and annual costs were calculated for the application of six different air-pollution-control system options to municipal sewage-sludge incinerators that were using multiple-hearth furnaces. The systems involved three principal types of air-pollution equipment - wet scrubbers, fabric filters, and electrostatic precipitators - applied to three different plant sizes (plants incinerating 36, 72, and 300 tons of dry sludge per day in one, two, and eight multiple-hearth furnaces, respectively). The six options were: (1) venturi/tray scrubber with a 40-inch pressure drop, (2) fabric filter system operating at 500 deg and equipped with an upstream temperature control, (3) fabric filter system operating at 500 deg and equipped with a heat exchanger and a scrubber for SO/sub 2/ reduction, (4) electrostatic precipitator (ESP) with upstream limited temperature and humidity control, (5) same as Option 4 but with an additional downstream wet scrubber for SO/sub 2/ reduction, and (6) ESP with upstream temperature control and an SO/sub 2/ scrubber. Technical feasibility studies indicated that all three types of controls could achieve a total particulate removal efficiency of 99 percent. The venturi/tray scrubber option entailed the lowest capital cost, but annual operating costs were highest because of the high pressure drops and increased energy use.

Annamraju, G.; Gerstle, R.W.; Shah, Y.M.; Arora, M.L.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Fast neutron incineration in the energy amplifier as alternative to geologic storage the case of Spain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In previous reports [1][2] we have presented the conceptual design of a fast neutron driven sub-critical device (Energy Amplifier) designed both for energy amplification (production) and for the incineration of unwanted waste from Nuclear Light Water Reactors (LWR). The latter scheme is here applied to the specific case of Spain, where 9 large LWRs are presently in operation. It is shown that a cluster of 5 EAs is a very effective and realistic solution to the elimination (in 37 years) of the present and foreseen (till 2029) LWR-Waste stockpiles of Spain, but with major improvements over Geologic Storage, since: (1) only a Low Level Waste (LLW) surface repository of reasonable size is ultimately required; (2) the large amount of energy stored in the trans-Uranics is recovered, amounting for each of the 37 years of incineration to a saving of about 8% of the present primary energy demand of Spain (100 MTep/y); (3) the slightly enriched (1.1%) Uranium, unburned by LWRs, can be recovered for further us...

Rubbia, Carlo; Kadi, Y; Rubio, Juan Antonio

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Uranium effluent testing for the Oak Ridge Toxic Substances Control Act mixed waste incinerator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge K-25 Site Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Incinerator has been undergoing a series of routine tests to determine uranium partitioning to the stack, scrubber waters, and bottom ash. This paper discusses the results of the most recent experiment in which relatively high rates of uranium stack gas emissions were identified: 6.11 g/h or 8 wt % based on the uranium feed. These data are compared with earlier data, and an empirical correlation is suggested between the stack emissions of uranium and the product of the uranium and chlorine concentration of the feed. This is consistent with certain findings with other metals, in which increasing chlorine feed contents led to increasing emissions.

Shor, J.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Bostick, W.D.; Hoffmann, D.P.; Gibson, L.V. Jr. [Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States); Ho, T.C. [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Rocky Flats Plant fluidized-bed incinerator. Engineering design and reference manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The information in this manual is being presented to complete the documentation of the fluidized-bed incineration (FBI) process development at the Rocky Flats Plant. The information pertains to the 82-kg/hour demonstration unit at the Rocky Flats Plant. This document continues the presentation of design reference material in the aeas of equipment drawings, space requirements, and unit costs. In addition, appendices contain an operating procedure and an operational safety analysis of the process. The cost figures presented are based on 1978 dollars and have not been converted to a current dollar value. Also, the cost of modifications are not included, since they would be insignificant if they were incorporated into a new installation.

Meile, L.J.

1982-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

211

High-temperature corrosion of ceramic-ceramic composites in a waste incinerator environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three types of ceramic composite were exposed to flue gases of a hazardous waste incinerator to assess their corrosion behavior. One composite consisted of continuously wound filaments of Al{sub 2}0{sub 3}-23 wt % ZrO{sub 2} in an alumina matrix. This composite was tested, both uncoated and coated, with zirconia on the outer surface. The second composite type consisted of the same fiber but in a zirconia matrix The third composite consisted of an alumina matrix strengthened with silicon carbide particles. Tubes of these materials were exposed in the waste incinerator at about 900{degrees}C for times up to six months. Two principal results of exposure were revealed by optical microscopy and electron microprobe examinations: flue gas constituents either penetrated the uncoated alumina matrix of the filament-wound composite, apparently through porosity in the matrix, or deposited on the surfaces of the other composite types where reaction and bonding occurred. Neither event caused significant microstructural degradation although thereaction in the composite with a zirconia matrix suggests that degradation could be a problem under more severe conditions. Apparently, the concentration of penetrating species was too small to form a significant amount of new compounds that could cause degradation within the alumina matrix of the filament-wound composite, and the temperature was too low for the deposits on the surface of the other two types of composites to react significantly with the materials during the longest exposure of 6 months. The zirconia coating on the alumina matrix composite was not adherent enough to permit an assessment of its effect.

Keiser, J.R.; Federer, J.I.; Henson, T.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hindman, D.L. [Babcock and Wilcox Co., Lynchburg, VA (United States)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 3. Characterization of the nature and magnitude of emissions. Draft report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. Volume III of the report describes the methods used to estimate both stack and fugitive emission rates from the facility.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

HELSINKI UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY ENE-47.153 VOCsVOCs,, PAHsPAHs, soot, tar, CO, soot, tar, CO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

incinerator EU (2000) Power plant Germany (1999) MSW incinerator Germany (1999) Hazardou s waste incinerator EU (1996) Waste incinerator USA (1995) CO no limit 50 50 250 50 50 76.31 THC no limit 10 10 20 10 10.153 VOC emissions from waste incineration plants,VOC emissions from waste incineration plants, in mg

Zevenhoven, Ron

214

Aachen RWTH Aarhus University Aberdeen University Adelaide University Alabama University Alberta University Amsterdam University Arizona University Auckland University Australian National University Bath University Beijing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Massachusetts University Massey University McGill University McMaster University Melbourne University Michigan State University Michigan University Minnesota University Monash University Montpellier UniversityAachen RWTH Aarhus University Aberdeen University Adelaide University Alabama University Alberta

Tisdell, Chris

215

Solvated Electron Technology{sup TM}. Non-Thermal Alternative to Waste Incineration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solvated Electron Technology (SET{sup TM}) is a patented non-thermal alternative to incineration for treating Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) and other mixed waste by destroying organic hazardous components. SET{sup TM} is a treatment process that destroys the hazardous components in mixed waste by chemical reduction. The residual material meets land disposal restriction (LDR) and TSCA requirements for disposal. In application, contaminated materials are placed into a treatment cell and mixed with the solvated electron solution. In the case of PCBs or other halogenated contaminants, chemical reactions strip the halogen ions from the chain or aromatic ring producing sodium chloride and high molecular weight hydrocarbons. At the end of the reaction, ammonia within the treatment cell is removed and recycled. The reaction products (such as sodium salts) produced in the process remain with the matrix. The SET{sup TM} process is 99.999% effective in destroying: polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs); trichloroethane (TCA) and trichloroethene (TCE); dioxins; polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs); benzene, toluene, xylene (BTX); pesticides; fungicides; herbicides; chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs); hydro-chlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), explosives and chemical-warfare agents; and has successfully destroyed many of the wastes listed in 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 261. In September 2007, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a Research and Development permit for SET for chemical destruction of 'pure' Pyranol, which is 60% PCBs. These tests were completed in November 2007. SET{sup TM} is recognized by EPA as a non-thermal process equivalent to incineration and three SET{sup TM} systems have been permitted by EPA as commercial mobile PCB destruction units. This paper describes in detail the results of select bench-, pilot-, and commercial-scale treatment of hazardous and mixed wastes for EPA, Department of Energy (DOE), and the Department of Defense(DoD), and the applicability of SET{sup TM} to currently problematic waste streams that have very limited treatment alternatives. In summary: SET{sup TM} operates as a non-thermal destruction process under low pressure. The process occurs in a closed system producing no hazardous off-gases and no regulated by-products such as dioxins or furans or their precursors. Advantages of SET{sup TM} include: - Organic contaminants are destroyed, not just removed, diluted or concentrated. - Operates as a closed system - produces no regulated secondary wastes. - Holds an EPA permit for PCB destruction. - Operates at ambient temperatures (70 deg. F). - Portable and sets up quickly in less than 4000 square feet of space. - Scalable to accommodate any size waste stream. - Requires minimal amounts of power, water and infrastructure. - Applicable to heterogeneous waste streams in all phases. The SET{sup TM} process is 99.9999% effective in destroying organic constituents of RCRA and TSCA waste, explosives and chemical-warfare agents; and has successfully destroyed many of the wastes listed in 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 261. The residual material meets land disposal restriction (LDR) and TSCA requirements for disposal. In November 2007, Commodore completed a treatability study on Pyranol to determine the effectiveness of SET{sup TM} treatment on oil containing 600,000 PPM PCBs. Laboratory results proved destruction of PCBs to less than 1 PPM at low temperatures and pressures. SET{sup TM} is a proven, safe and cost-effective alternative to incineration for some of the most difficult waste treatment problems that exist today. (authors)

Foutz, W.L.; Rogers, J.E.; Mather, J.D. [Commodore Advanced Sciences, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Soil solution chemistry of sewage-sludge incinerator ash and phosphate fertilizer amended soil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The chemical composition of the soil provides useful information on the feasibility of amending agricultural land with municipal and industrial waste, because the soil solution is the medium for most soil chemical reactions, the mobile phase in soils, and the medium for mineral adsorption by plant roots. The soil solutions studies in this research were from plots in a 4-yr field experiment conducted to evaluate the effects of the trace metals and P in sewage-sludge incinerator ash. Treatments compared ash with equivalent P rates from triple-superphosphate fertilizer and a control receiving no P application. Ash and phosphate fertilizer were applied annually at rates of 35, 70, and 140 kg citrate-soluble P ha{sup -1}. Cumulative ash applications during 4 yr amounted to 3.6, 7.2, and 14.4 Mg ash ha{sup -1}. Soil solutions were obtained by centrifugation-immiscible liquid displacement using a fluorocarbon displacing agent. Following chemical analysis, a chemical speciation model was used to determine possible solubility-controlling minerals for trace metals and P, and correlations between solution composition and plant uptake were analyzed. 37 refs., 5 tabs.

Bierman, P.M.; Rosen, C.J.; Bloom, P.R.; Nater, E.A. [Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Examination of Babcock and Wilcox tubes after exposure in an industrial waste incinerator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seven ceramic tubes provided by, and in most cases manufactured by, Babcock and Wilcox were exposed in E. I. DuPont`s Wilmington, Delaware, hazardous waste incinerator. These tubes were subsequently examined at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to determine the effect of exposure on the strength and microstructural integrity of the tube materials. An unexposed tube section of one of the materials was also examined. Evaluation methods included c-ring compression tests, light microscopy, and electron microprobe spectroscopy. The c-ring compression tests revealed a very wide range in the strengths of the materials tested; the strongest was DuPont Lanxide Composites (DLC) silicon carbide particulate-strengthened alumina, and the weakest was the DLC Type B mixed-oxide material. The only material for which data on unexposed samples were available showed lower strength than the exposed material. Microstructural examination of the samples yielded minimal evidence of interaction of most of the tube materials with the components of the environment. Microprobe examination showed some segregation of yttrium in the matrix and along the surface of one of the PRD166/zirconia tubes and limited interaction of the fibers in the same tube with the components of the environment.

Keiser, J.R.; Ferber, M.K.; Longmire, H.F.; Walker, L.R.; Hindman, D.L.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Mineralogy and pore water chemistry of a boiler ash from a MSW fluidized-bed incinerator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents an investigation of the mineralogy and pore water chemistry of a boiler ash sampled from a municipal solid waste fluidized-bed incinerator, subject to 18 months of dynamic leaching in a large percolation column experiment. A particular focus is on the redox behaviour of Cr(VI) in relation to metal aluminium Al{sup 0}, as chromium may represent an environmental or health hazard. The leaching behaviour and interaction between Cr(VI) and Al{sup 0} are interpreted on the basis of mineralogical evolutions observed over the 18-month period and of saturation indices calculated with the geochemical code PhreeqC and reviewed thermodynamic data. Results of mineralogical analyses show in particular the alteration of mineral phases during leaching (e.g. quartz and metal aluminium grains), while geochemical calculations suggest equilibria of percolating fluids with respect to specific mineral phases (e.g. monohydrocalcite and aluminium hydroxide). The combination of leaching data on a large scale and mineralogical analyses document the coupled leaching behaviour of aluminium and chromium, with chromium appearing in the pore fluids in its hexavalent and mobile state once metal aluminium is no longer available for chromium reduction.

Bodenan, F., E-mail: f.bodenan@brgm.f [BRGM - French Geological Survey, Environment and Processes Division, BP 36009, 3 Av. C. Guillemin, 45060 Orleans Cedex (France); Guyonnet, D.; Piantone, P.; Blanc, P. [BRGM - French Geological Survey, Environment and Processes Division, BP 36009, 3 Av. C. Guillemin, 45060 Orleans Cedex (France)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

219

Greenhouse gas emissions from MSW incineration in China: Impacts of waste characteristics and energy recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Determination of the amount of greenhouse gas (GHG) emitted during municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) is complex because both contributions and savings of GHGs exist in the process. To identify the critical factors influencing GHG emissions from MSWI in China, a GHG accounting model was established and applied to six Chinese cities located in different regions. The results showed that MSWI in most of the cities was the source of GHGs, with emissions of 25-207 kg CO{sub 2}-eq t{sup -1} rw. Within all process stages, the emission of fossil CO{sub 2} from the combustion of MSW was the main contributor (111-254 kg CO{sub 2}-eq t{sup -1} rw), while the substitution of electricity reduced the GHG emissions by 150-247 kg CO{sub 2}-eq t{sup -1} rw. By affecting the fossil carbon content and the lower heating value of the waste, the contents of plastic and food waste in the MSW were the critical factors influencing GHG emissions of MSWI. Decreasing food waste content in MSW by half will significantly reduce the GHG emissions from MSWI, and such a reduction will convert MSWI in Urumqi and Tianjin from GHG sources to GHG sinks. Comparison of the GHG emissions in the six Chinese cities with those in European countries revealed that higher energy recovery efficiency in Europe induced much greater reductions in GHG emissions. Recovering the excess heat after generation of electricity would be a good measure to convert MSWI in all the six cities evaluated herein into sinks of GHGs.

Yang Na [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Zhang Hua, E-mail: zhanghua_tj@tongji.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Chen Miao; Shao Liming [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); He Pinjing, E-mail: xhpjk@tongji.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

220

Paper waste - Recycling, incineration or landfilling? A review of existing life cycle assessments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review of existing life cycle assessments (LCAs) on paper and cardboard waste has been undertaken. The objectives of the review were threefold. Firstly, to see whether a consistent message comes out of published LCA literature on optimum disposal or recycling solutions for this waste type. Such message has implications for current policy formulation on material recycling and disposal in the EU. Secondly, to identify key methodological issues of paper waste management LCAs, and enlighten the influence of such issues on the conclusions of the LCA studies. Thirdly, in light of the analysis made, to discuss whether it is at all valid to use the LCA methodology in its current development state to guide policy decisions on paper waste. A total of nine LCA studies containing altogether 73 scenarios were selected from a thorough, international literature search. The selected studies are LCAs including comparisons of different management options for waste paper. Despite claims of inconsistency, the LCAs reviewed illustrate the environmental benefits in recycling over incineration or landfill options, for paper and cardboard waste. This broad consensus was found despite differences in geographic location and definitions of the paper recycling/disposal systems studied. A systematic exploration of the LCA studies showed, however, important methodological pitfalls and sources of error, mainly concerning differences in the definition of the system boundaries. Fifteen key assumptions were identified that cover the three paper cycle system areas: raw materials and forestry, paper production, and disposal/recovery. It was found that the outcome of the individual LCA studies largely depended on the choices made in some of these assumptions, most specifically the ones concerning energy use and generation, and forestry.

Villanueva, A. [European Topic Centre on Resource and Waste Management, Hojbro Plads 4, DK-1200 Copenhagen K (Denmark)], E-mail: alejandro@villanueva.dk; Wenzel, H. [Department of Manufacturing Engineering and Management, Technical University of Denmark, Building 424, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university waste-to-energy incinerator" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Report on the technical workshop on WTI incinerator risk issues. Held in Washington, DC on December 8-9, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report includes information and materials from a peer review workshop organized by EPA's Risk Assessment Forum (RAF) for the Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response and Region 5. The meeting was held in Washington, DC, at the Holiday Inn Capitol on December 8-9, 1993. The subject of the peer review was a draft project plan prepared by EPA Region 5 for assessing risk at an incinerator operated by Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) in East Liverpool, Ohio. The peer review panel was convened to evaluate the project plan as the scientific foundation for a risk assessment, which will be used in setting final permit conditions for the WTI facility.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

EA-1862: Oneida Seven Generation Corporation Waste-To-Energy System, Ashwaubenon, Wisconsin  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Oneidas Energy Recovery Project would construct and operate a solid waste-to-electricity power plant on vacant property within the Bayport Industrial Center in the City of Green Bay, Brown County, Wisconsin. This energy recovery process would involve bringing municipal solid waste into the plant for sizing (shredding), sorting (removing recyclable material), and conveying into one of three pyrolytic gasification systems.

223

E-Print Network 3.0 - american ref-fuel waste-to-energy Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 50 Leaching of Dioxins from Municipal Waste Combustor Residues Summary: 12, 12th North American...

224

E-Print Network 3.0 - american waste-to-energy conference Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 20 Leaching of Dioxins from Municipal Waste Combustor Residues Summary: 12, 12th North American...

225

EA-1860: Richland Renewable Energy Waste-to-Energy Project, Richland, Wisconsin  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is preparing a draft Environmental Assessment to analyze the potential environmental impacts of the proposed construction and operation of a new wastewater treatment facility and the alternative of not implementing this project.

226

Microsoft PowerPoint - Tribal Leader Forum Waste to Energy Introductio...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Fe 2 O 3 , and Al 2 O 3 Potential re-use Concrete, bricks, artificial reefs Air Modern air pollution control technology removes most contaminants Scrubbers, baghouse, ESP, etc....

227

Microsoft PowerPoint - Tribal Leader Forum Waste to Energy Introduction  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F S i DOE Tribal Leader ForumStatus of the U.S.What weTVALLC Tribal

228

Waste-to-Energy Evaluation: U.S. Virgin Islands | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Owned SmallOf The 2012NuclearBradley Nickell02-03

229

Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov PtyInformationSEDS dataIndiana:CoopWaspa Jump to: navigation,Information

230

BIZKAIA WASTE TO ENERGY PLANT PROJECT February, 2005 SUMMARY REPORT Page 1 of 7  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas turbine generator with 43 MW power output. e) 1 Heat recovery steam generator at 100 bars. #12 a) Thermal power exhaust gases from the gas turbine. b) Superheated steam (538 ºC 100 bar) to the steam turbine. c) Natural gas burners using fresh air to replace thermal energy in case of a gas turbine

Columbia University

231

Waste-to-Energy and Fuel Cell T h l i O i  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. #12;Global Approach for Using Biogas Innovation for Our Energy Future #12;Anaerobic Digestion by Generator Type (based on 40-million SCF* of biogas per year**)( g p y ) Generator Type Megawatthours not come in an infinite range of sizes. Innovation for Our Energy Future #12;Contaminants in Biogas

232

Waste-to-Energy Biomass Digester with Decreased Water Consumption - Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and Materials Disposition Information Waste andInnovation

233

Waste-to-Energy: Hawaii and Guam Energy Improvement Technology Demonstration Project  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and Materials Disposition Information Waste

234

"Wet" Waste-to-Energy in the Bioenergy Technologies Office | Department of  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment ofEnergy.pdfApplications:Adjustment Data Report"Troops

235

Case Study - The Challenge: Improving the Performance of a Waste-To-Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' ResearchTheMarketing,Energy-ChevronSeveral salesCarolyn L.in a Textile Plant

236

MacArthur Waste to Energy Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey,(MonasterLowell Point,ECO Auger <Industries Inc

237

Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 South Place: Salt LakeWashtenaw County, Michigan: Energy Resources Jump

238

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Overview: 2011 Waste-to-Energy Using Fuel Cells  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebratePartnersDepartment DOEDepartment ofWorkshop | Department of

239

Waste to Energy Power Production at DOE and DOD Sites | Department of  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of| Department of EnergyDepartmentDepartmentof EnergyEnergy Waste

240

Waste-to-Energy Projects at Army Installations | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of| Department of EnergyDepartmentDepartmentof

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university waste-to-energy incinerator" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Waste-to-Energy and Fuel Cell Technologies Overview | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of| Department of EnergyDepartmentDepartmentofTechnologies

242

Waste-to-Energy using Fuel Cells Workshop | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of| Department of EnergyDepartmentDepartmentofTechnologiesusing Fuel Cells

243

Report of the DOD-DOE Workshop on Converting Waste to Energy Using Fuel  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAXBalancedDepartment ofColumbusReport #StudyRenewableEntergyDepartment|Cells:

244

Waste-to-Energy using Fuel Cells Workshop | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment of Dept.| DepartmentVolvo TrucksofPostWasteWebinar

245

Comparative assessment of municipal sewage sludge incineration, gasification and pyrolysis for a sustainable sludge-to-energy management in Greece  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: The high output of MSS highlights the need for alternative routes of valorization. Evaluation of 3 sludge-to-energy valorisation methods through SWOT analysis. Pyrolysis is an energy and material recovery process resulting to zero waste. Identification of challenges and barriers for MSS pyrolysis in Greece was investigated. Adopters of pyrolysis systems face the challenge of finding new product markets. - Abstract: For a sustainable municipal sewage sludge management, not only the available technology, but also other parameters, such as policy regulations and socio-economic issues should be taken in account. In this study, the current status of both European and Greek Legislation on waste management, with a special insight in municipal sewage sludge, is presented. A SWOT analysis was further developed for comparison of pyrolysis with incineration and gasification and results are presented. Pyrolysis seems to be the optimal thermochemical treatment option compared to incineration and gasification. Sewage sludge pyrolysis is favorable for energy savings, material recovery and high added materials production, providing a zero waste solution. Finally, identification of challenges and barriers for sewage sludge pyrolysis deployment in Greece was investigated.

Samolada, M.C. [Dept. Secretariat of Environmental and Urban Planning Decentralized Area Macedonian Thrace, Taki Oikonomidi 1, 54008 Thessaloniki (Greece); Zabaniotou, A.A., E-mail: azampani@auth.gr [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, University Box 455, University Campus, 541 24 Thessaloniki (Greece)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

246

Emissions of PCDD/Fs from municipal solid waste incinerators in China Yuwen Ni, Haijun Zhang, Su Fan, Xueping Zhang, Qing Zhang, Jiping Chen *  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Emissions of PCDD/Fs from municipal solid waste incinerators in China Yuwen Ni, Haijun Zhang, Su February 2009 Available online 21 March 2009 Keywords: MSWIs PCDD/Fs Congener patterns Emission factor a b s t r a c t Gas emission of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDD

Columbia University

247

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 1. Executive summary. Draft report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. Volume I is a description of the components and methodologies used in the risk assessment and provides a summary of the major results from the three components of the assessment.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 4. Atmospheric dispersion and deposition modeling of emissions. Draft report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. Volume IV describes the air dispersion model used to estimate air concentrations and particle deposition, as well as the results of the modeling exercise.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Field Evaluation of MERCEM Mercury Emission Analyzer System at the Oak Ridge TSCA Incinerator East Tennessee Technology Park Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors reached the following conclusions: (1) The two-month evaluation of the MERCEM total mercury monitor from Perkin Elmer provided a useful venue in determining the feasibility of using a CEM to measure total mercury in a saturated flue gas. (2) The MERCEM exhibited potential at a mixed waste incinerator to meet requirements proposed in PS12 under conditions of operation with liquid feeds only at stack mercury concentrations in the range of proposed MACT standards. (3) Performance of the MERCEM under conditions of incinerating solid and liquid wastes simultaneously was less reliable than while feeding liquid feeds only for the operating conditions and configuration of the host facility. (4) The permeation tube calibration method used in this test relied on the CEM internal volumetric and time constants to relate back to a concentration, whereas a compressed gas cylinder concentration is totally independent of the analyzer mass flowmeter and flowrates. (5) Mercury concentration in the compressed gas cylinders was fairly stable over a 5-month period. (6) The reliability of available reference materials was not fully demonstrated without further evaluation of their incorporation into routine operating procedures performed by facility personnel. (7) The degree of mercury control occurring in the TSCA Incinerator off-gas cleaning system could not be quantified from the data collected in this study. (8) It was possible to conduct the demonstration at a facility incinerating radioactively contaminated wastes and to release the equipment for later unrestricted use elsewhere. (9) Experience gained by this testing answered additional site-specific and general questions regarding the operation and maintenance of CEMs and their use in compliance monitoring of total mercury emissions from hazardous waste incinerators.

None

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

An LCA model for waste incineration enhanced with new technologies for metal recovery and application to the case of Switzerland  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: An enhanced process-based LCA model for MSWI is featured and applied in case study. LCA modeling of recent technological developments for metal recovery from fly ash. Net release from Swiss MSWI 133 kg CO{sub 2}-eq/tonne waste from attributional LCA perspective. Net savings from a consequential LCA perspective reach up to 303 kg CO{sub 2}-eq/tonne waste. Impacts according to ReCiPe and CExD show similar pattern to climate change. - Abstract: A process model of municipal solid waste incinerators (MSWIs) and new technologies for metal recovery from combustion residues was developed. The environmental impact is modeled as a function of waste composition as well as waste treatment and material recovery technologies. The model includes combustion with a grate incinerator, several flue gas treatment technologies, electricity and steam production from waste heat recovery, metal recovery from slag and fly ash, and landfilling of residues and can be tailored to specific plants and sites (software tools can be downloaded free of charge). Application of the model to Switzerland shows that the treatment of one tonne of municipal solid waste results on average in 425 kg CO{sub 2}-eq. generated in the incineration process, and 54 kg CO{sub 2}-eq. accrue in upstream processes such as waste transport and the production of operating materials. Downstream processes, i.e. residue disposal, generates 5 kg CO{sub 2}-eq. Savings from energy recovery are in the range of 67 to 752 kg CO{sub 2}-eq. depending on the assumptions regarding the substituted energy production, while the recovery of metals from slag and fly ash currently results in a net saving of approximately 35 kg CO{sub 2}-eq. A similar impact pattern is observed when assessing the MSWI model for aggregated environmental impacts (ReCiPe) and for non-renewable resource consumption (cumulative exergy demand), except that direct emissions have less and no relevance, respectively, on the total score. The study illustrates that MSWI plants can be an important element of industrial ecology as they provide waste disposal services and can help to close material and energetic cycles.

Boesch, Michael E. [Aveny GmbH, Schwandenholzstr. 212, CH-8046 Zrich (Switzerland); Vadenbo, Carl, E-mail: vadenbo@ifu.baug.ethz.ch [ETH Zurich, Institute of Environmental Engineering, Schafmattstrasse 6, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Saner, Dominik [Swiss Post, Communications, Politics and Social Responsibility, Viktoriastrasse 21, P.O. Box, CH-3030 Berne (Switzerland); Huter, Christoph [City of Zrich, ERZ Entsorgung - Recycling Zrich, Hagenholzstrasse 110, P.O. Box, CH-8050 Zrich (Switzerland); Hellweg, Stefanie [ETH Zurich, Institute of Environmental Engineering, Schafmattstrasse 6, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

251

Lessons learned from an installation perspective for chemical demilitarization plant start-up at four operating incineration sites.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study presents the lessons learned by chemical storage installations as they prepared for the start of chemical demilitarization plant operations at the four current chemical incinerator sites in Alabama, Arkansas, Oregon, and Utah. The study included interviews with persons associated with the process and collection of available documents prepared at each site. The goal was to provide useful information for the chemical weapons storage sites in Colorado and Kentucky that will be going through plant start-up in the next few years. The study is not a compendium of what to do and what not to do. The information has been categorized into ten lessons learned; each is discussed individually. Documents that may be useful to the Colorado and Kentucky sites are included in the appendices. This study should be used as a basis for planning and training.

Motz, L.; Decision and Information Sciences

2011-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

252

A Feasibility Study of H{sub 2}S Abatement by Incineration of Noncondensable Gases in Vented Steam Flow from Davies-State 5206-1 Geothermal Steam Well, Geysers Geothermal Steam Field, Lake County, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Determine feasibility of using an incineration-type device to accomplish the required reduction in vent steam H{sub 2}S content to meet ICAPCO rules. This approach is to be the only method considered in this feasibility study.

None

2006-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

253

Report on the US EPA technical workshop on WTI incinerator risk assessment issues. Held in Washington, DC on January 11, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents information and materials from a peer review workshop organized by EPA`s Risk Assessment Forum for Region 5 and the Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response. The subject of the peer review was a draft document prepared by Region 5 assessing risk at an incinerator operated by Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) in East Liverpool, Ohio. This report summarizes the discussions that took place at the peer review workshop. The report opens with an overview of the workshop and a history of EPA`s WTI incinerator risk assessment activities (section 1), then presents the chairperson`s summary (section 2) and the five work group chairs` summaries (section 3). The body of the report ends with highlights of the peer reviewers` preliminary comments and of the comments offered by workshop observers (section 4).

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

K-1435 Wastewater Treatment System for the Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator Wastewater at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, TN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses the design and performance of a wastewater treatment system installed to support the operation of a hazardous waste incinerator. The Oak Ridge Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator (TSCAI), located at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), is designed and permitted to treat Resource ConservatioN and Recovery Act (RCRA) wastes including characteristic and listed wastes and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated mixed waste. the incinerator process generates acidic gases and particulates which consist of salts, metals, and radionuclides. These off-gases from the incinerator are treated with a wet off-gas scrubber system. The recirculated water is continuously purged (below down), resulting in a wastewater to be treated. Additional water sources are also collected on the site for treatment, including storm water that infiltrates into diked areas and fire water from the incinerator's suppression system. To meet regulatory requirements for discharge, a wastewater treatment system (WWTS) was designed, constructed, and operated to treat these water sources. The WWTS was designed to provide for periodic fluctuation of contaminant concentrations due to various feed streams to the incinverator. Blow down consists of total suspended solids (TSS) and total dissolved solids (TDS), encompassing metals, radionuclide contamination and trace organics. The system design flow rate range is 35 to 75 gallons per minute (gpm). The system is designed with redundancy to minimize time off-line and to reduce impacts to the TSCAI operations. A novel treatment system uses several unit operations, including chemical feed systems, two-stage chemical reaction treatment, microfiltration, sludge storage and dewatering, neutralization, granular activated carbon, effluent neutralization, and a complete programmable logic controller (PLC) and human-machine interface (HMI) control system. To meet the space requirements and to provide portability of the WWTS to other applications, the system was installed in three, over-the-road semi trailers, and interconnected with piping and power. Trailers were oriented on a small site footprint to facilitate ease of installation. A remote sump pump skid was provided to convey water from two holding sumps adjacent to the treatment process. An accumulation tank and pump were also provided to receive miscellaneous wastewaters for treatment if they meet the waste acceptance criteria. The paper includes details of the technology used in the design, the requirements for compliance, and the initial performance demonstration and jar testing results. The WWTS successfully allowed for highly efficient, high-volume treatment with compliant discharge to off-site surface water.

Swientoniewski M.D.

2008-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

255

Emissions of metals, chromium and nickel species, and organics from municipal waste-water-sludge incinerators. Volume 7. Site 8 emission-test report: Appendices. Final report, 1989-91  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Site 8 facility is a 24.1 million gallons per day (MGD) secondary biological treatment plant with a 0.1 MGD septage handling facility. The wastewater influent comes from predominantly (90 percent) domestic sources. The treatment facility serves a population of approximately 175,000. All 22 tons per day of sludge solids are dewatered by two belt presses to a concentration of 22 to 25 percent solids. Approximately 15 to 17 tons of solids are dewatered by one press and fed to the fluidized bed incinerator. The air pollution control system associated with this incinerator consists of a water injection venturi, and an impingement tray scrubber. A pilot-scale wet eletrostatic precipitator had been installed and was tested. Volume 7 contains the appendices for volume 6. These are (1) Incinerator and Scrubber Operating Data; (2) Sampling and Analytical Methods; (3) Sample Calculations; (4) Analytical Data and Reports, and (5) Continuous Emission Monitoring Data Calibrations/One-min averages.

Segall, R.R.; DeWees, W.G.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Performance of two fluid bed sludge incinerators with air pollution control systems consisting of a venturi scrubber and wet electrostatic precipitator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Performance tests were recently conducted on two new Hankin Fluid Bed Incineration Systems installed at publicly owned sewage treatment works in New Jersey. The purpose of the tests was to show that the systems met emission limits set by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection and Energy (NJDEPE), and that the systems met throughput and fuel consumption requirements. These systems, consisting of a fluid bed incinerator, heat exchanger, venturi scrubber, tray cooler, and wet electrostatic precipitator, were tested for emissions of heavy metals, sulfur oxides, nitrogen oxides, hydrogen chloride, carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds, and opacity. Both yielded emissions that were well within the stringent limits set by the NJDEPE in the operating permits. The incinerators exhibited a high level of fuel efficiency with fuel oil consumption averaging 5.5 and 6.0 gallons per ton of wet sludge. In addition, combustion efficiency was high, with a maximum average CO of 7.39 ppmvd and VOCs of 1.39 ppmvd (both corrected to 7% O{sub 2}). The air pollution control equipment showed very high removal efficiencies. Except for Mercury, collection efficiencies for all heavy metals fell within 98.7% to 99.999%. Particulate collection efficiency averaged 99.97 and 99.99%. Collection efficiency for HCl averaged 99.2% and 99.92%, and for SO{sub 2} averages were 97.1% and 94.8%. Finally, the level of NO{sub x} in the stack was extremely low with averages of 17.33 ppmvd and 14.19 ppmvd (corrected to 7% O{sub 2}) for the two systems.

Zaman, R.U. [Hankin Environmental Systems Inc., Somerville, NJ (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

257

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 6. Screening ecological risk assessment (SERA). Draft report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. The Screening Ecological Risk Assessment (SERA) is an analysis of the potential significance of risks to ecological receptors (e.g., plants, fish, wildlife) from exposure to facility emissions. The SERA was performed using conservative assumptions and approaches to determine if a further, more refined analysis is warranted. Volume VI describes in detail the methods used in the SERA and reports the results of the SERA in terms of site-specific risks to ecological receptors.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 7. Accident analysis: Selection and assessment of potential release scenarios. Draft report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. The Accident Analysis is an evaluation of the likelihood of occurrence and resulting consequences from several general classes of accidents that could potentially occur during operation of the facility. The Accident Analysis also evaluates the effectiveness of existing mitigation measures in reducing off-site impacts. Volume VII describes in detail the methods used to conduct the Accident Analysis and reports the results of evaluations of likelihood and consequence for the selected accident scenarios.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Identification of specific isomers of PCDD contaminants in environmental soils generated from the incineration of waste cables and their quantitative analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, a series of PCDDs emitted to the surrounding soil as the result of incineration of waste cables have been identified. PCDD contaminants were concentrated from soil samples and isolated from other materials by chromatographic methods. PCDD isomers were identified separately by column chromatography utilizing column packed with materials such as Kieselgel/44 vol.% H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. Macro Alumina B Super 1, Mix Column, Bio Beads S-X3, Alumina B Super 1 + Kieselgel/AgNO{sub 3} and their quantitative determinations were performed by GC/MS (gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy).

Pehlivan, M.; Beduek, A.D. [Selcuk Univ., Konya (Turkey)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

university of saskatchewan alumni handbook university of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

university of saskatchewan alumni handbook university of saskatchewan alumni handbook university of saskatchewan alumni handbook university of saskatchewan alumni handbook university of saskatchewan alumni handbook university of saskatchewan alumni handbook university of saskatchewan alumni handbook university

Saskatchewan, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university waste-to-energy incinerator" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

PUTTING KNOWLEDGE TO WORK The University of Georgia and Ft. Valley State College, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and counties of the state cooperating.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to poultry producers, including: burial, incineration, rendering, and composting. Available options. The use of incineration is now popular and is used by a large number of poultry producers where pits of fuel globally is making incineration a very expensive method of disposal. Incineration also poses

Navara, Kristen

262

1 Copyright 2009 by ASME Proceedings of the 17th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

models. On the other hand, full-scale grate models have not been used for examining solid waste mixing these phenomena, a full-scale physical model of the reverse acting grate was built and used for investigating residence time analysis using clay, wood and ceramic spheres in a small-scale model of the reverse acting

263

16th North American Waste to Energy Conference-May 2008 CO2 Enhanced Steam Gasification of Biomass Fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the decomposition of various biomass feedstocks and their conversion to gaseous fuels such as hydrogen. The steam studied. The biomass feedstocks were studied through the use of Thermo Gravimetric Analysis (TGA), Gas of biomass feedstocks can also aid in the processing of MSW. Gas evolution as a function of temperature

264

Copyright 2009 by ASME Proceedings of the 17th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and environmentally benign disposal of MSW, with energy recovery being a secondary consideration. There have been and in some cases nearly tripled, (b) energy recovery per unit of carbon dioxide emitted has become

Columbia University

265

Technical Report for the MVB (MSW & Biomass) Waste to Energy Plants and the AVG Hazardous WTE Plant in Hamburg, Germany  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with a small steam-turbine producing 3 MW for the plant's internal needs · The filtration part of the plant is equipped with SNCR technology, baghouse filters, HCl & SO2 scrubbers Power Plant: Coal and Gas MVB Unit 3 per line, at 90 bar and 500° C · The plant is equipped with a steam turbine of 20 MWe · On 2009

Columbia University

266

Robbins project - start-up and commercial operation at a leading-edge recycling, waste-to-energy plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On January 22, 1997, the Robbins Resource Recovery Facility began commercial operation in Robbins, Illinois, a suburb of Chicago, after a very successful start-up program. The first installation of its kind in the United States, the Robbins facility converts municipal solid waste (MSW) into refuse-derived fuel (RDF) that is fired in two circulating fluidized-bed boilers. Steam from the boilers powers a turbine generator that can produce enough electricity to service more than 50,000 homes. The Robbins facility processes a minimum of 1600 tons of MSW per day. Some 75 percent of the MSW is converted into RDF. In addition to compostable material, the balance yields reusable aluminum, ferrous materials, and glass. Even ash produced by the circulating fluidized-bed (CFB) boilers can be used to manufacture cement. The Robbins facility is operated by Foster Wheeler Illinois, Inc., a member of the Foster Wheeler Power Systems Group. The plant was engineered by Foster Wheeler USA Corporation and built by Foster Wheeler Constructors, Inc. Foster Wheeler Energy International, Inc. provided the circulating fluidized-bed boilers.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

267

Advanced Manufacturing Office: Case Study - The Challenge: Improving the Performance of a Waste-To-Energy Facility  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartment of EnergyAdministrative2 DOE2011 DOE Hydrogen and11Refuse Systems

268

Waste-To-Energy Techno-Economic Analysis and Life-Cycle Analysis Presentation for BETO 2015 Project Peer Review  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of| Department of EnergyDepartmentDepartmentof EnergyEnergy

269

University Library University of Saskatchewan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University Library University of Saskatchewan Core Competencies for University of Saskatchewan Librarians This document defines the basic knowledge and skills librarians at the University of Saskatchewan as reflected in Promise and Potential: The Third Integrated Plan 2012 to 2016 , University of Saskatchewan

Saskatchewan, University of

270

Final Report Waste Incineration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

regulations and the formation of dioxins, as well as a big effort is put into the treatment of solid residues

271

E-Print Network 3.0 - air operating permit Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ratio of the heated ambient air... the amount of stack particulate emis SlOns. Air pollution ... Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council...

272

E-Print Network 3.0 - aqueous process streams Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

products. If the aqueous ... Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 11 "Solvent Usage in Biorefineries...

273

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing nuclear waste Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 14 NRE 2110 Introduction to Nuclear and Radiological Engineering (Required)...

274

E-Print Network 3.0 - arc furnace steel Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

TID electric arc furnaces for MSW ash are ... Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy Page: << < 1 2...

275

E-Print Network 3.0 - analysis toluca basin Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in Toluca (population 0.82 million), the ... Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 5 Amer J of...

276

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing screening practices Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

during trommel screening and from the ... Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 19 Date: May...

277

E-Print Network 3.0 - amyopathic dermatomyositis refractory Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in waste to energy boilers has... included a combination of a castable silicon carbide cement layer, covered by refractory tiles. The system Source: Columbia University -...

278

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid degradable plastics Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Of this amount only 7% is recovered for recycling , mostly in the form of polyethylene Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council...

279

E-Print Network 3.0 - analyzing risk factors Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Risks Evaluate the ... Source: Noakes, David R. - Department of Chemistry and Physics, Virginia State University Collection: Physics 37 ASSESSING WASTE-TO-ENERGY PROJECT RISKS...

280

E-Print Network 3.0 - albina ruiz jordi Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Emission Factors Assessing Environmental Impacts Conclusion Albina 2 12;Research Objectives Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university waste-to-energy incinerator" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminous cement Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and expanded shale (lightweight) aggregate Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 63 By-Products...

282

E-Print Network 3.0 - air conditioning absorption Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

after cooling with excess air andor heat ... Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 17 A broadband...

283

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing landfill performance Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

, either in designated monofills or co-disposal landfills, significant leaching of dioxins and furans Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology...

284

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid gas emissions Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

control is the per formance of the acid gas... can control emissions of priority pollutants, including ... Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology...

285

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic sewage sludge Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Process, " Symposium on Clean Fuels From Biomas... , pyrolysis, and biological gaSification by anaerobic digestion ... Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research...

286

E-Print Network 3.0 - achieve high bed Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

validation of our reacting bed modelling code (FLIC) has... predictions. Our new gasification concept offers the prospect of ... Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy...

287

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminum slag dross Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

mast significant aspect of the IWPF feed mixtures Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 72 Zhang, L....

288

E-Print Network 3.0 - acireale sicily italy Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(Translation of Italian text by Lucia Rigamonti Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 47...

289

E-Print Network 3.0 - albina raanskiene rytis Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SCIENCE PUBLISHERS LTD. 10. Albina, D.O., Theory Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 70 STORING ARB...

290

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric presure arc Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the drying process takes place too. Here an ... Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 4 JOURNAL DE...

291

E-Print Network 3.0 - atomized oil burner Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

BTUILB) PERCENT EXCESS STOICHIOMETRIC ... Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 4 COMBUSTION OF...

292

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced high pressure Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FOR BOILER CLEANING Mark A. Bunton, P.E. ... Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 14 Plant Science...

293

E-Print Network 3.0 - air velocity distribution Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to the mater ial for penetration of the ... Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 34 Australasian...

294

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash particle deposition Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

RDF ASH GEORGE M. SAVAGE AND LUIS F. DIAZ Cal Recovery ... Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 36...

295

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic thermophiles final Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for treating this waste stream since it results in two valuable final products, biogas and ... Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council...

296

E-Print Network 3.0 - active organosulfur compounds1woa Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

-added products (e.g., activated carbon and carbon black). In their process, char upgrading is implemented Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and...

297

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinomycete salinispora arenicola Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

viable and non-viable, were determined with an Andersen six Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 56...

298

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerial plant parts Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

bulky waste. In large part, the location of the new ... Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 85...

299

E-Print Network 3.0 - annual fluidized bed Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

University of Minnesota Collection: Engineering 16 POTENTIAL ADVANTAGES OF INCINERATION IN FLUIDIZED BEDS Summary: POTENTIAL ADVANTAGES OF INCINERATION IN FLUIDIZED BEDS...

300

Emissions of metals, chromium and nickel species, and organics from municipal waste-water-sludge incinerators. Volume 9. Site 9 emission-test report: Appendices. Final report, 1989-91  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Site 9 is a secondary plant designed for 15 million gallons per day (MGD) of wastewater flow. The sludge incinerator at Site 9 is a seven (7) hearth, multiple hearth furnace (MHF) built by Nichols Engineering in 1974 controlled by an adjustable throat venturi scrubber with a nominal pressure drop of 20 in. w.c.. After leaving the venturi, the gases pass upward through a three (3) plate tray scrubber with a Chevron mist eliminator. A 10 ft. x 10 ft., upflow, wet electrostatic precipitator, manufacturer testing. Volume 9 contains the appendices PB92-151620 for Volume 8. These include: (1) Incinerator and Scrubber Operating Data, (2) Sampling and Analytical Methods; (3) Sample Calculations; (4) Analytical Data and Reports; (5) Continuous Emission Monitoring Data, Calibrations/One-min Averages, and (6) External Audit Report.

Segall, R.R.; DeWees, W.G.; Lewis, F.M.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university waste-to-energy incinerator" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Recommended surrogate PCB waste feed and fuel compositions to meet requirements given in Spec. K/D 5552 for test burns in the Martin Marietta Energy Systems Inc. incinerator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste feed heats of combustion, principle organic hazardous constituents (POHCs), ash contents, and organic chlorine concentrations are specified in Table 3 of Spec. No. K/D-5552 for test burns 1 through 7 in the Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. incinerator. The first four tests are intended to demonstrate that the incinerator will meet RCRA emission standards, HCl removal efficiencies, and requirements for destruction of POHCs. A mix containing 1,2-dichloro-, 1,2,4-trichloro-, and 1,2,4,5-tetrachlorobenzenes with a small amount of hexachlorobenzene is recommended as a PCB surrogate for test burns 5 and 6 to simulate the destructibility of PCBs in plant wastes. The mix would be diluted with appropriate amounts of dimethyl malonate and kerosene to obtain a homogeneous solution having the required heat of combustion and chlorine content for the liquid waste feeds. For test burn 7 the polychlorinated benzene mix would contain a small amount of hexachlorobenzene with larger amounts of 1,2,4,5-tetrachloro- and 1,2,4-trichlorobenzenes. The composition of the polychlorinated mixes is such that they should be comparable to Aroclor 1254 in overall destructibility by incineration, and achievement of a DRE for hexachlorobenzene greater than 99.99% in the test burns should provide assurance that the incinerator will be able to destroy PCBs in Aroclor 1260, which is the most refractory PCB mix present in plant wastes. If hexachlorobenzene is not available for these tests, hexachlorocyclopentadiene is recommended as a substitute for hexachlorobenzene in tests 5-7, which involve a PCB surrogate, and hexachloroethane is recommended as the alternative solid waste feed for test 4. Solutions containing kerosene and methanol are recommended as liquid fuels for tests 1 and 4 to achieve the required heats of combustion, while a dimethyl malonate-methanol solution is recommended to achieve the 7000 Btu/lb heat of combustion for test burn 2.

Anderson, R.W.

1984-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

302

Charles Darwin University Flinders University Griffith University James Cook University La Trobe University Murdoch University The University of Newcastle Biography for GLOVER, Professor Barney  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University Murdoch University The University of Newcastle Biography for GLOVER, Professor Barney Vice Chancellor, Charles Darwin University Professor Barney Glover is Vice-Chancellor of Charles Darwin University

303

Field trip to WTE facility I/S Vestforbrnding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Another activity is the composting of park and garden waste, resulting in compost applied for soil annually (including Municipal, Commercial and C/D waste), 25% of which is incinerated in a Waste-to Energy% of the potential energy of the waste is recovered.

Columbia University

304

OLD DOMINION UNIVERSITY University Policies and Procedures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AND ADMINISTRATOR RECRUITMENT FUNDING PROCEDURE Statement: University Recruitment Budget (1) The university6010 - 1 OLD DOMINION UNIVERSITY University Policies and Procedures 6010 - FACULTY maintains a central budget, called the University Recruitment Budget, for the support of essential

305

1 Columbia University--The University Seminars COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Columbia University--The University Seminars COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY T H E U N I V E R S I T Y S E M. Belknap Professor Emeritus of Russian, Columbia University, Director Emeritus of The University Seminars, Columbia University Susan Boynton Associate Professor of Music, Columbia University Ester Fuchs Professor

Champagne, Frances A.

306

Experimental research on emission and removal of dioxins in flue gas from a co-combustion of MSW and coal incinerator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the experimental study of dioxins removal from flue gas from a co-combustion municipal solid waste and coal incinerator by means of a fluidized absorption tower and a fabric filter. A test rig has been set up. The flow rate of flue gas of the test rig is 150-2000 m{sup 3}/h. The system was composed of a humidification and cooling system, an absorption tower, a demister, a slurry make-up tank, a desilter, a fabric filter and a measurement system. The total height of the absorption tower was 6.5 m, and the diameter of the reactor pool was 1.2 m. When the absorbent was 1% limestone slurry, the recirculation ratio was 3, the jet rate was 5-15 m/s and the submerged depth of the bubbling pipe under the slurry was 0.14 m, the removal efficiency for dioxins was 99.35%. The concentration of dioxins in the treated flue gas was 0.1573 x 10{sup -13} kg/Nm{sup 3} and the concentration of oxygen was 11%. This concentration is comparable to the emission standards of other developed countries.

Zhong Zhaoping [Department of Power Engineering, Research Institute of Thermal Energy Engineering, Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of Ministry of Education, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China)]. E-mail: zzhong@seu.edu.cn; Jin Baosheng [Department of Power Engineering, Research Institute of Thermal Energy Engineering, Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of Ministry of Education, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Huang Yaji [Department of Power Engineering, Research Institute of Thermal Energy Engineering, Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of Ministry of Education, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Zhou Hongcang [Department of Power Engineering, Research Institute of Thermal Energy Engineering, Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of Ministry of Education, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Lan Jixiang [Department of Power Engineering, Research Institute of Thermal Energy Engineering, Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of Ministry of Education, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Thermo-Mechanical Response of a TRISO Fuel Particle in a Fusion/Fission Engine for Incineration of Weapons Grade Plutonium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Laser Inertial Fusion-based (LIFE) engine is an advanced energy concept under development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). LIFE engine could be used to drive a subcritical fission blanket with fertile or fissile fuel. Current LIFE engine designs envisages fuel in pebble bed form with TRISO (tristructural isotropic) particles embedded in a graphite matrix, and pebbles flowing in molten salt Flibe (2LiF+BeF{sub 2}) coolant at T {approx} 700C. Weapons-grade plutonium (WGPu) fuel is an attractive option for LIFE engine involving the achievement of high fractional burnups in a short lifetime frame. However, WGPu LIFE engine operating conditions of high neutron fast fluence, high radiation damage, and high Helium and Hydrogen production pose severe challenges for typical TRISO particles. The thermo-mechanical fuel performance code HUPPCO (High burn-Up fuel Pebble Performance COde) currently under development accounts for spatial and time dependence of the material elastic properties, temperature, and irradiation swelling and creep mechanisms. In this work, some aspects of the thermo-mechanical response of TRISO particles used for incineration of weapons grade fuel in LIFE engine are analyzed. Preliminary results show the importance of developing reliable high-fidelity models of the performance of these new fuel designs and the need of new experimental data relevant to WGPu LIFE conditions.

Caro, M; DeMange, P; Marian, J; Caro, A

2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

308

DIMACS Center Rutgers University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hopkins University Andrew Patrick, NRC Canada Norman Sadeh, Carnegie Mellon University Working Group University Mark Ackerman, University of Michigan Fabian Monrose, Johns Hopkins University Andrew Patrick, NRC Canada Norman Sadeh, Carnegie Mellon University Workshop: Cryptography: Theory Meets Practice Dates

309

ADMINISTRATIVE UNIVERSITY POLICY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ADMINISTRATIVE UNIVERSITY POLICY FACULTY UNIVERSITY POLICY STUDENT UNIVERSITY POLICY Issue stakeholder list "Log-In" of Proposed University Policy with the University Compliance Committee (UCC) UCC identifies which track (i.e., Administrative, Faculty, or Student) the proposed University Policy

310

CONSORTIUM MEMBERS EU Universities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

coordinator > University of Tirana, Albania > University of Sarajevo, Bosnia & Herzegovina > South East Foundation, Belgium > University of Tuzla, Bosnia & Herzegovina > Roma Virtual Network, Israel > University

Heermann, Dieter W.

311

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Indiana University, Bloomington  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/ 1 #12; 2005 4 University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Indiana University, Bloomington University of Illinois, Urbana-Champagne University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 19 Center University of Michigan, Georgetown University, University of Nebraska, University of Kansas University

Wu, Yih-Min

312

The effects of the mechanicalchemical stabilization process for municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash on the chemical reactions in cement paste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: ? Milling extracted MSWI fly ash. ? Increasing specific surface area, destruction of the crystalline texture, and increasing the amount of amorphous materials. ? Increasing heavy metal stability. ? Inducing pozzolanic reactions and increasing the early and later strength of the cement paste. - Abstract: A water extraction process can remove the soluble salts present in municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly ash, which will help to increase the stability of the synthetic materials produced from the MSWI fly ash. A milling process can be used to stabilize the heavy metals found in the extracted MSWI fly ash (EA) leading to the formation of a non-hazardous material. This milled extracted MSWI fly ash (MEA) was added to an ordinary Portland cement (OPC) paste to induce pozzolanic reactions. The experimental parameters included the milling time (96 h), water to binder ratios (0.38, 0.45, and 0.55), and curing time (1, 3, 7 and 28 days). The analysis procedures included inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP/AES), BET, mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging. The results of the analyses indicate that the milling process helped to stabilize the heavy metals in the MEA, with an increase in the specific surface area of about 50 times over that of OPC. The addition of the MEA to the OPC paste decreased the amount of Ca(OH){sub 2} and led to the generation of calciumsilicatehydrates (CSH) which in turned increased the amount of gel pores and middle sized pores in the cement. Furthermore, a comparison shows an increase in the early and later strength over that of OPC paste without the addition of the milled extracted ash. In other words, the milling process could stabilize the heavy metals in the MEA and had an activating effect on the MEA, allowing it to partly substitute OPC in OPC paste.

Chen, Cheng-Gang [Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering, Tamkang University, 151, Ying-chung Road, Tamsui Dist., New Taipei City 251, Taiwan, ROC (China); Sun, Chang-Jung, E-mail: sun.3409@hotmail.com [Department of Environmental Technology and Management, Taoyuan Innovation Institute of Technology, 414, Sec. 3, Jhongshan E. Rd., Zhongli City, Taoyuan County 320, Taiwan, ROC (China); Gau, Sue-Huai; Wu, Ching-Wei; Chen, Yu-Lun [Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering, Tamkang University, 151, Ying-chung Road, Tamsui Dist., New Taipei City 251, Taiwan, ROC (China)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

313

University of Colorado University of Colorado Boulder  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Colorado Boulder University of Colorado Boulder University of Colorado Boulder University of Colorado Boulder University of Colorado Boulder Catalog 2012­13 Redefining Teaching & Learning­13 UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO BOULDER CATALOG contains a summary of campus offerings, policies, and requirements

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

314

University Archives University of Missouri at Columbia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University Archives University of Missouri at Columbia 703 Lewis Hall University of Missouri-Columbia Archives of the University of Missouri at Columbia reserves the right to refuse permission to individuals agree to credit the University Archives of the University of Missouri at Columbia in accordance

Taylor, Jerry

315

Recycling universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

If the effective cosmological constant is non-zero, our observable universe may enter a stage of exponential expansion. In such case, regions of it may tunnel back to the false vacuum of an inflaton scalar field, and inflation with a high expansion rate may resume in those regions. An ``ideal'' eternal observer would then witness an infinite succession of cycles from false vacuum to true, and back. Within each cycle, the entire history of a hot universe would be replayed. If there were several minima of the inflaton potential, our ideal observer would visit each one of these minima with a frequency which depends on the shape of the potential. We generalize the formalism of stochastic inflation to analyze the global structure of the universe when this `recycling' process is taken into account.

Jaume Garriga; Alexander Vilenkin

1997-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

316

Energy aspects of solid waste management: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Eighteenth Annual Illinois Energy Conference entitled ``Energy Aspects of Solid Waste Management`` was held in Chicago, Illinois on October 29--30, 1990. The conference program was developed by a planning committee that drew upon Illinois energy and environmental specialists from the major sectors including energy industries, environmental organizations, research universities, utility companies, federal, state and local government agencies, and public interest groups. Within this framework, the committee identified a number of key topic areas surrounding solid waste management in Illinois which were the focus of the conference. These issues included: review of the main components of the solid waste cycle in the Midwest and what the relative impact of waste reduction, recycling, incineration and land disposal might be on Illinois` and the Midwest`s solid waste management program. Investigation of special programs in the Midwest dealing with sewage sludge, combustion residuals and medical/infectious wastes. Review of the status of existing landfills in Illinois and the Midwest and an examination of the current plans for siting of new land disposal systems. Review of the status of incinerators and waste-to-energy systems in Illinois and the Midwest, as well as an update on activities to maximize methane production from landfills in the Midwest.

Not Available

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

317

University of Maryland University Health Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

special care is taken, should the extracts be lost or damaged, the University Health Center cannot assumeUniversity of Maryland University Health Center ALLERGY INJECTION POLICY The University Health to effectively use our service, we require your cooperation. INSTRUCTIONS Because the University Health Center

Milchberg, Howard

318

UNIVERSITY SPACE POLICY ALLOCATION OF UNIVERSITY SPACE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE DUBLIN UNIVERSITY SPACE POLICY #12;ALLOCATION OF UNIVERSITY SPACE I Purpose To provide a methodology for the allocation of space across the University II Background Due to the university's success in attracting research funding, the need for space and facilities has grown

319

University Archives University of Missouri at Columbia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University Archives University of Missouri at Columbia 703 Lewis Hall Columbia, Missouri 65211 of Missouri at Columbia, may be loaned out to University personnel. All items on loan will be listed below on loan from the University Archives, University of Missouri at Columbia. He/She further acknowledges full

Taylor, Jerry

320

Open University  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Michel Pentz est ne en Afrique du Sud et venu au Cern en 1957 comme physicien et prsident de l'associaion du personnel. Il est galement fondateur du mouvement Antiapartheid de Genve et a particip la fondation de l'Open University en Grande-Bretagne. Il nous parle des contextes pdagogiques, culturels et nationaux dans lesquels la mthode peut s'appliquer.

None

2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university waste-to-energy incinerator" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

University Partnerships  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layeredof2014National Nuclear23,DiversityFeet)University

322

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerobic training resistance Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 28 p y ich s ia tat vc il yp y ich s ia tat vc il y The university...

323

NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE AARHUS UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, biogas fuelled engines, natural gas fuelled gas turbines, gas oil fuelled reciprocating engines, gas oil fuelled gas turbines, steam turbines combusting residual oil and reciprocating engines combusting biomass (MSW) incineration plants, plants combusting straw or wood, natural gas fuelled reciprocating engines

324

German Company Offers to Transform Sofia Waste to Energy The German company AlphaKat has filed a bid at Sofia municipality to construct an  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is produced from 1.2kg waste and the expenses for 1 liter of diesel from an installation with power 2000 into diesel would cost EUR 65 M. Under their project Sofia would need two installations of that type. The company also claims that the diesel that will be produced from the waste would be of high quality

Columbia University

325

First waste-to-energy power station put into operation in Vietnam has successfully produced electricity from household and industrial waste as a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, its average cost per watt would be about half the price of electricity produced by other plants electricity from household and industrial waste as a newly-generated power supply has come online with the national electricity grid. On Wednesday, August 3, the Ho Chi Minh City Urban Environment Management

Columbia University

326

"Potential for Combined Heat and Power and District Heating and Cooling from Waste-to-Energy Facilities in the U.S. Learning from the Danish Experience"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is used for the generation of electricity. The advantages of district heating using WTE plants are heating and cooling system in Indianapolis. However, there are few U.S. hot water district heating systems,800 district heating and cooling systems, providing 320 million MWh of thermal energy. Currently, 28 of the 88

Shepard, Kenneth

327

Digital Gas Notified That Entropic Consortium Has Approval to Commercialize a Waste-to-Energy Plant in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

technology produces a clean-burning by-product from the widest variety of processed waste. The product has represented by the coal-substitute technology and the utilization of its advanced farming and other to a final design, technology and administrative review by the Ho Chi Minh City Environmental Protection

Columbia University

328

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste-to-Energy Conversion, and Waste-to-Chemical Conversion with Industrial Gas and Chemical Manufacturing Processes  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: Top Five EEREDepartment ofEnergyEnergyBetterMake Fuels andBiodieselJohn

329

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste-to-Energy Conversion, and Waste-to-Chemical Conversion with Industrial Gas and Chemical Manufacturing Processes  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd: ScopeDepartment1, 2011 DRAFTofBio-OilEnergyCombustion |MHRC

330

Participating Colleges & Universities (2008--2010)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Participating Colleges & Universities (2008--2010) Bowling Green State University Capital University Capital University (Center for Lifelong Learning) DeVry University Fairmount State University Franklin University Heidelberg University Indiana Wesleyan University Kent State University (College

331

University Libraries Technology Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Libraries Bowling Green State University #12;Table of Contents Introduction ..................................................................19 Page 2 of 19 Technology Plan, 2003-2005 University Libraries Bowling Green State University #12University Libraries Technology Plan 2003-2005 Page 1 of 19 Technology Plan, 2003-2005 University

Moore, Paul A.

332

DIMACS Center Rutgers University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Johns Hopkins University Andrew Patrick, NRC Canada Norman Sadeh, Carnegie Mellon University Other Cranor, AT&T Mark Ackerman, University of Michigan Fabian Monrose, Johns Hopkins University Andrew Patrick, NRC Canada Norman Sadeh, Carnegie Mellon University Working Group: Usable Privacy and Security

333

Stanford University Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stanford University Hearing Conservation Program April 2006 #12;Stanford University HEARING CONSERVATION PROGRAM CONTENTS PAGE 1.0 INTRODUCTION #12;HEARING CONSERVATION PROGRAM 1.0 INTRODUCTION "It is the policy of Stanford University to maintain

334

ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY STETSON UNIVERSITY Phoenix, AZ Deland, FL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

English Literature English BOWLING GREEN STATE UNIVERSITY Bowling Green, OH SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY IndustrialARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY STETSON UNIVERSITY Phoenix, AZ Deland, FL Interdisciplinary Studies Leadership FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY Instructional Systems Design Tallahassee, FL Interdisciplinary Studies

Wu, Shin-Tson

335

Renewing University Base Funding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewing University Base Funding The Priority Issues 29 February 2012 e conor funding to universities as an immediate goal. It has already put in place increases worth 3.5%. 2 undergraduate or postgraduate, be funded at the same rate. #12;3 Charles Darwin University Flinders University

336

Graduate Programs Auburn University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forestry Graduate Programs Auburn University Auburn University, Alabama 368495414 Programs://www.forestry.auburn.edu/graduate/ University of California, Berkeley Berkeley, California 947203114 Program: Forestry http://espm.berkeley.edu/gradprograms/grad_programs_mf.html Clemson University Clemson, South Carolina 29634 Program: Forest Resources http

337

Residential Learning University Housing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Residential Learning & University Housing Handbook 2008 - 2009 A Guide for Residential Living on the Campus of Rowan University #12;Welcome to Residential Learning & University Housing! The primary purpose of the Office of Residential Life & University Housing is to assist and support students in the pursuit

Rusu, Adrian

338

Columbia University Postdoctoral Officers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Columbia University Postdoctoral Officers Handbook 2013 #12;Greetings! I am excited to welcome you to the Columbia University community of scholars and investigators. The Columbia University Office of Postdoctoral Director, Office of Postdoctoral Affairs Columbia University in the city of new york office of postdoctoral

Grishok, Alla

339

Columbia University Postdoctoral Officers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Columbia University Postdoctoral Officers Handbook 2011 #12;Greetings! I am excited to welcome you to the Columbia University community of scholars and investigators. The Columbia University Office of Postdoctoral of Postdoctoral Affairs Columbia university in the City of new york offiCe of postdoCtoral affairs 840 Interchurch

Grishok, Alla

340

Waste utilization as an energy source: Municipal wastes. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the utilization of municipal wastes as an energy source. Articles discuss energy derived from incineration/combustion, refuse-derived fuels, co-firing municipal waste and standard fuels, landfill gas production, sewage combustion, and other waste-to-energy technologies. Citations address economics and efficiencies of various schemes to utilize municipal waste products as energy sources. (Contains a minimum of 130 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university waste-to-energy incinerator" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

NORTHERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NORTHERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2012-2013 #12;2 NORTHERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY of publica- tion. However, Northern Kentucky University reserves the right to change regulations, policies, or the Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education. University Accreditation Northern Kentucky University

Boyce, Richard L.

342

Henri Dwyer Address: 39 Highview Drive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) - Ecole Polytechnique, Paris, France Engineering program in one of France's leading schools - present Administrator/Consulting - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council, New York, NY, USA Part Research Internship - Segawa Laboratory, RCAST, Tokyo University, Tokyo, Japan Research internship

343

E-Print Network 3.0 - austerity plan pays Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

com pany in the field will pay 150% of the prime Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 20 A Model of...

344

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash washing experiments Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Std. Dev. type prep . calc.b "out" (m%,d) (m... of the total chlorine in the ash, condensate (from collector ... Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and...

345

University of Nebraska-Lincoln and University of Florida (Building...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nebraska-Lincoln and University of Florida (Building Energy Efficient Homes for America) Jump to: navigation, search Name: University of Nebraska-Lincoln and University of Florida...

346

, UNIVERSITY Brigham Young University Geology Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, UNIVERSITY #12;Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 1 5 - 1968 Part 2 Studies for Students No. 1 Guide to the Geology of the Wasatch Mountain Front, Between Provo Canyon and Y Mountain, Northeast of Provo, Utah by J. Keith Rigby and Lehi F. Hintze #12;A publication of the Department of Geology

Seamons, Kent E.

347

Colorado State University Colorado State University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Colorado State University _______________ 1.1 Page 1 Colorado State University In 1870, the Territorial Council and House of Representatives of the Territory of Colorado created the Colorado that same year as Colorado's land-grant college under the Morrill Act of 1862. The Morrill Act provided

Stephens, Graeme L.

348

Colorado State University Colorado State University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Colorado State University Colorado State University In 1870, the Territorial Council and House of Representatives of the Territory of Colorado created the Colorado Agricultural College. When the Territory became. The College admitted its first students in 1879 and received designation that same year as Colorado's land

Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

349

University Housing University of South Carolina  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at the University of South Carolina. It is designed to be a sustainable living and learning environment and employs a more sustainable campus and society. These programming efforts are a collaboration among University Housing, Sustainable Carolina and other campus partners. Community Features · Attending events

Almor, Amit

350

University Services Pamela Wheelock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Engineering Jerome Malmquist open position Business Services * Bruce Gritters September 2013 Public SafetyUniversity Services Pamela Wheelock Vice President MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS University Services Human Resources Linda Bjornberg Director open position CIO OPERATIONS Auxiliary Services Laurie Scheich

Amin, S. Massoud

351

Mathematics Department Millersville University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Mathematics Department Millersville University Master of Education in Mathematics (M.Ed.) #12;2 MASTER OF EDUCATION DEGREE IN MATHEMATICS Contents 1. Introduction ......................................................................................................2 a. Millersville University b. The Mathematics Department c. The Field of Mathematics Education Two

Hardy, Christopher R.

352

Environmental State University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biology Water Science Nursery Management Plant Breeding Biofuel Feedstocks OUR DEPARTMENT The PLANT specialties, including plant breeding, genetic engineering, sustainable agriculture, ornamental production State University is the only land-grant, Hispanic serving university in the contiguous United States

353

University Research Summaries  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Idaho National Laboratory published the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Geothermal Technologies Office 2001 University Research Summaries.

354

Mathematical Statistics Stockholm University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, University of Dar es Salaam, Postal address: Box 35062, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. E-mail: shabanmbare

Britton, Tom

355

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY INTRODUCTIONi.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;2 MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY INTRODUCTIONi. Welcome to the Online Professional Master of Science), and the College of Veterinary Medicine (CVM) at Michigan State University (MSU). This booklet contains important, Program Director Online Master of Science in Food Safety Michigan State University 1129 Farm Lane, Rm B 51

356

University Buildings Landmark Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

KEY University Buildings Landmark Buildings The Lanyon Building Roads Footpath Cafe University Accommodation Queen's University Belfast Campus Map The Lanyon Building The Students' Union The David Keir Building School Offices A Biological Sciences B Chemistry and Chemical Engineering C Education D

Müller, Jens-Dominik

357

Universal Prediction Neri Merhav  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Universal Prediction Neri Merhav y Meir Feder z July 23, 1998 Abstract This paper consists of an overview on universal prediction from an information-theoretic perspective. Special attention is given of the universal prediction problem are described with emphasis on the analogy and the di erences between results

Merhav, Neri

358

BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY FACULTY SENATE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Brandeis's story to the public. When questioned about the University's brand and identity, Ms. Miles answered that the logo is the University's brand identity. Brandeis is a research university with a long to the marketing of his image. Ms. Miles said that Brandeis had a real connection with Albert Einstein. She added

Fraden, Seth

359

Guillaume Bal Columbia University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Guillaume Bal Columbia University 500 W. 120th St, New York, NY 10027, U.S.A. (212) 854 4731 - 1993 Professional Experience · Professor, Columbia University, 2008-present. · Associate Professor, Columbia University, 2003-2008. · Visiting scholar, Institute for Pure and Applied Mathematics, UCLA campus

Bal, Guillaume

360

Michigan State University Alumni Association MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Michigan State University Alumni Association Bylaws #12;2 MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY ALUMNI of the organization shall be the Michigan State University Alumni Association (hereinafter, the "Association"). Section 2 Mission Statement The Michigan State University Alumni Association supports and enhances

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university waste-to-energy incinerator" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Bowling Green State University Coordinator of Library Instruction, University Libraries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bowling Green State University Coordinator of Library Instruction, University Libraries The University Libraries (UL) at Bowling Green State University (BGSU) invites applications and nominations and the University of Toledo, is managed by the University Libraries. Established in 1910, BGSU has received

Moore, Paul A.

362

UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA ENGINEERING FOUNDATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA ENGINEERING FOUNDATION I __________________________________________ pledge to contribute or make possible a gift to the University of Virginia Engineering Foundation for the University: ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________ Please make check payable to the Engineering Foundation and return to the University of Virginia

Acton, Scott

363

University of Toronto Governing Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fiVO AR BO R VELUT University of Toronto Governing Council W eb C opy UNIVERSITY FUNDS INVESTMENT://www.governingcouncil.utoronto.ca/ #12;UNIVERSITY FUNDS INVESTMENT POLICY June 21, 2007 Table of Contents 1. DESCRIPTION OF UNIVERSITY.....................................................................................................6 W eb C opy University of Toronto Governing Council--Web version 2 #12;UNIVERSITY FUNDS INVESTMENT

Boonstra, Rudy

364

University Advancement | University Communications and Marketing University Events & Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

England Center, 15 Strafford Ave., Durham, New Hampshire, 03824 ph.: 603 -862-1461 fax: 603 The Pease Greeters Scholarship in memory of Charles Nichols recognizes a University of New Hampshire student for public service and an affiliation with the U.S. military. This scholarship is established with the intent

New Hampshire, University of

365

KYUSHU UNIVERSITY FINANCIAL REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

KYUSHU UNIVERSITY FINANCIAL REPORT 200992009 #12;1 Kyushu University FINANCIAL REPORT 2009 Kyushu University FINANCIAL REPORT 2009 2 1 3 4 2 5 6 7 9 11 13 14 15 16 3 17 18 19 20 21 22 4 23 24 25 26 5 27 28 6 29 30 FINANCIAL REPORT index2009 #12;1,300 1,200 1,100 1,000 900 800 700 600 500 400 300 200 100 0 1

Nakamura, Iku

366

Universal System Benefits Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Montana established the Universal System Benefits Program (USBP) in 1997 as part of its restructuring legislation. The USBP supports cost-effective energy conservation, low-income customer...

367

CONTRACTING UNIVERSITY COUNSEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONTRACTING GUIDELINES HANDBOOK OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY COUNSEL The College of William & Mary #12................................................................................................................2 Contract Basics Office of Procurement....................................................................................................4 Contract Basics

Swaddle, John

368

Saugata Basu - Purdue University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assistant Professor, Department of Mathematics, University of. Michigan ..... Robotics, K.Y. Goldberg, D. Halperin, J.-C. Latombe, R.H. Wilson, Eds., A.K.. Peters...

2014-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

369

Purdue University Probability Seminar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wroclaw University of Technology, Heat kernel estimates for unimodal Lvy .... we establish the same scaling limit in the critical regime for three families of...

370

e conor.king@iru.edu.au t 0434 601 691 w iru.edu.au Charles Darwin University Flinders University Griffith University James Cook University La Trobe University Murdoch University The University of Newcastle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

e conor.king@iru.edu.au t 0434 601 691 w iru.edu.au Charles Darwin University Flinders University Griffith University James Cook University La Trobe University Murdoch University The University of Newcastle Response to the Base Funding Review Recommendations 29 February 2012 #12;2 The purpose of base

371

Valley Road University Drive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WATER AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE BUILDING (WE) THE BREEZEWAY THE GROVE THE QUAD UNIVERSITY HALL (UH and Teaching (Trading Room) · Faculty of Health Sciences · Faculty of Management · Simulation Health Centre Centre · Science Labs · Subway · The Urban Market · Tim Hortons · University of Calgary Faculty of Social

Seldin, Jonathan P.

372

University of Operations Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Management Plan Office of Campus and Public Safety University of Delaware Critical Incident Management Plan Management Plan Office of Campus and Public Safety - 4 - University of Delaware Critical Incident Management and Public Safety - 5 - County of New Castle CD-30 911 Center/Communications CD-31 Department of Police CD-32

Firestone, Jeremy

373

Mathematics Department Millersville University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mathematics Department Millersville University Bachelor's Degrees in Mathematics (B.S., B.A., B.S.E.) #12;Page 2 DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS MILLERSVILLE UNIVERSITY 2011 STUDENT HANDBOOK FOR MATHEMATICS MAJORS AND MINORS Contents Page WELCOME TO THE MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT

Hardy, Christopher R.

374

AALTO UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION CONSTITUTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AALTO UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION CONSTITUTION Section 1. Name and domicile of the Foundation The Foundation shall be called Aalto-korkeakoulusäätiö (Swedish: Stiftelsen för Aaltohögskolan, English: Aalto University Foundation) and its domicile shall be the City of Helsinki. Section 2. Purpose of the Foundation

Kaski, Samuel

375

University of Wisconsin Foundation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Wisconsin Foundation Payroll Deduction Authorization "Philanthropy will mean Statement, UW Foundation Iwish to ensure the continuation of educational excellence at Wisconsin of the funds indicated on the reverse side of this card. Please send to: University of Wisconsin Foundation

Sheridan, Jennifer

376

University Buildings Landmark Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

KEY University Buildings Landmark Buildings The Lanyon Building Roads Footpath Cafe Grass Queen's University Belfast Campus Map The Lanyon Building The Students' Union The David Keir Building School Offices and Sonic Arts Q Nursing and Midwifery R Pharmacy S Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering T Politics

Paxton, Anthony T.

377

University Buildings Landmark Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

KEY University Buildings Landmark Buildings The Lanyon Building Roads Footpath Cafe University Engineering N Medicine, Dentistry and Biomedical Sciences P Music and Sonic Arts Q Nursing and Midwifery R and Student Affairs 3 Administration Building 32 Ashby Building 27 Belfast City Hospital 28 Bernard Crossland

Paxton, Anthony T.

378

Utrecht University September 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Utrecht University September 2011 Faculty of Geosciences Welcome International Students #12;GEO.30 at the StudiePunt international@geo.uu.nl #12;Universiteit Utrecht Outline International Programme · General Orientation by Utrecht University (last Friday: 2 September 2011) · Social Orientation by ESN (last Saturday

Utrecht, Universiteit

379

Dynamics of Anisotropic Universes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a general study of the dynamical properties of Anisotropic Bianchi Universes in the context of Einstein General Relativity. Integrability results using Kovalevskaya exponents are reported and connected to general knowledge about Bianchi dynamics. Finally, dynamics toward singularity in Bianchi type VIII and IX universes are showed to be equivalent in some precise sence.

Jerome Perez

2006-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

380

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY AN OVERVIEW  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY AN OVERVIEW #12;COLUMBIA COLLEGE www.college.columbia.edu Columbia College UNIVERSITY SCHOOLS, #12;COLLEGES, AND AFFILIATES SCHOOL OF LAW www.law.columbia.edu Columbia Law School, philosophy, history, music, art, and science. THE FU FOUNDATION SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIENCE www.engineering.columbia

Yang, Junfeng

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university waste-to-energy incinerator" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

University of Hawaii ________________UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Typical Laser Classes (from ANSI) 37 Appendix J ­ Laser Warning Signs (from ANSI) 38 Appendix K ­ Laser, the University has adopted the American National Standard for the Safe Use of Lasers, ANSI Z136.1, and ANSI Z136

Browder, Tom

382

University Life Strategic Plan UNIVERSITY LIFE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the demands of work, social responsibility, and life in an ever-changing global society. Through a range well-being, post-graduation success Increased retention and timely degree completion Increased Engagement) #12;2 University Life is committed to preparing students for the demands of work, social

383

University Communications and Marketing University Events & Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a University of New Hampshire student for public service and an affiliation with the U.S. military Strafford Ave., Durham, New Hampshire, 03824 ph.: 603 -862-1461 fax: 603-862-1188 Pease Greeters Scholarship Events & Programs New England Center, 15 Strafford Ave., Durham, New Hampshire, 03824 ph.: 603 -862

New Hampshire, University of

384

University of Bath -Ordinances UNIVERSITY OF BATH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/School as set out in the Quality Assurance Code of Practice; have further responsibilities where delegated, Regulations and Rules of the University, words shall have the same meaning as in the Charter and Statutes/School as required; have general responsibility for quality management and support to students within the Faculty

Burton, Geoffrey R.

385

WESTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY STUDENT CODE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WESTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY STUDENT CODE Approved by The Western Michigan University Board Michigan University Kalamazoo, MI 49008 Effective August 2008 #12;A UNIVERSITY COMMUNITY IS... ...a for the Advancement of Teaching; Ernest L. Boyer (frwd.); Princeton, New Jersey; 1990 #12;WESTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY

de Doncker, Elise

386

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY 2007 -2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY 2007 - 2008 BULLETIN STATEMENT OF VISION, MISSION AND VALUES Adopted by the University Board of Trustees October 10, 2006 VISION The University of Kentucky will be one of the nation The University of Kentucky is a public, research-extensive, land grant university dedicated to improving people

MacAdam, Keith

387

BFUFall 2012 BICYCLE FRIENDLY UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 BFUFall 2012 BICYCLE FRIENDLY UNIVERSITY FEEDBACK REPORT University of Kansas, Lawrence #12;While the University of Kansas at Lawrence was not selected as a Bicycle Friendly University this year, reviewers hope recommendations to further promote bicycling at the University of Kansas at Lawrence and a menu of additional pro

388

Norwegian Language description of Jacobs University Hva er Jacobs University?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

underviser tverrfaglig og deltar i forskningen ved Description of Jacobs University. Jacobs University tilbyr 2006 tilbyr Jacobs University mangfoldige muligheter til å lære av hverandre og leve sammen. Fordelen

389

Charles Darwin University Flinders University Griffith University James Cook University La Trobe University Murdoch University The University of Newcastle Biography Professor Caroline McMillen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, innovation and teaching. She holds a Bachelor of Arts (Hons) and Doctor of Philosophy from Oxford University environment before birth on the risk of developing cardiovascular disease and obesity in adult life. Her and career summary · 1975 ­ 81: Graduated with BA (Hons) and Doctor of Philosophy at Oxford University before

390

University of Michigan -Traveler Contact Information Name __________________________________  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Michigan - Traveler Contact Information Name __________________________________ Phone __________________________________ Email __________________________________ University of Michigan/Clinic __________________________________ Address __________________________________ Phone __________________________________ University of Michigan

Eustice, Ryan

391

FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION, INC.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION, INC. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION June 30, 2011 and 2010 #12;FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION, INC. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AUDITORS' REPORT To the Board of Directors Florida Atlantic University Foundation, Inc. Boca Raton, Florida

Fernandez, Eduardo

392

FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION, INC.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION, INC. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION June 30, 2010 and 2009 #12;FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION, INC. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS To the Board of Directors Florida Atlantic University Foundation, Inc. Boca Raton, Florida We have audited

Fernandez, Eduardo

393

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY PHILANTHROPIST AWARD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY PHILANTHROPIST AWARD The MSU Alumni Association annually seeks and accepts nominations for the Michigan State University PHILANTHROPIST AWARD. This award is presented-going financial support and leadership to Michigan State University. The candidates will have demonstrated

394

University of Lethbridge Annual Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Lethbridge Annual Report 2011/12 #12; i University of Lethbridge 2011/12 Annual Report ACCOUNTABILITY STATEMENT The University of Lethbridge Annual Report for the year ended March 31, 2012 was prepared

Seldin, Jonathan P.

395

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Computer Engineering Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Computer Engineering Program The Fu Foundation School of Engineering Zukowski (caz@columbia.edu) Acting Chair, Computer Engineering Program #12;COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Computer interdepartmental major within Engineering School #12;COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Computer Engineering Program The Fu

Yang, Junfeng

396

Bagley University Classroom Building  

High Performance Buildings Database

Duluth, MN, MN LEED PLATINUM CERTIFIED AND PASSIVHAUS ( certification pending) CLASSROOM BUILDING The Nature Preserve where this building is located is a contiguous natural area, 55 acres in size, deeded to the University in the 1950's for educational and recreational use. The site has hiking trails through old growth hard woods frequented by the university students as well as the public. We were charged with designing a facility to serve eight different departments for the nature portions of their teaching and study at a regional University.

397

The universal radiative transport equation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE UNIVERSAL RADIATIVE TRANSPORT EQUATION Rudolph W.The Universal Radiative Transport Equation Rudolph W.The various radiative transport equations used in general

Preisendorfer, Rudolph W

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

UNIVERSALITY IS Martin Davis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

O F 1 #12;Alan Turing's universal machine: Code of M Input to M It provides a model of a memory amazing coincidence I have ever encountered." #12;Alan Turing 1947 (Address delivered to the London

399

Deakin University Victoria, Australia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Financial Planning Human Resources Management Interactive Marketing International Business International than 4.5 million people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. Deakin University and Construction Management Architecture Construction Management Design Facilities Management Arts Anthropology

Duchowski, Andrew T.

400

Northwestern University Information Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

... Integrated Technology Classrooms Online Lectures Collaborative Course Management Tools ...in any teaching environment Classroom Laptop Mobile Device www.it.northwestern.edu NUITAcademic&ResearchTechnologiesNorthwestern University Information Technology (NUIT) is committed to supporting faculty research

Shull, Kenneth R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university waste-to-energy incinerator" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

EPCglobal : a universal standard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis evaluates the likelihood of EPCglobal becoming the universal RFID standard by presenting a framework of ten factors used to analyze and determine if EPCglobal is moving in the right direction. The ten factors ...

Aguirre, Juan Ignacio

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

NEUP Approved Universities  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

U.S. universities and colleges must apply to the U.S. Department of Energy to administer NEUP scholarships and fellowships. That is done through a separate solicitation operated by the Department...

403

Simon Fraser University's  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a happy second home in the Indigenous Student Centre. Simon Fraser University recognizes the value graduated from Fraser Valley College in 1980 with a diploma in Social Services. Theresa feels her strength

404

Universal Extra Dimension  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is a brief discussion of the following features of the Universal Extra Dimension (UED) model: (i) Formulation, (ii) Indirect bounds, (iii) Collider search and the Inverse Problem, (iv) Astrophysical bounds, and (v) UED with two extra dimensions.

Anirban Kundu

2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

405

FINANCIAL ASSISTANT Binghamton University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of purchases, assigning general ledger accounts to employee labor records as well as purchase orders and workFINANCIAL ASSISTANT Binghamton University Physical Facilities - Finance & Resources Job Description purchasing functionality, accounts payable and receivable functionality and our employee labor distribution

Suzuki, Masatsugu

406

Indiana University Cognitive Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Indiana University Cognitive Science Exploring the Science of Learning Representations Simulations in science. How can simulations best be designed to enhance science learning and transfer? Computer Modeling Transfer Complex Systems Perception Which representations might help your students learn about

Indiana University

407

Thermodynamics of Fractal Universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the thermodynamical properties of the apparent horizon in a fractal universe. We find that one can always rewrite the Friedmann equation of the fractal universe in the form of the entropy balance relation $ \\delta Q=T_h d{S_h}$, where $ \\delta Q $ and $ T_{h} $ are the energy flux and Unruh temperature seen by an accelerated observer just inside the apparent horizon. We find that the entropy $S_h$ consists two terms, the first one which obeys the usual area law and the second part which is the entropy production term due to nonequilibrium thermodynamics of fractal universe. This shows that in a fractal universe, a treatment with nonequilibrium thermodynamics of spacetime may be needed. We also study the generalized second law of thermodynamics in the framework of fractal universe. When the temperature of the apparent horizon and the matter fields inside the horizon are equal, i.e. $T=T_h$, the generalized second law of thermodynamics can be fulfilled provided the deceleration and the equation of state parameters ranges either as $-1 \\leq q thermodynamics can be secured in a fractal universe by suitably choosing the fractal parameter $\\beta$.

Ahmad Sheykhi; Zeinab Teimoori; Bin Wang

2013-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

408

University contracts summary book  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal objectives of the Fossil Energy Program are to seek new ideas, new data, fundamental knowledge that will support the ongoing programs, and new processes to better utilize the nation's fossil energy resources with greater efficiency and environmental acceptability. Toward this end, the Department of Energy supports research projects conducted by universities and colleges to: Ensure a foundation for innovative technology through the use of the capabilities and talents in our academic institutions; provide an effective, two-way channel of communication between the Department of Energy and the academic community; and ensure that trained technical manpower is developed to carry out basic and applied research in support of DOE's mission. Fossil Energy's university activities emphasize the type of research that universities can do best - research to explore the potential of novel process concepts, develop innovative methods and materials for improving existing processes, and obtain fundamental information on the structure of coal and mechanisms of reactions of coal, shale oil, and other fossil energy sources. University programs are managed by different Fossil Energy technical groups; the individual projects are described in greater detail in this book. It is clear that a number of research areas related to the DOE Fossil Energy Program have been appropriate for university involvement, and that, with support from DOE, university scientific and technical expertise can be expected to continue to play a significant role in the advancement of fossil energy technology in the years to come.

None

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

University AdvAncement Bowling Green State University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University AdvAncement Bowling Green State University Office of Alumni and Development Bowling Green State University Mileti Alumni Center Bowling Green, Ohio 43403-0054 advance.bgsu.edu B O W L I N load. As Bowling Green State University progresses toward achieving its vision of being the premier

Moore, Paul A.

410

MILLERSVILLE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE CATALOG 2005-06 MILLERSVILLE UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MILLERSVILLE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE CATALOG 2005-06 1 MILLERSVILLE UNIVERSITY P.O. BOX 1002 Find Your Future. Here. #12;MILLERSVILLE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE CATALOG 2005-06 2 GOVERNING BOARDS GRADUATE CATALOG 2005-06 3 TABLE OF CONTENTS UNIVERSITY ADMINISTRATION

Hardy, Christopher R.

411

Western Michigan University -Extended University Programs How to Get Started  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Western Michigan University - Extended University Programs How to Get Started Interested in takingThe first toWestern Michigan University, Office of Admissions,1903W. Michigan Ave,Kalamazoo,MI 49008Western Michigan University,Office of Admissions,1903W.Michigan Ave, Kalamazoo,MI 49008-5211;the other

de Doncker, Elise

412

UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN NOMINATION TO THE UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN SENATE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN NOMINATION TO THE UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN SENATE The University of Saskatchewan Act 1995 (24.3) provides for membership on the University of Saskatchewan Senate by professional to the social, economic and cultural welfare of Saskatchewan; and (b) have a demonstrated interest in furthering

Saskatchewan, University of

413

University College Annual Report Written by Staff of University College  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.................................................................................................. 17 Scholastic Standards................................................................... 98 International Student Advising..................................................................................... 115 Appendix B: University College Organization Chart

Tipple, Brett

414

HARVARD UNIVERSITY FINANCIAL POLICY Responsible Office: University Financial Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Purchasing Card Page 2 of 7 #12;HARVARD UNIVERSITY FINANCIAL POLICY Responsible Office: University FinancialHARVARD UNIVERSITY FINANCIAL POLICY Responsible Office: University Financial Services Date First Effective: 4/1/2010 Revision Date: 6/30/2013 Purchasing Card Policy Statement Harvard Purchasing Cards

415

University of Northern British Columbia The University Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 University of Northern British Columbia The University Plan 2010 #12;1 2 Our Values We excel and responsive to student and community needs. #12;3 4 T he University of Northern British Columbia was born of northern British Columbia motivated 16,000 citizens to pay $5 each and petition government for a university

Northern British Columbia, University of

416

UNIVERSITY-INDUSTRY LIAISON OFFICE THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNIVERSITY-INDUSTRY LIAISON OFFICE THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA BREAKTHROUGHRESEARCHBUSINESSRESULTS 2005|06 ANNUAL REPORT UILO #12;The University of British Columbia, aspiring to be one of the world, Canada, and the world. TREK 2010: UBC'S VISION FOR THE 21ST CENTURY The University of British Columbia

Ollivier-Gooch, Carl

417

University of New Mexico Chapter University of New Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sigma Xi University of New Mexico Chapter University of New Mexico Albuquerque, NM 87131 May 13, 2011 Mr. Ajit Barve University of New Mexico Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001 Dear Mr. Barve, On behalf to attend monthly scientific presentations at the University of New Mexico, and participation in the annual

Krishna, Sanjay

418

Southeast Asia and Kyoto University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Kyoto University opened its ASEAN Center in Bangkok, Thailand (p.11), the latest development in over

Takada, Shoji

419

THE TRUSTEES OF PRINCETON UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.............................................. 32 The Princeton University Investment Company (PRINCO).. 33 Financial Planning ................................................ 34 The Cost

420

University of California, San Francisco  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the University to conduct its operations in conformance with applicable laws, regulations, and rel- evant

Oliver, Douglas L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university waste-to-energy incinerator" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

University of Rostock INTERNATIONAL OFFICE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The University offers a balanced range of subjects with innovative programmes of study and excellent research of "Life, Light and Matter", "Maritime Systems", "Ageing Science and Humanities" and "Knowledge and Fraunhofer institutes. #12;University of Rostock University of Rostock We here at the University of Rostock

Rostock, Universität

422

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY FACT BOOKLET  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY FACT BOOKLET 1999-2000 We aspire to enhance the University of Kentucky summary of the University of Kentucky's 1999-2000 Operating and Capital Budget; a profile of current facts about the many excellent programs underway at the University of Kentucky. This past year has been one

Hayes, Jane E.

423

UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS Amherst Campus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

......................................................................................................................... Page 3 E. Use of University Parking Facilities...................................... Page 12 U. Abandoned Vehicles

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

424

Nottingham Trent University Erasmus Partner List  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Designskolen Kolding Denmark Via University College Denmark Statens Teaterskole Finland University Of Lapland Finland ?bo Akademi University Finland Aalto University School Of Business Finland University Of Helsinki Finland Jamk University Of Applied Science Finland University Of Joensuu Finland Novia University

Evans, Paul

425

Explicit construction of universal structures Jan Hubicka  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Explicit construction of universal structures Jan Hubicka Charles University Prague Joint work with Jarik Nesetril Workshop on Homogeneous Structures 2011 Jan Hubicka Explicit construction of universal Explicit construction of universal structures #12;Universal relational structures By relational structures

St Andrews, University of

426

Georgetown University A Bicycle Friendly University In November 2013, Georgetown University was  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Georgetown University ­ A Bicycle Friendly University In November 2013, Georgetown University was designated a Bronze-level Bicycle Friendly University (BFU) by the League of American Bicyclists. By sharing the information below on what we are doing to support bicycling and on our BFU assessment and application process

Riesenhuber, Maximilian

427

Detonation and incineration products of PBX explosives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of experiments are planned to determine detonation product gases that are released into the environment when high explosives are tested. These experiments will be done in a 1.8-m-diam confinement vessel at ambient air pressure and partial vacuum. A matrix of four shots of PBX 9501, three shots of PBX 9502 and one shot of LX-10 are analyzed to determine the reproducibility and mass balance of materials in the detonation. This paper will only report on the detonation product gases as other experiments are planned.

Fletcher, M.A.; Loughran, E.D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Incinerator residue in bituminous base construction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for use of the material in a bituminous base. Preliminary investigation on the optimum mix design included Hveem stability, Marshall stability and Durability tests, A test section consisting of the experimental hot-mixed pavement, littercrete, and a... for flexural fatigue tests, Hveem and Marshall stabilities, thermal expansion, direct tension, splitting tensile and Schmidt tests. Four in. (10. 2 cm. ) diameter cores were taken after compaction (before traffic) and after six months in service. Samples...

Haynes, Joseph Anthony

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Incineration of radioactive waste in shaft furnace  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Development of nuclear technology depends greatly on solving the problems, concerning the treatment of waste, arising from power station activity. A great deal of waste will arise in the process of atomic power station decommissioning. One of the methods for radioactive waste treatment is a method of combustion. The volume reduction factor of the final product is 60--100. In the process of combustion, the organic radwaste is transported into gaseous wastes and ash. For better environmental protection, one must achieve the minimal release of nuclides from partially burned products in the gaseous phase, and maximize the waste in ash form suitable for final disposal.

Dmitriev, S.A.; Knyasev, I.A.; Kobelev, A.P. [Moscow SIA Radon, Sergiev Posad (Russian Federation). Dept. of Engineering Supply

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

430

The Dark Energy Universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Some seventy five years ago, the concept of dark matter was introduced by Zwicky to explain the anomaly of galactic rotation curves, though there is no clue to its identity or existence to date. In 1997, the author had introduced a model of the universe which went diametrically opposite to the existing paradigm which was a dark matter assisted decelarating universe. The new model introduces a dark energy driven accelarating universe though with a small cosmological constant. The very next year this new picture was confirmed by the Supernova observations of Perlmutter, Riess and Schmidt. These astronomers got the 2011 Nobel Prize for this dramatic observation. All this is discussed briefly, including the fact that dark energy may obviate the need for dark matter.

Burra G. Sidharth

2015-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

431

UNIVERSITIES IN TEXAS, PRIVATE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. And Vision 2020 research shows the best U.S. universities are currently receiving twice as much state funding (Ph.D. only), physics · statistics We also offer interdisciplinary graduate training programs, astronomy, atomic physics, condensed matter physics, high energy physics, nuclear physics, quantum optics

Boas, Harold P.

432

Purdue University & Kelly Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Purdue University & Kelly Services Higher quality staffing for higher education 765.448.6676 #12;Kelly's Key Strengths & Values · Respected global company · Dedicated branch network with Kelly: Contact Information · Our Local Kelly Services Branch is Located at: 3530 State Rd 26 E Lafayette

Fernández-Juricic, Esteban

433

Northwestern University Transportation Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Northwestern University Transportation Center 2011 Business Advisory Committee NUTC #12;#12;I have the pleasure of presenting our Business Advisory Committee members--a distinguished group of transportation industry lead- ers who have partnered with the Transportation Center in advancing the state of knowledge

Bustamante, Fabián E.

434

Rutgers University Environmental Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2) GHG Conversion Tool which convert standard metrics for electricity, green energy, fuel use) pledging to become an environmental steward by implementing a number of green initiatives that would reduce States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Rutgers University has resulted in reducing energy

Hanson, Stephen José

435

Rutgers University Environmental Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for electricity, green energy, fuel use, chemical use, water use, and sustainable materials management into MTCO2e) pledging to become an environmental steward by implementing a number of green initiatives that would reduce States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Rutgers University has resulted in reducing energy

Delgado, Mauricio

436

Cornell University Facilities Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

requirements, building code, and sustainability objectives. This plan takes a long- term view, projecting workCornell University Facilities Services Contract Colleges Facilities Fernow and Rice Hall in Fernow, Rice, Bruckner, Bradfield and Plant Science buildings. It includes a surging and phasing plan

Manning, Sturt

437

Sophia University Tokyo, Japan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sophia University Tokyo, Japan About: Located in the center of Tokyo, Sophia offers a very diverse and vibrant atmosphere. Students who attend Sophia can go for any discipline within their Faculty of Liberal Offerings 3. Accommodations 4. Application Materials For more information visit: http://www.sophia

Duchowski, Andrew T.

438

SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY Graduate School  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY Graduate School 2012 GRADUATE SCHOOL MARSHAL NOMINATION FORM NAME: (Last Name): (EXPECTED) DEGREE COMPLETE TERM (month/year): The Graduate School marshal must complete all degree School Marshal. Please provide a brief letter of nomination for the Name (please print): Title: Nominator

Mather, Patrick T.

439

SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY Graduate School  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY Graduate School 2015 GRADUATE SCHOOL MARSHAL NOMINATION FORM NAME: SUID: EMAIL School marshal must complete all degree requirements by April 22, 2015. All applicants must submit a memo: I hereby nominate this student as a candidate for 2015 Graduate School Marshal. Name: Title

Mather, Patrick T.

440

Mathematics Department Cornell University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mathematics Department Cornell University K-12 Education & Outreach Committee Report August 2011 Ilyashenko Edward Swartz #12;i Overview During the 2011-2012 academic year the Mathematics Department by faculty members, graduate students, and undergraduate students in Mathematics and the Center for Applied

Keinan, Alon

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university waste-to-energy incinerator" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

HARVARD UNIVERSITY CHEMICAL BIOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HARVARD UNIVERSITY CHEMICAL BIOLOGY PHD PROGRAM 2013-2014 Student Handbook #12;Program Contacts at the beginning of each semester. Laboratory Rotations Students in the Chemical Biology Program are expected an interest in having Chemical Biology Program Students in their labs. Students may rotate in the labs

Church, George M.

442

The Universe as Calorimeter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The maturation of very high energy astrophysics has enabled many novel physics applications. Among these is the investigation of extragalactic photon fields, which in some cases encode specific calorimetric information about such things as the formation of large-scale structure and the total high-energy luminosity of the universe. The origins of these backgrounds, and techniques for probing them will be discussed.

Wakely, Scott P. [Enrico Fermi Institute, Dept. of Physics, University of Chicago, Chicago IL 60637 (United States); Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago, Chicago IL 60637 (United States)

2006-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

443

University of Chicago Description  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

? The first self-sustaining, synthetic nuclear reaction occurred in an underground racket ball court or in International House (a private entity affiliated with the University) and housing is guaranteed for students who submit their application on time. Details are available on the Housing Office website. Courses

Bristol, University of

444

nagoya university handbook for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

5. Maps of Nagoya City Ward Offices around Nagoya University 6. Sorting of Domestic Recyclable and Non-recyclable Refuse 04 14 16 20 22 24 24 30 32 38 40 40 03 05 15 17 21 23 25 25 31 33 39 #12, libraries and wireless service, and free resources such as physical and mental health consultation

Takahashi, Ryo

445

Syracuse University Electrical Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Syracuse University Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Tenure Track Faculty Position in Electrical Engineering The Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science is seeking applicants for a tenure track position in Electrical Engineering starting in August 2014 or January 2015. The department

Mather, Patrick T.

446

The University Advertising Guidelines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

advertisements 21 A4 advertisements with image 22 On-line ­ brand advertising 23 On-line leaderboards and MPUs to these on page 48 in the Heriot-Watt University brand guidelines. Images Images should use the whole area) advertisements 6 Small space (5cms x 2cols) advertisements with image 8 A5 advertisements 9 A5 advertisements

Painter, Kevin

447

SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY MAIN CAMPUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY MAIN CAMPUS To Interstates 81, 690, and 90 (NYS Thruway). To ComArt, Lampe From Downtown Syracuse, Interstates 81, 690, and 90 (NYS Thruway) 10016P M ADISON STREET M ADISON Laboratory 49 Hinds Hall, School of Information Studies 40 Holden Observatory 47 Hoople Building 23

Mohan, Chilukuri K.

448

An Ever Expanding Universe?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is pointed out that very recent results based on supernovae observations that the universe will accelerate and expand for ever with ever decreasing density have been predicted in a recent cosmological model which also deduces hitherto purely empirical features like the mysterious relation between the pion mass and the Hubble Constant.

B. G. Sidharth

1998-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

449

Utrecht University September 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Utrecht University September 2011 Faculty of Geosciences Welcome New GeoSciences Students #12;GEO@geo.uu.nl #12;Universiteit Utrecht Faculty Orientation 10.00 Practical Matters at GeoSciences - Important placesSciences Plenary Kick-off 13.30 Into the Departments #12;Universiteit Utrecht SOLIS-ID / UU LOG-IN · Masterstudents

Utrecht, Universiteit

450

MARK PAGANI YALE UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and chaired the 2nd Yale Climate & Energy Institute annual conference (2011). Co PROFESSIONAL SERVICE: Guest member of the Annual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences Editorial Committee , University of Colorado, Boulder, CO. PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE: Director; Yale Climate and Energy Institute

451

UNIVERSITY AVENUE ROLLINS STREET  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROVIDENCERD University of Missouri: Main Campus Lemone Industrial Park South Farm Discovery Ridge Women Campus MU Power Plant A 34 kW solar photovoltaic (PV) system has been installed on the new fuel unloading building as part of the biomass boiler project. The solar PV system provides additional renewable energy

Taylor, Jerry

452

University Services Management Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

system U Services Finance organized a workforce planning process resulting in a team with better capacity > 3 Primary Services Human Resources Workforce Planning Recruitment and Selection Employee and Labor, and strategic planning efforts. In addition to supporting the University Services enterprise, the Management

Webb, Peter

453

California State University,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Appendices report CLA outcomes in detail and technical information underpinning your results. Power presents Collegiate Learning Assessment (CLA) results for colleges and universities that tested freshmen (page 2) Results (page 3) Moving Forward (page 3) II Attachments Technical Appendices The Technical

de Lijser, Peter

454

?engineering columbia university  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?engineering why engineeri columbia university engineering engineering why engineering for the world to use. The images below represent technological innovations pioneered by Columbia engineers. Can Parsons graduated from Columbia in 1882. 2.) Flat panel TV--Columbia Professor James Im developed

455

undergraduate BRAC UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Publisher: BRAC University 66, Mohakhali Dhaka 1212, Bangladesh Telephone: (88 02) 882 4051-4 (PABX) Fax xi Schools, Departments, Institutes & Centre xiii Partners in Education xviii Resources, Facilities and Services Resources at BRACU xx Facilities for Learning xxi Student Activities xxvi Academic System xxix

Petriu, Emil M.

456

Columbia University Medical Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Epidemiology Program Prevention, Control and Disparities Program SHARED RESOURCES EDUCATION ADMINISTRATION HOW spirit and the superior resources of a world-class multi-campus university, this combination sets on West 168th Street work so hard to understand why people in Bangladesh are developing skin cancer from

Grishok, Alla

457

Montana State University Administration and Finance University Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Disposal Engineering & Utilities Engineering Services Utilities Acquisitions Heating Plant OperationMontana State University Administration and Finance University Services Associate Vice President Bob Lashaway Facilities Services Budget & IT Services Budgeting & Accounting IT Services

Maxwell, Bruce D.

458

Montana State University -Administration and Finance University Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Disposal Engineering & Utilities Engineering Services Utilities Acquisitions Heating Plant OperationMontana State University - Administration and Finance University Services Associate Vice President Bob Lashaway Facilities Services Budget & IT Services Budgeting & Accounting IT Services

Lawrence, Rick L.

459

College/University: 1998 -2004 University of Kaiserslautern (Germany)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Education College/University: 1998 - 2004 University of Kaiserslautern (Germany) Diploma in Biology, billard, card-games, soccer, First name: Niels Last name: Heinz Date of birth: 07.02.1978 Country: Germany

Manstein, Dietmar J.

460

College/University: University of Indonesia; Jakarta, Indonesia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Education College/University: University of Indonesia; Jakarta, Indonesia Highest degree: B, under revision First name: Meta Last name: Djojosubroto Date of birth: 21.11.1975 Country: Indonesia E

Manstein, Dietmar J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university waste-to-energy incinerator" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA VICE PROVOST FOR UNIVERSITY LIFE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA VICE PROVOST FOR UNIVERSITY LIFE EQUITY & ACCESS PROGRAMS STUDENT) Ethnic/Racial Classification: (Please Circle): American Indian/Alaskan Native, Asian, Black or African): ___________ ______________________________________________________________________________ EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND What is your favorite school subject? ______________________________ What is your

Sharp, Kim

462

University of Pittsburgh University Center for International Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Pittsburgh University Center for International Studies Asian Studies Center Foreign to announce a competition for Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellowships (FLASF) for the University time to graduate study. PLEASE NOTE: Awarding of FLAS Fellowships is contingent on receipt of funding

Machery, Edouard

463

UNIVERSITY HEALTH SERVICES UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-MADISON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are pre-paid by the Student Health Fee. I understand that I will be informed if a health care providerUNIVERSITY HEALTH SERVICES UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-MADISON 333 East Campus Mall Madison, WI 53715-1381 http://www.uhs.wisc.edu MR# Name BD Gender ID# Date University Health Services (UHS) Information

Scharer, John E.

464

NEVADA UNIVERSITY TRANSPORTATION CENTER UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA, LAS VEGAS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NEVADA UNIVERSITY TRANSPORTATION CENTER UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA, LAS VEGAS 2011-2012 ANNUAL REPORT #12 University Transportation Center (NUTC) Vision: The NUTC will strive to become a nationally recognized center of excellence for research in planning, operations and management of sustainable transportation systems

Hemmers, Oliver

465

West Virginia University 1 Oak Ridge Associated Universities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

West Virginia University 1 Oak Ridge Associated Universities Oak Ridge Associated Universities and a contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. ORAU works with its, and research appointments; and to organize research alliances among its members. Through the Oak Ridge

Mohaghegh, Shahab

466

University Policy Process Style Guidelines for University Policy Documents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University Policy Process Style Guidelines for University Policy Documents 1 S:\\4every1\\Policy\\Univ Policy Improvement\\Final Docs\\Style Guidelines-UPP.docx Policy Name Do not include "Policy" or "Policy on specific applications such as "anyone operating university owned or operated vehicles". POLICY (required

Jones, Michelle

467

University of Kentucky University of Kentucky Doctoral Dissertations Graduate School  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Kentucky UKnowledge University of Kentucky Doctoral Dissertations Graduate School of Kentucky, sbierbower.uky@gmail.com This Dissertation is brought to you for free and open access by the Graduate School at UKnowledge. It has been accepted for inclusion in University of Kentucky Doctoral

Cooper, Robin L.

468

University of Kentucky University of Kentucky Doctoral Dissertations Graduate School  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Kentucky UKnowledge University of Kentucky Doctoral Dissertations Graduate School of Kentucky This Dissertation is brought to you for free and open access by the Graduate School at UKnowledge. It has been accepted for inclusion in University of Kentucky Doctoral Dissertations by an authorized

Cooper, Robin L.

469

TOKYO INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGYINTERNATIONALCOLLABORATION University/Institute Concluded  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carlsberg Laboratory and University of Copenhagen Aalto University Lappeenranta University of Technology

470

Charles Darwin University Flinders University Griffith University James Cook University La Trobe University Murdoch University The University of Newcastle IRU STATEMENT 13/2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the various bodies involved must be better" said Professor Barney Glover, Vice-Chancellor of Charles Darwin on improving higher education" Professor Glover commented. "The IRU also supports a thorough analysis to universities" Professor Glover concluded. Contact Professor Barney Glover Conor King Chair IRU, Vice

471

Charles Darwin University Flinders University Griffith University James Cook University La Trobe University Murdoch University The University of Newcastle IRU MEDIA RELEASE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

missed" said Professor Barney Glover, IRU Chair and Vice-Chancellor Charles Darwin University. "The will continue to argue for additional investment" Professor Glover concluded. Contact Professor Barney Glover Conor King Chair IRU Executive Director IRU 08 8946 6040 0434 601 691 0418 954 052 03 9479 5181 barney.glover

472

HUMAN RESOURCES SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

funding priorities, budget consideration, application requirements, University policies and proceduresHUMAN RESOURCES SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY ADMINISTRATIVE & PROFESSIONAL JOB DESCRIPTION Position to Canadian and international funding agencies. The incumbent will assist with the writing and reviewing

473

S.BERETANIASTREET UNIVERSITY AVENUE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hall Hawai`i Hall Crawford Hall Architecture School Gartley Hall Saunders Hall Queen Lili University High School 3 University Ave. Annexes Sustainability Courtyard 0 H1 Dance Building Agricultural

474

MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION Job Title: DIRECTOR Department: CENTER faculty in developing and assessing course goals in support of program and university learning goals for online and blended learning. Provide assistance in evaluating and implementing educational technologies

Endres. William J.

475

MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION JOB TITLE: CUSTODIAN (12 month/40 and clean fixtures. Maintain building entrances according to conditions by removing snow and ice, applying be exercised over seasonal/temporary university employees and student assistants. QUALIFICATION REQUIREMENTS

476

MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION JOB TITLE: CUSTODIAN (12 month and ice, applying sand and salt, and removing debris. Adhere to current department uniform policy supervision may be exercised over seasonal/temporary university employees and student assistants

477

MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION JOB TITLE: CUSTODIAN (12 mos and clean fixtures. Maintain building entrances according to conditions by removing snow and ice, applying be exercised over seasonal/temporary university employees and student assistants. QUALIFICATION REQUIREMENTS

478

MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION JOB TITLE: CUSTODIAN (9 month/20 hours and clean fixtures. Maintain building entrances according to conditions by removing snow and ice, applying be exercised over seasonal/temporary university employees and student assistants. QUALIFICATION REQUIREMENTS

479

SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY CLASS OF 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AFFAIRS 303 UNIVERSITY PLACE, SUITE 235 SYRACUSE, NY 13244 #12;Suite Syracuse Un of 2010 Pla bachelor rcent in 200 University Pla 05 / http://stu E UNIV F STUDENT A reer Services d to present t rovides info

Raina, Ramesh

480

University of Connecticut Health Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Connecticut Health Center UCONN Medical Group Comprehensive Spine Center (Patient: ____________________ AGE: _____ SEX: M / F Referring Physician: ___________ Primary Care Physician: _____________ 1. Where your symptoms begin? __/__/__/ *HCH2199* #12;University of Connecticut Health Center UCONN Medical

Oliver, Douglas L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university waste-to-energy incinerator" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY RESEARCH RESOURCES GUIDE Prepared by Minu Chaudhuri, Ph.edu/research/gcp.htm. The Columbia University Health Sciences Division requirement is the demonstration of knowledge ............................................................................. 3 IV ) Columbia Funding Resources

Pullman, Seth L.

482

Professor Jay Sethuraman Columbia University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Professor Jay Sethuraman Columbia University Monday April 2, 2012, Time: 1:00 pm 1 Washington Park Research at Columbia University. His research interests are in scheduling theory, discrete optimization

Lin, Xiaodong

483

University Research Management: An Exploratory Literature Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

requirements of universities and funding programs as well aschanges in the university funding policies. A preliminary2005. Industry funding and university professors research

Schuetzenmeister, Falk

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

INDIANA UNIVERSITY William Sherman Senior Technology Advisor...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

INDIANA UNIVERSITY William Sherman Senior Technology Advisor, Indiana University William Sherman is a senior technical advisor at Indiana University. He is the scientific...

485

Sustainability Framework 1 Queen's University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustainability Framework 1 Queen's University Sustainability Strategic Framework #12;Sustainability Framework 2 Contents Introduction .................................................................................................................................................. 2 Queen's Sustainability Mission

Abolmaesumi, Purang

486

University Graduate School Academic Bulletin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are University Graduate School fellowships, fee scholarships, and various privately and federally funded awards at Indiana University. The GGC's services include funding-database searches, workshops, one- on-one proposal22 University Graduate School 2009-2010 Academic Bulletin Student Financial Aid Fellowships

Indiana University

487

Bowling Green State University Institutional  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bowling Green State University Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee Policy/Procedure Manual animal research at Bowling Green State University. Reading over the first three policies will provide #12;309A University Hall Bowling Green, OH 43403-0183 Phone 419-372-7716 Fax 419-372-6916 email hsrb

Moore, Paul A.

488

Student Awards Simon Fraser University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Student Awards Simon Fraser University #12;SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY Simon Fraser University (SFU ­ gifts that will engage over 30,000 students and 6,500 researchers across three campuses, and strengthen our power to engage communities for the next 50 years. As part of this campaign, our goal for student

489

University of Bamberg Bamberg, Germany  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Bamberg Bamberg, Germany About: The University of Bamberg (German: Otto-Friedrich-Universität Bamberg) in Bamberg, Germany, is simultaneously one of the oldest and one of the newest universities://www.uni-bamberg.de/?id=2697 FUN FACTS ABOUT BAMBERG The working week in Germany also includes Saturday. So, when looking

Duchowski, Andrew T.

490

Accounts Receivable Western Michigan University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accounts Receivable Western Michigan University 1903 W. Michigan Avenue Kalamazoo, MI 49008 have read the Western Michigan University Third Party Billing Policy and agree to the terms. I am authorizing Western Michigan University to bill for the specified tuition and related fees for the term

de Doncker, Elise

491

Gerd Kortemeyer Michigan State University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LON-CAPA Gerd Kortemeyer Michigan State University January 2008 #12;LON-CAPA Course Management Management: Use same material in different courses Universities can share online content #12;Online Content Growth of shared content pool #12;Open Source, Free No licensing cost Universities can

492

Accounts Receivable Western Michigan University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accounts Receivable Western Michigan University 1903 W. Michigan Avenue Kalamazoo, MI 49008-5210 269 387-4251 Fax 269 387-4227 THIRD PARTY BILLING POLICY Western Michigan University (WMU# (269) 387-4227 Western Michigan University 1903 W. Michigan Avenue E-mail: wmu

de Doncker, Elise

493

DENISE L. MAUZERALL PRINCETON UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering, 1988 Brown University Sc.B., with honors, Chemistry, 1985 HONORS Intergovernmental Panel) Stanford University School of Engineering Fellowship, tuition. (1987 - 1988) Elected to Sigma Xi (1985) Sc.B 402d Development of Policy Initiatives for the Sustainable Use of Energy at Princeton University

Mauzerall, Denise

494

Graduate Programs University of Arizona  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GIS Graduate Programs University of Arizona Tucson, Arizona Program: Renewable Natural://www.srnr.arizona.edu/ucgis/gradprogram.html Ball State University Muncie, IN 473060470 Program: Geography http://www.bsu.edu/geog/ Boston University Boston, MA 02215 Program: Remote Sensing and Geographic Information Systems http

495

MURDOCH UNIVERSITY PERTH, WESTERN AUSTRALIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MURDOCH UNIVERSITY PERTH, WESTERN AUSTRALIA INAUGRATION CEREMONY 17TH SEPTEMBER, 1974 #12;ORDER Murdoch University, the second university to be established in Western Australia, and the eighteenth in Australia, was constituted 25 July 1973 by an Act of the Parliament of Western Australia. The initial

496

Annual Report University of Lethbridge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Annual Report 2012-13 University of Lethbridge #12;i University of Lethbridge 2012-13 Annual Report ACCOUNTABILITY STATEMENT The University of Lethbridge Annual Report for the year ended March 31, 2013, or fiscal implications of which we are aware have been considered in preparing this report. Original signed

Morris, Joy

497

Academic Resources UNIVERSITY CLASSROOM INVENTORY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Academic Resources UNIVERSITY CLASSROOM INVENTORY Building Order Spring 2014 BLDG RM CAP. ENH. AV;Academic Resources UNIVERSITY CLASSROOM INVENTORY Building Order Spring 2014 BLDG RM CAP. ENH. AV(01)* TAB_012814\\roomorder 2 of 4 1/28/2014 #12;Academic Resources UNIVERSITY CLASSROOM INVENTORY Building Order

498

Academic Resources UNIVERSITY CLASSROOM INVENTORY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Academic Resources UNIVERSITY CLASSROOM INVENTORY Capacity Order Spring 2014 BLDG RM CAP. ENH. AV UNIVERSITY CLASSROOM INVENTORY Capacity Order Spring 2014 BLDG RM CAP. ENH. AV(01)* TAB ARM(02) GEOG MAP(03/28/2014 #12;Academic Resources UNIVERSITY CLASSROOM INVENTORY Capacity Order Spring 2014 BLDG RM CAP. ENH. AV

499

FACT BOOKLET UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FACT BOOKLET 2013-2014 UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY #12;- 1 - Table of Contents Letter from President Eli statistics about people and programs at the University of Kentucky. In accordance with KRS 164 for Kentucky students and those in our target recruitment regions. The University's public/private partnership

Hayes, Jane E.

500

Department of Physics Columbia University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Physics Columbia University Copyright A. J. Millis 2010 John Hubbard photo Thanks abcd Uabcdd ad bdcdd (d) ab ab()d a()db() ab Habd adb #12;Department of Physics Columbia University to self energy #12;Department of Physics Columbia University Copyright A. J. Millis 2010 Cant treat all

Millis, Andrew