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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "units operable capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Capacity planning and admission control policies for intensive care units  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Poor management of the patient flow in intensive care units (ICUs) causes service rejections and presents significant challenges from the standpoint of capacity planning and management in ICUs. This thesis reports on the ...

Chaiwanon, Wongsakorn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Predicting Operator Capacity for Supervisory Control of Multiple UAVs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Predicting Operator Capacity for Supervisory Control of Multiple UAVs M.L. Cummings, C. E. Nehme, J, uninhabited (also known as unmanned) ae- rial vehicles (UAVs) have become indispensable assets to militarized forces. UAVs require human guidance to varying degrees and often through several operators. However

Cummings, Mary "Missy"

3

OFFICE OF RESOURCE PLANNING OPERATING BUDGET UNIT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OFFICE OF RESOURCE PLANNING Manager Sarah Teo OPERATING BUDGET UNIT Deputy Director (Operating, Strategic Initiatives & Consolidated Budgets) Tay Sok Kian Senior Director Ajith Prasad Senior Associate Initiatives & Research Budgets: (Planning & Budget Management) Revenue Policies & Planning: (Grants

Leng, Chenlei

4

Flood control reservoir operations for conditions of limited storage capacity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). Therefore, if the entire flood control capacity of a reservoir is available, only an extremely severe flood event would require the implementation of the EOS for most reservoir projects, and thus the bulk of the research has been focused on how to manage... operations objectives. In other words, the REOS provide a set of rules that reflect the risk of flooding upstream as well as downstream of the dams. The USACE and other reservoir management agencies may use the methodology proposed in this study...

Rivera Ramirez, Hector David

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

5

Improving Unit Operations-Test Station Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IMPROVING UNIT OPERATIONS - TEST STATION PERFORMANCE JosqIb 1. Filak. Jr, ? Corporate Energy Manager. Park.er?Hannafin COfpontioo- Cleveland. Oh ABSTRACT: This program's basic concept deals with the possibilities for reducing energy efficiency... requirements, control operation test performance functions more successfully, and retain peak load surges from reaching higher utility rate expense levels. 142 ESL-IE-95-04-23 Proceedings from the Seventeenth Industrial Energy Technology Conference...

Filak, J. J. Jr.

6

Operating Instructions CASSEHE PUMP DRIVE UNIT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4 · Operating Instructions CASSEHE® PUMP DRIVE UNIT Catalog No. 72-510-000 72-510-220 PUMPING The squeezing action of rollers on tubing causes the peristaltic pumping action. The flow is proportionate to the speied of the rollers and the inside diameter of the tubing, both of which can be varied. Pumping

Kleinfeld, David

7

Unit costs of waste management operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides estimates of generic costs for the management, disposal, and surveillance of various waste types, from the time they are generated to the end of their institutional control. Costs include monitoring and surveillance costs required after waste disposal. Available data on costs for the treatment, storage, disposal, and transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive, low-level radioactive, transuranic radioactive, hazardous, mixed (low-level radioactive plus hazardous), and sanitary wastes are presented. The costs cover all major elements that contribute to the total system life-cycle (i.e., ``cradle to grave``) cost for each waste type. This total cost is the sum of fixed and variable cost components. Variable costs are affected by operating rates and throughput capacities and vary in direct proportion to changes in the level of activity. Fixed costs remain constant regardless of changes in the amount of waste, operating rates, or throughput capacities. Key factors that influence cost, such as the size and throughput capacity of facilities, are identified. In many cases, ranges of values for the key variables are presented. For some waste types, the planned or estimated costs for storage and disposal, projected to the year 2000, are presented as graphics.

Kisieleski, W.E.; Folga, S.M.; Gillette, J.L.; Buehring, W.A.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

CANADA RUSSIA UNITED KINGDOM UNITED STATES Building / Launching / Operating first ever high definition,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 CANADA · RUSSIA · UNITED KINGDOM · UNITED STATES 1 #12;2 Building / Launching / Operating first

9

Unit Operation Efficiency Improvement Through Motionless Mixing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

instances, the power consumption associated with mix ing operations constitutes the major energy demand of a plant or factory. Generally speaking, most industrial mixing occurs in a tank with a motor driven shaft and a mixing blade or paddle assembly... 1/4 inch in diameter, to units many feet in diameter weighing tons. (Figs. 4 and 5). MECHANICAL AND MOTIONLESS MIXERS COMPARED Figure 6 shows a typical mechanical mixing system when materials A and Bare pumped to a mix tank, and the mixed pro...

King, L. T.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Development of operations based long range network capacity planning models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Planning for vaccines manufacturing capacity is both a complex task requiring many inputs and an important function of manufacturers to ensure the supply of vaccines that prevent life-threatening illnesses. This thesis ...

Wilson, Cynthia M. (Cynthia Marie)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

200-BP-5 operable unit treatability test report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 200-BP-5 Operable Unit was established in response to recommendations presented in the 200 East Groundwater Aggregate Area Management Study Report (AAMSR) (DOE-RL 1993a). Recognizing different approaches to remediation, the groundwater AAMSR recommended separating groundwater from source and vadose zone operable units and subdividing 200 East Area groundwater into two operable units. The division between the 200-BP-5 and 200-PO-1 Operable Units was based principally on source operable unit boundaries and distribution of groundwater plumes derived from either B Plant or Plutonium/Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant liquid waste disposal sites.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Impact of High Wind Power Penetration on Hydroelectric Unit Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS) investigated the operational impacts of very high levels of variable generation penetration rates (up to 35% by energy) in the western United States. This work examines the impact of this large amount of wind penetration on hydroelectric unit operations. Changes in hydroelectric unit operating unit patterns are examined for an aggregation of all hydro generators. The cost impacts of maintaining hydro unit flexibility are assessed and compared for a number of different modes of system operation.

Hodge, B. M.; Lew, D.; Milligan, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION CHICAGO OPERATIONS OFFICE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

,, . UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION CHICAGO OPERATIONS OFFICE TELEPHONE 9600 SOUTH CASS AVENUE (312) 739-7711 ARCONNE. ILLINOIS 60439 ," . i ' > ;.:a c. JAN 17 1975...

14

Accelerating the Fourier split operator method via graphics processing units  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Current generations of graphics processing units have turned into highly parallel devices with general computing capabilities. Thus, graphics processing units may be utilized, for example, to solve time dependent partial differential equations by the Fourier split operator method. In this contribution, we demonstrate that graphics processing units are capable to calculate fast Fourier transforms much more efficiently than traditional central processing units. Thus, graphics processing units render efficient implementations of the Fourier split operator method possible. Performance gains of more than an order of magnitude as compared to implementations for traditional central processing units are reached in the solution of the time dependent Schr\\"odinger equation and the time dependent Dirac equation.

Heiko Bauke; Christoph H. Keitel

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

15

High energy bursts from a solid state laser operated in the heat capacity limited regime  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

High energy bursts are produced from a solid state laser operated in a heat capacity limited regime. Instead of cooling the laser, the active medium is thermally well isolated. As a result, the active medium will heat up until it reaches some maximum acceptable temperature. The waste heat is stored in the active medium itself. Therefore, the amount of energy the laser can put out during operation is proportional to its mass, the heat capacity of the active medium, and the temperature difference over which it is being operated. The high energy burst capacity of a heat capacity operated solid state laser, together with the absence of a heavy, power consuming steady state cooling system for the active medium, will make a variety of applications possible. Alternately, cooling takes place during a separate sequence when the laser is not operating. Industrial applications include new material working processes. 5 figs.

Albrecht, G.; George, E.V.; Krupke, W.F.; Sooy, W.; Sutton, S.B.

1996-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

16

High energy bursts from a solid state laser operated in the heat capacity limited regime  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

High energy bursts are produced from a solid state laser operated in a heat capacity limited regime. Instead of cooling the laser, the active medium is thermally well isolated. As a result, the active medium will heat up until it reaches some maximum acceptable temperature. The waste heat is stored in the active medium itself. Therefore, the amount of energy the laser can put out during operation is proportional to its mass, the heat capacity of the active medium, and the temperature difference over which it is being operated. The high energy burst capacity of a heat capacity operated solid state laser, together with the absence of a heavy, power consuming steady state cooling system for the active medium, will make a variety of applications possible. Alternately, cooling takes place during a separate sequence when the laser is not operating. Industrial applications include new material working processes.

Albrecht, Georg (Livermore, CA); George, E. Victor (Livermore, CA); Krupke, William F. (Pleasanton, CA); Sooy, Walter (Pleasanton, CA); Sutton, Steven B. (Manteca, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Comparison of Capacity Value Methods for Photovoltaics in the Western United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report compares different capacity value estimation techniques applied to solar photovoltaics (PV). It compares more robust data and computationally intense reliability-based capacity valuation techniques to simpler approximation techniques at 14 different locations in the western United States. The capacity values at these locations are computed while holding the underlying power system characteristics fixed. This allows the effect of differences in solar availability patterns on the capacity value of PV to be directly ascertained, without differences in the power system confounding the results. Finally, it examines the effects of different PV configurations, including varying the orientation of a fixed-axis system and installing single- and double-axis tracking systems, on the capacity value. The capacity value estimations are done over an eight-year running from 1998 to 2005, and both long-term average capacity values and interannual capacity value differences (due to interannual differences in solar resource availability) are estimated. Overall, under the assumptions used in the analysis, we find that some approximation techniques can yield similar results to reliability-based methods such as effective load carrying capability.

Madaeni, S. H.; Sioshansi, R.; Denholm, P.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Overview paper Stochasticity of freeway operational capacity and chance-constrained  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. It is found that values of freeway operational capacity under different traffic flow conditions generally fit homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/trc ARTICLE IN PRESS Please cite this article in press as: Liu, H.X., Wu

Levinson, David M.

19

STOCHASTIC FLOW SEQUENCE GENERATION AND ASPINALL UNIT OPERATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to incorporate paleo #12;iv reconstructed data. The selected methods are then employed to generate syntheticSTOCHASTIC FLOW SEQUENCE GENERATION AND ASPINALL UNIT OPERATIONS By KENNETH C NOWAK B Flow Sequence Generation and Aspinall Unit Operations written by Kenneth C Nowak has been approved

20

Effective Energy Conservation in the Operating Unit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

can odcur. At that point, positive steps need to be takerl to rejuvenate the process. Suci, a step might weIll in clude a energy brainstorming session(s} where Ithe interaction between people can jar out some i~eas. that the unit coordinator has a...

Korich, R. D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "units operable capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Estimates of emergency operating capacity in US manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Development of integrated mobilization preparedness policies requires planning estimates of available productive capacity during national emergency conditions. Such estimates must be developed in a manner that allows evaluation of current trends in capacity and the consideration of uncertainties in various data inputs and in engineering assumptions. This study, conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), developed estimates of emergency operating capacity (EOC) for 446 manufacturing industries at the 4-digit Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) level of aggregation and for 24 key non-manufacturing sectors. This volume presents tabular and graphical results of the historical analysis and projections for each SIC industry. (JF)

Belzer, D.B. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Serot, D.E. (D/E/S Research, Richland, WA (USA)); Kellogg, M.A. (ERCE, Inc., Portland, OR (USA))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Feasibility study report for the 200-BP-1 operable unit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This feasibility study examines a range of alternatives and provides recommendations for selecting a preferred alternative for remediating contamination at the 200-BP-1 operable unit. The 200-BP-1 operable unit is located in the center of the Hanford Site along the northern boundary of the 200 East Area. The 241-BY Tank Farm is located immediately to the south of the operable unit. 200-BP-1 is a source operable unit with contaminated soils associated primarily with nine inactive cribs (known as the 216-B cribs). These cribs were used for disposal of low-level radioactive liquid waste from U Plant uranium recovery operations, and waste storage tank condensate from the adjacent 241-BY Tank Farm. The cribs used for disposal of U Plant waste were in operation from 1955--1965, and the cribs used for disposal of tank condensate were in operation from 1965--1975. In addition to the cribs, four unplanned releases of radioactive materials have occurred within the operable unit. Contaminated surface soils associated with the unplanned releases have been consolidated over the cribs and covered with clean soil to reduce contaminant migration and exposure. Discharge of wastes to the cribs has resulted in soil and groundwater contamination. The groundwater is being addressed as part of the 200 East Aggregate Area, groundwater operable unit. Contaminated soils at the site can be categorized by the types of contaminants, their distribution in the soil column, and the risk posed by the various potential exposure pathways. Below the clean soil cover, the near surface soils contain low-levels of contamination with cesium-137, radium-226, strontium-90, thorium-228, and uranium. The lifetime incremental cancer risk associated with these soils if they were exposed at the surface is 9{times}10{sup {minus}5}.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Impact of Operational Practices on Rail Line Capacity: A Simulation Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

@illinois.edu, yclai@ntu.edu.tw, cbarkan@illinois.edu ABSTRACT Long-term demand for freight and passenger is critical for cost-effective planning of new capacity. A key aspect of this is the effect of heterogeneous conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of various operational changes to reduce delays. The trade

Barkan, Christopher P.L.

24

Optimal Control of Airport Operations with Gate Capacity Constraints Harshad Khadilkar and Hamsa Balakrishnan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at Boston's Logan International Airport in the US are used to illustrate the advantages of the proposed for Boston Logan International Airport (BOS) is shown in Fig. 1. Gates at each of the four main terminalsOptimal Control of Airport Operations with Gate Capacity Constraints Harshad Khadilkar and Hamsa

Gummadi, Ramakrishna

25

Impact of High Wind Power Penetration on Hydroelectric Unit Operations: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examines the impact of this large amount of wind penetration on hydroelectric unit operations. Changes in hydroelectric unit operating unit patterns are examined for an aggregation of all hydro generators.

Hodge, B. M.; Lew, D.; Milligan, M.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Operating experience of Pyroflow boilers in a 250 MWe unit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cedar Bay Cogeneration project is a 250 MWe unit owned and operated by US Generating Company. This plant has one turbine rated at 250 MWe net which is supplied by three Pyroflow CFB boilers that operate in parallel while supplying a paper mill with steam on an uninterruptible basis. Compared to similar size CFB boilers the Cedar Bay boilers have certain unique features. First, these are reheat boilers which must continue to supply process steam even when the steam turbine is down. Second, the SO{sub 2} control operates at a very low Ca/S molar ratio by optimizing the process conditions and flyash reinjection. Third, the NO{sub x} reduction process utilizes aqueous ammonia injection. This paper presents the operating data at full load in terms of boiler efficiency, and the ability to limit gaseous emissions with minimum limestone and ammonia usage. Unique features relating to the multiple boiler installation are also discussed.

Chelian, P.K.; Hyvarinen, K. [Pyropower Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

27

SCOPING SUMMARY FOR THE P-AREA OPERABLE UNIT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This scoping summary supports development of the combined Remedial Investigation (RI)/Baseline Risk Assessment (BRA)/Feasibility Study (FS) for the P-Area Operable Unit (PAOU), or Combined document, which will be submitted on or before 09/28/2007. The objective of this Feasibility Study scoping summary meeting is to agree on the likely response actions to be evaluated and developed as alternatives in the combined document and agree on the uncertainties identified and whether they have been adequately managed.

Kupar, J; Sadika Baladi, S; Mark Amidon, M

2007-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

28

Method and apparatus for operating an improved thermocline storage unit  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for operating a thermocline storage unit in which an insulated barrier member is provided substantially at the interface region between the hot and cold liquids in the storage tank. The barrier member physically and thermally separates the hot and cold liquids substantially preventing any diffusing or mixing between them and substantially preventing any heat transfer therebetween. The barrier member follows the rise and fall of the interface region between the liquids as the tank is charged and discharged. Two methods of maintaining it in the interface region are disclosed. With the structure and operation of the present invention and in particular the significant reduction in diffusing or mixing between the hot and cold liquids as well as the significant reduction in the thermal heat transfer between them, the performance of the storage tank is improved. More specifically, the stability of the interface region or thermocline is enhanced and the thickness of the thermocline is reduced producing a corresponding increase in the steepness of the temperature gradient across the thermocline and a more efficiently operating thermocline storage unit.

Copeland, Robert J. (Lakewood, CO)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Method and apparatus for operating an improved thermocline storage unit  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for operating a thermocline storage unit in which an insulated barrier member is provided substantially at the interface region between the hot and cold liquids in the storage tank. The barrier member physically and thermally separates the hot and cold liquids substantially preventing any diffusing or mixing between them and substantially preventing any heat transfer there between. The barrier member follows the rise and fall of the interface region between the liquids as the tank is charged and discharged. Two methods of maintaining it in the interface region are disclosed. With the structure and operation of the present invention and in particular the significant reduction in diffusing or mixing between the hot and cold liquids as well as the significant reduction in the thermal heat transfer between them, the performance of the storage tank is improved. More specifically, the stability of the interface region or thermocline is enhanced and the thickness of the thermocline is reduced producing a corresponding increase in the steepness of the temperature gradient across the thermocline and a more efficiently operating thermocline storage unit.

Copeland, R.J.

1982-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

30

Article separation apparatus and method for unit operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An apparatus and method are disclosed for separating articles from a group of articles. The apparatus includes a container for containing one or more articles coupled to a suitable fluidizer for suspending articles within the container and transporting articles to an induction tube. A portal in the induction tube introduces articles singly into the induction tube. A vacuum pulls articles through the induction tube separating the articles from the group of articles in the container. The apparatus and method can be combined with one or more unit operations or modules, e.g., for inspecting articles, assessing quality of articles, or ascertaining material properties and/or parameters of articles, including layers thereof.

Pardini, Allan F.; Gervais, Kevin L.; Mathews, Royce A.; Hockey, Ronald L.

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

31

Feasibility Study for Operable Unit 7-13/14  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Subsurface Disposal Area is a radioactive waste landfill located within the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Laboratory Site in southeastern Idaho. This Feasibility Study for Operable Unit 7-13/14 analyzes options for mitigating risks to human health and the environment associated with the landfill. Analysis is conducted in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, using nine evaluation criteria to develop detailed and comparative analysis of five assembled alternatives. Assembled alternatives are composed of discrete modules. Ultimately, decision-makers will select, recombine, and sum various modules into an optimized preferred alternative and final remedial decision.

K. Jean Holdren; Thomas E. Bechtold; Brian D. Preussner

2007-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

32

Electric vehicle fleet operations in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is actively supporting the development and commercialization of advanced electric vehicles, and advanced batteries and propulsion systems. As part of this effort, the DOE Field Operations Program is performing commercial validation of electric vehicles. These efforts have included on-board data acquisition of electric vehicle operations and baseline performance testing. The baseline performance tests focus on parameters such as range, acceleration, and battery charging. This testing, performed in conjunction with EV America, has included the baseline performance testing of 14 electric vehicles will also be baseline performance tested. The baseline performance testing has documented annual improvements in performance. This and additional information is made available to the public via the internet homepage (http://ev.inel.gov). The Field Operations Program continues to support the development of electric vehicles and infrastructure in conjunction with its new qualified vehicle test partners: Electric Transportation Application of Phoenix, and Southern California Edison. The Field Operations Program is managed by the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company, at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. 4 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Francfort, J.E. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); O`Hara, D. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Impact of High Wind Power Penetration on Hydroelectric Unit Operations in the WWSIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines the impact of this large amount of wind penetration on hydroelectric unit operations. Changes in hydroelectric unit operating patterns are examined both for an aggregation of all hydro generators and for select individual plants.

Hodge, B.-M.; Lew, D.; Milligan, M.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Potential for supplying solar thermal energy to industrial unit operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Previous studies have identified major industries deemed most appropriate for the near-term adoption of solar thermal technology to provide process heat; these studies have been based on surveys that followed standard industrial classifications. This paper presents an alternate, perhaps simpler analysis of this potential, considered in terms of the end-use of energy delivered to industrial unit operations. For example, materials, such as animal feed, can be air dried at much lower temperatures than are currently used. This situation is likely to continue while economic supplies of natural gas are readily available. However, restriction of these supplies could lead to the use of low-temperature processes, which are more easily integrated with solar thermal technology. The adoption of solar technology is also favored by other changes, such as the relative rates of increase of the costs of electricity and natural gas, and by energy conservation measures. Thus, the use of low-pressure steam to provide process heat could be replaced economically with high-temperature hot water systems, which are more compatible with solar technology. On the other hand, for certain operations such as high-temperature catalytic and distillation processes employed in petroleum refining, there is no ready alternative to presently employed fluid fuels.

May, E.K.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Draft environmental impact statement for the siting, construction, and operation of New Production Reactor capacity. Volume 3, Sections 7-12, Appendices A-C  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts, both on a broad programmatic level and on a project-specific level, concerning a proposed action to provide new tritium production capacity to meet the nation`s nuclear defense requirements well into the 21st century. A capacity equivalent to that of about a 3,000-megawatt (thermal) heavy-water reactor was assumed as a reference basis for analysis in this EIS; this is the approximate capacity of the existing production reactors at DOE`s Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. The EIS programmatic alternatives address Departmental decisions to be made on whether to build new production facilities, whether to build one or more complexes, what size production capacity to provide, and when to provide this capacity. Project-specific impacts for siting, constructing, and operating new production reactor capacity are assessed for three alternative sites: the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; and the Savannah River Site. For each site, the impacts of three reactor technologies (and supporting facilities) are assessed: a heavy-water reactor, a light-water reactor, and a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Impacts of the no-action alternative also are assessed. The EIS evaluates impacts related to air quality; noise levels; surface water, groundwater, and wetlands; land use; recreation; visual environment; biotic resources; historical, archaeological, and cultural resources; socioeconomics; transportation; waste management; and human health and safety. The EIS describes in detail the potential radioactive releases from new production reactors and support facilities and assesses the potential doses to workers and the general public. This volume contains references; a list of preparers and recipients; acronyms, abbreviations, and units of measure; a glossary; an index and three appendices.

Not Available

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Capacity analysis, cycle time optimization, and supply chain strategy in multi-product biopharmaceutical manufacturing operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Application of system optimization theory, supply chain principles, and capacity modeling are increasingly valuable tools for use in pharmaceutical manufacturing facilities. The dynamics of the pharmaceutical industry - ...

Fetcho-Phillips, Kacey L. (Kacey Lynn)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Physics 1114: Unit 7 Homework Use the table in your text for specific heat capacity values.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at 20 C? [Specific heat capacity of air = 703 J/(kg C ) at constant volume.] 7. What is the specific of a heat engine and a heat pump. Include QH, QC, TH, TC, and W. What is the major difference in your two not the same? 6. Determine the maximum coefficient of performance of a heat pump used to heat the inside

Mansell, Edward "Ted"

38

Optimum Capacity Allocation of DG Units Based on Unbalanced Three-phase Optimal Power Flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Index Terms--Planning for Smart Grid , Unbalanced TOPF, Swarm Intelligence, DG Capacity Allocation, Smart Grid Co- simulation Platform. I. INTRODUCTION The growth of energy demand is increasing rapidly distribution system planning is necessary. Adnan Anwar and H. R. Pota are with the School of Engineering

Pota, Himanshu Roy

39

EIS-0195: Remedial Actions at Operable Unit 4, Fernald Environmental Management Project, Fernald, Ohio  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to conduct remedial action at Operable Unit 4 at the Fernald Environmental Management Project.

40

INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY REPORT FOR THE OPERABLE UNIT-1 LANDFILL TRENCHES, MIAMISBURG CLOSURE PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY REPORT FOR THE OPERABLE UNIT-1 LANDFILL TRENCHES, MIAMISBURG CLOSURE PROJECT, MIAMISBURG, OHIO DCN: 0468-SR-02-0

W.C. Adams

2010-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "units operable capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY REPORT OPERABLE UNIT-1 LANDFILL TRENCHES, MIAMISBURG CLOSURE PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY REPORT FOR THE OPERABLE UNIT-1 LANDFILL TRENCHES, MIAMISBURG CLOSURE PROJECT, MIAMISBURG, OHIO DCN: 0468-SR-03-0

W.C. Adams

2010-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

42

Phase I remedial investigation report for the 300-FF-5 operable unit, Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The focus of this remedial investigation (RI) is the 300-FF-5 operable unit, one of five operable units associated with the 300 Area aggregate of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Hanford Site. The 300-FF-5 operable unit is a groundwater operable unit beneath the 300-FF-1, 300-FF-2, and 300-FF-3 source operable units. This operable unit was designated to include all contamination detected in the groundwater and sediments below the water table that emanates from the 300-FF-1, 300-FF-2, and 300-FF-3 operable units (DOE-RL 1990a). In November 1989, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) placed the 300 Area on the National Priorities List (NPL) contained within Appendix B of the National Oil and Hazardous Substance Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP, 53 FR 51391 et seq.). The EPA took this action pursuant to their authority under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA, 42 USC 9601 et seq.). The DOE Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL), the EPA and Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) issued the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement), in May 1989 (Ecology et al. 1992, Rev. 2). This agreement, among other matters, governs all CERCLA efforts at the Hanford Site. In June 1990, a remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) workplan for the 300-FF-5 operable unit was issued pursuant to the Tri-Party Agreement.

NONE

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Tool-Assisted Unit-Test Generation and Selection Based on Operational Abstractions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tool-Assisted Unit-Test Generation and Selection Based on Operational Abstractions Tao Xie1 of Washington, Seattle, WA 98105 Abstract. Unit testing, a common step in software development, presents a chal- lenge. When produced manually, unit test suites are often insufficient to identify defects. The main

Xie, Tao

44

Treatment of produced water using chemical and biological unit operations.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Water generated along with oil and gas during coal bed methane and oil shale operations is commonly known as produced water, formation water, or oilfield (more)

Li, Liang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Drart environmental impact statement siting, construction, and operation of New Production Reactor capacity. Volume 4, Appendices D-R  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts, both on a broad programmatic level and on a project-specific level, concerning a proposed action to provide new tritium production capacity to meet the nation`s nuclear defense requirements well into the 21st century. A capacity equivalent to that of about a 3,000-megawatt (thermal) heavy-water reactor was assumed as a reference basis for analysis in this EIS; this is the approximate capacity of the existing production reactors at DOE`s Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. The EIS programmatic alternatives address Departmental decisions to be made on whether to build new production facilities, whether to build one or more complexes, what size production capacity to provide, and when to provide this capacity. Project-specific impacts for siting, constructing, and operating new production reactor capacity are assessed for three alternative sites: the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; and the Savannah River Site. For each site, the impacts of three reactor technologies (and supporting facilities) are assessed: a heavy-water reactor, a light-water reactor, and a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Impacts of the no-action alternative also are assessed. The EIS evaluates impacts related to air quality; noise levels; surface water, groundwater, and wetlands; land use; recreation; visual environment; biotic resources; historical, archaeological, and cultural resources; socioeconomics; transportation; waste management; and human health and safety. The EIS describes in detail the potential radioactive releases from new production reactors and support facilities and assesses the potential doses to workers and the general public. This volume contains 15 appendices.

Not Available

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Electric vehicle fleet operations in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is actively supporting the development and commercialization of advanced electric vehicles, batteries, and propulsion systems. As part of this effort, the DOE Field Operations Program is performing commercial validation testing of electric vehicles and supporting the development of an electric vehicle infrastructure. These efforts include the evaluation of electric vehicles in baseline performance, accelerated reliability, and fleet operations testing. The baseline performance testing focuses on parameters such as range, acceleration, and battery charging. This testing, performed in conjunction with EV America, has included the baseline performance testing of 16 electric vehicle models from 1994 through 1997. During 1997, the Chevrolet S10 and Ford Ranger electric vehicles were tested. During 1998, several additional electric vehicles from original equipment manufacturers will also be baseline performance tested. This and additional information is made available to the public via the Program`s web page (http://ev.inel.gov/sop). In conjunction with industry and other groups, the Program also supports the Infrastructure Working Council in its development of electric vehicle communications, charging, health and safety, and power quality standards. The Field Operations Program continues to support the development of electric vehicles and infrastructure in conjunction with its qualified vehicle test partners: Electric Transportation Applications, and Southern California Edison. The Field Operations Program is managed by the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory.

Francfort, J.E. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab.; O`Hara, D. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

GROUDWATER REMEDIATION AT THE 100-HR-3 OPERABLE UNIT HANFORD SITE WASHINGTON USA - 11507  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 100-HR-3 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) at the Hanford Site underlies three former plutonium production reactors and the associated infrastructure at the 100-D and 100-H Areas. The primary contaminant of concern at the site is hexavalent chromium; the secondary contaminants are strontium-90, technetium-99, tritium, uranium, and nitrate. The hexavalent chromium plume is the largest plume of its type in the state of Washington, covering an area of approximately 7 km{sup 2} (2.7 mi{sup 2}) with concentrations greater than 20 {micro}g/L. Concentrations range from 60,000 {micro}g/L near the former dichromate transfer station in the 100-D Area to large areas of 20 to 100 {micro}g/L across much of the plume area. Pump-and-treat operations began in 1997 and continued into 2010 at a limited scale of approximately 200 gal/min. Remediation of groundwater has been fairly successful in reaching remedial action objectives (RAOs) of 20 {micro}g/L over a limited region at the 100-H, but less effective at 100-D. In 2000, an in situ, permeable reactive barrier was installed downgradient of the hotspot in 100-D as a second remedy. The RAOs are still being exceeded over a large portion of the area. The CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company was awarded the remediation contract for groundwater in 2008 and initiated a remedial process optimization study consisting of modeling and technical studies intended to enhance the remediation. As a result of the study, 1,400 gal/min of expanded treatment capacity are being implemented. These new systems are designed to meet 2012 and 2020 target milestones for protection of the Columbia River and cleanup of the groundwater plumes.

SMOOT JL; BIEBESHEIMER FH; ELUSKIE JA; SPILIOTOPOULOS A; TONKIN MJ; SIMPKIN T

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

48

UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION NEVADA OPERATIONS OFFICE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C.Green River,The Secretaryat Grand4100F. oUNITED

49

Blue Helmeted Dragons : explaining China's participation in United Nations peace operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

China's personnel contributions to United Nations peace operations has significantly increased in the first decade of the twenty-first century, however little academic or policy attention has been given to examining patterns ...

Lin-Greenberg, Erik

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

A Systems Approach to Optimize the Operation of a Refrigeration Unit at a Chemical Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper focuses on the ongoing system level analysis and the optimization results of two steamturbine driven refrigeration units at the Dow Chemical company Peroxymerics (PXC) plant located at St. Charles Operations in Hahnville, LA. Six...

Papar, R.; Zugibe, K.; Heitler, J.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Multi-unit Operations in Non-Nuclear Systems: Lessons Learned for Small Modular Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nuclear-power community has reached the stage of proposing advanced reactor designs to support power generation for decades to come. Small modular reactors (SMRs) are one approach to meet these energy needs. While the power output of individual reactor modules is relatively small, they can be grouped to produce reactor sites with different outputs. Also, they can be designed to generate hydrogen, or to process heat. Many characteristics of SMRs are quite different from those of current plants and may be operated quite differently. One difference is that multiple units may be operated by a single crew (or a single operator) from one control room. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is examining the human factors engineering (HFE) aspects of SMRs to support licensing reviews. While we reviewed information on SMR designs to obtain information, the designs are not completed and all of the design and operational information is not yet available. Nor is there information on multi-unit operations as envisioned for SMRs available in operating experience. Thus, to gain a better understanding of multi-unit operations we sought the lesson learned from non-nuclear systems that have experience in multi-unit operations, specifically refineries, unmanned aerial vehicles and tele-intensive care units. In this paper we report the lessons learned from these systems and the implications for SMRs.

OHara J. M.; Higgins, J.; DAgostino, A.

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

52

Estimating the Capacity Value of Concentrating Solar Power Plants: A Case Study of the Southwestern United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We estimate the capacity value of concentrating solar power (CSP) plants without thermal energy storage in the southwestern U.S. Our results show that CSP plants have capacity values that are between 45% and 95% of maximum capacity, depending on their location and configuration. We also examine the sensitivity of the capacity value of CSP to a number of factors and show that capacity factor-based methods can provide reasonable approximations of reliability-based estimates.

Madaeni, S. H.; Sioshansi, R.; Denholm, P.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Contract for Operational Services (Rev 06/07/11) No: Unit: Date Page 1 Contract Manager  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contract for Operational Services (Rev 06/07/11) No: Unit: __________________________________________________________________________ Date Page 1 Contract Manager: CONTRACT for the SUPPLY of SERVICES (OPERATIONAL) between The Forestry to the Commission in accordance with and subject to the provisions of this Contract. 2 The Contract Commencement

54

Feasibility study report for the 200-BP-1 operable unit. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This feasibility study (FS) examines a range of alternatives and provides recommendations for selecting a preferred altemative for remediating contamination at the 200-BP-1 operable unit. The 200-BP-1 operable unit is located in the center of the Hanford Site along the northern boundary of the 200 East Area. The 241-BY Tank Farm is located immediately to the south of the operable unit. 200-BP-1 is a source operable unit with contaminated soils associated primarily with nine inactive cribs (known as the 216-B cribs). These cribs were used for disposal of low-level radioactive liquid waste from U Plant uranium recovery operations, and waste storage tank condensate from the adjacent 241-BY Tank Farm. The cribs used for disposal of U Plant waste were in operation from 1955--1965, and the cribs used for disposal of tank condensate were in operation from 1965-1975. In addition to the cribs, four unplanned releases of radioactive materials have occurred within the operable unit. Contaminated surface soils associated with the unplanned releases have been consolidated over the cribs and covered with clean soil to reduce contaminant migration and exposure. Discharge of wastes to the cribs has resulted in soil and groundwater contamination. The groundwater is being addressed as part of the 200 East Aggregate Area groundwater operable unit. Contaminated soils at the site can be categorized by the types of contaminants, their distribution in the soil column, and the risk posed by the various potential exposure pathways. Below the clean soil cover, the near surface soils contain low-:levels of contamination with cesium-137, radium-226, strontium-90, thorium-228 and uranium. The lifetime incremental cancer risk associated with these soils if they were exposed at the surface is 9 {times} 10{sup 5}.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

United States Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, completion report Operation KLAXON, Fiscal Year 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), Completion Report provides a summary of activities conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) between October 1, 1992, and September 30, 1993, associated with Operation KLAXON. (In the past, each annual Completion Report dealt with a series of underground nuclear detonations; however, because no nuclear tests were conducted during FY 1993, this Report summarizes continuing nonnuclear and nuclear test readiness activities at the NTS sponsored by DOE/NV.) The report serves as a reference for those involved with the planning and execution of Operation KLAXON and also serves as a planning guide for future operations. Information in the report covers the logistics and management of activities. Scientific information and data associated with NTS activities are presented in technical documents published by participating agencies. In September 1992, Congress legislated a nine-month moratorium on the testing of nuclear weapons. The bill also provided for a resumption of testing (with no more than five tests per year, or a total of 15 during the next three years) in July 1993, and mandated an end to nuclear testing, entirely, by 1996. President Bush signed the bill into law in October 1992.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Operable Unit 3-13, Group 7, SFE-20 Hot Waste Tank System Remedial Action Request  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Remedial Action Report summarizes activities undertaken to remediate the Operable Unit 3-13, Group 7, SFE-20 Hot Waste Tank System at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Laboratory Site. The site addressed in this report was defined in the Operable Unit 3-13 Record of Decision and subsequent implementing documents. This report concludes that remediation requirements and cleanup goals established for the site have been accomplished and is hereafter considered a No Further Action site.

L. Davison

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

57

Operable Unit 3-13, Group 7, SFE-20 Hot Waste Tank System Remedial Action Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Remedial Action Report summarizes activities undertaken to remediate the Operable Unit 3-13, Group 7, SFE-20 Hot Waste Tank System at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Laboratory Site. The site addressed in this report was defined in the Operable Unit 3-13 Record of Decision and subsequent implementing documents. This report concludes that remediation requirements and cleanup goals established for the site have been accomplished and is hereafter considered a No Further Action site.

Lee Davison

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

58

Phase 1 remedial investigation report for 200-BP-1 operable unit. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, in Washington State is organized into numerically designated operational areas including the 100, 200, 300, 400, 600, and 1100 Areas. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in November 1989 included the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site on the National Priority List (NPL) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Inclusion on the NPL initiated the remedial investigation (RD process for the 200-BP-1 operable unit. These efforts are being addressed through the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Ecology et al. 1989) which was negotiated and approved by the DOE, the EPA, and the State of Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) in May 1989. This agreement, known as the Tri-Party Agreement, governs all CERCLA efforts at Hanford. In March of 1990, the Department of Energy, Richland Operations (DOE-RL) issued a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) work plan (DOE-RL 1990a) for the 200-BP-1 operable unit. The work plan initiated the first phase of site characterization activities associated with the 200-BP-1 operable unit. The purpose of the 200-BP-1 operable unit RI is to gather and develop the necessary information to adequately understand the risks to human health and the environment posed by the site and to support the development and analysis of remedial alternatives during the FS. The RI analysis will, in turn, be used by Tri-Party Agreement signatories to make a risk-management-based selection of remedies for the releases of hazardous substances that have occurred from the 200-BP-1 operable unit.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Covanta Begins Operating Nation's First Energy-from-Waste Unit under the EPA's New Source Performance Standards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Covanta Begins Operating Nation's First Energy-from-Waste Unit under the EPA's New Source in the development and operation of large scale Energy-from-Waste and renewable energy projects, today announced it has begun operating the first energy-from-waste unit built under the U.S. Environmental Protection

Columbia University

60

Optimal Operation of a Wind Farm equipped with a Storage Unit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into another form of energy (kinetic energy or compressed air for example) and vice versa. This method has been is that the using cost of the storage device is not always a linear function of the energy stored or deliveredOptimal Operation of a Wind Farm equipped with a Storage Unit Paul Charton June 14, 2013 Keywords

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "units operable capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

OPERATIONAL GUIDANCE FOR BICYCLE-SPECIFIC TRAFFIC SIGNALS IN THE UNITED STATES: A REVIEW  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OPERATIONAL GUIDANCE FOR BICYCLE-SPECIFIC TRAFFIC SIGNALS IN THE UNITED STATES: A REVIEW Interim ........................................................................................................... 2 2.1.1 Guide for the Development of Bicycle Facilities (AASHTO, 1999).....................................................................................3 2.1.3 Guide for the Development of Bicycle Facilities (AASHTO, 2012

Bertini, Robert L.

62

Remedial investigation/feasibility study work plan for the 100-KR-4 operable unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Four areas of the Hanford Site (the 100, 200, 300, and 1100 Areas) have been included on the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) National Priorities List (NPL) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). This work plan and the attached supporting project plans establish the operable unit setting and the objectives, procedures, tasks, and schedule for conducting the CERCLA remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for the 100-KR-4 operable unit. The 100-K Area consists of the 100-KR-4 groundwater operable unit and three source operable units. The 100-KR-4 operable unit includes all contamination found in the aquifer soils and water beneath the 100-K Area. Source operable units include facilities and unplanned release sites that are potential sources of contamination.

Not Available

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Annual Summary Report Calendar Year 2000 for the 100-HR-3, 100-KR-4, and 100-NR-2 Operable Units and Pump-and-Treat Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual progress and performance evaluation report discusses the groundwater remedial actions in the 100 Area, including the interim actions at the 100-HR-3 and 100-KR-4 Operable Units, and also discusses the expedited response action in the 100-NR-2 operable unit.

G. B. Mitchem

2001-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

64

Pilot-scale treatability test plan for the 200-UP-1 groundwater Operable Unit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the treatability test plan for pilot-scale pump and treat testing at the 200-UP-1 Operable Unit. This treatability test plan has been prepared in response to an agreement between the US Department of Energy, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology, as documented in Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Ecology et al. 1989a) Change Control Form M-13-93-03 (Ecology et al. 1994). The agreement also requires that, following completion of the activities described in this test plan, a 200-UP-1 Operable Unit interim remedial measure (IRM) proposed plan be developed for use in preparing an interim action record of decision (ROD). The IRM Proposed Plan will be supported by the results of the testing described in this treatability test plan, as well as by other 200-UP-1 Operable Unit activities (e.g., limited field investigation, development of a qualitative risk assessment). Once issued, the interim action ROD will specify the interim action for groundwater contamination at the 200-UP-1 Operable Unit. The approach discussed in this treatability test plan is to conduct a pilot-scale pump and treat test for the contaminant plume associated with the 200-UP-1 Operable Unit. Primary contaminants of concern are uranium and technetium-99; the secondary contaminant of concern is nitrate. The pilot-scale treatability testing presented in this test plan has as its primary purpose to assess the performance of aboveground treatment systems with respect to the ability to remove the primary contaminants in groundwater withdrawn from the contaminant plume.

Wittreich, C.D.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Analysis of Unit-Level Changes in Operations with Increased SPP Wind from EPRI/LCG Balancing Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wind power development in the United States is outpacing previous estimates for many regions, particularly those with good wind resources. The pace of wind power deployment may soon outstrip regional capabilities to provide transmission and integration services to achieve the most economic power system operation. Conversely, regions such as the Southeastern United States do not have good wind resources and will have difficulty meeting proposed federal Renewable Portfolio Standards with local supply. There is a growing need to explore innovative solutions for collaborating between regions to achieve the least cost solution for meeting such a renewable energy mandate. The Department of Energy funded the project 'Integrating Midwest Wind Energy into Southeast Electricity Markets' to be led by EPRI in coordination with the main authorities for the regions: SPP, Entergy, TVA, Southern Company and OPC. EPRI utilized several subcontractors for the project including LCG, the developers of the model UPLAN. The study aims to evaluate the operating cost benefits of coordination of scheduling and balancing for Southwest Power Pool (SPP) wind transfers to Southeastern Electric Reliability Council (SERC) Balancing Authorities (BAs). The primary objective of this project is to analyze the benefits of regional cooperation for integrating mid-western wind energy into southeast electricity markets. Scenarios were defined, modeled and investigated to address production variability and uncertainty and the associated balancing of large quantities of wind power in SPP and delivery to energy markets in the southern regions of the SERC. DOE funded Oak Ridge National Laboratory to provide additional support to the project, including a review of results and any side analysis that may provide additional insight. This report is a unit-by-unit analysis of changes in operations due to the different scenarios used in the overall study. It focuses on the change in capacity factors and the number of start-ups required for each unit since those criteria summarize key aspects of plant operations, how often are they called upon and how much do they operate. The primary analysis of the overall project is based on security-constrained unit commitment (SCUC) and economic dispatch (SCED) simulations of the SPP-SERC regions as modeled for the year 2022. The SCUC/SCED models utilized for the project were developed through extensive consultation with the project utility partners, to ensure the various regions and operational practices are represented as best as possible in the model. SPP, Entergy, Oglethorpe Power Company (OPC), Southern Company, and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) actively participated in the project providing input data for the models and review of simulation results and conclusions. While other SERC utility systems are modeled, the listed SERC utilities were explicitly included as active participants in the project due to the size of their load and relative proximity to SPP for importing wind energy.

Hadley, Stanton W [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Strategic capacity in post devolution government in the UK: A comparative analysis of the lifecycle of central strategy units  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis analyses the changing role of central government strategy units in the devolved UK polity using a lifecycle model. At each stage of the lifecycle the units develop a different aim, undertake different tasks and follow different working...

MacDougall, Audrey

2007-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

67

RCRA facility investigation/corrective measures study work plan for the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 200-UP-2 Operable Unit is one of two source operable units at the U Plant Aggregate Area at the Hanford Site. Source operable units include waste management units and unplanned release sites that are potential sources of radioactive and/or hazardous substance contamination. This work plan, while maintaining the title RFI/CMS, presents the background and direction for conducting a limited field investigation in the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit, which is the first part of the process leading to final remedy selection. This report discusses the background, prior recommendations, goals, organization, and quality assurance for the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit Work Plan. The discussion begins with a summary of the regulatory framework and the role of the work plan. The specific recommendations leading into the work plan are then addressed. Next, the goals and organization of the report are discussed. Finally, the quality assurance and supporting documentation are presented.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Screening of Potential Remediation Methods for the 200-BP-5 Operable Unit at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A screening-level evaluation of potential remediation methods for application to the contaminants of concern (COC) in the 200-BP-5 Operable Unit at the Hanford Site was conducted based on the methods outlined in the Guidance for Conducting Remedial Investigations and Feasibility Studies under CERCLA Interim Final (EPA 1988). The scope of this screening was to identify the most promising remediation methods for use in the more detailed analysis of remediation alternatives that will be conducted as part of the full feasibility study. The screening evaluation was conducted for the primary COC (potential major risk drivers) identified in the groundwater sampling and analysis plan for the operable unit (DOE/RL-2001-49, Rev. 1) with additions.

Truex, Michael J.; Dresel, P. EVAN; Nimmons, Michael J.; Johnson, Christian D.

2006-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

69

Discrete Sampling Test Plan for the 200-BP-5 Operable Unit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Discrete Groundwater Sampling Project is conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on behalf of CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company. The project is focused on delivering groundwater samples from proscribed horizons within select groundwater wells residing in the 200-BP-5 Operable Unit (200-BP-5 OU) on the Hanford Site. This document provides the scope, schedule, methodology, and other details of the PNNL discrete sampling effort.

Sweeney, Mark D.

2010-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

70

Data validation report for the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit, fifth round groundwater samples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The data from the chemical analysis of 68 samples from the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit Third Quarter 1993 Groundwater Sampling Investigation and their related quality assurance samples were reviewed and validated to verify that reported sample results were of sufficient quality to support decisions regarding remedial actions performed at the site. Sample analysis included inorganics and general chemical parameters. Fifty three samples were validated for radiochemical parameters.

Vukelich, S.E. [Kearney (A.T.), Inc., Chicago, IL (United States)] [Kearney (A.T.), Inc., Chicago, IL (United States)

1994-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

71

Incorporating Wind Generation Forecast Uncertainty into Power System Operation, Dispatch, and Unit Commitment Procedures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, an approach to evaluate the uncertainties of the balancing capacity, ramping capability, and ramp duration requirements is proposed. The approach includes three steps: forecast data acquisition, statistical analysis of retrospective information, and prediction of grid balancing requirements for a specified time horizon and a given confidence level. Assessment of the capacity and ramping requirements is performed using a specially developed probabilistic algorithm based on histogram analysis, incorporating sources of uncertainty of both continuous (wind and load forecast errors) and discrete (forced generator outages and start-up failures) nature. A new method called the "flying-brick" technique is developed to evaluate the look-ahead required generation performance envelope for the worst case scenario within a user-specified confidence level. A self-validation process is used to validate the accuracy of the confidence intervals. To demonstrate the validity of the developed uncertainty assessment methods and its impact on grid operation, a framework for integrating the proposed methods with an EMS system is developed. Demonstration through integration with an EMS system illustrates the applicability of the proposed methodology and the developed tool for actual grid operation and paves the road for integration with EMS systems from other vendors.

Makarov, Yuri V.; Etingov, Pavel V.; Huang, Zhenyu; Ma, Jian; Subbarao, Krishnappa

2010-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

72

Pilot-scale treatability test plan for the 200-BP-5 operable unit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the treatability test plan for pilot-scale pump and treat testing at the 200-BP-5 Operable Unit. This treatability test plan has been prepared in response to an agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the State of Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology), as documented in Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement, Ecology et al. 1989a) Change Control Form M-13-93-03 (Ecology et al. 1994) and a recent 200 NPL Agreement Change Control Form (Appendix A). The agreement also requires that, following completion of the activities described in this test plan, a 200-BP-5 Operable Unit Interim Remedial Measure (IRM) Proposed Plan be developed for use in preparing an Interim Action Record of Decision (ROD). The IRM Proposed Plan will be supported by the results of this treatability test plan, as well as by other 200-BP-5 Operable Unit activities (e.g., development of a qualitative risk assessment). Once issued, the Interim Action ROD will specify the interim action(s) for groundwater contamination at the 200-BP-5 Operable Unit. The treatability test approach is to conduct a pilot-scale pump and treat test for each of the two contaminant plumes associated with the 200-BP-5 Operable Unit. Primary contaminants of concern are {sup 99}Tc and {sup 60}Co for underwater affected by past discharges to the 216-BY Cribs, and {sup 90}Sr, {sup 239/240}Pu, and Cs for groundwater affected by past discharges to the 216-B-5 Reverse Well. The purpose of the pilot-scale treatability testing presented in this testplan is to provide the data basis for preparing an IRM Proposed Plan. To achieve this objective, treatability testing must: Assess the performance of groundwater pumping with respect to the ability to extract a significant amount of the primary contaminant mass present in the two contaminant plumes.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Capacity Value of Concentrating Solar Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study estimates the capacity value of a concentrating solar power (CSP) plant at a variety of locations within the western United States. This is done by optimizing the operation of the CSP plant and by using the effective load carrying capability (ELCC) metric, which is a standard reliability-based capacity value estimation technique. Although the ELCC metric is the most accurate estimation technique, we show that a simpler capacity-factor-based approximation method can closely estimate the ELCC value. Without storage, the capacity value of CSP plants varies widely depending on the year and solar multiple. The average capacity value of plants evaluated ranged from 45%?90% with a solar multiple range of 1.0-1.5. When introducing thermal energy storage (TES), the capacity value of the CSP plant is more difficult to estimate since one must account for energy in storage. We apply a capacity-factor-based technique under two different market settings: an energy-only market and an energy and capacity market. Our results show that adding TES to a CSP plant can increase its capacity value significantly at all of the locations. Adding a single hour of TES significantly increases the capacity value above the no-TES case, and with four hours of storage or more, the average capacity value at all locations exceeds 90%.

Madaeni, S. H.; Sioshansi, R.; Denholm, P.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Remedial investigation/feasibility study work plan for the 100-BC-2 operable unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work plan and attached supporting project plans establish the operable unit setting and the objectives, procedures, tasks, and schedule for conducting the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for the 100-BC-2 operable unit in the 100 Area of the Hanford Site. The 100 Area is one of four areas at the Hanford Site that are on the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) National Priorities List under CERCLA. The 100-BC-2 operable unit is one of two source operable units in the 100-B/C Area (Figure ES-1). Source operable units are those that contain facilities and unplanned release sites that are potential sources of hazardous substance contamination. The 100-BC-2 source operable unit contains waste sites that were formerly in the 100-BC-2, 100-BC-3, and 100-BC-4 operable units. Because of their size and geographic location, the waste sites from these two operable units were added to 100-BC-2. This allows for a more efficient and effective investigation of the remaining 100-B/C Reactor area waste sites. The investigative approach to waste sites associated with the 100-BC-2 operable unit are listed in Table ES-1. The waste sites fall into three general categories: high priority liquid waste disposal sites, low priority liquid waste disposal sites, and solid waste burial grounds. Several sites have been identified as candidates for conducting an IRM. Two sites have been identified as warranting additional limited field sampling. The two sites are the 116-C-2A pluto crib, and the 116-C-2C sand filter.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Best management practices plan for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This plan was prepared in support of the Phase II Remedial Design Report (DOE/OR/01-1449&D1) and in accordance with requirements under CERCLA to present the plan for best management practices to be followed during the remediation. This document provides the Environmental Restoration Program with information about spill prevention and control, water quality monitoring, good housekeeping practices, sediment and erosion control measures, and inspections and environmental compliance practices to be used during Phase II of the remediation project for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Pilot-scale treatability test plan for the 100-HR-3 operable unit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the treatability test plan for pilot-scale pump-and-treat testing at the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit. The test will be conducted in fulfillment of interim Milestone M-15-06E to begin pilot-scale pump-and-treat operations by August 1994. The scope of the test was determined based on the results of lab/bench-scale tests (WHC 1993a) conducted in fulfillment of Milestone M-15-06B. These milestones were established per agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Washington State Department of Ecology and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and documented on Hanford Federal of Ecology Facility Agreement and Consent Order Change Control Form M-15-93-02. This test plan discusses a pilot-scale pump-and-treat test for the chromium plume associated with the D Reactor portion of the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit. Data will be collected during the pilot test to assess the effectiveness, operating parameters, and resource needs of the ion exchange (IX) pump-and-treat system. The test will provide information to assess the ability to remove contaminants by extracting groundwater from wells and treating extracted groundwater using IX. Bench-scale tests were conducted previously in which chromium VI was identified as the primary contaminant of concern in the 100-D reactor plume. The DOWEX 21K{trademark} resin was recommended for pilot-scale testing of an IX pump-and-treat system. The bench-scale test demonstrated that the system could remove chromium VI from groundwater to concentrations less than 50 ppb. The test also identified process parameters to monitor during pilot-scale testing. Water will be re-injected into the plume using wells outside the zone of influence and upgradient of the extraction well.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Final Hazard Categorization for the Remediation of Six 300-FF-2 Operable Unit Solid Waste Burial Grounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides the final hazard categorization for the remediation of six 300-FF-2 Operable Unit Burial Grounds, the 618-1, 618-2, 618-3, 618-7, 618-8, and 618-13 sites.

J. D. Ludowise; K. L. Vialetti

2008-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

78

A framework and methodology for enhancing operational requirements development : United States Coast Guard cutter project case study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Within any major United States Coast Guard cutter acquisition project, developing the operational requirements in the early phases of acquisition is difficult as the complexity of the system is not easily understood until ...

Schofield, Douglas M. (Douglas MacLean)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Phase I and II feasibility study report for the 300-FF-5 operable unit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Phase I/II feasibility study is to assemble and screen a list of alternatives for remediation of the 300-FF-5 operable site on the Hanford Reservation. This screening is based on information gathered in the Phase I Remedial Investigation (RI) and on currently available information on remediation technologies. The alternatives remaining after screening provide a range of response actions for remediation. In addition, key data needs are identified for collection during a Phase II RI (if necessary). This Phase I/II FS represents a primary document as defined by the Tri-Party Agreement, but will be followed by a Phase III FS that will further develop the alternatives and provide a detailed evaluation of them. The following remedial action objectives were identified for the 300-FF-5 operable unit: Limit current human exposure to contaminated groundwater in the unit; Limit discharge of contaminated groundwater to the Columbia River; Reduce contaminant concentrations in groundwater below acceptable levels by the year 2018.

NONE

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

80

Screening of Potential Remediation Methods for the 200-ZP-1 Operable Unit at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A screening-level evaluation of potential remediation methods for application to the contaminants of concern (COC) in the 200-ZP-1 Operable Unit at the Hanford Site was conducted based on the methods outlined in the Guidance for Conducting Remedial Investigations and Feasibility Studies under CERCLA Interim Final. The scope of this screening was to identify the most promising remediation methods for use in the more detailed analysis of remediation alternatives that will be conducted as part of the full feasibility study. The screening evaluation was conducted for the primary COC (potential major risk drivers). COC with similar properties were grouped for the screening evaluation. The screening evaluation was conducted in two primary steps. The initial screening step evaluated potential remediation methods based on whether they can be effectively applied within the environmental setting of the 200-ZP-1 Operable Unit for the specified contaminants. In the second step, potential remediation methods were screened using scoping calculations to estimate the scale of infrastructure, overall quantities of reagents, and conceptual approach for applying the method for each defined grouping of COC. Based on these estimates, each method was screened with respect to effectiveness, implementability, and relative cost categories of the CERCLA feasibility study screening process defined in EPA guidance.

Truex, Michael J.; Nimmons, Michael J.; Johnson, Christian D.; Dresel, P EVAN.; Murray, Christopher J.

2006-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "units operable capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Draft environmental impact statement for the siting, construction, and operation of New Production Reactor capacity. Volume 2, Sections 1-6  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts, both on a broad programmatic level and on a project-specific level, concerning a proposed action to provide new tritium production capacity to meet the nation`s nuclear defense requirements well into the 21st century. A capacity equivalent to that of about a 3,000-megawatt (thermal) heavy-water reactor was assumed as a reference basis for analysis in this EIS; this is the approximate capacity of the existing production reactors at DOE`s Savannah River Site. The EIS programmatic alternatives address Departmental decisions to be made on whether to build new production facilities, whether to build one or more complexes, what size production capacity to provide, and when to provide this capacity. Project-specific impacts for siting, constructing, and operating new production reactor capacity are assessed for three alternative sites: the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; and the Savannah River Site. For each site, the impacts of three reactor technologies (and supporting facilities) are assessed: a heavy-water reactor, a light-water reactor, and a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Impacts of the no-action alternative also are assessed. The EIS evaluates impacts related to air quality; noise levels; surface water, groundwater, and wetlands; land use; recreation; visual environment; biotic resources; historical, archaeological, and cultural resources; socioeconomics; transportation; waste management; and human health and safety. The EIS describes in detail the potential radioactive releases from new production reactors and support facilities and assesses the potential doses to workers and the general public. This volume contains the analysis of programmatic alternatives, project alternatives, affected environment of alternative sites, environmental consequences, and environmental regulations and permit requirements.

Not Available

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Aquifer testing data package for 1993 200-UP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following aquifer testing data supported 1993 Interim Remedial Measure field work for the U-1 and U-2 crib area near the uranium technetium and nitrate plumes beneath the U Plant Aggregate Area. The purpose of aquifer testing was to fill in hydraulic conductivity data gaps in the western portion of 200 West Area and help refine the hydrogeologic conceptual model. This data package reports data collected in accordance with the description of work released in 1993 by L.C. Swanson, entitled Description of Work for the 200-UP-1 Aquifer Testing Activity. These data are analyzed in the document Aquifer Test Analysis Results for 1993 200-UP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit. Slug tests were conducted at 7 existing wells, and pumping tests were conducted at 2 of those same existing wells.

Swanson, L.C.

1994-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

83

100-OL-1 Operable Unit Field Portable X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) Analyzer Pilot Study Plans  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pilot study is being conducted to support the approval of the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Work Plan to evaluate the 100-OL-1 Operable Unit (OU) pre-Hanford orchard lands. Based on comments received by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Washington State Department of Ecology, the pilot study will evaluate the use of field portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry measurements for evaluating lead and arsenic concentrations on the soil surface as an indicator of past use of lead arsenate pesticide residue in the OU. The work will be performed in the field during the summer of 2014, and assist in the planning for the characterization activities in the RI/FS.

Bunn, Amoret L.; Fritz, Brad G.; Wellman, Dawn M.

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

84

Data validation report for the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit first quarter 1994 groundwater sampling data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Westinghouse-Hanford has requested that a minimum of 20% of the total number of Sample Delivery Groups be validated for the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit First Quarter 1994 Groundwater Sampling Investigation. Therefore, the data from the chemical analysis of twenty-four samples from this sampling event and their related quality assurance samples were reviewed and validated to verify that reported sample results were of sufficient quality to support decisions regarding remedial actions performed at this site. The samples were analyzed by Thermo-Analytic Laboratories (TMA) and Roy F. Weston Laboratories (WESTON) using US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) CLP protocols. Sample analyses included: inorganics; and general chemical parameters. Forty-two samples were validated for radiochemical parameters by TMA and Teledyne.

Biggerstaff, R.L.

1994-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

85

100-OL-1 Operable Unit Pilot Study: XRF Evaluation of Select Pre-Hanford Orchards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prior to the acquisition of land by the U.S. Department of War in February 1943 and the creation of the Hanford Site, the land along the Columbia River was home to over 1000 people. Farming and orchard operations by both homesteaders and commercial organizations were prevalent. Orchard activities and the associated application of lead arsenate pesticide ceased in 1943, when residents were moved from the Hanford Site at the beginning of the Manhattan Project. Today, the residues from historical application of lead arsenate pesticide persist in some locations on the Hanford Site. In 2012, the U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and Washington State Department of Ecology established the 100-OL-1 Operable Unit (OU) through the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, known as the Tri-Party Agreement. The pre-Hanford orchard lands identified as the 100-OL-1 OU are located south of the Columbia River and east of the present-day Vernita Bridge, and extend southeast to the former Hanford townsite. The discontinuous orchard lands within 100-OL-1 OU are approximately 20 km2 (5000 ac). A pilot study was conducted to support the approval of the remedial investigation/feasibility study work plan to evaluate the 100-OL-1 OU. This pilot study evaluated the use of a field portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyzer for evaluating lead and arsenic concentrations on the soil surface as an indicator of lead arsenate pesticide residues in the OU. The objectives of the pilot study included evaluating a field portable XRF analyzer as the analytical method for decision making, estimating the nature and extent of lead and arsenic in surface soils in four decision units, evaluating the results for the purpose of optimizing the sampling approach implemented in the remedial investigation, and collecting information to improve the cost estimate and planning the cultural resources review for sampling activities in the remedial investigation. Based on the results of the pilot study, the recommendations for the revision of the work plan are as follows: characterize the surface soil using field portable XRF measurements with confirmatory inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy sampling for the remedial investigation establish decision units of similar defined areas establish a process for field investigation of soil concentrations exceeding the screening criteria at the border of the 100-OL-1 OU define data quality objectives for the work plan using the results of the pilot study and refining the sampling approach for the remedial investigation.

Bunn, Amoret L.; Fritz, Brad G.; Pulsipher, Brent A.; Gorton, Alicia M.; Bisping, Lynn E.; Brandenberger, Jill M.; Pino, Christian; Martinez, Dominique M.; Rana, Komal; Wellman, Dawn M.

2014-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

86

Large-Scale Pumping Test Recommendations for the 200-ZP-1 Operable Unit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently assessing aquifer characterization needs to optimize pump-and-treat remedial strategies (e.g., extraction well pumping rates, pumping schedule/design) in the 200-ZP-1 operable unit (OU), and in particular for the immediate area of the 241 TX-TY Tank Farm. Specifically, CHPRC is focusing on hydrologic characterization opportunities that may be available for newly constructed and planned ZP-1 extraction wells. These new extraction wells will be used to further refine the 3-dimensional subsurface contaminant distribution within this area and will be used in concert with other existing pump-and-treat wells to remediate the existing carbon tetrachloride contaminant plume. Currently, 14 extraction wells are actively used in the Interim Record of Decision ZP-1 pump-and-treat system for the purpose of remediating the existing carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater within this general area. As many as 20 new extraction wells and 17 injection wells may be installed to support final pump-and-treat operations within the OU area. It should be noted that although the report specifically refers to the 200-ZP-1 OU, the large-scale test recommendations are also applicable to the adjacent 200-UP-1 OU area. This is because of the similar hydrogeologic conditions exhibited within these two adjoining OU locations.

Spane, Frank A.

2010-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

87

Operable Unit 1 remedial investigation report, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This remedial investigation report for operable Unit 1 (OU-1) at Eielson Air Force Base presents data, calculations, and conclusions as to the nature and extent of surface and subsurface contamination at the eight source areas that make up OU-1. The information is based on the 1993 field investigation result and previous investigations. This report is the first in a set of three for OU-1. The other reports are the baseline risk assessment and feasibility study. The information in these reports will lead to a Record of Decision that will guide and conclude the environmental restoration effort for OU-1 at Eielson Air Force Base. The primary contaminants of concern include fuels and fuel-related contaminants (diesel; benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene; total petroleum hydrocarbon; polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), maintenance-related solvents and cleaners (volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons such as trichloroothylene), polychlorinated biphenyls, and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT). The origins of contaminants of concern include leaks from storage tanks, drums and piping, and spills. Ongoing operations and past sitewide practices also contribute to contaminants of concern at OU-1 source areas. These include spraying mixed oil and solvent wastes on unpaved roads and aerial spraying of DDT.

Gilmore, T.J.; Fruland, R.M.; Liikala, T.L. [and others

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Behavior-Based Simulation Approach for the Capacity and Traffic Operational Characteristic Study of Four-Way-Stop-Controlled Intersections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of the proposed research is to study the traffic operational characteristics at four-way-stop-controlled (FWSC) intersections with single -lane approaches. Observational data were collected at six FWSC ...

Yin, Juan

2010-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

89

Multivariable controller increased MTBE complex capacity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Capacity increased by more than 4.6% when one dynamic matrix multivariable controller began operating in Valero Refining Company`s MTBE production complex in Corpus Christi, Texas. This was on a plant that was already running well above design capacity due to previously made process changes. A single controller was developed to cover an isobutane dehydrogenation (ID) unit and an MTBE reaction and fractionation plant with the intermediate isobutylene surge drum. The overall benefit is realized by a comprehensive constrained multivariable predictive controller that properly handles all sets of limits experienced by the complex, whether limited by the front-end ID or back-end MTBE units. The controller has 20 manipulated, 6 disturbance and 44 controlled variables, and covers widely varying dynamics with settling times ranging from twenty minutes to six hours. The controller executes each minute with a six hour time horizon. A unique achievement is intelligent surge drum level handling by the controller for higher average daily complex capacity as a whole. The ID unit often operates at simultaneous limits on reactor effluent compressor capacity, cold box temperature and hydrogen/hydrocarbon ratio, and the MTBE unit at impurity in butene column overhead as well as impurity in MTBE product. The paper discusses ether production, isobutane dehydrogenation, maximizing production, controller design, and controller performance.

Robertson, D.; Peterson, T.J.; O`Connor, D. [DMC Corp., Houston, TX (United States); Payne, D.; Adams, V. [Valero Refining Co., Corpus Christi, TX (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

FEASIBILITY STUDY REPORT FOR THE 200-ZP-1 GROUNDWATER OPERABLE UNIT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site, managed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), encompasses approximately 1,517 km{sup 2} (586 mi{sup 2}) in the Columbia Basin of south-central Washington State. In 1989, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) placed the 100, 200, 300, and 1100 Areas of the Hanford Site on the 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 300, 'National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan' National Contingency Plan [NCPD], Appendix B, 'National Priorities List' (NPL), pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). The 200 Areas NPL sites consist of the 200 West and 200 East Areas (Figure 1-1). The 200 Areas contain waste management facilities, inactive irradiated fuel reprocessing facilities, and the 200 North Area (formerly used for interim storage and staging of irradiated fuel). Several waste sites in the 600 Area, located near the 200 Areas, also are included in the 200 Areas NPL site. The 200 Areas NPL site is in a region referred to as the 'Central Plateau' and consists of approximately 700 waste sites, excluding sites assigned to the tank farm waste management areas (WMAs). The 200-ZP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) consists of the groundwater located under the northern portion of the 200 West Area. Waste sources that contributed to the 200-ZP-1 OU included cribs and trenches that received liquid and/or solid waste in the past from the Z Plant and T Plant aggregate areas, WMA-T, WMA-TX/TY, and the State-Approved Land Disposal Site (SALDS). This feasibility study (FS) for the 200-ZP-1 Groundwater OU was prepared in accordance with the requirements of CERCLA decision documents. These decision documents are part of the Administrative Record for the selection of remedial actions for each waste site and present the selected remedial actions that are chosen in accordance with CERCLA, as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986, and to the extent practicable, the NCP. This FS conforms to the conditions set forth in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) (Ecology et al. 2003) and amendments, signed by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), EPA, and DOE Richland Operations Office (RL). This also includes Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-015-00C for completing all 200 Area non-tank farm OU pre-Record of Decision (ROD) documents on or before December 31, 2011. This FS supports the final remedy selection for the 200-ZP-1 OU, as described in the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Work Plan for the 200-ZP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit (referred to as the 200-ZP-1 RI/FS work plan) (DOE/RL-2003-55), as agreed upon by RL and EPA. Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-015-48B required Draft A of the 200-ZP-1 OU FS and proposed plan to be transmitted to EPA by September 30, 2007. As agreed to with EPA in the 200 Area Unit Managers Meeting Groundwater Operable Unit Status (FH-0503130), the baseline risk assessment (BRA) was delayed from inclusion in the remedial investigation (RI) report and is completed and documented in this FS. The Remedial Investigation Report for 200-ZP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit (referred to as the 200-ZP-1 RI report) (DOE/RL-2006-24) included an evaluation of human health and ecological risks and hazards. The RI report identified the radiological and chemical contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) that represent the primary risks to human health and the environment. The complete risk assessment in this FS incorporates additional analytical data from the unconfined aquifer that were obtained during or after preparation of the RI report, particularly for carbon tetrachloride and technetium-99. This FS also includes the initial results from an ongoing study of technetium-99 contamination near WMA-T, the sampling of new wells near the 216-W-LC laundry waste crib and T Plant, updated Hanford vadose zone fate and transport modeling, and groundwater particle-tracking analysis. The purpose of this FS is to develop and evaluate alternatives for remediation of

BYRNES ME

2008-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

91

Proposed changes to generating capacity 1980-1989 for the contiguous United States: as projected by the Regional Electric Reliability Councils in their April 1, 1980 long-range coordinated planning reports to the Department of Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The changes in generating capacity projected for 1980 to 1989 are summarized. Tabulated data provide summaries to the information on projected generating unit construction, retirements, and changes, in several different categories and groupings. The new generating units to be completed by the end of 1989 total 699, representing 259,490 megawatts. This total includes 10 wind power and one fuel cell installations totaling 48.5 MW to be completed by the end of 1989. There are 321 units totaling 13,222 MW to be retired. There are capacity changes due to upratings and deratings. Summary data are presented for: total requirement for electric energy generation for 1985; hydroelectric energy production for 1985; nuclear energy production for 1985; geothermal and other energy production for 1985; approximate non-fossil generation for 1985; range of fossil energy requirements for 1985; actual fossil energy sources 1974 to 1979; estimated range of fossil fuel requirements for 1985; coal capacity available in 1985; and computation of fuel use in 1985. Power plant capacity factors are presented. Extensive data on proposed generating capacity changes by individual units in the 9 Regional Electric Reliability Councils are presented.

None

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Explanation of Significant Differences for the Record of Decision for the Test Area North Operable Unit 1-10  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Explanation of Significant Differences (ESD) applies to the remedial actions performed under the Final Record of Decision for Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-1 0, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (DOE-ID 1999) as amended by the Explanation of Significant Differences for the Record of Decision for the Test Area North Operable Unit 1-10 (DOE-ID 2003), the Record of Decision Amendment for the V-Tanks (TSF-09 and TSF-18) and Explanation of Significant Differences for the PM-2A Tanks (TSF-26) and TSF-06, Area IO, at Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-1 0 (DOE-ID 2004a), and the Explanation of Significant Differences for the Record of Decision for the Test Area North Operable Unit 1-10 (DOE-ID 2005). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Idaho Operations Office; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 10; and the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare-now identified as the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ)-signed the Record of Decision (ROD) in December 1999, the 2003 ESD in April 2003, the ROD Amendment/ESD in February 2004, and the 2005 ESD in January 2005. The EPA and DEQ support the need for this ESD.

D. L. Eaton

2007-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

93

ALTERNATIVE REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGY STUDY FOR GROUNDWATER TREATMENT AT 200-PO-1 OPERABLE UNIT AT HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study focuses on the remediation methods and technologies applicable for use at 200-PO-I Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) at the Hanford Site. The 200-PO-I Groundwater au requires groundwater remediation because of the existence of contaminants of potential concern (COPC). A screening was conducted on alternative technologies and methods of remediation to determine which show the most potential for remediation of groundwater contaminants. The possible technologies were screened to determine which would be suggested for further study and which were not applicable for groundwater remediation. COPCs determined by the Hanford Site groundwater monitoring were grouped into categories based on properties linking them by remediation methods applicable to each COPC group. The screening considered the following criteria. (1) Determine if the suggested method or technology can be used for the specific contaminants found in groundwater and if the technology can be applied at the 200-PO-I Groundwater au, based on physical characteristics such as geology and depth to groundwater. (2) Evaluate screened technologies based on testing and development stages, effectiveness, implementability, cost, and time. This report documents the results of an intern research project conducted by Mathew Dado for Central Plateau Remediation in the Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project. The study was conducted under the technical supervision of Gloria Cummins and management supervision of Theresa Bergman and Becky Austin.

DADO MA

2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

94

Data validation report for the 100-FR-3 Operable Unit, third round groundwater samples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Westinghouse-Hanford has requested that a minimum of 20% of the total number of Sample Delivery Groups be validated for the 100-FR-3 operable Unit Third Round Groundwater sampling investigation. Therefore, the data from the chemical analysis of 51 samples from this sampling event and their related quality assurance samples were reviewed and validated to verify that reported sample results were of sufficient quality to support decisions regarding remedial actions performed at this site. The report is broken down into sections for each chemical analysis and radiochemical analysis type. Each section addresses the data package completeness, holding time adherence, instrument calibration and tuning acceptability, blank results, accuracy, precision, system performance, as well as the compound identification and quantitation. In addition, each section has an overall assessment and summary for the data packages reviewed for the particular chemical/radiochemical analyses. Detailed backup information is provided to the reader by SDG No. and sample number. For each data package, a matrix of chemical analyses per sample number is presented, as well as data qualification summaries.

Ayres, J.M.

1994-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

95

Unit Commitment of Generator Sets During Dynamic Positioning Operation Based on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is large (Radan, 2008). A method for selecting the correct units must therefore be used, as testing all

Johansen, Tor Arne

96

Economic Assessment of Electric-Drive Vehicle Operation in California and the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ECONOMIC ASSESSMENT OF ELECTRIC-DRIVE VEHICLE OPERATION INECONOMIC ASSESSMENT OF ELECTRIC-DRIVE VEHICLE OPERATION INconsumers to switch to electric-drive vehicles, including a

Lidicker, Jeffrey R.; Lipman, Timothy E.; Shaheen, Susan A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Sandia National Laboratories 2011 LDRD Annual Report Issued by Sandia National Laboratories, operated for the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, operated for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared-AC04-94AL85000. SAND 2012-2254P March 2012 LDRD Annual Report Staff: Hank Westrich Sheri Martinez Vin1 Sandia National Laboratories 2011 LDRD Annual Report #12;Issued by Sandia National Laboratories

98

Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 3): Naval Weapons Station, operable unit 2, Yorktown, VA, September 29, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This decision document presents a determination that the No Further Remedial Action Decision with Institutional Controls is sufficient to protect human health and the environment for Operable Unit No. II (OU II), Site 16, the West Road Landfill and Site Screening Area (SSA) 16, the Building 402 Metal Disposal Area at the Naval Weapons Station (WPNSTA) Yorktown (Site 16/SSA 16).

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Phase 1 and 2 feasibility study report for the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 300-FF-1 Operable Unit (OU) feasibility study (FS) presented in this document completes the FS process only through the first two study phases: Phase I, Remedial Alternatives Development, and Phase II, Remedial Alternatives Screening in accordance with CERCIA guidance for performing Remedial Investigations and Feasibility Studies (RI/FS) (EPA 1988a). This Phase I/II study provides a generalized view of workable remedial technologies as applied to the site contamination problems as a whole. Phase III, Detailed Analysis of Alternatives, will be performed at a later date to further evaluate screened alternatives based on the nine criteria in the CERCLA RI/FS guidance. The purpose of this Phase I/II FS is to develop and screen a range of alternatives for remediation of contamination present in the vadose zone of the 300-FF-1 OU. The scope of work for this Phase I/II FS includes five primary tasks: 1. Review existing documents and their associated data from relevant investigations and studies; 2. Establish remedial action objectives (RAO) and general response actions (GRA); 3. Identify applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARS) pertinent to all general response actions (including waste disposal); 4. Develop remedial alternatives (Phase I) applicable to the 300-FF-1 OU including identification and screening of technologies and process options, and assembly of remedial alternatives from representative technology types; 5. Screen alternatives (Phase II) developed in Phase I for implementability, effectiveness, and cost to identify those alternatives which warrant advancement to the detailed analysis phase (Phase III) of the FS.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Ancillary Services in the United States: Independent System Operator (ISO) Perspective (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The presentation provides an overview of how increasing penetrations of variable renewable energy on the electricity grid are impacting ancillary services markets in the United States.

Cochran, J.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "units operable capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Proposal for a Co-operation Agreement between CERN and The Government of the United Arab Emirates concerning the Further Development of Scientific and Technical Co-operation in High Energy Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proposal for a Co-operation Agreement between CERN and The Government of the United Arab Emirates concerning the Further Development of Scientific and Technical Co-operation in High Energy Physics

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Inventory of power plants in the United States 1990. [Contains glossary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this publication is to provide year-end statistics about electric generating units operated by electric utilities in the United States (the 50 States and the District of Columbia). The publication also provides a 10-year outlook of future generating unit additions. The Summary Statistics chapter contains aggregate capacity statistics at the national and various regional levels for operable electric generating units and planned electric generating unit additions. Aggregate capacity data at the national level are presented by energy source and by prime mover. Aggregate capacity data at the various regional levels are presented by prime energy source. Planned capacity additions in new units are summarized by year, 1991 through 2000. Additionally, this chapter contains a summary of electric generating unit retirements, by energy source and year, from 1991 through 2000. The chapter on Operable Electric Generating Units contains data about each operable electric generating unit and each electric generating unit that was retired from service during the year. Additionally, it contains a summary by energy source of electric generating unit capacity additions and retirements during 1990. Finally, the chapter on Projected Electric Generating Unit Additions contains data about each electric generating unit scheduled by electric utilities to start operation between 1991 and 2000. 11 figs., 22 tabs.

Not Available

1991-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

103

Record of Decision for Tank Farm Soil and INTEC Groundwater, Operable Unit 3-14  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This decision document presents the selected remedy for Operable Unit (OU) 3-14 tank farm soil and groundwater at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), which is located on the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site. The tank farm was initially evaluated in the OU 3-13 Record of Decision (ROD), and it was determined that additional information was needed to make a final decision. Additional information has been obtained on the nature and extent of contamination in the tank farm and on the impact to groundwater. The selected remedy was chosen in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Liability and Compensation Act of 1980 (CERCLA) (42 USC 9601 et seq.), as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) and the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (40 CFR 300). The selected remedy is intended to be the final action for tank farm soil and groundwater at INTEC. The response action selected in this ROD is necessary to protect the public health, welfare, or the environment from actual or threatened releases of hazardous substances into the environment. Such a release or threat of release may present an imminent and substantial endangerment to public health, welfare, or the environment. The remedial actions selected in this ROD are designed to reduce the potential threats to human health and the environment to acceptable levels. In addition, DOE-ID, EPA, and DEQ (the Agencies) have determined that no action is necessary under CERCLA to protect public health, welfare, or the environment at 16 sites located outside the tank farm boundary. The purposes of the selected remedy are to (1) contain contaminated soil as the radionuclides decay in place, (2) isolate current and future workers and biological receptors from contact with contaminated soil, and (3) restore the portion of Snake River Plain Aquifer contaminated by INTEC releases to Idaho Ground Water Quality standards (same as maximum contaminant levels) by reducing water infiltration through strontium-90 contaminated perched water and interbeds. In addition, the remedy will prevent future drinking water wells from being drilled into the contaminated portion of the aquifer that is in and near the INTEC facility until such time as the water is restored to maximum contaminant levels or below.

L. S. Cahn

2007-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

104

BIOTIC INTEGRITY OF STREAMS IN THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE INTEGRATOR OPERABLE UNITS, 1996 TO 2003  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) has been divided into six Integrator Operable Units (IOUs) that correspond to the watersheds of the five major streams on the SRS (Upper Three Runs, Fourmile Branch, Pen Branch, Steel Creek, and Lower Three Runs) and the portions of the Savannah River and Savannah River Swamp associated with the SRS. The streams are the primary integrators within each IOU because they potentially receive, through surface or subsurface drainage, soluble contaminants from all waste sites within their watersheds. If these contaminants reach biologically significant levels, they would be expected to effect the numbers, types, and health of stream organisms. In this study, biological sampling was conducted within each IOU as a measure of the cumulative ecological effects of the waste sites within the IOUs. The use of information from biological sampling to assess environmental quality is often termed bioassessment. The IOU bioassessment program included 38 sites in SRS streams and nine sites in the Savannah River. Sampling was conducted in 1996 to 1998, 2000, and 2003. Four bioassessment methods were used to evaluate ecological conditions in the IOU streams: the Index of Biotic Integrity, the Fish Health Assessment Index, measurement of fish tissue contaminant levels, and two benthic macroinvertebrate indices. The Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI) is an EPA supported method based on comparison of ecologically important and sensitive fish assemblage variables between potentially disturbed and reference (i.e., undisturbed) sites. It is designed to assess the ability of a stream to support a self-sustaining biological community and ecological processes typical of undisturbed, natural conditions. Since many types of contaminants can bioaccumulate, fish tissue contaminant data were used to determine the types of chemicals fish were exposed to and their relative magnitudes among IOUs. The Fish Health Assessment Index (HAI) is an EPA supported method for assessing the health and condition of individual fish based on dissection and internal examination. It helped to determine whether contaminant concentrations were high enough to adversely affect the health of individual fish. The benthic macroinvertebrate multimetric index (HDMI), used in 1997 to 2000, is a method for assessing stream health based on macroinvertebrate data collected with Hester-Dendy artificial substrates. In 2003 it was replaced with the Multiple Habitat Sampling protocol, a SCDHEC method for collecting and analyzing benthic macroinvertebrate data from natural substrate. These two macroinvertebrate based methods were used in conjunction with the fish based IBI to provide a more comprehensive assessment of ecological conditions. Lastly, habitat data were collected from each stream to assist in determining whether ecological integrity was compromised by physical factors (e.g., erosion) or chemical factors (e.g., discharge of toxic materials). Fish from many SRS streams exhibited evidence of contamination as a result of current or former SRS operations. The most prevalent radiological contaminants were cesium-137 (highest in fish from Lower Three Runs followed by Steel Creek and Fourmile Branch), tritium (highest in fish from Fourmile Branch followed by Pen Branch, and the Savannah River swamp), and strontium (highest in fish from Fourmile Branch followed by Pen Branch). Radiological contaminants were also found in fish collected from the Savannah River near the mouths of contaminated SRS streams; however, contaminant levels were substantially lower than in fish from the streams themselves. Mercury levels were moderately elevated in fish from some streams, particularly Lower Three Runs, and in fish from the Savannah River. Despite the occurrence of contaminants, most SRS streams exhibited comparatively high biotic integrity (based on IBI, HDMI, and MHSP scores) and minimal levels of pathology among individual fish (e.g., presence of tumors or extreme thinness), indicating that contaminant levels were generally insufficient to cause significant ecological de

Paller, M; Susan Dyer, S

2004-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

105

Evolution of interagency cooperation in the United States Government : the Maritime Operational Threat Response Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Following the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, there was concern among maritime security experts that terrorist or criminal organizations that wanted to do harm to the United States could exploit gaps that existed ...

Tomasulo, Gary L., Jr

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

United Technologies Corporation: Achieving Competitive Excellence (ACE): Operating System Case Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

United Technologies Corporation (abbreviated UTC, NYSE ticker symbol UTX) is a large, industrial conglomerate that designs, manufactures, and services a broad range of products, ranging from air conditioners and elevators ...

Roth, George

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

107

(Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only commercially active lithium mine operating in the United States was a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

94 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only commercially active lithium mine operating in the United States was a brine operation in Nevada. Two companies produced a large array of downstream lithium compounds in the United States from

108

United States Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office Environmental Compliance Handbook. Third edition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environment, Safety & Health Division (ESHD) of the Nevada Operations Office has prepared this Environmental Compliance Handbook for all users of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and other US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) facilities. The Handbook gives an overview of the important environmental laws and regulations that apply to the activities conducted by the Nevada Operations Office and other users of DOE/NV facilities in Nevada.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Full operating range robust hybrid control of a coal-fired boiler/turbine unit - article no. 041011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multi-input-multi-output robust controllers recently designed for the megawatt output/throttle pressure control in a coal-fired power plant boiler/turbine unit have demonstrated performance robustness noticeably superior to that of the currently employed nonlinear PID-based controller. These controllers, however, have been designed only for the range of 150-185 MW around the 185 MW nominal operating point, exhibiting a significant loss of performance in the lower range of 120-150 MW. Through system identification, the reason for this performance loss is demonstrated in the current work to be a pronounced dependence of the boiler/turbine unit steady state gains on the operating point. This problem is addressed via a hybrid control law consisting of two robust controllers and a robust switch between them activated by the set point change. The controllers are designed to cover the corresponding half-ranges of the full operating range. This permits attainment of the desired overall performance as well as reduction of modeling uncertainty induced by the operating point change to approximately 25% of that associated with the previous designs. Robust switching is accomplished through a novel hybrid mode of behavior-robustly controlled discrete transition.

Zheng, K.; Bentsman, J.; Taft, C.W. [University of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. for Engineering Science & Mechanics

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

110

Application and Operation of a 2-MW Organic Rankine Cycle System on a Refinery FCC Unit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The nation's largest organic Rankine cycle (ORC) waste heat recovery system was started up in July 1984 at a West Coast oil refinery. The system includes two hermetically sealed turbine-generator units, each rated at 1070 kW. Each turbine...

Drake, R. L.

111

Structure of Business Operations Departments, School and Other Unit Assignments FAS, Academic Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

School of Law School of Management Anesthesiology MacMillan Center School of Architecture Finance for Finance & Business Operations History of Medicine Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Envir Health & Safety

Haller, Gary L.

112

2. Unit Operation Dynamic simulation Unit operation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

specification . 2.2 Heat transfer equipment Air cooler, cooler/heater, heat exchanger, fired heater LNG multi flow heat exchanger . 2.3 Piping equipment Mixer, tee, pipe, gas pipe, valve, relief valve . 2.4 Rotating equipment Centrifugal compressor or expander, reciprocating compressor pump ,dynamic simulation

Hong, Deog Ki

113

Forward capacity market CONEfusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In ISO New England and PJM it was assumed that sponsors of new capacity projects would offer them into the newly established forward centralized capacity markets at prices based on their levelized net cost of new entry, or ''Net CONE.'' But the FCCMs have not operated in the way their proponents had expected. To clear up the CONEfusion, FCCM designs should be reconsidered to adapt them to the changing circumstances and to be grounded in realistic expectations of market conduct. (author)

Wilson, James F.

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

114

Probability of economic success for Netherlands dairy farmers moving operations to the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.S., California State University, Fresno Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. James W. Richardson Dairy producers in the Netherlands are struggling to stay in business due to increased environmental legislation, population density, intensity of farming systems..., costs of production and quota restrictions. One option available to Netherlands dairy farmers is to liquidate the value of their assets, put the money into an international bank, and buy an established dairy farm in the United States. The primary...

Duncan, Anthony Ray

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

115

A computer solution for estimating owning and operating costs for over-the-road hauling units  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF CONTENTS PAGE ABSTRACT ACKNOWLEDGEMENT S iv LIST OF TABLES LIST OF FIGURES vii ix CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION II OVER-THE-ROAD HAULING UNITS Characteristics Preliminary Purchase Investigation Vehicle Specifications Fuel Type Weight Restrictions... SIMULATION RUN III OUTPUT, SECOND SIMULATION RUN 88 101 113 VITA 125 yii LIST OF TABLES TABLE PAGE Major On-Highway Truck Manufacturers Gross Vehicle Weight (GVW) Components 10 12 3. (a) Fuel Costs Per Gallon 3. (b) Fuel Consumed Per Brake HP...

Wenners, Edward Bernard

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Waste Area Group 10, Operable Unit 10-08, Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Annual Status Report for Fiscal Year 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a status of the progress made in Fiscal Year 2006 on tasks identified in the Waste Area Group 10, Operable Unit 10-08, Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Work Plan. Major accomplishments include: (1) groundwater sampling and review of the groundwater monitoring data, (2) installation of a Sitewide groundwater-level monitoring network, (3) update of the Groundwater Monitoring and Field Sampling Plan of Operable Unit 10-08, (4) re-evaluation of the risk at Site TSF-08, (5) progress on the Operable Unit 10-08 Sitewide Groundwater Model.

R. P. Wells

2007-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

117

Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 8): Monticello Mill Tailings (USDOE), Operable Unit 3, Monticello, UT, September 29, 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This decision document presents the selected interim remedial action for Operable Unit (OU) 3 surface water and ground water at the Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS) in San Juan County, Utah. The selected alternative for the interim remedial action for OU 3 surface water runoff, continuation of ongoing monitoring efforts, and evaluation of a permeable reactive treatment (PeRT) wall through the use of a pilot-scale treatability study. If monitoring results indicate that the interim remedial action is not achieving the objectives of preventing exposure to and reducing contaminants in contaminated ground water, other alternatives will be evaluated from the OU 3 feasibility study.

NONE

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils Remediation Sets 4-6 (Phase II) Waste Management Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Waste Management Plan describes waste management and waste minimization activities for Group 3, Other Surface Soils Remediation Sets 4-6 (Phase II) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center located within the Idaho National Laboratory. The waste management activities described in this plan support the selected response action presented in the Final Record of Decision for Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Operable Unit 3-13. This plan identifies the waste streams that will be generated during implementation of the remedial action and presents plans for waste minimization, waste management strategies, and waste disposition.

G. L. Schwendiman

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

National CHP Roadmap: Doubling Combined Heat and Power Capacity...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

National CHP Roadmap: Doubling Combined Heat and Power Capacity in the United States by 2010, March 2001 National CHP Roadmap: Doubling Combined Heat and Power Capacity in the...

120

"Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

"Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the Northeast United States" Report Now Available "Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "units operable capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the Northeast United States - November 2013 Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the...

122

Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry: Unit 1, Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains a summarization of the results and insights from the Level 1 accident sequence analyses of internally initiated events, internally initiated fire and flood events, seismically initiated events, and the Level 2/3 risk analysis of internally initiated events (excluding fire and flood) for Surry, Unit 1. The analysis was confined to mid-loop operation, which can occur during three plant operational states (identified as POSs R6 and R10 during a refueling outage, and POS D6 during drained maintenance). The report summarizes the Level 1 information contained in Volumes 2--5 and the Level 2/3 information contained in Volume 6 of NUREG/CR-6144.

Chu, T.L.; Pratt, W.T. [eds.; Musicki, Z. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Environmental Monitoring Plan United States Department of Energy Richland Operations Office. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Environmental Monitoring Plan was prepared for the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Richland Operations Office (RL) to implement the requirements of DOE Order 5400.1. According to the Order, each DOE site, facility, or activity that uses, generates, releases, or manages significant pollutants or hazardous materials shall prepare a written environmental monitoring plan covering two major activities: (1) effluent monitoring and (2) environmental surveillance. The plan is to contain information discussing the rationale and design criteria for the monitoring programs, sampling locations and schedules, quality assurance requirements, program implementation procedures, analytical procedures, and reporting requirements. The plan`s purpose is to assist DOE in the management of environmental activities at the Hanford Site and to help ensure that operations on the site are conducted in an environmentally safe and sound manner.

NONE

1997-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

124

An Assessment of Use, Need for, and Capacity to Integrate Climate Information Among Water Managers in Southeastern United States and the ACF Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Assessment of Use, Need for, and Capacity to Integrate Climate Information Among Water Managers-year droughts, floods, and associated water management decisions have long concerned water managers in Western states. Similar concerns are now facing water managers in Southeastern states, including those in Georgia

Miami, University of

125

Co-operation Agreement between the European Organization for Nuclear Research and the Department of Energy of the United States of America and the National Science Foundation of the United States of America concerning Scientific and Technical Co-operation in Nuclear and Particle Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Co-operation Agreement between the European Organization for Nuclear Research and the Department of Energy of the United States of America and the National Science Foundation of the United States of America concerning Scientific and Technical Co-operation in Nuclear and Particle Physics

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Operation of the NRCh constriction of boilers in 300 MW energy units during combustion of anthracite dust  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Operation of the furnace constriction of boilers in 300 MW units during combustion of anthracite dust with liquid slag removal now requires special attention on the part of both operating personnel at thermal power plants and designers. The reason behind this is charring of the studs and carborundum mass on the roof portion of the constriction with subsequent exposure of the tubes; external high-temperature corrosion of the tubes on the roof portion and on the upper incline of the constriction with subsequent tapering of the tube walls to 1.5 mm and their breaking; the presence of corrosion-fatigue destruction of the tube walls in the upper incline of the constriction with formation of scale, transverse deep grooves and fissures on the front side of the tubes. Overall, at the present time the constriction is a point of failure that requires intensified control and greater repair costs to replace damaged sections of the heating surfaces. In conjunction with this, complex analysis of operation of the constriction has been carried out.

Kaminskii, V.P.; Mironov, S.N.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Analysis of radiation exposure for naval units of Operation CROSSROADS. Volume 1. Basic report. Technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

External radiation doses are reconstructed for crews of support and target ships of Joint Task Force One at Operation CROSSROADS, 1946. Volume I describes the reconstruction methodology, which consists of modeling the radiation environment, to include the radioactivity of lagoon water, target ships, and support ship contamination; retracing ship paths through this environment; and calculating the doses to shipboard personnel. The USS RECLAIMER, a support ship, is selected as a representative ship to demonstrate this methodology. Doses for all other ships are summarized. Volume II (Appendix A) details the results for target ship personnel. Volume III (Appendix B) details the results for support ship personnel. Calculated doses for more than 36,000 personnel aboard support ships while at Bikini range from zero to 1.7 rem. Of those approximately 34,000 are less than 0.5 rem. From the models provided, doses due to target ship reboarding and doses accrued after departure from Bikini can be calculated, based on the individual circumstances of exposure.

Weitz, R.; Thomas, C.; Klemm, J.; Stuart, J.; Knowles, M.

1982-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

128

New Pump and Treat Facility Remedial Action Work Plan For Test Area North Final Groundwater Remediation, Operable Unit 1-07B  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This remedial action work plan identifies the approach and requirements for implementing the medial zone remedial action for Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-07B, at the Idaho National Laboratory. This plan details the management approach for the construction and operation of the New Pump and Treat Facility (NPTF). As identified in the remediatial design/remedial action scope of work, a separate remedial design/remedial action work plan will be prepared for each remedial component of the Operable Unit 1-07B remedial action.

Nelson, L. O.

2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

129

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 8): California Gulch, Operable Unit 3, Leadville, CO, May 6, 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This decision document presents the Selected Remedy for stockpiled fine slag at the Arkansas Valley smelter slag pile of Operable Unit 3 within the California Gulch Superfund Site in Leadville, Colorado. The Selected Remedy is the No Action Alternative, which was presented in the Final Stockpiled Fine Slag Feasibility Study Report (FS). For the stockpiled fine slag, the Selected Remedy leaves the slag piles in their existing condition with no remediation, engineering controls, long term maintenance, or clean up planned. The Selected Remedy is protective of human health and the environment, and is considered effective because (1) no complete human or ecological exposure pathways were identified for the stockpiled fine slag and (2) the potential for release of metals in leachate from the stockpiled fine slag is minimal. The Selected Remedy provides a contingency for resource utilization, which may be undertaken in the future if regional market demand exists for the material.

Not Available

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 8): Anaconda Company Smelter (ARWW and S) Operable Unit, Anaconda, MT, September 29, 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), with the concurrence of the State of Montana Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ), presents this Record of Decision (ROD) for the Anaconda Regional Water, Waste, and Soils (ARWW and S) Operable Unit (OU) of the Anaconda Smelter National Priorities List (NPL) Site. The ROD is based on the Administrative Record for the ARWW and S OU, including three Remedial Investigations (RIs) and five Feasibility Study (FS) Deliverables, human health and ecological risk assessments, the Proposed Plan, the public comments received, including those from the potentially responsible party (PRP), and EPA responses. The ROD presents a brief summary of the RIs and FS Deliverables, actual and potential risks to human health and the environment, and the Selected Remedy. EPA followed the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended, the National Contingency Plan (NCP), and appropriate guidance in preparation of the ROD.

NONE

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Final Hazard Categorization for the Remediation of Six 300-FF-2 Operable Unit Solid Waste Burial Grounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides the final hazard categorization (FHC) for the remediation of six solid waste disposal sites (referred to as burial grounds) located in the 300-FF-2 Operable Unit (OU) on the Hanford Site. These six sites (618-1, 618-2, 618-3, 618-7, 618-8, and 618-13 Burial Grounds) were determined to have a total radionuclide inventory (WCH 2005a, WCH 2005d, WCH 2005e and WCH 2006b) that exceeds the DOE-STD-1027 Category 3 threshold quantity (DOE 1997) and are the subject of this analysis. This FHC document examines the hazards, identifies appropriate controls to manage the hazards, and documents the FHC and commitments for the 300-FF-2 Burial Grounds Remediation Project.

J. D. Ludowise

2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

132

LITERATURE SURVEY FOR GROUNDWATER TREATMENT OPTIONS FOR NITRATE IODINE-129 AND URANIUM 200-ZP-1 OPERABLE UNIT HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This literature review presents treatment options for nitrate, iodine-129, and uranium, which are present in groundwater at the 200-ZP-I Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) within the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. The objective of this review is to determine available methods to treat or sequester these contaminants in place (i.e., in situ) or to pump-and-treat the groundwater aboveground (i.e., ex situ). This review has been conducted with emphasis on commercially available or field-tested technologies, but theoretical studies have, in some cases, been considered when no published field data exist. The initial scope of this literature review included only nitrate and iodine-I 29, but it was later expanded to include uranium. The focus of the literature review was weighted toward researching methods for treatment of nitrate and iodine-129 over uranium because of the relatively greater impact of those compounds identified at the 200-ZP-I OU.

BYRNES ME

2008-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

133

Summary of Time Period-Based and Other Approximation Methods for Determining the Capacity Value of Wind and Solar in the United States: September 2010 - February 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper updates previous work that describes time period-based and other approximation methods for estimating the capacity value of wind power and extends it to include solar power. The paper summarizes various methods presented in utility integrated resource plans, regional transmission organization methodologies, regional stakeholder initiatives, regulatory proceedings, and academic and industry studies. Time period-based approximation methods typically measure the contribution of a wind or solar plant at the time of system peak - sometimes over a period of months or the average of multiple years.

Rogers, J.; Porter, K.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Bangladesh-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bangladesh-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies (EC-LEDS) AgencyCompany Organization United States Agency for International Development, United States...

135

Thailand-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies (EC-LEDS) AgencyCompany Organization United States Agency for International Development, United States Environmental...

136

Refinery Capacity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in NonproducingAdditions to Capacity on theThousand7.End1Capacity Report Operable

137

Managing nuclear predominant generating capacity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The most common belief, associated with nuclear power plant, leads to the conclusion that it can only operate, as a base load plant. This observation can be reversed, by just looking at large generating capacity, using an important nuclear generation mix. Nuclear plants may certainly load follow and contribute to the grid frequency control. The French example illustrates these possibilities. The reactor control of French units has been customized to accommodate the grid requests. Managing such a large nuclear plant fleet requires various actions be taken, ranging from a daily to a multi-annual perspective. The paper describes the various contributions leading to safe, reliable, well accepted and cost competitive nuclear plants in France. The combination of all aspects related to operations, maintenance scheduling, nuclear safety management, are presented. The use of PWR units carries considerable weight in economic terms, with several hundred million francs tied in with outage scheduling every year. This necessitates a global view of the entire generating system which can be mobilized to meet demand. There is considerable interaction between units as, on the one hand, they are competing to satisfy the same need, and, on the other hand, reducing maintenance costs means sharing the necessary resources, and thus a coordinated staggering of outages. In addition, nuclear fuel is an energy reserve which remains in the reactor for 3 or 4 years, with some of the fuel renewed each year. Due to the memory effect, the fuel retains a memory of past use, so that today's choices impact upon the future. A medium-term view of fuel management is also necessary.

Bouget, Y.H.; Herbin, H.C.; Carbonnier, D.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Tax Man Cometh: Income Taxation as a Measure of State Capacity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of state capacity. GDP per energy unit: Economic activityvalue) Indicator GDP per energy unit Average Correlation (p-

Weller, Nick; Ziegler, Melissa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Remedial investigation/feasibility study of the Clinch River/Poplar Creek operable unit. Volume 1: Main text  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the findings of an investigation into contamination of the Clinch River and Poplar Creek near the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in eastern Tennessee. For more than 50 years, various hazardous and radioactive substances have been released to the environment as a result of operations and waste management activities at the ORR. In 1989, the ORR was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL), established and maintained under the federal Comprehensive environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Under CERCLA, NPL sites must be investigated to determine the nature and extent of contamination at the site, assess the risk to human health and the environment posed by the site, and, if necessary, identify feasible remedial alternatives that could be used to clean the site and reduce risk. To facilitate the overall environmental restoration effort at the ORR, CERCLA activities are being implemented individually as distinct operable units (OUs). This document is the combined Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek OU.

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

EIS-0144: Siting, Construction, and Operation of New Production Reactor Capacity; Hanford Site, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, and Savannah River Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy developed this statement to assess the potential environmental impacts, both on a broad programmatic level and on a project-specific level, concerning a proposed action to provide new tritium production capacity to meet the nation's nuclear defense requirements well into the 21st century.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "units operable capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Dual capacity reciprocating compressor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A multi-cylinder compressor particularly useful in connection with northern climate heat pumps and in which different capacities are available in accordance with reversing motor rotation is provided with an eccentric cam on a crank pin under a fraction of the connecting rods, and arranged for rotation upon the crank pin between opposite positions 180[degree] apart so that with cam rotation on the crank pin such that the crank throw is at its normal maximum value all pistons pump at full capacity, and with rotation of the crank shaft in the opposite direction the cam moves to a circumferential position on the crank pin such that the overall crank throw is zero. Pistons whose connecting rods ride on a crank pin without a cam pump their normal rate with either crank rotational direction. Thus a small clearance volume is provided for any piston that moves when in either capacity mode of operation. 6 figs.

Wolfe, R.W.

1984-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

142

Dual capacity reciprocating compressor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A multi-cylinder compressor 10 particularly useful in connection with northern climate heat pumps and in which different capacities are available in accordance with reversing motor 16 rotation is provided with an eccentric cam 38 on a crank pin 34 under a fraction of the connecting rods, and arranged for rotation upon the crank pin between opposite positions 180.degree. apart so that with cam rotation on the crank pin such that the crank throw is at its normal maximum value all pistons pump at full capacity, and with rotation of the crank shaft in the opposite direction the cam moves to a circumferential position on the crank pin such that the overall crank throw is zero. Pistons 24 whose connecting rods 30 ride on a crank pin 36 without a cam pump their normal rate with either crank rotational direction. Thus a small clearance volume is provided for any piston that moves when in either capacity mode of operation.

Wolfe, Robert W. (Wilkinsburg, PA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Use of GTE-65 gas turbine power units in the thermal configuration of steam-gas systems for the refitting of operating thermal electric power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal configurations for condensation, district heating, and discharge steam-gas systems (PGU) based on the GTE-65 gas turbine power unit are described. A comparative multivariant analysis of their thermodynamic efficiency is made. Based on some representative examples, it is shown that steam-gas systems with the GTE-65 and boiler-utilizer units can be effectively used and installed in existing main buildings during technical refitting of operating thermal electric power plants.

Lebedev, A. S.; Kovalevskii, V. P. ['Leningradskii Metallicheskii Zavod', branch of JSC 'Silovye mashiny' (Russian Federation); Getmanov, E. A.; Ermaikina, N. A. ['Institut Teploenergoproekt', branch of JSC 'Inzhenernyi tsentr EES' (Russian Federation)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

144

SRNL PHASE 1 ASSESSMENT OF THE WAC/DQO AND UNIT OPERATIONS FOR THE WTP WASTE QUALIFICATION PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is currently transitioning its emphasis from a design and construction phase toward start-up and commissioning. With this transition, the WTP Project has initiated more detailed assessments of the requirements related to actual processing of the Hanford Site tank waste. One particular area of interest is the waste qualification program to be implemented to support the WTP. Given the successful implementation of similar waste qualification efforts at the Savannah River Site (SRS), based on critical technical support and guidance from the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), WTP requested the utilization of subject matter experts from SRNL to support a technology exchange to perform a review of the WTP waste qualification program, discuss the general qualification approach at SRS, and to identify critical lessons learned through the support of DWPF's sludge batch qualification efforts. As part of Phase 1, SRNL subject matter experts in critical technical and/or process areas reviewed specific WTP waste qualification information. The Phase 1 review was a collaborative, interactive, and iterative process between the two organizations. WTP provided specific analytical procedures, descriptions of equipment, and general documentation as baseline review material. SRNL subject matter experts reviewed the information and, as appropriate, requested follow-up information or clarification to specific areas of interest. This process resulted in multiple teleconferences with key technical contacts from both organizations resolving technical issues that lead to the results presented in this report. This report provides the results of SRNL's Phase 1 review of the WAC-DQO waste acceptance criteria and processability parameters, and the specific unit operations which are required to support WTP waste qualification efforts. The review resulted in SRNL providing concurrence, alternative methods, or gap identification for the proposed WTP analytical methods or approaches. For the unit operations, the SRNL subject matter experts reviewed WTP concepts compared to what is used at SRS and provided thoughts on the outlined tasks with respect to waste qualification. Also documented in this report are recommendations and an outline on what would be required for the next phase to further mature the WTP waste qualification program.

Peeler, D.; Adamson, D.; Bannochie, C.; Cozzi, A.; Eibling, R.; Hay, M.; Hansen, E.; Herman, D.; Martino, C.; Nash, C.; Pennebaker, F.; Poirier, M.; Reboul, S.; Stone, M.; Taylor-Pashow, K.; White, T.; Wilmarth, B.

2012-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

145

UNIT NUMBER  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 UNIT NAME C-611 Underaround Diesel Tank REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Immediately southeast of C-611 APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 1000 gallon FUNCTION: Diesel storage OPERATIONAL...

146

Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils Remediation Sets 4-6 (Phase II) Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan provides the framework for defining the remedial design requirements, preparing the design documentation, and defining the remedial actions for Waste Area Group 3, Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils, Remediation Sets 4-6 (Phase II) located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Laboratory. This plan details the design developed to support the remediation and disposal activities selected in the Final Operable Unit 3-13, Record of Decision.

D. E. Shanklin

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 4): Tri-City Disposal Company, operable unit 2, Bullitt County, Brooks, KY, March 29, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The document presents the decision made by the U.S. Environmental protection Agency (USEPA) for the second phase of remedial action (Operable Unit No. 2) at the Tri-City Industrial Disposal Site. Based on the results of additional sampling at Tri-City, monitoring reports, and risk evaluation, no further remedial action is necessary at the site to ensure protection of human health and the environment. This decision is the final remedial action for the site. Although EPA has determined that no additional Superfund action is warranted for the second operable unit, treatment and monitoring of contaminated groundwater (OU1) (PB92-964004) will continue at the site as necessary.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Waste Area Group 10, Operable Unit 10-08, Annual Monitoring Status Report for Fiscal Year 2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the status of Fiscal Year 2009 groundwater monitoring performed in Waste Area Group 10 at the U.S. Department of Energy Idaho National Laboratory Site, as identified in the Groundwater Monitoring and Field Sampling Plan for Operable Unit 10-08. Twelve of the fourteen required wells were sampled, and all ten required intervals from the Westbay wells were sampled. Two wells were not sampled because they were in the process of being converted into multiple-sample-interval Westbay wells by the U.S. Geological Survey. Groundwater samples were analyzed for volatile organic compounds identified on the Contract Laboratory Program target analyte list as well as metals (filtered), anions, and radionuclides (i.e., I-129, tritium, Tc-99, gross alpha, gross beta, and Sr-90). No contaminant exceeded maximum contaminant levels in wells along the southern boundary of the Idaho National Laboratory Site or in guard wells. Iron was above its secondary maximum contaminant level of 300 ug/L in one well. The cause of the elevated iron concentration is uncertain. Lead was detected just below its action level. However, the zinc concentration was also elevated in these wells, and the source of the lead is probably galvanized riser pipe in the wells. Once the galvanized pipe is replaced, both lead and zinc concentrations should decline, as has been observed at other Waste Area Group 10 wells.

Howard Forsythe

2010-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

149

Remedial investigation work plan for the Groundwater Operable Unit at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Remedial Investigation (RI) Work Plan has been developed as part of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) investigation of the Groundwater Operable Unit (GWOU) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) located near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The first iteration of the GWOU RI Work Plan is intended to serve as a strategy document to guide the ORNL GWOU RI. The Work Plan provides a rationale and organization for groundwater data acquisition, monitoring, and remedial actions to be performed during implementation of environmental restoration activities associated with the ORNL GWOU. It Is important to note that the RI Work Plan for the ORNL GWOU is not a prototypical work plan. The RI will be conducted using annual work plans to manage the work activities, and task reports will be used to document the results of the investigations. Sampling and analysis results will be compiled and reported annually with a review of data relative to risk (screening level risk assessment review) for groundwater. This Work Plan outlines the overall strategy for the RI and defines tasks which are to be conducted during the initial phase of investigation. This plan is presented with the understanding that more specific addenda to the plan will follow.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Solar Energy and Capacity Value (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a one-page, two-sided fact sheet on the capacity of solar power to provide value to utilities and power system operators.

Not Available

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

A Stochastic Unit-Commitment Model to Estimate the Costs of Changing Power Plant Operation under High Amounts of Intermittent Wind Power  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) a market for district heating and process heat. Time series for the wind power production rely on timeA Stochastic Unit-Commitment Model to Estimate the Costs of Changing Power Plant Operation under High Amounts of Intermittent Wind Power Integration Meibom, P.1 , Brand, H.2 , Barth, R.2 and Weber, C

152

Co-operative Forage Crop Investigations Between the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station and the Bureau of Plant Industry, United States Department of Agriculture. Alfalfa in Northwest Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION BULLETIN NO. 137 Co-operative Forage Crop Investigations BETWEEN THE Texas Agricultural Experiment Station AND THE Bureau of Plant Industry, United States Department of ~griculture ALFALFA IN NORTHWEST... features 7 Soil and plant covering ..................................... 8 Adaptability of alfalfa to the region ....................... 8 Preparing the land for alfalfa ................................. 8 Objects in preparing the land...

Conner, A. B. (Arthur Benjamin)

1911-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Refinery Capacity Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Refinery Capacity Report Released: June 15, 2006 Refinery Capacity Report --- Full report in PDF (1 MB) XLS --- Refinery Capacity Data by individual refinery as of January 1, 2006...

154

Capacity Markets for Electricity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ternative Approaches for Power Capacity Markets, Papers andprof id=pjoskow. Capacity Markets for Electricity [13]Utility Commission- Capacity Market Questions, available at

Creti, Anna; Fabra, Natalia

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

On the Automatic Construction of Indistinguishable Operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

their computational and storage capacity; due to their low unit cost and small size, such devices are sig- nificantly of algorithms which are sensitive to the demands of the platform. Coupled with these issues of efficiency, which frequency of any operation since both eat into the valuable battery life of the device. Perhaps the most

156

Remedial investigation/feasibility study for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek operable unit. Volume 1. Main text  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the combined Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Crack (CR/PC) Operable Unit (OU). The CR/PC OU is located in Anderson and Roane Counties, Tennessee and consists of the Clinch River and several of its embayments in Melton Hill and Watts Bar Reservoirs. These waters have received hazardous substances released over a period of 50 years from the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), a National Priority List site established under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. A remedial investigation has been conducted to determine the current nature and extent of any contamination and to assess the resulting risk to human health and the environment. The feasibility study evaluates remedial action alternatives to identify any that are feasible for implementation and that would effectively reduce risk. Historical studies had indicated that current problems would likely include {sup 137}Cs in sediment of the Clinch River, mercury in sediment and fish of Poplar Creek and PCBs and pesticides in fish from throughout the OU. Peak releases of mercury and {sup 137}Cs occurred over 35 years ago, and current releases are low. Past releases of PCBs from the ORR are poorly quantified, and current releases are difficult to quantify because levels are so low. The site characterization focused on contaminants in surface water, sediment, and biota. Contaminants in surface water were all found to be below Ambient Water Quality Criteria. Other findings included the following: elevated metals including cesium 137 and mercury in McCoy Branch sediments; PCBs and chlordane elevated in several fish species, presenting the only major human health risk, significant ecological risks in Poplar Creek but not in the Clinch River.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Remedial investigation/feasibility study of the Clinch River/Poplar Creek operable unit. Volume 1, main text  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the combined Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek Operable Unit (CR/PC OU), an off-site OU associated with environmental restoration activities at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). As a result of past, present, and potential future releases of hazardous substances into the environment, the ORR was placed on the National Priorities List in December 1989 (54 FR 48184). Sites on this list must be investigated for possible remedial action, as required by the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, 42 U.S.C. 9601, et seq.). This report documents the findings of the remedial investigation of this OU and the feasibility of potential remedial action alternatives. These studies are authorized by Sect. 117 of CERCLA and were conducted in accordance with the requirements of the National Contingency Plan (40 CFR Part 300). DOE, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) have entered into a Federal Facility Agreement (FFA), as authorized by Sect. 120 of CERCLA and Sects. 3008(h) and 6001 of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (42 U.S.C. 6901, et seq.). The purpose of this agreement is to ensure a coordinated and effective response for all environmental restoration activities occurring at the ORR. In addition to other responsibilities, the FFA parties mutually define the OU boundaries, set remediation priorities, establish remedial investigation priorities and strategies, and identify and select remedial actions. A copy of this FFA is available from the DOE Information Resource Center in Oak Ridge, Tennessee.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 8): Anaconda Smelter site, (Operable Unit 11 - Flue Dust), Deer Lodge County, Anaconda, MT. (Second remedial action), September 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 6,000-acre Anaconda Smelter site is a former copper and ore processing facility in Deer Lodge County, Montana. Land use in the area is predominantly residential. The site is bounded on the north and east, respectively, by the Warm Springs Creek and Mill Creek, both of which are potential sources of drinking water. From 1884 until 1980 when activities ceased, the site was used for ore processing and smelting operations. In 1988, EPA conducted an investigation to determine the nature and extent of the flue dust contamination. A 1988 ROD addressed the Mill Creek Operable Unit (OU15) and documented the relocation of residents from the community surrounding the smelter site as the selected remedial action. The Record of Decision (ROD) addresses the Flue Dust Operable Unit (OU11). The primary contaminants of concern affecting this site from the flue dust materials are metals including arsenic, cadmium, and lead. The selected remedial action for the site is included.

Not Available

1991-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

159

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale ProvedTexas" ,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating

160

United Technologies Corporation: Internal Audit Department (IAD) Case Study: A Case Study of the UTC ACE Operating System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study of United Technologies Corporation's Internal Audit Department (IAD) examines how stability and change are important factors in how this department functions and improves. IAD is a leader in the adoption of ...

Roth, George

2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "units operable capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Installation and Operation of Sorbathene Solvent Vapor Recovery Units to Recover and Recycle Volatile Organic Compounds at Operating Sites within the Dow Chemical Company  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

because of the history of fires caused by exothermic heat of adsorption and high flammability when adsorption occurs during a long cycle time'. Three SORBATHENE units utilizing activated carbon with a short cycle time to limit temperature rise have... to the potential presence of oxygen in the vapor phase and the increased reactivity of the chemicals on the catalytic surface of the adsorbent. The extent of temperature rises and pressure swings are critical parameters. The adsorption phenomena is exothermic...

Hall, T. L.; Larrinaga, L.

162

Report for Batch Leach Analyses on Sediments at 100-FR-3 Operable Unit, Boreholes C7790, C7791, and C7792  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a data report for CHPRC for the 100-FR-3 operable unit. Between August 15, 2010 and December 2, 2010 sediment samples were received from the 100-FR-3 Operable Unit for geochemical studies. The analyses for this project were performed at the 325 building located in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The analyses were performed according to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) approved procedures and/or nationally recognized test procedures. The data sets include the sample identification numbers, analytical results, estimated quantification limits (EQL), and quality control data. The preparatory and analytical quality control requirements, calibration requirements, acceptance criteria, and failure actions are defined in the on-line QA plan 'Conducting Analytical Work in Support of Regulatory Programs' (CAW). This QA plan implements the Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Requirements Documents (HASQARD) for PNNL.

Lindberg, Michael J.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Real-time optimization boosts capacity of Korean olefins plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Real-time optimization (RTO) of Hyundai Petrochemical Co. Ltd.`s olefins complex at Daesan, South Korea, increased ethylene capacity 4% and revenues 12%, and decreased feedstock and energy usage 2.5%, with no changes in operating conditions. The project comprised RTO and advanced process control (APC) systems for the 350,000 metric ton/year (mty) ethylene plant. A similar system was implemented in the hydrotreating and benzene recovery sections of the plant`s pyrolysis-gasoline treating unit. Hyundai Petrochemical started up its olefins complex on Korea`s western seaboard in late 1991. The Daesan complex comprises 10 plants, including naphtha cracking, monomer, and polymer units. Additional support facilities include: industrial water treatment plants; electric generators; automatic storage systems; a jetty with capacity to berth 100,000 dwt and 10,000 dwt ships simultaneously; a research and development center. The plant`s capacity is 350,000 mty ethylene and 175,000 mty propylene, based on 7,200 operating hr/year. Since start-up, naphtha has been the primary feed, but the plant was designed with flexibility to process C{sub 3}/C{sub 4} (LPG) and gas oil feeds. This paper reviews the project management and decision making process along with the computerized control system design.

Yoon, S. [Hyundai Petrochemical Co. Ltd., Daesan (Korea, Republic of); Dasgupta, S.; Mijares, G. [M.W. Kellogg Co., Houston, TX (United States)

1996-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

164

Monitoring Infrastructure Capacity Monitoring Infrastructure Capacity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Levinson, D. (2000) Monitoring Infrastructure Capacity p. 165-181 in Land Market Monitoring for Smart Urban) task. Monitoring infrastructure capacity is at least as complex as monitoring urban land markets Levinson, D. (2000) Monitoring Infrastructure Capacity p. 165-181 in Land Market Monitoring for Smart Urban

Levinson, David M.

165

TECHNICAL EVALUATION OF SOIL REMEDIATION ALTERNATIVES AT THE BUILDING 812 OPERABLE UNIT, LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABORATORY SITE 300  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy Livermore Site Office requested a technical review of remedial alternatives proposed for the Building 812 Operable Unit, Site 300 at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The team visited the site and reviewed the alternatives proposed for soil remediation in the draft RI/FS and made the following observations and recommendations. Based on the current information available for the site, the team did not identify a single technology that would be cost effective and/or ecologically sound to remediate DU contamination at Building 812 to current remedial goals. Soil washing is not a viable alternative and should not be considered at the site unless final remediation levels can be negotiated to significantly higher levels. This recommendation is based on the results of soil washing treatability studies at Fernald and Ashtabula that suggest that the technology would only be effective to address final remediation levels higher than 50 pCi/g. The technical review team identified four areas of technical uncertainty that should be resolved before the final selection of a preferred remedial strategy is made. Areas of significant technical uncertainty that should be addressed include: (1) Better delineation of the spatial distribution of surface contamination and the vertical distribution of subsurface contamination in the area of the firing table and associated alluvial deposits; (2) Chemical and physical characterization of residual depleted uranium (DU) at the site; (3) Determination of actual contaminant concentrations in air particulates to support risk modeling; and (4) More realistic estimation of cost for remedial alternatives, including soil washing, that were derived primarily from vendor estimates. Instead of conducting the planned soil washing treatability study, the team recommends that the site consider a new phased approach that combines additional characterization approaches and technologies to address the technical uncertainty in the remedial decision making. The site should redo the risk calculations as the future use scenario has changed for the site. As a result, the existing model is based on very conservative assumptions that result in calculation of unreasonably low cleanup goals. Specifically, the review team proposes that LLNL consider: (1) Revising the industrial worker scenario to a reasonable maximum exposure (RME) for a site worker that performs a weekly walk down of the area for two hours for 25 years (or an alternative RME if the exposure scenario changes); (2) Revising the ESSI of 2 mg U per kg soil for the deer mouse to account for less than 0.05 of the total ingested uranium being adsorbed by the gut; (3) Revising bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) for vegetation and invertebrates that are based on 100 mg of soluble uranium per kg of soil, as the uranium concentration in the slope soil does not average 100 mg/kg and it is not all in a soluble form; and (4) Measuring actual contaminant concentrations in air particulates at the site and using the actual values to support risk calculations. The team recommends that the site continue a phased approach during remediation. The activities should focus on elimination of the principal threats to groundwater by excavating (1) source material from the firing table and alluvial deposits, and (2) soil hotspots from the surrounding slopes with concentrations of U-235 and U-238 that pose unacceptable risk. This phased approach allows the remediation path to be driven by the results of each phase. This reduces the possibility of costly 'surprises', such as failure of soil treatment, and reduces the impact of remediation on endangered habitat. Treatment of the excavated material with physical separation equipment may result in a decreased volume of soil for disposal if the DU is concentrated in the fine-grained fraction, which can then be disposed of in an offsite facility at a considerable cost savings. Based on existing data and a decision to implement the recommended phased approach, the cost of characterization, excavation and physical

Eddy-Dilek, C.; Miles, D.; Abitz, R.

2009-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

166

Feasibility study for remedial action for the groundwater operable units at the chemical plant area and the ordnance works area, Weldon Spring, Missouri  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Army (DA) are conducting an evaluation to identify the appropriate response action to address groundwater contamination at the Weldon Spring Chemical Plant (WSCP) and the Weldon Spring Ordnance Works (WSOW), respectively. The two areas are located in St. Charles County, about 48 km (30 rni) west of St. Louis. The groundwater operable unit (GWOU) at the WSCP is one of four operable units being evaluated by DOE as part of the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP). The groundwater operable unit at the WSOW is being evaluated by the DA as Operable Unit 2 (OU2); soil and pipeline contamination are being managed under Operable Unit 1 (OU1). Remedial activities at the WSCP and the WSOW are being conducted in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). Consistent with DOE policy, National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) values have been incorporated into the CERCLA process. A remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) work plan summarizing initial site conditions and providing site hydrogeological and exposure models was published in August of 1995 (DOE 1995). The remedial investigation (RI) and baseline risk assessment (BRA) have also recently been completed. The RI (DOE and DA 1998b) discusses in detail the nature, extent, fate, and transport of groundwater and spring water contamination. The BRA (DOE and DA 1998a) is a combined baseline assessment of potential human health and ecological impacts and provides the estimated potential health risks and ecological impacts associated with groundwater and springwater contamination if no remedial action were taken. This feasibility study (FS) has been prepared to evaluate potential options for addressing groundwater contamination at the WSCP and the WSOW. A brief description of the history and environmental setting of the sites is presented in Section 1.1, key information relative to the nature and extent of contamination is presented in Section 1.2, and the results of the BRA are summarized in Section 1.3. The objective of this FS is discussed in Section 1.4, and preliminary remediation goals are identified in Section 1.5. The organization of the remaining chapters of this FS is outlined in Section 1.6.

NONE

1999-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

167

UNIT NUMBER  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 C-750B Diesel UST UNIT NAME REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Southeast corner of C-750 APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 10,000 gallon FUNCTION: Diesel storage OPERATIONAL STATUS: Removed...

168

UNIT NUMBER  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 UNIT NAME C-633 PCB So111 Site REGULATORY STATUS CERCLA LOCATION C-633 Transformer area (Mac location 75) APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS I Unknown FUNCTION Soill site OPERATIONAL STATUS...

169

Shutdown and low-power operation at commercial nuclear power plants in the United States. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report contains the results of the NRC Staff`s evaluation of shutdown and low-power operations at US commercial nuclear power plants. The report describes studies conducted by the staff in the following areas: Operating experience related to shutdown and low-power operations, probabilistic risk assessment of shutdown and low-power conditions and utility programs for planning and conducting activities during periods the plant is shut down. The report also documents evaluations of a number of technical issues regarding shutdown and low-power operations performed by the staff, including the principal findings and conclusions. Potential new regulatory requirements are discussed, as well as potential changes in NRC programs. A draft report was issued for comment in February 1992. This report is the final version and includes the responses to the comments along with the staff regulatory analysis of potential new requirements.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

100-BC-5 Operable Unit, Batch Leach Analyses and Report for Sediments at RI/FS Wells C7508, C7783, C7784, C7785, and C7787  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is an analytical data report for sediment samples from the 100 BC Operable unit. This report contains the updated dates for samples associated with Hexavalent Chromium/Soil analysis. Between August 24, 2010 and March 3, 2011 sediment samples were received from 100-BC Decision Unit Soil for geochemical studies. The analyses for this project were performed at the 331 building located in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The analyses were performed according to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) approved procedures and/or nationally recognized test procedures. The data sets include the sample identification numbers, analytical results, estimated quantification limits (EQL), and quality control data. The preparatory and analytical quality control requirements, calibration requirements, acceptance criteria, and failure actions are defined in the on-line QA plan 'Conducting Analytical Work in Support of Regulatory Programs' (CAW). This QA plan implements the Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Requirements Documents (HASQARD) for PNNL.

Lindberg, Michael J.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

MEASUREMENT OF SPECIFIC HEAT CAPACITY OF SALTSTONE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the goals of the Saltstone variability study is to identify (and quantify the impact of) the operational and compositional variables that control or influence the important processing and performance properties of Saltstone grout mixtures. The heat capacity of the Saltstone waste form is one of the important properties of Saltstone mixes that was last measured at SRNL in 1997. It is therefore important to develop a core competency for rapid and accurate analysis of the specific heat capacity of the Saltstone mixes in order to quantify the impact of compositional and operational variations on this property as part of the variability study. The heat capacity, coupled with the heat of hydration data obtained from isothermal calorimetry for a given Saltstone mix, can be used to predict the maximum temperature increase in the cells within the vaults of the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). The temperature increase controls the processing rate and the pour schedule. The maximum temperature is also important to the performance properties of the Saltstone. For example, in mass pours of concrete or grout of which Saltstone is an example, the maximum temperature increase and the maximum temperature difference (between the surface and the hottest location) are controlled to ensure durability of the product and prevent or limit the cracking caused by the thermal gradients produced during curing. This report details the development and implementation of a method for the measurement of the heat capacities of Saltstone mixes as well as the heat capacities of the cementitious materials of the premix and the simulated salt solutions used to batch the mixes. The developed method utilizes the TAM Air isothermal calorimeter and takes advantage of the sophisticated heat flow measurement capabilities of the instrument. Standards and reference materials were identified and used to validate the procedure and ensure accuracy of testing. Heat capacities of Saltstone mixes were {approx} 55% higher than the previous measurement of specific heat capacity on a reference Saltstone mix in 1997. Values of mixes prepared using Deliquification, Dissolution and Adjustment (DDA), Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) and Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) simulants and premix at 0.60 w/cm ratio were {approx} 1.95 J/g/{sup o}C and were equivalent within experimental error. The simple law of mixtures was used to predict the heat capacities of the Saltstone and the results were in excellent agreement with experimental data. This simple law of mixtures can therefore be used to predict the heat capacities of Saltstone mixes in those cases where measurements have not been made. The time dependence of the heat capacity is important as an input to the modeling of temperature increase in Saltstone vaults. The heat capacity of a mix of MCU and premix at 0.60 w/cm ratio was measured immediately after initial mixing and then periodically up to times greater than 100 days. Within experimental error, the heat capacity did not change with time. Therefore, the modeling is not complicated by requiring a time dependent function for specific heat capacity. The water to cementitious material (w/cm) ratio plays a key role in determining the value of the heat capacity. Both experimental and predictive values for SWPF mixes as function of the w/cm ratio were obtained and presented in this report. Predictions of the maximum temperatures of the Saltstone mixes were made using the heat of hydration data from previous isothermal measurements and the newly measured heat capacities for DDA, MCU and SWPF mixes. The maximum temperature increase ranged from 37 to 48 C for these mixes. The presence of aluminate at 0.33 M produced a temperature increase of 68 C which is close to the adiabatic temperature rise of 74 C observed by Steimke and Fowler in 1997 for a mix containing 0.35 M aluminate. Aluminum dissolution of the sludge will increase the aluminate in the DSS which in turn will result in a larger temperature increase in the Saltstone vaults during the curing p

Harbour, J; Vickie Williams, V

2008-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

172

Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1: Evaluation of severe accident risks for plant operational state 5 during a refueling outage. Main report and appendices, Volume 6, Part 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Traditionally, probabilistic risk assessments (PRAS) of severe accidents in nuclear power plants have considered initiating events potentially occurring only during full power operation. Recent studies and operational experience have, however, implied that accidents during low power and shutdown could be significant contributors to risk. In response to this concern, in 1989 the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the potential risks during low power and shutdown operations. Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The program consists of two parallel projects being performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (Surry) and Sandia National Laboratories (Grand Gulf). The program objectives include assessing the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and comparing the estimated risks with the risk associated with accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The scope of the program is that of a Level-3 PRA. The subject of this report is the PRA of the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station, Unit 1. The Grand Gulf plant utilizes a 3833 MWt BUR-6 boiling water reactor housed in a Mark III containment. The Grand Gulf plant is located near Port Gibson, Mississippi. The regime of shutdown analyzed in this study was plant operational state (POS) 5 during a refueling outage, which is approximately Cold Shutdown as defined by Grand Gulf Technical Specifications. The entire PRA of POS 5 is documented in a multi-volume NUREG report (NUREG/CR-6143). The internal events accident sequence analysis (Level 1) is documented in Volume 2. The Level 1 internal fire and internal flood analyses are documented in Vols 3 and 4, respectively.

Brown, T.D.; Kmetyk, L.N.; Whitehead, D.; Miller, L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Forester, J. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Johnson, J. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Safety evaluation report related to the operation of Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391). Supplement No. 14  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Supplement No. 14 to the Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the Tennessee Valley Authority for license to operate Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2, Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391, located in Rhea County, Tennessee, has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The purpose of this supplement is to update the Safety Evaluation with additional information submitted by the applicant since Supplement No. 13 was issued, and matters that the staff had under review when Supplement No. 13 was issued.

Tam, P.S.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Environmental, safety, and health plan for the remedial investigation of Waste Area Grouping 10, Operable Unit 3, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document outlines the environmental, safety, and health (ES&H) approach to be followed for the remedial investigation of Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 10 at Oak at Ridge National Laboratory. This ES&H Plan addresses hazards associated with upcoming Operable Unit 3 field work activities and provides the program elements required to maintain minimal personnel exposures and to reduce the potential for environmental impacts during field operations. The hazards evaluation for WAG 10 is presented in Sect. 3. This section includes the potential radiological, chemical, and physical hazards that may be encountered. Previous sampling results suggest that the primary contaminants of concern will be radiological (cobalt-60, europium-154, americium-241, strontium-90, plutonium-238, plutonium-239, cesium-134, cesium-137, and curium-244). External and internal exposures to radioactive materials will be minimized through engineering controls (e.g., ventilation, containment, isolation) and administrative controls (e.g., procedures, training, postings, protective clothing).

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Sampling and analysis plan for the site characterization of the waste area Grouping 1 groundwater operable unit at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 1 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) includes all of the former ORNL radioisotope research, production, and maintenance facilities; former waste management areas; and some former administrative buildings. Site operations have contaminated groundwater, principally with radiological contamination. An extensive network of underground pipelines and utilities have contributed to the dispersal of contaminants to a known extent. In addition, karst geology, numerous spills, and pipeline leaks, together with the long and varied history of activities at specific facilities at ORNL, complicate contaminant migration-pathway analysis and source identification. To evaluate the extent of contamination, site characterization activity will include semiannual and annual groundwater sampling, as well as monthly water level measurements (both manual and continuous) at WAG 1. This sampling and analysis plan provides the methods and procedures to conduct site characterization for the Phase 1 Remedial Investigation of the WAG 1 Groundwater Operable Unit.

NONE

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 8): Denver Radium, Operable Unit 9, Denver, CO. (Eighth remedial action), December 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Denver Radium site is a former radioactive mining site located in Denver, Denver County, Colorado. Industrial activities commenced at the site in 1886 with the construction of the Bailey Smelter. By 1903, the Colorado Zinc Company had constructed a mill on the site of the Bailey Smelter, and zinc milling operations continued until 1910. From 1914 to 1917, the U.S. Bureau of Mines operated a radium processing facility onsite, known as the National Radium Institute (NRI). Other onsite industrial activities included minerals recovery, manufacturing and servicing of storage batteries, treating and sacking of metallic ore insulation, oil reclamation, and landfilling. The ROD addresses approximately 16,500 cubic yards of metal-contaminated soil as OU9, the 9th of 11 OUs planned for the site. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil are metals, including arsenic, lead, and zinc.

Not Available

1991-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

177

Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,,781Title: Telephone:shortOil and Natural8U.S.NA (Barrels per Calendar

178

Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmesApplication2ArgonneAssemblyDemandPlasma4 (Barrels per

179

Remedial Investigation work plan for Bear Creek Valley Operable Unit 4 (shallow groundwater in Bear Creek Valley) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To effectively evaluate the cumulative impact of releases from multiple sources of contamination, a structured approach has been adopted for Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) based on studies of the groundwater and surface water separate from studies of the sources. Based on the realization of the complexity of the hydrogeologic regime of the ORR, together with the fact that there are numerous sources contributing to groundwater contamination within a geographical area, it was agreed that more timely investigations, at perhaps less cost, could be achieved by separating the sources of contamination from the groundwater and surface water for investigation and remediation. The result will be more immediate attention [Records of Decision (RODS) for interim measures or removal actions] for the source Operable Units (OUs) while longer-term remediation investigations continue for the hydrogeologic regime`s, which are labeled as integrator OUs. This Remedial Investigation work plan contains summaries of geographical, historical, operational, geological, and hydrological information specific to the unit. Taking advantage of the historical data base and ongoing monitoring activities and applying the observational approach to focus data gathering activities will allow the Feasibility Study to evaluate all probable or likely alternatives.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Remedial investigation work plan for Bear Creek Valley Operable Unit 4 (shallow groundwater in Bear Creek Valley) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To effectively evaluate the cumulative impact of releases from multiple sources of contamination, a structured approach has been adopted for Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) based on studies of the groundwater and surface water separate from studies of the sources. Based on the realization of the complexity of the hydrogeologic regime of the ORR, together with the fact that there are numerous sources contributing to groundwater contamination within a geographical area, it was agreed that more timely investigations, at perhaps less cost, could be achieved by separating the sources of contamination from the groundwater and surface water for investigation and remediation. The result will be more immediate attention [Records of Decision (RODs) for interim measures or removal actions] for the source Operable Units (OUs) while longer-term remediation investigations continue for the hydrogeologic regimes, which are labeled as integrator OUs. This remedial investigation work plan contains summaries of geographical, historical, operational, geological, and hydrological information specific to the unit. Taking advantage of the historical data base and ongoing monitoring activities and applying the observational approach to focus data gathering activities will allow the feasibility study to evaluate all probable or likely alternatives.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "units operable capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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181

Work plan for the remedial investigation/feasibility study-environmental assessment for the quarry residuals operable unit at the Weldon Spring Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting cleanup activities at the Weldon Spring site, which is located in St. Charles County, Missouri, about 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis. The Weldon Spring site consists of two noncontiguous areas -- the chemical plant area, which includes four raffinate pits, and the quarry. Cleanup activities at the Weldon Spring site are conducted in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended, incorporating the values of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The contents of the documents prepared for the project are not intended to represent a statement regarding the legal applicability of NEPA to remedial actions conducted under CERCLA. In accordance with the integrated CERCLA/NEPA approach, a remedial investigation/feasibility study-environmental assessment (RI/FS-EA) is being conducted to evaluate conditions and potential responses for the quarry residuals operable unit (QROU). This operable unit consists of the following areas and/or media: the residual material remaining at the Weldon Spring quarry after removal of the pond water and bulk waste; underlying groundwater; and other media located in the surrounding vicinity of the quarry, including adjacent soil, surface water, and sediment in Femme Osage Slough. This work plan identifies the activities within the RI/FS-EA process that are being proposed to address contamination remaining at the quarry area.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

(Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only active lithium carbonate plant in the United States was a brine operation in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

94 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only active lithium carbonate plant in the United States was a brine operation in Nevada. Two companies produced a large array of downstream lithium compounds in the United States from domestic or South

183

Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1. Volume 5: Analysis of core damage frequency from seismic events during mid-loop operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1989 the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to examine carefully the potential risks during low-power and shutdown operations. The program included two parallel projects, one at Brookhaven National Laboratory studying a pressurized water reactor (Surry Unit 1) and the other at Sandia National Laboratories studying a boiling water reactor (Grand Gulf). Both the Brookhaven and Sandia projects have examined only accidents initiated by internal plant faults--so-called ``internal initiators.`` This project, which has explored the likelihood of seismic-initiated core damage accidents during refueling shutdown conditions, is complementary to the internal-initiator analyses at Brookhaven and Sandia. This report covers the seismic analysis at Surry Unit 1. All of the many systems modeling assumptions, component non-seismic failure rates, and human error rates that were used in the internal-initiator study at Surry have been adopted here, so that the results of the two studies can be as comparable as possible. Both the Brookhaven study and this study examine only two shutdown plant operating states (POSs) during refueling outages at Surry, called POS 6 and POS 10, which represent mid-loop operation before and after refueling, respectively. This analysis has been limited to work analogous to a level-1 seismic PRA, in which estimates have been developed for the core-damage frequency from seismic events during POSs 6 and 10. The results of the analysis are that the core-damage frequency of earthquake-initiated accidents during refueling outages in POS 6 and POS 10 is found to be low in absolute terms, less than 10{sup {minus}6}/year.

Budnitz, R.J. [Future Resources Associates, Inc., Berkeley, CA (United States); Davis, P.R. [PRD Consulting (United States); Ravindra, M.K.; Tong, W.H. [EQE International, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1: Evaluation of severe accident risks for plant operational state 5 during a refueling outage. Supporting MELCOR calculations, Volume 6, Part 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To gain a better understanding of the risk significance of low power and shutdown modes of operation, the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research at the NRC established programs to investigate the likelihood and severity of postulated accidents that could occur during low power and shutdown (LP&S) modes of operation at commercial nuclear power plants. To investigate the likelihood of severe core damage accidents during off power conditions, probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) were performed for two nuclear plants: Unit 1 of the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station, which is a BWR-6 Mark III boiling water reactor (BWR), and Unit 1 of the Surry Power Station, which is a three-loop, subatmospheric, pressurized water reactor (PWR). The analysis of the BWR was conducted at Sandia National Laboratories while the analysis of the PWR was performed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This multi-volume report presents and discusses the results of the BWR analysis. The subject of this part presents the deterministic code calculations, performed with the MELCOR code, that were used to support the development and quantification of the PRA models. The background for the work documented in this report is summarized, including how deterministic codes are used in PRAS, why the MELCOR code is used, what the capabilities and features of MELCOR are, and how the code has been used by others in the past. Brief descriptions of the Grand Gulf plant and its configuration during LP&S operation and of the MELCOR input model developed for the Grand Gulf plant in its LP&S configuration are given.

Kmetyk, L.N.; Brown, T.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan for Operable Units 6-05 and 10-04, Phase IV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Phase IV Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan addresses the remediation of areas with the potential for UXO at the Idaho National Laboratory. These areas include portions of the Naval Proving Ground, the Arco High-Altitude Bombing Range, and the Twin Buttes Bombing Range. Five areas within the Naval Proving Ground that are known to contain UXO include the Naval Ordnance Disposal Area, the Mass Detonation Area, the Experimental Field Station, The Rail Car Explosion Area, and the Land Mine Fuze Burn Area. The Phase IV remedial action will be concentrated in these five areas. For other areas, such as the Arco High-Altitude Bombing Range and the Twin Buttes Bombing Range, ordnance has largely consisted of sand-filled practice bombs that do not pose an explosion risk. Ordnance encountered in these areas will be addressed under the Phase I Operations and Maintenance Plan that allows for the recovery and disposal of ordnance that poses an imminent risk to human health or the environment.

R. P. Wells

2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

186

Analysis of radiation exposure for naval units of Operation Crossroads. Volume 2. (Appendix A) target ships. Technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

External radiation doses are reconstructed for crews of support and target ships of Joint Task Force One at Operation CROSSROADS, 1946. Volume I describes the reconstruction methodology, which consists of modeling the radiation environment, to include the radioactivity of lagoon water, target ships, and support ship contamination; retracing ship paths through this environment; and calculating the doses to shipboard personnel. The USS RECLAIMER, a support ship, is selected as a representative ship to demonstrate this methodology. Doses for all other ships are summarized. Volume II (Appendix A) details the results for target ship personnel. Volume III (Appendix B) details the results for support ship personnel. Calculated doses for more than 36,000 personnel aboard support ships while at Bikini range from zero to 1.7 rem. Of those, approximately 34,000 are less than 0.5 rem. From the models provided, doses due to target ship reboarding and doses accrued after departure from Bikini can be calculated, based on the individual circumstances of exposure.

Weitz, R.; Thomas, C.; Klemm, J.; Stuart, J.; Knowles, M.

1982-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

187

Analysis of radiation exposure for naval units of Operation Crossroads. Volume 3. (Appendix B) support ships. Technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

External radiation doses are reconstructed for crews of support and target ships of Joint Task Force One at Operation CROSSROADS, 1946. Volume I describes the reconstruction methodology, which consists of modeling the radiation environment, to include the radioactivity of lagoon water, target ships, and support ship contamination; retracing ship paths through this environment; and calculating the doses to shipboard personnel. The USS RECLAIMER, a support ship, is selected as a representative ship to demonstrate this methodology. Doses for all other ships are summarized. Volume II (Appendix A) details the results for target ship personnel. Volume III (Appendix B) details the results for support ship personnel. Calculated doses for more than 36,000 personnel aboard support ships while at Bikini range from zero to 1.7 rem. Of those approximately 34,000 are less than 0.5 rem. From the models provided, doses due to target ship reboarding and doses accrued after departure from Bikini can be calculated, based on the individual circumstances of exposure.

Weitz, R.; Thomas, C.; Klemm, J.; Stuart, J.; Knowles, M.

1982-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

188

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 10): Commencement Bay Nearshore/Tideflats Site, operable unit 4, Ruston/North Tacoma Study Area, WA, June 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This decision document presents the selected remedial action for the Ruston/North Tacoma Study Area, in Ruston and Tacoma, Washington. The EPA has divided the Commencement Bay/Nearshore Tideflats Superfund site into seven operable units (OU's) in order to facilitate the investigation, analysis, and cleanup of this very large site. Four of these OU's are associated with the Asarco smelter: OU 02 - Asarco Tacoma Smelter; OU 04 - Asarco Off-Property (Ruston/North Tacoma Study Area); OU 06 - Asarco Sediments; and OU 07 - Asarco Demolition. The remedy described in this ROD addresses OU 04 and involves the cleanup of arsenic and lead contaminated soils and slag in the Study Area, the residential community surrounding the smelter. This remedy will address the principal threat posed by conditions at the site, which is the ingestion of contaminated soil and dust.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Report for Batch Leach Analyses on Sediments at 100-KR-4 Operable Unit, Boreholes C7684, C7688, and C7695  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a data report for sediment samples received by CHPRC from the 100-KR-4 OU. Between December 17, 2010 and February 17, 2011 sediment samples were received from 100-KR-4 Operable Unit for geochemical studies. The analyses for this project were performed at the 331 building located in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The analyses were performed according to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) approved procedures and/or nationally recognized test procedures. The data sets include the sample identification numbers, analytical results, estimated quantification limits (EQL), and quality control data. The preparatory and analytical quality control requirements, calibration requirements, acceptance criteria, and failure actions are defined in the on-line QA plan 'Conducting Analytical Work in Support of Regulatory Programs' (CAW). This QA plan implements the Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Requirements Documents (HASQARD) for PNNL.

Lindberg, Michael J.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

One multivariable controller increased capacity of an Oleflex{trademark}/MTBE complex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Capacity increased by more than 4.6% when one dynamic matrix controller began operating in Valero Refining Company`s MTBE production complex in Corpus Christi, Texas. This was on a plant that was already running well above design capacity due to process changes previously made on the plant. A single controller was developed to cover an Oleflex{trademark} isobutane dehydrogenation unit and an MTBe reaction and fractionation plant with the intermediate isobutylene surge drum. The overall benefit is realized by a comprehensive constrained multivariable predictive controller which properly handles all sets of limits experienced by the complex, whether limited by the front-end Oleflex{trademark} or back-end MTBE unit. The controller has 20 manipulated, 6 disturbance and 44 controlled variables, and covers widely varying dynamics with settling times ranging from twenty minutes to six hours. The controller executes each minute with a six hour time horizon. A unique achievement is intelligent handling of the surge drum level by the controller for higher average daily capacity of the complex as a whole. The Oleflex{trademark} often operates at simultaneous limits on reactor effluent compressor capacity, cold box temperature and hydrogen/hydrocarbon ratio and the MTBE at impurity in butene column overhead as well as impurity in MTBE product.

Robertson, D.; Peterson, T.J.; O`Connor, D. [Dynamic Matrix Control Corp., Houston, TX (United States); Adams, V.; Payne, D. [Valero Refining Co., Corpus Christi, TX (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Numbers 50-390 and 50-391). Supplement Number 13  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report supplements the Safety Evaluation Report (SER), NUREG-0847 (June 1982), Supplement No. 1 (September 1982), Supplement No. 2 (January 1984), Supplement No. 3 (January 1985), Supplement No. 4 (March 1985), Supplement No. 5 (November 1990), Supplement No. 6 (April 1991), Supplement No. 7 (September 1991), Supplement No. 8 (January 1992), Supplement No. 9 (June 1992), Supplement No. 10 (October 1992), Supplement No. 11 (April 1993), and Supplement No. 12 (October 1993), issued by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission with respect to the application filed by the Tennessee Valley Authority, as applicant and owner, for licenses to operate the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391). The facility is located in Rhea County, Tennessee, near the Watts Bar Dam on the Tennessee River. This supplement provides recent information regarding resolution of some of the outstanding and confirmatory items, and proposed license conditions identified in the SER. These issues relate to: Design criteria -- structures, components, equipment, and systems; Reactor; Instrumentation and controls; Electrical power systems; Auxiliary systems; Conduct of operations; Accident analysis; and Quality assurance.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Remedial Investigation Work Plan for Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit 3 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Upper East Fork Popular Creek Operable Unit 3 (UEFPC OU 3) is a source term OU composed of seven sites, and is located in the western portion of the Y-12 Plant. For the most part, the UEFPC OU 3 sites served unrelated purposes and are geographically removed from one another. The seven sites include the following: Building 81-10, the S-2 Site, Salvage Yard oil storage tanks, the Salvage Yard oil/solvent drum storage area, Tank Site 2063-U, the Salvage Yard drum deheader, and the Salvage Yard scrap metal storage area. All of these sites are contaminated with at least one or more hazardous and/or radioactive chemicals. All sites have had some previous investigation under the Y-12 Plant RCRA Program. The work plan contains summaries of geographical, historical, operational, geological, and hydrological information specific to each OU 3 site. The potential for release of contaminants to receptors through various media is addressed, and a sampling and analysis plan is presented to obtain objectives for the remedial investigation. Proposed sampling activities are contingent upon the screening level risk assessment, which includes shallow soil sampling, soil borings, monitoring well installation, groundwater sampling, and surface water sampling. Data from the site characterization activities will be used to meet the above objectives. A Field Sampling Investigation Plan, Health and Safety Plan, and Waste Management Plan are also included in this work plan.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Remedial investigation/feasibility study of the Clinch River/Poplar Creek operable unit. Volume 4. Information related to the feasibility study and ARARs. Appendixes G, H, I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the findings of an investigation into contamination of the Clinch River and Poplar Creek near the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in eastern Tennessee. For more than 50 years, various hazardous and radioactive substances have been released to the environment as a result of operations and waste management activities at the ORR. In 1989, the ORR was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL), established and maintained under the federal Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Under CERCLA, NPL sites must be investigated to determine the nature and extent of contamination at the site, assess the risk to human health and the environment posed by the site, and, if necessary, identify feasible remedial alternatives that could be used to clean the site and reduce risk. To facilitate the overall environmental restoration effort at the ORR, CERCLA activities are being implemented individually as distinct operable units (OUs). This document is the combined Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek OU.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Remedial Investigation Work Plan for Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 1 (Chestnut Ridge Security Pits) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Remedial Investigation (RI) Work Plan specifically addresses Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 1, (OU1) which consists of the Chestnut Ridge Security Pits (CRSP). The CRSP are located {approximately}800 ft southeast of the central portion of the Y-12 Plant atop Chestnut Ridge, which is bounded to the northwest by Bear Creek Valley and to the southeast by Bethel Valley. Operated from 1973 to 1988, the CRSP consisted of a series of trenches used for the disposal of classified hazardous and nonhazardous waste materials. Disposal of hazardous waste materials was discontinued in December 1984, while nonhazardous waste disposal ended on November 8, 1988. An RI is being conducted at this site in response to CERCLA regulations. The overall objectives of the RI are to collect data necessary to evaluate the nature and extent of contaminants of concern (COC), support an ecological risk assessment (ERA) and a human health risk assessment (HHRA), support the evaluation of remedial alternatives, and ultimately develop a Record of Decision for the site. The purpose of this Work Plan is to outline RI activities necessary to define the nature and extent of suspected contaminants at Chestnut Ridge OU1. Potential migration pathways also will be investigated. Data collected during the RI will be used to evaluate the overall risk posed to human health and the environment by OU1.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Remedial investigation/feasibility study of the Clinch River/Poplar Creek Operable Unit. Volume 3. Risk assessment information. Appendixes E, F  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the findings of an investigation into contamination of the Clinch River and Poplar Creek near the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in eastern Tennessee. For more than 50 years, various hazardous and radioactive substances have been released to the environment as a result of operations and waste management activities at the ORR. In 1989, the ORR was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL), established and maintained under the federal Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Under CERCLA, NPL sites must be investigated to determine the nature and extent of contamination at the site, assess the risk to human health and the environment posed by the site, and, if necessary, identify feasible remedial alternatives that could be used to clean the site and reduce risk. To facilitate the overall environmental restoration effort at the ORR, CERCLA activities are being implemented individually as distinct operable units (OUs). This document is Volume 3 of the combined Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek OU.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Post-Closure Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Effluent Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Effluent site is located in the southeastern portion of the Area 12 Camp at the Nevada Test Site. This site is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (1996) as Corrective Action Site (CAS) 12-19-01 and is the only CAS assigned to Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 339. Post-closure sampling and inspection of the site were completed on March 27, 2002. Post-closure monitoring activities were scheduled biennially (every two years) in the Post-Closure Monitoring Plan provided in the Closure Report for CAU 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Effluent, Nevada Test Site (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office [DOEN], 1997). A baseline for the site was established by sampling in 1997. Based on the recommendations from the 1999 post-closure monitoring report (DOE/NV, 1999), samples were collected in 2000, earlier than originally proposed, because the 1999 sample results did not provide the expected decrease in total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) concentrations at the site. Sampling results from 2000 (DOE/NV, 2000) and 2001 (DOE/NV, 2001) revealed favorable conditions for natural degradation at the CAU 339 site, but because of differing sample methods and heterogeneity of the soil, data results from 2000 and later were not directly correlated with previous results. Post-closure monitoring activities for 2002 consisted of the following: (1) Soil sample collection from three undisturbed plots (Plots A, B, and C, Figure 2). (2) Sample analysis for TPH as oil and bio-characterization parameters (Comparative Enumeration Assay [CEA] and Standard Nutrient Panel [SNP]). (3) Site inspection to evaluate the condition of the fencing and signs. (4) Preparation and submittal of the Post-Closure Monitoring Report.

K. B. Campbell

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Competitive Acquisition of Prioritizable Capacity-Based Ancillary Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the competitive procurement of capacity-based ancillary services (AS) in unbundled markets by the Independent Grid1 Competitive Acquisition of Prioritizable Capacity-Based Ancillary Services Gianfranco Chicco Operator (IGO). The capacity-based AS are prioritized in order of ascending response times. Prioritization

198

ORISE: Capacity Building  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capacity Building Because public health agencies must maintain the resources to respond to public health challenges, critical situations and emergencies, the Oak Ridge Institute...

199

Shaped Offset QPSK Capacity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work we compute the capacities and the pragmatic capacities of military-standard shaped-offset quadrature phase-shift keying (SOQPSK-MIL) and aeronautical telemetry SOQPSK (SOQPSK-TG). In the pragmatic approach, SOQPSK is treated as a...

Sahin, Cenk

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

200

Liquid heat capacity lasers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The heat capacity laser concept is extended to systems in which the heat capacity lasing media is a liquid. The laser active liquid is circulated from a reservoir (where the bulk of the media and hence waste heat resides) through a channel so configured for both optical pumping of the media for gain and for light amplification from the resulting gain.

Comaskey, Brian J. (Walnut Creek, CA); Scheibner, Karl F. (Tracy, CA); Ault, Earl R. (Livermore, CA)

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "units operable capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Temporal vs. Stochastic Granularity in Thermal Generation Capacity ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unit Commitment, Electricity Markets, Stochastic Programming. NOTATION ... Department of Energy Office of Science laboratory, is operated under. Contract No.

smryan

2013-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

202

Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1. Volume 5: Analysis of core damage frequency from seismic events for plant operational state 5 during a refueling outage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1989 the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to examine carefully the potential risks during low-power and shutdown operations. The program included two parallel projects, one at Sandia National Laboratories studying a boiling water reactor (Grand Gulf), and the other at Brookhaven National Laboratory studying a pressurized water reactor (Surry Unit 1). Both the Sandia and Brookhaven projects have examined only accidents initiated by internal plant faults---so-called ``internal initiators.`` This project, which has explored the likelihood of seismic-initiated core damage accidents during refueling outage conditions, is complementary to the internal-initiator analyses at Brookhaven and Sandia. This report covers the seismic analysis at Grand Gulf. All of the many systems modeling assumptions, component non-seismic failure rates, and human effort rates that were used in the internal-initiator study at Grand Gulf have been adopted here, so that the results of the study can be as comparable as possible. Both the Sandia study and this study examine only one shutdown plant operating state (POS) at Grand Gulf, namely POS 5 representing cold shutdown during a refueling outage. This analysis has been limited to work analogous to a level-1 seismic PRA, in which estimates have been developed for the core-damage frequency from seismic events during POS 5. The results of the analysis are that the core-damage frequency for earthquake-initiated accidents during refueling outages in POS 5 is found to be quite low in absolute terms, less than 10{sup {minus}7}/year.

Budnitz, R.J. [Future Resources Associates, Inc., Berkeley, CA (United States); Davis, P.R. [PRD Consulting (United States); Ravindra, M.K.; Tong, W.H. [EQE International, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Remedial investigation concept plan for the groundwater operable units at the chemical plant area and the ordnance works area, Weldon Spring, Missouri  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of the Army (DA) are conducting cleanup activities at two properties--the DOE chemical plant area and the DA ordnance works area (the latter includes the training area)--located in the Weldon Spring area in St. Charles County, Missouri. These areas are on the National Priorities List (NPL), and cleanup activities at both areas are conducted in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. DOE and DA are conducting a joint remedial investigation (RI) and baseline risk assessment (BRA) as part of the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for the groundwater operable units for the two areas. This joint effort will optimize further data collection and interpretation efforts and facilitate overall remedial decision making since the aquifer of concern is common to both areas. A Work Plan issued jointly in 1995 by DOE and the DA discusses the results of investigations completed at the time of preparation of the report. The investigations were necessary to provide an understanding of the groundwater system beneath the chemical plant area and the ordnance works area. The Work Plan also identifies additional data requirements for verification of the evaluation presented.

NONE

1999-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

204

Safety evaluation report related to the operation of Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391). Supplement No. 15  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report supplements the Safety Evaluation Report (SER), NUREG-0847 (June 1982), Supplement No. 1 (September 1982), Supplement No. 2 (January 1984), Supplement No. 3 (January 1985), Supplement No. 4 (March 1985), Supplement No. 5 (November 1990), Supplement No. 6 (April 1991), Supplement No. 7 (September 1991), Supplement No. 8 (January 1992), Supplement No. 9 (June 1992), Supplement No. 10 (October 1992), Supplement No. 11 (April 1993), Supplement No. 12 (October 1993), Supplement No. 13 (April 1994), and Supplement No. 14 (December 1994) issued by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission with respect to the application filed by the Tennessee Valley Authority, as applicant and owner, for licenses to operate the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391). The facility is located in Rhea County, Tennessee, near the Watts Bar Dam on the Tennessee River. This supplement provides recent information regarding resolution of some of the outstanding and confirmatory items, and proposed license conditions identified in the SER.

Tam, P.S.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 8): Ogden Defense Depot, Operable Unit 1, Weber County, UT. (Second remedial action), June 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1941, the 1,100-acre Ogden Defense Depot (DDOU) site, located in Ogden, Weber County, Utah, has been a key installation in the Department of Defense supply system. Operable Unit 1, which is located in the southwest part of the DDOU, is composed of the backfill material in the Plain City Canal, Burial Site 1, and Burial Site 3-B. Burial Site 1 was reported to have been used for the disposal of riot control agent (chloroacetophenone) and white smoke (hexachloroethane) containers in the 1940's. In the early 1960's, Burial Site 3-B was reportedly the burying ground for over 1,000 arctic-style rubber boots. The ROD addresses a final remedy for OU1 that will reduce the principal threats posed by contaminated soil and shallow ground water at the site. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil, debris, and ground water are VOCs, including TCE; other organics, including dioxins and pesticides; and metals, including arsenic and lead.

Not Available

1992-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

206

Remedial Investigation Work Plan for Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 1 (Chestnut Ridge Security Pits) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document outlines the activities necessary to conduct a Remedial Investigation (RI) of the Chestnut Ridge Security Pits (CRSP) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The CRSP, also designated Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit (OU) 1, is one of four OUs along Chestnut Ridge on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The purpose of the RI is to collect data to (1) evaluate the nature and extent of known and suspected contaminants, (2) support an Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA) and a Human Health Risk Assessment (HHRA), (3) support the feasibility study in the development and analysis of remedial alternatives, and (4) ultimately, develop a Record of Decision (ROD) for the site. This chapter summarizes the regulatory background of environmental investigation on the ORR and the approach currently being followed and provides an overview of the RI to be conducted at the CRSP. Subsequent chapters provide details on site history, sampling activities, procedures and methods, quality assurance (QA), health and safety, and waste management related to the RI.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Remedial investigation/feasibility study Work Plan and addenda for Operable Unit 4-12: Central Facilities Area Landfills II and III at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is divided into two main sections -- the Work Plan and the addenda. The Work Plan describes the regulatory history and physical setting of Operable Unit 4-12, previous sampling activities, and data. It also identifies a preliminary conceptual model, preliminary remedial action alternatives, and preliminary applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements. In addition, the Work Plan discusses data gaps and data quality objectives for proposed remedial investigation activities. Also included are tasks identified for the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) and a schedule of RI/FS activities. The addenda include details of the proposed field activities (Field Sampling Plan), anticipated quality assurance activities (Quality Assurance Project Plan), policies and procedures to protect RI/FS workers and the environment during field investigations (Health and Safety Plan), and policies, procedures, and activities that the Department of Energy will use to involve the public in the decision-making process concerning CFA Landfills II and III RI/FS activities (Community Relations Plan).

Keck, K.N.; Stormberg, G.J.; Porro, I.; Sondrup, A.J.; McCormick, S.H.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Spatial Analysis of Contaminants in 200 West Area Groundwater in Support of the 200-ZP-1 Operable Unit Pre-Conceptual Remedy Design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents a preliminary spatial and geostatistical analysis of the distribution of several contaminants of interest (COIs) in groundwater within the unconfined aquifer beneath the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. The contaminant plumes of interest extend within the 200-ZP-1 and 200-UP-1 groundwater operable units. The COIs included in the PNNL study were carbon tetrachloride (CTET), technetium-99 (Tc-99), iodine-129 (I-129), chloroform, plutonium, uranium, trichloroethylene (TCE), and nitrate. The project included three tasks. Task 1 involved the development of a database that includes all relevant depth-discrete data on the distribution of COIs in the study area. The second task involved a spatial analysis of the three-dimensional (3D) distribution of data for the COIs in the study area. The main focus of the task was to determine if sufficient data are available for geostatistical mapping of the COIs in 3D. Task 3 involved the generation of numerical grids of the concentration of CTET, chloroform, and Tc-99.

Murray, Christopher J.; Bott, Yi-Ju

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

209

Post-Closure Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Discharge Area Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning site is located in the southeast portion of the Area 12 Camp at the Nevada Test Site (Figure 1). This site is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996) as Corrective Action Site (CAS) 12-19-01 and is the only CAS assigned to Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 339. Post-closure sampling and inspection of the site were completed on March 23, 2001. Because of questionable representativeness and precision of the results, the site was resampled on June 12, 2001. Post-closure monitoring activities were scheduled biennially (every two years) in the Post-Closure Monitoring Plan provided in the December 1997 Closure Report for CAU 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Discharge Area, Nevada Test Site (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office [DOE/NV], 1997). If after six years the rate of degradation appears to be so slow that the greatest concentration of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) present at the site would not decay within 30 years of the site closure, the site will be reevaluated with consideration to enriching the impacted soil at the site to enhance the degradation process. A baseline for the site was established by sampling in 1997. Based on the recommendations from the 1999 post-closure monitoring report, samples were collected in 2000, earlier than originally proposed, because the 1999 sample results did not provide the expected decrease in TPH concentrations at the site. Sampling results from 2000 revealed favorable conditions for natural degradation at the CAU 339 site, but because of differing sample methods and heterogeneity of the soil, the data results from 2000 were not directly correlated with previous results. Post-closure monitoring activities for 2001 consisted of the following: Soil sample collection from three undisturbed plots (Plots A, B, and C, Figure 2); Sample analysis for TPH as oil and bio-characterization parameters (Comparative Enumeration Assay [CEA] and Standard Nutrient Panel [SNP]); Site inspection to evaluate the condition of the fencing and signs; and Preparation and submittal of the Post-Closure Monitoring Report.

A. T. Urbon

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

An approach to reduce start-up opacity on a coal-fired cycling unit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Motivated by the need to prevent stack emission discharges even during start-up, an operations program was initiated to reduce opacity on a coal-fired cycling unit. The measurement basis is a numeric comparison of annual start-ups and yearly totals for reportable opacity six-minute averages. The unit of interest has been in commercial operation since 1978 and has experienced more than 1600 cycles of operation. The 46 gross megawatt fossil fuel unit has shown a rising capacity factor as cycling frequency has increased during the past years. This paper examines the effectiveness of the opacity reduction program and the experiences and methods required to achieve the results. 1986 reference data showed 122 reportable opacity occurrences for 145 unite start-ups. Combined 1988-89 records tabulated to 48 reportable opacity occurrences for 303 cycling operations.

Costello, P.A. (Illinois Power Co., Havana Power Station, Havana, IL (US))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL

Siefert, Chris

212

Large mobile mining equipment operating on soft ground T.G. Joseph  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Large mobile mining equipment operating on soft ground T.G. Joseph School of Mining & Petroleum. The toll on large mobile mining equipment such as > 327 tonne capacity haulers and > 46 m3 electric for large mobile units, a discussion on the extension of the process to shovel undercarriage and carbody

Joseph, Tim Grain

213

Optimization Online - Operations Risk Management by Planning ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aug 1, 2007 ... Operations Risk Management by Planning Optimally the Qualified Workforce Capacity. Emmanuel Fragni re(Emmanuel.Fragniere ***at***...

Emmanuel Fragni re

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Refinery Capacity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in NonproducingAdditions to Capacity on theThousand7.End1Capacity

215

Nuclear Operations Application to Environmental Restoration at Corrective Action Unit 547, Miscellaneous Contaminated Waste Sites, at the Nevada National Security Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office has responsibility for environmental restoration at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly the Nevada Test Site). This includes remediation at locations where past testing activities have resulted in the release of plutonium to the environment. One of the current remediation efforts involves a site where an underground subcritical nuclear safety test was conducted in 1964. The underground test was vented through a steel pipe to the surface in a closed system where gas samples were obtained. The piping downstream of the gas-sampling apparatus was routed belowground to a location where it was allowed to vent into an existing radioactively contaminated borehole. The length of the pipe above the ground surface is approximately 200 meters. This pipe remained in place until remediation efforts began in 2007, at which time internal plutonium contamination was discovered. Following this discovery, an assessment was conducted to determine the quantity of plutonium present in the pipe. This site has been identified as Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 547, Miscellaneous Contaminated Waste Sites. The quantity of plutonium identified at CAU 547 exceeded the Hazard Category 3 threshold but was below the Hazard Category 2 threshold specified in DOE Standard DOE-STD-1027-92. This CAU, therefore, was initially categorized as a Hazard Category 3 environmental restoration site. A contaminated facility or site that is initially categorized as Hazard Category 3, however, may be downgraded to below Hazard Category 3 if it can be demonstrated through further analysis that the form of the material and the energy available for release support reducing the hazard category. This is an important consideration when performing hazard categorization of environmental restoration sites because energy sources available for release of material are generally fewer at an environmental restoration site than at an operating facility and environmental restoration activities may result in the complete removal of source material.

Kevin Cabble (NSO), Mark Krauss and Patrick Matthews (N-I)

2011-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

216

The economics of shutting and restarting primary aluminium smelting capacity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In recent years the aluminum industry in the Western world has been operating well below capacity, with cutbacks in production due largely to the depressed aluminum market conditions of 1992 and 1993. Since mid-1995, however, aluminum producers have begun restarting idled capacity. Extensive efforts and preparation are required both to close capacity in an orderly manner and to restart idled capacity. This paper presents a comprehensive analysis of the costs of shutting capacity, maintaining idled capacity, and restarting potlines. Costs have been calculated for a smelter which may be considered representative of the industry as a whole. Technical aspects and commercial data are outlined for the representative smelter, with costs presented under a variety of shutdown and restart conditions. Additionally, the time required to bring capacity back on-line is examined for several scenarios, and the economic impact of idled capacity is discussed.

Driscoll, K.J. [CRU International, Ltd., London (United Kingdom)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Operational Impacts of Large Deployments of Offshore Wind (Poster)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential operational impact of deploying 54 GW of offshore wind in the United States was examined. The capacity was not evenly distributed; instead, it was concentrated in regions with better wind quality and close to load centers (Table 1). A statistical analysis of offshore wind power time series was used to assess the effect on the power system. The behavior of offshore wind resembled that of onshore wind, despite the former presenting higher capacity factors, more consistent power output across seasons, and higher variability levels. Thus, methods developed to manage onshore wind variability can be extended and applied to offshore wind.

Ibanez, E.; Heaney, M.

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Licensed operating reactors: Status summary report, data as of December 31, 1995. Volume 20  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s monthly summary of licensed nuclear power reactor data is based primarily on the operating data report submitted by licensees for each unit. This report is divided into two sections: the first contains summary highlights and the second contains data on each individual unit in commercial operation. Section 1 availability factors, capacity factors, and forced outage rates are simple arithmetic averages. Section 2 items in the cumulative column are generally as reported by the licensees and notes to the use of weighted averages and starting dates other than commercial operation are provided.

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Update report on the performance of 400 megawatt and larger nuclear and coal-fired generating units. Performance through 1977  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Forty-seven nuclear generating units and 125 coal-fired generating plants that have had at least one full year of commercial operation are covered in this report. Their performances are evaluated using the capacity factor, availability factor, equivalent availability, and forced outage rate. The data are arranged by state and utility. (DLC)

None

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

CARBON MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES FOR U.S. ELECTRICITY GENERATION CAPACITY: A VINTAGE-BASED APPROACH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examines the stock of fossil-fired power generation capacity in the United States within the context of climate change. At present, there are over 1,337 fossil-fired power generating units of at least 100 MW in capacity, that began operating between the early 1940s and today. Together these units provide some 453 GW of electric power. Launching a national program to accelerate the early retirement of this stock or tearing them down and undertaking near-term brownfield redevelopment with advanced power cycle technologies as a means of addressing their greenhouse gas emissions will not be a sensible option for all of these units. Considering a conservative 40-year operating life, there are over 667 existing fossil-fired power plants, representing a capacity of over 291 GW, that have at least a decades worth of productive life remaining. This paper draws upon specialized tools developed by Battelle to analyze the characteristics of this subset of U.S. power generation assets and explore the relationships between plant type, location, emissions, and vintage. It examines the use of retrofit carbon capture technologies, considering criteria such as the proximity of these power plants to geologic reservoirs, to assess the potential that geologic sequestration of CO2 offers these plants for managing their emissions. The average costs for retrofitting these plants and sequestering their CO2 into nearby geologic reservoirs are presented. A discussion of a set of planned U.S. fossil-fired power projects within this context is also included.

Dahowski, Robert T.; Dooley, James J.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "units operable capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Refinery Capacity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in NonproducingAdditions to Capacity on theThousand7.End1Capacity Report June 2014

222

Refinery Capacity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in NonproducingAdditions to Capacity on theThousand7.End1Capacity Report June

223

Refinery Capacity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in NonproducingAdditions to Capacity on theThousand7.End1Capacity Report

224

Refinery Capacity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in NonproducingAdditions to Capacity on theThousand7.End1Capacity Report

225

Refinery Capacity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in NonproducingAdditions to Capacity on theThousand7.End1Capacity Reportof Last

226

Refinery Capacity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in NonproducingAdditions to Capacity on theThousand7.End1Capacity Reportof

227

Refinery Capacity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in NonproducingAdditions to Capacity on theThousand7.End1Capacity ReportofVacuum

228

Refinery Capacity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in NonproducingAdditions to Capacity on theThousand7.End1CapacityCORPORATION /

229

Refinery Capacity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in NonproducingAdditions to Capacity on theThousand7.End1CapacityCORPORATION

230

Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1. Volume 2, Part 1C: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events for plant operational State 5 during a refueling outage, Main report (Sections 11--14)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains the accident sequence analysis of internally initiated events for Grand Gulf, Unit 1 as it operates in the Low Power and Shutdown Plant Operational State 5 during a refueling outage. The report documents the methodology used during the analysis, describes the results from the application of the methodology, and compares the results with the results from two full power analyses performed on Grand Gulf.

Whitehead, D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Darby, J. [Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Yakle, J. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Representation of Solar Capacity Value in the ReEDS Capacity Expansion Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An important issue for electricity system operators is the estimation of renewables' capacity contributions to reliably meeting system demand, or their capacity value. While the capacity value of thermal generation can be estimated easily, assessment of wind and solar requires a more nuanced approach due to the resource variability. Reliability-based methods, particularly assessment of the Effective Load-Carrying Capacity, are considered to be the most robust and widely-accepted techniques for addressing this resource variability. This report compares estimates of solar PV capacity value by the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) capacity expansion model against two sources. The first comparison is against values published by utilities or other entities for known electrical systems at existing solar penetration levels. The second comparison is against a time-series ELCC simulation tool for high renewable penetration scenarios in the Western Interconnection. Results from the ReEDS model are found to compare well with both comparisons, despite being resolved at a super-hourly temporal resolution. Two results are relevant for other capacity-based models that use a super-hourly resolution to model solar capacity value. First, solar capacity value should not be parameterized as a static value, but must decay with increasing penetration. This is because -- for an afternoon-peaking system -- as solar penetration increases, the system's peak net load shifts to later in the day -- when solar output is lower. Second, long-term planning models should determine system adequacy requirements in each time period in order to approximate LOLP calculations. Within the ReEDS model we resolve these issues by using a capacity value estimate that varies by time-slice. Within each time period the net load and shadow price on ReEDS's planning reserve constraint signals the relative importance of additional firm capacity.

Sigrin, B.; Sullivan, P.; Ibanez, E.; Margolis, R.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

EA-0821: Operation of the Glass Melter Thermal Treatment Unit at the U.S. Department of Energy's Mound Plant, Miamisburg, Ohio  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to use an existing glass melter thermal treatment unit (also known as a Penberthy Pyro-Converter joule-heated glass furnace) for the...

233

Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL ­ Supply chains and logistics ­ Systems of systems (e.g., the nuclear fuel cycle, fleet management) #12

Langerhans, Brian

234

Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events for Plant Operational State 5 during a refueling outage. Volume 2, Part 3: Internal Events Appendices I and J  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides supporting documentation for various tasks associated with the performance of the probablistic risk assessment for Plant Operational State 5 during a refueling outage at Grand Gulf, Unit 1 as documented in Volume 2, Part 1 of NUREG/CR-6143.

Yakle, J. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Darby, J. [Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Whitehead, D.; Staple, B. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Demonstrate the removal efficiency and capacity of MOF materials for krypton recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metal organic framework materials (MOFs) were developed and tested in support of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy, Fuel Cycle Technology Separations and Waste Forms Campaign. Specifically, materials are being developed for the removal of xenon (Xe) and krypton (Kr) from gaseous products of nuclear fuel reprocessing unit operations. Two metal organic framework structures were investigated in greater detail to demonstrate the removal efficiency and capacity of MOF materials for krypton recovery. Our two bed breakthrough measurements on NiDOBDC and FMOFCu indicate these materials can capture and separate parts per million levels of Xe and Kr from air. The removal efficiency and adsorption capacity for Kr on these two MOFs were further increased upon removal of Xe upfront.

Thallapally, Praveen K.; Liu, Jian; Strachan, Denis M.

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

236

Capacity Value of Solar Power  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Evaluating the capacity value of renewable energy sources can pose significant challenges due to their variable and uncertain nature. In this paper the capacity value of solar power is investigated. Solar capacity value metrics and their associated calculation methodologies are reviewed and several solar capacity studies are summarized. The differences between wind and solar power are examined, the economic importance of solar capacity value is discussed and other assessments and recommendations are presented.

Duignan, Roisin; Dent, Chris; Mills, Andrew; Samaan, Nader A.; Milligan, Michael; Keane, Andrew; O'Malley, Mark

2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

237

Remedial investigation report on Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 2 (filled coal ash pond/Upper McCoy Branch) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 2: Appendixes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report comprises appendices A--J which support the Y-12 Plant`s remedial action report involving Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 2 (filled coal ash pond/Upper McCoy Branch). The appendices cover the following: Sampling fish from McCoy Branch; well and piezometer logs; ecological effects of contaminants in McCoy Branch 1989-1990; heavy metal bioaccumulation data; microbes in polluted sediments; and baseline human health risk assessment data.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Operation of Distributed Generation Under Stochastic Prices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We model the operating decisions of a commercial enterprisethatneeds to satisfy its periodic electricity demand with either on-sitedistributed generation (DG) or purchases from the wholesale market. Whilethe former option involves electricity generation at relatively high andpossibly stochastic costs from a set of capacity-constrained DGtechnologies, the latter implies unlimited open-market transactions atstochastic prices. A stochastic dynamic programme (SDP) is used to solvethe resulting optimisation problem. By solving the SDP with and withoutthe availability of DG units, the implied option values of the DG unitsare obtained.

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris

2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

239

Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act (MSA): Investments in U.S. Seafood Processing Capacity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In these instances, investments in processing capacity may have lagged because of weak domestic markets for those Processing Capacity ISSUE: The MSA, as reauthorized in 2007, mandates in P.L. 109-479, sec. 106(c facilities in the United States for fisheries that lack capacity needed to process fish harvested by United

240

China ups ethylene capacity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

China is continuing with plans to build up its petrochemical sector. Following government approval the Dongying petrochemical complex in Shandong province is expected to get under way early next year. It will be based on a 140,000-m.t./year ethylene plant and will be the second-largest petrochemical complex in the province, after Qilu, about 50 km away. In addition, there are plans to expand capacities of existing ethylene plants. The Dongying complex will be owned by Shengli Oil Field (50%). Shandong province (35%), and the Dongying municipality (15%). Downstream capacities will comprise 80,000 m.t./year of linear low-density polyethylene (LLDPE) and 20,000 m.t./year of high-density PE. Butene-1 to be used as comonomer for LLDPE will be shipped from Qilu.

Alperowicz, N.; Wood, A.

1992-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "units operable capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

ORISE: Capacity Building  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory |CHEMPACK Mapping Application ORISE developsRelatedCapacity

242

Refinery Capacity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in NonproducingAdditions to Capacity on theThousand7.End1

243

Refinery Capacity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in NonproducingAdditions to Capacity on

244

Refinery Capacity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in NonproducingAdditions to Capacity on Cokers Catalytic Crackers Hydrocrackers

245

Refinery Capacity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in NonproducingAdditions to Capacity on Cokers Catalytic Crackers

246

Operating System Concepts Silberschatz and Galvin 2004 revised by Wiseman5.1 A thread (or lightweight process) is a basic unit of CPU utilization;  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Operating System Concepts Silberschatz and Galvin 2004 revised by Wiseman5.1 Threads · A thread Concepts Silberschatz and Galvin 2004 revised by Wiseman5.2 Single and Multithreaded Processes Operating System Concepts Silberschatz and Galvin 2004 revised by Wiseman5.3 Threads (Cont.) · In a multiple

Wiseman, Yair

247

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 7): Oronogo-Duenweg Mining Belt Site, Operable Unit 4, Jasper County, MO, July 29, 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has prepared this decision document to present the selected remedial action for ground water at the Oronogo/Duenweg Mining Belt Site located in Jasper County, Missouri. This selected remedy deals with providing safe drinking water supplies to residents currently consuming ground water contaminated with metals. The major components of selected remedy are: Support to Public Water Supply District No. 3 in the Oronogo/Duenweg Designated Area (DA); Extension of existing public water lines in the Oronogo/Duenweg DA; Extension of existing public water lines in the Irons Gates Extension DA; Installation of point-of-use treatment units to homes not accessible to public water; A maintenance program for the point-of-use treatment units; A monitoring program for threatened homes and the point-of-use treatment units; and Institutional controls to regulate future uses of the contaminated shallow aquifer.

NONE

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations. Appendix E (Sections E.9-E.16), Volume 2, Part 3B  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Traditionally, probabilistic risk assessments (PRA) of severe accidents in nuclear power plants have considered initiating events potentially occurring only during full power operation. Some previous screening analyses that were performed for other modes of operation suggested that risks during those modes were small relative to full power operation. However, more recent studies and operational experience have implied that accidents during low power and shutdown could be significant contributors to risk. Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The scope of the program includes that of a level-3 PRA. In phase 2, mid-loop operation was selected as the plant configuration to be analyzed based on the results of the phase 1 study. The objective of the phase 2 study is to perform a detailed analysis of the potential accident scenarios that may occur during mid-loop operation, and compare the results with those of NUREG-1150. The scope of the level-1 study includes plant damage state analysis, and uncertainty analysis. Volume 1 summarizes the results of the study. Internal events analysis is documented in Volume 2. It also contains an appendix that documents the part of the phase 1 study that has to do with POSs other than mid-loop operation. Internal fire and internal flood analyses are documented in Volumes 3 and 4. A separate study on seismic analysis, documented in Volume 5, was performed for the NRC by Future Resources Associates, Inc. Volume 6 documents the accident progression, source terms, and consequence analysis.

Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P.; Yang, J.; Bozoki, G.; Hsu, C.J.; Diamond, D.J.; Wong, S.M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Bley, D.; Johnson, D. [PLG Inc., Newport Beach, CA (United States)] [and others

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit-1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations. Appendices F-H, Volume 2, Part 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Traditionally, probabilistic risk assessments (PRA) of severe accidents in nuclear power plants have considered initiating events potentially occurring only during full power operation. Some previous screening analyses that were performed for other modes of operation suggested that risks during those modes were small relative to full power operation. However, more recent studies and operational experience have implied that accidents during low power and shutdown could be significant contributors to risk. Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The scope of the program includes that of a level-3 PRA. In phase 2, mid-loop operation was selected as the plant configuration to be analyzed based on the results of the phase 1 study. The objective of the phase 2 study is to perform a detailed analysis of the potential accident scenarios that may occur during mid-loop operation, and compare the results with those of NUREG-1150. The scope of the level-1 study includes plant damage state analysis, and uncertainty analysis. Volume 1 summarizes the results of the study. Internal events analysis is documented in Volume 2. It also contains an appendix that documents the part of the phase 1 study that has to do with POSs other than mid-loop operation. Internal fire and internal flood analyses are documented in Volumes 3 and 4. A separate study on seismic analysis, documented in Volume 5, was performed for the NRC by Future Resources Associates, Inc. Volume 6 documents the accident progression, source terms, and consequence analysis.

Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P.; Yang, J.; Bozoki, G.; Hsu, C.J.; Diamond, D.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Bley, D.; Johnson, D. [PLG Inc., Newport Beach, CA (United States); Holmes, B. [AEA Technology, Dorset (United Kingdom)] [and others

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Designing Rules for the Capacity Market Hlne Le Cadre Michal Soubra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Designing Rules for the Capacity Market Hélène Le Cadre Michaël Soubra MINES ParisTech, Centre per unit of demand. Finally, coupling the energy and the capacity markets, we design rules for the ca moral hazard and abuse of dominant positions. 1 Introduction Capacity markets have proven to be one

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

251

Capacity Constraints Across Nests in Assortment Optimization Under the Nested Logit Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Capacity Constraints Across Nests in Assortment Optimization Under the Nested Logit Model Jacob B Abstract We consider assortment optimization problems when customers choose according to the nested logit in all nests. When each product consumes one unit of capacity, our capacity constraint limits

Topaloglu, Huseyin

252

Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit-1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations. Appendix I, Volume 2, Part 5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Traditionally, probabilistic risk assessments (PRA) of severe accidents in nuclear power plants have considered initiating events potentially occurring only during full power operation. Some previous screening analyses that were performed for other modes of operation suggested that risks during those modes were small relative to full power operation. However, more recent studies and operational experience have implied that accidents during low power and shutdown could be significant contributors to risk. During 1989, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the potential risks during low power and shutdown operations. The program includes two parallel projects being performed by Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL) and Sandia National Labs. (SNL). Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The objective of this volume of the report is to document the approach utilized in the level-1 internal events PRA for the Surry plant, and discuss the results obtained. A phased approach was used in the level-1 program. In phase 1, which was completed in Fall 1991, a coarse screening analysis examining accidents initiated by internal events (including internal fire and flood) was performed for all plant operational states (POSs). The objective of the phase 1 study was to identify potential vulnerable plant configurations, to characterize (on a high, medium, or low basis) the potential core damage accident scenarios, and to provide a foundation for a detailed phase 2 analysis.

Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P.; Yang, J.; Bozoki, G.; Hsu, C.J.; Diamond, D.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Bley, D.; Johnson, D. [PLG Inc., Newport Beach, CA (United States); Holmes, B. [AEA Technology, Dorset (United Kingdom)] [and others

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

(Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only commercially active lithium mine in the United States was a brine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

94 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only commercially active lithium mine in the United States was a brine operation in Nevada. The mine's production capacity was expanded in 2012, and a new lithium hydroxide plant opened in North

254

ince 1992, the United States has been involved in the establishment and op-eration of a science and technology center in Russia--the International Sci-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and technology center in Russia--the International Sci- ence and Technology Center (ISTC)--and a similar center..." This agreement was initialed in May of 1992, with the United States, Russia, the European Union, and Japan to create a science center in Ukraine distinct from the one being established in Russia. Ratification

255

WINDExchange: Wind Potential Capacity  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption byAbout Printable Version Bookmark and Wind Potential Capacity

256

Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations, Appendices A--D. Volume 2, Part 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During 1989, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the Potential risks during low Power and shutdown operations. The program includes two parallel projects being performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the Plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The objective of this report is to document the approach utilized in the Surry plant and discuss the results obtained. A parallel report for the Grand Gulf plant is prepared by SNL. This study shows that the core-damage frequency during mid-loop operation at the Surry plant is comparable to that of power operation. We recognize that there is very large uncertainty in the human error probabilities in this study. This study identified that only a few procedures are available for mitigating accidents that may occur during shutdown. Procedures written specifically for shutdown accidents would be useful. This document, Volume 2, Pt. 2 provides appendices A through D of this report.

Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [and others

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1: Evaluation of severe accident risk during mid-loop operations. Main report. Volume 6. Part 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During 1989, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the potential risks during low power and shutdown operations. The program includes two parallel projects being performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The scope of the program includes that of a level-3 PRA. A phased approach was used in the level-1 program. In phase 1 which was completed in Fall 1991, a coarse screening analysis including internal fire and flood was performed for all plant operational states (POSs). The objective of the phase 1 study was to identify potential vulnerable plant configurations, to characterize (on a high, medium, or low basis) the potential core damage accident scenarios, and to provide a foundation for a detailed phase 2 analysis. In phase 2, mid-loop operation was selected as the plant configuration to be analyzed based on the results of the phase 1 study. The objective of the phase 2 study is to perform a detailed analysis of the potential accident scenarios that may occur during mid-loop operation, and compare the results with those of NUREG-1150. The results of the phase 2 level 2/3 study are the subject of this volume of NUREG/CR-6144, Volume 6.

Jo, J.; Lin, C.C.; Neymotin, L. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [and others

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Inventory of power plants in the United States 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Inventory of Power Plants in the US provides year-end statistics on generating units operated by electric utilities in the US (the 50 States and the District of Columbia). Statistics presented in this report reflect the status of generating units as of December 31, 1994. The publication also provides a 10-year outlook for generating unit additions. This report is prepared annually by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy (DOE). Data summarized in this report are useful to a wide audience including Congress, Federal, and State agencies; the electric utility industry; and the general public. This is a report of electric utility data; in cases where summary data of nonutility capacity are presented, it is specifically noted as such.

NONE

1995-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

259

NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency Comparison of Capacity Value Methods for Photovoltaics in the Western United States Seyed Hossein Madaeni, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC

260

Physical Property Analysis and Report for Sediments at 100-BC-5 Operable Unit, Boreholes C7505, C7506, C7507, and C7665  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Between October 14, 2009 and February 22, 2010 sediment samples were received from 100-BC Decision Unit for geochemical studies. This is an analytical data report for sediments received from CHPRC at the 100 BC 5 OU. The analyses for this project were performed at the 325 building located in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The analyses were performed according to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) approved procedures and/or nationally recognized test procedures. The data sets include the sample identification numbers, analytical results, estimated quantification limits (EQL), and quality control data. The preparatory and analytical quality control requirements, calibration requirements, acceptance criteria, and failure actions are defined in the on-line QA plan 'Conducting Analytical Work in Support of Regulatory Programs' (CAW). This QA plan implements the Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Requirements Documents (HASQARD) for PNNL.

Lindberg, Michael J.

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "units operable capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

2005 Year End Wind Power Capacity for the United States  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:SeadovCooperative JumpWilliamsonWoodsonCounty iscomfortNews This page lists allMaps

262

Environmental Assessment for the Operation of the Glass Melter Thermal Treatment Unit at the US Department of Energy`s Mound Plant, Miamisburg, Ohio  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The glass melter would thermally treat mixed waste (hazardous waste contaminated with radioactive constituents largely tritium, Pu-238, and/or Th-230) that was generated at the Mound Plant and is now in storage, by stabilizing the waste in glass blocks. Depending on the radiation level of the waste, the glass melter may operate for 1 to 6 years. Two onsite alternatives and seven offsite alternatives were considered. This environmental assessment indicates that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the human environment according to NEPA, and therefore the finding of no significant impact is made, obviating the need for an environmental impact statement.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Results Of Routine Strip Effluent Hold Tank And Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank Samples From Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit During Macrobatch 5 Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT) and Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT) samples from several of the ''microbatches'' of Integrated Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch (''Macrobatch'') 5 have been analyzed for {sup 238}Pu, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, and by Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectroscopy (ICPES). The results indicate good decontamination performance within process design expectations. While the data set is sparse, the results of this set and the previous set of results for Macrobatch 4 samples indicate generally consistent operations. The DSSHT samples show continued presence of titanium, likely from leaching of the monosodium titanate in the Actinide Removal process (ARP).

Peters, T. B.; Fondeur, F. F.

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

264

North Dakota Refining Capacity Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

According to a 2008 report issued by the United States Geological Survey, North Dakota and Montana have an estimated 3.0 to 4.3 billion barrels of undiscovered, technically recoverable oil in an area known as the Bakken Formation. With the size and remoteness of the discovery, the question became 'can a business case be made for increasing refining capacity in North Dakota?' And, if so what is the impact to existing players in the region. To answer the question, a study committee comprised of leaders in the region's petroleum industry were brought together to define the scope of the study, hire a consulting firm and oversee the study. The study committee met frequently to provide input on the findings and modify the course of the study, as needed. The study concluded that the Petroleum Area Defense District II (PADD II) has an oversupply of gasoline. With that in mind, a niche market, naphtha, was identified. Naphtha is used as a diluent used for pipelining the bitumen (heavy crude) from Canada to crude markets. The study predicted there will continue to be an increase in the demand for naphtha through 2030. The study estimated the optimal configuration for the refinery at 34,000 barrels per day (BPD) producing 15,000 BPD of naphtha and a 52 percent refinery charge for jet and diesel yield. The financial modeling assumed the sponsor of a refinery would invest its own capital to pay for construction costs. With this assumption, the internal rate of return is 9.2 percent which is not sufficient to attract traditional investment given the risk factor of the project. With that in mind, those interested in pursuing this niche market will need to identify incentives to improve the rate of return.

Dennis Hill; Kurt Swenson; Carl Tuura; Jim Simon; Robert Vermette; Gilberto Marcha; Steve Kelly; David Wells; Ed Palmer; Kuo Yu; Tram Nguyen; Juliam Migliavacca

2011-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

265

Korean oxygenates rule sparks MTBE capacity plans  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Korean government`s strict standard for gasoline sold domestically is expected to have a significant impact on the methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) market. The mandate-requiring gasoline oxygen content of 0.5% this year, 0.75% by 1996, and 1.0% by 1998-has sparked a rush by Korean refineries to build new MTBE plants. If expansion plans are carried out, Korea`s MTBE capacity will increase from 280,000 m.t./year to 650,000 m.t./year by 1996, far surpassing predicted demand. Honam Oil, part of the Lucky Group, plans startup of a 100,000-m.t./year unit at Yeochon by early 1996. In addition, by the end of 1996 Ssangyong Oil will bring a 100,000-m.t./year unit onstream.

Kim, Hyung-Jin

1994-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

266

Trade-offs between NO{sub x} heat rate and opacity at Morgantown Unit 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In work carried out at Morgantown Unit 2, PEPCO and Lehigh University developed techniques for optimizing the operation of an ABB-CE LNCFS III low NO{sub x} firing system. Because of marginal ESP capacity, the ability to reduce NO{sub x} is limited by opacity excursions at this unit. Using a parametric boiler testing approach, and guided by neural network techniques for analysis of the data, control settings were identified which minimize the full load heat rate as a function of the target NO{sub x} level, subject to a stack opacity constraint.

D`Agostini, M.; Walsh, R.; Eskenazi, D.; Levy, E. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States)] [and others

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program Joint Research and Development Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear power has contributed almost 20% of the total amount of electricity generated in the United States over the past two decades. High capacity factors and low operating costs make nuclear power plants (NPPs) some of the most economical power generators available. Further, nuclear power remains the single largest contributor (nearly 70%) of non-greenhouse gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Even when major refurbishments are performed to extend operating life, these plants continue to represent cost-effective, low-carbon assets to the nation's electrical generation capability.

Don Williams

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program Joint Research and Development Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear power has contributed almost 20% of the total amount of electricity generated in the United States over the past two decades. High capacity factors and low operating costs make nuclear power plants (NPPs) some of the most economical power generators available. Further, nuclear power remains the single largest contributor (nearly 70%) of non-greenhouse gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Even when major refurbishments are performed to extend operating life, these plants continue to represent cost-effective, low-carbon assets to the nations electrical generation capability.

Don Williams

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Factors driving wind power development in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the United States, there has been substantial recent growth in wind energy generating capacity, with growth averaging 24 percent annually during the past five years. About 1,700 MW of wind energy capacity was installed in 2001, while another 410 MW became operational in 2002. This year (2003) shows promise of significant growth with more than 1,500 MW planned. With this growth, an increasing number of states are experiencing investment in wind energy projects. Wind installations currently exist in about half of all U.S. states. This paper explores the key factors at play in the states that have achieved a substantial amount of wind energy investment. Some of the factors that are examined include policy drivers, such as renewable portfolio standards (RPS), federal and state financial incentives, and integrated resource planning; as well as market drivers, such as consumer demand for green power, natural gas price volatility, and wholesale market rules.

Bird, Lori A.; Parsons, Brian; Gagliano, Troy; Brown, Matthew H.; Wiser, Ryan H.; Bolinger, Mark

2003-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

270

Final environmental impact statement for the construction and operation of an independent spent fuel storage installation to store the Three Mile Island Unit 2 spent fuel at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Docket Number 72-20  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) contains an assessment of the potential environmental impacts of the construction and operation of an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) for the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) fuel debris at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental laboratory (INEEL). US Department of Energy-Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) is proposing to design, construct, and operate at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). The TMI-2 fuel debris would be removed from wet storage, transported to the ISFSI, and placed in storage modules on a concrete basemat. As part of its overall spent nuclear fuel (SNF) management program, the US DOE has prepared a final programmatic environmental impact statement (EIS) that provides an overview of the spent fuel management proposed for INEEL, including the construction and operation of the TMI-2 ISFSI. In addition, DOE-ID has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) to describe the environmental impacts associated with the stabilization of the storage pool and the construction/operation of the ISFSI at the ICPP. As provided in NRC`s NEPA procedures, a FEIS of another Federal agency may be adopted in whole or in part in accordance with the procedures outlined in 40 CFR 1506.3 of the regulations of the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ). Under 40 CFR 1506.3(b), if the actions covered by the original EIS and the proposed action are substantially the same, the agency adopting another agency`s statement is not required to recirculate it except as a final statement. The NRC has determined that its proposed action is substantially the same as actions considered in DOE`s environmental documents referenced above and, therefore, has elected to adopt the DOE documents as the NRC FEIS.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal floods during mid-loop operations. Volume 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The major objective of the Surry internal flood analysis was to provide an improved understanding of the core damage scenarios arising from internal flood-related events. The mean core damage frequency of the Surry plant due to internal flood events during mid-loop operations is 4.8E-06 per year, and the 5th and 95th percentiles are 2.2E-07 and 1.8E-05 per year, respectively. Some limited sensitivity calculations were performed on three plant improvement options. The most significant result involves modifications of intake-level structure on the canal, which reduced core damage frequency contribution from floods in mid-loop by about 75%.

Kohut, P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Licensed operating reactors: Status summary report data as of December 31, 1991. Volume 16  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s annual summary of licensed nuclear power reactor data is based primarily on the report of operating data submitted by licensees for each unit for the month of December because that report contains data for the month of December, the year to date (in this case calendar year 1991) and cumulative data, usually from the date of commercial operation. The data is not independently verified, but various computer checks are made. The report is divided into two sections. The first contains summary highlights and the second contains data on each individual unit in commercial operation. Section 1 capacity and availability factors are simple arithmetic averages. Section 2 items in the cumulative column are generally as reported by the licensee and notes as to the use of weighted averages and starting dates other than commercial operation are provided.

NONE

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Licensed operating reactors. Status summary report data as of December 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commissions annual summary of licensed nuclear power reactor data is based primarily on the report of operating data submitted by licensees for each unit for the month of December, the year to date (in this case calendar year 1993) and cumulative data, usually for the date of commercial operation. The data is not independently verified, but various computer checks are made. The report is divided into two sections. The first contains summary highlights and the second contains data on each individual unit in commercial operation. Section 1 capacity and availability factors are simple arithmetic averages. Section 2 items in the cumulative column are generally as reported by the licensee and notes as to the use of weighted averages and starting dates other than commercial operation are provided.

Hartfield, R.A.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Licensed operating reactors. Status summary report data as of 12-31-94: Volume 19  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s annual summary of licensed nuclear power reactor data is based primarily on the report of operating data submitted by licensees for each unit for the month of December because that report contains data for the month of December, the year to date (in this case calendar year 1994) and cumulative data, usually from the date of commercial operation. The data is not independently verified, but various computer checks are made. The report is divided into two sections. The first contains summary highlights and the second contains data on each individual unit in commercial operation. Section 1 capacity and availability factors are simple arithmetic averages. Section 2 items in the cumulative column are generally as reported by the licensee and notes as to the use of weighted averages and starting dates other than commercial operation are provided.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Advanced control documentation for operators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advanced controls were implemented on Ashland Oil's Reduced Crude Conversion (RCC) and Metals Removal System (MRS) units, the RCC and MRS main fractionators and the unit gas plant. This article describes the format used for the operator documentation at Ashland. Also, a potential process unit problem is described which can be solved by good operator documentation. The situation presented in the paper is hypothetical, however,the type of unit upset described an occur if proper precautions are not taken.

Ayral, T.E. (Mobil Oil, Torrance, CA (US)); Conley, R.C. (Profimatics, Inc., Thousand Oaks, CA (US)); England, J.; Antis, K. (Ashland Oil, Ashland, KY (US))

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Remedial investigation work plan for Bear Creek Valley Operable Unit 2 (Rust Spoil Area, SY-200 Yard, Spoil Area 1) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The enactment of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) in 1976 and the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) to RCRA in 1984 created management requirements for hazardous waste facilities. The facilities within the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) were in the process of meeting the RCRA requirements when ORR was placed on the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) National Priorities List (NPL) on November 21, 1989. Under RCRA, the actions typically follow the RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA)/RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI)/Corrective Measures Study (CMS)/Corrective Measures implementation process. Under CERCLA the actions follow the PA/SI/Remedial Investigation (RI)/Feasibility Study (FS)/Remedial Design/Remedial Action process. The development of this document will incorporate requirements under both RCRA and CERCLA into an RI work plan for the characterization of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) Operable Unit (OU) 2.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Report for Batch Leach Analyses on Sediments at 100-HR-3 Operable Unit, Boreholes C7620, C7621, C7622, C7623, C7626, C7627, C7628, C7629, C7630, and C7866.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a data report for sediment samples analyzed for CHPRC. Between November 4, 2010 and April 25, 2011 sediment samples were received from 100-HR-3 Operable Unit for geochemical studies. The analyses for this project were performed at the 331 building located in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The analyses were performed according to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) approved procedures and/or nationally recognized test procedures. The data sets include the sample identification numbers, analytical results, estimated quantification limits (EQL), and quality control data. The preparatory and analytical quality control requirements, calibration requirements, acceptance criteria, and failure actions are defined in the on-line QA plan 'Conducting Analytical Work in Support of Regulatory Programs' (CAW). This QA plan implements the Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Requirements Documents (HASQARD) for PNNL.

Lindberg, Michael J.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Systematic Method for Evaluating Extraction and Injection Flow Rates for 100-KR-4 and 100-HR-3 Groundwater Operable Unit Pump-and-Treat Interim Actions for Hydraulic Containment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes a systematic method to develop flow rate recommendations for Pump-and-Treat (P&T) extraction and injection wells in 100-KR-4 and 100-HR-3 Groundwater Operable Units (OU) of the Hanford Site. Flow rate recommendations are developed as part of ongoing performance monitoring and remedy optimization of the P&T interim actions to develop hydraulic contairnnent of the dissolved chromium plume in groundwater and protect the Columbia River from further discharges of groundwater from inland. This document details the methodology and data required to infer the influence of individual wells near the shoreline on hydraulic containment and river protection and develop flow rate recommendations to improve system performance and mitigate potential shortcomings of the system configuration in place.

Spiliotopoulos, Alexandros A.

2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

279

Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Discharge Area, Nevada Test Site, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document constitutes an addendum to the Closure Report for CAU 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Discharge Area Nevada Test Site, December 1997 as described in the document Supplemental Investigation Report for FFACO Use Restrictions, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (SIR) dated November 2008. The SIR document was approved by NDEP on December 5, 2008. The approval of the SIR document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR removals. In conformance with the SIR document, this addendum consists of: This page that refers the reader to the SIR document for additional information The cover, title, and signature pages of the SIR document The NDEP approval letter The corresponding section of the SIR document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the UR for CAS 12-19-01, A12 Fleet Ops Steam Cleaning Efflu. This UR was established as part of a Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective action and is based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996). Since this UR was established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, this UR was reevaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the UR) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove the UR because contamination is not present at the site above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining this UR will be canceled, and the postings and signage at this site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at this site that are unrelated to the FFACO UR such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at this site.

Grant Evenson

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

U.S. Downstream Charge Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,,781Title: Telephone: FAX: Last Name:4, 2014 U.S. dieselDay, Except

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "units operable capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

U.S. Production Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,,781Title: Telephone: FAX:9,152 8,905 8,967 9,38719,039 19,630

282

U.S. Total Shell Storage Capacity at Operable Refineries  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,,781Title: Telephone: FAX:9,152 8,905Area: U.S. TotalArea: U.S. East

283

U.S. Working Storage Capacity at Operable Refineries  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,,781Title: Telephone: FAX:9,152 8,905Area: U.S.530 15,728Area: U.S.

284

HIGH-CAPACITY POLYANION CATHODES  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

FY12 - 280K * Funding for FY13 - 280K *Funding for FY14 - 280K Barriers * Barriers - Cost - Cycle life - Energy and power densities * Targets - High-capacity and high-voltage...

285

UNIT NUMBER:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

193 UNIT NUMBER: 197 UNIT NAME: CONCRETE RUBBLE PILE (30) REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Outside plant security fence, north of the plant on Big Bayou Creek on private property....

286

Effect of spatial variability on the bearing capacity of cement-treated ground  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents a reliability assessment for the undrained bearing capacity of a surface strip foundation based on the results of a probabilistic study in which the shear strength and unit weight of cement-treated ...

Kasama, Kiyonobu

287

Estimation and tactical allocation of airport capacity in the presence of uncertainty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Major airports in the United States and around the world have seen an increase in congestion-related delays over the past few years. Because airport congestion is caused by an imbalance between available capacity and demand, ...

Ramanujam, Varun

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Performance of Gas-Engine Driven Heat Pump Unit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Air-conditioning (cooling) for buildings is the single largest use of electricity in the United States (U.S.). This drives summer peak electric demand in much of the U.S. Improved air-conditioning technology thus has the greatest potential impact on the electric grid compared to other technologies that use electricity. Thermally-activated technologies (TAT), such as natural gas engine-driven heat pumps (GHP), can provide overall peak load reduction and electric grid relief for summer peak demand. GHP offers an attractive opportunity for commercial building owners to reduce electric demand charges and operating expenses. Engine-driven systems have several potential advantages over conventional single-speed or single-capacity electric motor-driven units. Among them are variable speed operation, high part load efficiency, high temperature waste heat recovery from the engine, and reduced annual operating costs (SCGC 1998). Although gas engine-driven systems have been in use since the 1960s, current research is resulting in better performance, lower maintenance requirements, and longer operating lifetimes. Gas engine-driven systems are typically more expensive to purchase than comparable electric motor-driven systems, but they typically cost less to operate, especially for commercial building applications. Operating cost savings for commercial applications are primarily driven by electric demand charges. GHP operating costs are dominated by fuel costs, but also include maintenance costs. The reliability of gas cooling equipment has improved in the last few years and maintenance requirements have decreased (SCGC 1998, Yahagi et al. 2006). Another advantage of the GHP over electric motor-driven is the ability to use the heat rejected from the engine during heating operation. The recovered heat can be used to supplement the vapor compression cycle during heating or to supply other process loads, such as water heating. The use of the engine waste heat results in greater operating efficiency compared to conventional electric motor-driven units (SCGC 1998). In Japan, many hundreds of thousands of natural gas-driven heat pumps have been sold (typically 40,000 systems annually) (Yahagi et al. 2006). The goal of this program is to develop dependable and energy efficient GHPs suitable for U.S. commercial rooftop applications (the single largest commercial product segment). This study describes the laboratory performance evaluation of an integrated 10-ton GHP rooftop unit (a 900cc Daihatsu-Aisin natural gas engine) which uses R410A as the refrigerant (GEDAC No.23). ORNL Thermally-Activated Heat Pump (TAHP) Environmental Chambers were used to evaluate this unit in a controlled laboratory environment.

Abdi Zaltash; Randy Linkous; Randall Wetherington; Patrick Geoghegan; Ed Vineyard; Isaac Mahderekal; Robert Gaylord

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

289

Site descriptions of environmental restoration units at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report, Site Descriptions of Environmental Restoration Units at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, is being prepared to assimilate information on sites included in the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program of the K-25 Site, one of three major installations on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) built during World War III as part of the Manhattan Project. The information included in this report will be used to establish program priorities so that resources allotted to the K-25 ER Program can be best used to decrease any risk to humans or the environment, and to determine the sequence in which any remedial activities should be conducted. This document will be updated periodically in both paper and Internet versions. Units within this report are described in individual data sheets arranged alphanumerically. Each data sheet includes entries on project status, unit location, dimensions and capacity, dates operated, present function, lifecycle operation, waste characteristics, site status, media of concern, comments, and references. Each data sheet is accompanied by a photograph of the unit, and each unit is located on one of 13 area maps. These areas, along with the sub-area, unit, and sub-unit breakdowns within them, are outlined in Appendix A. Appendix B is a summary of information on remote aerial sensing and its applicability to the ER program.

Goddard, P.L.; Legeay, A.J.; Pesce, D.S.; Stanley, A.M.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Remedial investigation/feasibility study of the Clinch River/Poplar Creek Operable Unit. Volume 4. Appendixes G, H, and I and information related to the feasibility study and ARARs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the findings of an investigation into contamination of the Clinch River and Poplar Creek near the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in eastern Tennessee. For more than 50 years, various hazardous and radioactive substances have been released to the environment as a result of operations and waste management activities at the ORR. In 1989, the ORR was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL), established and maintained under the federal Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Under CERCLA, NPL sites must be investigated to determine the nature and extent of contamination at the site, assess the risk to human health and the environment posed by the site, and, if necessary, identify feasible remedial alternatives that could be used to clean the site and reduce risk. To facilitate the overall environmental restoration effort at the ORR, CERCLA activities are being implemented individually as distinct operable units (OUs). This document is Volume 4 of the combined Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek OU.

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Tri-Laboratory Linux Capacity Cluster 2007 SOW  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Program (formerly know as Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative, ASCI) has led the world in capability computing for the last ten years. Capability computing is defined as a world-class platform (in the Top10 of the Top500.org list) with scientific simulations running at scale on the platform. Example systems are ASCI Red, Blue-Pacific, Blue-Mountain, White, Q, RedStorm, and Purple. ASC applications have scaled to multiple thousands of CPUs and accomplished a long list of mission milestones on these ASC capability platforms. However, the computing demands of the ASC and Stockpile Stewardship programs also include a vast number of smaller scale runs for day-to-day simulations. Indeed, every 'hero' capability run requires many hundreds to thousands of much smaller runs in preparation and post processing activities. In addition, there are many aspects of the Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) that can be directly accomplished with these so-called 'capacity' calculations. The need for capacity is now so great within the program that it is increasingly difficult to allocate the computer resources required by the larger capability runs. To rectify the current 'capacity' computing resource shortfall, the ASC program has allocated a large portion of the overall ASC platforms budget to 'capacity' systems. In addition, within the next five to ten years the Life Extension Programs (LEPs) for major nuclear weapons systems must be accomplished. These LEPs and other SSP programmatic elements will further drive the need for capacity calculations and hence 'capacity' systems as well as future ASC capability calculations on 'capability' systems. To respond to this new workload analysis, the ASC program will be making a large sustained strategic investment in these capacity systems over the next ten years, starting with the United States Government Fiscal Year 2007 (GFY07). However, given the growing need for 'capability' systems as well, the budget demands are extreme and new, more cost effective ways of fielding these systems must be developed. This Tri-Laboratory Linux Capacity Cluster (TLCC) procurement represents the ASC first investment vehicle in these capacity systems. It also represents a new strategy for quickly building, fielding and integrating many Linux clusters of various sizes into classified and unclassified production service through a concept of Scalable Units (SU). The programmatic objective is to dramatically reduce the overall Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) of these 'capacity' systems relative to the best practices in Linux Cluster deployments today. This objective only makes sense in the context of these systems quickly becoming very robust and useful production clusters under the crushing load that will be inflicted on them by the ASC and SSP scientific simulation capacity workload.

Seager, M

2007-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

292

UNIT NUMBER:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

10 feet wide by 30 feet long FUNCTION: Provide cooling water for computer systems and HVAC systems various plant buildings. OPERATIONAL STATUS: Active DATES OPERATED: 1953 to...

293

Wind Power Development in the United States: Current Progress, Future Trends  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Operating Cost of Natural Gas Combustion Turbine Operatingincrease in quick-ramping gas combustion-turbine capacity in

Wiser, Ryan H

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Ordered involutive operator spaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is a companion to recent papers of the authors; here we construct the `noncommutative Shilov boundary' of a (possibly nonunital) selfadjoint ordered space of Hilbert space operators. The morphisms in the universal property of the boundary preserve order. As an application, we consider `maximal' and `minimal' unitizations of such ordered operator spaces.

Blecher, David P; Neal, Matthew; Werner, Wend

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Adsorption -capacity data for 283 organic compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Adsorption on activated carbon is a widely used method for removing volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from gases and other exhaust streams. This article presents a compilation of adsorption-capacity data as a function of the VOC concentration in the gas. The results are useful in engineering and environmental studies, and in the design of carbon-based adsorption systems to remove unwanted organic pollutants from gases. For vapor control, carbon-based systems typically combine a carbon-adsorption unit with a secondary control method to reclaim or destroy the vapors desorbed during carbon-bed regeneration. To remove organics dissolved in wastewater, air stripping is typically used to transfer the organics to a vapor stream. Carbon adsorption is then used to separate the organics from the stripper exhaust. Collected vapors can be recovered for reuse or destroyed, depending on their value.

Yaws, C.L.; Bu, L.; Nijhawan, S. [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Final Report: Particulate Emissions Testing, Unit 1, Potomac...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

were completed while Unit 1 was operating at 90% of full load (84MW) or greater. Final Report: Particulate Emissions Testing, Unit 1, Potomac River Generating Station, Alexandria,...

297

FISHERY STATISTICS UNITED STATES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1973 STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 67 Prepared by STATISTICS a review of the fishery statistics for the year 1973 . These statistics include data on the volume and value of landings of fishery products, employment 1n the fish- eries, quantity of gear operated, number

298

FISHERY STATISTICS UNITED STATES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1971 STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 65 Prepared by STATISTICS ry statistics for the year 1971 . These statistics include data on the volume and value of landings of fishery products, employment in the fishe ries, quantity of gear operated, number of fishing craft e

299

UNIT OPERATION Separator, 3 phase separator, tank.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EQUIPMENT. . Centrifugal compressor, expander, reciprocating compressor centrifugal pump . -Centrifugal compressor expander Inlet output connection , power source volume head . motor Inlet outlet connection , power source , , piston . -Pump Centrifugal compressor ,choke flow

Hong, Deog Ki

300

Hybrid Zero-capacity Channels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There are only two known kinds of zero-capacity channels. The first kind produces entangled states that have positive partial transpose, and the second one - states that are cloneable. We consider the family of 'hybrid' quantum channels, which lies in the intersection of the above classes of channels and investigate its properties. It gives rise to the first explicit examples of the channels, which create bound entangled states that have the property of being cloneable to the arbitrary finite number of parties. Hybrid channels provide the first example of highly cloneable binding entanglement channels, for which known superactivation protocols must fail - superactivation is the effect where two channels each with zero quantum capacity having positive capacity when used together. We give two methods to construct a hybrid channel from any binding entanglement channel. We also find the low-dimensional counterparts of hybrid states - bipartite qubit states which are extendible and possess two-way key.

Sergii Strelchuk; Jonathan Oppenheim

2012-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "units operable capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Determination of HEat Capacity of Yucca Mountain Strtigraphic Layers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The heat generated from the radioactive waste to be placed in the proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, will affect the thermal-hydrology of the Yucca Mountain stratigraphic layers. In order to assess the effect of the movement of repository heat into the fractured rocks accurate determination of thermodynamic and hydraulic properties is important. Heat capacity is one of the properties that are required to evaluate energy storage in the fractured rock. Rock-grain heat capacity, the subject of this study, is the heat capacity of the solid part of the rock. Yucca Mountain consists of alternating lithostratigraphic units of welded and non-welded ash-flow tuff, mainly rhyolitic in composition and displaying varying degrees of vitrification and alteration. A number of methods exist that can be used to evaluate heat capacity of the stratigraphic layers that consist of different compositions. In this study, the mineral summation method has been used to quantify the heat capacity of the stratigraphic layers based on Kopp's rule. The mineral summation method is an addition of the weighted heat capacity of each mineral found in a specific layer. For this study the weighting was done based on the mass percentage of each mineral in the layer. The method utilized a mineralogic map of the rocks at the Yucca Mountain repository site. The Calico Hills formation and adjacent bedded tuff layers display a bimodal mineral distribution of vitric and zeolitic zones with differing mineralogies. Based on this bimodal distribution in zeolite abundance, the boundary between the vitric and zeolitic zones was selected to be 15% zeolitic abundance. Thus, based on the zeolite abundance, subdivisions have been introduced to these layers into ''vitric'' and ''zeolitic'' zones. Heat capacity values have been calculated for these layers both as ''layer average'' and ''zone average''. The heat capacity determination method presented in this report did not account for spatial variability in the horizontal direction within each layer.

T. Hadgu; C. Lum; J.E. Bean

2006-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

302

Operating experience of large ultra super critical steam turbine with latest technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In Japan, the main large capacity fossil-fuel power plant larger than 500 MW are supercritical units and the steam condition of 24.2 MPa, 538/566 C has been adopted. Through extensive development work, design and material technologies for steam turbines with a 593 C steam temperature have been established, and the steam condition of 24.2 MPa, 583/593 C was applied to the 700 MW steam turbine of Hekinan No.3 Unit, Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc. for the first time in Japan. This is also the world`s largest unit with a steam condition of 593 C. The Hekinan No. 3 Unit was designed and manufactured applying the latest technologies established for 593 C application. The unit was first rolled with steam in July 1992 and after successful trial operation and tests, the No. 3 Unit started commercial operation in April 1993. This paper introduces the latest technologies and the overhaul inspection results after about one year`s commercial operation.

Kishimoto, Masaru; Minami, Yoshihiro [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Yokohama (Japan); Takayanagi, Kiyoshi; Umaya, Masahide [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Takasago (Japan)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

303

Capacity Allocation and Pricing Strategies for Wireless Femtocell Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Indoor cell phone users often suffer from poor connectivity. One promising solution, femtocell technology, has been rapidly developed and deployed over the past few years. One of the biggest challenges for femtocell deployment is lack of a clear business model. This paper investigates the economic incentive for the cellular operator (also called macrocell operator) to enable femtocell service by leasing spectrum resource to an independent femtocell operator. On the one hand, femtocell services can increase communication service quality and thus increase the efficiency of the spectrum resource. On the other hand, femtocell services may introduce more competition to the market. We model the interactions between a macrocell operator, a femtocell operator, and users as a three-stage dynamic game, and derive the equilibrium pricing and capacity allocation decisions. We show that when spectrum resources are very limited, the macrocell operator has incentive to lease spectrum to femtocell operators, as femtocell ser...

Duan, Lingjie; Huang, Jianwei

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Voltage verification unit  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A voltage verification unit and method for determining the absence of potentially dangerous potentials within a power supply enclosure without Mode 2 work is disclosed. With this device and method, a qualified worker, following a relatively simple protocol that involves a function test (hot, cold, hot) of the voltage verification unit before Lock Out/Tag Out and, and once the Lock Out/Tag Out is completed, testing or "trying" by simply reading a display on the voltage verification unit can be accomplished without exposure of the operator to the interior of the voltage supply enclosure. According to a preferred embodiment, the voltage verification unit includes test leads to allow diagnostics with other meters, without the necessity of accessing potentially dangerous bus bars or the like.

Martin, Edward J. (Virginia Beach, VA)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

305

Sluiceway Operations to Pass Juvenile Salmonids at The Dalles Dam, Columbia River, USA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Existing ice and trash sluiceways are commonly used to pass juvenile salmonids downstream at hydropower dams through a benign, non-turbine route. At The Dalles Dam on the Columbia River, managers undertook optimizing operations of sluiceway weirs to maximize survival of juvenile salmonids at the powerhouse. We applied fixed-location hydroacoustic methods to compare fish passage rates and sluiceway efficiencies for two weir configurations during 2004 and 2005: three weirs versus six weirs, located at the mid- versus east powerhouse, respectively. We also analyzed horizontal distributions of passage at the sluiceway and turbines and the effects of operating turbines beneath open sluiceway gates to provide supporting data relevant to operations optimization. Based on the findings, we recommend the following for long-term operations for the sluiceway at The Dalles Dam: open six rather than three sluiceway weirs to take advantage of the maximum hydraulic capacity of the sluiceway; open the three weirs above the western-most operating main turbine unit (MU) and the three weirs at MU 8 where turbine passage rates are relatively high; operate the turbine units below open sluiceway weirs as a standard procedure; operate the sluiceway 24 h/d year-round to maximize its benefits to juvenile salmonids; and use the same operations for spring and summer emigrants. These operational concepts are transferable to dams where sluiceway surface flow outlets are used protect downstream migrating fishes.

Johnson, Gary E.; Khan, Fenton; Skalski, J. R.; Klatte, Bernard A.

2013-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

306

Kampung Capacity Local Solutions for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kampung Capacity Local Solutions for Sustainable Rural Energy in the Baram River Basin, Sarawak with a large-scale hydropower plan for the river basin. Keywords: South East Asia, Malaysia, Rural Energy In this study we explore the potential for rural renewable energy supply through a focus on villages

Kammen, Daniel M.

307

Operation of Concentrating Solar Power Plants in the Western Wind and Solar Integration Phase 2 Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS) explores various aspects of the challenges and impacts of integrating large amounts of wind and solar energy into the electric power system of the West. The phase 2 study (WWSIS-2) is one of the first to include dispatchable concentrating solar power (CSP) with thermal energy storage (TES) in multiple scenarios of renewable penetration and mix. As a result, it provides unique insights into CSP plant operation, grid benefits, and how CSP operation and configuration may need to change under scenarios of increased renewable penetration. Examination of the WWSIS-2 results indicates that in all scenarios, CSP plants with TES provides firm system capacity, reducing the net demand and the need for conventional thermal capacity. The plants also reduced demand during periods of short-duration, high ramping requirements that often require use of lower efficiency peaking units. Changes in CSP operation are driven largely by the presence of other solar generation, particularly PV. Use of storage by the CSP plants increases in the higher solar scenarios, with operation of the plant often shifted to later in the day. CSP operation also becomes more variable, including more frequent starts. Finally, CSP output is often very low during the day in scenarios with significant PV, which helps decrease overall renewable curtailment (over-generation). However, the configuration studied is likely not optimal for High Solar Scenario implying further analysis of CSP plant configuration is needed to understand its role in enabling high renewable scenarios in the Western United States.

Denholm, P.; Brinkman, G.; Lew, D.; Hummon, M.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Addendum to the remedial investigation report on Bear Creek Valley Operable Unit 2 (Rust Spoil Area, Spoil Area 1, and SY-200 Yard) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1: Main text  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This addendum to the Remedial Investigation (RI) Report on Bear Creek Valley Operable Unit (OU) 2 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant was prepared in accordance with requirements under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) for reporting the results of a site characterization for public review. This addendum is a supplement to a document that was previously issued in January 1995 and that provided the Environmental Restoration Program with information about the results of the 1993 investigation performed at OU 2. The January 1995 D2 version of the RI Report on Bear Creek Valley OU 2 included information on risk assessments that have evaluated impacts to human health and the environment. Information provided in the document formed the basis for the development of the Feasibility Study Report. This addendum includes revisions to four chapters of information that were a part of the document issued in January 1995. Specifically, it includes revisions to Chaps. 2, 3, 4, and 9. Volume 1 of this document is not being reissued in its entirety as a D3 version because only the four chapters just mentioned have been affected by requested changes. Note also that Volume 2 of this RI Report on Bear Creek Valley OU 2 is not being reissued in conjunction with Volume 1 of this document because there have been no changes requested or made to the previously issued version of Volume 2 of this document.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Capacity Allocation with Competitive Retailers Masabumi Furuhata  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to uncertainty of market demands, costly capacity construction and time consuming capacity expansion. This makes the market to be unstable and malfunc- tioning. Such a problem is known as the capacity allocation investigate the properties of capacity allocation mechanisms for the markets where a sin- gle supplier

Zhang, Dongmo

310

NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Ancillary Services in the United  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/ISOs Market Installed Capacity Miles of Transmission Population PJM 164,895 MW 56,499 51M MISO 146,497 MW 53 · Capacity Markets #12;5 Ancillary Services · Ancillary services can either be cost-based or market April 2013 NREL/PR6A2058554 #12;2 North American Energy Markets Source: ISO/RTO Council #12;3 U.S. RTOs

311

United States Geological Survey Geospatial Information Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 United States Geological Survey Geospatial Information Response Standard Operating Procedures May 20, 2013 Executive Summary The Geospatial, reporting requirements, and business processes for acquiring and providing geospatial

Torgersen, Christian

312

Optimization Online - Toward Scalable Stochastic Unit Commitment ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

May 16, 2014 ... ... in stochastic unit commitment, with application to real data associated with the Independent System Operator for New England (ISO-NE).

Yonghan Feng

2014-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

313

On the Capacity of a Class of MIMO Cognitive Radios  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cognitive radios have been studied recently as a means to utilize spectrum in a more efficient manner. This paper focuses on the fundamental limits of operation of a MIMO cognitive radio network with a single licensed user and a single cognitive user. The channel setting is equivalent to an interference channel with degraded message sets (with the cognitive user having access to the licensed user's message). An achievable region and an outer bound is derived for such a network setting. It is shown that the achievable region is optimal for a portion of the capacity region that includes sum capacity.

Sridharan, Sriram

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Capacity and Energy Cost of Information in Biological and Silicon Photoreceptors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Capacity and Energy Cost of Information in Biological and Silicon Photoreceptors PAMELA ABSHIRE of infor- mation capacity (in bits per second) versus energy cost of infor- mation (in joules per bit levels of abstraction. At the functional level, we ex- amine the operational and task specification

Maryland at College Park, University of

315

AN EFFICIENT PROCEDURE FOR THE RATIONAL BUYER APPROACH FOR THE ACQUISITION OF CAPACITY-BASED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AN EFFICIENT PROCEDURE FOR THE RATIONAL BUYER APPROACH FOR THE ACQUISITION OF CAPACITY ­ This paper addresses the competitive pro- curement of capacity-based ancillary services (AS) in un- bundled markets by the Independent Grid Operator (IGO). These AS include upward frequency control, load follow

Gross, George

316

High capacity immobilized amine sorbents  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is provided for making low-cost CO.sub.2 sorbents that can be used in large-scale gas-solid processes. The improved method entails treating an amine to increase the number of secondary amine groups and impregnating the amine in a porous solid support. The method increases the CO.sub.2 capture capacity and decreases the cost of utilizing an amine-enriched solid sorbent in CO.sub.2 capture systems.

Gray, McMahan L. (Pittsburgh, PA); Champagne, Kenneth J. (Fredericktown, PA); Soong, Yee (Monroeville, PA); Filburn, Thomas (Granby, CT)

2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

317

UNIT NUMBER  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6 UNIT NAME C-632-8 Sulfuric Acid Storaqe TaD REGULATORY STATUS CERCLA LOCATION Southwest of C-631 coolin location 76 APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS 5000 Qal - FUNCTION Sulfuric acid...

318

The desulfurization of flue gas at the Mae Moh Power Plant Units 12 and 13  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As pollution of air, water and ground increasingly raises worldwide concern, the responsible national and international authorities establish and issue stringent regulations in order to maintain an acceptable air quality in the environment. In Thailand, the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT) takes full responsibility in environmental protection matters as well as in generating the electricity needed to supply the country`s very rapid power demand growth. Due to the rapidly increasing electricity demand of the country, EGAT had decided to install two further lignite-fired units of 300 MW each (Units 12 and 13) at the Mae Moh power generation station and they are now under construction. The arrangement and the capacity of all the power plant units are as shown. In 1989, EGAT started the work on the flue gas desulfurization system of Mae Moh power plant units 12 and 13 as planned. A study has been conducted to select the most suitable and most economical process for flue gas desulfurization. The wet scrubbing limestone process was finally selected for the two new units. Local limestone will be utilized in the process, producing a by-product of gypsum. Unfortunately, natural gypsum is found in abundance in Thailand, so the produced gypsum will be treated as landfill by mixing it with ash from the boilers of the power plants and then carrying it to the ash dumping area. The water from the waste ash water lake is utilized in the process as much as possible to minimize the requirement of service water, which is a limited resource. The Mae Moh power generation station is situated in the northern region of Thailand, 600 km north of Bangkok and about 30 km east of the town of Lampang, close to the Mae Moh lignite mine. Three lignite-fired units (Units 1-3) of 75 MW each, four units (Units 4-7) of 150 MW each and four units (Units 8-11) of 300 MW each are in operation.

Haemapun, C.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

319

Operational Experience with a Cryogenic Axial-Centrifugal Compressor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), presently under construction at CERN, requires large refrigeration capacity at 1.8 K. Compression of gaseous helium at cryogenic temperatures is therefore inevitable. Together with subcontractors, Linde Kryotechnik has developed a prototype machine. This unit is based on a cryogenic axial-centrifugal compressor, running on ceramic ball bearings and driven by a variable-frequency electrical motor operating at ambient temperature. Integrated in a test facility for superconducting magnets the machine has been commissioned without major problems and successfully gone through the acceptance test in autumn 1995. Subsequent steps were initiated to improve efficiency of this prototype. This paper describes operating experience gained so far and reports on measured performance prior to and after constructional modifications.

Decker, L; Lhlein, K; Purtschert, W; Ziegler, B L; Lebrun, P; Tavian, L; Brunovsky, I; Tucek, L

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Remedial Investigation Report on Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 2 (Filled Coal Ash Pond/Upper McCoy Branch) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1. Main Text  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a report on the remedial investigation (RI) of Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit (OU) 2 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Chestnut Ridge OU 2 consists of Upper McCoy Branch (UMB), the Filled Coal Ash Pond (FCAP), and the area surrounding the Sluice Channel formerly associated with coal ash disposal in the FCAP. Chestnut Ridge OU 2 is located within the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation in Anderson County, Tennessee, approximately 24 miles west of Knoxville. The pond is an 8.5-acre area on the southern slope of Chestnut Ridge, 0.5 mile south of the main Y-12 Plant and geographically separated from the Y-12 Plant by Chestnut Ridge. The elevation of the FCAP is {approximately} 950 ft above mean sea level (msl), and it is relatively flat and largely vegetated. Two small ponds are usually present at the northeast and northwest comers of the FCAP. The Sluice Channel Area extends {approximately}1000 ft from the northern margin of the FCAP to the crest of Chestnut Ridge, which has an elevation of {approximately}1100 ft above msl. The Sluice Channel Area is largely vegetated also. McCoy Branch runs from the top of Chestnut Ridge across the FCAP into Rogers Quarry and out of the quarry where it runs a short distance into Milton Hill Lake at McCoy Embayment, termed UMB. The portion south of Rogers Quarry, within Chestnut Ridge OU 4, is termed Lower McCoy Branch. The DOE Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant disposed of coal ash from its steam plant operations as a slurry that was discharged into an ash retention impoundment; this impoundment is the FCAP. The FCAP was built in 1955 to serve as a settling basin after coal ash slurried over Chestnut Ridge from the Y-12 Plant. The FCAP was constructed by building an earthen dam across the northern tributary of McCoy Branch. The dam was designed to hold 20 years of Y-12 steam plant ash. By July 1967, ash had filled up the impoundment storage behind the dam to within 4 ft of the top.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "units operable capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Investment strategies for capacity expansion.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis addresses a problem at the nexus of operations, strategy, and economics: in concentrated markets, on the one hand firms may need to expand (more)

Yang, Shu-Jung Sunny

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Plug and Process Loads Capacity and Power Requirements Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses gaps in actionable knowledge that would help reduce the plug load capacities designed into buildings. Prospective building occupants and real estate brokers lack accurate references for plug and process load (PPL) capacity requirements, so they often request 5-10 W/ft2 in their lease agreements. Limited initial data, however, suggest that actual PPL densities in leased buildings are substantially lower. Overestimating PPL capacity leads designers to oversize electrical infrastructure and cooling systems. Better guidance will enable improved sizing and design of these systems, decrease upfront capital costs, and allow systems to operate more energy efficiently. The main focus of this report is to provide industry with reliable, objective third-party guidance to address the information gap in typical PPL densities for commercial building tenants. This could drive changes in negotiations about PPL energy demands.

Sheppy, M.; Gentile-Polese, L.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

UNIT NUMBER  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lake APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: About 100 ft by 100 ft FUNCTION: Storage area -used concrete, brick. amd other material placed here for future use. OPERATIONAL STATUS: In place...

324

UNIT NUMBER  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

STATUS DATES OPERATED -1950 to oresent SITEPROCESS DESCRIPTION: Underground concrete tank resistant membrane and acid brick. ined with an acid- WASTE DESCRIPTION:...

325

UNIT NUMBER  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

OPERATED SITEPROCESS DESCRIPTION: A 5000-gal stainless steel tank with associated pumps and piping. The tank is located in a stainless steel lined concrete conta1nment area....

326

UNIT NUMBER  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

In place DATES OPERATED: Unknown SITEPROCESS DESCRIPTION: Ballard Wildlife Management Area utilizes concrete rubble for dam and road stabilization. This concrete rubble...

327

Workover well control. Part 3. Conventional rigs, snubbing units handle a variety of workover jobs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The conventional rig, the most widely used rig for workovers, performs several common functions: tripping in and out of the hole, rotating the work string, and circulating fluid. Its primary component groups are the derrick, hoisting systems, rotary tools, circulating systems, and tubular goods. Rig sizing depends on the job requirements; the typical workover rig is a small-capacity, single unit used for concentric work. A workover rig's most important feature is its portability; compartmentalizing the rig permits transporting it offshore in packages smaller than 8000 lb and allows small cranes to replace derrick barges for loading operations.

Adams, N.

1981-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

328

The NASA CSTI High Capacity Power Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SP-100 Space Nuclear Power Program was established in 1983 by DOD, DOE, and NASA as a joint program to develop technology for military and civil applications. Starting in 1986, NASA has funded a technology program to maintain the momentum of promising aerospace technology advancement started during Phase I of SP-100 and to strengthen, in key areas, the changes for successful development and growth capability of space nuclear reactor power systems for a wide range of future space applications. The elements of the CSTI High Capacity Power Project include Systems Analysis, Stirling Power Conversion, Thermoelectric Power Conversion, Thermal Management, Power Management, Systems Diagnostics, Environmental Interactions, and Material/Structural Development. Technology advancement in all elements is required to provide the growth capability, high reliability and 7 to 10 year lifetime demanded for future space nuclear power systems. The overall project with develop and demonstrate the technology base required to provide a wide range of modular power systems compatible with the SP-100 reactor which facilitates operation during lunar and planetary day/night cycles as well as allowing spacecraft operation at any attitude or distance from the sun. Significant accomplishments in all of the project elements will be presented, along with revised goals and project timelines recently developed.

Winter, J.; Dudenhoefer, J.; Juhasz, A.; Schwarze, G.; Patterson, R.; Ferguson, D.; Titran, R. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH (United States). Lewis Research Center; Schmitz, P. [Sverdrup Technology, Inc., Brook Park, OH (United States). Lewis Research Center Group; Vandersande, J. [Jet Propulsion Lab., Pasadena, CA (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

[working paper] Regional Economic Capacity, Economic Shocks,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 [working paper] Regional Economic Capacity, Economic Shocks, and Economic that makes them more likely to resist economic shocks or to recover quickly from of resilience capacity developed by Foster (2012) is related to economic resilience

Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

330

Fair capacity sharing of multiple aperiodic servers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For handling multiple aperiodic tasks with different temporal requirements, multiple aperiodic servers are used. Since capacity is partitioned statically among the multiple servers, they suffer from heavy capacity exhaustions. Bernat and Burns...

Melapudi, Vinod Reddy

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Determining Optimal Equipment Capacities in Cooling, Heating and Power (CHP) Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Evaluation of potential cooling, heating and power (CHP) applications requires an assessment of the operations and economics of a particular system in meeting the electric and thermal demands of a specific end-use facility. A key determinate in whether a candidate system will be economic is the proper selection of equipment capacities. A methodology to determine the optimal capacities for CHP prime movers and absorption chillers using nonlinear optimization algorithms has been coded into a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet tool that performs the capacity optimization and operations simulation. This paper presents details on the use and results of this publicly available tool.

DeVault, Robert C [ORNL; Hudson II, Carl Randy [ORNL

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Can Science and Technology Capacity be Measured?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The ability of a nation to participate in the global knowledge economy depends to some extent on its capacities in science and technology. In an effort to assess the capacity of different countries in science and technology, this article updates a classification scheme developed by RAND to measure science and technology capacity for 150 countries of the world.

Wagner, Caroline S; Dutta, Arindum

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Internal Markets for Supply Chain Capacity Allocation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Internal Markets for Supply Chain Capacity Allocation David McAdams and Thomas W. Malone Sloan David McAdams & Thomas Malone #12;Internal Markets for Supply Chain Capacity Allocation David Mc ("internal markets") to help allocate manufacturing capacity and determine the prices, delivery dates

334

The effects of capacity discipline on smaller U.S. airports : trends in service, connectivity, and fares  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

After decades of growth in domestic flights, seats, and available seat-miles, airlines reduced capacity at airports across the United States from 2007-2012 in response to a global economic downturn and high and volatile ...

Wittman, Michael D. (Michael David)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Advances in Energy Efficiency, Capital Cost, and Installation Schedules for Large Capacity Cooling Applications Using a Packaged Chiller Plant Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reductions in unit capital costs of installed chiller plant capacity on a dollar per ton basis, 2) marked improvements in total procurement and installation schedules, 3) significantly smaller space requirements, and 4) enhanced control over total system...

Pierson, T. L.; Andrepont, J. S.

336

Iran outlines oil productive capacity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

National Iranian Oil Co. (NIOC) tested production limits last month to prove a claim of 4 million bd capacity made at September's meeting of the organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries. Onshore fields account for 3.6 million bd of the total, with offshore fields providing the rest. NIOC plans to expand total capacity to 4.5 million bd by April 1993, consisting of 4 million b/d onshore and 500,000 b/d offshore. Middle East Economic Survey says questions remain about completion dates for gas injection, drilling, and offshore projects, but expansion targets are attainable within the scheduled time. NIOC said some slippage may be unavoidable, but it is confident the objective will be reached by third quarter 1993 at the latest. More than 60 rigs are working or about to be taken under contract to boost development drilling in onshore fields and provide gas injection in some. NIOC has spent $3.2 billion in foreign exchange on the drilling program in the last 2 1/2 years.

Not Available

1992-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

337

The NASA CSTI High Capacity Power Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SP-100 program was established in 1983 by DOD, DOE, and NASA as a joint program to develop the technology necessary for space nuclear power systems for military and civil applications. During 1986 and 1987, the NASA Advanced Technology Program was responsible for maintaining the momentum of promising technology advancement efforts started during Phase I of SP-100 and to strengthen, in key areas, the chances for successful development and growth capability of space nuclear reactor power systems for future space applications. In 1988, the NASA Advanced Technology Program was incorporated into NASA`s new Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI). The CSTI program was established to provide the foundation for technology development in automation and robotics, information, propulsion, and power. The CSTI High Capacity Power Program builds on the technology efforts of the SP-100 program, incorporates the previous NASA advanced technology project, and provides a bridge to the NASA exploration technology programs. The elements of CSTI high capacity power development include conversion systems - Stirling and thermoelectric, thermal management, power management, system diagnostics, and environmental interactions. Technology advancement in all areas, including materials, is required to provide the growth capability, high reliability and 7 to 10 years lifetime demanded for future space nuclear power systems. The overall program will develop and demonstrate the technology base required to provide a wide range of modular power systems while minimizing the impact of day/night operation as well as attitudes and distance from the Sun. Significant accomplishments in all of the program elements will be discussed, along with revised goals and project timelines recently developed.

Winter, J.M.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

UNIT NUMBER  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

West end of Happy Ho ow Lake APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 200 ft long by 4 ft wide -concrete 4-6 in thickness FUNCTION: Erosion control of dam face OPERATIONAL STATUS: In place...

339

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: moderator temper ature coefficient, reactivity co reactor Unit 4 of the Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant (Sweden) during fuel cycle 16 is analyzed absorption cross-section behavior. Consequently, if NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY VOL. 140 NOV. 2002 147 #12;Demazire

Demazire, Christophe

340

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: moderator temper- ature coefficient, reactivity co reactor Unit 4 of the Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant (Sweden) during fuel cycle 16 is analyzed. Consequently, if*E-mail: demaz@nephy.chalmers.se NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY VOL. 140 NOV. 2002 147 #12;high-burnup fuel

Pzsit, Imre

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "units operable capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Capacity fade of Sony 18650 cells cycled at elevated temperatures Part II. Capacity fade analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Capacity fade of Sony 18650 cells cycled at elevated temperatures Part II. Capacity fade analysis P August 2002 Abstract A complete capacity fade analysis was carried out for Sony 18650 cells cycled the other losses. # 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Capacity fade; Sony 18650

Popov, Branko N.

342

A Rinsing Effluent Evaporator for Dismantling Operations - 13271  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Between 1958 and 1997, the UP1 plant at Marcoule - located in the south of France - reprocessed and recycled nearly 20,000 MT of used fuel from special defense applications reactors, as well as fuel from the first generation of electricity generating reactors in France (natural uranium fuel, CO{sub 2}-cooled, graphite-moderated). Decommissioning and Dismantling of the UP1 plant and its associated units started in 1998. Since 2005, the UP1 facility has been operated by AREVA as the Marcoule Management and Operation contractor for French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA). An important part of this decommissioning program deals with the vitrification facility of Marcoule. This facility includes 20 tanks devoted to interim storage of highly active solutions, prior to vitrification. In 2006, a rinsing program was defined as part of the tank cleanup strategy. The main objective of the rinsing phases was to decrease activity in order to limit the volume of 'long-life active' waste produced during the decommissioning operations, so the tanks can be dismantled without the need of remote operations. To enable this rinsing program, and anticipating large volumes of generated effluent, the construction of an evaporation unit proved to be essential. The main objective of this unit was to concentrate the effluent produced during tank rinsing operations by a factor of approximately 10, prior to it being treated by vitrification. The evaporator design phase was launched in September 2006. The main challenge for the Project team was the installation of this new unit within a nuclear facility still in operation and in existing compartments not initially designed for this purpose. Cold operating tests were completed in 2008, and in May 2009, the final connections to the process were activated to start the hot test phase. During the first hot test operations performed on the first batches of clean-up effluent, the evaporator had a major operating problem. Extremely large quantities of foam were produced, affecting the evaporator operation, and creating the risk of a reduction in its capacity and throughput performance. A task force of AREVA process, operations, and safety experts from Marcoule and the La Hague reprocessing complex was assembled. New operating parameters were defined and tested to improve the process. Since then, the evaporator has performed very satisfactorily. The foam buildup phenomenon has been brought under complete control. All the different types of effluents produced during cleanup operations have been concentrated, and the results obtained in terms of quality and throughput, have ensured a consistent supply to the vitrification unit. The evaporator was operated until the end of April 2012, and enabled the production of 500 cubic meters of very high activity effluent, concentrating the fission products rinsed from the storage tanks. The evaporator will now be deactivated and decommissioned, with the first rinsing and cleanup operations scheduled to begin in 2014. (authors)

Rives, Rachel [AREVA BE/NV, Marcoule (France)] [AREVA BE/NV, Marcoule (France); Asou-Pothet, Marielle [CEA DEN/DPAD, Marcoule (France)] [CEA DEN/DPAD, Marcoule (France); Chambon, Frederic [AREVA FEDERAL SERVICES, Columbia, MD (United States)] [AREVA FEDERAL SERVICES, Columbia, MD (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Store-operate-coherence-on-value  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system, method and computer program product for performing various store-operate instructions in a parallel computing environment that includes a plurality of processors and at least one cache memory device. A queue in the system receives, from a processor, a store-operate instruction that specifies under which condition a cache coherence operation is to be invoked. A hardware unit in the system runs the received store-operate instruction. The hardware unit evaluates whether a result of the running the received store-operate instruction satisfies the condition. The hardware unit invokes a cache coherence operation on a cache memory address associated with the received store-operate instruction if the result satisfies the condition. Otherwise, the hardware unit does not invoke the cache coherence operation on the cache memory device.

Chen, Dong; Heidelberger, Philip; Kumar, Sameer; Ohmacht, Martin; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard

2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

344

United States  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of EnergyTheTwo New EnergyofDEVELOPMENTEnergy 1n n d d eAlan8 United

345

Contamination analysis unit  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The portable Contamination Analysis Unit (CAU) measures trace quantifies of surface contamination in real time. The detector head of the portable contamination analysis unit has an opening with an O-ring seal, one or more vacuum valves and a small mass spectrometer. With the valve closed, the mass spectrometer is evacuated with one or more pumps. The O-ring seal is placed against a surface to be tested and the vacuum valve is opened. Data is collected from the mass spectrometer and a portable computer provides contamination analysis. The CAU can be used to decontaminate and decommission hazardous and radioactive surface by measuring residual hazardous surface contamination, such as tritium and trace organics It provides surface contamination data for research and development applications as well as real-time process control feedback for industrial cleaning operations and can be used to determine the readiness of a surface to accept bonding or coatings.

Gregg, Hugh R. (Livermore, CA); Meltzer, Michael P. (Livermore, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Contamination analysis unit  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The portable Contamination Analysis Unit (CAU) measures trace quantities of surface contamination in real time. The detector head of the portable contamination analysis unit has an opening with an O-ring seal, one or more vacuum valves and a small mass spectrometer. With the valve closed, the mass spectrometer is evacuated with one or more pumps. The O-ring seal is placed against a surface to be tested and the vacuum valve is opened. Data is collected from the mass spectrometer and a portable computer provides contamination analysis. The CAU can be used to decontaminate and decommission hazardous and radioactive surfaces by measuring residual hazardous surface contamination, such as tritium and trace organics. It provides surface contamination data for research and development applications as well as real-time process control feedback for industrial cleaning operations and can be used to determine the readiness of a surface to accept bonding or coatings. 1 fig.

Gregg, H.R.; Meltzer, M.P.

1996-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

347

Report for Batch Leach Analyses on Sediments at 100-HR-3 Operable Unit, Boreholes C7620, C7621, C7622, C7623, C7626, C7627, C7628, C7629, C7630, and C7866. Revision 1.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a revision to a previously released report. This revision contains additional analytical results for the sample with HEIS number B2H4X7. Between November 4, 2010 and October 26, 2011 sediment samples were received from 100-HR-3 Operable Unit for geochemical studies. The analyses for this project were performed at the 331 building located in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The analyses were performed according to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) approved procedures and/or nationally recognized test procedures. The data sets include the sample identification numbers, analytical results, estimated quantification limits (EQL), and quality control data. The preparatory and analytical quality control requirements, calibration requirements, acceptance criteria, and failure actions are defined in the on-line QA plan 'Conducting Analytical Work in Support of Regulatory Programs' (CAW). This QA plan implements the Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Requirements Documents (HASQARD) for PNNL. Samples were received with a chain of custody (COC) and were analyzed according to the sample identification numbers supplied by the client. All Samples were refrigerated upon receipt until prepared for analysis. All samples were received with custody seals intact unless noted in the Case Narrative. Holding time is defined as the time from sample preparation to the time of analyses. The prescribed holding times were met for all analytes unless noted in the Case Narrative. All reported analytical results meet the requirements of the CAW or client specified SOW unless noted in the case narrative. Due to the requirements of the statement of work and sampling events in the field, the 28 day and the 48 hr requirements cannot be met. The statement of work requires samples to be selected at the completion of the borehole. It is not always possible to complete a borehole and have the samples shipped to the laboratory within the hold time requirements. Duplicate RPD for Uranium 238 (38.9%) was above the acceptance limit (35) in 1E05003-DUP1 for ICPMS-Tc-U-WE The sample result is less than 10 times the detection limits. Duplicate recoveries are not applicable to this analyte. Duplicate RPD for Silver 107 (68.2%) was above the acceptance limit (35) in 2C06004-DUP1 for ICPMS-RCRA-AE The sample result is less than 10 times the detection limits. Duplicate recoveries are not applicable to this analyte. Matrix Spike Recovery for Chromium, Hexavalent (48.8%) was outside acceptance limits (75-125) in 1E23001-MS1 for Hexavalent Chromium/Soil. Potential Matrix interference. Sample results associated with this batch are below the EQL. There should be no impact to the data as reported. Matrix Spike Recovery for Chromium, Hexavalent (50.2%) was outside acceptance limits (75-125) in 2B22010-MS1 for Hexavalent Chromium/Soil. Potential Matrix interference. Sample results associated with this batch are below the EQL. There should be no impact to the data as reported.

Lindberg, Michael J.

2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

348

Generation capacity expansion in restructured energy markets.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??With a significant number of states in the U.S. and countries around the world trading electricity in restructured markets, a sizeable proportion of capacity expansion (more)

Nanduri, Vishnuteja

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Increasing water holding capacity for irrigation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Increasing water holding capacity for irrigation Reseachers recommend solutions for sediment trapping in irrigation system LANL and SNL leveraged technical expertise to determine...

350

Quantum Capacities of Channels with small Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the quantum capacity of noisy quantum channels which can be represented by coupling a system to an effectively small environment. A capacity formula is derived for all cases where both system and environment are two-dimensional--including all extremal qubit channels. Similarly, for channels acting on higher dimensional systems we show that the capacity can be determined if the channel arises from a sufficiently small coupling to a qubit environment. Extensions to instances of channels with larger environment are provided and it is shown that bounds on the capacity with unconstrained environment can be obtained from decompositions into channels with small environment.

Michael M. Wolf; David Perez-Garcia

2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

351

Worldwide Energy Efficiency Action through Capacity Building...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Training (WEACT) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Worldwide Energy Efficiency Action through Capacity Building and Training (WEACT) Name Worldwide Energy Efficiency Action...

352

Vehicle Operation and Parking Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vehicle Operation and Parking Policy Responsible Administrative Unit: Finance & Administration in this policy. 2.0 POLICY STATEMENT This policy is intended to promote safe driving by operators of all vehicles are in effect at all times and apply to all persons and vehicles physically present on the CSM campus

353

Vehicle Operation and Parking Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vehicle Operation and Parking Policy Responsible Administrative Unit: Finance & Administration STATEMENT This policy is intended to promote safe driving by operators of all vehicles utilizing streets and apply to all persons and vehicles physically present on the CSM campus. For the purpose of this policy

354

Revamp of Ukraine VCM plant will boost capacity, reduce emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oriana Concern (formerly P.O. Chlorvinyl) is revamping its 250,000 metric ton/year (mty) vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) plant at Kalusch, Ukraine. At the core of the project area new ethylene dichloride (EDC) cracking furnace and direct chlorination unit, and revamp of an oxychlorination unit to use oxygen rather than air. The plant expansion and modernization will boost capacity to 370,000 mty. New facilities for by-product recycling and recovery, waste water treatment, and emissions reduction will improve the plant`s environmental performance. This paper shows expected feedstock and utility consumption for VCM production. Techmashimport and P.O. Chlorvinyl commissioned the Kalusch plant in 1975. The plant was built by Uhde GmbH, Dortmund, Germany. The paper also provides a schematic of the Hoechst/Uhde VCM process being used for the plant revamp. The diagram is divided into processing sections.

NONE

1996-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

355

Carbon Dioxide Sealing Capacity: Textural or Compositional Controls?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research project is aiming to assess the carbon dioxide sealing capacity of most common seal-rocks, such as shales and non-fractured limestones, by analyzing the role of textural and compositional parameters of those rocks. We hypothesize that sealing capacity is controlled by textural and/or compositional pa-rameters of caprocks. In this research, we seek to evaluate the importance of textural and compositional parameters affecting the sealing capacity of caprocks. The conceptu-al framework involves two testable end-member hypotheses concerning the sealing ca-pacity of carbon dioxide reservoir caprocks. Better understanding of the elements controlling sealing quality will advance our knowledge regarding the sealing capacity of shales and carbonates. Due to relatively low permeability, shale and non-fractured carbonate units are considered relatively imper-meable formations which can retard reservoir fluid flow by forming high capillary pres-sure. Similarly, these unites can constitute reliable seals for carbon dioxide capture and sequestration purposes. This project is a part of the comprehensive project with the final aim of studying the caprock sealing properties and the relationship between microscopic and macroscopic characteristics of seal rocks in depleted gas fields of Oklahoma Pan-handle. Through this study we examined various seal rock characteristics to infer about their respective effects on sealing capacity in special case of replacing reservoir fluid with super critical carbon dioxide (scCO{sub 2}). To assess the effect of textural and compositional properties on scCO{sub 2} maximum reten-tion column height we collected 30 representative core samples in caprock formations in three counties (Cimarron, Texas, Beaver) in Oklahoma Panhandle. Core samples were collected from various seal formations (e.g., Cherokee, Keys, Morrowan) at different depths. We studied the compositional and textural properties of the core samples using several techniques. Mercury Injection Porosimetry (MIP), Scanning Electron Microsco-py SEM, and Sedigraph measurements are used to assess the pore-throat-size distribu-tion, sorting, texture, and grain size of the samples. Also, displacement pressure at 10% mercury saturation (Pd) and graphically derived threshold pressure (Pc) were deter-mined by MIP technique. SEM images were used for qualitative study of the minerals and pores texture of the core samples. Moreover, EDS (Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spec-trometer), BET specific surface area, and Total Organic Carbon (TOC) measurements were performed to study various parameters and their possible effects on sealing capaci-ty of the samples. We found that shales have the relatively higher average sealing threshold pressure (Pc) than carbonate and sandstone samples. Based on these observations, shale formations could be considered as a promising caprock in terms of retarding scCO{sub 2} flow and leak-age into above formations. We hypothesized that certain characteristics of shales (e.g., 3 fine pore size, pore size distribution, high specific surface area, and strong physical chemical interaction between wetting phase and mineral surface) make them an effi-cient caprock for sealing super critical CO{sub 2}. We found that the displacement pressure at 10% mercury saturation could not be the ultimate representative of the sealing capacity of the rock sample. On the other hand, we believe that graphical method, introduced by Cranganu (2004) is a better indicator of the true sealing capacity. Based on statistical analysis of our samples from Oklahoma Panhandle we assessed the effects of each group of properties (textural and compositional) on maximum supercriti-cal CO{sub 2} height that can be hold by the caprock. We conclude that there is a relatively strong positive relationship (+.40 to +.69) between supercritical CO{sub 2} column height based on Pc and hard/ soft mineral content index (ratio of minerals with Mohs hardness more than 5 over minerals with Mohs hardness less than 5) in both shales and limestone samples. Average median pore rad

Cranganu, Constantin; Soleymani, Hamidreza; Sadiqua, Soleymani; Watson, Kieva

2013-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

356

OSCARS Extends JGI Network Capacity  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the ContributionsArms ControlChris Samoray CommunicationsOperationsOSCARS Collaborative

357

REDUCTION CAPACITY OF SALTSTONE AND SALTSTONE COMPONENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The duration that saltstone retains its ability to immobilize some key radionuclides, such as technetium (Tc), plutonium (Pu), and neptunium (Np), depends on its capacity to maintain a low redox status (or low oxidation state). The reduction capacity is a measure of the mass of reductants present in the saltstone; the reductants are the active ingredients that immobilize Tc, Pu, and Np. Once reductants are exhausted, the saltstone loses its ability to immobilize these radionuclides. The reduction capacity values reported here are based on the Ce(IV)/Fe(II) system. The Portland cement (198 {micro}eq/g) and especially the fly ash (299 {micro}eq/g) had a measurable amount of reduction capacity, but the blast furnace slag (820 {micro}eq/g) not surprisingly accounted for most of the reduction capacity. The blast furnace slag contains ferrous iron and sulfides which are strong reducing and precipitating species for a large number of solids. Three saltstone samples containing 45% slag or one sample containing 90% slag had essentially the same reduction capacity as pure slag. There appears to be some critical concentration between 10% and 45% slag in the Saltstone formulation that is needed to create the maximum reduction capacity. Values from this work supported those previously reported, namely that the reduction capacity of SRS saltstone is about 820 {micro}eq/g; this value is recommended for estimating the longevity that the Saltstone Disposal Facility will retain its ability to immobilize radionuclides.

Roberts, K.; Kaplan, D.

2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

358

Training Units and Developing Leaders Contents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The 2011 edition of (Field Manual) FM 7-0 reflected the Armys unit training and leader development concepts borne from a decade of persistent combat operations. Army Doctrine Publication (ADP) 7-0, Training Units and Developing Leaders, re-establishes fundamental training and leader development concepts and processes for the U.S. Army. Training doctrine is again based on the Armys operations and planning processes, now defined by ADP 3-0, Unified Land Operations, and ADP 5-0, The Operations Process. Mission command makes the commander responsible for unit readiness and leader development. Unit commanders must be the subject matter experts. Commanders cannot delegate oversight of unit training and leader development to subordinates. The commanders physical presence at training sends a clear message to subordinatesunit training and leader development are the most important things the unit does when it is not actively engaged in operations. Unit training and leader development are inextricably linked. Good training supports leader development and good leaders develop good training programs for

Raymond T. Odierno

359

Building a Sustainable Future FACILITIES & OPERATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Building a Sustainable Future FACILITIES & OPERATIONS #12;A Laboratory on a Mission ...to meet: The Environmental Technology Building and National Security Building house more than 650 staff members. #12;Pacific capacity "The Facilities & Operations organization is dedicated to safely and sustainably building

360

Dual capacity compressor with reversible motor and controls arrangement therefor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hermetic reciprocating compressor such as may be used in heat pump applications is provided for dual capacity operation by providing the crankpin of the crankshaft with an eccentric ring rotatably mounted thereon, and with the end of the connecting rod opposite the piston encompassing the outer circumference of the eccentric ring, with means limiting the rotation of the eccentric ring upon the crankpin between one end point and an opposite angularly displaced end point to provide different values of eccentricity depending upon which end point the eccentric ring is rotated to upon the crankpin, and a reversible motor in the hermetic shell of the compressor for rotating the crankshaft, the motor operating in one direction effecting the angular displacement of the eccentric ring relative to the crankpin to the one end point, and in the opposite direction effecting the angular displacement of the eccentric ring relative to the crankpin to the opposite end point, this arrangement automatically giving different stroke lengths depending upon the direction of motor rotation. The mechanical structure of the arrangement may take various forms including at least one in which any impact of reversal is reduced by utilizing lubricant passages and chambers at the interface area of the crankpin and eccentric ring to provide a dashpot effect. In the main intended application of the arrangement according to the invention, that is, in a refrigerating or air conditioning system, it is desirable to insure a delay during reversal of the direction of compressor operation. A control arrangement is provided in which the control system controls the direction of motor operation in accordance with temperature conditions, the system including control means for effecting operation in a low capacity direction or alternatively in a high capacity direction in response to one set, and another set, respectively, of temperature conditions and with timer means delaying a restart of the compressor motor for at least a predetermined time in response to a condition of the control means operative to initiate a change in the operating direction of the compressor when it restarts.

Sisk, Francis J. (Washington Township, Fayette County, PA)

1980-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "units operable capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Graphene-on-Diamond Devices with Increased Current-Carrying Capacity: Carbon sp2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Graphene-on-Diamond Devices with Increased Current-Carrying Capacity: Carbon sp2 -on-sp3 Technology Laboratory, Illinois 60439, United States *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: Graphene demonstrated potential for practical applications owing to its excellent electronic and thermal properties. Typical graphene field

362

Achieving increased spent fuel storage capacity at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The HFIR facility was originally designed to store approximately 25 spent cores, sufficient to allow for operational contingencies and for cooling prior to off-site shipment for reprocessing. The original capacity has now been increased to 60 positions, of which 53 are currently filled (September 1994). Additional spent cores are produced at a rate of about 10 or 11 per year. Continued HFIR operation, therefore, depends on a significant near-term expansion of the pool storage capacity, as well as on a future capability of reprocessing or other storage alternatives once the practical capacity of the pool is reached. To store the much larger inventory of spent fuel that may remain on-site under various future scenarios, the pool capacity is being increased in a phased manner through installation of a new multi-tier spent fuel rack design for higher density storage. A total of 143 positions was used for this paper as the maximum practical pool capacity without impacting operations; however, greater ultimate capacities were addressed in the supporting analyses and approval documents. This paper addresses issues related to the pool storage expansion including (1) seismic effects on the three-tier storage arrays, (2) thermal performance of the new arrays, (3) spent fuel cladding corrosion concerns related to the longer period of pool storage, and (4) impacts of increased spent fuel inventory on the pool water quality, water treatment systems, and LLLW volume.

Cook, D.H.; Chang, S.J.; Dabs, R.D.; Freels, J.D.; Morgan, K.A.; Rothrock, R.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Griess, J.C. [Griess (J.C.), Knoxville, TN (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

363

Performance of Variable Capacity Heat Pumps in a Mixed Humid Climate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Variable capacity heat pumps represent the next wave of technology for heat pumps. In this report, the performance of two variable capacity heat pumps (HPs) is compared to that of a single or two stage baseline system. The units were installed in two existing research houses located in Knoxville, TN. These houses were instrumented to collect energy use and temperature data while both the baseline systems and variable capacity systems were installed. The homes had computer controlled simulated occupancy, which provided consistent schedules for hot water use and lighting. The temperature control and energy use of the systems were compared during both the heating and cooling seasons. Multiple linear regression models were used along with TMY3 data for Knoxville, TN in order to normalize the effect that the outdoor air temperature has on energy use. This enables a prediction of each system's energy use over a year with the same weather. The first system was a multi-split system consisting of 8 indoor units and a single outdoor unit. This system replaced a 16 SEER single stage HP with a zoning system, which served as the baseline. Data was collected on the baseline system from August 2009 to December 2010 and on the multi-split system from January 2011 to January 2012. Soon after the installation of the multi-split system, some of the smaller rooms began over-conditioning. This was determined to be caused by a small amount of continuous refrigerant flow to all of the indoor units when the outdoor unit was running regardless of whether they were calling for heat. This, coupled with the fact that the indoor fans run continuously, was providing enough heat in some rooms to exceed the set point. In order to address this, the indoor fans were disabled when not actively heating per the manufacturer's recommendation. Based on the measured data, the multi-split system was predicted to use 40% more energy in the heating season and 16% more energy in the cooling season than the baseline system, for the typical meteorological year weather data. The AHRI ratings indicated that the baseline system would perform slightly better than the multi-split system, but not by as large of a margin as seen in this study. The multi-split system was able to maintain more consistent temperature throughout the house than the baseline system, but it did allow relative humidity levels to increase above 60% in the summer. The second system was a split system with an inverter driven compressor and a single ducted air handler. This unit replaced a 16 SEER two stage HP with a zoning system. Data was collected on the baseline system from July 2009 to November 2010 and on the ducted inverter system from December 2010 to January 2012. The ducted inverter system did not offer a zone controller, so it functioned as a single zone system. Due to this fact, the registers had to be manually adjusted in order to better maintain consistent temperatures between the two levels of the house. The predicted heating season energy use for the ducted inverter system, based on the measured energy use, was 30% less than that of the baseline system for the typical meteorological year. However, the baseline system was unable to operate in its high stage due to a wiring issue with the zone controller. This resulted in additional resistance heat use during the winter and therefore higher energy use than would be expected in a properly performing unit. The AHRI ratings would indicate that the baseline system would use less energy than the ducted inverter system, which is opposite to the results of this study. During the cooling season, the ducted inverter system was predicted to use 23% more energy than the baseline system during the typical meteorological year. This is also opposite of the results expected by comparing the AHRI ratings. After a detailed comparison of the ducted inverter system's power use compared to that of a recently installed identical system at a retro-fit study house, there is concern that the unit is not operating as intended. The power use and cycles indicate t

Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL; Jackson, Roderick K [ORNL

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Termination unit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This invention relates to a termination unit comprising an end-section of a cable. The end section of the cable defines a central longitudinal axis and comprising end-parts of N electrical phases, an end-part of a neutral conductor and a surrounding thermally insulation envelope adapted to comprising a cooling fluid. The end-parts of the N electrical phases and the end-part of the neutral conductor each comprising at least one electrical conductor and being arranged in the cable concentrically around a core former with a phase 1 located relatively innermost, and phase N relatively outermost in the cable, phase N being surrounded by the neutral conductor, electrical insulation being arrange between neighboring electrical phases and between phase N and the neutral conductor, and wherein the end-parts of the neutral conductor and the electrical phases each comprise a contacting surface electrically connected to at least one branch current lead to provide an electrical connection: The contacting surfaces each having a longitudinal extension, and being located sequentially along the longitudinal extension of the end-section of the cable. The branch current leads being individually insulated from said thermally insulation envelope by individual electrical insulators.

Traeholt, Chresten [Frederiksberg, DK; Willen, Dag [Klagshamn, SE; Roden, Mark [Newnan, GA; Tolbert, Jerry C [Carrollton, GA; Lindsay, David [Carrollton, GA; Fisher, Paul W [Heiskell, TN; Nielsen, Carsten Thidemann [Jaegerspris, DK

2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

365

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Computers and Other Electronics in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings...

366

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total...

367

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total...

368

Capacity Value of PV and Wind Generation in the NV Energy System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Calculation of photovoltaic (PV) and wind power capacity values is important for estimating additional load that can be served by new PV or wind installations in the electrical power system. It also is the basis for assigning capacity credit payments in systems with markets. Because of variability in solar and wind resources, PV and wind generation contribute to power system resource adequacy differently from conventional generation. Many different approaches to calculating PV and wind generation capacity values have been used by utilities and transmission operators. Using the NV Energy system as a study case, this report applies peak-period capacity factor (PPCF) and effective load carrying capability (ELCC) methods to calculate capacity values for renewable energy sources. We show the connection between the PPCF and ELCC methods in the process of deriving a simplified approach that approximates the ELCC method. This simplified approach does not require generation fleet data and provides the theoretical basis for a quick check on capacity value results of PV and wind generation. The diminishing return of capacity benefit as renewable generation increases is conveniently explained using the simplified capacity value approach.

Lu, Shuai; Diao, Ruisheng; Samaan, Nader A.; Etingov, Pavel V.

2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

369

DURABILITY OF VERY LOW CAPACITY PRESSURE ATOMIZED FUEL NOZZLES USED WITH LOW FIRING RATE RESIDENTIAL OIL BURNERS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), working for the United States Department of Energy (DOE), has conducted a preliminary evaluation of the potential of very low fuel input capacity Simplex type pressure atomizing nozzles for use with oil burners designed for residential boilers, furnaces and water heaters. These nozzles under suitable conditions can be sufficiently reliable to enable new heating system designs. This would allow for the design of heating appliances that match the smaller load demands of energy efficient homes built with modern components and architectural systems designed to minimize energy use. When heating systems are installed with excessive capacity, oversized by three to four times the load, the result is a loss of up to ten percent as compared to the rated appliance efficiency. The use of low capacity nozzles in systems designed to closely match the load can thereby result in significant energy savings. BNL investigated the limitations of low flow rate nozzles and designed long-term experiments to see if ways could be determined that would be beneficial to long-term operation at low input capacities without failures. In order to maximize the potential for success the best possible industry practices available were employed. Low flow rate nozzles primarily fail by blockage or partial blockage of internal fuel flow passages inside the nozzle. To prevent any contaminants from entering the nozzle BNL investigated the geometry and critical dimensions and the current sate of the art of fuel filter design. Based on this investigation it was concluded that the best available filters should be more than capable of filtering contaminants from the fuel prior to entering the oil burner itself. This position was indeed validated based on the long-term trials conducted under this study no evidence resulted to change our position. It is highly recommended that these filters rated at 10 microns and with large filter capacity (surface area), should be used with all oil burner installations. The other possible failure mode had been attributed to fuel degradation and this became the main focus of the evaluation. The degradation of fuel usually occurs faster under higher temperature conditions. To preclude this as much as possible controls that provided for a post-purge of combustion airflow after burner shut down were selected. This provided a short period of time where the burner's combustion air blower continues to operate after the flame has gone out. This tends to cool the nozzle and in turn the fuel inside the small flow pathways inside the nozzle components. This study concludes that the use of low capacity nozzles is possible but only when the temperature and thermal mass environment of the combustion chamber result in a relatively ''cool'' condition. This was accomplished in one long-term experiment that essentially operated for a full heating season equivalent with no evidence of nozzle plugging or failure. The nozzle body surface temperature was kept at or below 150 F during the duration of the trial. On the other hand, a second system was studied that ended in a partial nozzle blockage and a system failure. In this ''hot environment'' system the nozzle body temperature reached 210 F. This occurred at close to a full heating season equivalent, yet it still would have resulted in a no-heat complaint by the homeowner.

MCDONALD,R.J.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Biological Kraft Chemical Recycle for Augmentation of Recovery Furnace Capacity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The chemicals used in pulping of wood by the kraft process are recycled in the mill in the recovery furnace, which oxidizes organics while simultaneously reducing sulfate to sulfide. The recovery furnace is central to the economical operation of kraft pulp mills, but it also causes problems. The total pulp production of many mills is limited by the recovery furnace capacity, which cannot easily be increased. The furnace is one of the largest sources of air pollution (as reduced sulfur compounds) in the kraft pulp mill.

Stuart E. Strand

2001-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

371

Photovoltaics effective capacity: Interim final report 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors provide solid evidence, based on more than 8 million data points, that regional photovoltaic (PV) effective capacity is largely unrelated to the region`s solar resource. They confirm, however, that effective capacity is strongly related to load-shape characteristics. The load-shape effective-capacity relationship appears to be valid for end-use loads as small as 100 kW, except possibly in the case of electrically heated buildings. This relationship was used as a tool to produce a US map of PV`s effective capacity. The regions of highest effective capacities include (1) the central US from the northern Great Plains to the metropolitan areas of Chicago and Detroit, down to the lower Mississippi Valley, (2) California and western Arizona, and (3) the northeast metropolitan corridor. The features of this map are considerably different from the traditional solar resource maps. They tend to reflect the socio-economic and climatic factors that indirectly drive PV`s effective capacity: e.g., commercial air-conditioning, little use of electric heat, and strong summer heat waves. The map provides a new and significant insight to a comprehensive valuation of the PV resource. The authors assembled preliminary evidence showing that end-use load type may be related to PV`s effective capacity. Highest effective capacities were found for (nonelectrically heated) office buildings, followed by hospitals. Lowest capacities were found for airports and residences. Many more data points are needed, however, to ascertain and characterize these preliminary findings.

Perez, R.; Seals, R. [State Univ. of New York, Albany, NY (United States). Atmospheric Sciences Research Center

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Representation of the Solar Capacity Value in the ReEDS Capacity Expansion Model: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An important emerging issue is the estimation of renewables' contributions to reliably meeting system demand, or their capacity value. While the capacity value of thermal generation can be estimated easily, assessment of wind and solar requires a more nuanced approach due to resource variability. Reliability-based methods, particularly, effective load-carrying capacity (ELCC), are considered to be the most robust techniques for addressing this resource variability. The Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) capacity expansion model and other long-term electricity capacity planning models require an approach to estimating CV for generalized PV and system configurations with low computational and data requirements. In this paper we validate treatment of solar photovoltaic (PV) capacity value by ReEDS capacity expansion model by comparing model results to literature for a range of energy penetration levels. Results from the ReEDS model are found to compare well with both comparisons--despite not being resolved at an hourly scale.

Sigrin, B.; Sullivan, P.; Ibanez, E.; Margolis, R.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Evaluation of advanced turbomachinery for underground pumped hydroelectric storage. Part 3. Multistage unregulated pump/turbines for operating heads of 1000 to 1500 m  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report in a series of three on studies of advanced hydraulic turbomachinery for underground pumped hydroelectric storage. All three reports address Francis-type, reversible pump/turbines. The first report covered single-stage regulated units; the second report covered two-stage regulated units; the present report covers multistage unregulated units. Multistage unregulated pump/turbines offer an economically attractive option for heads of 1000 to 1500 m. The feasibility of developing such machines for capacities up to 500 MW and operating heads up to 1500 m has been evaluated. Preliminary designs have been generated for six multistage pump/turbines. The designs are for nominal capacities of 350 and 500 MW and for operating heads of 1000, 1250, and 1500 m. Mechanical, hydraulic, and economic analyses indicate that these machines will behave according to the criteria used to design them and that they can be built at a reasonable cost with no unsolvable problems. Efficiencies of 85.8% and 88.5% in the generating and pumping modes, respectively, can be expected for the 500-MW, 1500-m unit. Performances of the other five machines are at least comparable, and usually better. Over a 1000 to 1500-m head range, specific $/kW costs of the pump/turbines in mid-1978 US dollars vary from 19.0 to 23.1 for the 500-MW machines, and from 21.0 to 24.1 for the 350-MW machines.

Frigo, A.A.; Pistner, C.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

High Capacity Pouch-Type Li-air Batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The pouch-type Li-air batteries operated in ambient condition are reported in this work. The battery used a heat sealable plastic membrane as package material, O2 diffusion membrane and moisture barrier. The large variation in internal resistance of the batteries is minimized by a modified separator which can bind the cell stack together. The cells using the modified separators show improved and repeatable discharge performances. It is also found that addition of about 20% of 1,2-dimethoxyethane (DME) in PC:EC (1:1) based electrolyte solvent improves can improve the wetability of carbon electrode and the discharge capacities of Li-air batteries, but further increase in DME amount lead to a decreased capacity due to increase electrolyte loss during discharge process. The pouch-type Li-air batteries with the modified separator and optimized electrolyte has demonstrated a specific capacity of 2711 mAh g-1 based on carbon and a specific energy of 344 Wh kg-1 based on the complete batteries including package.

Wang, Deyu; Xiao, Jie; Xu, Wu; Zhang, Jiguang

2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

375

CIS 380 Operating Systems Course Number & Title (A.1) CIS 380 Operating Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CIS 380 Operating Systems Course Number & Title (A.1) CIS 380 Operating Systems Credit Units (A.2 Operating Systems (3/e). Prentice Hall, Supplementary text: W. Richard Stevens and Stephen A. Rago. Advanced) This course is an introduction to the theory and practice behind modern computer operating systems. Topics

Plotkin, Joshua B.

376

California: Conducting Polymer Binder Boosts Storage Capacity...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

- 10:17am Addthis Working with Nextval, Inc., Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) developed a Conducting Polymer Binder for high-capacity lithium-ion batteries. With a...

377

Internal Markets for Supply Chain Capacity Allocation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper explores the possibility of solving supply chain capacity allocation problems using internal markets among employees of the same company. Unlike earlier forms of transfer pricing, IT now makes it easier for such ...

McAdams, David

2005-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

378

Capacity Building Project with Howard University  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The purpose of this initiative is to build community capacity for public participation in environmental and energy decision making. The target communities are those impacted by U.S. Department of...

379

Expandability, reversibility, and optimal capacity choice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We develop continuous-time models of capacity choice when demand fluctuates stochastically, and the firm's opportunities to expand or contract are limited. Specifically, we consider costs of investing or disinvesting that ...

Dixit, Avinash K.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Feedback Capacity of the Compound Channel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work, we find the capacity of a compound finite-state channel (FSC) with time-invariant deterministic feedback. We consider the use of fixed length block codes over the compound channel. Our achievability result ...

Shrader, Brooke E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "units operable capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Inventories and capacity utilization in general equilibrium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The primary goal of this dissertation is to gain a better understanding, in thecontext of a dynamic stochastic general equilibrium framework, of the role of inventories and capacity utilization (of both capital and labor) and, in particular...

Trupkin, Danilo Rogelio

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

382

UNIT NAME C-611 PCB Spill Site REGULATORY STATUS CERCLA  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

79 UNIT NAME C-611 PCB Spill Site REGULATORY STATUS CERCLA LOCATION C-611 Transformer area (Map location 79) APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS FUNCTION Spill Site OPERATIONAL STATUS NA DATES...

383

Measuring the capacity impacts of demand response  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Critical peak pricing and peak time rebate programs offer benefits by increasing system reliability, and therefore, reducing capacity needs of the electric power system. These benefits, however, decrease substantially as the size of the programs grows relative to the system size. More flexible schemes for deployment of demand response can help address the decreasing returns to scale in capacity value, but more flexible demand response has decreasing returns to scale as well. (author)

Earle, Robert; Kahn, Edward P.; Macan, Edo

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

384

TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE THE OPERATION OF EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarterly report documents work performed under Tasks 15, 16, and 18 through 23 of the project entitled: ''Technologies to Enhance the Operation of Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure''. The project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity. The report first documents a survey site test performed on a TCVC10 engine/compressor installed at Dominion's Groveport Compressor Station. This test completes planned screening efforts designed to guide selection of one or more units for design analysis and testing with emphasis on identification and reduction of compressor losses. The report further presents the validation of the simulation model for the Air Balance tasks and outline of conceptual manifold designs.

Anthony J. Smalley; Ralph E. Harris; Gary D. Bourn; Danny M. Deffenbaugh

2005-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

385

Specific heat capacity of freshly excised prostate specimens This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is the specific heat capacity per unit mass in J g-1 C-1 , is the thermal diffusivity in cm2 s-1 , kSpecific heat capacity of freshly excised prostate specimens This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article. 2011 Physiol. Meas. 32 N55 (http

Patch, Sarah

386

LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4.A.22 LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR OPERATION/MAINTENANCE. 2.0 Scope This procedure applies to all personnel needing to operate this equipment. 3.0 Procedure 3 OF QUANTIFLEX ANESTHESIA MACHINE/ SURGIVET SAV2500 VENTILATOR UNIT 1.0 Purpose This procedure outlines how

Krovi, Venkat

387

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

York" ,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)" 1,"Robert Moses Niagara","Hydroelectric","New York Power Authority",2353.2...

388

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Virginia" ,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)" 1,"Bath County","Pumped Storage","Virginia Electric & Power Co",3003 2,"North...

389

Air conditioning system with supplemental ice storing and cooling capacity  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present air conditioning system with ice storing and cooling capacity can generate and store ice in its pipe assembly or in an ice storage tank particularly equipped for the system, depending on the type of the air conditioning system. The system is characterized in particular in that ice can be produced and stored in the air conditioning system whereby the time of supplying cooled air can be effectively extended with the merit that the operation cycle of the on and off of the compressor can be prolonged, extending the operation lifespan of the compressor in one aspect. In another aspect, ice production and storage in great amount can be performed in an off-peak period of the electrical power consumption and the stored ice can be utilized in the peak period of the power consumption so as to provide supplemental cooling capacity for the compressor of the air conditioning system whereby the shift of peak and off-peak power consumption can be effected with ease. The present air conditioning system can lower the installation expense for an ice-storing air conditioning system and can also be applied to an old conventional air conditioning system.

Weng, Kuo-Lianq (Taichung, TW); Weng, Kuo-Liang (Taichung, TW)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

OPERATIONS (OPS)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

OPS) OBJECTIVE OPS.1 The formality and discipline of operations is adequate to conduct work safely and programs are in place to maintain this formality and discipline. (CR 13)...

391

Design operators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Design operators is a thesis that investigates the nature and characteristics of the design process by examining the interaction of computation with architectural design. The effects of the introduction of these media in ...

Dritsas, Stylianos, 1978-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Operating Costs  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This chapter is focused on capital costs for conventional construction and environmental restoration and waste management projects and examines operating cost estimates to verify that all elements of the project have been considered and properly estimated.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

393

Better Building Alliance, Plug and Process Loads in Commercial Buildings: Capacity and Power Requirement Analysis (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This brochure addresses gaps in actionable knowledge that can help reduce the plug load capacities designed into buildings. Prospective building occupants and real estate brokers lack accurate references for plug and process load (PPL) capacity requirements, so they often request 5-10 W/ft2 in their lease agreements. This brochure should be used to make these decisions so systems can operate more energy efficiently; upfront capital costs will also decrease. This information can also be used to drive changes in negotiations about PPL energy demands. It should enable brokers and tenants to agree about lower PPL capacities. Owner-occupied buildings will also benefit. Overestimating PPL capacity leads designers to oversize electrical infrastructure and cooling systems.

Not Available

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

H. R. 3113: an act providing for the coordinated operation of the Central Valley project and the State water project in California. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session, March 25, 1985  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The House Committee on Energy and Natural Resources rewrote the Bill coordinating operations of the Central Valley Project in California and the state water project, and limited the Secretary of the Interior to no more than 75% of the Central Valley Project's annual yield. The Bill specifies procedures for water delivery contracts and reimbursements. Title II deals with the preservation of the Suisin Marsh District; Title III with the reclamation of small projects; and Title IV with contract validation. The document contains both the original and the amended wording of H.R. 3113.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

DECENTRALIZING SEMICONDUCTOR CAPACITY PLANNING VIA INTERNAL MARKET COORDINATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 DECENTRALIZING SEMICONDUCTOR CAPACITY PLANNING VIA INTERNAL MARKET COORDINATION SULEYMAN KARABUK semiconductor manufacturer: marketing managers reserve capacity from manufacturing based on product demands, while attempting to maximize profit; manufacturing managers allocate capacity to competing marketing

Wu, David

396

Operational health physics training  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The initial four sections treat basic information concerning atomic structure and other useful physical quantities, natural radioactivity, the properties of {alpha}, {beta}, {gamma}, x rays and neutrons, and the concepts and units of radiation dosimetry (including SI units). Section 5 deals with biological effects and the risks associated with radiation exposure. Background radiation and man-made sources are discussed next. The basic recommendations of the ICRP concerning dose limitations: justification, optimization (ALARA concepts and applications) and dose limits are covered in Section seven. Section eight is an expanded version of shielding, and the internal dosimetry discussion has been extensively revised to reflect the concepts contained in the MIRD methodology and ICRP 30. The remaining sections discuss the operational health physics approach to monitoring radiation. Individual sections include radiation detection principles, instrument operation and counting statistics, health physics instruments and personnel monitoring devices. The last five sections deal with the nature of, operation principles of, health physics aspects of, and monitoring approaches to air sampling, reactors, nuclear safety, gloveboxes and hot cells, accelerators and x ray sources. Decontamination, waste disposal and transportation of radionuclides are added topics. Several appendices containing constants, symbols, selected mathematical topics, and the Chart of the Nuclides, and an index have been included.

NONE

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

On Ergodic Secrecy Capacity for Gaussian MISO Wiretap Channels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Gaussian multiple-input single-output (MISO) wiretap channel model is considered, where there exists a transmitter equipped with multiple antennas, a legitimate receiver and an eavesdropper each equipped with a single antenna. We study the problem of finding the optimal input covariance that achieves ergodic secrecy capacity subject to a power constraint where only statistical information about the eavesdropper channel is available at the transmitter. This is a non-convex optimization problem that is in general difficult to solve. Existing results address the case in which the eavesdropper or/and legitimate channels have independent and identically distributed Gaussian entries with zero-mean and unit-variance, i.e., the channels have trivial covariances. This paper addresses the general case where eavesdropper and legitimate channels have nontrivial covariances. A set of equations describing the optimal input covariance matrix are proposed along with an algorithm to obtain the solution. Based on this framew...

Li, Jiangyuan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Moldova-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(EC-LEDS) AgencyCompany Organization United States Agency for International Development, United States Environmental Protection Agency, United States Department of Energy, United...

399

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Computers and Other Electronics in U.S. Homes, by OwnerRenter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in...

400

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Not Asked (Apartments in Buildings" "With 5 or More Units)",19.1,4.4,3.7,6.2,4.7 "FoundationBasement of Single-Family" "Units and Apartments in Buildings With" "2 to 4 Units...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "units operable capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Not Asked (Apartments in Buildings" "With 5 or More Units)",19.1,9.6,5,2.2,1.5,0.8 "FoundationBasement of Single-Family" "Units and Apartments in Buildings With" "2 to 4 Units...

402

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by OwnerRenter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With"...

403

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by OwnerRenter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With"...

404

United States Department of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gifford Pinchot Drive Madison, WI #12;2 International system of units (SI conversion factors) Conversion English unit factor SI unit acre 4,046 square meter (m2 ) board foot 0.002 cubic meter (m3 ) bushel (U

405

Process model and capacity upgrades of the CTI-4000 liquid helium coldbox  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) is in the process of re-commissioning a vintage CTI-4000 liquid helium coldbox, initially supplied by CTI-Cryogenics/Sulzer to Los Alamos in 1979. The coldbox was originally designed as a liquid helium refrigerator with capacity of ?1200 W at nominal 4-K. The process utilized LN{sub 2} precooling, in-series operation of two centrifugal gas bearing turboexpanders and final Joule-Thomson (J-T) expansion. At FNAL, the coldbox will be utilized as a liquefier to support 2-K operations. A process model was developed to aid in the upgrade decisions and used to determine the nominal capacity of the liquefier. Capacity upgrades are achieved by safely utilizing the internal LN2 precooler, the addition of a 3-inch reciprocating wet expansion engine and increasing the overall process pressure by recertifying two limiting pressure vessels to a higher MAWP.

Hansen, Benjamin; Klebaner, Arkadiy [Fermilab, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Quack, Hans [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Dresden (Germany)

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

406

Serbia-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Serbia-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies (EC-LEDS) Jump to: navigation, search Name Serbia-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies...

407

Guatemala-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Guatemala-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies (EC-LEDS) Jump to: navigation, search Name Guatemala-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies...

408

HT Combinatorial Screening of Novel Materials for High Capacity...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

HT Combinatorial Screening of Novel Materials for High Capacity Hydrogen Storage HT Combinatorial Screening of Novel Materials for High Capacity Hydrogen Storage Presentation for...

409

Expansion of Novolyte Capacity for Lithium Ion Electrolyte Production...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

15eswise2012p.pdf More Documents & Publications Expansion of Novolyte Capacity for Lithium Ion Electrolyte Production Expansion of Novolyte Capacity for Lithium Ion Electrolyte...

410

Expansion of Novolyte Capacity for Lithium Ion Electrolyte Production...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

15eswise2011p.pdf More Documents & Publications Expansion of Novolyte Capacity for Lithium Ion Electrolyte Production Expansion of Novolyte Capacity for Lithium Ion Electrolyte...

411

Solid-State Hydrogen Storage: Storage Capacity,Thermodynamics...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage: Storage Capacity,Thermodynamics and Kinetics. Solid-State Hydrogen Storage: Storage Capacity,Thermodynamics and Kinetics. Abstract: Solid-state reversible...

412

Design and Evaluation of Novel High Capacity Cathode Materials...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Design and Evaluation of Novel High Capacity Cathode Materials Design and Evaluation of Novel High Capacity Cathode Materials 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies...

413

Design and Evaluation of Novel High Capacity Cathode Materials...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Evaluation of Novel High Capacity Cathode Materials Design and Evaluation of Novel High Capacity Cathode Materials 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle...

414

Study Finds 54 Gigawatts of Offshore Wind Capacity Technically...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Study Finds 54 Gigawatts of Offshore Wind Capacity Technically Possible by 2030 Study Finds 54 Gigawatts of Offshore Wind Capacity Technically Possible by 2030 September 11, 2014 -...

415

India-Vulnerability Assessment and Enhancing Adaptive Capacities...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Adaptive Capacities to Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Name India-Vulnerability Assessment and Enhancing Adaptive Capacities to Climate Change AgencyCompany...

416

RULES FOR CONGESTION MANAGEMENT EVALUATION OF AVAILABILITY OF CAPACITY AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RULES FOR CONGESTION MANAGEMENT EVALUATION OF AVAILABILITY OF CAPACITY AND POSSIBILITIES................................................................16 5.6 Socio-economic cost of guaranteed capacity

417

PWR core monitoring and simulation during load follow operation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a new operation core support system developed for pressurized water reactors. This system provides an enhanced understanding of the operating core with significant benefits in operational flexibility. It also permits evaluation of alternatives and specific situations that allows for enhanced operation of the unit, which provides benefits in power capability and minimizes potential operational issues.

Beard, C. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (USA). Commercial Nuclear Fuel Div.); Winter, M.; Niederer, R. (Commonwealth Edison Co., Zion, IL (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Heat capacity at the glass transition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A fundamental problem of glass transition is to explain the jump of heat capacity at the glass transition temperature $T_g$ without asserting the existence of a distinct solid glass phase. This problem is also common to other disordered systems, including spin glasses. We propose that if $T_g$ is defined as the temperature at which the liquid stops relaxing at the experimental time scale, the jump of heat capacity at $T_g$ follows as a necessary consequence due to the change of system's elastic, vibrational and thermal properties. In this picture, we discuss time-dependent effects of glass transition, and identify three distinct regimes of relaxation. Our approach explains widely observed logarithmic increase of $T_g$ with the quench rate and the correlation of heat capacity jump with liquid fragility.

Kostya Trachenko; Vadim Brazhkin

2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

419

Temporary Losses of Highway Capacity and Impacts on Performance: Phase 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Traffic congestion and its impacts significantly affect the nation's economic performance and the public's quality of life. In most urban areas, travel demand routinely exceeds highway capacity during peak periods. In addition, events such as crashes, vehicle breakdowns, work zones, adverse weather, railroad crossings, large trucks loading/unloading in urban areas, and other factors such as toll collection facilities and sub-optimal signal timing cause temporary capacity losses, often worsening the conditions on already congested highway networks. The impacts of these temporary capacity losses include delay, reduced mobility, and reduced reliability of the highway system. They can also cause drivers to re-route or reschedule trips. Such information is vital to formulating sound public policies for the highway infrastructure and its operation. In response to this need, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, sponsored by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), made an initial attempt to provide nationwide estimates of the capacity losses and delay caused by temporary capacity-reducing events (Chin et al. 2002). This study, called the Temporary Loss of Capacity (TLC) study, estimated capacity loss and delay on freeways and principal arterials resulting from fatal and non-fatal crashes, vehicle breakdowns, and adverse weather, including snow, ice, and fog. In addition, it estimated capacity loss and delay caused by sub-optimal signal timing at intersections on principal arterials. It also included rough estimates of capacity loss and delay on Interstates due to highway construction and maintenance work zones. Capacity loss and delay were estimated for calendar year 1999, except for work zone estimates, which were estimated for May 2001 to May 2002 due to data availability limitations. Prior to the first phase of this study, which was completed in May of 2002, no nationwide estimates of temporary losses of highway capacity by type of capacity-reducing event had been made. This report describes the second phase of the TLC study (TLC2). TLC2 improves upon the first study by expanding the scope to include delays from rain, toll collection facilities, railroad crossings, and commercial truck pickup and delivery (PUD) activities in urban areas. It includes estimates of work zone capacity loss and delay for all freeways and principal arterials, rather than for Interstates only. It also includes improved estimates of delays caused by fog, snow, and ice, which are based on data not available during the initial phase of the study. Finally, computational errors involving crash and breakdown delay in the original TLC report are corrected.

Chin, S.M.

2004-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

420

OPERATOR PERFORMANCE IN LONG DURATION, LOW TASK LOAD CONTROL OPERATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and conducted. Overall, 36 participants operated a digital nuclear power plant control workstation simulation In the United States, a major effort is underway to modernize existing nuclear power plants and their control rooms, as well as design new, advanced nuclear power plants. Current control rooms for nuclear power

Cummings, Mary "Missy"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "units operable capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Protocol for GL spin columns p10, 200ug capacity. p200, 600ug capacity.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Protocol for GL spin columns p10, 200ug capacity. p200, 600ug capacity. Glscienceinc.com product tips (exact protocol from GL Sciences): 1. Bring samples up in 65 uL of Buffer A. 2. Condition a. Add

Richardson, David

422

Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Design Basis Capacity Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study of the design basis capacity of process systems was prepared by Fluor Federal Services for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project. The evaluation uses a summary level model of major process sub-systems to determine the impact of sub-system interactions on the overall time to complete fuel removal operations. The process system model configuration and time cycle estimates developed in the original version of this report have been updated as operating scenario assumptions evolve. The initial document released in Fiscal Year (FY) 1996 varied the number of parallel systems and transport systems over a wide range, estimating a conservative design basis for completing fuel processing in a two year time period. Configurations modeling planned operations were updated in FY 1998 and FY 1999. The FY 1998 Base Case continued to indicate that fuel removal activities at the basins could be completed in slightly over 2 years. Evaluations completed in FY 1999 were based on schedule modifications that delayed the start of KE Basin fuel removal, with respect to the start of KW Basin fuel removal activities, by 12 months. This delay resulted in extending the time to complete all fuel removal activities by 12 months. However, the results indicated that the number of Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) stations could be reduced from four to three without impacting the projected time to complete fuel removal activities. This update of the design basis capacity evaluation, performed for FY 2000, evaluates a fuel removal scenario that delays the start of KE Basin activities such that staffing peaks are minimized. The number of CVD stations included in all cases for the FY 2000 evaluation is reduced from three to two, since the scenario schedule results in minimal time periods of simultaneous fuel removal from both basins. The FY 2000 evaluation also considers removal of Shippingport fuel from T Plant storage and transfer to the Canister Storage Building for storage.

CLEVELAND, K.J.

2000-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

423

A study of freeway capacity in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

studies have been undertaken to determine the value of capacity. A study by Hurdle and Datta in 1983 concluded that the value of 2, 000 pcphpl was still a good estimate of capacity (5). In contrast, a study by Agyemang-Duah (6) concluded...). Many other studies have attempted to measure the flows in both conditions and have produced varying results. Another related issue is the requirement for the existence of sufficient demand which is highlighted by McShane and Roess (13). Agyemang-Duah...

Ringert, John Franklin

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Damodar Valley Corporation, Chandrapura Unit 2 Thermal Power Station Residual Life Assessment Summary report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The BHEL/NTPC/PFC/TVA teams assembled at the DVC`s Chadrapura station on July 19, 1994, to assess the remaining life of Unit 2. The workscope was expanded to include major plant systems that impact the unit`s ability to sustain generation at 140 MW (Units 1-3 have operated at average rating of about 90 MW). Assessment was completed Aug. 19, 1994. Boiler pressure parts are in excellent condition except for damage to primary superheater header/stub tubes and economizer inlet header stub tubes. The turbine steam path is in good condition except for damage to LP blading; the spar rotor steam path is in better condition and is recommended for Unit 2. Nozzle box struts are severely cracked from the flame outs; the cracks should not be repaired. HP/IP rotor has surface cracks at several places along the steam seal areas; these cracks are shallow and should be machined out. Detailed component damage assessments for above damaged components have been done. The turbine auxiliary systems have been evaluated; cooling tower fouling/blockage is the root cause for the high turbine back pressure. The fuel processing system is one of the primary root causes for limiting unit capacity. The main steam and hot reheat piping systems were conservatively designed and have at least 30 years left;deficiencies needing resolution include restoration of insulation, replacement of 6 deformed hanger clamp/bolts, and adjustment of a few hanger settings. The cold reheat piping system is generally in good condition; some areas should be re-insulated and the rigid support clamps/bolts should be examined. The turbine extraction piping system supports all appeared to be functioning normally.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Westinghouse Hanford Company Conduct of Operations Manual: GOCO Cross-Cultivation Committee, Operational Excellence Task Force  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This manual has been prepared to establish guidelines that are to be used at all Westinghouse Government Operations Business Unit (GOBU) sites and Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). The purpose of the manual is to establish standards that comply with the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.19, Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities'' and that will be used at all Westinghouse Government Operations Business Unit sites and Westinghouse Savannah River Company.

Schilperoort, D.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Westinghouse Hanford Company Conduct of Operations Manual: GOCO Cross-Cultivation Committee, Operational Excellence Task Force  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This manual has been prepared to establish guidelines that are to be used at all Westinghouse Government Operations Business Unit (GOBU) sites and Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). The purpose of the manual is to establish standards that comply with the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.19, ``Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities`` and that will be used at all Westinghouse Government Operations Business Unit sites and Westinghouse Savannah River Company.

Schilperoort, D.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Bad bag detection systems installed on the COHPAC (Compact Hybrid Particulate Collector) at Alabama Power, E.C. Gaston Unit No.3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In December of 1996, Alabama Power Company, a subsidiary of the Southern Company, began operating a baghouse in conjunction with an existing hot-side precipitator on the cold side of the air heaters. The concept combining an electrostatic precipitator and a baghouse is termed a COHPAC (Compact Hybrid Particulate Collector), an EPRI technology. The baghouse is installed on Unit No.3 which is a 280 Mwe pulverized coal fired unit. Unit No.3 shares a common stack with Unit No.4, so the baghouse treats 50% of the total stack flow. The installation has resulted in the ability of both boilers to operate without costly boiler load reductions, which were quite common prior to the installation of the COHPAC system because of stack capacity. To date, after nearly three years of operation the COHPAC system has meet and exceeded all performance expectations. The installation has consistently provided low outlet emissions (<0.01 lb/Mbtu) and low opacity levels. To date, there have not been any known bag failures and maintenance has been minimal. Testing has shown bag life to be finite but no data has been compiled on this type system showing the operating window that would ensure optimal performance. Mullen Burst tests have shown degradation in bag strength, which indicates that this degradation at some point could result in premature failure of the bags. The COHPAC system installed at E.G., Gaston includes over 2,000 bags corresponding to roughly 57,500 ft{sup 2} of collecting surface area. Current methods of finding damaged bags are quite laborious and time intensive. A system to monitor performance and locating damaged bags will be presented. Associated performance and overall historical operating data on Unit No.3 will also be presented.

Berry, M.S.; Harrison, W.; Corina, B.; Wilson, R.; Harrington, J.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Wind Power Forecasting Error Frequency Analyses for Operational Power System Studies: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The examination of wind power forecasting errors is crucial for optimal unit commitment and economic dispatch of power systems with significant wind power penetrations. This scheduling process includes both renewable and nonrenewable generators, and the incorporation of wind power forecasts will become increasingly important as wind fleets constitute a larger portion of generation portfolios. This research considers the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study database of wind power forecasts and numerical actualizations. This database comprises more than 30,000 locations spread over the western United States, with a total wind power capacity of 960 GW. Error analyses for individual sites and for specific balancing areas are performed using the database, quantifying the fit to theoretical distributions through goodness-of-fit metrics. Insights into wind-power forecasting error distributions are established for various levels of temporal and spatial resolution, contrasts made among the frequency distribution alternatives, and recommendations put forth for harnessing the results. Empirical data are used to produce more realistic site-level forecasts than previously employed, such that higher resolution operational studies are possible. This research feeds into a larger work of renewable integration through the links wind power forecasting has with various operational issues, such as stochastic unit commitment and flexible reserve level determination.

Florita, A.; Hodge, B. M.; Milligan, M.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

CONVERT 15 WELLS TO BORS PUMPING UNITS AND TEST/COMPARE TO CONVENTIONAL UNITS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new type of fluid lifting equipment called Balanced Oil Recovery System (trade named BORS Lift{trademark}) was installed on several idle oil wells to demonstrate the operating efficiency of this innovative equipment technology. The BORS Lift system is designed to bring oil to the surface without the accompanying formation water. The BORS Lift system uses an innovative strap mechanism that takes oil from the top of the downhole oilwater column and lifts it to the surface, eliminating production of the formation water. Eliminating salt water production could potentially increase oil production, reduce operational costs, benefit the environment, and cut salt water disposal costs. Although the BORS Lift units did not function as intended, lessons learned during the course of the field demonstration project resulted in improvements in the technology and redesign of subsequent generation BORS Lift units which are reported to have significantly improved their performance characteristics. BORS Lift units were installed on 15 temporarily abandoned wells which had been shut down due to low oil production, high water production, and uneconomic operating conditions. The wells had been producing with artificial lift at a high watercut from a shallow (850-900 feet), pressure depleted oil sand reservoir prior to being shut down. The electrical motor driven BORS Lift units provided a possible approach for economically returning the shallow, low-volume oil wells to production. The BORS Lift units used in this field demonstration were designed to recover up to roughly 22 barrels of fluid per day from depths ranging to 1,700 feet, ideal for many marginal stripper well operations. The BORS units were first-production-model test units, operated under oil field conditions for the first time, and were naturally expected to experience some design problems. From the onset, the operator experienced mechanical, design, and operational problems with the BORS Lift units and was unable to maintain un-interrupted production operations. The inventor provided considerable on-site technical support in an ongoing effort to correct the problems with the units and the inventor worked extensively with the operator to make design and manufacturing changes to the units to try to improve their reliability and performance. The operational problems were mostly related to the durability of the various components under oil field operating conditions such as inadequate mechanical, electrical, and electronic design for rough service, extended operation, and severe weather conditions. During the course of the demonstration project, it further appeared that the producing formation lacked sufficient reservoir energy and/or favorable oil properties to mobilize and displace oil from the formation into the well bore in order to recharge the oil column in the well. The BORS Lift units were then moved to a second lease which appeared to have more favorable WTI quality oil properties. Eight of these units were reported to have been installed and placed in operation on the second lease, however, operational difficulties continued. It was determined that the units were inadequately designed and would need to be replace by improved second generation units. Due to the lack of success with the first generation units and the extra cost to replace them with the redesigned units, the operators decided not to continue with the project and the project was terminated at that point.

Walter B. North

2003-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

430

Results Of Routine Strip Effluent Hold Tank, Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank, Caustic Wash Tank And Caustic Storage Tank Samples From Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit During Macrobatch 6 Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT), Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT), Caustic Wash Tank (CWT) and Caustic Storage Tank (CST) samples from several of the ''microbatches'' of Integrated Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch (''Macrobatch'') 6 have been analyzed for {sup 238}Pu, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, and by Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectroscopy (ICPES). The results from the current microbatch samples are similar to those from comparable samples in Macrobatch 5. From a bulk chemical point of view, the ICPES results do not vary considerably between this and the previous macrobatch. The titanium results in the DSSHT samples continue to indicate the presence of Ti, when the feed material does not have detectable levels. This most likely indicates that leaching of Ti from MST in ARP continues to occur. Both the CST and CWT samples indicate that the target Free OH value of 0.03 has been surpassed. While at this time there is no indication that this has caused an operational problem, the CST should be adjusted into specification. The {sup 137}Cs results from the SRNL as well as F/H lab data indicate a potential decline in cesium decontamination factor. Further samples will be carefully monitored to investigate this.

Peters, T. B.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Mobile inspection and repackaging unit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Storage of large volumes of radioactive mixed waste (RMW) generated over the past 20 years at the Hanford Site has resulted in various waste management challenges. Presently, disposal capacity for RMW does not exist. Containers holding RMW will be stored until processing facilities can be completed to provide treatment and final disposal. Because of the complexity of these wastes, special projects have been initiated to properly manage them. This paper addresses one such project. The goal of this project is to develop a mobile inspection and repackaging unit (IRU) for solid RMW. The paper describes the structural design, equipment, ventilation system, instruments and electrical systems, video monitors and recorders, materials handling, and waste processing of containers.

Whitney, G.A.; Roberts, R.J. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States). Solid Waste Disposal Div.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

432

Robust capacity expansion solutions for telecommunication ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

networksX the osts of investment nd the qulity of servie @ oA ...... Robust solutions with 1 ? ? for capacity constraints. Deterministic. Protection ...... tions networks under demnd unertintyD in Proceedings of the 6th International.

2010-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

433

Building Environmental Health Capacity in Allegheny County  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Building Environmental Health Capacity in Allegheny County: Environmental Indicators Outcomes standard Air Quality Computer Systems Days exceeding ozone standard Air Quality Computer Systems Attainment of the annual PM-2.5 standard (Fine particulates) Air Quality Computer Systems Annual PM-2.5 level Air Quality

434

PROJECT REPORT HVAC EQUIPMENT DEMOGRAPHICS AND CAPACITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROJECT REPORT HVAC EQUIPMENT DEMOGRAPHICS AND CAPACITY ANALYSIS TOOLS APPLICABLE TO MULTI Commercial HVAC Design Process 12 5.0 Conclusion 18 6.0 References 19 TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTIONS #12;MULTI performance by collectively improving the enve- lope, lighting and HVAC systems. The primary goals of the UC

California at Davis, University of

435

CSEM WP 124 Capacity Markets for Electricity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CSEM WP 124 Capacity Markets for Electricity Anna Creti, LEEERNA, University of Toulouse for Electricity Anna Creti LEEERNA, University of Toulouse Natalia Fabra Universidad Carlos III de Madrid February 2004 Abstract The creation of electricity markets has raised the fundamental question as to whether

California at Berkeley. University of

436

Information Capacity of Energy Harvesting Sensor Nodes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Information Capacity of Energy Harvesting Sensor Nodes R Rajesh CABS, DRDO Bangalore, India Email: rajesh81r@gmail.com Vinod Sharma Dept. of ECE Indian Institute of Science Bangalore, India Email: vinod Email: pramodv@uiuc.edu Abstract--Sensor nodes with energy harvesting sources are gaining popularity due

Sharma, Vinod

437

Partial energies fluctuations and negative heat capacities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We proceed to a critical examination of the method used in nuclear fragmentation to exhibit signals of negative heat capacity. We show that this method leads to unsatisfactory results when applied to a simple and well controlled model. Discrepancies are due to incomplete evaluation of potential energies.

Xavier Campi; H. Krivine; E. Plagnol; N. Sator

2004-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

438

Kampung Capacity Local Solutions for Sustainable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kampung Capacity Local Solutions for Sustainable Rural Energy in the Baram River Basin, Sarawak for the river basin. Keywords: South East Asia, Malaysia, Rural Energy Access, Local Solutions #12;RAEL Report, Malaysia Rebekah Shirley Daniel Kammen University of California ­ Berkeley Renewable and Appropriate Energy

Kammen, Daniel M.

439

Capacity Building in Wind Energy for PICs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

indicates that significant wind energy potential exists. · A monitoring project showed that in Rarotonga system. · About 30 other islands could have potential for grid connected wind turbines in the 100-1000 k1 Capacity Building in Wind Energy for PICs Presentation of the project Regional Workshop Suva

440

Constrained capacity of MIMO Rayleigh fading channels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis channel capacity of a special type of multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) Rayleigh fading channels is studied, where the transmitters are subject to a finite phase-shift keying (PSK) input alphabet. The constraint on the input...

He, Wenyan

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "units operable capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Methods and some implications of beef trade between Australia and the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

marketing chain to the United States, 2) Australian levies and quarantine, 3) United States beef quota system and, 4) some major implications of government regulations. The first section explains the methods of transporting beef from Australia...). An understanding of the United States beef quota system is given in the third section. This system is overseen and operated by the President of the United States, United States Secretary of Agriculture, United States Secretary of Treasury, and the United States...

Rutledge, Mark

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Wireless Network Capacity Management: A Real Options Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

capacity, market price of risk, investment timing option 1 Introduction Wireless networks are now regarded

Forsyth, Peter A.

443

TURKEY'S CIVILIAN CAPACITY IN POST-CONFLICT RECONSTRUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TURKEY'S CIVILIAN CAPACITY IN POST-CONFLICT RECONSTRUCTION 1 TURKEY'S CIVILIAN CAPACITY IN POST-CONFLICT RECONSTRUCTION by Teri Murphy & Onur Sazak #12;Turkey's Civilian Capacity in post-Conflict Reconstruction By Teri-checking was indispensable for the realization of this project. #12;TURKEY'S CIVILIAN CAPACITY IN POST

Yanikoglu, Berrin

444

Laminated microchannel devices, mixing units and method of making same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A laminated microchannel device is described in which there is a unit operation process layer that has longitudinal channel. The longitudinal channel is cut completely through the layer in which the unit process operation resides. Both the device structure and method of making the device provide significant advantages in terms of simplicity and efficiency. A static mixing unit that can be incorporated in the laminated microchannel device is also described.

Bennett, Wendy D [Kennewick, WA; Hammerstrom, Donald J [West Richland, WA; Martin, Peter M [Kennewick, WA; Matson, Dean W [Kennewick, WA

2002-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

445

Iran moves to beef up downstream operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reviews the plans of the Iranian oil and gas industry to rebuild their oil and gas processing and distribution network. It describes the construction and operation of two natural gas processing plants along with a gas condensate processing plant. Another project is a liquefied petroleum gas processing facility which is also discussed. Plant capacities and specifications of operations are discussed along with the various types of processing and treatment equipment and needed pipeline construction.

Tippee, B.

1996-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

446

1987 DOE review: First collider run operation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This review covers the operations of the first run of the 1.8 TeV superconducting super collider. The papers enclosed cover: PBAR source status, fixed target operation, Tevatron cryogenic reliability and capacity upgrade, Tevatron Energy upgrade progress and plans, status of the D0 low beta insertion, 1.8 K and 4.7 K refrigeration for low-..beta.. quadrupoles, progress and plans for the LINAC and booster, near term and long term and long term performance improvements.

Childress, S.; Crawford, J.; Dugan, G.; Edwards, H.; Finley, D.A.; Fowler, W.B.; Harrison, M.; Holmes, S.; Makara, J.N.; Malamud, E.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Operation Poorman  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of Operation Poorman were to design and build a portable seismic system and to set up and use this system in a cold-weather environment. The equipment design uses current technology to achieve a low-power, lightweight system that is configured into three modules. The system was deployed in Alaska during wintertime, and the results provide a basis for specifying a mission-ready seismic verification system.

Pruvost, N.; Tsitouras, J.

1981-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

448

Operations Videos  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratorySpeeding access1 TechnicalOilOnlineandOperations

449

NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Impact of High Wind Power Penetrations on Hydroelectric Unit Operations in the WWSIS Bri-Mathias Hodge Penetrations on Hydroelectric Unit Operations in the WWSIS Bri-Mathias Hodge, Debra Lew, and Michael Milligan penetration on hydroelectric unit operations. Changes in hydroelectric unit operating patterns are examined

450

Operations Information  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 The 2002 WholesaleEnergy'sRunning jobsOPERATING PLANOperations

451

Kuwait pressing toward preinvasion oil production capacity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oil field reconstruction is shifting focus in Kuwait as the country races toward prewar production capacity of 2 million b/d. Oil flow last month reached 1.7 million b/d, thanks largely to a massive workover program that has accomplished about as much as it can. By midyear, most of the 19 rigs in Kuwait will be drilling rather than working over wells vandalized by retreating Iraqi troops in February 1991. Seventeen gathering centers are at work, with capacities totaling 2.4 million b/d, according to state-owned Kuwait Oil Co. (KOC). This article describes current work, the production infrastructure, facilities strategy, oil recovery, well repairs, a horizontal pilot project, the drilling program, the constant reminders of war, and heightened tensions.

Tippee, B.

1993-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

452

Solar Power: Using Photovoltaics to Preserve California's Electricity Capacity Reserves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The California Power Authority (CPA) is committed to increasing the use of renewable energy supplies--such as photovoltaics and wind--as a hedge against price fluctuations of electricity and natural gas. The CPA wants to own and operate an adequate supply of reserve generation that: - Can be deployed quickly in response to severe summer peak loads, unexpected loss of base and intermediate generation units, and failure of critical transmission facilities; - Will minimize the reliance on spot market purchases during periods when the State is most vulnerable to price gouging from private generators.

Herig, C..

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Calculations of Heat-Capacities of Adsorbates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHYSICAL REVIEW B VOLUME 14, NUMBER 7 1 OCTOBER 1976 Calculations of heat capacities of adsorbates W. R. Lawrence and R. E. Allen Department of Physics, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (Received 2 September 1975) The phonon... the substrate has a perfect (100) surface and the adsorbate goes down as a solid monolayer in registry with the substrate. The quasiharmonic approximation was used, and the results for Ne adsorbates were considerably different from those obtained...

LAWRENCE, WR; Allen, Roland E.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Property:MeanCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories onFocusOskiPhilipspresentsGeothermalAreaMeanCapacity Jump to:

455

A kinematic wave theory of capacity drop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Capacity drop at active bottlenecks is one of the most puzzling traffic phenomena, but a thorough understanding is practically important for designing variable speed limit and ramp metering strategies. In this study, we attempt to develop a simple model of capacity drop within the framework of kinematic wave theory based on the observation that capacity drop occurs when an upstream queue forms at an active bottleneck. In addition, we assume that the fundamental diagrams are continuous in steady states. This assumption is consistent with observations and can avoid unrealistic infinite characteristic wave speeds in discontinuous fundamental diagrams. A core component of the new model is an entropy condition defined by a discontinuous boundary flux function. For a lane-drop area, we demonstrate that the model is well-defined, and its Riemann problem can be uniquely solved. We theoretically discuss traffic stability with this model subject to perturbations in density, upstream demand, and downstream supply. We clarify that discontinuous flow-density relations, or so-called "discontinuous" fundamental diagrams, are caused by incomplete observations of traffic states. Theoretical results are consistent with observations in the literature and are verified by numerical simulations and empirical observations. We finally discuss potential applications and future studies.

Wen-Long Jin; Qi-Jian Gan; Jean-Patrick Lebacque

2013-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

456

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,," Detached"," Attached"," 2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Televisions" "Total Homes",113.6,71.8,6.7,9,19.1,6.9 "Televisions" "Number of...

457

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

in Buildings With" ,,,,"Detached",,"Attached",,"2 to 4 Units",,"5 or More Units",,"Mobile Homes" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" "Fuels Used and End Uses",,"Own","Rent","Own","Rent",...

458

Colombia-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Protection Agency, United States Department of Energy, United States Department of Agriculture, United States Department of State Sector Climate, Energy, Land Focus Area...

459

A Study of United States Hydroelectric Plant Ownership  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ownership of United States hydroelectric plants is reviewed from several perspectives. Plant owners are grouped into six owner classes as defined by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. The numbers of plants and the corresponding total capacity associated with each owner class are enumerated. The plant owner population is also evaluated based on the number of owners in each owner class, the number of plants owned by a single owner, and the size of plants based on capacity ranges associated with each owner class. Plant numbers and corresponding total capacity associated with owner classes in each state are evaluated. Ownership by federal agencies in terms of the number of plants owned by each agency and the corresponding total capacity is enumerated. A GIS application that is publicly available on the Internet that displays hydroelectric plants on maps and provides basic information about them is described.

Douglas G Hall

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Performing an allreduce operation using shared memory  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for performing an allreduce operation using shared memory that include: receiving, by at least one of a plurality of processing cores on a compute node, an instruction to perform an allreduce operation; establishing, by the core that received the instruction, a job status object for specifying a plurality of shared memory allreduce work units, the plurality of shared memory allreduce work units together performing the allreduce operation on the compute node; determining, by an available core on the compute node, a next shared memory allreduce work unit in the job status object; and performing, by that available core on the compute node, that next shared memory allreduce work unit.

Archer, Charles J. (Rochester, MN); Dozsa, Gabor (Ardsley, NY); Ratterman, Joseph D. (Rochester, MN); Smith, Brian E. (Rochester, MN)

2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

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461

Wind Potential Capacity at 110-m Hub Height for United States  

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462

Wind Potential Capacity at 140-m Hub Height for United States  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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463

1999 Year End Wind Power Capacity Map of the United States  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

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464

2000 Year End Wind Power Capacity Map for the United States  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

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465

2001 Year End Wind Power Capacity Map for the United States  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

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466

2002 Year End Wind Power Capacity Map for the United States  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:SeadovCooperative JumpWilliamsonWoodsonCounty iscomfortNews This page lists allMaps

467

2003 Year End Wind Power Capacity Map for the United States  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:SeadovCooperative JumpWilliamsonWoodsonCounty iscomfortNews This page lists allMaps

468

2004 Year End Wind Power Capacity Map for the United States  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:SeadovCooperative JumpWilliamsonWoodsonCounty iscomfortNews This page lists allMaps

469

2006 Year End Wind Power Capacity Map for the United States  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:SeadovCooperative JumpWilliamsonWoodsonCounty iscomfortNews This page lists allMaps

470

2007 Year End Wind Power Capacity Map for the United States  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

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471

2008 Year End Wind Power Capacity Map for the United States  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:SeadovCooperative JumpWilliamsonWoodsonCounty iscomfortNews This page lists allMaps

472

2009 Year End Wind Power Capacity Map for the United States  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:SeadovCooperative JumpWilliamsonWoodsonCounty iscomfortNews This page lists allMaps

473

2010 Year End Wind Power Capacity Map for the United States  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:SeadovCooperative JumpWilliamsonWoodsonCounty iscomfortNews This page lists allMaps

474

2011 Year End Wind Power Capacity Map of the United States  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:SeadovCooperative JumpWilliamsonWoodsonCounty iscomfortNews This page lists allMaps

475

2012 Year End Wind Power Capacity Map of the United States  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:SeadovCooperative JumpWilliamsonWoodsonCounty iscomfortNews This page lists allMaps

476

Unit Testing Discussion C  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unit Testing Discussion C #12;Unit Test public Method is smallest unit of code Input/output transformation Test if the method does what it claims Not exactly black box testing #12;Test if (actual result Expected Computed Input #12;Functionality Computation ­ Easy to test Time based Asynchronous interaction

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

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