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1

Final Site-Specific Decommissioning Inspection Report for the University of Washington Research and Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Report of site-specific decommissioning in-process inspection activities at the University of Washington Research and Test Reactor Facility.

Sarah Roberts

2006-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

2

University Research Reactor Task Force to the Nuclear Energy Research  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' Research Petroleum ReserveDepartment ofEnergy, OfficeDepartment of EnergyAdvisory

3

Instrumentation for Neutron Scattering at the Missouri University Research Reactor Paul F. Miceli  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Instrumentation for Neutron Scattering at the Missouri University Research Reactor Paul F. Miceli Research Reactor (MURR) provides significant thermal neutron flux, which enables neutron scattering]. There are presently 5 instruments located on the beam port floor that are dedicated to neutron scattering: (1) TRIAX

Montfrooij, Wouter

4

MODULAR PEBBLE BED REACTOR PROJECT UNIVERSITY RESEARCH CONSORTIUM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Annual Report Page ii MODULAR PEBBLE BED REACTOR ABSTRACT This project is developing a fundamental. Publication of an archival journal article covering this work is being prepared. · Detailed gas reactor Abstract

5

Decommissioning Small Research and Training Reactors; Experience on Three Recent University Projects - 12455  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Decommissioning small reactors within the confines of an active University environment presents unique challenges. These range from the radiological protection of the nearby University population and grounds, to the logistical challenges of working in limited space without benefit of the established controlled, protected, and vital areas common to commercial facilities. These challenges, and others, are discussed in brief project histories of three recent (calendar year 2011) decommissioning activities at three University training and research reactors. These facilities include three separate Universities in three states. The work at each of the facilities addresses multiple phases of the decommissioning process, from initial characterization and pre-decommissioning waste removal, to core component removal and safe storage, through to complete structural dismantlement and site release. The results of the efforts at each University are presented, along with the challenges that were either anticipated or discovered during the decommissioning efforts, and results and lessons learned from each of the projects. (authors)

Gilmore, Thomas [LVI Services Inc. (United States); DeWitt, Corey; Miller, Dustin; Colborn, Kurt [Enercon Services, Inc. (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Research reactors - an overview  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A broad overview of different types of research and type reactors is provided in this paper. Reactor designs and operating conditions are briefly described for four reactors. The reactor types described include swimming pool reactors, the High Flux Isotope Reactor, the Mark I TRIGA reactor, and the Advanced Neutron Source reactor. Emphasis in the descriptions is placed on safety-related features of the reactors. 7 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

West, C.D.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Monitoring and Control Research Using a University Reactor and SBWR Test-Loop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The existing hybrid simulation capability of the Penn State Breazeale nuclear reactor was expanded to conduct research for monitoring, operations and control. Hybrid simulation in this context refers to the use of the physical time response of the research reactor as an input signal to a real-time simulation of power-reactor thermal-hydraulics which in-turn provides a feedback signal to the reactor through positioning of an experimental changeable reactivity device. An ECRD is an aluminum tube containing an absorber material that is positioned in the central themble of the reactor kinetics were used to expand the hybrid reactor simulation (HRS) capability to include out-of-phase stability characteristics observed in operating BWRs.

Robert M. Edwards

2003-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

8

University Reactor Conversion Lessons Learned Workshop for Purdue University Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory, under its programmatic responsibility for managing the University Research Reactor Conversions, has completed the conversion of the reactor at Purdue University Reactor. With this work completed and in anticipation of other impending conversion projects, the INL convened and engaged the project participants in a structured discussion to capture the lessons learned. The lessons learned process has allowed us to capture gaps, opportunities, and good practices, drawing from the project team’s experiences. These lessons will be used to raise the standard of excellence, effectiveness, and efficiency in all future conversion projects.

Eric C. Woolstenhulme; Dana M. Hewit

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Final Site Specific Decommissioning Inspection Report #2 for the University of Washington Research and Test Reactor, Seattle, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the period of August through November 2006, ORISE performed a comprehensive IV at the University of Washington Research and Test Reactor Facility. The objective of the ORISE IV was to validate the licensee’s final status survey processes and data, and to assure the requirements of the DP and FSSP were met.

S.J. Roberts

2007-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

10

Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor Workshop  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR) was the first reactor built in the U.S. for peacetime atomic research following World War II.  Construction began in 1947 and the reactor started...

11

Reactor Safety Research Programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) from January 1 through March 31, 1981, for the Division of Reactor Safety Research within the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision-making regarding pipeto- pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Core thermal models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-ofcoolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation, severe fuel damage, and postaccident coolability tests for the ESSOR reactor Super Sara Test Program, Ispra, Italy; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

Edler, S. K.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

EXPERIMENT OPERATIONS PLAN FOR A LOSS-OF-COOLANT ACCIDENT SIMULATION IN THE NATIONAL RESEARCH UNIVERSAL REACTOR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pressurized water reactor loss-of-coolant accident phenomena are being simulated with a series of experiments in the U-2 loop of the National Research Universal Reactor at Chalk River, Ontario, Canada. The first of these experiments includes up to 45 parametric thermal-hydraulic tests to establish the relationship between the reflood delay time of emergency coolant, the reflooding rate, and the resultant fuel rod cladding peak temperature. This document contains both experiment proposal and assembly proposal information. The intent of this document is to supply information required by the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL), and to identify the planned procedures and data that will be used both to establish readiness to proceed from one test phase to the next and to operate the experiment. Operating control settings and limits are provided for both experimenter systems and CRNL systems. A hazards review summarizes safety issues that have been addressed during the development of the experiment plan.

Russcher, G. E.; Cannon, L. W.; Goodman, R. L.; Hesson, G. M.; King, L. L.; McDuffie, P. N.; Marshall, R. K.; Nealley, C.; Pilger, J. P.; Mohr, C. L.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Reactor Safety Research Programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest laboratory from October 1 through December 31, 1979, for the Division of Reactor Safety Research within the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Evaluation of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibilty of determining structural graphite strength, evaluating the feasibilty of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the remaining integrity of pressurized water reactor steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Test assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include the loss-of-coolant accident simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; the fuel rod deformation and post-accident coolability tests for the ESSOR Test Reactor Program, lspra, Italy; the blowdown and reflood tests in the test facility at Cadarache, France; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and the experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

Dotson, CW

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

United States Domestic Research Reactor Infrastrucutre TRIGA Reactor Fuel Support  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United State Domestic Research Reactor Infrastructure Program at the Idaho National Laboratory manages and provides project management, technical, quality engineering, quality inspection and nuclear material support for the United States Department of Energy sponsored University Reactor Fuels Program. This program provides fresh, unirradiated nuclear fuel to Domestic University Research Reactor Facilities and is responsible for the return of the DOE-owned, irradiated nuclear fuel over the life of the program. This presentation will introduce the program management team, the universities supported by the program, the status of the program and focus on the return process of irradiated nuclear fuel for long term storage at DOE managed receipt facilities. It will include lessons learned from research reactor facilities that have successfully shipped spent fuel elements to DOE receipt facilities.

Douglas Morrell

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Research Program of a Super Fast Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research program of a supercritical-pressure light water cooled fast reactor (Super Fast Reactor) is funded by MEXT (Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology) in December 2005 as one of the research programs of Japanese NERI (Nuclear Energy Research Initiative). It consists of three programs. (1) development of Super Fast Reactor concept; (2) thermal-hydraulic experiments; (3) material developments. The purpose of the concept development is to pursue the advantage of high power density of fast reactor over thermal reactors to achieve economic competitiveness of fast reactor for its deployment without waiting for exhausting uranium resources. Design goal is not breeding, but maximizing reactor power by using plutonium from spent LWR fuel. MOX will be the fuel of the Super Fast Reactor. Thermal-hydraulic experiments will be conducted with HCFC22 (Hydro chlorofluorocarbons) heat transfer loop of Kyushu University and supercritical water loop at JAEA. Heat transfer data including effect of grid spacers will be taken. The critical flow and condensation of supercritical fluid will be studied. The materials research includes the development and testing of austenitic stainless steel cladding from the experience of PNC1520 for LMFBR. Material for thermal insulation will be tested. SCWR (Supercritical-Water Cooled Reactor) of GIF (Generation-4 International Forum) includes both thermal and fast reactors. The research of the Super Fast Reactor will enhance SCWR research and the data base. The research period will be until March 2010. (authors)

Oka, Yoshiaki; Ishiwatari, Yuki; Liu, Jie; Terai, Takayuki; Nagasaki, Shinya; Muroya, Yusa; Abe, Hiroaki [Nuclear Professional School / Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, The University of Tokyo, Tokaimura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki, 319-1188 (Japan); Mori, Hideo [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kyushu University (Japan); Akiba, Masato; Akimoto, Hajime; Okumura, Keisuke; Akasaka, Naoaki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan); GOTO, Shoji [Tokyo Electric Power Company (Japan)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Hydro-mechanical analysis of low enriched uranium fuel plates for University of Missouri Research Reactor .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??As part of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) Reactor Conversion program, work is underway to analyze and validate a new fuel assembly for the… (more)

Kennedy, John C.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Two U.S. University Research Reactors to be Converted From Highly...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Statement on Reactor Conversion JOINT STATEMENT OF THE CO-CHAIRS OF THE NUCLEAR ENERGY AND NUCLEAR SECURITY WORKING GROUP OF THE BILATERAL U.S. - RUSSIA PRESIDENTIAL COMMISSION...

18

Material Sample Collection with Tritium and Gamma Analyses at the University of Illinois's Nuclear Research Laboratory TRIGA Nuclear Research Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The University of Illinois in Champaign-Urbana has an Advanced TRIGA reactor facility which was built in 1960 and operated until August 1998. The facility was shutdown for a variety of reasons, primarily due to a lack of usage by the host institution. In 1998 the reactor went into SAFSTOR and finally shipped its fuel in 2004. At the present time a site characterization and decommissioning plan are in process and hope to be submitted to the NRC in early 2006. The facility had to be fully characterized and part of this characterization involved the collection and analysis of samples. This included various solid media such as, concrete, graphite, metals, and sub-slab surface soils for immediate analysis of Activation and Tritium contamination well below the easily measured surfaces. This detailed facility investigation provided a case to eliminate historical unknowns, increasing the confidence for the segregation and packaging of high specific activity Low Level Radwaste (LLRW), from which a strategy of 'surgical-demolition' and segregation could be derived thus maximizing the volumes of 'clean material'. Performing quantitative volumetric concrete or metal radio-analyses safer and faster (without lab intervention) was a key objective of this dynamic characterization approach. Currently, concrete core bores are shipped to certified laboratories where the concrete residue is run through a battery of tests to determine the contaminants. The existing core boring operation volatilises or washes out some of the contaminants (like tritium) and oftentimes cross-contaminates the are a around the core bore site. The volatilization of the contaminants can lead to airborne problems in the immediate vicinity of the core bore. Cross-contamination can increase the contamination area and thereby increase the amount of waste generated that needs to be treated and stabilized before disposal. The goal was to avoid those field activities that could cause this type of release. Therefore, TRUPRO{sup R}, a sampling and profiling tool in conjunction with radiometric instrumentation was utilized to produce contamination profiles through the material being studied. All samples (except metals) on-site were analyzed within 10 minutes for tritium using a calibrated portable liquid scintillation counter (LSC) and analyzed for gamma activation products using a calibrated ISOCS. Improved sample collection with near real time analysis along with more historical hazard analysis enhanced significantly over the baseline coring approach the understanding of the depth distribution of contaminants. The water used in traditional coring can result in a radioactive liquid waste that needs to be dealt with. This would have been an issue at University of Illinois. Considerable time, risk reduction and money are saved using this profiling approach. (authors)

Charters, G.; Aggarwal, S. [New Millennium Nuclear Technologies, 575 Union Blvd, Suite 102, Lakewood, CO 80228 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

University Reactor Matching Grants Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the 2002 Fiscal year, funds from the DOE matching grant program, along with matching funds from the industrial sponsors, have been used to support research in the area of thermal-hydraulics. Both experimental and numerical research projects have been performed. Experimental research focused on two areas: (1) Identification of the root cause mechanism for axial offset anomaly in pressurized water reactors under prototypical reactor conditions, and (2) Fluid dynamic aspects of thin liquid film protection schemes for inertial fusion reactor chambers. Numerical research focused on two areas: (1) Multi-fluid modeling of both two-phase and two-component flows for steam conditioning and mist cooling applications, and (2) Modeling of bounded Rayleigh-Taylor instability with interfacial mass transfer and fluid injection through a porous wall simulating the ''wetted wall'' protection scheme in inertial fusion reactor chambers. Details of activities in these areas are given.

John Valentine; Farzad Rahnema; Said Abdel-Khalik

2003-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

20

Experiment Operations Plan for a Loss-of-Coolant Accident Simulation in the National Research Universal Reactor Materials Tests 1 and 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) simulation program is evaluating the thermal-hydraulic and mechanical effects of LOCA conditions on pressurized water reactor test fuel bundles. This experiment operation plan for the second and third experiments of the program will provide peak fuel cladding temperatures of up to 1172K (1650{degree}F) and 1061K (1450{degree}) respectively. for a long enough time to cause test fuel cladding deformation and rupture in both. Reflood coolant delay times and the reflooding rates for the experiments were selected from thermal-hydraulic data measured in the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor facilities and test train assembly during the first experiment.

Russcher, G. E.; Wilson, C. L.; Marshall, R, K.; King, L. L.; Parchen, L. J.; Pilger, J. P.; Hesson, G. M.; Mohr, C. L.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university research reactor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Corrosion Minimization for Research Reactor Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Existing university research reactors are being converted to use low-enriched uranium fue to eliminate the use of highly-enriched uranium. These conversions require increases in fuel loading that will result in the use of elements with more fuel plates, resulting in a net decrease in the water annulus between fuel plates. The proposed decrease in the water annulus raises questions about the requirements and stability of the surface hydroxide on the aluminum fuel cladding and the potential for runaway corrosion resulting in fuel over-temperature incidents. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), as regulator for these university reactors, must ensure that proposed fuel modifications will not result in any increased risk or hazard to the reactor operators or the public. This document reviews the characteristics and behavior of aluminum hydroxides, analyzes the drivers for fuel plate corrosion, reviews relevant historical incidents, and provides recommendations on fuel design, surface treatment, and reactor operational practices to avoid corrosion issues.

Eric Shaber; Gerard Hofman

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

2012 Annual Report Research Reactor Infrastructure Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The content of this report is the 2012 Annual Report for the Research Reactor Infrastructure Program.

Douglas Morrell

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

International Research Reactor Decommissioning Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many research reactors have been or will be shut down and are candidates for decommissioning. Most of the respective countries neither have a decommissioning policy nor the required expertise and funds to effectively implement a decommissioning project. The IAEA established the Research Reactor Decommissioning Demonstration Project (R{sup 2}D{sup 2}P) to help answer this need. It was agreed to involve the Philippine Research Reactor (PRR-1) as model reactor to demonstrate 'hands-on' experience as it is just starting the decommissioning process. Other facilities may be included in the project as they fit into the scope of R{sup 2}D{sup 2}P and complement to the PRR-1 decommissioning activities. The key outcome of the R{sup 2}D{sup 2}P will be the decommissioning of the PRR-1 reactor. On the way to this final goal the preparation of safety related documents (i.e., decommissioning plan, environmental impact assessment, safety analysis report, health and safety plan, cost estimate, etc.) and the licensing process as well as the actual dismantling activities could provide a model to other countries involved in the project. It is expected that the R{sup 2}D{sup 2}P would initiate activities related to planning and funding of decommissioning activities in the participating countries if that has not yet been done.

Leopando, Leonardo [Philippine Nuclear Research Institute, Quezon City (Philippines); Warnecke, Ernst [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

24

University Research  

Office of Science (SC) Website

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial CarbonArticles News News Homeuniversity-research/ The Office of Science

25

Sodium fast reactor safety and licensing research plan. Volume II.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Expert panels comprised of subject matter experts identified at the U.S. National Laboratories (SNL, ANL, INL, ORNL, LBL, and BNL), universities (University of Wisconsin and Ohio State University), international agencies (IRSN, CEA, JAEA, KAERI, and JRC-IE) and private consultation companies (Radiation Effects Consulting) were assembled to perform a gap analysis for sodium fast reactor licensing. Expert-opinion elicitation was performed to qualitatively assess the current state of sodium fast reactor technologies. Five independent gap analyses were performed resulting in the following topical reports: (1) Accident Initiators and Sequences (i.e., Initiators/Sequences Technology Gap Analysis), (2) Sodium Technology Phenomena (i.e., Advanced Burner Reactor Sodium Technology Gap Analysis), (3) Fuels and Materials (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Fuels and Materials: Research Needs), (4) Source Term Characterization (i.e., Advanced Sodium Fast Reactor Accident Source Terms: Research Needs), and (5) Computer Codes and Models (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Gaps Analysis of Computer Codes and Models for Accident Analysis and Reactor Safety). Volume II of the Sodium Research Plan consolidates the five gap analysis reports produced by each expert panel, wherein the importance of the identified phenomena and necessities of further experimental research and code development were addressed. The findings from these five reports comprised the basis for the analysis in Sodium Fast Reactor Research Plan Volume I.

Ludewig, H. (Brokhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Powers, D. A.; Hewson, John C.; LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Wright, A. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Phillips, J.; Zeyen, R. (Institute for Energy Petten, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France); Clement, B. (IRSN/DPAM.SEMIC Bt 702, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France); Garner, Frank (Radiation Effects Consulting, Richland, WA); Walters, Leon (Advanced Reactor Concepts, Los Alamos, NM); Wright, Steve; Ott, Larry J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Suo-Anttila, Ahti Jorma; Denning, Richard (Ohio State University, Columbus, OH); Ohshima, Hiroyuki (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Ohno, S. (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Miyhara, S. (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Yacout, Abdellatif (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Farmer, M. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Wade, D. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Grandy, C. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Schmidt, R.; Cahalen, J. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Olivier, Tara Jean; Budnitz, R. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA); Tobita, Yoshiharu (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Serre, Frederic (Centre d'%C3%94etudes nucl%C3%94eaires de Cadarache, Cea, France); Natesan, Ken (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Carbajo, Juan J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Jeong, Hae-Yong (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon, Korea); Wigeland, Roald (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Corradini, Michael (University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI); Thomas, Justin (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Wei, Tom (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Sofu, Tanju (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Flanagan, George F. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Bari, R. (Brokhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Porter D. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Lambert, J. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Hayes, S. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Sackett, J. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Denman, Matthew R.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

University Research Summaries  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Idaho National Laboratory published the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Geothermal Technologies Office 2001 University Research Summaries. 

27

University of Virginia Reactor Facility Decommissioning Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The University of Virginia Reactor Facility started accelerated decommissioning in 2002. The facility consists of two licensed reactors, the CAVALIER and the UVAR. This paper will describe the progress in 2002, remaining efforts and the unique organizational structure of the project team.

Ervin, P. F.; Lundberg, L. A.; Benneche, P. E.; Mulder, R. U.; Steva, D. P.

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

28

University Reactor Conversion Lessons Learned Workshop for Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this meeting were to capture the observations, insights, issues, concerns, and ideas of those involved in the Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center (TAMU NSC) TRIGA Reactor Conversion so that future efforts can be conducted with greater effectiveness, efficiency, and with fewer challenges. This workshop was held in conjunction with a similar workshop for the University of Florida Reactor Conversion. Some of the generic lessons from that workshop are included in this report for completeness.

Eric C. Woolstenhulme; Dana M. Meyer

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

University Reactor Conversion Lessons Learned Workshop for the University of Florida  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy’s (DOE) Idaho National Laboratory (INL), under its programmatic responsibility for managing the University Research Reactor Conversions, has completed the conversion of the reactor at the University of Florida. This project was successfully completed through an integrated and collaborative effort involving the INL, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), DOE (Headquarters and Field Office), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Universities, and contractors involved in analyses, fuel design and fabrication, and SNF shipping and disposition. With the work completed with these two universities, and in anticipation of other impending conversion projects, INL convened and engaged the project participants in a structured discussion to capture lessons learned. The objectives of this meeting were to capture the observations, insights, issues, concerns, and ideas of those involved in the reactor conversions so that future efforts can be conducted with greater effectiveness, efficiency, and with fewer challenges.

Eric C. Woolstenhulme; Dana M. Meyer

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Inspection methods for physical protection. Task II. Review of research reactor licensees' physical security practices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Security systems and security procedures for the AFRRI reactor, the University of Maryland TRIGA reactor, and the University of Virginia CAVALIER and UVAR reactors are described.

Not Available

1980-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

31

Environmental Management Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-out report · Transition to long-term surveillance and maintenance · Office of Environmental ManagementEnvironmental Management Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR) Project Completion John Sattler Federal Project Director Office of Environmental Management U.S. Department of Energy BNL

Homes, Christopher C.

32

Independent Confirmatory Survey Report for the University of Arizona Nuclear Reactor Laboratory, Tucson, Arizona  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The University of Arizona (University) research reactor is a TRIGA swimming pool type reactor designed by General Atomics and constructed at the University in 1958. The reactor first went into operation in December of 1958 under U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license R-52 until final shut down on May 18, 2010. Initial site characterization activities were conducted in February 2009 during ongoing reactor operations to assess the radiological status of the Nuclear Reactor Laboratory (NRL) excluding the reactor tank, associated components, and operating systems. Additional post-shutdown characterization activities were performed to complete characterization activities as well as verify assumptions made in the Decommissioning Plan (DP) that were based on a separate activation analysis (ESI 2009 and WMG 2009). Final status survey (FSS) activities began shortly after the issuance of the FSS plan in May 2011. The contractor completed measurement and sampling activities during the week of August 29, 2011.

Nick A. Altic

2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

33

Sterile Neutrino Search Using China Advanced Research Reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the feasibility of a sterile neutrino search at the China Advanced Research Reactor by measuring $\\bar {\

Gang Guo; Fang Han; Xiangdong Ji; Jianglai Liu; Zhaoxu Xi; Huanqiao Zhang

2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

34

Yale High Energy Physics Research: Precision Studies of Reactor Antineutrinos  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This reports presents experimental research at the intensity frontier of particle physics with particular focus on the study of reactor antineutrinos and the precision measurement of neutrino oscillations. The experimental neutrino physics group of Professor Heeger and Senior Scientist Band at Yale University has had leading responsibilities in the construction and operation of the Daya Bay Reactor Antineutrino Experiment and made critical contributions to the discovery of non-zero$\\theta_{13}$. Heeger and Band led the Daya Bay detector management team and are now overseeing the operations of the antineutrino detectors. Postdoctoral researchers and students in this group have made leading contributions to the Daya Bay analysis including the prediction of the reactor antineutrino flux and spectrum, the analysis of the oscillation signal, and the precision determination of the target mass yielding unprecedented precision in the relative detector uncertainty. Heeger's group is now leading an R\\&D effort towards a short-baseline oscillation experiment, called PROSPECT, at a US research reactor and the development of antineutrino detectors with advanced background discrimination.

Heeger, Karsten M [Yale University

2014-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

35

Status of reduced enrichment program for research reactors in Japan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The status of reduced enrichment program for research reactors in Japan will be reviewed. The reduced enrichment programs for the JRR-3M, JRR-4 and JMTR of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA, former name is Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI)) has been completed by 1999, and the reactors are being satisfactory operated using LEU fuels. The KUR of Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI) has been partially completed and is still in progress under the Joint Study Program with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The JRR-3M using LEU silicide fuel elements have done a functional test by the Japanese Government in 2000, and the property of the reactor core was satisfied. JAEA has established a 'U-Mo fuel ad hoc committee' and has been studying the U-Mo fuel installation plan by carefully observing the development situation of the U-Mo fuel. In KURRI, the KUR has terminated its operation using HEU fuel on February 2006. The HEU KUR spent fuel elements will be sent to the U.S. by March 2008. Licensing for the full core conversion of KUR to LEU fuel is under progress and the core conversion to LEU is expected to be completed in 2008. (author)

Unesaki, Hironobu [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Asashiro-nishi 2-1010, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Ohta, Kazunori; Inoue, Takeshi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakata Shirane 2-4, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

36

Reactor Safety Research: Semiannual report, January-June 1986: Reactor Safety Research Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories is conducting, under USNRC sponsorship, phenomenological research related to the safety of commercial nuclear power reactors. The research includes experiments to simulate the phenomenology of accident conditions and the development of analytical models, verified by experiment, which can be used to predict reactor and safety systems performance behavior under abnormal conditions. The objective of this work is to provide NRC requisite data bases and analytical methods to (1) identify and define safety issues, (2) understand the progression of risk-significant accident sequences, and (3) conduct safety assessments. The collective NRC-sponsored effort at Sandia National Laboratories is directed at enhancing the technology base supporting licensing decisions.

Not Available

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

NUCLEAR POWER AND RESEARCH REACTORS 1939 1942 1943 1944  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;#12;11 #12;2 NUCLEAR POWER AND RESEARCH REACTORS 1939 1942 1943 1944 Nuclear fission discovered 430 nuclear power reactors are operating in the world, and 103 nuclear power plants produce 20, naval reactors, and nuclear power plants. Oak Ridge experiments byArt Snell in 1944 showed that 10 tons

Pennycook, Steve

38

Annular Core Research Reactor - Critical to Science-Based Weapons...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Annular Core Research Reactor - Critical to Science-Based Weapons Design, Certification | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People...

39

University Turbine Systems Research Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary areas of university research were combustion, aerodynamics/heat transfer, and materials, with a few projects in the area of instrumentation, sensors and life (ISL).

Leitner, Robert; Wenglarz, Richard

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

40

Health physics research reactor reference dosimetry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reference neutron dosimetry is developed for the Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) in the new operational configuration directly above its storage pit. This operational change was physically made early in CY 1985. The new reference dosimetry considered in this document is referred to as the 1986 HPRR reference dosimetry and it replaces any and all HPRR reference documents or papers issued prior to 1986. Reference dosimetry is developed for the unshielded HPRR as well as for the reactor with each of five different shield types and configurations. The reference dosimetry is presented in terms of three different dose and six different dose equivalent reporting conventions. These reporting conventions cover most of those in current use by dosimetrists worldwide. In addition to the reference neutron dosimetry, this document contains other useful dosimetry-related data for the HPRR in its new configuration. These data include dose-distance measurements and calculations, gamma dose measurements, neutron-to-gamma ratios, ''9-to-3 inch'' ratios, threshold detector unit measurements, 56-group neutron energy spectra, sulfur fluence measurements, and details concerning HPRR shields. 26 refs., 11 figs., 31 tabs.

Sims, C.S.; Ragan, G.E.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university research reactor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

An Account of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Thirteen Research Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory has built and operated 13 nuclear reactors in its 66-year history. The first was the graphite reactor, the world's first operational nuclear reactor, which served as a plutonium production pilot plant during World War II. It was followed by two aqueous-homogeneous reactors and two red-hot molten-salt reactors that were parts of power-reactor development programs and by eight others designed for research and radioisotope production. One of the eight was an all-metal fast burst reactor used for health physics studies. All of the others were light-water cooled and moderated, including the famous swimming-pool reactor that was copied dozens of times around the world. Two of the reactors were hoisted 200 feet into the air to study the shielding needs of proposed nuclear-powered aircraft. The final reactor, and the only one still operating today, is the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) that was built particularly for the production of californium and other heavy elements. With the world's highest flux and recent upgrades that include the addition of a cold neutron source, the 44-year-old HFIR continues to be a valuable tool for research and isotope production, attracting some 500 scientific visitors and guests to Oak Ridge each year. This report describes all of the reactors and their histories.

Rosenthal, Murray Wilford [ORNL

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Fission neutron/gamma irradiation of Bacillus thuringiensis bacteria at the Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center Reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this research is to fully characterize the effectiveness of the Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center Reactor (TAMU NSCR) neutrons for bacterial sterilization, and to assess the secondary gamma flux produced when neutrons...

Hearnsberger, David Wayne

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

43

Advanced reactor safety research. Quarterly report, July-September 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, is conducting the Advanced Reactor Safety Research Program on behalf of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Sandia has been given the task to investigate seven major areas of interest which are intimately related to over-all NRC needs. These are: core debris behavior - inherent retention; containment analysis; elevated temperature design assessment; LMFBR accident delineation; advanced reactor core phenomenology; light water reactor (LWR) fuel damage phenomenology; and test and facility technology.

Not Available

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Photoneutron effects on pulse reactor kinetics for the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) is a swimming-pool type pulsed reactor that maintains an epithermal neutron flux and a nine-inch diameter central dry cavity. One of its uses is neutron and gamma-ray irradiation damage studies on electronic components under transient reactor power conditions. In analyzing the experimental results, careful attention must be paid to the kinetics associated with the reactor to ensure that the transient behavior of the electronic device is understood. Since the ACRR fuel maintains a substantial amount of beryllium, copious quantities of photoneutrons are produced that can significantly alter the expected behavior of the reactor power, especially following a reactor pulse. In order to understand these photoneutron effects on the reactor kinetics, the KIFLE transient reactor-analysis code was modified to include the photoneutron groups associated with the beryllium. The time-dependent behavior of the reactor power was analyzed for small and large pulses, assuming several initial conditions including following several pulses during the day, and following a long steady-state power run. The results indicate that, for these types of initial conditions, the photoneutron contribution to the reactor pulse energy can have a few to tens of percent effect.

Parma, Edward J., Jr.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

University Research Management: An Exploratory Literature Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

requirements of universities and funding programs as well aschanges in the university funding policies. A preliminary2005. Industry funding and university professors research

Schuetzenmeister, Falk

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

BGRR-039, Rev. 0 Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

........................................................................................................ 17 4.0 Waste Management 17 5.0 Lessons Learned 18 6.0 REFERENCES 19 Appendix A Action MemorandumBGRR-039, Rev. 0 Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor Decommissioning Project FINAL COMPLETION

47

Research and educational activities at the MIT Research Reactor : Fiscal year 1968  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A report of research and educational activities which utilized the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, five-megawatt, heavy water, research reactor during fiscal year 1968 has been prepared for administrative use at MIT ...

Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Nuclear Engineering; 7102 Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Research Reactor. Staff; U.S. Atomic Energy Commission

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Research universities for the 21st century  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The `public outcomes` from research universities are educated students and research that extends the frontiers of knowledge. Measures of these `public outcomes` are inadequate to permit either research or education consumers to select research universities based on quantitative performance data. Research universities annually spend over $20 billion on research; 60% of these funds are provided by Federal sources. Federal funding for university research has recently grown at an annual rate near 6% during a time period when other performers of Federal research have experienced real funding cuts. Ten universities receive about 25% of the Federal funds spent on university research. Numerous studies of US research universities are reporting storm clouds. Concerns include balancing research and teaching, the narrow focus of engineering education, college costs, continuing education, and public funding of foreign student education. The absence of research on the `public outcomes` from university research results in opinion, politics, and mythology forming the basis of too many decisions. Therefore, the authors recommend studies of other nations` research universities, studies of various economic models of university research, analysis of the peer review process and how well it identifies the most capable research practitioners and at what cost, and studies of research university ownership of intellectual property that can lead to increased `public outcomes` from publicly-funded research performed by research universities. They advocate two practices that could increase the `public outcomes` from university research. These are the development of science roadmaps that link science research to `public outcomes` and `public outcome` metrics. Changes in the university research culture and expanded use of the Internet could also lead to increased `public outcomes`. They recommend the use of tax incentives to encourage companies to develop research partnerships with research universities.

Gover, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Huray, P.G. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)] [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Reduced enrichment for research and test reactors: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The international effort to develop new research reactor fuel materials and designs based on the use of low-enriched uranium, instead of highly-enriched uranium, has made much progress during the eight years since its inception. To foster direct communication and exchange of ideas among the specialist in this area, the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, at the Argonne National Laboratory, sponsored this meeting as the ninth of a series which began in 1978. All previous meetings of this series are listed on the facing page. The focus of this meeting was on the LEU fuel demonstration which was in progress at the Oak Ridge Research (ORR) reactor, not far from where the meeting was held. The visit to the ORR, where a silicide LEU fuel with 4.8 g A/cm/sup 3/ was by then in routine use, illustrated how far work has progressed.

Not Available

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Reactor safety research programs. Quarterly report Apr-Jun 81  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) from April 1 through June 30, 1981, for the Division of Reactor Safety Research within the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision-making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Core thermal models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation, severe fuel damage, and postaccident coolability tests for the ESSOR reactor Super Sara Test Program, Ispra, Italy; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

Edler, S.K.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Report April- June 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest laboratory (PNL} from April1 through June 30, 1981, for the Division of Reactor Safety Research within the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision-making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Core thermal models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation, severe fuel damage, and postaccident coolability tests for the ESSOR reactor Super Sara Test Program, lspra, Italy; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory {INEL). These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

Edler, S. K.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

University of Florida--US Department of Energy 1994-1995 reactor sharing program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The grant support of $24,250 (1994-95?) was well used by the University of Florida as host institution to support various educational institutions in the use of UFTR Reactor. All users and uses were screened to assure the usage was for educational institutions eligible for participation in the Reactor Sharing Program; where research activities were involved, care was taken to assure the research was not funded by grants for contract funding from outside sources. Over 12 years, the program has been a key catalyst for renewing utilization of UFTR both by external users around the State of Florida and the Southeast and by various faculty members within the University of Florida. Tables provide basic information about the 1994-95 program and utilization of UFTR.

Vernetson, W.G.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Reactor Safety Research: Semiannual report, July-December 1986  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories is conducting, under USNRC sponsorship, phenomenological research related to the safety of commercial nuclear power reactors. The research includes experiments to simulate the phenomenology of the accident conditions and the development of analytical models, verified by experiment, which can be used to predict reactor and safety systems performance and behavior under abnormal conditions. The objective of this work is to provide NRC requisite data bases and analytical methods to (1) identify and define safety issues, (2) understand the progression of risk-significant accident sequences, and (3) conduct safety assessments. The collective NRC-sponsored effort at Sandia National Laboratories is directed at enhancing the tehcnology base supporting licensing decisions.

Not Available

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

RERTR 2009 (Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration's Office of Global Threat Reduction in cooperation with the China Atomic Energy Authority and International Atomic Energy Agency hosted the 'RERTR 2009 International Meeting on Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors.' The meeting was organized by Argonne National Laboratory, China Institute of Atomic Energy and Idaho National Laboratory and was held in Beijing, China from November 1-5, 2009. This was the 31st annual meeting in a series on the same general subject regarding the conversion of reactors within the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI). The Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program develops technology necessary to enable the conversion of civilian facilities using high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuels and targets.

Totev, T.; Stevens, J.; Kim, Y. S.; Hofman, G.; Matos, J.; Hanan, N.; Garner, P.; Dionne, B.; Olson, A.; Feldman, E.; Dunn, F.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Atomic Research Center; Inst. of Nuclear Physics; LLNL; INL; Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst.; Comisi?n Nacional de Energ?a At?mica; Nuclear Reactor Lab.; Inst. of Atomic Energy-Poland; AECL-Canada; Hungarian Academy of Sciences KFKI Atomic Energy Research Inst.; Japan Atomic Energy Agency; Nuclear Power Inst. of China; Kyoto Univ. Research Reactor Inst.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Report January - March 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory from January 1 through March 31, 1980, for the Division of Reactor Safety Research within the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Evaluation of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibilty of determining structural graphite strength, evaluating the feasibilty of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the remaining integrity of pressurized water reactor steam generator tubes where serviceinduced degradation has been indicated. Test assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include the loss-of-coolant accident simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; the fuel rod deformation and post-accident coolability tests for the ESSOR Test Reactor Program, Ispra, Italy; the blowdown and reflood tests in the test facility at Cadarache, France; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and the experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

Hagen, C. M

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Report July- September 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) from April 1 through June 30, 1980, for the Division of Reactor Safety Research within the Nuclear Regulatory Commission {NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining structural graphite strength, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the remaining integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Test assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation and postaccident coolability tests for the ESSOR Test Reactor Program, Ispra, Italy; blowdown and reflood tests in the test facility at Cadarache, France; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

Edler, S. K.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Report April -June 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) from April 1 through June 30, 1980, for the Division of Reactor Safety Research within the Nuclear Regulatory Commission {NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining structural graphite strength, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the remaining integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Test assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation and postaccident coolability tests for the ESSOR Test Reactor Program, Ispra, Italy; blowdown and reflood tests in the test facility at Cadarache, France; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

Edler, S. K.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Report October - December 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) from October 1 through December 31, 1980, for the Division of Reactor Safety Research within the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining structural graphite strength, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NOE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the remaining integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Test assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation and postaccident coolability tests for the ESSOR Test Reactor Program, Ispra, Italy; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

Edler, S K

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Reduced-Enrichment Research and Test Reactor Program: Environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal program objective and principal part of the proposed action is to improve the proliferation resistance of nuclear fuels used in research and test reactors by providing the technical means (through technical development, design, and testing) for reducing the uranium enrichment requirements of these fuels to substantially less than the 90 to 93% enrichment currently used. Operator acceptance of the reduced-enrichment-uranium (REU) fuel alternative will require minimizing of reactor performance reduction, fuel cycle cost increases, the number of new safety and licensing issues raised, and reactor and facility modifications. The other part of the proposed action is to assure the capability for commercial production and supply of REU fuel for use both in the US and abroad. The RERTR Program scope is limited to generic design studies, technical support to reactor operating organizations in preparing for conversions to REU fuels, fuel development, fuel demonstrations, and technical support for commercialization of REU fuels. This environmental assessment addresses the environmental consequences of RERTR Program activities and of specific conversions of typical reactors (the Ford Nuclear Reactor and one or two other to-be-designated demonstrations) to REU-fuel cycles, including domestic and international shipments of enriched uranium pertinent to the conduct of RERTR Program activities.

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Reduced enrichment for research and test reactors: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 15th annual Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) international meeting was organized by Ris{o} National Laboratory in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency and Argonne National Laboratory. The topics of the meeting were the following: National Programs, Fuel Fabrication, Licensing Aspects, States of Conversion, Fuel Testing, and Fuel Cycle. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university research reactor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA RESEARCH FOUNDATION, INC.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA RESEARCH FOUNDATION, INC. Compliance Reports For the Year Ended June 30, 2010 #12;UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA RESEARCH FOUNDATION, INC. Table of Contents Page Financial Statements Foundation, Inc. Athens, Georgia Compliance We have audited the University of Georgia Research Foundation

Hall, Daniel

62

UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA RESEARCH FOUNDATION, INC.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA RESEARCH FOUNDATION, INC. Compliance Reports For the Year Ended June 30, 2009 #12;UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA RESEARCH FOUNDATION, INC. Table of Contents Page Financial Statements of Directors University of Georgia Research Foundation, Inc. Athens, Georgia Compliance We have audited

Hall, Daniel

63

UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA RESEARCH FOUNDATION, INC.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA RESEARCH FOUNDATION, INC. Financial Statements for the year ended June 30, 2011 #12;2 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA RESEARCH FOUNDATION, INC. Contents Page Report of Independent Auditors of Directors University of Georgia Research Foundation, Inc. Athens, Georgia We have audited the accompanying

Arnold, Jonathan

64

UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA RESEARCH FOUNDATION, INC.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA RESEARCH FOUNDATION, INC. Compliance Reports For the Year Ended June 30, 2012 #12;UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA RESEARCH FOUNDATION, INC. Table of Contents Page Financial Statements Circular A-133 To the Board of Directors University of Georgia Research Foundation, Inc. Athens, Georgia

Hall, Daniel

65

UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA RESEARCH FOUNDATION, INC.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA RESEARCH FOUNDATION, INC. Financial Statements for the year ended June 30, 2009 #12;UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA RESEARCH FOUNDATION, INC. Contents Page Report of Independent Auditors 2 Standards 45 #12;Report of Independent Auditors Board of Directors University of Georgia Research Foundation

Hall, Daniel

66

UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA RESEARCH FOUNDATION, INC.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA RESEARCH FOUNDATION, INC. Compliance Reports For the Year Ended June 30, 2011 #12;UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA RESEARCH FOUNDATION, INC. Table of Contents Page Financial Statements of Georgia Research Foundation, Inc. Athens, Georgia Compliance We have audited the University of Georgia

Hall, Daniel

67

UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA RESEARCH FOUNDATION, INC.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA RESEARCH FOUNDATION, INC. Financial Statements for the year ended June 30, 2012 #12;UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA RESEARCH FOUNDATION, INC. Contents 2 Page Report of Independent Auditors of Directors University of Georgia Research Foundation, Inc. Athens, Georgia We have audited the accompanying

Arnold, Jonathan

68

Reactor core design and modeling of the MIT research reactor for conversion to LEU  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Feasibility design studies for conversion of the MIT Research Reactor (MITR) to LEU are described. Because the reactor fuel has a rhombic cross section, a special input processor was created in order to model the reactor in great detail with the REBUS-PC diffusion theory code, in 3D (triangular-z) geometry. Comparisons are made of fuel assembly power distributions and control blade worth vs. axial position, between REBUS-PC results and Monte Carlo predictions from the MCNP code. Results for the original HEU core at zero burnup are also compared with measurement. These two analysis methods showed remarkable agreement. Ongoing fuel cycle studies are summarized. A status report will be given as to results thus far that affect key design decisions. Future work plans and schedules to achieve completion of the conversion are presented. (author)

Newton, Thomas H. Jr. [Nuclear Reactor Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 138 Albany St., Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Olson, Arne P.; Stillman, John A. [RERTR Program, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

69

Technological Transfer from Research Nuclear Reactors to New Generation Nuclear Power Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this paper is the analysis of the technological transfer role in the nuclear field, with particular emphasis on nuclear reactors domain. The presentation is sustained by historical arguments. In this frame, it is very important to start with the achievements of the first nuclear systems, for instant those with natural uranium as fuel and heavy water as moderator, following in time through the history until the New Generation Nuclear Power Reactors.Starting with 1940, the accelerated development of the industry has implied the increase of the global demand for energy. In this respect, the nuclear energy could play an important role, being essentially an unlimited source of energy. However, the nuclear option faces the challenges of increasingly demanding safety requirements, economic competitiveness and public acceptance. Worldwide, a significant amount of experience has been accumulated during development, licensing, construction, and operation of nuclear power reactors. The experience gained is a strong basis for further improvements. Actually, the nuclear programs of many countries are addressing the development of advanced reactors, which are intended to have better economics, higher reliability, improved safety, and proliferation-resistant characteristics in order to overcome the current concerns about nuclear power. Advanced reactors, now under development, may help to meet the demand for energy power of both developed and developing countries as well as for district heating, desalination and for process heat.The paper gives historical examples that illustrate the steps pursued from first research nuclear reactors to present advanced power reactors. Emphasis was laid upon the fact that the progress is due to the great discoveries of the nuclear scientists using the technological transfer.

Radulescu, Laura ['Horia Hulubei' National Institute of Nuclear Physics and Engineering, PO BOX MG-6, Bucharest 077125 (Romania); Pavelescu, Margarit [Academy of Romanian Scientists, Bucharest (Romania)

2010-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

70

Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility: Addressing advanced nuclear materials research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), based at the Idaho National Laboratory in the United States, is supporting Department of Energy and industry research efforts to ensure the properties of materials in light water reactors are well understood. The ATR NSUF is providing this support through three main efforts: establishing unique infrastructure necessary to conduct research on highly radioactive materials, conducting research in conjunction with industry partners on life extension relevant topics, and providing training courses to encourage more U.S. researchers to understand and address LWR materials issues. In 2010 and 2011, several advanced instruments with capability focused on resolving nuclear material performance issues through analysis on the micro (10-6 m) to atomic (10-10 m) scales were installed primarily at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) in Idaho Falls, Idaho. These instruments included a local electrode atom probe (LEAP), a field-emission gun scanning transmission electron microscope (FEG-STEM), a focused ion beam (FIB) system, a Raman spectrometer, and an nanoindentor/atomic force microscope. Ongoing capability enhancements intended to support industry efforts include completion of two shielded, irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) test loops, the first of which will come online in early calendar year 2013, a pressurized and controlled chemistry water loop for the ATR center flux trap, and a dedicated facility intended to house post irradiation examination equipment. In addition to capability enhancements at the main site in Idaho, the ATR NSUF also welcomed two new partner facilities in 2011 and two new partner facilities in 2012; the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and associated hot cells and the University California Berkeley capabilities in irradiated materials analysis were added in 2011. In 2012, Purdue University’s Interaction of Materials with Particles and Components Testing (IMPACT) facility and the Pacific Northwest Nuclear Laboratory (PNNL) Radiochemistry Processing Laboratory (RPL) and PIE facilities were added. The ATR NSUF annually hosts a weeklong event called User’s Week in which students and faculty from universities as well as other interested parties from regulatory agencies or industry convene in Idaho Falls, Idaho to see presentations from ATR NSUF staff as well as select researchers from the materials research field. User’s week provides an overview of current materials research topics of interest and an opportunity for young researchers to understand the process of performing work through ATR NSUF. Additionally, to increase the number of researchers engaged in LWR materials issues, a series of workshops are in progress to introduce research staff to stress corrosion cracking, zirconium alloy degradation, and uranium dioxide degradation during in-reactor use.

John Jackson; Todd Allen; Frances Marshall; Jim Cole

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Design and optimization of a high thermal flux research reactor via Kriging-based algorithm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In response to increasing demands for the services of research reactors, a 5 MW LEU-fueled research reactor core is developed and optimized to provide high thermal flux within specified limits upon thermal hydraulic ...

Kempf, Stephanie Anne

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Friction pressure drop measurements and flow distribution analysis for LEU conversion study of MIT Research Reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The MIT Nuclear Research Reactor (MITR) is the only research reactor in the United States that utilizes plate-type fuel elements with longitudinal fins to augment heat transfer. Recent studies on the conversion to low-enriched ...

Wong, Susanna Yuen-Ting

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

E-Print Network 3.0 - annular core research reactor Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

data buse. m a x . RO char.ioKji RESEARCH REACTORS. U ;I.I-I 1 ..-i-.' 2 -lltM. This profile... retrieves all references about research reactors. Normally a query consisting of...

74

Indiana University Collaborative Research Grants 2012 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to faculty on all Indiana University campuses. Funding decisions will result from a competitive peer review University's New Frontiers seed funding program. Eligibility: All faculty and staff whose appointments allowIndiana University Collaborative Research Grants 2012 ­ 2013 Indiana University is pleased

Menczer, Filippo

75

UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA RESEARCH FOUNDATION, INC.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA RESEARCH FOUNDATION, INC. Financial Statements for the year ended June 30, 2010 #12;UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA RESEARCH FOUNDATION, INC. Contents Page Report of Independent Auditors 2 of Georgia Research Foundation, Inc. Athens, Georgia We have audited the accompanying statement of net assets

Hall, Daniel

76

Innovative Research Universities Australia Response to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Innovative Research Universities Australia Response to DEST Knowledge Transfer Project Developing Introduction This response builds on the IRU Australia's earlier discussion paper The Third Mission Australia and overseas, this paper contends that engagement1 activity between universities

77

Nine Universities Begin Critical Turbine Systems Research  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy announced the selection of ten projects at nine universities under the Office of Fossil Energy’s University Turbine Systems Research Program.

78

Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative: High Operating...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

University Research Initiative (MURI) to develop high-operating temperature heat-transfer fluids for concentrating solar power (CSP) applications. The following...

79

Applications from Universities and Other Research Institutions...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Policies EFRCs FOA Applications from Universities and Other Research Institutions Construction Review EPSCoR DOE Office of Science Graduate Fellowship (DOE SCGF) External link...

80

UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN Strategic Research Plan Summary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN Strategic Research Plan Summary Canada ResearchChairs Program, Canada provinceofSaskatchewan,inits academic programs and the qualityof the learning environment of Saskatchewan has established an international reputation for achievement in a diversity of disciplines

Patterson, William P.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university research reactor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN Strategic Research Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN Strategic Research Plan Canada ResearchChairs Program, Canada Excellence provinceofSaskatchewan,inits academic programs and the qualityof the learning environment of Saskatchewan has established an international reputation for achievement in a diversity of disciplines

Patterson, William P.

82

University Coal Research Program 2013 Selections  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Since the University Coal Research Program's inception in 1979, more than 728 research projects have been funded. With a combined value in excess of $132 million, these projects have provided new...

83

Advanced Reactor Safety Research Division. Quarterly progress report, January 1-March 31, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Reactor Safety Research Programs quarterly progress report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the USNRC Division of Reactor Safety Research. The projects reported each quarter are the following: HTGR Safety Evaluation, SSC Code Development, LMFBR Safety Experiments, and Fast Reactor Safety Code Validation.

Agrawal, A.K.; Cerbone, R.J.; Sastre, C.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Advanced Reactor Safety Research Division quarterly progress report, January 1-March 31, 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Progress Report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the USNRC Division of Reactor Safety Research. The projects reported each quarter are the following: HTGR Safety Evaluation, SSC Code Development, LMFBR Safety Experiments, and Fast Reactor Safety Code Validation.

Cerbone, R.J.; Ginsberg, T.; Guppy, J.G.; Sastre, C.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Advanced Reactor Safety Research Division. Quarterly progress report, July 1-September 30, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Progress Report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the USNRC Division of Reactor Safety Research. The projects reported each quarter are the following: HTGR Safety Evaluation, SSC Code Development, LMFBR Safety Experiments, and Fast Reactor Safety Code Validation.

Ramano, A.J. (comp.)

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Advanced Reactor Safety Research Division quarterly progress report, 1 October-31 December 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Reactor Safety Research Programs quarterly progress report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the USNRC Division of Reactor Safety Research. The projects reported each quarter are the following: HTGR Safety Evaluation, LMFBR Safety Experiments, SSC Code Development, and Fast Reactor Safety Code Validation.

Cerbone, R.J.; Ginsberg, T.; Guppy, J.G.; Sastre, C.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Advanced Reactor Safety Research Division. Quarterly progress report, July 1-September 30, 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Progress Report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the USNRC Division of Reactor Safety Research. The projects reported each quarter are the following: HTGR Safety Evaluation, SSC Code Development, LMFBR Safety Experiments, and Fast Reactor Safety Code Validation.

Romano, A.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Advanced Reactor Safety Research Division. Quarterly progress report, April 1-June 30, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Progress Report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the USNRC Division of Reactor Safety Research. The projects reported each quarter are the following: HTGR safety evaluation, SSC Code Development, LMFBR Safety Experiments, and Fast Reactor Safety Code Validation.

Romano, A.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Public Vs. Private Good Research at Land-Grant Universities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

availability of public funding for university research. Inresearch the university must obtain funding. The universityavailability of public funding for university research. In

Rausser, Gordon C.; Simon, Leo K.; Stevens, Reid

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Advanced sodium fast reactor accident source terms : research needs.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An expert opinion elicitation has been used to evaluate phenomena that could affect releases of radionuclides during accidents at sodium-cooled fast reactors. The intent was to identify research needed to develop a mechanistic model of radionuclide release for licensing and risk assessment purposes. Experts from the USA, France, the European Union, and Japan identified phenomena that could affect the release of radionuclides under hypothesized accident conditions. They qualitatively evaluated the importance of these phenomena and the need for additional experimental research. The experts identified seven phenomena that are of high importance and have a high need for additional experimental research: High temperature release of radionuclides from fuel during an energetic eventEnergetic interactions between molten reactor fuel and sodium coolant and associated transfer of radionuclides from the fuel to the coolantEntrainment of fuel and sodium bond material during the depressurization of a fuel rod with breached claddingRates of radionuclide leaching from fuel by liquid sodiumSurface enrichment of sodium pools by dissolved and suspended radionuclidesThermal decomposition of sodium iodide in the containment atmosphereReactions of iodine species in the containment to form volatile organic iodides. Other issues of high importance were identified that might merit further research as development of the mechanistic model of radionuclide release progressed.

Powers, Dana Auburn; Clement, Bernard [IRSN/DPAM.SEMIC Bt 702, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France; Denning, Richard [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH; Ohno, Shuji [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan; Zeyen, Roland [Institute for Energy Petten, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Research at the University of Bayreuth Research Priorities // Projects // Achievements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Economics Research Centre for German and European Energy Law (FER) Institute of Medical Care Management picture: The "Solar Sphere" at the School of Engineering (F. Lechner, 1999) #12;Research at the University Centre for German and European Food Law Research Centre of Food Quality (ForN) Research Centre of Capital

Ullmann, G. Matthias

92

Eastern Europe Research Reactor Initiative nuclear education and training courses - Current activities and future challenges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Eastern Europe Research Reactor Initiative was established in January 2008 to enhance cooperation between the Research Reactors in Eastern Europe. It covers three areas of research reactor utilisation: irradiation of materials and fuel, radioisotope production, neutron beam experiments, education and training. In the field of education and training an EERRI training course was developed. The training programme has been elaborated with the purpose to assist IAEA Member States, which consider building a research reactor (RR) as a first step to develop nuclear competence and infrastructure in the Country. The major strength of the reactor is utilisation of three different research reactors and a lot of practical exercises. Due to high level of adaptability, the course can be tailored to specific needs of institutions with limited or no access to research reactors. (authors)

Snoj, L. [Josef Stefan Inst., Jamova cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Sklenka, L.; Rataj, J. [Dept. of Nuclear Reactor, Czech Technical Univ. in Prague, V Holesovickach 2, 180 00 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Boeck, H. [Vienna Univ. of Technology/Atominstitut, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Vienna (Austria)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Advanced reactor safety research quarterly report, January-March 1982. Vol. 21  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Information is presented concerning core debris behavior (inherent retention); containment analysis; elevated temperature design assessment; Clinch River risk assessment study; advanced reactor core phenomenology; LWR damaged fuel relocation phenomenology; and Annular Core Research Reactor facilities and operation.

Not Available

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

The University of Maryland Energy Research Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gap of In1-xGaxN to solar spectrum ENERGY EFFICIENCY The university's Center for Environmental EnergyThe University of Maryland Energy Research Center Join Us in Building a Sustainable Energy Future · Provide energy technology and policy leadership to the state, the nation, and the world. The University

Shapiro, Benjamin

95

UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA RESEARCH FOUNDATION, INC.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA RESEARCH FOUNDATION, INC. COMPLIANCE REPORTS For the Year Ended June 30, 2013 #12;UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA RESEARCH FOUNDATION, INC. TABLE OF CONTENTS Financial Statements Foundation, Inc. Athens, Georgia Report on Compliance for Each Major Federal Program We have audited

Arnold, Jonathan

96

Role of research reactors in training of NPP personnel with special focus on training reactor VR-1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research reactors play an important role in providing key personnel of nuclear power plants a hands-on experience from operation and experiments at nuclear facilities. Training of NPP (Nuclear Power Plant) staff is usually deeply theoretical with an extensive utilisation of simulators and computer visualisation. But a direct sensing of the reactor response to various actions can only improve the personnel awareness of important aspects of reactor operation. Training Reactor VR-1 and its utilization for training of NPP operators and other professionals from Czech Republic and Slovakia is described. Typical experimental exercises and good practices in organization of a training program are demonstrated. (authors)

Sklenka, L.; Rataj, J.; Frybort, J.; Huml, O. [Dept. of Nuclear Reactors, Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical Univ. in Prague, V Holesovickach 2, Prague 8, 180 00 (Czech Republic)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Research in nondestructive evaluation techniques for nuclear reactor concrete structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) Pathway of the Department of Energy's Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is to develop the scientific basis for understanding and predicting longterm environmental degradation behavior of material in nuclear power plants and to provide data and methods to assess the performance of systems, structures, and components (SSCs) essential to safe and sustained nuclear power plant operations. The understanding of aging-related phenomena and their impacts on SSCs is expected to be a significant issue for any nuclear power plant planning for long-term operations (i.e. service beyond the initial license renewal period). Management of those phenomena and their impacts during long-term operations can be better enable by improved methods and techniques for detection, monitoring, and prediction of SSC degradation. The MAaD Pathway R and D Roadmap for Concrete, 'Light Water Reactor Sustainability Nondestructive Evaluation for Concrete Research and Development Roadmap', focused initial research efforts on understanding the recent concrete issues at nuclear power plants and identifying the availability of concrete samples for NDE techniques evaluation and testing. [1] An overview of the research performed by ORNL in these two areas is presented here.

Clayton, Dwight; Smith, Cyrus [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

98

UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD FAU Research Facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Harriet L.Wilkes Honors College FAU Research Facility Expansion Satellite Utility Plant Chiller Lift

Fernandez, Eduardo

99

University Policy No.: RH8100 Classification: Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 University Policy No.: RH8100 Classification: Research Approving Authority: Board of Governors RESEARCH POLICY Effective Date: January 2010 Supersedes: June 2002 Last Editorial Change: Mandated Review: January 2017 PURPOSE 1.00 The purpose of this policy is to set out the manner in which research

Victoria, University of

100

Decommissioning of German Research Reactors Under the Governance of the Federal Ministry of Education and Research - 12154  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1956, nuclear research and development (R and D) in Germany has been supported by the Federal Government. The goal was to help German industry to become competitive in all fields of nuclear technology. National research centers were established and demonstration plants were built. In the meantime, all these facilities were shut down and are now in a state of decommissioning and dismantling (D and D). Meanwhile, Germany is one of the leading countries in the world in the field of D and D. Two big demonstration plants, the Niederaichbach Nuclear Power Plant (KKN) a heavy-water cooled pressure tube reactor with carbon-dioxide cooling and the Karlstein Superheated Steam Reactor (HDR) a boiling light water reactor with a thermal power of 100 MW, are totally dismantled and 'green field' is reached. Another big project was finished in 2008. The Forschungs-Reaktor Juelich 1 (FRJ1), a research reactor with a thermal power of 10 MW was completely dismantled and in September 2008 an oak tree was planted on a green field at the site, where the FRJ1 was standing before. This is another example for German success in the field of D and D. Within these projects a lot of new solutions and innovative techniques were tested, which were developed at German universities and in small and medium sized companies mostly funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF). Some examples are underwater-cutting technologies like plasma arc cutting and contact arc metal cutting. This clearly shows that research on the field of D and D is important for the future. Moreover, these research activities are important to save the know-how in nuclear engineering in Germany and will enable enterprises to compete on the increasing market of D and D services. The author assumes that an efficient decommissioning of nuclear installations will help stabilize the credibility of nuclear energy. Some critics of nuclear energy are insisting that a return to 'green field sites' is not possible. The successful completion of two big D and D projects (HDR and KKN), which reached green field conditions, are showing quite the contrary. Moreover, research on D and D technologies offers the possibility to educate students on a field of nuclear technology, which will be very important in the future. In these days D and D companies are seeking for a lot of young engineers and this will not change in the coming years. (authors)

Weigl, M. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Projekttraeger Karlsruhe (PTKA-WTE), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university research reactor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

E-Print Network 3.0 - application research reactor Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Technologies 28 Research Aptitude Problem 1 Scavenging of aerosol particles by ice crystals Summary: strategies that would be required to operate these reactor systems....

102

2014 University Turbine Systems Research Workshop  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

University Turbine Systems Research Workshop October 21-24, 2014 Accommodations Union Club Hotel 101 N. Grant Street West Lafayette, IN 47907 The Union Club Hotel will be the...

103

The RERTR (Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor) program: A progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The progress of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program is described. After a brief summary of the results which the RERTR Program, in collaboration with its many international partners, had achieved by the end of 1985, the activities, results, and new developments which occurred in 1986 are reviewed. The second miniplate series, concentrating on U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al and U/sub 3/Si-Al fuels, was expanded and its irradiation continued. Postirradiation examinations of several of these miniplates and of six previously irradiated U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al full-size elements were completed with excellent results. The whole-core ORR demonstration with U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al fuel at 4.8 g U/cm/sup 3/ is well under way and due for completion before the end of 1987. DOE removed an important barrier to conversions by announcing that the new LEU fuels will be accepted for reprocessing. New DOE prices for enrichment and reprocessing services were calculated to have minimal effect on HEU reactors, and to reduce by about 8 to 10% the total fuel cycle costs of LEU reactors. New program activities include preliminary feasibility studies of LEU use in DOE reactors, evaluation of the feasibility to use LEU targets for the production of fission-product /sup 99/Mo, and responsibility for coordinating safety evaluations related to LEU conversions of US university reactors, as required by NRC. Achievement of the final program goals is projected for 1990. This progress could not have been achieved without close international cooperation, whose continuation and intensification are essential to the achievement of the ultimate goals of the RERTR Program.

Travelli, A.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

The Intense Slow Positron Beam Facility at the NC State University PULSTAR Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An intense slow positron beam is in its early stages of operation at the 1-MW open-pool PULSTAR research reactor at North Carolina State University. The positron beam line is installed in a beam port that has a 30-cmx30-cm cross sectional view of the core. The positrons are created in a tungsten converter/moderator by pair-production using gamma rays produced in the reactor core and by neutron capture reactions in cadmium cladding surrounding the tungsten. Upon moderation, slow ({approx}3 eV) positrons that are emitted from the moderator are electrostatically extracted, focused and magnetically guided until they exit the reactor biological shield with 1-keV energy, approximately 3-cm beam diameter and an intensity exceeding 6x10{sup 8} positrons per second. A magnetic beam switch and transport system has been installed and tested that directs the beam into one of two spectrometers. The spectrometers are designed to implement state-of-the-art PALS and DBS techniques to perform positron and positronium annihilation studies of nanophases in matter.

Hawari, Ayman I.; Moxom, Jeremy; Hathaway, Alfred G.; Brown, Benjamin [Nuclear Engineering/Nuclear Reactor Program, North Carolina State University, P.O. Box 7909, Raleigh NC 27695 (United States); Gidley, David W.; Vallery, Richard [Physics Department, University of Michigan, 450 Church Street, Ann Arbor MI 48109 (United States); Xu, Jun [Chemical and Analytical Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831 (United States)

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

105

RESEARCH AT THE UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fundamental scholarship, discovery and multidisciplinary cultural, social and technological innovation. OneEXCELLENCE INNOVATION LEADERSHIP RESEARCH AT THE UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO REPORT TO GOVERNING COUNCIL-R) at the University of Toronto. Changing and challenging times call for innovation. To this end, the OVP-R has taken

Sokolowski, Marla

106

Northwestern University Office for Research Safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Northwestern University Office for Research Safety ISIS User Manual ISIS (pronounced -ss) is Northwestern University's Integrated Safety Information System. ISIS is the on-line web application by which PIs submit applications and registrations for review. ISIS also builds a laboratory's Safety Profile

Shull, Kenneth R.

107

Statistical Assistant Research Data Centre, Queens University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

JOB OFFER Statistical Assistant Research Data Centre, Queens University Position: Statistical Assistant at the RDC, Queens University Classification: Statistics Canada term part-time CR-04 Salary: $ 44, etc.) - Provide basic assistance on the use of the computer network and statistical software

Graham, Nick

108

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst 160 Governors Drive Research Laboratory (RERL) at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst in the course of performing work 14, 2008 Renewable Energy Research Laboratory Page 1 University of Massachusetts, Amherst Amherst, MA

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

109

PHYSICS AND SAFETY ANALYSIS FOR THE NIST RESEARCH REACTOR.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detailed reactor physics and safety analyses have been performed for the 20 MW D{sub 2}O moderated research reactor (NBSR) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The analyses provide an update to the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) and employ state-of-the-art calculational methods. Three-dimensional Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport calculations were performed with the MCNP code to determine the safety parameters for the NBSR. The core depletion and determination of the fuel compositions were performed with MONTEBURNS. MCNP calculations were performed to determine the beginning, middle, and end-of-cycle power distributions, moderator temperature coefficient, and shim safety arm, beam tube and void reactivity worths. The calculational model included a plate-by-plate description of each fuel assembly, axial mid-plane water gap, beam tubes and the tubular geometry of the shim safety arms. The time-dependent analysis of the primary loop was determined with a RELAP5 transient analysis model that includes the pump, heat exchanger, fuel element geometry, and flow channels for both the six inner and twenty-four outer fuel elements. The statistical analysis used to assure protection from critical heat flux (CHF) was performed using a Monte Carlo simulation of the uncertainties contributing to the CHF calculation. The power distributions used to determine the local fuel conditions and margin to CHF were determined with MCNP. Evaluations were performed for the following accidents: (1) the control rod withdrawal startup accident, (2) the maximum reactivity insertion accident, (3) loss-of-flow resulting from loss of electrical power, (4) loss-of-flow resulting from a primary pump seizure, (5) loss-of-flow resulting from inadvertent throttling of a flow control valve, (6) loss-of-flow resulting from failure of both shutdown cooling pumps and (7) misloading of a fuel element. In both the startup and maximum reactivity insertion accidents, the core power transient is terminated by a reactor trip at 26 MW. The calculations show that both the peak reactor power and the excursion energy depend on the negative reactivity insertion from reactor trip. In one of the loss-of-flow accidents offsite electrical power is assumed lost to the three operating primary pumps. A slightly delayed reactor scram is initiated as a result of primary flow coast down. The RELAP5 results indicate that there is adequate margin to CHF and no damage to the fuel will occur, because of the momentum of the coolant flowing through the fuel channels and the negative scram reactivity insertion. For both the primary pump seizure and inadvertent throttling of a flow control valve, the RELAP5 analyses indicate that the reduction in power following the trip is sufficient to ensure that there is adequate margin to CHF and that the fuel cladding does not fail. The analysis of the loss-of-flow accident in the extremely unlikely case where both shutdown pumps fail, shows that the cooling provided by the D{sub 2}O is sufficient to ensure the cladding does not fail. The power distributions were examined for a set of fuel misloadings in which a fresh fuel element is moved from a peripheral low-reactivity location to a central high-reactivity location. The calculations show that there is adequate margin to CHF and the cladding does not fail. An additional analysis was performed to simulate the operation at low power (500 kW) without forced flow cooling. The result indicates that natural convection cooling is adequate for operation of the NBSR at a power level of 500 kW.

CHENG,L.HANSON,A.DIAMOND,D.XU,J.CAREW,J.RORER,D.

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

110

Sodium fast reactor fuels and materials : research needs.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An expert panel was assembled to identify gaps in fuels and materials research prior to licensing sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR) design. The expert panel considered both metal and oxide fuels, various cladding and duct materials, structural materials, fuel performance codes, fabrication capability and records, and transient behavior of fuel types. A methodology was developed to rate the relative importance of phenomena and properties both as to importance to a regulatory body and the maturity of the technology base. The technology base for fuels and cladding was divided into three regimes: information of high maturity under conservative operating conditions, information of low maturity under more aggressive operating conditions, and future design expectations where meager data exist.

Denman, Matthew R.; Porter, Douglas (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Art (Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL); Lambert, John (Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL); Hayes, Steven (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Natesan, Ken (Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL); Ott, Larry J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Garner, Frank (Radiation Effects Consulting. Richland, WA); Walters, Leon (Advanced Reactor Concepts, Idaho Falls, ID); Yacout, Abdellatif (Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Overview of the vanadium alloy researches for fusion reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various vanadium alloys are being developed as one of the options of structural materials for advanced blankets of fusion reactors. Besides the large heats made in Japan and US, a 110 kg V-4Cr-4Ti ingot was produced in RF recently. Development of advanced vanadium alloys were also carried out, such as the ultra-fine grain alloys containing Y and that with W and TiC strengthening particles. Investigations were performed for further widening of temperature and mechanical application windows of the reference V-4Cr-4Ti alloy by plastic deformation and heat treatments. Neutron irradiation effects combined with lithium corrosion were studied. In addition, some efforts are oriented to issues related to DEMO blanket manufacturing technology, such as W coating for first wall protection and the welding technologies to fabricate large vanadium component. This paper highlights the recent activities of these vanadium alloy researches, discusses the critical issues and summarizes the remaining issues to be addressed.

Chen, J. M.; Chernov, V. M.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Muroga, Takeo

2011-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

112

Advanced reactor safety research, quarterly report, October-December 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Information is presented concerning advanced reactor core phenomenology; light water reactor severe core damage phenomenology; core debris behavior; containment analysis; elevated temperature design assessment; LMFBR accident delineation; and test and facility technology.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Sodium fast reactor safety and licensing research plan. Volume I.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report proposes potential research priorities for the Department of Energy (DOE) with the intent of improving the licensability of the Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR). In support of this project, five panels were tasked with identifying potential safety-related gaps in available information, data, and models needed to support the licensing of a SFR. The areas examined were sodium technology, accident sequences and initiators, source term characterization, codes and methods, and fuels and materials. It is the intent of this report to utilize a structured and transparent process that incorporates feedback from all interested stakeholders to suggest future funding priorities for the SFR research and development. While numerous gaps were identified, two cross-cutting gaps related to knowledge preservation were agreed upon by all panels and should be addressed in the near future. The first gap is a need to re-evaluate the current procedures for removing the Applied Technology designation from old documents. The second cross-cutting gap is the need for a robust Knowledge Management and Preservation system in all SFR research areas. Closure of these and the other identified gaps will require both a reprioritization of funding within DOE as well as a re-evaluation of existing bureaucratic procedures within the DOE associated with Applied Technology and Knowledge Management.

Sofu, Tanju (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Bari, R. (Brokhaven National Laboratory Upton, NY); Wigeland, Roald (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Denman, Matthew R.; Flanagan, George F. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst 160 Governors Drive version 1.1 #12;September 24, 2004 Renewable Energy Research Laboratory Page 1 University of Massachusetts

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

115

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst 160 Governors Drive. Rogers April 4, 2005 #12;April 4, 2005 Renewable Energy Research Laboratory Page 1 University

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

116

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst 160 Governors Drive Anthony L. Rogers April 4, 2005 #12;April 4, 2005 Renewable Energy Research Laboratory Page 1 University

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

117

FACT SHEET: Clean Coal University Research Awards and Project...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

FACT SHEET: Clean Coal University Research Awards and Project Descriptions FACT SHEET: Clean Coal University Research Awards and Project Descriptions As part of President Obama's...

118

The University of Maryland Energy Research Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The University of Maryland Energy Research Center Join Us in Building a Sustainable Energy Future ThE NEEd Our quality of life, standard of living and national security depend on energy. A strong, balanced together the research capabilities necessary to create a sustainable energy future, with faculty expertise

Rubloff, Gary W.

119

University Research Consortium annual review meeting program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This brochure presents the program for the first annual review meeting of the University Research Consortium (URC) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). INEL is a multiprogram laboratory with a distinctive role in applied engineering. It also conducts basic science research and development, and complex facility operations. The URC program consists of a portfolio of research projects funded by INEL and conducted at universities in the United States. In this program, summaries and participant lists for each project are presented as received from the principal investigators.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Wayne State University Research Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to potential financial conflict of interest and/or commitment. This policy is designed (a) to guide employees expectation that the design, conduct or reporting of funded research or cooperative agreements with companies employees are committed to conducting themselves with the highest standards of integrity and ethics

Finley Jr., Russell L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university research reactor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

PHYSICS AND SAFETY ANALYSIS FOR THE NIST RESEARCH REACTOR.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detailed reactor physics and safety analyses have been performed for the 20 MW D{sub 2}O moderated research reactor (NBSR) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The analyses provide an update to the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) and employ state-of-the-art calculational methods. Three-dimensional MCNP Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport calculations were performed to determine the safety parameters for the NBSR. The core depletion and determination of the fuel compositions were performed with MONTEBURNS. MCNP calculations were performed to determine the beginning, middle, and end-of-cycle power distributions, moderator temperature coefficient, and shim arm, beam tube and void reactivity worths. The calculational model included a plate-by-plate description of each fuel assembly, axial mid-plane water gap, beam tubes and the tubular geometry of the shim arms. The time-dependent analysis of the primary loop was determined with a RELAP5 transient analysis model including the pump, heat exchanger, fuel element geometry, and flow channels for both the six inner and twenty-four outer fuel elements. The statistical analysis used to assure protection from critical heat flux (CHF) was performed using a Monte Carlo simulation of the uncertainties contributing to the CHF calculation. The power distributions used to determine the local fuel conditions and margin to CHF were determined with MCNP. Evaluations were performed for the following accidents: (1) the control rod withdrawal startup accident, (2) the maximum reactivity insertion accident, (3) loss-of-flow resulting from loss of electrical power, (4) loss-of-flow resulting from a primary pump seizure, (5) loss-of-flow resulting from inadvertent throttling of a flow control valve, (6) loss-of-flow resulting from failure of both shutdown cooling pumps and (7) misloading of a fuel element. In both the startup and maximum reactivity insertion accidents, the core power transient is terminated by a reactor trip at 30 MW. The calculations show that both the peak reactor power and the excursion energy depend on the negative reactivity insertion from reactor trip. Two cases were considered for loss of electrical power. In the first case offsite power is lost, resulting in an immediate scram caused by loss of power to the control rod system. In the second case power is lost to only the three operating primary pumps, resulting in a slightly delayed scram when loss-of-flow is detected as the pumps coast down. In both instances, RELAP5 results indicate that there is adequate margin to CHF and no damage to the fuel will occur, because of the momentum of the coolant flowing through the fuel channels and the negative scram reactivity insertion. For both the primary pump seizure and inadvertent throttling of a flow control valve, the RELAP5 analyses indicate that the reduction in power following the trip is sufficient to ensure that there is adequate margin to CHF and the fuel cladding does not fail. The analysis of the loss-of-flow accident in the extremely unlikely case where both shutdown pumps fail shows that the cooling provided by the D{sub 2}O is sufficient to ensure the cladding does not fail. The power distributions were examined for a set of fuel misloadings in which a fresh fuel element is moved from a peripheral low-reactivity location to a central high-reactivity location. The calculations show that there is adequate margin to CHF and the cladding does not fail.

CAREW,J.CHENG,L.HANSON,AXU,J.RORER,D.DIAMOND,D.

2003-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

122

Water Reactor Safety Research Division quarterly progress report, January 1-March 31, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Water Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the USNRC Division of Reactor Safety Research. The projects reported each quarter are the following: LWR Thermal Hydraulic Development, Advanced Code Evaluation, TRAC Code Assessment, and Stress Corrosion Cracking of PWR Steam Generator Tubing.

Romano, A.J. (comp.)

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Water Reactor Safety Research Division. Quarterly progress report, April 1-June 30, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Water Reactor Safety Research Programs quarterly report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the USNRC Division of Reactor Safety Research. The projects reported each quarter are the following: LWR Thermal Hydraulic Development, Advanced Code Evlauation, TRAC Code Assessment, and Stress Corrosion Cracking of PWR Steam Generator Tubing.

Abuaf, N.; Levine, M.M.; Saha, P.; van Rooyen, D.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Water Reactor Safety Research Division. Quarterly progress report, October 1-December 31, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Water Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the USNRC Division of Reactor Safety Research. The projects reported each quarter are the following: Stress Corrosion Cracking of PWR Steam Generator Tubing, Advanced Code Evaluation, Simulator Improvement Program, and LWR Assessment and Application.

Cerbone, R.J.; Saha, P.; van Rooyen, D.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

The environmental impact of radioactive effluents from a university reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 1972), For gaseous releases, the area surrounding the reactor was divided into sixteen 22. 5- " gree sectors. Each sector was further divided into ten sections with boundaries at one mile intervals from the reactor, to a distance of 5 miles, another...

Hamiter, Floyd Raymond

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Development and transfer of fuel fabrication and utilization technology for research reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Approximately 300 research reactors supplied with US-enriched uranium are currently in operation in about 40 countries, with a variety of types, sizes, experiment capabilities and applications. Despite the usefulness and popularity of research reactors, relatively few innovations in their core design have been made in the last fifteen years. The main reason can be better understood by reviewing briefly the history of research reactor fuel technology and enrichment levels. Stringent requirements on the enrichment of the uranium to be used in research reactors were considered and a program was launched to assist research reactors in continuing their operation with the new requirements and with minimum penalties. The goal of the new program, the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, is to develop the technical means to utilize LEU instead of HEU in research reactors without significant penalties in experiment performance, operating costs, reactor modifications, and safety characteristics. This paper reviews briefly the RERTR Program activities with special emphasis on the technology transfer aspects of interest to this conference.

Travelli, A.; Domagala, R.F.; Matos, J.E.; Snelgrove, J.L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Annular Core Research Reactor at Sandia National Laboratories...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

at Sandia National Laboratories achieves 10,000th reactor pulse operation | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the...

128

U.S. Department of Energy Program of International Technical Cooperation for Research Reactor Utilization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) has initiated collaborations with the national nuclear authorities of Egypt, Peru, and Romania for the purpose of advancing the commercial potential and utilization of their respective research reactors. Under its Office of International Safeguards ''Sister Laboratory'' program, DOE/NNSA has undertaken numerous technical collaborations over the past decade intended to promote peaceful applications of nuclear technology. Among these has been technical assistance in research reactor applications, such as neutron activation analysis, nuclear analysis, reactor physics, and medical radioisotope production. The current collaborations are intended to provide the subject countries with a methodology for greater commercialization of research reactor products and services. Our primary goal is the transfer of knowledge, both in administrative and technical issues, needed for the establishment of an effective business plan and utilization strategy for the continued operation of the countries' research reactors. Technical consultation, cooperation, and the information transfer provided are related to: identification, evaluation, and assessment of current research reactor capabilities for products and services; identification of opportunities for technical upgrades for new or expanded products and services; advice and consultation on research reactor upgrades and technical modifications; characterization of markets for reactor products and services; identification of competition and estimation of potential for market penetration; integration of technical constraints; estimation of cash flow streams; and case studies.

Chong, D.; Manning, M.; Ellis, R.; Apt, K.; Flaim, S.; Sylvester, K.

2004-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

129

Final progress report on Grant No. DE-FG02-81ER10229, U.S. Department of Energy Reactor Sharing Program at the University of Wisconsin, July 15, 2000 - May 31, 2001  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Reactor Sharing Program makes the facilities of the University of Wisconsin Nuclear Reactor Laboratory available to other educational institutions. Uses include direct instruction, student theses projects, and staff research projects. A list of using institutions and a brief description of use is given.

Agasie, Robert J.

2001-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

130

NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE AARHUS UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Climate and Energy Financial support: Danish Environmental Protection Agency Please cite as: Lyck, E INdICATORS fOR dANISH GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS fROM 1990 TO 2007 #12;[Blank page] #12;AU NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE AARHUS UNIVERSITY INdICATORS fOR dANISH GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS fROM 1990

131

A University of Alabamay Research Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

question is, how much electrification? Biofuel will be present but secondary ­ Impact on land use revolutionary?y Research Center y y The world currently uses energy in two separate spheres: Mobile energy Lequesne CAVT, University of Alabama Gov't regulations, global warming #12;

Carver, Jeffrey C.

132

University of Minnesota CTS Research Conference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Program l Minnesota Central Safety Funds l Foster safety culture among county stakeholders #12;4/20/2011 51 University of Minnesota CTS Research Conference May 25, 2011 Mn/DOT County Roadway Safety Plans and Opportunities l Data Needs l Safety Emphasis Areas l Safety Strategies l Safety Workshop l Safety Projects l

Minnesota, University of

133

UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON Division of Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Agency: Pass_Thru Agency: Agency Type: Duration: CFDA: 00730 / 5019 / H0053 / B0001 / C107072 / 54732 Partnerships84.366CFDA: 00730 / 5015 / H0062 / C0001 / G108230 / 55411 University of Texas at Austin U: Duration: Center for Research for Mothers and Children93.865CFDA: 00730 / 5013 / H0288 / B0001 / G107007

Azevedo, Ricardo

134

Materials science division light-water-reactor safety research program. Quarterly progress report, October - December 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This progress report summarizes the Argonne National Laboratory work performed during October, November, and December 1981 on water-reactor-safety problems. The research and development areas covered are environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors, transient fuel response and fission-product release, and clad properties for code verification.

Not Available

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Light-water-reactor safety research program. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This progress report summarizes the Argonne National Laboratory work performed during April, May, and June 1981 on water-reactor-safety problems. The research and development areas covered are transient fuel response and fission-product release and environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

A RESEARCH ON SEAMLESS PLATFORM CHANGE OF REACTOR PROTECTION SYSTEM FROM PLC TO FPGA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A RESEARCH ON SEAMLESS PLATFORM CHANGE OF REACTOR PROTECTION SYSTEM FROM PLC TO FPGA JUNBEOM YOO1 1. INTRODUCTION A safety grade PLC is an industrial digital computer used to develop safety-critical systems such as RPS (Reactor Protection System) for nuclear power plants. The software loaded into a PLC

137

Roadmap for Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Research and Development by the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy s (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is a five year effort which works to develop the fundamental scientific basis to understand, predict, and measure changes in materials and systems, structure, and components as they age in environments associated with continued long-term operations of existing commercial nuclear power reactors. This year, the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) Pathway of this program has placed emphasis on emerging Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) methods which support these objectives. DOE funded Research and Development (R&D) on emerging NDE techniques to support commercial nuclear reactor sustainability is expected to begin next year. This summer, the MAaD Pathway invited subject matter experts to participate in a series of workshops which developed the basis for the research plan of these DOE R&D NDE activities. This document presents the results of one of these workshops which are the DOE LWRS NDE R&D Roadmap for Reactor Pressure Vessels (RPV). These workshops made a substantial effort to coordinate the DOE NDE R&D with that already underway or planned by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) through their representation at these workshops.

Smith, Cyrus M [ORNL; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL; Clayton, Dwight A [ORNL; Matlack, Katie [Georgia Institute of Technology; Ramuhalli, Pradeep [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Light, Glenn [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Thermonuclear Fusion Research Progress and the Way to the Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper reviews the progress of fusion research and its prospects for electricity generation. It starts with a reminder of the principles of thermonuclear fusion and a brief discussion of its potential role in the future of the world energy production. The reactions allowing energy production by fusion of nuclei in stars and on earth and the conditions required to sustain them are reviewed. At the high temperatures required for fusion (hundred millions kelvins), matter is completely ionized and has reached what is called its 4th state: the plasma state. The possible means to achieve these extreme temperatures is discussed. The remainder of the paper focuses on the most promising of these approaches, magnetic confinement. The operating principles of the presently most efficient machine of this type -- the tokamak -- is described in some detail. On the road to producing energy with fusion, a number of obstacles have to be overcome. The plasma, a fluid that reacts to electromagnetic forces and carries currents and charges, is a complex medium. Fusion plasma is strongly heated and is therefore a good example of a system far from equilibrium. A wide variety of instabilities can grow in this system and lead to self-organized structures and spontaneous cycles. Turbulence is generated that degrades the confinement and hinders easy achievement of long lasting hot plasmas. Physicists have learned how to quench turbulence, thereby creating sort of insulating bottles inside the plasma itself to circumvent this problem. The recent history of fusion performance is outlined and the prospect of achieving power generation by fusion in a near future is discussed in the light of the development of the 'International Tokamak Experimental Reactor' project ITER.

Koch, Raymond [Laboratory for Plasma Physics, Royal Military Academy, Association EURATOM - Belgian State, 1000 Brussels (Belgium)

2006-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

139

Risk management at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory research reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In November of 1986, the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) was shut down by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) due to a concern regarding embrittlement of the reactor vessel. A massive review effort was undertaken by ORNL and the Department of Energy (DOE). This review resulted in an extensive list of analyses and design modifications to be completed before restart could take place. The review also focused on the improvement of management practices including implementation of several of the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) requirements. One of the early items identified was the need to perform a Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) on the reactor. It was decided by ORNL management that this PRA would not be just an exercise to assess the ``bottom`` line in order to restart, but would be used to improve the overall safety of the reactor, especially since resources (both manpower and dollars) were severely limited. The PRA would become a basic safety tool to be used instead of a more standard deterministic approach to safety used in commercial reactor power plants. This approach was further reinforced, because the reactor was nearly 25 years old at this time, and the design standards and regulations had changed significantly since the original design, and many of the safety issues could not be addressed by compliance to codes and standards.

Flanagan, G.F.; Linn, M.A.; Proctor, L.D.; Cook, D.H.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

140

Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Report July - September 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest laboratory (PNL) from July 1 through September 30, 1981, for the Division of Accident Evaluation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR} steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision-making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Core thermal models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation, severe fuel damage, and postaccident coolability tests for the ESSOR reactor Super Sara Test Program, lspra, Italy; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Idaho Falls, Idaho. These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

Edler, S. K.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university research reactor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Report October - December 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest laboratory (PNL) from October 1 through December 31, 1981, for the Division of Accident Evaluation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where serviceinduced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision-making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Core thermal models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation, severe fuel damage, and post accident coolability tests for the ESSOR reactor Super Sara Test Program, lspra, Italy; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Idaho Falls, Idaho. These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

Edler, S. K.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Reactor Physics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reactor Physics Reactor and nuclear physics is a key area of research at INL. Much of the research done in reactor physics can be separated into one of three categories:...

143

The RERTR (Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor) Program: Progress and plans  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The progress of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program is described. After a brief summary of the results which the RERTR Program, in collaboration with its many international partners, had achieved by the end of 1986, the activities, results, and new developments which occurred in 1987 are reviewed. Irradiation of the second miniplate series, concentrating on U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al and U/sub 3/Si-Al fuels, was completed and postirradiation examinations were performed on many of its miniplates. The whole-core ORR demonstration with U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al fuel at 4.8 g U/cm/sup 3/ was completed at the end of March with excellent results and with 29 elements estimated to have reached at least 40% average burnup. Good progress was made in the area of LEU usage for the production of fission /sup 99/Mo, and in the coordination of safety evaluations related to LEU conversions of US university reactors. Planned activities include testing and demonstrating advanced fuels intended to allow use of reduced enrichment uranium in very-high-performance reactors. Two candidate fuels are U/sub 3/Si-Al with 19.75% enrichment and U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al with 45% enrichment. Demonstration of these fuels will include irradiation of full-size elements and, possibly, a full-core demonstration. Achievement of the final program goals is still projected for 1990. This progress could not have been possible without the close international cooperation which has existed from the beginning, and which is essential to the ultimate success of the RERTR Program.

Travelli, A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

EA-0912: Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to accept 409 spent fuel elements from eight foreign research reactors in seven European countries.  The spent fuel would be shipped across...

145

Effect of reduced enrichment on the fuel cycle for research reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The new fuels developed by the RERTR Program and by other international programs for application in research reactors with reduced uranium enrichment (<20% EU) are discussed. It is shown that these fuels, combined with proper fuel-element design and fuel-management strategies, can provide at least the same core residence time as high-enrichment fuels in current use, and can frequently significantly extend it. The effect of enrichment reduction on other components of the research reactor fuel cycle, such as uranium and enrichment requirements, fuel fabrication, fuel shipment, and reprocessing are also briefly discussed with their economic implications. From a systematic comparison of HEU and LEU cores for the same reference research reactor, it is concluded that the new fuels have a potential for reducing the research reactor fuel cycle costs while reducing, at the same time, the uranium enrichment of the fuel.

Travelli, A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Light-water-reactor safety research program. Quarterly progress report, January-March 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This progress report summarizes the Argonne National Laboratory work performed during January, February, and March 1980 on water-reactor-safety problems. The research and development area covered is Transient Fuel Response and Fission-Product Release.

Massey, W.E.; Kyger, J.A.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Light-water-reactor safety research program: quarterly progress report, July-September, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The progress report summarizes the Argonne National Laboratory work performed during July, August, and September 1980 on water-reactor-safety problems. The research and development area covered is Transient Fuel Response and Fission-product Release.

Massey, W.E.; Till, C.E.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Abstracts and research accomplishments of university coal research projects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Principal Investigators of the grants supported by the University Coal Research Program were requested to submit abstracts and highlight accomplishments of their projects in time for distribution at a grantees conference. This book is a compilation of the material received in response to the request. Abstracts discuss the following area: coal science, coal surface science, reaction chemistry, advanced process concepts, engineering fundamentals and thermodynamics, environmental science.

Not Available

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Light water reactor safety research program. Volume 12: quarterly report, Apr-Jun 79  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress of the Light Water Reactor Safety Research Program during the 2nd quarter of 1979. Specifically, the report summarizes progress in five major areas of research. They are: (1) the molten core/concrete interactions study; (2) steam explosion research phenomena; (3) statistical LOCA analysis; (4) UHI model development; (5) two-phase jet loads.

Berman, M.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Sensitivity and uncertainty analyses for thermo-hydraulic calculation of research reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of input parameters on thermohydraulic calculations for a research reactor has successfully done in this research. The uncertainty analysis was carried out on input parameters for thermohydraulic calculation of sub-channel analysis using Code COOLOD-N. The input parameters include radial peaking factor, the increase bulk coolant temperature, heat flux factor and the increase temperature cladding and fuel meat at research reactor utilizing plate fuel element. The input uncertainty of 1% - 4% were used in nominal power calculation. The bubble detachment parameters were computed for S ratio (the safety margin against the onset of flow instability ratio) which were used to determine safety level in line with the design of 'Reactor Serba Guna-G. A. Siwabessy' (RSG-GA Siwabessy). It was concluded from the calculation results that using the uncertainty input more than 3% was beyond the safety margin of reactor operation.

Hartini, Entin; Andiwijayakusuma, Dinan [Center for Development of Nuclear Informatics - National Nuclear Energy Agency PUSPIPTEK, Serpong, Tangerang, Banten (Indonesia)] [Center for Development of Nuclear Informatics - National Nuclear Energy Agency PUSPIPTEK, Serpong, Tangerang, Banten (Indonesia); Isnaeni, Muh Darwis [Center for Reactor Technology and Nuclear Safety- National Nuclear Energy Agency PUSPIPTEK, Serpong, Tangerang, Banten (Indonesia)] [Center for Reactor Technology and Nuclear Safety- National Nuclear Energy Agency PUSPIPTEK, Serpong, Tangerang, Banten (Indonesia)

2013-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

151

Frontier of Fusion Research: Path to the Steady State Fusion Reactor by Large Helical Device  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ITER, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, which will be built in Cadarache in France, has finally started this year, 2006. Since the thermal energy produced by fusion reactions divided by the external heating power, i.e., the Q value, will be larger than 10, this is a big step of the fusion research for half a century trying to tame the nuclear fusion for the 6.5 Billion people on the Earth. The source of the Sun's power is lasting steadily and safely for 8 Billion years. As a potentially safe environmentally friendly and economically competitive energy source, fusion should provide a sustainable future energy supply for all mankind for ten thousands of years. At the frontier of fusion research important milestones are recently marked on a long road toward a true prototype fusion reactor. In its own merits, research into harnessing turbulent burning plasmas and thereby controlling fusion reaction, is one of the grand challenges of complex systems science.After a brief overview of a status of world fusion projects, a focus is given on fusion research at the National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS) in Japan, which is playing a role of the Inter University Institute, the coordinating Center of Excellence for academic fusion research and by the Large Helical Device (LHD), the world's largest superconducting heliotron device, as a National Users' facility. The current status of LHD project is presented focusing on the experimental program and the recent achievements in basic parameters and in steady state operations. Since, its start in a year 1998, a remarkable progress has presently resulted in the temperature of 140 Million degree, the highest density of 500 Thousand Billion/cc with the internal density barrier (IDB) and the highest steady average beta of 4.5% in helical plasma devices and the largest total input energy of 1.6 GJ, in all magnetic confinement fusion devices. Finally, a perspective is given of the ITER Broad Approach program as an integrated part of ITER and Development of Fusion Energy project Agreement. Moreover, the relationship with the NIFS' new parent organization the National Institutes of Natural Sciences and with foreign research institutions is briefly explained.

Motojima, Osamu [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki-shi, Gifu-ken, 509-5292 (Japan)

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Thermal hydraulic limits analysis for the MIT Research Reactor low enrichment uranium core conversion using statistical propagation of parametric uncertainties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The MIT Research Reactor (MITR) is evaluating the conversion from highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low enrichment uranium (LEU) fuel. In addition to the fuel element re-design from 15 to 18 plates per element, a reactor ...

Chiang, Keng-Yen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst 160 Governors Drive work sponsored by the Renewable Energy Trust (RET), as administered by the Massachusetts Technology 18, 2008 Renewable Energy Research Laboratory Page 1 University of Massachusetts, Amherst Amherst, MA

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

154

Polytechnic Institute of New York University Researchers Represented...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Network ResearcherResearch Institution Web page Aronov, Boris - Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Polytechnic Institute of New York University http:...

155

INDIRECT COSTS OF RESEARCH University Policy No: FM5400  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

recoveries towards the indirect costs associated with externally funded Research conducted at the University Research Funding Agreements supported by external funds; to all University Members as defined Funding Agreements). Distribution 10.00 The Indirect Costs recovered by the university from Research

Victoria, University of

156

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst 160 Governors Drive Renewable Energy Research Laboratory Page 1 University of Massachusetts, Amherst Amherst, MA 01003 NOTICE AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This report was prepared by the Renewable Energy Research Laboratory (RERL) at the University

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

157

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst 160 Governors Drive. Ray January 5, 2005 #12;Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst 160 AND ACKNOWLEDGMENTS This report was prepared by the Renewable Energy Research Laboratory (RERL) at the University

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

158

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst 160 Governors Drive;10/28/2008 Renewable Energy Research Laboratory Page 1 University of Massachusetts, Amherst Amherst, MA 01003 NOTICE AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This report was prepared by the Renewable Energy Research Laboratory (RERL) at the University

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

159

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research Laboratory (RERL) at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst in the course of performingRenewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst 160 Governors Drive Report template version 1.3 #12;April 3, 2006 Renewable Energy Research Laboratory Page 1 University

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

160

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research Laboratory (RERL) at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst in the course of performingRenewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst 160 Governors Drive. Ellis February 28, 2008 #12;February 28, 2008 Renewable Energy Research Laboratory Page 1 University

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university research reactor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst 160 Governors Drive 20, 2005 #12;January 20, 2005 Renewable Energy Research Laboratory Page 1 University of Massachusetts Research Laboratory (RERL) at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst in the course of performing work

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

162

Abstract and research accomplishments of University Coal Research Projects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Principal Investigators of the grants supported by the University Coal Research Program were requested to submit abstracts and highlight accomplishments of their respective projects in time for distribution at a conference on June 13--14, 1995 at Tennessee State University in Nashville, Tennessee. This book is a compilation of the material received in response to that request. For convenience, the 70 grants reported in this book are stored into eight technical areas, Coal Science, Coal Surface Science, Reaction Chemistry, Advanced Process Concepts, Engineering Fundamentals and Thermodynamics, Environmental Science, high Temperature Phenomena, and Special topics. Indexes are provided for locating projects by subject, principal investigators, and contracting organizations. Each extended abstract describes project objectives, work accomplished, significance to the Fossil Energy Program, and plans for the next year.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Advanced neutron irradiation system using Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center Reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was installed in the irradiation cell of the Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center Reactor (NSCR). By increasing the thickness of the lead-bismuth alloy, the neutron spectra were shifted into lower energies by the scattering interactions of fast...

Jang, Si Young

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Dry Storage of Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel - 13321  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spent fuel from domestic and foreign research reactors is received and stored at the Savannah River Site's L Area Material Storage (L Basin) Facility. This DOE-owned fuel consists primarily of highly enriched uranium in metal, oxide or silicide form with aluminum cladding. Upon receipt, the fuel is unloaded and transferred to basin storage awaiting final disposition. Disposition alternatives include processing via the site's H Canyon facility for uranium recovery, or packaging and shipment of the spent fuel to a waste repository. A program has been developed to provide a phased approach for dry storage of the L Basin fuel. The initial phase of the dry storage program will demonstrate loading, drying, and storage of fuel in twelve instrumented canisters to assess fuel performance. After closure, the loaded canisters are transferred to pad-mounted concrete overpacks, similar to those used for dry storage of commercial fuel. Unlike commercial spent fuel, however, the DOE fuel has high enrichment, very low to high burnup, and low decay heat. The aluminum cladding presents unique challenges due to the presence of an oxide layer that forms on the cladding surface, and corrosion degradation resulting from prolonged wet storage. The removal of free and bound water is essential to the prevention of fuel corrosion and radiolytic generation of hydrogen. The demonstration will validate models predicting pressure, temperature, gas generation, and corrosion performance, provide an engineering scale demonstration of fuel handling, drying, leak testing, and canister backfill operations, and establish 'road-ready' storage of fuel that is suitable for offsite repository shipment or retrievable for onsite processing. Implementation of the Phase I demonstration can be completed within three years. Phases II and III, leading to the de-inventory of L Basin, would require an additional 750 canisters and 6-12 years to complete. Transfer of the fuel from basin storage to dry storage requires integration with current facility operations, and selection of equipment that will allow safe operation within the constraints of existing facility conditions. Examples of such constraints that are evaluated and addressed by the dry storage program include limited basin depth, varying fuel lengths up to 4 m, (13 ft), fissile loading limits, canister closure design, post-load drying and closure of the canisters, instrument selection and installation, and movement of the canisters to storage casks. The initial pilot phase restricts the fuels to shorter length fuels that can be loaded to the canister directly underwater; subsequent phases will require use of a shielded transfer system. Removal of the canister from the basin, followed by drying, inerting, closure of the canister, and transfer of the canister to the storage cask are completed with remotely operated equipment and appropriate shielding to reduce personnel radiation exposure. (authors)

Adams, T.M.; Dunsmuir, M.D.; Leduc, D.R.; Severynse, T.F.; Sindelar, R.L. [Savannah River National Laboratory (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory (United States); Moore, E.N. [Moore Nuclear Energy, LLC (United States)] [Moore Nuclear Energy, LLC (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Reactor safety research programs. Quarterly report, January-March 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) from January 1 through March 31, 1982, for the Division of Accident Evaluation and the Division of Engineering Technology, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision-making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Core thermal models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities.

Edler, S.K. (ed.)

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Reactor safety research programs. Quarterly report, July-September 1983  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, and examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics. Accelerated pellet-cladding interaction modeling is being conducted to predict the probability of fuel rod failure under normal operating conditions. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Experimental data and validated models are being used to determine a method for evaluating the acceptance of welded or weld-repaired stainless steel piping. Thermal-hydraulic models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. High-temperature materials property tests are being conducted to provide data on severe core damage fuel behavior. Severe fuel damage accident tests are being conducted at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; and an instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program is being performed at Halden, Norway. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities, including the Super Sara Test Program, Ispra, Italy, and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility.

Edler, S.K. (ed.)

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Reactor safety research programs. Quarterly report, April-June 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) from April 1 through June 30, 1982, for the Division of Accident Evaluation and the Division of Engineering Technology, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision-making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Core thermal models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities.

Edler, S.K. (ed.)

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

DISMANTLING OF THE UPPER RPV COMPONENTS OF THE KARLSRUHE MULTI-PURPOSE RESEARCH REACTOR (MZFR), GERMANY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Multi-purpose Research Reactor was a pressurized-water reactor cooled and moderated with heavy water. It was built from 1961 to 1966 and went critical for the first time on 29 September 1965. After nineteen years of successful operation, the reactor was de-activated on 3 May 1984. The reactor had a thermal output of 200 MW and an electrical output of 50 MW. The MZFR not only served to supply electrical power, but also as a test bed for: - research into various materials for reactor building (e. g. zirkaloy), - the manufacturing and operating industry to gain experience in erection and operation, - training scientific and technical reactor staff, and - power supply (first nuclear combined-heat-and-power system, 1979-1984). The experience gained in operating the MZFR was very helpful for the development and operation of power reactors. At first, safe containment and enclosure of the plant was planned, but then it was decided to dismantle the plant completely, step by step, in view o f the clear advantages of this approach. The decommissioning concept for the complete elimination of the plant down to a green-field site provides for eight steps. A separate decommissioning license is required for each step. As part of the dismantling, about 72,000 Mg [metric tons] of concrete and 7,200 Mg of metal (400 Mg RPV) must be removed. About 700 Mg of concrete (500 Mg biological shield) and 1300 Mg of metal must be classified as radioactive waste.

Prechtl, E.; Suessdorf, W.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

169

Mo-99 production at the Annular Core Research Reactor - recent calculative results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant progress has been made over the past year in understanding the chemistry and processing challenges associated with {sup 99}Mo production using Cintichem type targets. Targets fabricated at Los Alamos National Laboratory have been successfully irradiated in fuel element locations at the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) and processed at the Sandia Hot Cell Facility. The next goal for the project is to remove the central cavity experiment tube from the reactor core, allowing for the irradiation of up to 37 targets. After the in-core work is complete, the reactor will be capable of producing significant quantities of {sup 99}Mo.

Parma, E.J.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Michigan State University Research Integrity, Vol.3 No. 2 Spring 1999 RESEARCH INTEGRITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Michigan State University Research Integrity, Vol.3 No. 2 Spring 1999 RESEARCH INTEGRITY Spring IN THIS ISSUE INTRODUCTION Research Mentoring P.1 RESEARCH ETHICS SYMPOSIUM Michigan State University April 1 N. Henry, Assistant Professor Department of Physiology Michigan State University P.3 ETHICS

171

Light-Water-Reactor Safety Research Program. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This progress report summarizes the Argonne National Laboratory work performed during October, November, and December 1979 on water-reactor-safety problems. The research and development areas covered are: (1) Heat Transfer Coordination for LOCA Research Programs and (2) Transient Fuel Response and Fission-Product Release. 29 refs., 39 figs., 1 tab.

Massey, W.E.; Kyger, J.A.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Proceedings of the 1990 International Meeting on Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The global effort to reduce, and possibly, eliminate the international traffic in highly-enriched uranium caused by its use in research reactors requires extensive cooperation and free exchange of information among all participants. To foster this free exchange of information, the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, at Argonne National Laboratory, sponsored this meeting as the thirteenth of a series which began in 1978. The common effort brought together, past, a large number of specialists from many countries. On hundred twenty-three participants from 26 countries, including scientists, reactor operators, and personnel from commercial fuel suppliers, research centers, and government organizations, convened in Newport, Rhode Island to discuss their results, their activities, and their plans relative to converting research reactors to low-enriched fuels. As more and more reactors convert to the use of low-enriched uranium, the emphasis of our effort has begun to shift from research and development to tasks more directly related to implementation of the new fuels and technologies that have been developed, and to refinements of those fuels and technologies. It is appropriate, for this reason, that the emphasis of this meeting was placed on safety and on conversion experiences. This individual papers in this report have been cataloged separately.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Facilities: Sandia Pulsed Reactor  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive SolarEducationStationCSPRecovery Act SolarReactor FacilityFacility -

174

Light-water-reactor safety materials engineering research programs. Quarterly progress report, January-March 1985. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This progress report summarizes work performed by the Materials Science and Technology Division of Argonne National Laboratory during January, February, and March 1985 on water reactor safety problems. The research and development areas covered are Environmentally Assisted Cracking in Light-Water Reactors and Long-Term Embrittlement of Cast Duplex Stainless Steels in Light-Water-Reactor Systems. 42 refs.

Not Available

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Light-water-reactor safety materials engineering research programs. Volume 3. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This progress report summarizes work performed by the Materials Science and Technology Division of Argonne National Laboratory during October, November, and December 1984 on water reactor safety problems. The research and development areas covered are Environmentally Assisted Cracking in Light-Water Reactors and Long-Term Embrittlement of Cast Duplex Stainless Steels in Light-Water-Reactor Systems.

Not Available

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

ReseaRch at the University of Maryland Nuclear Safety Research at the University of Maryland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research on nuclear energy started at the University of Maryland just after World War II, when and nuclear weapons was followed by controversial accidents and regulation. Today, nuclear power is considered that analyze the risks involved in the use of nuclear energy. Understanding and Using Radiation The ionizing

Hill, Wendell T.

177

Melt-Dilute Treatment Technology for Aluminum Based Research Reactor Spent Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy has selected the Savannah River Site (SRS) as the location to consolidate and store Aluminum Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF), originating in the United States, from Foreign Research Reactor (FRR) and Domestic Research Reactor (DRR) through the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) process. These SNF are either in service, being stored in water basins or in dry storage casks at the reactor sites, or have been transferred to SRS and stored in water basins. A portion of this inventory contains HEU. Since the fuel receipts would continue for several decades beyond projected SRS canyon operations, it is anticipated that it will be necessary to develop disposal technologies that do not rely on reprocessing. The Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Task Team, appointed by the Office of Spent Fuel Management of DOE, assessed and identified the most promising technology options for the alternative disposition of aluminum based domestic and foreign research reactor SNF in a geologic repository. The most promising options identified by the task team were direct/ co-disposal and melt-dilute technologies. The DOE through the SRS has evaluated the two options and has identified Melt-Dilute Treatment Technology as the preferred alternative in the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the ultimate disposal of Al-SNF in the Mined Geologic Disposal System.

Adams, T.

1999-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

178

Using low-enriched uranium in research reactors: The RERTR program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the RERTR program is to minimize and eventually eliminate use of highway enriched uranium (HEU) in research and test reactors. The program has been very successful, and has developed low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel materials and designs which can be used effectively in approximately 90 percent of the research and test reactors which used HEU when the program began. This progress would not have been possible without active international cooperation among fuel developers, commercial vendors, and reactor operators. The new tasks which the RERTR program is undertaking at this time include development of new and better fuels that will allow use of LEU fuels in all research and test reactors; cooperation with Russian laboratories, which will make it possible to minimize and eventually eliminate use of HEU in research reactors throughout the world, irrespective of its origin; and development of an LEU-based process for the production of {sup 99}Mo. Continuation and intensification of international cooperation are essential to the achievement of the ultimate goals of the RERTR program.

Travelli, A.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Thermal hydraulics analysis of the MIT research reactor in support of a low enrichment uranium (LEU) core conversion .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The MIT research reactor (MITR) is converting from the existing high enrichment uranium (HEU) core to a low enrichment uranium (LEU) core using a high-density… (more)

Ko, Yu-Chih, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst 160 Governors Drive;January 20, 2005 Renewable Energy Research Laboratory Page 1 University of Massachusetts, Amherst Amherst Laboratory (RERL) at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst in the course of performing work sponsored

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university research reactor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst 160 Governors Drive;January 16, 2007 Renewable Energy Research Laboratory Page 1 University of Massachusetts, Amherst Amherst Laboratory (RERL) at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst in the course of performing work sponsored

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

182

Assessment of Research University Medical Centre Utrecht (UMC Utrecht)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Afzender Assessment of Research Quality University Medical Centre Utrecht (UMC Utrecht) 2001 - 2006) the absence of a national comparison. In this new procedure, The Board of Utrecht University has appointed of the research at the UMC Utrecht (see Appendix 1). The Board of Utrecht University determined in more detail

Utrecht, Universiteit

183

Innovative Research Universities Australia Discussion Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

funding of Australian universities August 2005 Flinders University h Griffith University h La Trobe Stream funding of Australian universities August 2005 Background to this Paper At the recent National invited the university sector to provide "the basis upon which a third stream funding model might

184

SUPRI (Stanford University Petroleum Research Institute) heavy oil research program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a summary of the work performed under Department of Energy contract FG19-87BC14126 during the period February 22, 1987 to February 21, 1990. During that period the Stanford University Petroleum Research Institute has published twenty-two technical reports and professional papers. This report presents in general terms the scope of work of SUPRI which is divided in five main projects: reservoir properties, in-situ combustion, improvement of steam injection by additives, well-to-well formation evaluation, and field support services. The results obtained during the period of performance of the contract are then presented in the form of abstracts from the technical reports and papers written during the period of performance.

Brigham, W.E.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Aziz, K.; Castanier, L.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Proceedings of the 1988 International Meeting on Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The international effort to develop and implement new research reactor fuels utilizing low-enriched uranium, instead of highly- enriched uranium, continues to make solid progress. This effort is the cornerstone of a widely shared policy aimed at reducing, and possibly eliminating, international traffic in highly-enriched uranium and the nuclear weapon proliferation concerns associated with this traffic. To foster direct communication and exchange of ideas among the specialists in this area, the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, at Argonne National Laboratory, sponsored this meeting as the eleventh of a series which began 1978. Individual papers presented at the meeting have been cataloged separately.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

ames laboratory research reactor: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of the authors Perona, Pietro 75 Ris National Laboratory DTU Optics and Plasma Research Department Multidisciplinary Databases and Resources Websites Summary: Ris...

187

Research and Development at U.S. Research Universities: An Analysis of Scope Economies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and synergies arising between traditional university research outputs (articles and doctorates) and academic traditional university research outputs (articles and doctorates) and academic patents. We propose a new data from 92 research universities show significant economies of scope between articles and patents

Foltz, Jeremy D.

188

University of Florida Change, Petty Cash, and Research Stipend Funds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Florida Change, Petty Cash, and Research Stipend Funds New Fund Information for the stewardship of the University's cash and investments, including research stipend funds. We need assurance - Research Stipend Fund Department Name Fund Amount ($) Note to Custodian: Treasury Management is responsible

Watson, Craig A.

189

Center for Transportation Research University of Texas at Austin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for Transportation Research University of Texas at Austin Randy B. Machemehl, Ph.D., P.E. Nasser I. Al-Rashid Centennial Professor in Transportation Engineering, Director of the Center for Transportation Research, and SWUTC Executive Committee Member Center for Transportation Research University

190

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst 160 Governors Drive. Ellis August 21, 2008 Report template version 3.1 #12;August 21, 2008 Renewable Energy Research This report was prepared by the Renewable Energy Research Laboratory (RERL) at the University of Massachusetts

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

191

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst 160 Governors Drive was prepared by the Renewable Energy Research Laboratory (RERL) at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst contained, described, disclosed, or referred to in this report. July 24, 2009 Renewable Energy Research

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

192

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst 160 Governors Drive April 13, 2006 Report template version 2.0 #12;April 13, 2006 Renewable Energy Research Laboratory Page was prepared by the Renewable Energy Research Laboratory (RERL) at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

193

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst 160 Governors Drive by the Renewable Energy Research Laboratory (RERL) at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst in the course, disclosed, or referred to in this report. November 11, 2009 Renewable Energy Research Laboratory Page 1

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

194

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst 160 Governors Drive Report template version 3.1.1 #12;November 20, 2007 Renewable Energy Research Laboratory Page 1 by the Renewable Energy Research Laboratory (RERL) at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst in the course

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

195

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst 160 Governors Drive Anthony F. Ellis April 10, 2008 Report template version 3.1 #12;April 10, 2008 Renewable Energy Research This report was prepared by the Renewable Energy Research Laboratory (RERL) at the University of Massachusetts

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

196

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst 160 Governors Drive by the Renewable Energy Research Laboratory (RERL) at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst in the course, disclosed, or referred to in this report. June 12, 2009 Renewable Energy Research Laboratory Page 1

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

197

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst 160 Governors Drive F. Ellis July 21, 2008 Report template version 3.1 #12;July 21, 2008 Renewable Energy Research This report was prepared by the Renewable Energy Research Laboratory (RERL) at the University of Massachusetts

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

198

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst 160 Governors Drive by the Renewable Energy Research Laboratory (RERL) at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst in the course, disclosed, or referred to in this report. July 17, 2009 Renewable Energy Research Laboratory Page 1

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

199

UK Energy Research Centre Demand Reduction Theme, University of Oxford  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UK Energy Research Centre Demand Reduction Theme, University of Oxford The Experience of Carbon Energy Research Centre ­ Demand Reduction Theme Environmental Change Institute Oxford University Centre for the Environment South Parks Road Oxford OX1 3QY www.eci.ox.ac.uk www.ukerc.ac.uk #12;UK Energy Research Centre 2 1

200

Abstracts and research accomplishments of university coal research projects at historically black colleges and universities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Principal Investigators of the grants supported by the University Coal Research Program at Historically Black Colleges and Universities were requested to submit abstracts and highlight accomplishments of their projects in time for distribution at a grantees conference on June 25--27, 1991 at the Vista International Hotel, Pittsburgh PA. This book is a compilation of the material received in response to the request. The following topics are discussed: properties of coal, rheology, gasification, pyrolysis, combustion, synthesis of alcohols, cleanup of flue gas, and plasma seeding.

Not Available

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university research reactor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

RERTR Program: goals, progress and plans. [Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The status of the US Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program is reviewed. After a brief outline of RERTR Program objectives and goals, program accomplishments are discussed with emphasis on the development, demonstration and application of new LEU fuels. Most program activities have proceeded as planned, and a combination of two silicide fuels (U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al and U/sub 3/Si-Al) holds excellent promise for achieving the long-term program goals. Current plans and schedules project the uranium density of qualified RERTR fuels for plate-type reactors to grow by approximately 1 g U/cm/sup 3/ each year, from the nearly null value of 1982 to the 7.0 g U/cm/sup 3/ which will be reached in early 1989. The technical needs of research reactors for HEU exports are also estimated to undergo a gradual but dramatic decline in the coming years.

Travelli, A.

1984-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

202

Johnson Research Group University of New Hampshire  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

group at Boston University. http://sites.bu.edu/porcogrp/ #12;Microwave Flash Pyrolysis: Making Reactive

New Hampshire, University of

203

MYRRHA a multi-purpose hybrid research reactor for high-tech applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

MYRRHA (Multi-purpose hYbrid Research Reactor for High-tech Applications) is the flexible experimental accelerator driven system (ADS) in development at SCK-CEN. MYRRHA is able to work both in subcritical (ADS) as in critical mode. In this way, MYRRHA will allow fuel developments for innovative reactor systems, material developments for generation IV (GEN IV) systems, material developments for fusion reactors, radioisotope production and industrial applications, such as Si-doping. MYRRHA will also demonstrate the ADS full concept by coupling the three components (accelerator, spallation target and subcritical reactor) at reasonable power level to allow operation feedback, scalable to an industrial demonstrator and allow the study of efficient transmutation of high-level nuclear waste. MYRRHA is based on the heavy liquid metal technology and so it will contribute to the development of lead fast reactor (LFR) technology and in critical mode, MYRRHA will play the role of European technology pilot plant in the roadmap for LFR. In this paper the historical evolution of MYRRHA and the rationale behind the design choices is presented and the latest configuration of the reactor core and primary system is described. (authors)

Abderrahim, H. A.; Baeten, P. [SCK CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

LWZ-0023- In the Matter of Universities Research Association, Inc.  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Universities Research Association, Inc. (URA) is the management and operating contractor for the Department of Energy's (the DOE) Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (the Laboratory) in...

205

MANAGEMENT OF RESEARCH AND TEST REACTOR ALUMINUM SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL - A TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's Environmental Management (DOE-EM) Program is responsible for the receipt and storage of aluminum research reactor spent nuclear fuel or used fuel until ultimate disposition. Aluminum research reactor used fuel is currently being stored or is anticipated to be returned to the U.S. and stored at DOE-EM storage facilities at the Savannah River Site and the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. This paper assesses the technologies and the options for safe transportation/receipt and interim storage of aluminum research reactor spent fuel and reviews the comprehensive strategy for its management. The U.S. Department of Energy uses the Appendix A, Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Criteria, to identify the physical, chemical, and isotopic characteristics of spent nuclear fuel to be returned to the United States under the Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program. The fuel is further evaluated for acceptance through assessments of the fuel at the foreign sites that include corrosion damage and handleability. Transport involves use of commercial shipping casks with defined leakage rates that can provide containment of the fuel, some of which are breached. Options for safe storage include wet storage and dry storage. Both options must fully address potential degradation of the aluminum during the storage period. This paper focuses on the various options for safe transport and storage with respect to technology maturity and application.

Vinson, D.

2010-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

206

Light Water Reactor Safety Research Program. Semiannual report, April-September 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents progress made in Light Water Reactor Safety research conducted by Division 6441 in the period from April 1982 to September 1982. The programs conducted under investigation include Core Concrete Interactions, Core Melt-Coolant Interactions, Containment Emergency Sump Performance, the Hydrogen Program, and Combustible Gas in Containment Program. 50 references.

Berman, M.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Environmental Assessment of Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy has completed the Environmental Assessment (EA) of Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel and issued a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the proposed action. The EA and FONSI are enclosed for your information. The Department has decided to accept a limited number of spent nuclear fuel elements (409 elements) containing uranium that was enriched in the United States from eight research reactors in Austria, Denmark, Germany, Greece, the Netherlands, Sweden, and Switzerland. This action is necessary to maintain the viability of a major US nuclear weapons nonproliferation program to limit or eliminate the use of highly enriched uranium in civil programs. The purpose of the EA is to maintain the cooperation of the foreign research reactor operators with the nonproliferation program while a more extensive Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is prepared on a proposed broader policy involving the acceptance of up to 15,000 foreign research reactor spent fuel elements over a 10 to 15 year period. Based on an evaluation of transport by commercial container liner or chartered vessel, five eastern seaboard ports, and truck and train modes of transporting the spent fuel overland to the Savannah River Sits, the Department has concluded that no significant impact would result from any combination of port and made of transport. In addition, no significant impacts were found from interim storage of spent fuel at the Savannah River Site.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst 160 Governors Drive. Manwell Anthony F. Ellis Anthony Rogers October 18, 2004 #12;October 18, 2004 Renewable Energy Research........................................................................................................................ 18 #12;October 18, 2004 Renewable Energy Resear

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

209

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst 160 Governors Drive Anthony F. Ellis Anthony Rogers Kai Wu September 15, 2004 #12;September 15, 2004 Renewable Energy Research........................................................................................................................ 18 #12;September 15, 2004 Renewable Energy Re

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

210

Stirling engine research at national and university laboratories in Japan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) reviewed research projects that are related to the development of Stirling engines and that are under way at Japanese national laboratories and universities. The research and development focused on component rather than on whole engine development. PNL obtained the information from a literature review and interviews conducted at the laboratories and universities. The universities have less equipment available and operate with smaller staffs for research than do the laboratories. In particular, the Mechanical Engineering Laboratory and the Aerospace Laboratory conduct high-quality component and fundamental work. Despite having less equipment, some of the researchers at the universities conduct high-quality fundamental research. As is typical in Japan, several of the university professors are very active in consulting and advisory capacities to companies engaged in Stirling engine development, and also with government and association advisory and technical committees. Contacts with these professors and selective examination of their research are good ways to keep abreast of Japanese Stirling developments.

Hane, G.J.; Hutchinson, R.A.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

University Research Administrator (URA) position availability Yoshida-South campus, Kyoto University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 / 3 University Research Administrator (URA) position availability Yoshida-South campus, Kyoto University 24 10 1 1 October 2012 Job title University Research Administrator (URA) Number 1 One network. Please note that the candidate is expected to mainly use English in the workplace, carrying out

Takada, Shoji

212

Nuclear nonproliferation: Concerns with US delays in accepting foregin research reactors` spent fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One key US nonproliferation goal is to discourage use of highly enriched uranium fuel (HEU), which can be used to make nuclear bombs, in civilian nuclear programs worldwide. DOE`s Off-Site Fuels Policy for taking back spent HEU from foreign research reactors was allowed to expire due to environmental reasons. This report provides information on the effects of delays in renewing the Off-Site Fuels Policy on US nonproliferation goals and programs (specifically the reduced enrichment program), DOE`s efforts to renew the fuels policy, and the price to be charged to the operators of foreign reactors for DOE`s activities in taking back spent fuel.

NONE

1994-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

213

Research Port 2013 -2014 University Libraries www.lib.umd.edu/tl/guides/research-port  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Port 2013 - 2014 University Libraries www.lib.umd.edu/tl/guides/research-port What is Research Port? Research Port is an electronic portal that allows you to: Access subscription resources Research Port and also e-mail or save article citations. Log in to Research Port Start at the UM Libraries

Gruner, Daniel S.

214

CV INA KONING Post-doc researcher at Utrecht University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 CV INA KONING Post-doc researcher at Utrecht University Universiteit Utrecht May 2011 ­ Present (1 year 11 months) PhD student on alcohol prevention among early adolescents Utrecht University March early adolescents and their parents. The project was carried out by the Utrecht University

Oro, Daniel

215

UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI -COLUMBIA OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI - COLUMBIA OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND OFFICE OF SPONSORED PROGRAMS of Missouri The University of Missouri Office of Sponsored Programs Administration 310 Jesse Hall Columbia, MO Programs Administration University of Missouri 310 Jesse Hall Columbia, MO 65211-1230 (573) 882

Taylor, Jerry

216

Advanced Reactor Research and Development Funding Opportunity Announcement  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' ResearchThe Office ofReporting (Connecticut)41AdamEnergyAdvancedDepartment||1

217

Research and Medical Isotope Reactor Supply | Y-12 National Security  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared atEffect of DryCorrectionComplex Research and Medical ...

218

Center for Transportation Research University of Texas at Austin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for Transportation Research University of Texas at Austin C. Michael Walton, Ph.D., P for Transportation Research University of Texas at Austin Austin, TX 78701 cmwalton@mail.utexas.edu (512) 471 pursued a career in transport systems engineering and policy analysis. Dr. Walton is a member

219

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst 160 Governors Drive by the Renewable Energy Research Laboratory (RERL) at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst in the course of performing work sponsored by the Renewable Energy Trust (RET), as administered by the Massachusetts

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

220

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst 160 Governors Drive AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This report was prepared by the Renewable Energy Research Laboratory (RERL) at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst in the course of performing work sponsored by the Renewable Energy Trust (RET

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university research reactor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst 160 Governors Drive Abdulwahid Anthony F. Ellis July 18, 2008 Report template version 3.1 #12;July 18, 2008 Renewable Energy AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This report was prepared by the Renewable Energy Research Laboratory (RERL) at the University

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

222

Report of the Vice-President Research University of Saskatchewan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Report of the Vice-President Research University of Saskatchewan Review of Activities - June 2006 and artistic (RSA) activities and enhancing the research culture at the University of Saskatchewan. This report of Saskatchewan Chairs Program Over the past six months the subcommittee of the Joint Committee of Chairs

Patterson, William P.

223

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst 160 Governors Drive This report was prepared by the Renewable Energy Research Laboratory (RERL) at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst in the course of performing work sponsored by the Renewable Energy Trust (RET), as administered

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

224

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst 160 Governors Drive was prepared by the Renewable Energy Research Laboratory (RERL) at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst in the course of performing work sponsored by the Massachusetts Department of Energy Resources (DOER

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

225

Fresh and Spent Nuclear Fuel Repatriation from the IRT-2000 Research Reactor Facility, Sofia, Bulgaria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The IRT 2000 research reactor, operated by the Bulgarian Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy (INRNE), safely shipped all of their Russian-origin nuclear fuel from the Republic of Bulgaria to the Russian Federation beginning in 2003 and completing in 2008. These fresh and spent fuel shipments removed all highly enriched uranium (HEU) from Bulgaria. The fresh fuel was shipped by air in December 2003 using trucks and a commercial cargo aircraft. One combined spent fuel shipment of HEU and low enriched uranium (LEU) was completed in July 2008 using high capacity VPVR/M casks transported by truck, barge, and rail. The HEU shipments were assisted by the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return Program (RRRFR) and the LEU spent fuel shipment was funded by Bulgaria. This report describes the work, approvals, organizations, equipment, and agreements required to complete these shipments and concludes with several major lessons learned.

K. J. Allen; T. G. Apostolov; I. S. Dimitrov

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

University Research Ins0tutes (URIs) Research Centres (RCs)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seafarers Interna0onal Research Centre Skills, Knowledge and Organisa0onal performance & Methods (WISERD) Cardiff Interdisciplinary Energy Research Network Wales

Martin, Ralph R.

227

A Review of Previous Research in Direct Energy Conversion Fission Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From the earliest days of power reactor development, direct energy conversion was an obvious choice to produce high efficiency electric power generation. Directly capturing the energy of the fission fragments produced during nuclear fission avoids the intermediate conversion to thermal energy and the efficiency limitations of classical thermodynamics. Efficiencies of more than 80% are possible, independent of operational temperature. Direct energy conversion fission reactors would possess a number of unique characteristics that would make them very attractive for commercial power generation. These reactors would be modular in design with integral power conversion and operate at low pressures and temperatures. They would operate at high efficiency and produce power well suited for long distance transmission. They would feature large safety margins and passively safe design. Ideally suited to production by advanced manufacturing techniques, direct energy conversion fission reactors could be produced more economically than conventional reactor designs. The history of direct energy conversion can be considered as dating back to 1913 when Moseleyl demonstrated that charged particle emission could be used to buildup a voltage. Soon after the successful operation of a nuclear reactor, E.P. Wigner suggested the use of fission fragments for direct energy conversion. Over a decade after Wigner's suggestion, the first theoretical treatment of the conversion of fission fragment kinetic energy into electrical potential appeared in the literature. Over the ten years that followed, a number of researchers investigated various aspects of fission fragment direct energy conversion. Experiments were performed that validated the basic physics of the concept, but a variety of technical challenges limited the efficiencies that were achieved. Most research in direct energy conversion ceased in the US by the late 1960s. Sporadic interest in the concept appears in the literature until this day, but there have been no recent significant programs to develop the technology.

DUONG,HENRY; POLANSKY,GARY F.; SANDERS,THOMAS L.; SIEGEL,MALCOLM D.

1999-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

228

Development of Regulatory Technical Requirements for the Advanced Integral Type Research Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the current status of the study on the development of regulatory technical requirements for the licensing review of an advanced integral type research reactor of which the license application is expected in a few years. According to the Atomic Energy Act of Korea, both research and education reactors are subject to the technical requirements for power reactors in the licensing review. But, some of the requirements may not be applicable or insufficient for the licensing reviews of reactors with unique design features. Thus it is necessary to identify which review topics or areas can not be addressed by the existing requirements and to develop the required ones newly or supplement appropriately. Through the study performed so far, it has been identified that the following requirements need to be developed newly for the licensing review of SMART-P: the use of proven technology, the interfacial facility, the non-safety systems, and the metallic fuels. The approach and basis for the development of each of the requirements are discussed. (authors)

Jo, Jong Chull; Yune, Young Gill; Kim, Woong Sik; Kim, Hho Jung [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, 19 Kusung-dong, Yusung-ku, Taejon, 305-338 (Korea, Republic of)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Testing of a Transport Cask for Research Reactor Spent Fuel - 13003  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the beginning of the last decade three Latin American countries that operate research reactors - Argentina, Brazil and Chile - have been joining efforts to improve the regional capability in the management of spent fuel elements from the TRIGA and MTR reactors operated in the region. A main drive in this initiative, sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency, is the fact that no definite solution regarding the back end of the research reactor fuel cycle has been taken by any of the participating country. However, any long-term solution - either disposition in a repository or storage away from reactor - will involve at some stage the transportation of the spent fuel through public roads. Therefore, a licensed cask that provides adequate shielding, assurance of subcriticality, and conformance to internationally accepted safety, security and safeguards regimes is considered a strategic part of any future solution to be adopted at a regional level. As a step in this direction, a packaging for the transport of irradiated fuel for MTR and TRIGA research reactors was designed by the tri-national team and a half-scale model equipped with the MTR version of the internal basket was constructed in Argentina and Brazil and tested in Brazil. Three test campaigns have been carried out so far, covering both normal conditions of transportation and hypothetical accident conditions. After failing the tests in the first two test series, the specimen successfully underwent the last test sequence. A second specimen, incorporating the structural improvements in view of the previous tests results, will be tested in the near future. Numerical simulations of the free drop and thermal tests are being carried out in parallel, in order to validate the computational modeling that is going to be used as a support for the package certification. (authors)

Mourao, Rogerio P.; Leite da Silva, Luiz [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear, Belo Horizonte (Brazil)] [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Miranda, Carlos A.; Mattar Neto, Miguel [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Sao Paulo (Brazil)] [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Quintana, Jose F.A.; Saliba, Roberto O. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Bariloche (Argentina)] [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Bariloche (Argentina); Novara, Oscar E. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina)] [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Strategic Plan for Light Water Reactor Research and Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this strategic plan is to establish a framework that will allow the Department of Energy (DOE) and the nuclear power industry to jointly plan the nuclear energy research and development (R&D) agenda important to achieving the Nation's energy goals. This strategic plan has been developed to focus on only those R&D areas that will benefit from a coordinated government/industry effort. Specifically, this plan focuses on safely sustaining and expanding the electricity output from currently operating nuclear power plants and expanding nuclear capacity through the deployment of new plants. By focusing on R&D that addresses the needs of both current and future nuclear plants, DOE and industry will be able to take advantage of the synergism between these two technology areas, thus improving coordination, enhancing efficiency, and further leveraging public and private sector resources. By working together under the framework of this strategic plan, DOE and the nuclear industry reinforce their joint commitment to the future use of nuclear power and the National Energy Policy's goal of expanding its use in the United States. The undersigned believe that a public-private partnership approach is the most efficient and effective way to develop and transfer new technologies to the marketplace to achieve this goal. This Strategic Plan is intended to be a living document that will be updated annually.

None

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Colorado State University Computer Programmer Research Associate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the positives cited in the ranking include: practically every new road has a bike lane and bicycles can even be checked out of a bike #12;library; Colorado State University occupies a scenic spot in the middle of town identity or expression. Colorado State University is an equal opportunity/equal access/affirmative action

232

UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON Division of Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.001CFDA: 00730 / 5045 / H0065 / B0001 / G101342 / 46163 University of Houston Downtown NASA - National Services Program43.001CFDA: 00730 / 5045 / H0065 / B0001 / G101387 / 46213 University of Houston Downtown: CFDA: 00730 / 5022 / H0065 / B0001 / G104499 / 50034 Biothera, the Immune Health Company CB Designation

Azevedo, Ricardo

233

UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON Division of Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.002CFDA: 00730 / 5013 / H0053 / C0001 / G105174 / 51358 Defense Logistics Agency CB Designation: Project: CFDA: 00730 / 5021 / H0025 / C0001 / G105328 / 51376 Rice University CB Designation: Project Type.367CFDA: 00730 / 5013 / H0062 / B0001 / C104952 / 51355 Texas Christian University - Andrews Institute U

Azevedo, Ricardo

234

Biomedical Engineering Bionanosystems Research at Louisiana Tech University  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nature of this project is to equip and support research in nanoengineered systems for biomedical, bioenvironmental, and bioenergy applications. Funds provided by the Department of Energy (DoE) under this Congressional Directive were used to support two ongoing research projects at Louisiana Tech University in biomedical, bioenvironmental, and bioenergy applications. Two major projects (Enzyme Immobilization for Large Scale Reactors to Reduce Cellulosic Ethanol Costs, and Nanocatalysts for Coal and Biomass Conversion to Diesel Fuel) and to fund three to five additional seed projects were funded using the project budget. The project funds also allowed the purchase and repair of sophisticated research equipment that will support continued research in these areas for many years to come. Project funds also supported faculty, graduate students, and undergraduate students, contributing to the development of a technically sophisticated work force in the region and the State. Descriptions of the technical accomplishments for each funded project are provided. Biofuels are an important part of the solution for sustainable transportation fuel and energy production for the future. Unfortunately, the country's appetite for fuel cannot be satisfied with traditional sugar crops such as sugar cane or corn. Emerging technologies are allowing cellulosic biomass (wood, grass, stalks, etc.) to also be converted into ethanol. Cellulosic ethanol does not compete with food production and it has the potential to decrease greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 86% versus current fossil fuels (current techniques for corn ethanol only reduce greenhouse gases by 19%). Because of these advantages, the federal government has made cellulosic ethanol a high priority. The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) requires a minimum production of at least 16 billion gallons of cellulosic ethanol by 2022. Indeed, the Obama administration has signaled an ambitious commitment of achieving 2 billion gallons of cellulosic ethanol by 2013. Louisiana is well positioned to become a national contributor in cellulosic ethanol, with an excellent growing season, a strong pulp/paper industry, and one of the nation's first cellulosic ethanol demonstration plants. Dr. Palmer in Chemical Engineering at Louisiana Tech University is collaborating with Drs. Lvov and Snow in Chemistry and Dr. Hegab in Mechanical Engineering to capitalize on these advantages by applying nanotechnology to improve the cellulosic ethanol processes. In many of these processes, expensive enzymes are used to convert the cellulose to sugars. The nanotechnology processes developed at Louisiana Tech University can immobilize these enzymes and therefore significantly reduce the overall costs of the process. Estimates of savings range from approximately $32 million at each cellulosic ethanol plant, to $7.5 billion total if the 16 billion gallons of cellulosic ethanol is achieved. This process has the advantage of being easy to apply in a large-scale commercial environment and can immobilize a wide variety or mixture of enzymes for production. Two primary objectives with any immobilization technique are to demonstrate reusability and catalytic activity (both reuse of the immobilized enzyme and reuse of the polymer substrate). The scale-up of the layering-by-layering process has been a focus this past year as some interesting challenges in the surface chemistry have become evident. Catalytic activity of cellulase is highly dependent upon how the feed material is pretreated to enhance digestion. Therefore, efforts this year have been performed this year to characterize our process on a few of the more prevalent pretreatment methods.

Palmer, James; Lvov, Yuri; Hegab, Hisham; Snow, Dale; Wilson, Chester; McDonald, John; Walker, Lynn; Pratt, Jon; Davis, Despina; Agarwal, Mangilal; DeCoster, Mark; Feng, June; Que, Long; O'Neal, Chad; Guilbeau, Eric; Zivanovic, Sandra; Dobbins, Tabbetha; Gold, Scott; Mainardi, Daniela; Gowda, Shathabish; Napper, Stan

2010-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

235

UNIVERSITY TURBINE SYSTEMS RESEARCH PROGRAM SUMMARY AND DIRECTORY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The South Carolina Institute for Energy Studies (SCIES), administratively housed at Clemson University, has participated in the advancement of combustion turbine technology for over a decade. The University Turbine Systems Research Program, previously referred to as the Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) program, has been administered by SCIES for the U.S. DOE during the 1992-2003 timeframe. The structure of the program is based on a concept presented to the DOE by Clemson University. Under the supervision of the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the UTSR consortium brings together the engineering departments at leading U.S. universities and U.S. combustion turbine developers to provide a solid base of knowledge for the future generations of land-based gas turbines. In the UTSR program, an Industrial Review Board (IRB) (Appendix C) of gas turbine companies and related organizations defines needed gas turbine research. SCIES prepares yearly requests for university proposals to address the research needs identified by the IRB organizations. IRB technical representatives evaluate the university proposals and review progress reports from the awarded university projects. To accelerate technology transfer technical workshops are held to provide opportunities for university, industry and government officials to share comments and improve quality and relevancy of the research. To provide educational growth at the Universities, in addition to sponsored research, the UTSR provides faculty and student fellowships. The basis for all activities--research, technology transfer, and education--is the DOE Turbine Program Plan and identification, through UTSR consortium group processes, technology needed to meet Program Goals that can be appropriately researched at Performing Member Universities.

Lawrence P. Golan; Richard A. Wenglarz

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

A simple setup for neutron tomography at the Portuguese Nuclear Research Reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A simple setup for neutron radiography and tomography was recently installed at the Portuguese Research Reactor. The objective of this work was to determine the operational characteristics of the installed setup, namely the irradiation time to obtain the best dynamic range for individual images and the spatial resolution. The performance of the equipment was demonstrated by imaging a fragment of a 17th century decorative tile.

M. A. Stanojev Pereira; J. G. Marques; R. Pugliesi

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

237

Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors. Main report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Safety and Cost Information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of two representative licensed nuclear research and test reactors. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between costs (in 1981 dollars), occupational radiation doses, potential radiation dose to the public, and other safety impacts. The alternatives considered are: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and ENTOMB (entombment). The study results are presented in two volumes. Volume 1 (Main Report) contains the results in summary form.

Konzek, G.J.; Ludwick, J.D.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Smith, R.I.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Center for Transportation Research University of Texas at Austin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for Transportation Research University of Texas at Austin Chandra Bhat, Ph.D. Director, Center for Transportation Research Adnan Abou-Ayyash Centennial Professor in Transportation Engineering-4535 Biography Dr. Chandra R. Bhat is the Director of the Center for Transportation Research (CTR) and the Adnan

239

Materials Research Laboratory University of California, Santa Barbara  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FR: Maureen Evans, Management Services Officer UC Santa Barbara Materials Research Laboratory tel, Management Services Officer Materials Research Laboratory University of California Santa Barbara, CA 93106-5121 The certificate should be mailed or faxed to: Materials Research Laboratory Attn; Maureen Evans, Management

Bigelow, Stephen

240

Materials Science and Technology Division light-water-reactor safety research program: quarterly progress report, January-March 1983  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This progress report summarizes the Argonne National Laboratory work performed during January, February and March 1983 on water reactor safety problems. The research and development areas covered are Environmentally Assisted Cracking in Light Water Reactors, Transient Fuel Response and Fission Product Release, Clad Properties for Code Verification, and Long-Term Embrittlement of Cast Duplex Stainless Steels in LWR Systems.

Not Available

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university research reactor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Materials Science Division light-water-reactor safety-research program. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1982. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This progress report summarizes the Argonne National Laboratory work performed during April, May, and June 1982 on water-reactor-safety problems. The research and development areas covered are Environmentally Assisted Cracking in Light Water Reactors, Transient Fuel Response and Fission Product Release, and Clad Properties for Code Verification.

Shack, W.J.; Rest, J.; Kassner, T.F.; Chung, H.M.; Claytor, T.N.; Kupperman, D.S.; Maiya, P.S.; Nichols, F.A.; Park, J.Y.; Ruther, W.E.; Yaggee, F.L.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Materials Science Division light-water-reactor safety research program. Quarterly progress report, July-September 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This progress report summarizes the Argonne National Laboratory work performed during July, August, and September 1982 on water reactor safety problems. The research and development areas covered are Environmentally Assisted Cracking in Light Water Reactors, Transient Fuel Response and Fission Product Release, Clad Properties for Code Verification, Posttest Fuel Examination of the ORNL Fission Product Release Tests, and Examination of TMI-2 Fuel Specimens.

Shack, W.J.; Rest, J.; Kassner, T.F.; Neimark, L.A.; Chung, H.M.; Claytor, T.N.; Kupperman, D.S.; Maiya, P.S.; Nichols, F.A.; Park, J.Y.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

IAEA coordinated research project on thermal-hydraulics of Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactors (SCWRs)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactor (SCWR) is an innovative water-cooled reactor concept, which uses supercritical pressure water as reactor coolant. It has been attracting interest of many researchers in various countries mainly due to its benefits of high thermal efficiency and simple primary systems, resulting in low capital cost. The IAEA started in 2008 a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Thermal-Hydraulics of SCWRs as a forum to foster the exchange of technical information and international collaboration in research and development. This paper summarizes the activities and current status of the CRP, as well as major progress achieved to date. At present, 15 institutions closely collaborate in several tasks. Some organizations have been conducting thermal-hydraulics experiments and analysing the data, and others have been participating in code-to-test and/or code-to-code benchmark exercises. The expected outputs of the CRP are also discussed. Finally, the paper introduces several IAEA activities relating to or arising from the CRP. (authors)

Yamada, K. [Vienna International Centre, P.O. Box 100, 1400 Vienna (Austria); Aksan, S. N. [International Atomic Energy Agency, 1400 Vienna (Austria)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

PhD Scholarships Electricity Research Centre, University College Dublin The Electricity Research Centre (ERC) is an industry-university research collaboration with research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the stability analysis and control of electric power systems modelled as stochastic differentialPhD Scholarships ­ Electricity Research Centre, University College Dublin The Electricity Research candidates for PhD scholarships under its Sustainable Electrical Energy Systems Cluster. The Sustainable

245

University Coal Research | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

research alongside students who were pursuing advanced degrees in engineering, chemistry and other technical disciplines. Not only did new discoveries in energy science and...

246

E-Print Network 3.0 - argonaut bilbao reactor Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

reprocessing and transmutation... with industry, national laboratories, and universities; upgrading and sharing of research reactors Source: Laughlin, Robert B. - Department of...

247

Materials Science and Technology Division, light-water-reactor safety research program. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research and development areas covered are Environmentally Assisted Cracking in Light Water Reactors, Transient Fuel Response and Fission Product Release, Clad Properties for Code Verification, and Long-Term Embrittlement of Cast Duplex Stainless Steels in LWR Systems.

Shack, W.J.; Rest, J.; Kassner, T.F.; Ayrault, G.; Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Kupperman, D.S.; Maiya, P.S.; Nichols, F.A.; Park, J.Y.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Conservation Ecology & Entomology Department Stellenbosch University ecological network research (Mondi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conservation Ecology & Entomology Department Stellenbosch University ecological network research (Mondi Ecological Network Programme (MENP) Ecological networks (ENs) reduce the isolation of populations helps to prevent ecological relaxation (the loss of ecological systems and interactions) and so prevents

Geldenhuys, Jaco

249

SURVEY RESEARCH LABORATORY UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT CHICAGO Conference on Health Survey Research Methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SURVEY RESEARCH LABORATORY · UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT CHICAGO 10th Conference on Health Survey Research Methods April 8­11, 2011 CALL FOR PAPERS The Tenth Conference on Health Survey research methods that improve the quality of health survey data. The CHSRM will bring together researchers

Illinois at Chicago, University of

250

University of New Orleans/ Advanced Materials Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solar cells. Their synthesis, characterization and application as photoanode materials in dye sensitized of sciences research award to fund the proposal on making efficient dye sensitized solar cells by plasmonic Core-Shell Metal-Metal Oxide 3D Nanoarchitectures for Dye Sensitized Solar Cells, Gordon Research

Pennycook, Steve

251

UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON Division of Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Agency: Pass_Thru Agency: Agency Type: Duration: CFDA: 00730 / 5017 / H0093 / C0001 / G104028 / 50393 Type: Duration: Center for Research for Mothers and Children93.865CFDA: 00730 / 5013 / H0288 / B0001,312.50 Cost Center: Agency: Pass_Thru Agency: Agency Type: Duration: Drug Abuse Research Programs93.279CFDA

Azevedo, Ricardo

252

UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON Division of Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

_Thru Agency: Agency Type: Duration: Drug Abuse Research Programs93.279CFDA: 00730 / 5013 / H0125 / B0001 / G.305CFDA: 00730 / 5013 / H0288 / B0001 / G101970 / 48264 Institute of Educational Sciences CB Designation Center: Agency: Pass_Thru Agency: Agency Type: Duration: Drug Abuse Research Programs93.279CFDA: 00730

Azevedo, Ricardo

253

University of Florida Change, Petty Cash, and Research Stipend Funds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Florida Change, Petty Cash, and Research Stipend Funds New Fund Information - Petty for the stewardship of the University's cash and investments, including petty cash funds. We need assurance Cash Fund Department Name Fund Amount ($) Note to Custodian: Treasury Management is responsible

Watson, Craig A.

254

Database Connects Public to University of Nebraska Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Database Connects Public to University of Nebraska Research By Steve Ress There's a wealth of water easier. An easily accessible and searchable database sponsored by the University of Nebraska Rachael Herpel, outreach and education specialist at the UNL Water Center. The database can be found

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

255

Air Products Research Alliance University of California,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Materials Lithium battery electrolyte salts Functional Coatings Nanoparticle Dispersions Electronic Materials Conductive Polymer Hole Injection Layer Lithium battery electrolytes Aqueous, Solvent&D in lieu of in-house R&D Utilizes R&D partners to accelerate commercialization University alliance approach

California at Santa Barbara, University of

256

Climatic Research Unit University of East Anglia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

studies:the Maldives, Australia and the Mediterranean. Climate Change andTourism www January, 2000, University of Surrey). These publications review the impacts of climate change for a wide range of international holiday destinations visited by UK tourists. The impacts of climate change

Feigon, Brooke

257

UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON Division of Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Agency Type: Duration: CFDA: 00730 / 5021 / H0025 / C0001 / G103816 / 49943 The Houston Arts Alliance CB: Duration: CFDA: 00730 / 5021 / H0504 / C0001 / G104112 / 49956 United Engineering Foundation CB Designation Programs93.110CFDA: 00730 / 5015 / H0064 / B0001 / G103587 / 49867 University of Texas Health Science

Azevedo, Ricardo

258

UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON Division of Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center: Agency: Pass_Thru Agency: Agency Type: Duration: CFDA: 00730 / 5021 / H0041 / B0001 / C109363_Thru Agency: Agency Type: Duration: CFDA: 00730 / 5018 / H0064 / B0001 / G107626 / 55317 University of Texas Type: Duration: CFDA: 00730 / 5016 / H0064 / C0001 / G108417 / 56321 Texas Department of State Health

Azevedo, Ricardo

259

UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON Division of Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

_Thru Agency: Agency Type: Duration: CFDA: 00730 / 5021 / H0102 / B0100 / C107517 / 55882 Howard Hughes Medical Disorders93.853CFDA: 00730 / 5015 / H0125 / B0100 / G108881 / 56023 University of Texas Health Science: Agency: Pass_Thru Agency: Agency Type: Duration: CFDA: 00730 / 5021 / H0125 / B0001 / G101988 / 47486

Azevedo, Ricardo

260

UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON Division of Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Agency Type: Duration: Maternal and Child Health Federal Consolidated Programs93.110CFDA: 00730 / 5015 Type: Duration: Maternal and Child Health Federal Consolidated Programs93.110CFDA: 00730 / 5015 / H0087 Federal Consolidated Programs93.110CFDA: 00730 / 5015 / H0087 / B0001 / G106839 / 52975 University

Azevedo, Ricardo

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university research reactor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON Division of Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Firms12.002CFDA: 00730 / 5013 / H0053 / C0001 / G108332 / 55646 Defense Logistics Agency CB Designation: Duration: CFDA: 00730 / 5021 / H0025 / B0001 / G108617 / 55567 Rice University Houston Endowment, Inc. CB_Thru Agency: Agency Type: Duration: CFDA: 00730 / 5019 / H0063 / B0100 / C108697 / 55984 Aldine Independent

Azevedo, Ricardo

262

2007 international meeting on Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR). Abstracts and available papers presented at the meeting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Meeting papers discuss research and test reactor fuel performance, manufacturing and testing. Some of the main topics are: conversion from HEU to LEU in different reactors and corresponding problems and activities; flux performance and core lifetime analysis with HEU and LEU fuels; physics and safety characteristics; measurement of gamma field parameters in core with LEU fuel; nondestructive analysis of RERTR fuel; thermal hydraulic analysis; fuel interactions; transient analyses and thermal hydraulics for HEU and LEU cores; microstructure research reactor fuels; post irradiation analysis and performance; computer codes and other related problems.

NONE

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

263

Research and Development Roadmaps for Nondestructive Evaluation of Cables, Concrete, Reactor Pressure Vessels, and Piping Fatique  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To address these research needs, the MAaD Pathway supported a series of workshops in the summer of 2012 for the purpose of developing R&D roadmaps for enhancing the use of Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) technologies and methodologies for detecting aging and degradation of materials and predicting the remaining useful life. The workshops were conducted to assess requirements and technical gaps related to applications of NDE for cables, concrete, reactor pressure vessels (RPV), and piping fatigue for extended reactor life. An overview of the outcomes of the workshops is presented here. Details of the workshop outcomes and proposed R&D also are available in the R&D roadmap documents cited in the bibliography and are available on the LWRS Program website (http://www.inl.gov/lwrs).

Clayton, Dwight A [ORNL] [ORNL; Bakhtiari, Sasan [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)] [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Smith, Cyrus M [ORNL] [ORNL; Simmons, Kevin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Ramuhalli, Pradeep [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Coble, Jamie [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Brenchley, David [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Meyer, Ryan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

RELAP5 Application to Accident Analysis of the NIST Research Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detailed safety analyses have been performed for the 20 MW D{sub 2}O moderated research reactor (NBSR) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The time-dependent analysis of the primary system is determined with a RELAP5 transient analysis model that includes the reactor vessel, the pump, heat exchanger, fuel element geometry, and flow channels for both the six inner and twenty-four outer fuel elements. A post-processing of the simulation results has been conducted to evaluate minimum critical heat flux ratio (CHFR) using the Sudo-Kaminaga correlation. Evaluations are performed for the following accidents: (1) the control rod withdrawal startup accident and (2) the maximum reactivity insertion accident. In both cases the RELAP5 results indicate that there is adequate margin to CHF and no damage to the fuel will occur because of sufficient coolant flow through the fuel channels and the negative scram reactivity insertion.

Baek, J.; Cuadra Gascon, A.; Cheng, L.Y.; Diamond, D.

2012-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

265

Description of a research reactor control system using a programmable controller  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the design features, testing methods, and operational experience of a programmable controller (PC) installed as a neutron flux controller in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The PC was designed to control neutron flux from 1 to 105% for three selectable ranges. The PC generates a flux setpoint under operator control, calculates the reactor heat power from flow and temperature signals, calculates a neutron flux calibration factor based on the heat power, and positions a control rod based on the flux-setpoint difference. The programmable controller was tested by controlling an analog computer model of the ORR. The equipment was installed in August 1985, and except for some startup problems, the system has performed well.

Battle, R.E.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) project: A world-class research reactor facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), a new research facility being designed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The facility is based on a 330 MW, heavy-water cooled and reflected reactor as the neutron source, with a thermal neutron flux of about 7.5{times}10{sup 19}m{sup {minus}2}{center_dot}sec{sup {minus}1}. Within the reflector region will be one hot source which will serve 2 hot neutron beam tubes, two cryogenic cold sources serving fourteen cold neutron beam tubes, two very cold beam tubes, and seven thermal neutron beam tubes. In addition there will be ten positions for materials irradiation experiments, five of them instrumented. The paper touches on the project status, safety concerns, cost estimates and scheduling, a description of the site, the reactor, and the arrangements of the facilities.

Thompson, P.B. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (US); Meek, W.E. [Gilbert/Commonwealth, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (US)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials Research and Development Plan (PLN-2803)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900°C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic, or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development Program is responsible for performing research and development on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. Studies of potential Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) steels have been carried out as part of the pre-conceptual design studies. These design studies generally focus on American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code status of the steels, temperature limits, and allowable stresses. Three realistic candidate materials have been identified by this process: conventional light water reactor RPV steels A508/533, 2ĽCr-1Mo in the annealed condition, and modified 9Cr 1Mo ferritic martenistic steel. Based on superior strength and higher temperature limits, the modified 9Cr-1Mo steel has been identified by the majority of design engineers as the preferred choice for the RPV. All of the vendors have concluded, however, that with adequate engineered cooling of the vessel, the A508/533 steels are also acceptable.

J. K. Wright; R. N. Wright

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Office of the Vice President for Research and Innovation, University College Cork UCC Strategic Research Fund 2012 Guidelines document  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Fund 2012 ­ Guidelines document University College Cork - Strategic Research Fund ­ Guidelines for Research and Innovation, University College Cork 2 UCC Strategic Research Fund 2012 ­ Guidelines document and Innovation, University College Cork 3 UCC Strategic Research Fund 2012 ­ Guidelines document Operation

Schellekens, Michel P.

269

Research | NEES - EFRC | University of Maryland Energy Frontier Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch Welcome toResearch Areas OurLANLSoftwareCenter Research

270

International Atomic Energy Agency support of research reactor highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium fuel conversion projects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The IAEA has been involved for more than twenty years in supporting international nuclear non- proliferation efforts associated with reducing the amount of highly enriched uranium (HEU) in international commerce. IAEA projects and activities have directly supported the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) programme, as well as directly assisted efforts to convert research reactors from HEU to LEU fuel. HEU to LEU fuel conversion projects differ significantly depending on several factors including the design of the reactor and fuel, technical needs of the member state, local nuclear infrastructure, and available resources. To support such diverse endeavours, the IAEA tailors each project to address the relevant constraints. This paper presents the different approaches taken by the IAEA to address the diverse challenges involved in research reactor HEU to LEU fuel conversion projects. Examples of conversion related projects in different Member States are fully detailed. (author)

Bradley, E.; Adelfang, P.; Goldman, I.N. [Research Reactors Unit, Division of Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Technology, International Atomic Energy Agency, Wagramer Strasse 5, P.O. Box 100, A-1400 Vienna (Austria)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

271

University of Florida Change, Petty Cash, and Research Stipend Funds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Florida Change, Petty Cash, and Research Stipend Funds Request for New Fund DEPARTMENT INFORMATION FUND INFORMATION CHARTFIELD INFORMATION CONTACT INFORMATION Custodian Prepared by (if College name Amount requested ($) Type of fund Research stipendPetty cashChange What is the primary

Watson, Craig A.

272

Center for Transportation Training and Research Texas Southern University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for Transportation Training and Research Texas Southern University Khosro Godazi Associate Director, Center for Transportation Training and Research, and SWUTC Associate Director for Transportation.S. in City Planning. He is Director of 4-week Texas Summer Transportation Institute that has been held

273

Center for Transportation Training and Research Texas Southern University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for Transportation Training and Research Texas Southern University Carol Lewis, Ph.D. Director, Center for Transportation Training and Research, and SWUTC Executive Committee Member Texas is an Associate Professor in Transportation Studies and Direc- tor of the Center for Transportation Training

274

COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY Research Integrity & Compliance Review Office (RICRO)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY Research Integrity & Compliance Review Office (RICRO) Assistant of the Research Integrity and Compliance Review Office (RICRO) is responsible for a broad range of duties to the campus community and visitors to campus. #12; Ability to successfully plan and prepare for as well as set

275

EDUCATION, RESEARCH AND INNOVATION Lund University / Presentation 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/ Presentation 2011 MAX IV & the European Spallation Source #12;Lund University / Presentation 2011 World to be completed in 2015 ESS · Based on the world's most powerful neutron source · Will be used to study/innovation) MAX IV · World-leading research Centre for cancer research · Access to the premises at the latest 28

276

Water Resources Research Institute of the University of North Carolina  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Resources Research Institute of the University of North Carolina Annual Technical Report FY 2000 Introduction SUMMARY The North Carolina Water Resources Research Institute program for 2000-2001 (Federal Fiscal Year 2000) continued to focus on three broad areas of concern: surface waters, groundwater

277

UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON Division of Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Institute on Drug Abuse CB Designation: Project Type: Project Title: Integrated Treatment-Life GAD in Primary Care: Enhancing Outcomes and Translational Value FEDERAL 9/1/2011 to 4 Dr. $22,200.00 Cost Center: Agency: Pass_Thru Agency: Agency Type: Duration: Drug Abuse Research

Azevedo, Ricardo

278

University of Arizona Research Computing 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in High Performance Computing and High Throughput Computing (HPC/HTC) and storage will greatly advance, the new Research Data Center houses our next generation of High Performance Computing (HPC), High on interdisciplinary concepts and on collaborations with industry. Our reliance on high performance computing

Lega, Joceline

279

NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE AARHUS UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department: Department of Policy Analysis Publisher: National Environmental Research Institute Aarhus on Long Range Transboundary Air Pollution due by 15 February 2009. The report contains information)pyrene for the years 1990-2007 and (6) Dioxin and HCB. Further, the report contains infor- mation on background data

280

NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE AARHUS UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department: Department of Policy Analysis Publisher: National Environmental Research Institute Aarhus on Long Range Transboundary Air Pollution due by 15 February 2010. The report contains information)pyrene for the years 1990-2008 and (6) Dioxin and HCB. Further, the report contains infor- mation on background data

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university research reactor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON Division of Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Agency: Pass_Thru Agency: Agency Type: Duration: CFDA: 00730 / 5021 / H0087 / C0001 / G104805 / 50180: Duration: Humanities_Digital Humanities Initiative45.169CFDA: 00730 / 5013 / H0086 / B0001 / G104343: Drug Abuse Research Programs93.279CFDA: 00730 / 5013 / H0125 / B0001 / G104090 / 49988 Louisiana State

Azevedo, Ricardo

282

UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON Division of Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Firms12.002CFDA: 00730 / 5013 / H0053 / C0001 / G103556 / 49320 Defense Logistics Agency CB Designation Type: Duration: CFDA: 00730 / 5021 / H0122 / C0001 / G103665 / 49578 Charles G. Koch Charitable) Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration93.535CFDA: 00730 / 5013 / H0500 / B0001 / G103586 / 49817 Centers

Azevedo, Ricardo

283

UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON Division of Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

_Thru Agency: Agency Type: Duration: CFDA: 00730 / 5021 / H0064 / B0001 / G105858 / 51985 Baylor College Research, Educational Outreach, or Training in the area of Exploration43.003CFDA: 00730 / 5013 / H0065 / B and Space Administration43.000CFDA: 00730 / 5013 / H0065 / B0001 / G106319 / 52427 NASA - National

Azevedo, Ricardo

284

UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON Division of Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Agency Type: Duration: Healthy Marriage Promotion and Responsible Fatherhood Grants93.086CFDA: 00730: Pass_Thru Agency: Agency Type: Duration: Drug Abuse Research Programs93.279CFDA: 00730 / 5013 / H0064: Pass_Thru Agency: Agency Type: Duration: CFDA: 00730 / 5021 / H0122 / B0100 / C107496 / 55501 Chiang

Azevedo, Ricardo

285

UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON Division of Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Agency: Pass_Thru Agency: Agency Type: Duration: Small Business Development Center59.037CFDA: 00730 for Research for Mothers and Children93.865CFDA: 00730 / 5013 / H0064 / B0001 / G107960 / 55160 Baylor College: Duration: CFDA: 00730 / 5021 / H0097 / C0001 / C106751 / 55095 The Houston Arts Alliance CB Designation

Azevedo, Ricardo

286

Advanced reactor safety research. Quarterly report, October-December 1981. Volume 20  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Information is presented concerning the inherent retention of core debris following a severe reactor accident; containment analysis for LWR and LMFBR type reactors; LMFBR accident delineation; advanced reactor core phenomenology; LWR damaged fuel phenomenology; and ACRR status.

Not Available

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Current status of the development of high density LEU fuel for Russian research reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the main directions of the Russian RERTR program is to develop U-Mo fuel and fuel elements/FA with this fuel. The development is carried out both for existing reactors, and for new advanced designs of reactors. Many organizations in Russia, i.e. 'TVEL', RDIPE, RIAR, IRM, NPCC participate in the work. Two fuels are under development: dispersion and monolithic U-Mo fuel, as well two types of FA to use the dispersion U-Mo fuel: with tubular type fuel elements and with pin type fuel elements. The first stage of works was successfully completed. This stage included out-pile, in-pile and post irradiation examinations of U-Mo dispersion fuel in experimental tubular and pin fuel elements under parameters similar to operation conditions of Russian design pool-type research reactors. The results received both in Russia and abroad enabled to go on to the next stage of development which includes irradiation tests both of full-scale IRT pin-type and tube-type fuel assemblies with U-Mo dispersion fuel and of mini-fuel elements with modified U-Mo dispersion fuel and monolithic fuel. The paper gives a generalized review of the results of U-Mo fuel development accomplished by now. (author)

Vatulin, A.; Dobrikova, I.; Suprun, V.; Trifonov, Y. [Federal State Unitary Enterprise, A.A. Bochvar All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Inorganic Materials (VNIINM), 123060 Rogov 5a, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kartashev, E.; Lukichev, V. [Federal State Unitary Enterprise RDIPE, 101000 P.O. Box 788, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

288

Performance characteristics of the annular core research reactor fuel motion detection system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent proof tests have shown that the annular core research reactor (ACRR) fuel motion detection system has reached its design goals of providing high temporal and spatial resolution pictures of fuel distributions in the ACRR. The coded aperture imaging system (CAIS) images the fuel by monitoring the fission gamma rays from the fuel that pass through collimators in the reactor core. The gamma-ray beam is modulated by coded apertures before producing a visible light coded image in thin scintillators. Each coded image is then amplified and recorded by an opticalimage-intensifier/fast-framing-camera combination. The proximity to the core and the coded aperture technique provide a high data collection rate and high resolution. Experiments of CAIS at the ACRR conducted under steady-state operation have documented the beneficial effects of changes in the radiation shielding and imaging technique. The spatial resolutions are 1.7 mm perpendicular to the axis of a single liquid-metal fast breeder reactor fuel pin and 9 mm in the axial dimension. Changes in mass of 100 mg in each resolution element can be detected each frame period, which may be from 5 to 100 ms. This diagnostic instrument may help resolve important questions in fuel motion phenomenology.

Kelly, J.G.; Stalker, K.T.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors. Appendices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Safety and Cost Information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of two representative licensed nuclear research and test reactors. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between costs (in 1981 dollars), occupational radiation doses, potential radiation dose to the public, and other safety impacts. The alternatives considered are: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and EMTOMB (entombment). The study results are presented in two volumes. Volume 2 (Appendices) contains the detailed data that support the results given in Volume 1, including unit-component data.

Konzek, G.J.; Ludwick, J.D.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Smith, R.I.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Progress of the RERTR (Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor) Program in 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The progress of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program is described. After a brief summary of the results which the RERTR Program, in collaboration with its many international partners, had achieved by the end of 1988, the major events, findings, and activities of 1989 are reviewed. The scope of the RERTR Program activities was curtailed, in 1989, by an unexpected legislative restriction which limited the ability of the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency to adequately fund the program. Nevertheless, the thrust of the major planned program activities was maintained, and meaningful results were obtained in several areas of great significance for future work. 15 refs., 12 figs.

Travelli, A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Light Water Reactor Safety Research Program. Semiannual report, October 1983-March 1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the investigations and analyses conducted at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, in support of the Light Water Reactor Safety Research Program from October 1983 through March 1984. The Fuel-Coolant Interactions Study investigates the mechanism of concrete erosion by molten core materials, the nature and rate of generation of evolved gases, and the effects of fission-product release. The Hydrogen Behavior and Mitigative and Preventive Schemes Programs investigate the HECTR code for modeling hydrogen deflagration, and the Grand Gulf Igniter System II is being reviewed. All activities are continuing. 53 figs., 11 tabs.

Berman, M.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials Research and Development Plan (PLN-2803)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production, with an outlet gas temperature in the range of 750°C, and a design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite-moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic, or pebble bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic (TRISO)-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. This technology development plan details the additional research and development (R&D) required to design and license the NGNP RPV, assuming that A 508/A 533 is the material of construction. The majority of additional information that is required is related to long-term aging behavior at NGNP vessel temperatures, which are somewhat above those commonly encountered in the existing database from LWR experience. Additional data are also required for the anticipated NGNP environment. An assessment of required R&D for a Grade 91 vessel has been retained from the first revision of the R&D plan in Appendix B in somewhat less detail. Considerably more development is required for this steel compared to A 508/A 533 including additional irradiation testing for expected NGNP operating temperatures, high-temperature mechanical properties, and extensive studies of long-term microstructural stability.

J. K. Wright; R. N. Wright

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced reactor research Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to build the world's most advanced nuclear fusion reactor... ) International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), which will be built at Cadarache, near the...

294

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced research reactor Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to build the world's most advanced nuclear fusion reactor... ) International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), which will be built at Cadarache, near the...

295

E-Print Network 3.0 - austrian research reactor Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to build the world's most advanced nuclear fusion reactor... ) International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), which will be built at Cadarache, near the...

296

E-Print Network 3.0 - anuclear research reactor Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to build the world's most advanced nuclear fusion reactor... ) International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), which will be built at Cadarache, near the...

297

E-Print Network 3.0 - astra research reactor Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

than 30 countries signed a deal on Tuesday to build the world's most advanced nuclear fusion reactor... ) International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), which will be...

298

University Coal Research | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' Research Petroleum ReserveDepartment ofEnergy, OfficeDepartment of Energy

299

University of Delaware | CCEI Research Highlights  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearchScheduledProductionCCEI Advisory BoardK-12Research

300

System Upgrades at the Advanced Test Reactor Help Ensure that Nuclear Energy Research Continues at the Idaho National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fully operational in 1967, the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a first-of-its-kind materials test reactor. Located on the Idaho National Laboratory’s desert site, this reactor remains at the forefront of nuclear science, producing extremely high neutron irradiation in a relatively short time span. The Advanced Test Reactor is also the only U.S. reactor that can replicate multiple reactor environments concurrently. The Idaho National Laboratory and the Department of Energy recently invested over 13 million dollars to replace three of ATR’s instrumentation and control systems. The new systems offer the latest software and technology advancements, ensuring the availability of the reactor for future energy research. Engineers and project managers successfully completed the four year project in March while the ATR was in a scheduled maintenance outage. “These new systems represent state-of-the-art monitoring and annunciation capabilities,” said Don Feldman, ATR Station Manager. “They are comparable to systems currently used for advanced reactor designs planned for construction in the U.S. and in operation in some foreign countries.”

Craig Wise

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university research reactor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

The current state of the Russian reduced enrichment research reactors program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the last year after the 16-th International Conference on Reducing Fuel Enrichment in Research Reactors held in October, 1993 in Oarai, Japan, the conclusive stage of the Program on reducing fuel enrichment (to 20% in U-235) in research reactors was finally made up in Russia. The Program was started late in 70th and the first stage of the Program was completed by 1986 which allowed to reduce fuel enrichment from 80-90% to 36%. The completion of the Program current stage, which is counted for 5-6 years, will exclude the use of the fuel enriched by more than 20% from RF to other countries such as: Poland, Czeck Republick, Hungary, Roumania, Bulgaria, Libya, Viet-Nam, North Korea, Egypt, Latvia, Ukraine, Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan. In 1994 the Program, approved by RF Minatom authorities, has received the status of an inter-branch program since it was admitted by the RF Ministry for Science and Technical Policy. The Head of RF Minatom central administrative division N.I.Ermakov was nominated as the Head of the Russian Program, V.G.Aden, RDIPE Deputy Director, was nominated as the scientific leader. The Program was submitted to the Commission for Scientific, Technical and Economical Cooperation between USA and Russia headed by Vice-President A. Gore and Prime Minister V. Chemomyrdin and was given support also.

Aden, V.G.; Kartashov, E.F.; Lukichev, V.A. [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Status of the RERTR (Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor) Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The progress of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program is described. After a brief summary of the results which the RERTR Program, in collaboration with its many international partners, had achieved by the end of 1987, the major events, findings and activities of 1988 are reviewed. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued a formal and generic approval of the use of U3Si2-Al dispersion fuel in research and test reactors, with densities up to 4.8 g U/cmT. New significant findings from postirradiation examinations, from ion-beam irradiations, and from analytical modeling, have raised serious doubts about the potential of LEU U3Si-Al dispersion fuel for applications requiring very high uranium densities and high burnups (>6 g U/cmT, >50% burnup). As a result of these findings, the fuel development efforts have been redirected towards three new initiatives: (1) a systematic application of ion-beam irradiations to screen new materials; (2) application of Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) procedures to produce U3Si2-Al plates with high uranium densities and thin uniform cladding; and (3) application of HIP procedures to produce plates with U3Si wires imbedded in an aluminum matrix, achieving stability, high uranium density, and thin uniform cladding. The new fuel concepts hold the promise of extraordinary performance potential and require approximately five years to develop.

Travelli, A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Light water reactor safety research program, quarterly report, July-September 1980. Volume 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report covers research performed during July-September 1980 for the NRC Light Water Reactor Safety Research Program comprised of: (1) The Molten Fuel Concrete Interactions (MFCI) study of experimental and analytical investigations of the chemical and physical phenomena associated with interactions between molten core materials and concrete; (2) Steam Explosion Phenomena program to assess the probability and consequences of steam explosions during postulated meltdown accidents in LWRs; (3) Separate Effects Tests for TRAP Code Development investigating vapor pressures of fission-product species at elevated temperatures, chemical compound formation and reaction rates; (4) Containment Emergency Sump Performance (CESP) program to investigate the reliability of ECCS sumps; (5) Hydrogen Program designed to quantify the threat posed by hydrogen released during LWR accidents; and (6) Combustible Gas in Containment Program to study the generation of H2 from the corrosion of zinc and other materials located within LWR containment buildings.

Berman, M.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Supercritical Water Reactor (SCWR) - Survey of Materials Research and Development Needs to Assess Viability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Supercritical water-cooled reactors (SCWRs) are among the most promising advanced nuclear systems because of their high thermal efficiency [i.e., about 45% vs. 33% of current light water reactors (LWRs)] and considerable plant simplification. SCWRs achieve this with superior thermodynamic conditions (i.e., high operating pressure and temperature), and by reducing the containment volume and eliminating the need for recirculation and jet pumps, pressurizer, steam generators, steam separators and dryers. The reference SCWR design in the U.S. is a direct cycle, thermal spectrum, light-water-cooled and moderated reactor with an operating pressure of 25 MPa and inlet/outlet coolant temperature of 280/500 °C. The inlet flow splits, partly to a down-comer and partly to a plenum at the top of the reactor pressure vessel to flow downward through the core in special water rods to the inlet plenum. This strategy is employed to provide good moderation at the top of the core, where the coolant density is only about 15-20% that of liquid water. The SCWR uses a power conversion cycle similar to that used in supercritical fossil-fired plants: high- intermediate- and low-pressure turbines are employed with one moisture-separator re-heater and up to eight feedwater heaters. The reference power is 3575 MWt, the net electric power is 1600 MWe and the thermal efficiency is 44.8%. The fuel is low-enriched uranium oxide fuel and the plant is designed primarily for base load operation. The purpose of this report is to survey existing materials for fossil, fission and fusion applications and identify the materials research and development needed to establish the SCWR viabilitya with regard to possible materials of construction. The two most significant materials related factors in going from the current LWR designs to the SCWR are the increase in outlet coolant temperature from 300 to 500 °C and the possible compatibility issues associated with the supercritical water environment. • Reactor pressure vessel • Pumps and piping

Philip E. MacDonald

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

technology offer Vienna University of Technology | Research and Transfer Support | Tanja Sovic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

technology offer Vienna University of Technology | Research and Transfer Support | Tanja Sovic Technology Researchers of the Vienna University of Technology and the Medical University of Vienna have found application filed International patent application (PCT) filed Next steps · Electrophysiological testing

Szmolyan, Peter

306

Reactor Sharing Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress achieved at the University of Florida Training Reactor (UFTR) facility through the US Department of Energy's University Reactor Sharing Program is reported for the period of 1991--1992.

Vernetson, W.G.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

University of New Mexico Bureau of Business and Economic Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of New Mexico Bureau of Business and Economic Research CENTRAL NEW MEXICO EDUCATION NEEDS ASSESSMENT Prepared for: United Way of Central New Mexico Funding Provided by: PNM United Way of Central New Mexico Dr. Jeffrey Mitchell July 2011 #12; #12;TABLE

Maccabe, Barney

308

University of Florida Change, Petty Cash, and Research Stipend Funds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Florida Change, Petty Cash, and Research Stipend Funds Change to Existing Fund EXISTING FUND INFORMATION CHANGES TO FUND Complete all areas that are applicable for your fund request. CHANGE IN FUND LOCATION CHANGE IN CUSTODIANSHIP New Custodian InformationExisting Custodian Information

Watson, Craig A.

309

Center for Transportation Training and Research Texas Southern University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for Transportation Training and Research Texas Southern University Lei Yu, Ph.D., P.E. Professor of Transportation and Dean College of Science and Technology, and SWUTC Executive Committee Member and Technology, Industrial Technol- ogy, Mathematics, Physics, and Transportation Studies. He also oversees

310

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst 160 Governors Drive template version 3.1.2 #12;NOTICE AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This report was prepared by the Renewable Energy sponsored by the Renewable Energy Trust (RET), as administered by the Massachusetts Technology Collaborative

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

311

National Environmental Research Institute University of Aarhus . Denmark  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Department of Policy Analysis Publisher: National Environmental Research Institute University of Aarhus and the methodologies and assumptions used for the inventories are described. The pollutants considered are SO2, NOX, NMVOC, CH4, CO, CO2, N2O, particulate matter, heavy metals, dioxins and PAH. A consider- able decrease

312

Stanford University School of Medicine Responsible Conduct of Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stanford University School of Medicine Responsible Conduct of Research Session 6: Tissue Use Makeup Cases Please choose one case and write a 3-5 page paper that answers the questions that accompany many years gathering tissue samples from women with breast cancer. All donors gave permission

313

ResearchMICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY > 2012 The comeback ooze  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY > 2012 Sanctuary in paradise Rare Hawaiian birds find refuge in tiny island forests, Sarah Bird. Send your comments to the editor at mlgoodri@mtu.edu. Learn more about research at Michigan for bigger people--by design Rising sun A new dawn for solar power 16 19 20 3RESE ARCH 2012 | Michigan

314

Kyoto University has launched a Japan-Thailand collaborative research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kyoto University has launched a Japan-Thailand collaborative research project titled "Development of clean and efficient utilization of low rank coals and biomass by solvent treatment," supported biomass waste as well as low-rank coals into valuable products such as carbon fiber, biofuel, and high

Takada, Shoji

315

Research, Innovation & Economic Development at North Carolina State University ReseaRch Impetus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

results Research, Innovation & Economic Development at North Carolina State University XI, NO. 2NCElloR FoR RESEaRCh, INNovaTIoN & ECoNomIC DEvEloPmENT Terri L. Lomax agRICUlTURE aND lIFE SCIENCES Johnny C. Wynne Partnership joined our team. We will be officially known as the Office of Research, Innovation and Economic

Langerhans, Brian

316

Status report on the Small Secure Transportable Autonomous Reactor (SSTAR) /Lead-cooled Fast Reactor (LFR) and supporting research and development.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides an update on development of a pre-conceptual design for the Small Secure Transportable Autonomous Reactor (SSTAR) Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor (LFR) plant concept and supporting research and development activities. SSTAR is a small, 20 MWe (45 MWt), natural circulation, fast reactor plant for international deployment concept incorporating proliferation resistance for deployment in non-fuel cycle states and developing nations, fissile self-sufficiency for efficient utilization of uranium resources, autonomous load following making it suitable for small or immature grid applications, and a high degree of passive safety further supporting deployment in developing nations. In FY 2006, improvements have been made at ANL to the pre-conceptual design of both the reactor system and the energy converter which incorporates a supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle providing higher plant efficiency (44 %) and improved economic competitiveness. The supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle technology is also applicable to Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors providing the same benefits. One key accomplishment has been the development of a control strategy for automatic control of the supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle in principle enabling autonomous load following over the full power range between nominal and essentially zero power. Under autonomous load following operation, the reactor core power adjusts itself to equal the heat removal from the reactor system to the power converter through the large reactivity feedback of the fast spectrum core without the need for motion of control rods, while the automatic control of the power converter matches the heat removal from the reactor to the grid load. The report includes early calculations for an international benchmarking problem for a LBE-cooled, nitride-fueled fast reactor core organized by the IAEA as part of a Coordinated Research Project on Small Reactors without Onsite Refueling; the calculations use the same neutronics computer codes and methodologies applied to SSTAR. Another section of the report details the SSTAR safety design approach which is based upon defense-in-depth providing multiple levels of protection against the release of radioactive materials and how the inherent safety features of the lead coolant, nitride fuel, fast neutron spectrum core, pool vessel configuration, natural circulation, and containment meet or exceed the requirements for each level of protection. The report also includes recent results of a systematic analysis by LANL of data on corrosion of candidate cladding and structural material alloys of interest to SSTAR by LBE and Pb coolants; the data were taken from a new database on corrosion by liquid metal coolants created at LANL. The analysis methodology that considers penetration of an oxidation front into the alloy and dissolution of the trailing edge of the oxide into the coolant enables the long-term corrosion rate to be extracted from shorter-term corrosion data thereby enabling an evaluation of alloy performance over long core lifetimes (e.g., 30 years) that has heretofore not been possible. A number of candidate alloy specimens with special treatments or coatings which might enhance corrosion resistance at the temperatures at which SSTAR would operate were analyzed following testing in the DELTA loop at LANL including steels that were treated by laser peening at LLNL; laser peening is an approach that alters the oxide-metal bonds which could potentially improve corrosion resistance. LLNL is also carrying out Multi-Scale Modeling of the Fe-Cr system with the goal of assisting in the development of cladding and structural materials having greater resistance to irradiation.

Sienicki, J. J.; Moisseytsev, A.; Yang, W. S.; Wade, D. C.; Nikiforova, A.; Hanania, P.; Ryu, H. J.; Kulesza, K. P.; Kim, S. J.; Halsey, W. G.; Smith, C. F.; Brown, N. W.; Greenspan, E.; de Caro, M.; Li, N.; Hosemann, P.; Zhang, J.; Yu, H.; Nuclear Engineering Division; LLNL; LANL; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech.; Ecole des Mines de Paris; Oregon State Univ.; Univ.of California at Berkley

2008-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

317

Fuel development activities of the US RERTR Program. [Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress in the development and irradiation testing of high-density fuels for use with low-enriched uranium in research and test reactors is reported. Swelling and blister-threshold temperature data obtained from the examination of miniature fuel plates containing UAl/sub x/, U/sub 3/O/sub 8/, U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/, or U/sub 3/Si dispersed in an aluminum matrix are presented. Combined with the results of metallurgical examinations, these data show that these four fuel types will perform adequately to full burnup of the /sup 235/U contained in the low-enriched fuel. The exothermic reaction of the uranium-silicide fuels with aluminum has been found to occur at about the same temperature as the melting of the aluminum matrix and cladding and to be essentially quenched by the melting endotherm. A new series of miniature fuel plate irradiations is also discussed.

Snelgrove, J.L.; Domagala, R.F.; Wiencek, T.C.; Copeland, G.L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

A computer model for the transient analysis of compact research reactors with plate type fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A coupled neutronics and core thermal-hydraulic performance model has been developed for the analysis of plate type U-Al fueled high-flux research reactor transients. The model includes point neutron kinetics, one-dimensional, non-homogeneous, equilibrium two-phase flow and beat transfer with provision for subcooled boiling, and spatially averaged one-dimensional beat conduction. The feedback from core regions other than the fuel elements is included by employing a lumped parameter approach. Partial differential equations are discretized in space and the combined equation set representing the model is converted to an initial value problem. A variable-order, variable-time-step time advancement scheme is used to solve these ordinary differential equations. The model is verified through comparisons with two other computer code results and partially validated against SPERT-II tests. It is also used to analyze a series of HFIR reactivity transients.

Sofu, T. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Dodds, H.L. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Reactor pressure vessel integrity research at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Maintaining the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in a light-water-cooled nuclear power plant is crucial in preventing and controlling severe accidents that have the potential for major contamination release. The RPV is the only key safety-related component of the plant for which a duplicate or redundant backup system does not exist. It is therefore imperative to understand and be able to predict the integrity inherent in the RPV. For this reason, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has established the related research programs at ORNL described herein to provide for the development and confirmation of the methods used for: (1) establishing the irradiation exposure conditions within the RPV in the Embrittlement Data Base and Dosimetry Evaluation Program, (2) assessing the effects of irradiation on the RPV materials in the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program, and (3) developing overall structural and fracture analyses of RPVs in the Heavy-Section Steel Technology Program.

Corwin, W.R.; Pennell, W.E.; Pace, J.V.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

320

Neutronic calculations for the conversion to LEU of a research reactor core  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For a five-year transitional period the Greek Research Reactor (GRR-1) was operating with a mixed core, containing both Low Enrichment (LEU) and High Enrichment (HEU) Uranium MTR- type fuel assemblies. The neutronic study of the GRR-1 conversion to LEU has been performed using a code system comprising the core-analysis code CITATION-LDI2 and the cell-calculation modules XSDRNPM and NITAWL-II of the SCALE code. A conceptual LEU core configuration was defined and analyzed with respect to the three dimensional multi-group neutron fluxes, the power distribution, the control-rod worth and the compliance with pre-defined Operation Limiting Conditions. Perturbation calculations and reactivity feedback computations were also carried out to provide input to a subsequent thermal-hydraulic study. (author)

Varvayanni, M.; Catsaros, N.; Stakakis, E. [National Center for Scientific Research 'DEMOKRITOS', 153 10 Aghia Paraskevi (Greece); Grigoriadis, D. [National Center for Scientific Research 'DEMOKRITOS', 153 10 Aghia Paraskevi (Greece); Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Cyprus, P.O. Box 20537, Nicosia 1678 (Cyprus)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university research reactor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Survey of Materials Research and Development Needs to Support Early Deployment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The VHTR reference concept is a helium-cooled, graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor with an outlet temperature of 1000 C or higher. It is expected that the VHTR will be purchased in the future as either an electricity producing plant with a direct cycle gas turbine or a hydrogen producing (or other process heat application) plant. The process heat version of the VHTR will require that an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) and primary gas circulator be located in an adjoining power conversion vessel. A third VHTR mission - actinide burning - can be accomplished with either the hydrogen-production or gas turbine designs. The first ''demonstration'' VHTR will produce both electricity and hydrogen using the IHX to transfer the heat to either a hydrogen production plant or the gas turbine. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will be designed to assure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage during accidents. The fuel cycle will be a once-through very high burnup low-enriched uranium fuel cycle. The purpose of this report is to identify the materials research and development needs for the VHTR. To do this, we focused on the plant design described in Section 2, which is similar to the GT-MHR plant design (850 C core outlet temperature). For system or component designs that present significant material challenges (or far greater expense) there may be some viable design alternatives or options that can reduce development needs or allow use of available (cheaper) materials. Nevertheless, we were not able to assess those alternatives in the time allotted for this report and, to move forward with this material research and development assessment, the authors of this report felt that it was necessary to use a GT-MHR type design as the baseline design.

Eric Shaber; G. Baccaglini; S. Ball; T. Burchell; B. Corwin; T. Fewell; M. Labar; P. MacDonald; P. Rittenhouse; Russ Vollam; F. Southworth

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Production of 37Ar in The University of Texas TRIGA reactor facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The detection of {sup 37}Ar is important for on-site inspections for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty monitoring. In an underground nuclear explosion this radionuclide is produced by {sup 40}Ca(n,{alpha}){sup 37}Ar reaction in surrounding soil and rock. With a half-life of 35 days, {sup 37}Ar provides a signal useful for confirming the location of an underground nuclear event. An ultra-low-background proportional counter developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is used to detect {sup 37}Ar, which decays via electron capture. The irradiation of Ar gas at natural enrichment in the 3L facility within the Mark II TRIGA reactor facility at The University of Texas at Austin provides a source of {sup 37}Ar for the calibration of the detector. The {sup 41}Ar activity is measured by the gamma activity using an HPGe detector after the sample is removed from the core. Using the {sup 41}Ar/{sup 37}Ar production ratio and the {sup 41}Ar activity, the amount of {sup 37}Ar created is calculated. The {sup 41}Ar decays quickly (half-life of 109.34 minutes) leaving a radioactive sample of high purity {sup 37}Ar and only trace levels of {sup 39}Ar.

Egnatuk, Christine M.; Lowrey, Justin; Biegalski, S.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Haas, Derek A.; Orrell, John L.; Woods, Vincent T.; Keillor, Martin E.

2011-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

323

Light-water-reactor safety fuel systems research programs. Quarterly progress report, January-March 1985. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This progress report summarizes work performed by the Materials Science and Technology Division of Argonne National Laboratory during January, February, and March 1985 on water reactor safety problems related to fuel and cladding. The research and development areas covered are Transient Fuel Response and Fission Product Release and Clad Properties for Code Verification. 15 refs.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Light-water-reactor safety fuel systems research programs. Quarterly progress report, January-March 1984. [Fuel and cladding problems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This progress report summarizes work performed by the Materials Science and Technology Division of Argonne National Laboratory during January, February, and March 1984 on water reactor safety problems related to fuel and cladding. The research and development areas covered are Transient Fuel Response and Fission Product Release and Clad Properties for Code Verification.

Not Available

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Light-water-reactor safety fuel systems research programs. Quarterly progress report, July-September 1984. Volume 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This progress report summarizes work performed by the Materials Science and Technology Division of Argonne National Laboratory during July, August, and September 1984 on water reactor safety problems related to fuel and cladding. The research and development areas covered are Transient Fuel Response and Fission Product Release and Clad Properties for Code Verification. 17 refs., 23 figs., 5 tabs.

Not Available

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Light-water-reactor safety fuel systems research programs. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1984. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This progress report report summarizes work performed by the Materials Science and Technology Division of Argonne National Laboratory during April, May, and June 1984 on water reactor safety problems related to fuel and cladding. The research and development areas covered are Transient Fuel Response and Fission Product Release and Clad Properties for Code Verification.

Not Available

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Light-water-reactor safety fuel systems research programs. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1984. Volume 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This progress report summarizes work performed by the Materials Science and Technology Division of Argonne National Laboratory during October, November, and December 1984 on water reactor safety problems related to fuel and cladding. The research and development areas covered are Transient Fuel Response and Fission Product Release and Clad Properties for Code Verification. 30 refs., 23 figs., 2 tabs.

Not Available

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Fuel Cell Research at the University of South Carolina  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Five projects were conducted in an effort to supplement the efforts of fuel cell research at the University of South Carolina and to contribute to the Technical Plan for Fuel Cells of the Department of Energy. These efforts include significant interaction with the industrial community through DOE funded projects and through the National Science Foundation?s Industry/University Cooperative Research Center (NSF-I/UCRC) for Fuel Cells at USC. The allocation of projects described below leveraged all of these sources of funding without overlap and redundancy. 1. "Novel Non-Precious Metal Catalyst For PEMFCs" (Dr. Branko Popov) 2. "Non Carbon Supported Catalysts" (Dr. John Weidner) 3. "Hydrogen Quality" (Dr. Jean St-Pierre) 4. "Gasket Materials: Mechanical and Chemical Stability in PEMFC" (Dr. Y.J. (Bill) Chao) 5. "Mathematical Modeling of PEM Fuel Cells," (Dr. Sirivatch (Vatch) Shimpalee)

Van Zee, John W.

2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

329

Dismantling Structures and Equipment of the MR Reactor and its Loop Facilities at the National Research Center 'Kurchatov Institute' - 12051  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2008 a design of decommissioning of research reactors MR and RFT has been developed in the National research Center 'Kurchatov institute'. The design has been approved by Russian State Authority in July 2009 year and has received the positive conclusion of ecological expertise. In 2009-2010 a preparation for decommissioning of reactors MR and RFT was spent. Within the frames of a preparation a characterization, sorting and removal of radioactive objects, including the irradiated fuel, from reactor storage facilities and pool have been executed. During carrying out of a preparation on removal of radioactive objects from reactor sluice pool water treating has been spent. For these purposes modular installation for clearing and processing of a liquid radioactive waste 'Aqua - Express' was used. As a result of works it was possible to lower volume activity of water on three orders in magnitude that has allowed improving essentially of radiating conditions in a reactor hall. Auxiliary systems of ventilation, energy and heat supplies, monitoring systems of radiating conditions of premises of the reactor and its loop-back installations are reconstructed. In 2011 the license for a decommissioning of the specified reactors has been received and there are begun dismantling works. Within the frames of works under the design the armature and pipelines are dismantled in a under floor space of a reactor hall where a moving and taking away pipelines of loop facilities and the first contour of the MR reactor were replaced. A dismantle of the main equipment of loop facility with the gas coolant has been spent. Technologies which were used on dismantle of the radioactive contaminated equipment are presented, the basic works on reconstruction of systems of maintenance of on the decommissioning works are described, the sequence of works on the decommissioning of reactors MR and RFT is shown. Dismantling works were carried out with application of means of a dust suppression that, in aggregate with standard means at such works of individual protection of the personnel and devices of radiating control, has allowed to lower risk of action of radiation on the personnel, the population and environment at the expense of reduction of volume activity of radioactive aerosols in air. (authors)

Volkov, V.G.; Danilovich, A.S.; Zverkov, Yu. A.; Ivanov, O.P.; Kolyadin, V.I.; Lemus, A.V.; Muzrukova, V.D.; Pavlenko, V.I.; Semenov, S.G.; Fadin, S.Yu.; Shisha, A.D.; Chesnokov, A.V. [National Research Center 'Kurchatov Institute', Moscow (Russian Federation)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Awareness, Preference, Utilization, and Messaging Research for the Spallation Neutron Source and High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) offers the scientific community unique access to two types of world-class neutron sources at a single site - the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The 85-MW HFIR provides one of the highest steady-state neutron fluxes of any research reactor in the world, and the SNS is one of the world's most intense pulsed neutron beams. Management of these two resources is the responsibility of the Neutron Sciences Directorate (NScD). NScD commissioned this survey research to develop baseline information regarding awareness of and perceptions about neutron science. Specific areas of investigative interest include the following: (1) awareness levels among those in the scientific community about the two neutron sources that ORNL offers; (2) the level of understanding members of various scientific communities have regarding benefits that neutron scattering techniques offer; and (3) any perceptions that negatively impact utilization of the facilities. NScD leadership identified users of two light sources in North America - the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory and the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory - as key publics. Given the type of research in which these scientists engage, they would quite likely benefit from including the neutron techniques available at SNS and HFIR among their scientific investigation tools. The objective of the survey of users of APS, NSLS, SNS, and HFIR was to explore awareness of and perceptions regarding SNS and HFIR among those in selected scientific communities. Perceptions of SNS and FHIR will provide a foundation for strategic communication plan development and for developing key educational messages. The survey was conducted in two phases. The first phase included qualitative methods of (1) key stakeholder meetings; (2) online interviews with user administrators of APS and NSLS; and (3) one-on-one interviews and traditional and online focus groups with scientists. The latter include SNS, HFIR, and APS users as well as scientists at ORNL, some of whom had not yet used HFIR and/or SNS. These approaches informed development of the second phase, a quantitative online survey. The survey consisted of 16 questions and 7 demographic categorizations, 9 open-ended queries, and 153 pre-coded variables and took an average time of 18 minutes to complete. The survey was sent to 589 SNS/HFIR users, 1,819 NSLS users, and 2,587 APS users. A total of 899 individuals provided responses for this study: 240 from NSLS; 136 from SNS/HFIR; and 523 from APS. The overall response rate was 18%.

Bryant, Rebecca [Bryant Research, LLC; Kszos, Lynn A [ORNL

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Delphi research consortiumDelphi research consortium Delft University of TechnologyDelft University of Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

://http://www.delphi.tudelft.nlwww.delphi.tudelft.nl Delft University of Technology Linking multiple removal and daylightLinking multiple removal and daylight imaging for active surface seismic dataimaging for active surface seismic data D.J.D.J. Verschuur ·Implicit relation primaries and multiples: P = P - P A P ; M = P A P ; A = RS-1 ·Iterative solution: Pi+1

332

International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Projects on Structural Integrity of Reactor Pressure Vessels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has conducted a series of Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs) that have focused on irradiated reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel fracture toughness properties and approaches for assuring structural integrity of RPVs throughout operating life. A series of nine CRPs have been sponsored by the IAEA, starting in the early 1970s, focused on neutron radiation effects on RPV steels. The purpose of the CRPs was to develop comparisons and correlations to test the uniformity of irradiated results through coordinated international research studies and data sharing. Consideration of dose rate effects, effects of alloying (nickel, manganese, silicon, etc.) and residual elements (eg., copper and phosphorus), and drop in upper shelf toughness are also important for assessing neutron embrittlement effects. The ultimate use of embrittlement understanding is assuring structural integrity of the RPV under current and future operation and accident conditions. Material fracture toughness is the key ingredient needed for this assessment, and many of the CRPs have focused on measurement and application of irradiated fracture toughness. This paper presents an overview of the progress made since the inception of the CRPs in the early 1970s. The chronology and importance of each CRP have been reviewed and put into context for continued and long-term safe operation of RPVs.

Server, W. L. [ATI Consulting, Pinehurst, NC; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Interim status report on lead-cooled fast reactor (LFR) research and development.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the status of Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor (LFR) research and development carried out during the first half of FY 2008 under the U.S. Department of Energy Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative. Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor research and development has recently been transferred from Generation IV to the Reactor Campaign of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). Another status report shall be issued at the end of FY 2008 covering all of the LFR activities carried out in FY 2008 for both Generation IV and GNEP. The focus of research and development in FY 2008 is an initial investigation of a concept for a LFR Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR) Technology Pilot Plant (TPP)/demonstration test reactor (demo) incorporating features and operating conditions of the European Lead-cooled SYstem (ELSY) {approx} 600 MWe lead (Pb)-cooled LFR preconceptual design for the transmutation of waste and central station power generation, and which would enable irradiation testing of advanced fuels and structural materials. Initial scoping core concept development analyses have been carried out for a 100 MWt core composed of sixteen open-lattice 20 by 20 fuel assemblies largely similar to those of the ELSY preconceptual fuel assembly design incorporating fuel pins with mixed oxide (MOX) fuel, central control rods in each fuel assembly, and cooled with Pb coolant. For a cycle length of three years, the core is calculated to have a conversion ratio of 0.79, an average discharge burnup of 108 MWd/kg of heavy metal, and a burnup reactivity swing of about 13 dollars. With a control rod in each fuel assembly, the reactivity worth of an individual rod would need to be significantly greater than one dollar which is undesirable for postulated rod withdrawal reactivity insertion events. A peak neutron fast flux of 2.0 x 10{sup 15} (n/cm{sup 2}-s) is calculated. For comparison, the 400 MWt Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) achieved a peak neutron fast flux of 7.2 x 10{sup 15} (n/cm{sup 2}-s) and the initially 563 MWt PHENIX reactor attained 2.0 x 10{sup 15} (n/cm{sup 2}-s) before one of three intermediate cooling loops was shut down due to concerns about potential steam generator tube failures. The calculations do not assume a test assembly location for advanced fuels and materials irradiation in place of a fuel assembly (e.g., at the center of the core); the calculations have not examined whether it would be feasible to replace the central assembly by a test assembly location. However, having only fifteen driver assemblies implies a significant effect due to perturbations introduced by the test assembly. The peak neutron fast flux is low compared with the fast fluxes previously achieved in FFTF and PHENIX. Furthermore, the peak neutron fluence is only about half of the limiting value (4 x 10{sup 23} n/cm{sup 2}) typically used for ferritic steels. The results thus suggest that a larger power level (e.g., 400 MWt) and a larger core would be better for a TPP based upon the ELSY fuel assembly design and which can also perform irradiation testing of advanced fuels and materials. In particular, a core having a higher power level and larger dimensions would achieve a suitable average discharge burnup, peak fast flux, peak fluence, and would support the inclusion of one or more test assembly locations. Participation in the Generation IV International Forum Provisional System Steering Committee for the LFR is being maintained throughout FY 2008. Results from the analysis of samples previously exposed to flowing lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) in the DELTA loop are summarized and a model for the oxidation/corrosion kinetics of steels in heavy liquid metal coolants was applied to systematically compare the calculated long-term (i.e., following several years of growth) oxide layer thicknesses of several steels.

Tzanos, C. P.; Sienicki, J. J.; Moisseytsev, A.; Smith, C. F.; de Caro, M.; Halsey, W. G.; Li, N.; Hosemann, P.; Zhang, J.; Bolind, A.; LLNL; LANL; Univ. of Illinois

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

334

Low Level Radioactive Wastes Conditioning during Decommissioning of Salaspils Research Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The decommissioning of Salaspils research reactor is connected with the treatment of 2200 tons different materials. The largest part of all materials ({approx}60 % of all dismantled materials) is connected with low level radioactive wastes conditioning activities. Dismantled radioactive materials were cemented in concrete containers using water-cement mortar. According to elaborated technology, the tritiated water (150 tons of liquid wastes from special canalization tanks) was used for preparation of water-cement mortar. Such approach excludes the emissions of tritiated water into environment and increases the efficiency of radioactive wastes management system for decommissioning of Salaspils research reactor. The Environmental Impact Assessment studies for Salaspils research reactor decommissioning (2004) and for upgrade of repository 'Radons' for decommissioning purposes (2005) induced the investigations of radionuclides release parameters from cemented radioactive waste packages. These data were necessary for implementation of quality assurance demands during conditioning of radioactive wastes and for safety assessment modeling for institutional control period during 300 years. Experimental studies indicated, that during solidification of water- cement samples proceeds the increase of temperature up to 81 deg. C. It is unpleasant phenomena since it can result in damage of concrete container due to expansion differences for mortar and concrete walls. Another unpleasant factor is connected with the formation of bubbles and cavities in the mortar structure which can reduce the mechanical stability of samples and increase the release of radionuclides from solidified cement matrix. The several additives, fly ash and PENETRON were used for decrease of solidification temperature. It was found, that addition of fly ash to the cement-water mortar can reduce the solidification temperature up to 62 deg. C. Addition of PENETRON results in increasing of solidification temperature up to 83 deg. C. Experimental data shows, that water/cement ratio significantly influences on water-cement mortar's viscosity and solidified samples mechanical stability. Increasing of water ratio from 0.45 up to 0.65 decreases water-cement mortar's viscosity from 1100 mPas up to 90 mPas. Significant reduction of viscosity is an important factor, which facilitates the fulfillment all gaps and cavities with the mortar during conditioning of solid radioactive wastes in containers. On the other hand, increase water ratio from 0.45 up to 0.65 decreases mechanical stability of water-cement samples from 23 N/mm{sup 2} to the 12 N/mm{sup 2}. It means that water-cement bulk stability significantly decreases with increasing of water content. Technologically is important to increase the tritiated water content in container with cemented radioactive wastes. It gives a possibility to increase the fulfillment of container with radioactive materials. On the other hand, additional water significantly reduces bulk stability of containers with cemented radioactive wastes, which can result in disintegration of radioactive wastes packages in repository during 300 years. Taking into account the experimental results, it is not recommended to exceed the water/cement ratio more than 0.60. Tritium and Cs{sup 137} leakage tests show, that radionuclides release curves has a complicate structure. Experimental results indicated that addition of fly ash result in facilitation of tritium and cesium release in water phase. This is unpleasant factor, which significantly decreases the safety of disposed radioactive wastes. Despite the positive impact on solidification temperature drop, the addition of fly ash to the cement-water mortar is not recommended in case of cementation of radionuclides in concrete containers. In conclusion: The cementation processes of solid radioactive wastes in concrete containers were investigated. The influence of additives on cementation processes was studied. It was shown, that the increasing of water ratio from 0.45 up to 0.65 decreases water-cement mortar

Abramenkova, G.; Klavins, M. [Faculty of Geographical and Earth Sciences, University of Latvia, 19 Rainis Boulevard, Riga, LV-1586 (Latvia); Abramenkovs, A. [Ministry of Environment, Hazardous Wastes Management State Agency, 31 Miera Street, Salaspils, LV-2169 (Latvia)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

335

The U.S. Research University as a Global Model: Some Fundamental Problems to Consider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

other forms of university funding, such as the creation oflargest source of university R&D funding in S&E; share dropspresumably federal funding of university research in the

Rhoads, Robert A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Geothermal studies at the University of Utah Research Institute  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The University of Utah Research Institute (WRI) is a self-supporting corporation organized in December 1972 under the Utah Non-Profit Corporation Association Act. Under its charter, the Institute is separate in its operations and receives no direct financial support from either the University of Utah or the State of Utah. The charter includes provisions for WRI to conduct both public and proprietary scientific work for governmental agencies, academic institutions, private industry, and individuals. WRI is composed of five divisions, shown in Figure 1: the Earth Science Laboratory (ESL), the Environmental Studies Laboratory (EVSL), the Center for Remote Sensing and Cartography (CRSC), the Engineering Technology Laboratory (ETL) and the Atmospheric Physics Laboratory (APL). The Earth Science Laboratory has a staff of geologists, geochemists and geophysicists who have a broad range of experience in geothermal research and field projects as well as in mineral and petroleum exploration. The Environmental Studies Laboratory offers a variety of technical services and research capabilities in the areas of air quality and visibility, acid precipitation, surface and groundwater contamination, and environmentally caused stress in vegetation. The Center for Remote Sensing and Cartography offers applied research and services with a full range of remote sensing and mapping capability, including satellite and airborne imagery processing and interpretation. The Engineering Technology Laboratory is currently studying the interaction of the human body with electromagnetic radiation. The Atmospheric Physics Laboratory is developing hygroscopic droplet growth theory and orographic seeding models for dispersal of fog.

None

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

THE RESEARCH FOUNDATION OF STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK AT BINGHAMTON ANNOUNCEMENT OF PROFESSIONAL VACANCY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE RESEARCH FOUNDATION OF STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK AT BINGHAMTON ANNOUNCEMENT OF PROFESSIONAL Local Title: Small Business Advisor Salary Grade: Research Foundation Project Number: 1098578 Salary FOUNDATION OF STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK AT BINGHAMTON Nov 2003 #12;

Suzuki, Masatsugu

338

Research, scholarship and creative activity at Oklahoma State University 2010 OSU research team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, statisticians and hyperbaric medicine experts involved in the study are evaluating autism from several different&A section, tackling questions about our state's economic outlook and how universities can play a role researchers, a multidisciplinary team world renowned for their study of ticks and tick-borne diseases. OSU

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

339

A Carnegie Doctoral-Research University Statesboro, GA Office of Strategic Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Strategic Research and Analysis (OSRA) July 19, 2011 Project Request: Fall 2011 After-graduation Plans February 20, 2012 Office of Career Services Fall 2011 After-graduation Plans Survey Report Survey Fall 2011 After-graduation Plans Survey Fall 2011, 2/20/2012 Georgia Southern University Office

Hutcheon, James M.

340

Light-water-reactor safety research program. Quarterly progress report, July to September 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Information is presented concerning environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors; transient fuel response and fission-product release; and clad properties for code verification.

Not Available

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university research reactor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Development of a core design optimization tool and analysis in support of the planned LEU conversion of the MIT Research Reactor (MITR-II) ; Development of a core design optimization tool and analysis in support of the planned low enriched uranium conversion of the MIT Research Reactor (MITR-II) .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The MIT Research Reactor (MITR-II) is currently undergoing analysis for the planned conversion from high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU), as part… (more)

Connaway, Heather M. (Heather Moira)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

April 14, 2014 Page 1 of 2 Application for a University Research Assistant Appointment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Annual Budget *Please list projects from eligible funding sources that the University Research AssistantApril 14, 2014 Page 1 of 2 Application for a University Research Assistant Appointment Please complete this application form only for the proposal to create a University Research Assistant appointment

344

2008 Colorado State University Combined Research and Extension Annual Report of Accomplishments and Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2008 Colorado State University Combined Research and Extension Annual Report of Accomplishments and Results Status: Submitted Date Submitted: 03/31/09 2008 Colorado State University Combined Research, integrated and interactive efforts from Colorado State University research and extension programs. Integral

345

Updating reactor control: mini-computers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An aging reactor control console and a limited operating budget have impeded many research projects in the TRIGA reactor facility at the University of Utah. The, University's present console is Circa 1959 vintage and repairs to the console are frequently required which present many electronic problems to a staff with little electronic training. As an alternative to a single function control console we are developing a TRIGA control system based upon a mini-computer. The system hardware has been specified and the hardware is currently being acquired. The software will be programmed by the staff to customize the system to the reactor's physical systems and technical specifications. The software will be designed to monitor and control all reactor functions, control a pneumatic sample transfer system, acquire and analyze neutron activation data, provide reactor facility security surveillance, provide reactor documentation including online logging of physical parameters, and record regularly scheduled reactor calibrations and laboratory accounting procedures. The problem of hardware rewiring and changing technical specifications and changing safety system characteristics can be easily handled in the software. Our TRIGA reactor also functions as a major educational resource using available reactor based software. The computer control system can be employed to provide on-line training in reactor physics and kinetics. (author)

Crawford, K.C.; Sandquist, G.M. [University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Radiation Exposures Associated with Shipments of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experience has shown that the analyses of marine transport of spent fuel in the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) were conservative. It is anticipated that for most shipments. The external dose rate for the loaded transportation cask will be more in line with recent shipments. At the radiation levels associated with these shipments, we would not expect any personnel to exceed radiation exposure limits for the public. Package dose rates usually well below the regulatory limits and personnel work practices following ALARA principles are keeping human exposures to minimal levels. However, the potential for Mure shipments with external dose rates closer to the exclusive-use regulatory limit suggests that DOE should continue to provide a means to assure that individual crew members do not receive doses in excess of the public dose limits. As a minimum, the program will monitor cask dose rates and continue to implement administrative procedures that will maintain records of the dose rates associated with each shipment, the vessel used, and the crew list for the vessel. DOE will continue to include a clause in the contract for shipment of the foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel requiring that the Mitigation Action Plan be followed.

MASSEY,CHARLES D.; MESSICK,C.E.; MUSTIN,T.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Status of the RERTR program: overview, progress and plans. [Reduced Enrighment Research and Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The status of the US Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program is reviewed. After a summary of the accomplishments which the RERTR Program had achieved by the end of 1984 with its many international partners, emphasis is placed on the progress achieved during 1985 and on current plans and schedules. A new miniplate series, concentrating on U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al and U/sub 3/Si-Al fuels, was fabricated and is well into irradiation. The whole-core ORR demonstration is scheduled to begin in November 1985, with U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al fuel at 4.8 g U/cm/sup 3/. Altogether, 921 full-size test and prototype elements have been ordered for fabrication with reduced enrichment and the new technologies. Qualification of U/sub 3/Si-Al fuel with approx.7 g U/cm/sup 3/ is still projected for 1989. This progress could not have been achieved without the close international cooperation which has existed since the beginning, and whose continuation and intensification will be essential to the achievement of the long-term RERTR goals.

Travelli, A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Research and Development Program Plan -- Fiscal Year 2009–2013  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear power has reliably and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. By the year 2030, domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to grow to levels of 16 to 36% higher than 2007 levels. At the same time, most currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their 60-year operating licenses. If current operating nuclear power plants do not operate beyond 60 years, the total fraction of generated electrical energy from nuclear power will begin to decline—even with the expected addition of new nuclear generating capacity. The oldest commercial plants in the United States reached their 40th anniversary this year. U.S. regulators have begun considering extended operations of nuclear power plants and the research needed to support long-term operations. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Research and Development (R&D) Program, developed and sponsored by the Department of Energy, is performed in close collaboration with industry R&D programs. The purpose of the LWRS R&D Program is to provide technical foundations for licensing and managing long-term, safe and economical operation of the current operating nuclear power plants. The LWRS R&D Program vision is captured in the following statements: Existing operating nuclear power plants will continue to safely provide clean and economic electricity well beyond their first license- extension period, significantly contributing to reduction of United States and global carbon emissions, enhancement of national energy security, and protection of the environment. There is a comprehensive technical basis for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, economical operation of nuclear power plants. Sustaining the existing operating U.S. fleet also will improve its international engagement and leadership on nuclear safety and security issues.

Idaho National Laboratory

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Summary engineering description of underwater fuel storage facility for foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a summary description for an Underwater Fuel Storage Facility (UFSF) for foreign research reactor (FRR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF). A FRR SNF environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is being prepared and will include both wet and dry storage facilities as storage alternatives. For the UFSF presented in this document, a specific site is not chosen. This facility can be sited at any one of the five locations under consideration in the EIS. These locations are the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Hanford, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Nevada Test Site. Generic facility environmental impacts and emissions are provided in this report. A baseline fuel element is defined in Section 2.2, and the results of a fission product analysis are presented. Requirements for a storage facility have been researched and are summarized in Section 3. Section 4 describes three facility options: (1) the Centralized-UFSF, which would store the entire fuel element quantity in a single facility at a single location, (2) the Regionalized Large-UFSF, which would store 75% of the fuel element quantity in some region of the country, and (3) the Regionalized Small-UFSF, which would store 25% of the fuel element quantity, with the possibility of a number of these facilities in various regions throughout the country. The operational philosophy is presented in Section 5, and Section 6 contains a description of the equipment. Section 7 defines the utilities required for the facility. Cost estimates are discussed in Section 8, and detailed cost estimates are included. Impacts to worker safety, public safety, and the environment are discussed in Section 9. Accidental releases are presented in Section 10. Standard Environmental Impact Forms are included in Section 11.

Dahlke, H.J.; Johnson, D.A.; Rawlins, J.K.; Searle, D.K.; Wachs, G.W.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Cancer Research Institute, Loma Linda University Medical Center  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) DOE/EA-0975, evaluating the construction, equipping and operation of the Cancer Research Institute (CRI) at the Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) on its campus in Loma Linda, California. Based on the analysis in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required. This document describes alternatives, the affected environment and environmental consequences of the proposed action.

NONE

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Oklahoma State University proposed Advanced Technology Research Center. Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) evaluating the construction and equipping of the proposed Advanced Technology Research Center (ATRC) at Oklahoma State University (OSU) in Stillwater, Oklahoma. Based on the analysis in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Materials Science and Technology Division Light-Water-Reactor Safety Research Program. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1983. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The progress report summarizes the Argonne National Laboratory work performed during April, May, and June 1983 on water reactor safety problems. The research and development areas covered are Environmentally Assisted Cracking in Light Water Reactors, Transient Fuel Response and Fission Product Release, Clad Properties for Code Verification, and Long-Term Embrittlement of Cast Duplex Stainless Steels in LWR Systems.

Shack, W.J.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Materials Science and Technology Division light-water-reactor safety research program. Quarterly progress report, July-September 1983. Volume 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This progress report summarizes the Argonne National Laboratory work performed during July, August, and September 1983 on water reactor safety problems. The research and development areas covered are Environmentally Assisted Cracking in Light Water Reactors (reported elsewhere), Transient Fuel Response and Fission Product Release, Clad Properties for Code Verification, and Long-Term Embrittlement of Cast Duplex Stainless Steels in LWR Systems (reported elsewhere).

Not Available

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Research and Development of High Temperature Light Water Cooled Reactor Operating at Supercritical-Pressure in Japan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the status and future plans of research and development of the high temperature light water cooled reactor operating at supercritical-pressure in Japan. It includes; the concept development; material for the fuel cladding; water chemistry under supercritical pressure; thermal hydraulics of supercritical fluid; and the conceptual design of core and plant system. Elements of concept development of the once-through coolant cycle reactor are described, which consists of fuel, core, reactor and plant system, stability and safety. Material studies include corrosion tests with supercritical water loops and simulated irradiation tests using a high-energy transmission electron microscope. Possibilities of oxide dispersion strengthening steels for the cladding material are studied. The water chemistry research includes radiolysis and kinetics of supercritical pressure water, influence of radiolysis and radiation damage on corrosion and behavior on the interface between water and material. The thermal hydraulic research includes heat transfer tests of single tube, single rod and three-rod bundles with a supercritical Freon loop and numerical simulations. The conceptual designs include core design with a three-dimensional core simulator and sub-channel analysis, and balance of plant. (authors)

Yoshiaki Oka [Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 112-0006 (Japan); Katsumi Yamada [Isogo Nuclear Engineering Center, Toshiba Corporation, 8, Shinsugita-cho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama, 235-8523 (Japan)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Funding and the Future of U.S. Public Research Universities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Innovation through research is a critical element to a nation's success in the highly competitive global marketplace. University research provides the base from which an important part of the most competitive innovations arise. The modern research...

McPherson, Peter; Gobstein, Howard J.; Shulenburger, David E.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Conceptual Design of Molten Salt Loop Experiment for MIT Research Reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Molten salt is a promising coolant candidate for Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) Gen-IV designs. The low neutron absorption, high thermal capacity, chemical inertness, and high boiling point at low pressure of ...

Bean, Malcolm K.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Advanced reactor safety research quarterly report, October-December 1982. Volume 24  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes progress in a number of activities dealing with current safety issues relevant to both light water reactors (LWRs) and breeder reactors. The work includes a broad range of experiments to simulate accidental conditions to provide the required data base to understand important accident sequences and to serve as a basis for development and verification of the complex computer simulation models and codes used in accident analysis and licensing reviews. Such a program must include the development of analytical models, verified by experiment, which can be used to predict reactor and safety system performance under a broad variety of abnormal conditions. Current major emphasis is focused on providing information to NRC relevant to (1) its deliberations and decisions dealing with severe LWR accidents and (2) its safety evaluation of the proposed Clinch River Breeder Reactor.

Not Available

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Research on acceleration method of reactor physics based on FPGA platforms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The physical designs of the new concept reactors which have complex structure, various materials and neutronic energy spectrum, have greatly improved the requirements to the calculation methods and the corresponding computing hardware. Along with the widely used parallel algorithm, heterogeneous platforms architecture has been introduced into numerical computations in reactor physics. Because of the natural parallel characteristics, the CPU-FPGA architecture is often used to accelerate numerical computation. This paper studies the application and features of this kind of heterogeneous platforms used in numerical calculation of reactor physics through practical examples. After the designed neutron diffusion module based on CPU-FPGA architecture achieves a 11.2 speed up factor, it is proved to be feasible to apply this kind of heterogeneous platform into reactor physics. (authors)

Li, C.; Yu, G.; Wang, K. [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Accident Analysis for the NIST Research Reactor Before and After Fuel Conversion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Postulated accidents have been analyzed for the 20 MW D2O-moderated research reactor (NBSR) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The analysis has been carried out for the present core, which contains high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel and for a proposed equilibrium core with low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The analyses employ state-of-the-art calculational methods. Three-dimensional Monte Carlo neutron transport calculations were performed with the MCNPX code to determine homogenized fuel compositions in the lower and upper halves of each fuel element and to determine the resulting neutronic properties of the core. The accident analysis employed a model of the primary loop with the RELAP5 code. The model includes the primary pumps, shutdown pumps outlet valves, heat exchanger, fuel elements, and flow channels for both the six inner and twenty-four outer fuel elements. Evaluations were performed for the following accidents: (1) control rod withdrawal startup accident, (2) maximum reactivity insertion accident, (3) loss-of-flow accident resulting from loss of electrical power with an assumption of failure of shutdown cooling pumps, (4) loss-of-flow accident resulting from a primary pump seizure, and (5) loss-of-flow accident resulting from inadvertent throttling of a flow control valve. In addition, natural circulation cooling at low power operation was analyzed. The analysis shows that the conversion will not lead to significant changes in the safety analysis and the calculated minimum critical heat flux ratio and maximum clad temperature assure that there is adequate margin to fuel failure.

Baek J.; Diamond D.; Cuadra, A.; Hanson, A.L.; Cheng, L-Y.; Brown, N.R.

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

360

Energy and Environment Research Position The Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Princeton University seeks a research scientist to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy and Environment Research Position The Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and the environment, with particular emphasis on geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide. The research program at Princeton University seeks a research scientist to develop a new research program at the nexus of energy

Bou-Zeid, Elie

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university research reactor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Development of refined MCNPX-PARET multi-channel model for transient analysis in research reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reactivity insertion transients are often analyzed (RELAP, PARET) using a two-channel model, representing the hot assembly with specified power distribution and an average assembly representing the remainder of the core. For the analysis of protected by the reactor safety system transients and zero reactivity feedback coefficients this approximation proves to give adequate results. However, a more refined multi-channel model representing the various assemblies, coupled through the reactivity feedback effects to the whole reactor core is needed for the analysis of unprotected transients with excluded over power and period trips. In the present paper a detailed multi-channel PARET model has been developed which describes the reactor core in different clusters representing typical BR2 fuel assemblies. The distribution of power and reactivity feedback in each cluster of the reactor core is obtained from a best-estimate MCNPX calculation using the whole core geometry model of the BR2 reactor. The sensitivity of the reactor response to power, temperature and energy distributions is studied for protected and unprotected reactivity insertion transients, with zero and non-zero reactivity feedback coefficients. The detailed multi-channel model is compared vs. simplified fewer-channel models. The sensitivities of transient characteristics derived from the different models are tested on a few reactivity insertion transients with reactivity feedback from coolant temperature and density change. (authors)

Kalcheva, S.; Koonen, E. [SCK-CEN, BR2 Reactor Dept., Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Olson, A. P. [RERTR Program, Nuclear Engineering Div., Argonne National Laboratory, Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Expanding and optimizing fuel management and data analysis capabilities of MCODE-FM in support of MIT research reactor (MITR-II) LEU conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Studies are underway in support of the MIT research reactor (MITR-II) conversion from high enriched Uranium (HEU) to low enriched Uranium (LEU), as required by recent non-proliferation policy. With the same core configuration ...

Horelik, Nicholas E. (Nicholas Edward)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Materials Science and Technology Division Light-Water-Reactor Safety Research Program. Volume 4. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1983  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research and development areas covered are Environmentally Assisted Cracking in Light Water Reactors, Transient Fuel Response and Fission Product Release, Clad Properties for Code Verification, and Long-Term Embrittlement of Cast Duplex Stainless Steels in LWR Systems.

Not Available

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Analysis of a research reactor under anticipated transients without scram events using the RELAP5/MOD3.2 computer program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simulations for two series of anticipated transients phics. without scram (ATWS) events have been carried out for a small, hypothetical, research reactor based on the High Flux Australian Reador HIFAR using the RELAPS/MOD3.Z computer program...

Hari, Sridhar

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

THE RESEARCH FOUNDATION OF STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK AT BINGHAMTON ANNOUNCEMENT OF PROFESSIONAL VACANCY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

--- THE RESEARCH FOUNDATION OF STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK AT BINGHAMTON ANNOUNCEMENT: Asst Director - The Binghamton FundBinghamton University Foundation Salary Grade: Research Foundation-=1~2'--_---1 D Name: Rebecca Benner Department: Binghamton University Foundation Address: PO Box 6005 Binghamton

Suzuki, Masatsugu

366

Twenty-second water reactor safety information meeting. Volume 2: Severe accident research, thermal hydraulic research for advanced passive LWRs, high-burnup fuel behavior  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This three-volume report contains papers presented at the Twenty-Second Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 24-26, 1994. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from Finland, France, Italy, Japan, Russia, and United Kingdom. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting.

Monteleone, S. [comp.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Status of axial heterogeneous liquid-metal fast breeder reactor core design studies and research and development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current status of axial heterogeneous core (AHC) design development in Japan, which consists of an AHC core design in a pool-type demonstration fast breeder reactor (DFBR) and research and development activities supporting AHC core design, is presented. The DFBR core design objectives developed by The Japan Atomic Power Company include (a) favorable core seismic response, (b) core compactness, (c) high availability, and (d) lower fuel cycle cost. The AHC concept was selected as a reference pool-type DFBR core because it met these objectives more suitably than the homogeneous core (HOC). The AHC core layouts were optimized emphasizing the reduction of the burnup reactivity swing, peak fast fluence, and power peaking. The key performance parameters resulting from the AHC, such as flat axial power/flux distribution, lower peak fast fluence, lower burnup reactivity swing, etc., were evaluated in comparison with the HOC. The critical experiments at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute's Fast Critical Assembly facility demonstrate the key AHC performance characteristics. The large AHC engineering benchmark experiments using the zero-power plutonium reactor and the AHC fuel pin irradiation test program using the JOYO reactor are also presented.

Nakagawa, H.; Inagaki, T.; Yoshimi, H.; Shirakata, K.; Watari, Y.; Suzuki, M.; Inoue, K.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

University of Northern British Columbia & BC Rural & Remote Health Research Network  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Northern British Columbia & BC Rural & Remote Health Research Network Provincial in the province. The University of Northern British Columbia is the secretariat for the BCRRHRN and satellite sites are located at the University of British Columbia and the University of Victoria. Duties

Bolch, Tobias

369

NETL-Regional University Alliance Researcher to Receive Nation...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

in the classroom and as faculty advisor to the WVU Energy Club, which has designed a biodiesel reactor to convert waste grease into fuel for campus buses. Dr. Anderson is the...

370

Fuel Cell Research at the University of South Carolina  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Five projects are proposed, in an effort to supplement the efforts of fuel cell research at the University of South Carolina and to contribute to the Technical Plan for Fuel Cells of the Department of Energy. These efforts include significant interaction with the industrial community through DOE funded projects and through the National Science Foundation’s Industry/University Cooperative Research Center for Fuel Cells. The allocation of projects described below leverage all of these sources of funding without overlap and redundancy. The first project “Novel Non-Precious Metal Catalyst For PEMFCs,” (Dr. Branko Popov) continues DOE award DE-FC36-03GO13108 for which funding was delayed by DOE due to budget constraints. The purpose of this project is to develop an understanding of the feasibility and limitations of metal-free catalysts. The second project, “Non Carbon Supported Catalysts” (Dr. John Weidner), is focused on improved catalysts and seeks to develop novel materials, which are more corrosion resistant. This corrosion behavior is critical during transient operation and during start-up and shutdown. This second project will be leveraged with recent, peer-reviewed, supplemental funding from NSF for use in the National Science Foundation Industry/University Cooperative Research Center for Fuel Cells (CFC) at USC. The third project, “Hydrogen Quality,” (Dr. Jean St-Pierre) will support the cross-program effort on H2 quality and focus on supporting subteam 1. We assume this task because of we have performed experiments and developed models that describe performance losses associated with CO, NH3, H2S contaminants in the hydrogen fuel feed to laboratory-scale single cells. That work has been focused on reformate fed to a stationary PEMFC and relatively high concentrations of these contaminants, this project will seek to apply that knowledge to the issue of hydrogen fuel quality as it relates to transportation needs. As part of this project USC and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) will explore, in a collaborative effort, the usefulness of a techniques developed at ORNL to measure differences in the extent of contaminates adsorption with a spatially resolved mass spectrometer. A subcontract will be issued to ORNL for this part of this task. The fourth project, “Gaskets” (Dr. Y.J. (Bill) Chao), will complement industrial sponsorship of Project 25C in the National Science Foundation Industry/University Cooperative Research Center for Fuel Cells (CFC) at USC. We have found some materials that give relatively good initial performance and minimal long-term stress relaxation but their raw material cost is higher than that desired by stack and component suppliers. In this fourth project our goals is to obtain a fundamental understanding of the degradation mechanisms of existing gasket and seal materials in a PEMFC environment. We seek to explain the interactions of chemical and mechanical stresses that decrease the long-term durability of both existing and new sealing materials. The fifth project, “Modeling the Acid Loss in PBI-type High Temperature Membranes,” (Dr. Sirivatch (Vatch) Shimpalee) will support the development of stationary, but the fundamental studies of acid transport should have applications as new high-temperature membranes are developed for transportation and other early market fuel cells. We will work with Plug Power, Inc. (PLUG) to develop a model that will allow for long-term prediction of acid loss from PBI-type High Temperature Membranes (HTM) fuel cells. This project seeks to complete tasks which were under funded in FY2006 due to DOE budget constraints.

Van Zee, John W.

2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

371

FACT SHEET: Clean Coal University Research Awards and Project...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Indiana University and partner Purdue University Indianapolis will collaborate with Praxair Surface Technologies, Indianapolis, to develop computational models to study the...

372

NREL: Wind Research - Pennsylvania State University Wins Big...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pennsylvania State University Wins Big in Las Vegas NWTC tests Collegiate Wind Competition turbines July 29, 2014 Members of the Pennsylvania State University pose in team uniforms...

373

As a leading research university with a distinctive commitment to undergraduate education, Rice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 #12;2 Mission As a leading research university with a distinctive commitment to undergraduate in fall 2004 #12;4 Expanding academic endeavor 2006: NanoJapan (U.S.-Japan cooperative research Infodynamics with Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 2010: Institute for Urban Research 2010

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

374

THE RESEARCH FOUNDATION OF STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK AT BINGHAMTON ANNOUNCEMENT OF PROFESSIONAL VACANCY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE RESEARCH FOUNDATION OF STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK AT BINGHAMTON ANNOUNCEMENT OF PROFESSIONAL Associate Local Title: Program Manager Research Foundation Project Number: TBA If Part-time, % of time: 50 and State Law. THE RESEARCH FOUNDATION OF STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK AT BINGHAMTON ,,""" c?f,Cf!!!) #12

Suzuki, Masatsugu

375

THE RESEARCH FOUNDATION OF STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK AT BINGHAMTON ANNOUNCEMENT OF PROFESSIONAL VACANCY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE RESEARCH FOUNDATION OF STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK AT BINGHAMTON ANNOUNCEMENT OF PROFESSIONAL STEM Local Title: Academic Counselor Salary Grade: Research Foundation Project Number 1090651 Salary, .in Accordance with the Federal and State Law. ' THE RESEARCH FOUNDATION OF STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW

Suzuki, Masatsugu

376

Reactor-safety research programs. Quarterly report, July-September 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized water reactor steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision-making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Core thermal models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions.

Edler, S.K. (ed.)

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Reactor-safety research programs. Quarterly report, October-December 1982. Volume 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized-water-reactor steam-generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Core thermal models being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the bahavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities.

Edler, S.K. (ed.)

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Reactor safety research programs. Volume 1. Quarterly report, January-March 1983  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory from January 1 through March 31, 1983, for the Division of Accident Evaluation and the Division of Engineering Technology, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Evaluation of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized water reactor steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Core thermal models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions.

Edler, S.K. (ed.)

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Argonne Liquid-Metal Advanced Burner Reactor : components and in-vessel system thermal-hydraulic research and testing experience - pathway forward.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This white paper provides an overview and status report of the thermal-hydraulic nuclear research and development, both experimental and computational, conducted predominantly at Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne from the early 1970s through the early 1990s was the Department of Energy's (DOE's) lead lab for thermal-hydraulic development of Liquid Metal Reactors (LMRs). During the 1970s and into the mid-1980s, Argonne conducted thermal-hydraulic studies and experiments on individual reactor components supporting the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II), Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR). From the mid-1980s and into the early 1990s, Argonne conducted studies on phenomena related to forced- and natural-convection thermal buoyancy in complete in-vessel models of the General Electric (GE) Prototype Reactor Inherently Safe Module (PRISM) and Rockwell International (RI) Sodium Advanced Fast Reactor (SAFR). These two reactor initiatives involved Argonne working closely with U.S. industry and DOE. This paper describes the very important impact of thermal hydraulics dominated by thermal buoyancy forces on reactor global operation and on the behavior/performance of individual components during postulated off-normal accident events with low flow. Utilizing Argonne's LMR expertise and design knowledge is vital to the further development of safe, reliable, and high-performance LMRs. Argonne believes there remains an important need for continued research and development on thermal-hydraulic design in support of DOE's and the international community's renewed thrust for developing and demonstrating the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) reactor(s) and the associated Argonne Liquid Metal-Advanced Burner Reactor (LM-ABR). This white paper highlights that further understanding is needed regarding reactor design under coolant low-flow events. These safety-related events are associated with the transition from normal high-flow operation to natural circulation. Low-flow coolant events are the most difficult to design for because they involve the most complex thermal-hydraulic behavior induced by the dominance of thermal-buoyancy forces acting on the coolants. Such behavior can cause multiple-component flow interaction phenomena, which are not adequately understood or appreciated by reactor designers as to their impact on reactor performance and safety. Since the early 1990s, when DOE canceled the U.S. Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) program, little has been done experimentally to further understand the importance of the complex thermal-buoyancy phenomena and their impact on reactor design or to improve the ability of three-dimensional (3-D) transient computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and structures codes to model the phenomena. An improved experimental data base and the associated improved validated codes would provide needed design tools to the reactor community. The improved codes would also facilitate scale-up from small-scale testing to prototype size and would facilitate comparing performance of one reactor/component design with another. The codes would also have relevance to the design and safety of water-cooled reactors. To accomplish the preceding, it is proposed to establish a national GNEP-LMR research and development center at Argonne having as its foundation state-of-art science-based infrastructure consisting of: (a) thermal-hydraulic experimental capabilities for conducting both water and sodium testing of individual reactor components and complete reactor in-vessel models and (b) a computational modeling development and validation capability that is strongly interfaced with the experimental facilities. The proposed center would greatly advance capabilities for reactor development by establishing the validity of high-fidelity (i.e., close to first principles) models and tools. Such tools could be used directly for reactor design or for qualifying/tuning of lower-fidelity models, which now require costly experimental qualification for each different type of design

Kasza, K.; Grandy, C.; Chang, Y.; Khalil, H.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

380

BRILLIANT Researchers from the University of Illinois, Northwestern University, the Institute of High  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of High Performance Computing in Singapore, and Tsinghua University in Beijing report having found University, the Institute of High Performance Computing in Singapore, and Tsinghua University in Beijing

Rogers, John A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university research reactor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

The DF-4 fuel damage experiment in ACRR (Annual Core Research Reactor) with a BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) control blade and channel box  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DF-4 test was an experimental investigation into the melt progression behavior of boiling water reactor (BWR) core components under high temperature severe core damage conditions. In this study 14 zircaloy clad UO{sub 2} fuel rods, and representations of the zircaloy fuel canister and stainless steel/B{sub 4}C control blade were assembled into a 0.5 m long test bundle. The test bundle was fission heated in a flowing steam environment, using the Annular Core Research Reactor at Sandia Laboratories, simulating the environmental conditions of an uncovered BWR core experiencing high temperature damage as a result residual fission product decay heating. The experimental results provide information on the thermal response of the test bundle components, the rapid exothermic oxidation of the zircaloy fuel cladding and canister, the production of hydrogen from metal-steam oxidation, and the failure behavior of the progressively melting bundle components. This information is provided in the form of thermocouple data, steam and hydrogen flow rate data, test bundle fission power data and visual observation of the damage progression. In addition to BWR background information, this document contains a description of the experimental hardware with details on how the experiment was instrumented and diagnosed, a description of the test progression, and a presentation of the on-line measurements. Also in this report are the results of a thermal analysis of the fueled test section of the fueled test section of the experiment demonstrating an overall consistency in the measurable quantities from the test. A discussion of the results is provided. 38 refs., 72 figs., 7 tabs.

Gauntt, R.O.; Gasser, R.D.; Ott, L.J. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Research in High Energy Physics at Duke University  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the Closeout Report for the research grant in experimental elementary particle physics, carried out by the Duke University High Energy Physics (HEP) group. We re- port on physics results and detector development carried out under this grant, focussing on the recent three-year grant period (2010 to 2013). The Duke HEP group consisted of seven faculty members, two senior scientists, #12;ve postdocs and eight graduate students. There were three thrusts of the research program. Measurements at the energy frontier at CDF and ATLAS were used to test aspects of elementary particle theory described by the Stan- dard Model (SM) and to search for new forces and particles beyond those contained within the SM. The neutrino sector was explored using data obtained from a large neutrino detector located in Japan, and R & D was conducted on new experiments to be built in the US. The measurements provided information about neutrino masses and the manner in which neutri- nos change species in particle beams. Two years ago we have started a new research program in rare processes based on the Mu2E experiment at Fermilab. This research is motivated by the search for the #22; ! e transition with unprecedented sensitivity, a transition forbidden in the standard model but allowed in supersymmetric and other models of new physics. The high energy research program used proton and antiproton colliding beams. The experiments were done at the Fermilab Tevatron (proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV) and at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (proton-proton collisions at 7-8 TeV). The neutrino program used data obtained from the Super-Kamiokande detec- tor. This water-#12;lled Cherenkov counter was used to detect and measure the properties of neutrinos produced in cosmic ray showers, and from neutrino beams produced from acceler- ators in Japan. The Mu2E experiment will use a special stopped muon beam to be built at Fermilab.

Kotwal, Ashutosh V. [PI] [PI; Goshaw, Al [Co-PI] [Co-PI; Kruse, Mark [Co-PI] [Co-PI; Oh, Seog [Co-PI] [Co-PI; Scholberg, Kate [Co-PI] [Co-PI; Walter, Chris [Co-PI] [Co-PI

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

383

Research in High Energy Physics at Duke University  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the Closeout Report for the research grant in experimental elementary particle physics, carried out by the Duke University High Energy Physics (HEP) group. We re- port on physics results and detector development carried out under this grant, focussing on the recent three-year grant period (2010 to 2013). The Duke HEP group consisted of seven faculty members, two senior scientists, five postdocs and eight graduate students. There were three thrusts of the research program. Measurements at the energy frontier at CDF and ATLAS were used to test aspects of elementary particle theory described by the Stan- dard Model (SM) and to search for new forces and particles beyond those contained within the SM. The neutrino sector was explored using data obtained from a large neutrino detector located in Japan, and R & D was conducted on new experiments to be built in the US. The measurements provided information about neutrino masses and the manner in which neutri- nos change species in particle beams. Two years ago we have started a new research program in rare processes based on the Mu2E experiment at Fermilab. This research is motivated by the search for the #22;{mu} {yields} e transition with unprecedented sensitivity, a transition forbidden in the standard model but allowed in supersymmetric and other models of new physics. The high energy research program used proton and antiproton colliding beams. The experiments were done at the Fermilab Tevatron (proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV) and at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (proton-proton collisions at 7-8 TeV). The neutrino program used data obtained from the Super-Kamiokande detector. This water-filled Cherenkov counter was used to detect and measure the properties of neutrinos produced in cosmic ray showers, and from neutrino beams produced from acceler- ators in Japan. The Mu2E experiment will use a special stopped muon beam to be built at Fermilab.

Goshaw, Alfred; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kruse, Mark; Oh, Seog; Scholberg, Kate; Walter, Chris

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

384

Request for Proposals for the Hulka Energy Research Fellowships managed by the University of Maryland Energy Research Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy, · ocean thermal or wave energy or geothermal energy conversion. The proposed research mustRequest for Proposals for the Hulka Energy Research Fellowships managed by the University of Maryland Energy Research Center Announcement Date: November 15, 2011 Proposal Due Date: December 12, 2011

Rubloff, Gary W.

385

Advanced reactor safety research. Quarterly report, April-June 1982. Volume 22  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Overall objective of this work is to provide NRC a comprehensive data base essential to (1) defining key safety issues, (2) understanding risk-significant accident sequences, (3) developing and verifying models used in safety assessments, and (4) assuring the public that power reactor systems will not be licensed and placed in commercial service in the United States without appropriate consideration being given to their effects on health and safety. This report describes progress in a number of activities dealing with current safety issues relevant to both light water and breeder reactors. The work includes a broad range of experiments to simulate accidental conditions to provide the required data base to understand important accident sequences and to serve as a basis for development and verification of the complex computer simulation models and codes used in accident analysis and licensing reviews. Such a program must include the development of analytical models, verified by experiment, which can be used to predict reactor and safety system performance under a broad variety of abnormal conditions. Current major emphasis is focused on providing information to NRC relevant to (1) its deliberations and decisions dealing with severe LWR accidents, and (2) its safety evaluation of the proposed Clinch River Breeder Reactor.

none,

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Advanced reactor safety research. Quarterly report, July-September 1982. Volume 23  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Information is presented concerning core debris behavior; high-temperature fission-product chemistry and transport; containment analysis; elevated temperature materials assessment; development of LMFBR regulatory criteria and source terms; advanced reactor core phenomenology; LWR damaged fuel phenomenology; and ACRR status.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

University of Michigan Institute for Research on Labor, Employment and the Economy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Michigan Institute for Research on Labor, Employment and the Economy (IRLEE) Mission innovation, increasing entrepreneurship, and improving the economy; (5) Foster a core of interdisciplinary

Shyy, Wei

388

Proceedings of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission twentieth water reactor safety information meeting; Volume 2, Severe accident research, Thermal hydraulics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This three-volume report contains papers presented at the Twentieth Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 21--23, 1992. The papers describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included 10 different papers presented by researchersfrom CEC, China, Finland, France, Germany, Japan, Spain and Taiwan. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Weiss, A.J. [comp.] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Examples of the use of PSA in the design process and to support modifications at two research reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many, if not most, of the world`s commercial nuclear power plants have been the subject of plant-specific probabilistic safety assessments (PSA). A growing number of other nuclear facilities as well as other types of industrial installations have been the focus of plant-specific PSAs. Such studies have provided valuable information concerning the nature of the risk of the individual facility and have been used to identify opportunities to manage that risk. This paper explores the risk management activities associated with two research reactors in the United States as a demonstration of the versatility of the use of PSA to support risk-related decision making.

Johnson, D.H.; Bley, D.C.; Lin, J.C. [PLG, Inc., Newport Beach, CA (United States); Ramsey, C.T.; Linn, M.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Production capabilities in US nuclear reactors for medical radioisotopes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The availability of reactor-produced radioisotopes in the United States for use in medical research and nuclear medicine has traditionally depended on facilities which are an integral part of the US national laboratories and a few reactors at universities. One exception is the reactor in Sterling Forest, New York, originally operated as part of the Cintichem (Union Carbide) system, which is currently in the process of permanent shutdown. Since there are no industry-run reactors in the US, the national laboratories and universities thus play a critical role in providing reactor-produced radioisotopes for medical research and clinical use. The goal of this survey is to provide a comprehensive summary of these production capabilities. With the temporary shutdown of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) in November 1986, the radioisotopes required for DOE-supported radionuclide generators were made available at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR). In March 1988, however, the HFBR was temporarily shut down which forced investigators to look at other reactors for production of the radioisotopes. During this period the Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR) played an important role in providing these services. The HFIR resumed routine operation in July 1990 at 85 MW power, and the HFBR resumed operation in June 1991, at 30 MW power. At the time of the HFBR shutdown, there was no available comprehensive overview which could provide information on status of the reactors operating in the US and their capabilities for radioisotope production. The obvious need for a useful overview was thus the impetus for preparing this survey, which would provide an up-to-date summary of those reactors available in the US at both the DOE-funded national laboratories and at US universities where service irradiations are currently or expected to be conducted.

Mirzadeh, S.; Callahan, A.P.; Knapp, F.F. Jr. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Schenter, R.E. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States))

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Eight Advanced Coal Projects Chosen for Further Development by DOE's University Coal Research Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE has selected eight new projects to further advanced coal research under the University Coal Research Program. The selected projects will improve coal conversion and use and will help propel technologies for future advanced coal power systems.

392

University of Georgia Research Foundation, Inc. Expenditure Guidelines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or directors of the Research Foundation. Personal use must be avoided. Indirect cost funds which the Research

Arnold, Jonathan

393

E-Print Network 3.0 - argonne research reactor Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

research projects, which are broadly described below. Since 1990, Argonne... System is ISO 9001:2000 certified. Research at Argonne centers around three principal areas:...

394

Reactor safety research programs. Quarterly report, January-March 1985. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory from January 1 through March 31, 1985, for the Division of Accident Evaluation and the Division of Engineering Technology, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Results from an instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program being performed at Halden, Norway, are reported. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho. High-temperature materials property tests are being conducted to provide data on severe core damage fuel behavior. Thermal-hydraulic computer programs are providing best-estimate analyses for a variety of safety issues in light-water reactors. Severe fuel damage tests are being conducted in the NRU Reactor, Chalk River, Canada.

Edler, S.K. (ed.)

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Light water reactor safety research program. Quarterly report Jan-Mar 80  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Molten Fuel Concrete Interactions (MFCI) study is comprised of experimental and analytical investigations of the chemical and physical phenomena associated with interactions between molten core materials and concrete. Such interactions are possible during hypothetical fuel-melt accidents in light water reactors (LWRs) when molten fuel and steel from the reactor core penetrate the pressure vessel and cascade onto the concrete substructure. The purpose of the MFCI study is to develop an understanding of these interactions suitable for risk assessment. Emphasis is placed on identifying and investigating the dominant interaction phenomena occurring between prototypic materials. The table of contents is the following: Molten fuel concrete interactions study; Steam explosion phenomena; Separate effects tests for TRAP code development; and Containment emergency sump performance.

Berman, M.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Light-water-reactor safety research program. Quarterly progress report, July-September 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A physically realistic description of fuel swelling and fission-gas release is needed to aid in predicting the behavior of fuel rods and fission gases under certain hypothetical light-water-reactor (LWR) accident conditions. To satisfy this need, a comprehensive computer-base model, the Steady-State and Transient Gas-Release and Swelling Subroutine (GRASS-SST), its faster-running version, FASTGRASS, and correlations based on analyses performed with GRASS-SST, PARAGRASS, are being developed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). This model is being incorporated into the Fuel-Rod Analysis Program (FRAP) code being developed by EG and G Idaho, Inc., at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The analytical effort is supported by a data base and correlations developed from characterization of irradiated LWR fuel and from out-of-reactor transient heating tests of irradiated commercial and experimental LWR fuel under a range of thermal conditions. 7 refs., 2 figs.

Massey, W.E.; Till, C.E.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Reactor safety research programs. Quarterly report, April-June 1983. Vol. 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory from April 1 through June 30, 1983, for the Division of Accident Evaluation and the Division of Engineering Technology, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized water reactor steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Experimental data and validated models are being used to determine a method for evaluating the acceptance of welded or weld-repaired stainless steel piping. Core thermal models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior or full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. High-temperature materials property tests are being conducted to provide data on severe core damage fuel behavior. Severe fuel damage accident tests are being conducted at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; and an instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program is being performed at Halden, Norway. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities, including fuel rod deformation and severe fuel damage tests for the Super Sara Test Program, Ispra, Italy; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho.

Edler, S.K. (ed.)

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Safety analysis for operating the Annular Core Research Reactor with Cintichem-type targets installed in the central region of the core  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Production of the molybdenum-99 isotope at the Annular Core Research Reactor requires highly enriched, uranium oxide loaded targets to be irradiated for several days in the high neutron-flux region of the core. This report presents the safety analysis for the irradiation of up to seven Cintichem-type targets in the central region of the core and compares the results to the Annular Core Research Reactor Safety Analysis Report. A 19 target grid configuration is presented that allows one to seven targets to be irradiated, with the remainder of the grid locations filled with aluminum ''void'' targets. Analyses of reactor, neutronic, thermal hydraulics, and heat transfer calculations are presented. Steady-state operation and accident scenarios are analyzed with the conclusion that the reactor can be operated safely with seven targets in the grid, and no additional risk to the public.

PARMA JR.,EDWARD J.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Reactor safety research programs. Quarterly report, October-December 1983. Vol. 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation include investigating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems and examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics. Accelerated pellet-cladding interaction modeling is being conducted to predict the probability of fuel rod failure under normal operating conditions. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Experimental data and validated models are being used to determine a method for evaluating the acceptance of welded or weld-repaired stainless steel piping. Thermal-hydraulic models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. High-temperature materials property tests are being conducted to provide data on severe core damage fuel behavior. Severe fuel damage accident tests are being conducted at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; an instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program is being performed at Halden, Norway; and fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility.

Edler, S.K. (ed.)

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Technology Transfer The Research Profile of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Science Research Technology Transfer The Research Profile of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz #12;#12;Science Research Technology Transfer 3 Foreword In light of the tough international Technology Transfer 38 Imprint Contents Science Research Technology Transfer 5 #12;Clear Commitment

Kaus, Boris

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university research reactor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

University Venture Development Fund Transforming today's research and development into tomorrow's businesses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University Venture Development Fund Transforming today's research and development into tomorrow: University Venture Development Fund P.O. Box 243 Portland, OR 97207 Phone (503) 725-4911 It is highly this process. Thank you for supporting the University Venture Development Fund! PDX_DOCS:401207.2 [33137

Bertini, Robert L.

402

CaTER: University of Michigan's Web Portal for Clinical and Translational Empowered Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CaTER: University of Michigan's Web Portal for Clinical and Translational Empowered Research Suresh), University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI Abstract Numerous biomedical resources (e.g. websites to help find of biomedical resources at the University of Michigan revealed that the resources can be organized along

Bhavnani, Suresh K.

403

2008 New Mexico State University Combined Research and Extension Annual Report of Accomplishments and Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2008 New Mexico State University Combined Research and Extension Annual Report of Accomplishments and Results Status: Submitted Date Submitted: 06/08/09 2008 New Mexico State University Combined Research and Extension Annual Report of Accomplishments and Results 1. Executive Summary I. Report Overview New Mexico

Johnson, Eric E.

404

THE RESEARCH FOUNDATION OF STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK AT BINGHAMTON ANNOUNCEMENT OF PROFESSIONAL VACANCY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE RESEARCH FOUNDATION OF STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK AT BINGHAMTON ANNOUNCEMENT OF PROFESSIONAL at Binghamton DepartmenULocation: Binghamton University Foundation Appointment Title: Proje Local Title: Asst Director ct Staff Associate - The Binghamton Fund Salary Grade: Research Foundation Project Number: \\t8fa

Suzuki, Masatsugu

405

THE RESEARCH FOUNDATION OF STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK AT BINGHAMTON ANNOUNCEMENT OF PROFESSIONAL VACANCY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE RESEARCH FOUNDATION OF STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK AT BINGHAMTON ANNOUNCEMENT OF PROFESSIONAL at Binghamton Appointment Title: Director DepartmenULocation: Binghamton University Foundation/Advancement Services Local Title: Director of the Binghamton Fund Salary Grade: E.7 Research Foundation Project Number

Suzuki, Masatsugu

406

THE RESEARCH FOUNDATION OF STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK AT BINGHAMTON ANNOUNCEMENT OF PROFESSIONAL VACANCY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE RESEARCH FOUNDATION OF STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK AT BINGHAMTON ANNOUNCEMENT OF PROFESSIONAL at Binghamton Appointment Title: Project Staff Assistant Department/Location: Binghamton University Foundation - Advancement Services Local Title Advancement Writer Salary Grade: E.99 Research Foundation Project Number

Suzuki, Masatsugu

407

University of Rochester Medical Center / Saunders Research Building Entrance to Saunders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Building 265 Crittenden Boulevard From Syracuse and the East NYS Thruway (I-90 West) to Exit 46 (RochesterUniversity of Rochester Medical Center / Saunders Research Building Visitor Parking Entrance to Saunders Research Building New York State Thruway University of Rochester Medical Center Enlarged Detail

Goldman, Steven A.

408

Effort on Developing Cabled Ocean Observatories Research Assitant, Institute of Mechatronics Control Engineering, Zhejiang University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Mechatronics Control Engineering, Zhejiang University Post-doctoral Research Fellow, Department of Ocean and Resources Engineering, University of Hawaii Abstract Cabled ocean observatory that enables abundant powerEffort on Developing Cabled Ocean Observatories in China Yanhu Chen Research Assitant, Institute

Frandsen, Jannette B.

409

2007 Colorado State University Combined Research and Extension Annual Report Status: Accepted  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2007 Colorado State University Combined Research and Extension Annual Report Status: Accepted Date Accepted: 08/27/08 2007 Colorado State University Combined Research and Extension Annual Report 1 to programming and a re-newed vision to Colorado Extension work. The changing economy resulted in a new emphasis

410

Computational characterization and experimental validation of the thermal neutron source for neutron capture therapy research at the University of Missouri  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Parameter studies, design calculations and neutronic performance measurements have been completed for a new thermal neutron beamline constructed for neutron capture therapy cell and small-animal radiobiology studies at the University of Missouri Research Reactor. The beamline features the use of single-crystal silicon and bismuth sections for neutron filtering and for reduction of incident gamma radiation. The computational models used for the final beam design and performance evaluation are based on coupled discrete-ordinates and Monte Carlo techniques that permit detailed modeling of the neutron transmission properties of the filtering crystals with very few approximations. Validation protocols based on neutron activation spectrometry measurements and rigorous least-square adjustment techniques show that the beam produces a neutron spectrum that has the anticipated level of thermal neutron flux and a somewhat higher than expected, but radio-biologically insignificant, epithermal neutron flux component. (authors)

Broekman, J. D. [University of Missouri, Research Reactor Center, 1513 Research Park Drive, Columbia, MO 65211-3400 (United States); Nigg, D. W. [Idaho National Laboratory, PO Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Hawthorne, M. F. [University of Missouri, International Institute of Nano and Molecular Medicine, 1514 Research Park Dr., Columbia, MO 65211-3450 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Research Intensity of Canadian Universities T. Tiedje, August 16, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and total volume of research output than with the quality or productivity. Rankings have been based on a variety of criteria, including for example total research funding, research output, and the quality of their students' experience

412

Report of the ANS Project Feasibility Workshop for a High Flux Isotope Reactor-Center for Neutron Research Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Conceptual Design Report (CDR) and its subsequent updates provided definitive design, cost, and schedule estimates for the entire ANS Project. A recent update to this estimate of the total project cost for this facility was $2.9 billion, as specified in the FY 1996 Congressional data sheet, reflecting a line-item start in FY 1995. In December 1994, ANS management decided to prepare a significantly lower-cost option for a research facility based on ANS which could be considered during FY 1997 budget deliberations if DOE or Congressional planners wished. A cost reduction for ANS of about $1 billion was desired for this new option. It was decided that such a cost reduction could be achieved only by a significant reduction in the ANS research scope and by maximum, cost-effective use of existing High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and ORNL facilities to minimize the need for new buildings. However, two central missions of the ANS -- neutron scattering research and isotope production-were to be retained. The title selected for this new option was High Flux Isotope Reactor-Center for Neutron Research (HFIR-CNR) because of the project`s maximum use of existing HFIR facilities and retention of selected, central ANS missions. Assuming this shared-facility requirement would necessitate construction work near HFIR, it was specified that HFIR-CNR construction should not disrupt normal operation of HFIR. Additional objectives of the study were that it be highly credible and that any material that might be needed for US Department of Energy (DOE) and Congressional deliberations be produced quickly using minimum project resources. This requirement made it necessary to rely heavily on the ANS design, cost, and schedule baselines. A workshop methodology was selected because assessment of each cost and/or scope-reduction idea required nearly continuous communication among project personnel to ensure that all ramifications of propsed changes.

Peretz, F.J.; Booth, R.S. [comp.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

"Leveraging University Expertise to Inform Better Policy" Research Advisor Approval -If the brief preparer is a student or postdoc, please have the research advisor (PI, major  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"Leveraging University Expertise to Inform Better Policy" Research Advisor Approval - If the brief preparer is a student or postdoc, please have the research advisor (PI, major advisor, etc

California at Davis, University of

414

Theoretical analysis of the subcritical experiments performed in the IPEN/MB-01 research reactor facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The theoretical analysis of the subcritical experiments performed at the IPEN/MB-01 reactor employing the coupled NJOY/AMPX-II/TORT systems was successfully accomplished. All the analysis was performed employing ENDF/B-VII.0. The theoretical approach follows all the steps of the subcritical model of Gandini and Salvatores. The theory/experiment comparison reveals that the calculated subcritical reactivity is in a very good agreement to the experimental values. The subcritical index ({xi}) shows some discrepancies although in this particular case some work still have to be made to model in a better way the neutron source present in the experiments. (authors)

Lee, S. M.; Dos Santos, A. [Inst. de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Cidade Universitaria, Av. Lineu Prestes, 2242, 05508-000 Sao Paulo - SP (Brazil)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

CIRES /NGDC Professional Research Assistant The Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) at the University of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sciences (CIRES) at the University of Colorado at Boulder conducts collaborative research with NOAA of NGDC, David Skaggs Research Center, 325 Broadway, Boulder, Colorado. Primary Duties Work with data of format standards for environmental data; CSV, netCDF, HDF5 Familiarity with Spring, Jakarta projects

Colorado at Boulder, University of

416

Clark Atlanta Universities (CAU) Energy Related Research Capabilities...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Outlook Conference Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center HYDROGEN AND FUEL CELL EDUCATION AT CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LOS ANGELES GATE Center for Automotive...

417

Public Vs. Private Good Research at Land-Grant Universities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IP) ownership and any royalty distribution within thereceived some fraction of the royalty stream associated withThis allocation of royalty revenues provides university

Rausser, Gordon C.; Simon, Leo K.; Stevens, Reid

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Irradiation research capabilities at HFIR (High Flux Isotope Reactor) and ANS (Advanced Neutron Source)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A variety of materials irradiation facilities exist in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and are planned for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor. In 1986 the HFIR Irradiation Facilities Improvement (HIFI) project began modifications to the HFIR which now permit the operation of two instrumented capsules in the target region and eight capsules of 46-mm OD in the RB region. Thus, it is now possible to perform instrumented irradiation experiments in the highest continuous flux of thermal neutrons available in the western world. The new RB facilities are now large enough to permit neutron spectral tailoring of experiments and the modified method of access to these facilities permit rotation of experiments thereby reducing fluence gradients in specimens. A summary of characteristics of irradiation facilities in HFIR is presented. The ANS is being designed to provide the highest thermal neutron flux for beam facilities in the world. Additional design goals include providing materials irradiation and transplutonium isotope production facilities as good, or better than, HFIR. The reference conceptual core design consists of two annular fuel elements positioned one above the other instead of concentrically as in the HFIR. A variety of materials irradiation facilities with unprecedented fluxes are being incorporated into the design of the ANS. These will include fast neutron irradiation facilities in the central hole of the upper fuel element, epithermal facilities surrounding the lower fuel element, and thermal facilities in the reflector tank. A summary of characteristics of irradiation facilities presently planned for the ANS is presented. 2 tabs.

Thoms, K.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Reactor Safety Research Programs. Quarterly report, July-September 1984. Volume 3. [PWR; BWR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory from July 1 through September 30, 1984, for the Division of Accident Evaluation and the Division of Engineering Technology, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Results from an instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program being performed at Halden, Norway, are reported. Accelerated pellet-cladding interaction modeling is being conducted to predict the probability of fuel rod failure under normal operating conditions. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho. High-temperature materials property tests are being conducted to provide data on severe core damage fuel behavior. Thermal-hydraulic models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Severe fuel damage accident tests are being conducted in the NRU Reactor, Chalk River, Canada.

Edler, S.K. (ed.)

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Reactor safety research programs. Quarterly report, January-March 1984. Vol. 1. [PWR; BWR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory from January 1 through March 31, 1984, for the Division of Accident Evaluation and the Division of Engineering Technology, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Results from an instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program being performed at Halden, Norway, are reported. Accelerated pellet-cladding interaction modeling is being conducted to predict the probability of fuel rod failure under normal operating conditions. Experimental data on analytical models are being provided to aid in decision making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho. High-temperature materials property tests are being conducted to provide data on severe core damage fuel behavior. Thermal-hydraulic models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Severe fuel damage accident tests are being conducted at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada.

Edler, S.K. (ed.)

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university research reactor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Reactor safety research programs. Quarterly report, April-June 1984. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory from April 1 through June 30, 1984, for the Division of Accident Evaluation and the Division of Engineering Technology, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Results from an instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program being performed at Halden, Norway, are reported. Accelerated pellet-cladding interaction modeling is being conducted to predict the probability of fuel rod failure under normal operating conditions. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho. High-temperature materials property tests are being conducted to provide data on severe core damage fuel behavior. Thermal-hydraulic models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Severe fuel damage accident tests are being conducted at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada.

Edler, S.K. (ed.)

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Calculational-experimental research models for a fast reactor with a heterogeneous core  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The physical characteristics of heterogeneous metallic oxide cores were experimentally studied by physical tests of the critical assemblies BFS-46 and BFS-46AZ, which simulate a reactor of the BN-1600 type, into the core of which a fuel assembly with metallic uranium is inserted. A calculational model for the critical assemblies being investigated, showing the zones and their dimensions, is presented. The critical assembly BFS-46AZ is a modification of the basic critical assembly BFS-46 which adds plutonium to the IBZ to simulate its accumulation during reactor operation. The BFS-46 and BFS-46AZ assemblies have identical dimensions for the IBZ and LEZ, and have different HEZ dimensions, necessary to ensure the criticality of each assembly. Plutonium with a /sup 240/Pu content equal to 3.8% is used in the LEZ. The critically parameters are calculated using one-dimensional and two-dimensional models in a 26-group diffusion approximation based on the BNAP-78 system of group constants.

Belov, S.P.; Bobrov, S.B.; Kazanskii, Yu.A.; Kuzin, E.N.; Matveev, V.I.; Novozhilov, A.I.; Chernyi, V.A.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

EDUCATION, RESEARCH AND INNOVATION Lund University / Presentation 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2012 MAX IV & the European Spallation Source #12;Lund University / Presentation 2012 World to be completed in 2015 ESS · Based on the world's most powerful neutron source · Will be used to study in 50 countries worldwide #12;Lund University / Presentation 2012 International cooperation Lund

424

Decommissioning of the Dragon High Temperature Reactor (HTR) Located at the Former United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) Research Site at Winfrith - 13180  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Dragon Reactor was constructed at the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Research Establishment at Winfrith in Dorset through the late 1950's and into the early 1960's. It was a High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTR) with helium gas coolant and graphite moderation. It operated as a fuel testing and demonstration reactor at up to 20 MW (Thermal) from 1964 until 1975, when international funding for this project was terminated. The fuel was removed from the core in 1976 and the reactor was put into Safestore. To meet the UK's Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) objective to 'drive hazard reduction' [1] it is necessary to decommission and remediate all the Research Sites Restoration Ltd (RSRL) facilities. This includes the Dragon Reactor where the activated core, pressure vessel and control rods and the contaminated primary circuit (including a {sup 90}Sr source) still remain. It is essential to remove these hazards at the appropriate time and return the area occupied by the reactor to a safe condition. (author)

Smith, Anthony A. [Research Sites Restoration Ltd, Winfrith, Dorset (United Kingdom)] [Research Sites Restoration Ltd, Winfrith, Dorset (United Kingdom)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

The University of Mississippi Department of Electrical EngineeringCenterofAppliedElectromagneticSystemsResearch(CAESR) The University of Mississippi Department of Electrical EngineeringCenterofAppliedElectromagneticSystemsResearch(CAESR) Optimizing Multip  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

=100, NY=100 Computation Time vs Domain Size #12;The University of Mississippi Department of ElectricalThe University of Mississippi Department of Electrical EngineeringCenterofAppliedElectromagneticSystemsResearch(CAESR) The University of Mississippi Department of Electrical Engineering

Elsherbeni, Atef Z.

426

Exploratory energy research program at the University of Michigan. Progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A DOE grant to the University of Michigan for an Exploratory Energy Research Program is being used by the U-M Office of Energy Research (OER) to support faculty research and grad student research assistantships. Progress on activity during the first six months of the program is described and brief status reports on 20 energy-related faculty research projects in the physical, engineering, biological, and behavioral sciences are presented.

Kerr, W.

1980-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

427

Experience in Remote Demolition of the Activated Biological Shielding of the Multi Purpose Research Reactor (MZFR) on the German Karlsruhe Site - 12208  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2009, WAK Decommissioning and Waste Management GmbH (WAK) became owner and operator of the waste treatment facilities of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) as well as of the prototype reactors, the Compact Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (KNK) and Multi-Purpose Reactor (MZFR), both being in an advanced stage of dismantling. Together with the dismantling and decontamination activities of the former WAK reprocessing facility since 1990, the envisaged demolishing of the R and D reactor FR2 and a hot cell facility, all governmentally funded nuclear decommissioning projects on the Karlsruhe site are concentrated under the WAK management. The small space typical of prototype research reactors represented a challenge also during the last phase of activated dismantling, dismantling of the activated biological shield of the MZFR. Successful demolition of the biological shield required detailed planning and extensive testing in the years before. In view of the limited space and the ambient dose rate that was too high for manual work, it was required to find a tool carrier system to take up and control various demolition and dismantling tools in a remote manner. The strategy formulated in the concept of dismantling the biological shield by means of a modified electro-hydraulic demolition excavator in an adaptable working scaffolding turned out to be feasible. The following boundary conditions were essential: - Remote exchange of the dismantling and removal tools in smallest space. - Positioning of various supply facilities on the working platform. - Avoiding of interfering edges. - Optimization of mass flow (removal of the dismantled mass from the working area). - Maintenance in the surroundings of the dismantling area (in the controlled area). - Testing and qualification of the facilities and training of the staff. Both the dismantling technique chosen and the proceeding selected proved to be successful. Using various designs of universal cutters developed on the basis of wall saws, both the activated steel liner and the inner reinforcing layer were cut remotely in one process. This allowed for the efficient execution of the following remote concrete removal steps using mining techniques. The electro-hydraulic demolition excavator that was purchased and then modified turned out to be an ideal tool carrier system with rapid-exchange coupling. Due to the high availability, no major delays occurred. This also was a result of the consistently implemented maintenance and repair concept. With the excavator installed in a modifiable scaffolding suspended from a rotating carrier ring, all dismantling areas could be reached and treated in spite of the small space. Thanks to an optimum organization of work-flows, routine change of dismantling work, and maintenance or repair, the iterative radiological measurement campaigns could be integrated in the whole activity without the dismantling work being disturbed significantly. The ventilation system with pressure grading and pre-filtration units ensured a low contamination level in the dismantling area. It was also possible to manage the dust formed by the milling of concrete surfaces. As it was possible to further cut metal parts and crushed concrete later on, residue flows were optimized. The planned overall period for testing, dismantling the bio-shield and removing the equipment was 36 months. The final duration was 39 months. (authors)

Eisenmann, Beata; Fleisch, Joachim; Prechtl, Erwin; Suessdorf, Werner; Urban, Manfred [WAK Rueckbau- und Entsorgungs- GmbH, P.O.Box 12 63, 76339 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

The power distribution and neutron fluence measurements and calculations in the VVER-1000 Mock-Up on the LR-0 research reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The power density distribution in a reactor has significant influence on core structures and pressure vessel mechanical resistance, as well as on the physical characteristics of nuclear fuel. This quantity also has an effect on the leakage neutron and photon field. This issue has become of increasing importance, as it touches on actual questions of the VVER nuclear power plant life time extension. This paper shows the comparison of calculated and experimentally determined pin by pin power distributions. The calculation has been performed with deterministic and Monte Carlo approaches. This quantity is accompanied by the neutron and photon flux density calculation and measurements at different points of the light water zero-power (LR-0) research reactor mock-up core, reactor built-in component (core barrel), and reactor pressure vessel and model. The effect of the different data libraries used for calculation is discussed. (authors)

Kostal, M.; Juricek, V.; Rypar, V.; Svadlenkova, M. [Research Center Rez Ltd., 250 68 Husinec-Rez 130 (Czech Republic); Cvachovec, F. [Univ. of Defence, Kounicova 65, 662 10 Brno (Czech Republic)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Decommissioning the Romanian Water-Cooled Water-Moderated Research Reactor: New Environmental Perspective on the Management of Radioactive Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pre-feasibility and feasibility studies were performed for decommissioning of the water-cooled water-moderated research reactor (WWER) located in Bucharest - Magurele, Romania. Using these studies as a starting point, the preferred safe management strategy for radioactive wastes produced by reactor decommissioning is outlined. The strategy must account for reactor decommissioning, as well as for the rehabilitation of the existing Radioactive Waste Treatment Plant and for the upgrade of the Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility at Baita-Bihor. Furthermore, the final rehabilitation of the laboratories and ecological reconstruction of the grounds need to be provided for, in accordance with national and international regulations. In accordance with IAEA recommendations at the time, the pre-feasibility study proposed three stages of decommissioning. However, since then new ideas have surfaced with regard to decommissioning. Thus, taking into account the current IAEA ideology, the feasibility study proposes that decommissioning of the WWER be done in one stage to an unrestricted clearance level of the reactor building in an Immediate Dismantling option. Different options and the corresponding derived preferred option for waste management are discussed taking into account safety measures, but also considering technical, logistical and economic factors. For this purpose, possible types of waste created during each decommissioning stage are reviewed. An approximate inventory of each type of radioactive waste is presented. The proposed waste management strategy is selected in accordance with the recommended international basic safety standards identified in the previous phase of the project. The existing Radioactive Waste Treatment Plant (RWTP) from the Horia Hulubei Institute for Nuclear Physics and Engineering (IFIN-HH), which has been in service with no significant upgrade since 1974, will need refurbishing due to deterioration, as well as upgrading in order to ensure the plant complies with current safety standards. This plant will also need to be adapted to treat wastes generated by WWER dismantling. The Baita-Bihor National Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility consists of two galleries in an abandoned uranium mine located in the central-western part of the Bihor Mountains in Transylvania. The galleries lie at a depth of 840 m. The facility requires a considerable overhaul. Several steps recommended for the upgrade of the facility are explored. Environmental concerns have lately become a crucial part of the radioactive waste management strategy. As such, all decisions must be made with great regard for land utilization around nuclear objectives. (authors)

Barariu, G.; Giumanca, R. [Romanian Authority for Nuclear Activity (RAAN), Subsidiary of Technology and Engineering for Nuclear Objectives (SITON), 111 Atomistilor St., Bucuresti-Magurele, Ilfov (Romania)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Advanced Test Reactor Tour  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory is the foremost nuclear materials test reactor in the world. This virtual tour describes the reactor, how experiments are conducted, and how spent nuclear fuel is handled and stored. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

Miley, Don

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Advanced Test Reactor Tour  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory is the foremost nuclear materials test reactor in the world. This virtual tour describes the reactor, how experiments are conducted, and how spent nuclear fuel is handled and stored. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

Miley, Don

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

432

Reactor safety research programs. Quarterly report, October-December 1984. Volume 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results from an instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program being performed at Halden, Norway, are reported. Accelerated pellet-cladding interaction modeling is being conducted to predict the probability of fuel rod failure under normal operating conditions. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho. High-temperature materials property tests are being conducted to provide data on severe core damage fuel behavior. Thermal-hydraulic computer programs are providing best-estimate analyses for a variety of safety issues in light-water reactors. 8 figs., 1 tab.

Edler, S.K. (ed.)

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Greek research reactor performance characteristics after addition of beryllium reflector and LEU fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The GRR-1 is a 5-MW pool-type, light-water-moderated and-cooled reactor fueled with MTR-type fuel elements. Recently received Be reflector blocks will soon be added to the core to add additional reactivity until fresh LEU fuel arrives. REBUS-3 xy fuel cycle analyses, using burnup dependent cross sections, were performed to assist in fuel management decisions for the water- and Be-reflected HEU nonequilibrium cores. Cross sections generated by EPRI-CELL have been benchmarked to identical VIM Monte Carlo models. The size of the Be-reflected LEU core has been reduced to 30 elements compared to 35 for the HEU water-reflected core, and an equilibrium cycle calculation has been performed.

Deen, J.R.; Snelgrove, J.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Papastergiou, C. [National Center for Scientific Research, Athens (Greece)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

434

Greek research reactor performance characteristics after addition of beryllium reflector and LEU fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The GRR-1 is a 5-MW pool-type, light-water-moderated and-cooled reactor fueled with MTR-type fuel elements. Recently received Be reflector blocks will soon be added to the core to add additional reactivity until fresh LEU fuel arrives. REBUS-3 xy fuel cycle analyses, using burnup dependent cross sections, were performed to assist in fuel management decisions for the water- and Be-reflected HEU nonequilibrium cores. Cross sections generated by EPRI-CELL have been benchmarked to identical VIM Monte Carlo models. The size of the Be-reflected LEU core has been reduced to 30 elements compared to 35 for the HEU water-reflected core, and an equilibrium cycle calculation has been performed.

Deen, J.R.; Snelgrove, J.L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Papastergiou, C. (National Center for Scientific Research, Athens (Greece))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

The University of Western Ontario RESEARCH FINANCE, Financial Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.ca rzonzelm@uwo.ca nwatt3@uwo.ca ACRONYMS CFI Canada Foundation for Innovation NSERC Natural Sciences Ontario Research Fund - Genomics & Life Sciences SSHRC Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council Ministry of Economic Development and Innovation (MEDI): VP Research (IDF) Innovation Demonstration Fund

Denham, Graham

436

Design of a low enrichment, enhanced fast flux core for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Worldwide, there is limited test reactor capacity to perform the required irradiation experiments on advanced fast reactor materials and fuel designs. This is particularly true in the U.S., which no longer has an operating ...

Ellis, Tyler Shawn

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Undergraduate reactor control experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A sequence of reactor and related experiments has been a central element of a senior-level laboratory course at Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) for more than 20 yr. A new experiment has been developed where the students program and operate a computer controller that manipulates the speed of a secondary control rod to regulate TRIGA reactor power. Elementary feedback control theory is introduced to explain the experiment, which emphasizes the nonlinear aspect of reactor control where power level changes are equivalent to a change in control loop gain. Digital control of nuclear reactors has become more visible at Penn State with the replacement of the original analog-based TRIGA reactor control console with a modern computer-based digital control console. Several TRIGA reactor dynamics experiments, which comprise half of the three-credit laboratory course, lead to the control experiment finale: (a) digital simulation, (b) control rod calibration, (c) reactor pulsing, (d) reactivity oscillator, and (e) reactor noise.

Edwards, R.M.; Power, M.A.; Bryan, M. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Groundwater Monitoring and Control Before Decommissioning of the Research Reactor VVR-S from Magurele-Bucharest  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research reactor type VVR-S (tank type, water is cooler, moderator and reflector, thermal power- 2 MW, thermal energy- 9. 52 GW d) was put into service in July 1957 and, in December 1997 was shout down. In 2002, Romanian Government decided to put the research reactor in the permanent shut-down in order to start the decommissioning. This nuclear facility was used in nuclear research and radioisotope production for 40 years, without events, incidents or accidents. Within the same site, in the immediate vicinity of the research reactor, there are many other nuclear facilities: Radioactive Waste Treatment Plant, Tandem Van der Graaf heavy ions accelerator, Cyclotron, Industrial Irradiator, Radioisotope Production Center. The objectives of this work were dedicated on the water underground analyses described in the following context: - presentation of the approaches in planning the number of drillings, vertical soil profiles (characteristics, analyses, direction of the flow of underground water, uncertainties in measurements); - presentation of the instrumentation used in analyses of water, soil and vegetation samples - analyses and final conclusions on results of the measurements; - comparison of the results of measurements on underground water from drillings with the measurements results on samples from the town and the system of drinking water - supplied from the second level of underground water. According to the analysis, in general, no values higher than the Minimum Detectable Activity were detected in water samples (MDA) for Pb{sup 212}, Bi{sup 214}, Pb{sup 214}, Ac{sup 228}, but situated under values foreseen in drinking water. Distribution of Uranium As results of the Uranium determination, values higher than 0,004 mg/l (4 ppb) were detected, values that represent the average contents in the underground water. The higher values, 2-3 times higher than background, were detected in the water from the drillings F15, F12, F5, F13, drillings located between RWTP (Radioactive Waste Treatment Plant) - the 300 m{sup 3} tanks and the Spent Filters Storage (SFS). At south of this area, on the leaking direction of the underground water layer, in the drillings F1, F2, F3, F18 and at east, in F6, F7, the natural Uranium values are within the background for the underground-water. Distribution of Radon For the Radon determination with RAD 7 equipment, water samples were taken from the same piezo-metrical drilling, 2 or 4 times during of six months period, and then, the average contents were calculated, which varied between 0,35 - 2,1 Bq/l. The values higher than 1,1 -1,2 Bq/l were detected in the water taken from the drillings located in the northern part (F10, F11) and in the eastern part (F6, F8) of the Institute fences (around of the radioactive waste storage facilities). The concentrations of 0,3 - 0,5 Bq/l are in the underground-water layer 'intercepted' by the piezo-metrical drillings (F1, F2, F3) located near the Nuclear Reactor. Concentration of heavy metals: 0.04-0.08 mg/l Pb in F5, F14, F7, F8 exceeding MCA-Maximum Admissible Concentration (0.01 mg/l) for Pb, and for Zn in F5, F7, F8, F14 are 0.2-0.5 mg/l situated under MCA , and 0.18 mg/l in F18, in accordance with tendency of decreasing of concentration of contaminants. After 50 years of deploying nuclear activities on the site the underground water quality is in very good condition. Taking into consideration the direction of the underground water flow, it results that, only in the area of underground pipe, around of the research reactor and radioactive waste treatment plant, the quality of water is influenced, and remediation actions are not necessary. Based on measurements executed in F18, the water quality is the same with any other part of the region. During the decommissioning of the Research Reactor, the samples from 18 drillings will be analysed monthly, and the contents of the heavy metals, Pb and Zn, will be monitored carefully, together with all the factors: air, soil, vegetation, subsoil, water surface and underground water. A great attention will be paid t

Dragusin, Mitica [National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering-Horia Hulubei - IFIN-HH, Bucharest-Magurele, Romania, POBox MG-6, 077125, Ilfov (Romania)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

439

MONTANA STATE UNIVERSITY RESEARCH AND OTHER SPONSORED PROGRAMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,574,166 Activities & Engagement $20,078 Research Stations $576,115 MMEC/MilTech $1,312,074 Division of Health

Maxwell, Bruce D.

440

The Interdivisional Research Building, which will bring together University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

carbon-14 dating; executed the first controlled, self-sustaining nuclear chain . The ARB will house the Institute for Biophysical Dynamics as well as the Materials Research Science

Gardel, Margaret

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university research reactor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Two U.S. University Research Reactors to be Converted From Highly Enriched  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment of EnergyTheDepartment of EnergyDepartment ofUranium to

442

American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Wave Rotor Research Program at Michigan State University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and power generation purposes including utilization of wave rotors for microturbines, ultra-micro gas turbines, and water refrigeration systems. In collaboration with the research team at Warsaw University

MĂĽller, Norbert

443

Proceedings of the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting: Volume 1, Plenary session; Advanced reactor research; advanced control system technology; advanced instrumentation and control hardware; human factors research; probabilistic risk assessment topics; thermal hydraulics; thermal hydraulic research for advanced passive LWRs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This three-volume report contains 90 papers out of the 102 that were presented at the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 25--27, 1993. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from France, Germany, Japan, Russia, Switzerland, Taiwan, and United Kingdom. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting. Individual papers have been cataloged separately. This document, Volume 1 covers the following topics: Advanced Reactor Research; Advanced Instrumentation and Control Hardware; Advanced Control System Technology; Human Factors Research; Probabilistic Risk Assessment Topics; Thermal Hydraulics; and Thermal Hydraulic Research for Advanced Passive Light Water Reactors.

Monteleone, S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [comp.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Delft University of Technology Software Engineering Research Group  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

van Deursen and Ali Mesbah. Research Issues in the Automated Testing of Ajax Applications. In Proceedings 36th International Conference on Current Trend in Theory and Practice of Computer Science (SOFSEM permission of the authors. #12;Research Issues in the Automated Testing of Ajax Applications Arie van Deursen

Mesbah, Ali

445

National Environmental Research Institute University of Aarhus . Denmark  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

No. 236, 2007 Danish emission inventories for road transport and other mobile sources Inventories . Denmark Research notes from NERI No. 236, 2007 Danish emission inventories for road transport and other mobile sources Inventories until year 2004 Morten Winther #12;Data sheet Series title and no.: Research

446

Enterprise Campuses Clemson University International Center for Automotive Research (CUICAR)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of five LEED certified buildings; Innovation Place Tower, BMW Information Technology Research Center / Pioneer Partners: BMW, Michelin, Proterra, Timken, AT&T, ATW, SCRA Campus Partners: BMW, CADFEM, CCIT-Pur, Tigges USA, Toho Tenax Research Partners: BMW, Bosch, Chrysler, Dassault Systemes, DriveSafety, EZGO

Duchowski, Andrew T.

447

Benchmark calculations for a heavy water research reactor using the WIMS-D4M code and a ENDF/B-V based library  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of unit-cell and global diffusion and transport calculations performed for the Georgia Tech heavy water research reactor using the WIMS-D4m code and a new ENDF/B-V based library are presented in this paper. Key cross sections, eigenvalues, neutron fluxes and peak power densities obtained from global diffusion calculations are compared.

Mo, S.C.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

448

Research Experience for Undergraduates At the University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physics Research Experience for Undergraduates At the University of Illinois at Urbana.illinois.edu/undergrad/reu/http://physics.illinois.edu/undergrad/reu/ The University of Illinois REU/Cosmology · Biological Physics · Condensed Matter Physics · High Energy Physics · Nuclear Physics · Physics Education

Gilbert, Matthew

449

Multi-University Research to Advance Discovery Fusion Energy Science using a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dept of Applied Physics and Applied Math, Columbia University, New York, NY Plasma Science and FusionMulti-University Research to Advance Discovery Fusion Energy Science using a Superconducting Center, MIT, Cambridge, MA Outline · Intermediate scale discovery fusion energy science needs support

450

POLICY STATEMENT University of Georgia Research Foundation, Inc. Policy on Equity Acquisition in Licensing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

POLICY STATEMENT University of Georgia Research Foundation, Inc. Policy on Equity Acquisition the interests of the company over their responsibilities to UGARF and the University of Georgia. This Policy with this Policy. II. Policy In the course of intellectual property licensing, UGARF, through the work of TCO, may

Arnold, Jonathan

451

Industrial Research Chair in Energy Systems for Smart Cities SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY, CANADA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Industrial Research Chair in Energy Systems for Smart Cities SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY, CANADA energy, as well as any other renewable energy sources and related technology in alignment The Faculty of Applied Sciences at Simon Fraser University, British Columbia, Canada, invites applications

452

Norwich University Applied Research Institutes Cyber Security Education/Training and Exercises  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Norwich University Applied Research Institutes Cyber Security Education/Training and Exercises October 18, 2013 ­ University of Memphis Cyber Security Expo #12;Training ­ Cyber Incident Awareness Training Emergency Management for IT Professionals Cyber Security Exercise Development Tools ­ Cyber Smart

Dasgupta, Dipankar

453

SymposiumClinical Research Priority Program University of Zurich "Viral Infectious Diseases"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Biosystems Science and Engineering (BSSE), ETH Zurich 15:25 Coffee break Part II: Metagenomics ­ ChairSymposiumClinical Research Priority Program ­ University of Zurich "Viral Infectious Diseases:00 Great Lecture Hall WEST, UniversityHospital Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, Zurich 14:00 Welcome

Zürich, Universität

454

Advanced research and technoloty: University Coal Research Program. [Listed by state, organization and contract No. plus brief description  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In October 1979, Congress provided a new budget line item of $5 million for a program open to universities with existing laboratories capable of performing coal research. In response, the Department of Energy developed a national and regional program focused on university work in coal conversion and utilization. The program emphasizes coal combustion, conversion of coal to synthetic oil and gases, and characterization of coals from various regions of the country, and encourages the investigation and development of pertinent, promising, or novel ideas for advancing our knowledge of coal science. The program was announced to the academic community in December 1979, inviting more than 2000 departments of chemistry, chemical engineering, and mechanical engineering as well as academic vice-presidents for research, and university faculty to submit coal research proposals. By March 1980, more than 500 proposals had been received for consideration. By June 1980, after technical review of the proposals, 41 grants were awarded to 33 universities in 24 states. Each of these projects is described by means of a single-page summary that includes pertinent technical and fiscal information. The University Coal Research Program complements other DOE Fossil Energy activities with universities consisting of more than 400 active projects with an annual funding level of about $42 million. However, the new program differs in several respects: (1) it is performed through grants, rather than contracts or cooperative agreements, thereby offering investigators greater leeway in approaches to performance of their research objectives, (2) although mission oriented, it supports somewhat longer-term and more fundamental projects, and (3) it includes the training of students as an important objective.

Not Available

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

The University of British Columbia, aspiring to be Canada's best university, will provide students with an outstanding and distinctive education, and conduct leading research to serve  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;The University of British Columbia, aspiring to be Canada's best university, will provide of British Columbia, Canada, and the world. Our Mission The University of British Columbia will provide its with and for their communities, and be agents for positive change. Research Principles The University of British Columbia

Ollivier-Gooch, Carl

456

Energy Research at The State University of New York  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the methane as a fuel and its potential for use in an internal combustion engine. Contact: Mr. James Van bacteria in the production of hydrogen. Contact: Dr. Neil Ringler, SUNY ESF, (315) 470-6606, neilringler Sciences at Cornell University, (607) 255-2478, lpw1@cornell.edu Hydrogen economy ­ Developing better

Suzuki, Masatsugu

457

University of Southampton Research Repository ePrints Soton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An experimental investigation into LNG rollover has been performed, using cryogenic liquids to simulate a two- layered LNG system. A vacuum insulated glass vessel was designed and constructed for rollover simulation, pagination http://eprints.soton.ac.uk #12;UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHAMPTON ROLLOVER AND INTERFACIAL STUDIES IN LNG

458

Pioneering research from the University of Cambridge The machine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar power 34 ­ 35 Sarah Franklin 18 ­ 19 Microscopic crystals 20 ­ 21 Venice's Lagoon 22 ­ 23 from energy, biodiversity and food security to anthropology, architecture, history and economics, who and the environment across the University: from the development of new sources of energy and the design of sustainable

Talbot, James P.

459

University of Southampton Research Repository ePrints Soton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mechanism is therefore needed so the lighting strike damage processes can be numerically investigated, pagination http://eprints.soton.ac.uk #12;UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHAMPTON Modelling of the Thermal Chemical Damage investigations relating to lightning strike damage of Carbon Fibre Composites (CFC), have assumed that the energy

460

ResearchMICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY > 2011 APOCALYPSE THEN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Medici recognized for fuel-cell discoveries 25 18 20 24 25 23 3Michigan Technological University #12 the strongest acids and alkalies. History of greed, power, and the Golden Gate receives accolades Historian history. Paying the Toll: Local Power, Regional Politics, and the Golden Gate Bridge tells the tale

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "university research reactor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

University of Southampton Research Repository ePrints Soton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Stella Kremmyda Thesis for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy August 2010 #12;I UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHAMPTON ABSTRACT of Philosophy SALMON IN PREGANCY STUDY (SIPS): THE EFFECTS OF INCREASED OILY FISH CONSUMPTION ON MATERNAL. Epidemiological studies link higher fish intake during pregnancy with lower risk of atopy in the offspring. Oily

Quartly, Graham

462

College of Law, University of Saskatchewan, Canada Research Chair in Law (Tier 2) The College of Law at the University of Saskatchewan in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada seeks to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

College of Law, University of Saskatchewan, Canada Research Chair in Law (Tier 2) The College of Law at the University of Saskatchewan in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada seeks to recruit and nominate a Canada Research Chair in Law (Tier 2). The Canada Research Chair program (www

Saskatchewan, University of

463

Fuel Cell Research at the University of Delaware  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The grant initiated nine basic and applied research projects to improve fundamental understanding and performance of the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells, to explore innovative methods for hydrogen production and storage, and to address the critical issues and barriers to commercialization. The focus was on catalysis, hydrogen production and storage, membrane durability and flow modeling and characterization of Gas Diffusion Media. Three different types of equipment were purchase with this grant to provide testing and characterization infrastructure for fuel cell research and to provide undergraduate and graduate students with the opportunity to study fuel cell membrane design and operation. They are (i) Arbin Hydrogen cell testing station, (ii) MTS Alliance�¢���¢ RT/5 material testing system with an ESPEC custom-designed environmental chamber for membrane Durability Testing and (iii) Chemisorption for surface area measurements of electrocatalysts. The research team included ten faculty members who addressed various issues that pertain to Fuel Cells, Hydrogen Production and Storage, Fuel Cell transport mechanisms. Nine research tasks were conducted to address the critical issues and various barriers to commercialization of Fuel Cells. These research tasks are subdivided in the general areas of (i) Alternative electrocatalysis (ii) Fuel Processing and Hydrogen Storage and (iii) Modeling and Characterization of Membranes as applied to Fuel Cells research.. The summary of accomplishments and approaches for each of the tasks is presented below

Chen, Jingguang G.; Advani, Suresh G.

2006-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

464

New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute, New Mexico State University http://wrri.nmsu.edu Problem and research objectives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is disposed of via deep injec- tion wells. The amount of water disposed of through the injection wells is vast Huang and Snezna Rogelj, New Mexico Tech Project descriptors: produced water, membrane desalinationNew Mexico Water Resources Research Institute, New Mexico State University http

Johnson, Eric E.

465

Nuclear Fission Reactor Safety Research in FP7 and future perspectives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The European Union (?U) has defined in the Europe 2020 strategy and 2050 Energy Roadmap its long-term vision for establishing a secure, sustainable and competitive energy system and setting up legally binding targets by 2020 for reducing greenhouse emissions, by increasing energy efficiency and the share of renewable energy sources while including a significant share from nuclear fission. Nuclear energy can enable the further reduction in harmful emissions and can contribute to the EU’s competitive energy system, security of supply and independence from fossil fuels. Nuclear fission is a valuable option for those 14 EU countries that promote its use as part of their national energy mix. The European Group on Ethics in Science and New Technologies (EGE) adopted its Opinion No.27 ‘An ethical framework for assessing research, production and use of energy’ and proposed an integrated ethics approach for the research, production and use of energy in the EU, seeking equilibrium among four criteria – access ...

Garbil, Roger

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

University Teams Lead Innovative Solar Research Projects | Department of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layeredof2014NationalUniversity Partnerships

467

results.Research and Graduate Studies at North Carolina State University Achievements in Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

it comes to this global challenge. Research here is expanding North Carolina's biofuels industries, smart

Parker, Matthew D. Brown

468

University of Missouri Only One Mizzou acres of campus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

medicine and a nuclear research reactor on one campus 1 There's only one MIZZOU! #12;University of Missouri-have gadgets, fashion apparel and books. Mizzou's Student Recreation Complex, while preserving elements

Taylor, Jerry

469

Final Closeout Report University Research Program in Robotics for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report covers the 2003-04 contract period, with a retrospective of the 11 years for the contract, from 1993 to 2004. This includes personnel, technical publications and reports, plus research laboratories employed. Specific information is given in eight research areas, reporting on all technology developed and/or deployed by the University of Florida.

James S. Tulenko; Carl Crane

2004-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

470

Furman University NIH-INBRE and NSF-RII Programs 2013 Summer Undergraduate Research Application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Furman University NIH-INBRE and NSF-RII Programs 2013 Summer Undergraduate Research Application Excellence (NIH-INBRE) and Research Infrastructure Improvement (NSF-RII) Awards, will fund several of $5,000 (NIH-INBRE, tax withheld) or stipend of $4,500 (NSF-RII, no taxes withheld) will be provided

471

The Economic Impact of Oregon's Urban Research University $1.4 billion and growing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Economic Impact of Oregon's Urban Research University $1.4 billion and growing #12;From this in the face of tough economic times. This report offers a snapshot of the economic benefits Portland State are an economic catalyst through our partnerships, our research and our programs. Continue to expect great things

Bertini, Robert L.

472

Environmental Geochemistry Research Program Dr. Bruce E. Herbert, Texas A&M University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Geochemistry Research Program Dr. Bruce E. Herbert, Texas A&M University Geology, South Tx. Recent Funded Research Projects Nonpoint Source Contaminants from South Texas Uranium Mines): Watershed-Scale bioavailability of arsenic released from South Texas uranium mines · Chris Markley, Ph

Herbert, Bruce

473

Developing fuel management capabilities based on coupled Monte Carlo depletion in support of the MIT Research Reactor (MITR) conversion .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Pursuant to a 1986 NRC ruling, the MIT Reactor (MITR) is planning on converting from the use of highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched… (more)

Romano, Paul K. (Paul Kollath)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Materials Science Division light-water-reactor safety research program. Quarterly progress report, January-March 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Information is presented concerning environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors; transient fuel response and fission product release; and clad properties for code verification.

Shack, W.J.; Rest, J.; Kassner, T.F.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Successful Completion of the Largest Shipment of Russian Research Reactor High-Enriched Uranium Spent Nuclear Fuel from Czech Republic to Russian Federation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On December 8, 2007, the largest shipment of high-enriched uranium spent nuclear fuel was successfully made from a Russian-designed nuclear research reactor in the Czech Republic to the Russian Federation. This accomplishment is the culmination of years of planning, negotiations, and hard work. The United States, Russian Federation, and the International Atomic Energy Agency have been working together on the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return (RRRFR) Program in support of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative. In February 2003, RRRFR Program representatives met with the Nuclear Research Institute in Rež, Czech Republic, and discussed the return of their high-enriched uranium spent nuclear fuel to the Russian Federation for reprocessing. Nearly 5 years later, the shipment was made. This paper discusses the planning, preparations, coordination, and cooperation required to make this important international shipment.

Michael Tyacke; Dr. Igor Bolshinsky; Jeff Chamberlin

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Sixteenth water reactor safety information meeting: Proceedings: Volume 5, NUREG-1150, accident managment, recent advances in severe accident research, TMI-2, BWR Mark l shell failure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This five-volume report contains 141 papers out of the 175 that were presented at the Sixteenth Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland, during the week of October 24--27, 1988. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included twenty different papers presented by researchers from Germany, Italy, Japan, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan and the United Kingdom. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting. This document, Volume 5, discusses NUREG-1150, Accident Management, Recent Advances in Severe Accident Research, BWR Mark I Shell Failure, and the Three Mile Island-2 Reactor.

Weiss, A.J. (comp.)

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Howard University Researchers Represented in the E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr FlickrGuidedCH2MLLC HistoryVeteransto get a NERSCHoward University

478

University of Dayton Research Institute | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop,Save Energy Now Jump(EC-LEDS)Agriculture Name:AlbertaUniversity of

479

University of Maine Integrated Forest Product Refinery (IFPR) Technology Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project supported research on science and technology that forms a basis for integrated forest product refinery for co-production of chemicals, fuels and materials using existing forest products industry infrastructure. Clear systems view of an Integrated Forest Product Refinery (IFPR) allowed development of a compelling business case for a small scale technology demonstration in Old Town ME for co-production of biofuels using cellulosic sugars along with pulp for the new owners of the facility resulting in an active project on Integrated Bio-Refinery (IBR) at the Old Town Fuel & Fiber. Work on production of advanced materials from woody biomass has led to active projects in bioplastics and carbon nanofibers. A lease for 40,000 sq. ft. high-bay space has been obtained to establish a Technology Research Center for IFPR technology validation on industrially relevant scale. UMaine forest bioproducts research initiative that began in April 2006 has led to establishment of a formal research institute beginning in March 2010.

Pendse, Hemant P.

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

480

REPORT ON RESEARCH 2010 UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS AMHERST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Commonwealth, the nation, and the world. 01 FROM THE VICE CHANCELLOR 03 STIMULATING YEAR 06 WHAT'S NEXT FOR BIOFUELS RESEARCH 08 MIGHTY MICROBE 10 POWER SURGE! 12 BRIDGING THE GAP 14 BRIGHT MINDS 16 AFRO-AM TURNS 40 is a founding partner in the soon-to-be- constructed Green High Performance Computing Center. This world

Nagurney, Anna

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481

California State University Long Beach, Research Foundation Employment Opportunities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Doctoral Research Associate PAYROLL CLASSIFICATION: Post-Doctoral Fellow I DEPARTMENT: Psychology URM Program STATUS be added as required. EDUCATION, SKILLS AND ABILITIES: Candidates must have a Ph.D. or a Bachelor's Degree in Social or Educational Psychology, or closely related field. Excellent organization, written

Sorin, Eric J.

482

University of New Mexico Bureau of Business and Economic Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Employment Statistics 720 740 760 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 UNM Bureau of Business and Economic Research of Labor Statistics, Current Employment Statistics 0.86 0.88 0.90 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 New Mexico's coincident index Coincident index includes: · Nonfarm employment · Avg. hours worked in manufacturing

New Mexico, University of

483

EconomicImpactofResearch&Commercialisationat LeidenUniversity&LeidenUniversityMedicalCentre  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

@biggareconomics.co.uk www.biggareconomics.co.uk #12;CONTENTS Page 1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY in the Netherlands and has a reputation as one of Europe's top universities. The LUMC, one of the Netherlands eight

Galis, Frietson