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1

Transmission line capital costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The displacement or deferral of conventional AC transmission line installation is a key benefit associated with several technologies being developed with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Management (OEM). Previous benefits assessments conducted within OEM have been based on significantly different assumptions for the average cost per mile of AC transmission line. In response to this uncertainty, an investigation of transmission line capital cost data was initiated. The objective of this study was to develop a database for preparing preliminary estimates of transmission line costs. An extensive search of potential data sources identified databases maintained by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) as superior sources of transmission line cost data. The BPA and WAPA data were adjusted to a common basis and combined together. The composite database covers voltage levels from 13.8 to 765 W, with cost estimates for a given voltage level varying depending on conductor size, tower material type, tower frame type, and number of circuits. Reported transmission line costs vary significantly, even for a given voltage level. This can usually be explained by variation in the design factors noted above and variation in environmental and land (right-of-way) costs, which are extremely site-specific. Cost estimates prepared from the composite database were compared to cost data collected by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) for investor-owned utilities from across the United States. The comparison was hampered because the only design specifications included with the FERC data were voltage level and line length. Working within this limitation, the FERC data were not found to differ significantly from the composite database. Therefore, the composite database was judged to be a reasonable proxy for estimating national average costs.

Hughes, K.R.; Brown, D.R.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

LIFE Cost of Electricity, Capital and Operating Costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Successful commercialization of fusion energy requires economic viability as well as technical and scientific feasibility. To assess economic viability, we have conducted a pre-conceptual level evaluation of LIFE economics. Unit costs are estimated from a combination of bottom-up costs estimates, working with representative vendors, and scaled results from previous studies of fission and fusion plants. An integrated process model of a LIFE power plant was developed to integrate and optimize unit costs and calculate top level metrics such as cost of electricity and power plant capital cost. The scope of this activity was the entire power plant site. Separately, a development program to deliver the required specialized equipment has been assembled. Results show that LIFE power plant cost of electricity and plant capital cost compare favorably to estimates for new-build LWR's, coal and gas - particularly if indicative costs of carbon capture and sequestration are accounted for.

Anklam, T

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

3

Electric power substation capital costs  

SciTech Connect

The displacement or deferral of substation equipment is a key benefit associated with several technologies that are being developed with the support of the US Department of Energy`s Office of Utility Technologies. This could occur, for example, as a result of installing a distributed generating resource within an electricity distribution system. The objective of this study was to develop a model for preparing preliminary estimates of substation capital costs based on rudimentary conceptual design information. The model is intended to be used by energy systems analysts who need ``ballpark`` substation cost estimates to help establish the value of advanced utility technologies that result in the deferral or displacement of substation equipment. This cost-estimating model requires only minimal inputs. More detailed cost-estimating approaches are recommended when more detailed design information is available. The model was developed by collecting and evaluating approximately 20 sets of substation design and cost data from about 10 US sources, including federal power marketing agencies and private and public electric utilities. The model is principally based on data provided by one of these sources. Estimates prepared with the model were compared with estimated and actual costs for the data sets received from the other utilities. In general, good agreement (for conceptual level estimating) was found between estimates prepared with the cost-estimating model and those prepared by the individual utilities. Thus, the model was judged to be adequate for making preliminary estimates of typical substation costs for US utilities.

Dagle, J.E.; Brown, D.R.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Updated Capital Cost Estimates Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants April 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants ii This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies.

5

CAPITAL AND OPERATING COST OF HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM COAL GASIFICATION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CAPITAL AND OPERATING COST OF HYDROGEN CAPITAL AND OPERATING COST OF HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM COAL GASIFICATION Final Report April 2003 Prepared for: The United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under: Contract No. DE-AM26-99FT40465 between the NETL and Concurrent Technologies Corporation (CTC) Subcontract No. 990700362 between CTC and Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group Inc. Task 50611 DOE Task Managers: James R. Longanbach Gary J. Stiegel Parsons Project Manager: Michael D. Rutkowski Principal Investigators: Thomas L. Buchanan Michael G. Klett Ronald L. Schoff PARSONS Capital and Operating Cost of Hydrogen Production from Coal Gasification Page i April 2003 TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Title Page List of Tables iii List of Figures iii

6

Capital cost models for geothermal power plants  

SciTech Connect

A computer code, titled GEOCOST, has been developed at Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, to rapidly and systematically calculate the potential costs of geothermal power. A description of the cost models in GEOCOST for the geothermal power plants is given here. Plant cost models include the flashed steam and binary systems. The data sources are described, along with the cost data correlations, resulting equations, and uncertainties. Comparison among GEOCOST plant cost estimates and recent A-E estimates are presented. The models are intended to predict plant costs for second and third generation units, rather than the more expensive first-of-a-kind units.

Cohn, P.D.; Bloomster, C.H.

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Cost Analysis of Inadequate Interoperability in the US Capital ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... inadequate interoperability include manual reentry of ... the costs of the decommissioning phase because ... operate, and decommission capital facilities ...

2004-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

8

Table 1. Updated estimates of power plant capital and operating costs  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Updated estimates of power plant capital and operating costs" Updated estimates of power plant capital and operating costs" ,"Plant Characteristics",,,"Plant Costs (2012$)" ,"Nominal Capacity (MW)","Heat Rate (Btu/kWh)",,"Overnight Capital Cost ($/kW)","Fixed O&M Cost ($/kW-yr)","Variable O&M Cost ($/MWh)" ,,,,,,,"NEMS Input" " Coal" "Single Unit Advanced PC",650,8800,,3246,37.8,4.47,"N" "Dual Unit Advanced PC",1300,8800,,2934,31.18,4.47,"Y" "Single Unit Advanced PC with CCS",650,12000,,5227,80.53,9.51,"Y" "Dual Unit Advanced PC with CCS",1300,12000,,4724,66.43,9.51,"N" "Single Unit IGCC ",600,8700,,4400,62.25,7.22,"N"

9

Capital costs have major impact on projected power sector ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural gas-fired power plants dominate the 2011 Annual ... AEO2011 also includes several alternative cases with lower assumed capital costs of nuclear, fossil fuel ...

10

Cost of a Ride: The Effects of Densities on Fixed-Guideway Transit Ridership and Capital Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rail transit capital cost study update final. Washington,2005). Managing Capital Costs of Major Federally Fundedin US rail transit project cost overrun. Transportation

Guerra, Erick; Cervero, Robert

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

A model of the Capital Cost of a natural gas-fired fuel cell based Central Utilities Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This model defines the methods used to estimate the cost associated with acquisition and installation of capital equipment of the fuel cell systems defined by the central utility plant model. The capital cost model estimates the cost of acquiring and installing the fuel cell unit, and all auxiliary equipment such as a boiler, air conditioning, hot water storage, and pumps. The model provides a means to adjust initial cost estimates to consider learning associated with the projected level of production and installation of fuel cell systems. The capital cost estimate is an input to the cost of ownership analysis where it is combined with operating cost and revenue model estimates.

Not Available

1993-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

12

Energy efficiency capital requirements for buildings in the United States  

SciTech Connect

Estimates of energy savings for any national energy efficiency or environmental improvement program should be based on a reasonable understanding of how much of the market can be served by such a program and what is the total value of investment required (capital requirements) to accomplish the savings claimed by the program. Current information on the energy savings performance and capital requirements of large-scale energy efficiency programs is used to develop a simple framework for analysis of capital requirements and the size of markets (dollar value of the markets) to compare with proposed new initiatives or programs. The comparison provides a reality check on the energy savings claimed. Based on this framework, current energy efficiency efforts and estimates of @p for proposed initiatives are examined. The examination shows that, in the United States, investment requirements for achieving claimed national energy savings goals should be estimated more consistently and that constraints related to the dollar volume of markets do not appear to be considered adequately. The analysis framework is used to show that major growth in costing energy efficiency markets is needed, and that simple reliance on existing approaches such as current utility DSM programs will not be adequate to reach proposed goals. Any nation serious about achieving needed energy use reductions in buildings should have reliable information about the costs of and increase in market size needed for achieving reduction goals. The analysis framework presented here will help improve that reliability.

MacDonald, M.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

13

Fuel costs and the retirement of capital goods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper explores the effect that energy prices and market conditions have on the retirement rates of capital goods using new micro data on aircraft lifetimes and fuel costs. The oil shocks of the 1970s made fuel intensive ...

Goolsbee, Austan Dean

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

When Does Information Asymmetry Affect the Cost of Capital?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper examines when information asymmetry among investors affects the cost of capital in excess of standard risk factors. When equity markets are perfectly competitive, information asymmetry has no separate effect on ...

Armstrong, Christopher S.

15

FUEL CELLS IN SHIPPING: HIGHER CAPITAL COSTS AND REDUCED FLEXIBILITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: The paper discusses some main economic characteristics of fuel cell power production technology applied to shipping. Whenever competitive fuel cell systems enter the market, they are likely to have higher capital costs and lower operating costs than systems based on traditional combustion technology. Implications of the difference are investigated with respect to investment flexibility by the use of a real options model of ship investment, lay-up and scrapping decisions under freight rate uncertainty. A higher capital share of total expected costs can represent a significant opportunity cost in uncertain markets. The paper highlights the significance of accounting properly for value of flexibility prior to investment in new technology.

Sigbjørn Sødal

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Controlling Capital Costs in High Performance Office Buildings: A Review of Best Practices for Overcoming Cost Barriers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Controlling Capital Costs in Controlling Capital Costs in High Performance Office Buildings: A Review of Best Practices for Overcoming Cost Barriers Preprint Shanti Pless and Paul Torcellini To be presented at the ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Pacific Grove, California August 12-17, 2012 Conference Paper NREL/CP-5500-55264 May 2012 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308. Accordingly, the US Government and Alliance retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

17

The interrelationships between corporations' dependence on external financing, information disclosure and cost of capital  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper tests the relationship between corporations' dependence on external financing and their level of corporate information disclosure, and the relationship between the cost of capital and the level of corporate information disclosure in the ... Keywords: Taiwan, cost of capital, debt, e-finance, electronic finance, equity capital, external financing, information disclosure, integrated circuits, website information

Fu-Ju Yang; Chien-Ting Han; Her-Jiun Sheu

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

FACILITIES ENGINEER WEST CHICAGO Execute capital projects for manufacturing facilities and utilities systems: scope development, cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

improvements, including all stages of project engineering: scope development, cost estimation, system designFACILITIES ENGINEER ­ WEST CHICAGO OVERVIEW: Execute capital projects for manufacturing facilities and utilities systems: scope development, cost estimation, system design, equipment sizing

Heller, Barbara

19

10 MWe Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant total capital cost  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A detailed breakdown of the capital cost of the 10 MWe Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant located near Barstow, California is presented. The total capital requirements of the pilot plant are given in four cost breakdown structures: (1) project costs (research and development, design, factory, construction, and start-up); (2) plant system costs (land, structures and improvements, collector system, receiver system, thermal transport system, thermal storage system, turbine-generator plant system, electrical plant system, miscellaneous plant equipment, and plant level); (3) elements of work costs (sitework/earthwork, concrete work, metal work, architectural work, process equipment, piping and electrical work); and (4) recurring and non-recurring costs. For all four structures, the total capital cost is the same ($141,200,000); however, the allocation of costs within each structure is different. These cost breakdown structures have been correlated to show the interaction and the assignment of costs for specific areas.

Norris, H.F. Jr.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Low-cost inertial measurement unit.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories performs many expensive tests using inertial measurement units (IMUs)--systems that use accelerometers, gyroscopes, and other sensors to measure flight dynamics in three dimensions. For the purpose of this report, the metrics used to evaluate an IMU are cost, size, performance, resolution, upgradeability and testing. The cost of a precision IMU is very high and can cost hundreds of thousands of dollars. Thus the goals and results of this project are as follows: (1) Examine the data flow in an IMU and determine a generic IMU design. (2) Discuss a high cost IMU implementation and its theoretically achievable results. (3) Discuss design modifications that would save money for suited applications. (4) Design and implement a low cost IMU and discuss its theoretically achievable results. (5) Test the low cost IMU and compare theoretical results with empirical results. (6) Construct a more streamlined printed circuit board design reducing noise, increasing capabilities, and constructing a self-contained unit. Using these results, we can compare a high cost IMU versus a low cost IMU using the metrics from above. Further, we can examine and suggest situations where a low cost IMU could be used instead of a high cost IMU for saving cost, size, or both.

Deyle, Travis Jay

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "units capital costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Unit Cost Natural Gas | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2 2 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142281532 Varnish cache server Unit Cost Natural Gas Dataset Summary Description Provides annual energy usage for years 1989 through 2010 for UT at Austin; specifically, electricity usage (kWh), natural gas usage (Mcf), associated costs. Also provides water consumption for 2005 through 2010. Source University of Texas (UT) at Austin, Utilities & Energy Management Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords Electricity Consumption Natural Gas Texas Unit Cost Electricity Unit Cost Natural Gas University Water Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Energy and Water Use Data for UT-Austin (xls, 32.8 KiB) Quality Metrics

22

Unit Cost Electricity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8 8 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142281518 Varnish cache server Unit Cost Electricity Dataset Summary Description Provides annual energy usage for years 1989 through 2010 for UT at Austin; specifically, electricity usage (kWh), natural gas usage (Mcf), associated costs. Also provides water consumption for 2005 through 2010. Source University of Texas (UT) at Austin, Utilities & Energy Management Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords Electricity Consumption Natural Gas Texas Unit Cost Electricity Unit Cost Natural Gas University Water Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Energy and Water Use Data for UT-Austin (xls, 32.8 KiB) Quality Metrics

23

Coal-fired power-plant-capital-cost estimates. Final report. [Mid-1978 price level; 13 different sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conceptual designs and order-of-magnitude capital cost estimates have been prepared for typical 1000-MW coal-fired power plants. These subcritical plants will provide high efficiency in base load operation without excessive efficiency loss in cycling operation. In addition, an alternative supercritical design and a cost estimate were developed for each of the plants for maximum efficiency at 80 to 100% of design capacity. The power plants will be located in 13 representative regions of the United States and will be fueled by coal typically available in each region. In two locations, alternate coals are available and plants have been designed and estimated for both coals resulting in a total of 15 power plants. The capital cost estimates are at mid-1978 price level with no escalation and are based on the contractor's current construction projects. Conservative estimating parameters have been used to ensure their suitability as planning tools for utility companies. A flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system has been included for each plant to reflect the requirements of the promulgated New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) for sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) emissions. The estimated costs of the FGD facilities range from 74 to 169 $/kW depending on the coal characteristics and the location of the plant. The estimated total capital requirements for twin 500-MW units vary from 8088 $/kW for a southeastern plant burning bituminous Kentucky coal to 990 $/kW for a remote western plant burning subbituminous Wyoming coal.

Holstein, R.A.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Electricity Generation Plants  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This paper provides information on the cost of building new electricity power plants. These cost estimates are critical inputs in the development of energy projections and analyses.

Michael Leff

2010-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

25

Total capital cost data base: 10MWe Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the total capital cost data base of the 10 MWe Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant. This Solar One cost data base was created using the computer code ''Cost Data Management System (CDMS)''. The cost data base format was developed to be used as a common method of presentation of capital costs for power plants. The basic format is a plant system cost breakdown structure. Major accounts are land; structures and improvements; collector, receiver, thermal transport, thermal storage, and stream generation systems; turbine plant; electrical plant; miscellaneous plant systems and equipment; and plant-level indirect costs. Each major account includes subaccounts to as many as nine level of detail. The data base can be accessed to provide elements-of-work costs at any subaccount level or at the plant level. The elements-of-work include sitework/earthwork; concrete work; metal work; architectural; process equipment; piping; electrical; and miscellaneous work. Each of these elements-of-work can be or are broken into finer detail and costs can be accumulated to identify more specific needs, e.g., pipe insulation or heat exchangers. The cost data base can be accessed and various reports can be generated. These vary from a single page summary to detailed listings of costs and notes. Reported costs can be stated in dollars, dollars per kilowatt or percentage of the total plant cost. Reports or samples of reports for the pilot plant capital cost are included.

Norris, H.F. Jr.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Estimation of Capital and Levelized Cost...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

cost for 1 MW systems with various EP ratios Validated PNNL model using PNNL 1 kW, 1 kWh stack performance data Provided a roadmap for cost effective redox flow battery systems...

27

EIA - Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Electricity Generation Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Almost all of these factors can vary by region, as do capacity factors for renewable generation, operations and maintenance costs associated with individual ...

28

EIA - Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Electricity Generation Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... by the costs has changed significantly. Prior estimates were for a highly efficient plant employing gasification and a combined cycle generator; the new ...

29

CAPITAL AND OPERATING COST OF HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM COAL GASIFICATI...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 Coal Using Preliminary Assumptions 2-15 2.5.1 Approach to Cost Estimating 2-16 2.5.2 Production Costs (Operation and Maintenance) 2-16 2.5.3 Consumables 2-17 2.5.4 Byproduct...

30

Microsoft Word - QGESS_CapitalCostScalingMethodology_Final_20130201.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Q Q U U A A L L I I T T Y Y G G U U I I D D E E L L I I N N E E S S F F O O R R E E N N E E R R G G Y Y S S Y Y S S T T E E M M S S T T U U D D I I E E S S C C a a p p i i t t a a l l C C o o s s t t S S c c a a l l i i n n g g M M e e t t h h o o d d o o l l o o g g y y DOE/NETL-2010/???? DOE/NETL-341/013113 ii Capital Cost Scaling Methodology Quality Guidelines for Energy Systems Studies January 2013 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights.

31

Wind-To-Hydrogen Project: Electrolyzer Capital Cost Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study is being performed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy and Xcel Energy's Wind-to-Hydrogen Project (Wind2H2) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The general aim of the project is to identify areas for improving the production of hydrogen from renewable energy sources. These areas include both technical development and cost analysis of systems that convert renewable energy to hydrogen via water electrolysis. Increased efficiency and reduced cost will bring about greater market penetration for hydrogen production and application. There are different issues for isolated versus grid-connected systems, however, and these issues must be considered. The manner in which hydrogen production is integrated in the larger energy system will determine its cost feasibility and energy efficiency.

Saur, G.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Wind-To-Hydrogen Project: Electrolyzer Capital Cost Study  

SciTech Connect

This study is being performed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy and Xcel Energy's Wind-to-Hydrogen Project (Wind2H2) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The general aim of the project is to identify areas for improving the production of hydrogen from renewable energy sources. These areas include both technical development and cost analysis of systems that convert renewable energy to hydrogen via water electrolysis. Increased efficiency and reduced cost will bring about greater market penetration for hydrogen production and application. There are different issues for isolated versus grid-connected systems, however, and these issues must be considered. The manner in which hydrogen production is integrated in the larger energy system will determine its cost feasibility and energy efficiency.

Saur, G.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Capital and operating cost estimates. Volume I. Preliminary design and assessment of a 12,500 BPD coal-to-methanol-to-gasoline plant. [Grace C-M-G Plant, Henderson County, Kentucky  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Deliverable No. 18b - Capital and Operating Cost Estimates includes a detailed presentation of the 12,500 BPD coal-to-methanol-to-gasoline plant from the standpoint of capital, preoperations, start-up and operations cost estimation. The base capital cost estimate in June 1982 dollars was prepared by the Ralph M. Parsons Company under the direction of Grace. The escalated capital cost estimate as well as separate estimates for preoperations, startup and operations activities were developed by Grace. The deliverable consists of four volumes. Volume I contains details of methodology used in developing the capital cost estimate, summary information on a base June 1982 capital cost, details of the escalated capital cost estimate and separate sections devoted to preoperations, start-up, and operations cost. The base estimate is supported by detailed information in Volumes II, III and IV. The degree of detail for some units was constrained due to proprietary data. Attempts have been made to exhibit the estimating methodology by including data on individual equipment pricing. Proprietary details are available for inspection upon execution of nondisclosure and/or secrecy agreements with the licensors to whom the data is proprietary. Details of factoring certain pieces of equipment and/or entire modules or units from the 50,000 BPD capital estimate are also included. In the case of the escalated capital estimate, Grace has chosen to include a sensitivity analysis which allows for ready assessment of impacts of escalation rates (inflation), contingency allowances and the construction interest financing rates on the escalated capital cost. Each of the estimates associated with bringing the plant to commercial production rates has as a basis the schedule and engineering documentation found in Deliverable No. 14b - Process Engineering and Mechanical Design Report, No. 28b - Staffing Plans, No. 31b - Construction Plan, and No. 33b - Startup and Operation Plan.

Not Available

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Rail costs and capital adjustments in a quasi regulated environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reports on results obtained from the estimation of a rail cost function using a pooled-time series, cross section of Class I railroads for the period 1974-1986. An analysis is performed of short-run and long-run ...

Friedlaender, Ann Fetter

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Developing a Cost Model and Methodology to Estimate Capital Costs for Thermal Energy Storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides an update on the previous cost model for thermal energy storage (TES) systems. The update allows NREL to estimate the costs of such systems that are compatible with the higher operating temperatures associated with advanced power cycles. The goal of the Department of Energy (DOE) Solar Energy Technology Program is to develop solar technologies that can make a significant contribution to the United States domestic energy supply. The recent DOE SunShot Initiative sets a very aggressive cost goal to reach a Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE) of 6 cents/kWh by 2020 with no incentives or credits for all solar-to-electricity technologies.1 As this goal is reached, the share of utility power generation that is provided by renewable energy sources is expected to increase dramatically. Because Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) is currently the only renewable technology that is capable of integrating cost-effective energy storage, it is positioned to play a key role in providing renewable, dispatchable power to utilities as the share of power generation from renewable sources increases. Because of this role, future CSP plants will likely have as much as 15 hours of Thermal Energy Storage (TES) included in their design and operation. As such, the cost and performance of the TES system is critical to meeting the SunShot goal for solar technologies. The cost of electricity from a CSP plant depends strongly on its overall efficiency, which is a product of two components - the collection and conversion efficiencies. The collection efficiency determines the portion of incident solar energy that is captured as high-temperature thermal energy. The conversion efficiency determines the portion of thermal energy that is converted to electricity. The operating temperature at which the overall efficiency reaches its maximum depends on many factors, including material properties of the CSP plant components. Increasing the operating temperature of the power generation system leads to higher thermal-to-electric conversion efficiency. However, in a CSP system, higher operating temperature also leads to greater thermal losses. These two effects combine to give an optimal system-level operating temperature that may be less than the upper operating temperature limit of system components. The overall efficiency may be improved by developing materials, power cycles, and system-integration strategies that enable operation at elevated temperature while limiting thermal losses. This is particularly true for the TES system and its components. Meeting the SunShot cost target will require cost and performance improvements in all systems and components within a CSP plant. Solar collector field hardware will need to decrease significantly in cost with no loss in performance and possibly with performance improvements. As higher temperatures are considered for the power block, new working fluids, heat-transfer fluids (HTFs), and storage fluids will all need to be identified to meet these new operating conditions. Figure 1 shows thermodynamic conversion efficiency as a function of temperature for the ideal Carnot cycle and 75% Carnot, which is considered to be the practical efficiency attainable by current power cycles. Current conversion efficiencies for the parabolic trough steam cycle, power tower steam cycle, parabolic dish/Stirling, Ericsson, and air-Brayton/steam Rankine combined cycles are shown at their corresponding operating temperatures. Efficiencies for supercritical steam and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) are also shown for their operating temperature ranges.

Glatzmaier, G.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Controlling Capital Costs in High Performance Office Buildings: A Review of Best Practices for Overcoming Cost Barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a set of 15 best practices for owners, designers, and construction teams of office buildings to reach high performance goals for energy efficiency, while maintaining a competitive budget. They are based on the recent experiences of the owner and design/build team for the Research Support Facility (RSF) on National Renewable Energy Facility's campus in Golden, CO, which show that achieving this outcome requires each key integrated team member to understand their opportunities to control capital costs.

Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Reducing Energy Costs And Minimizing Capital Requirements: Case Studies of Thermal Energy Storage (TES)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Large cooling systems typically represent substantial capital investments and incur high operating energy costs. Cooling loads tend to peak during times of year and times of day when high ambient temperatures create a maximum demand for power, and thus during those times when power has its highest cost or value. Thermal Energy Storage (TES) provides a means of de-coupling the generation of cooling from the provision of cooling to the peak cooling loads. In this manner, peak power demand is reduced, time-of day energy costs can be minimized, and real-time variations in power value can be used to the advantage of the energy consumer.

Andrepont, J. S.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Fusion reactor design studies: standard unit costs and cost scaling rules  

SciTech Connect

This report establishes standard unit costs and scaling rules for estimating costs of material, equipment, land, and labor components used in magnetic confinement fusion reactor plant construction and operation. Use of the standard unit costs and scaling rules will add uniformity to cost estimates, and thus allow valid comparison of the economic characteristics of various reactor concepts.

Schulte, S.C.; Bickford, W.E.; Willingham, C.E.; Ghose, S.K.; Walker, M.G.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Environmental residuals and capital costs of energy recovery from municipal sludge and feedlot manure  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The capital and environmental cost of energy recovery from municipal sludge and feedlot manure is analyzed. Literature on waste processing and energy conversion and interviews with manufacturers were used for baseline data for construction of theoretical models using three energy conversion processes: anaerobic digestion, incineration, and pyrolysis. Process characteristics, environmental impact data, and capital costs are presented in detail for each conversion system. The energy recovery systems described would probably be sited near large sources of sludge and manure, i.e., metropolitan sewage treatment plants and large feedlots in cattle-raising states. Although the systems would provide benefits in terms of waste disposal as well as energy production, they would also involve additional pollution of air and water. Analysis of potential siting patterns and pollution conflicts is needed before energy recovery systems using municipal sludge can be considered as feasible energy sources.

Ballou, S W; Dale, L; Johnson, R; Chambers, W; Mittelhauser, H

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Why Real Interest Rates, Cost of Capital and Price/Earnings Ratios Vary Across Countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

G ?(0,1) measures the capital intensity of the production ofthat assume different capital intensities of the productionfunction). These capital intensities are assumed to range

Chowdhry, Bhagwan; Titman, Sheridan

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "units capital costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Unit costs of waste management operations  

SciTech Connect

This report provides estimates of generic costs for the management, disposal, and surveillance of various waste types, from the time they are generated to the end of their institutional control. Costs include monitoring and surveillance costs required after waste disposal. Available data on costs for the treatment, storage, disposal, and transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive, low-level radioactive, transuranic radioactive, hazardous, mixed (low-level radioactive plus hazardous), and sanitary wastes are presented. The costs cover all major elements that contribute to the total system life-cycle (i.e., ``cradle to grave``) cost for each waste type. This total cost is the sum of fixed and variable cost components. Variable costs are affected by operating rates and throughput capacities and vary in direct proportion to changes in the level of activity. Fixed costs remain constant regardless of changes in the amount of waste, operating rates, or throughput capacities. Key factors that influence cost, such as the size and throughput capacity of facilities, are identified. In many cases, ranges of values for the key variables are presented. For some waste types, the planned or estimated costs for storage and disposal, projected to the year 2000, are presented as graphics.

Kisieleski, W.E.; Folga, S.M.; Gillette, J.L.; Buehring, W.A.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

A capital cost comparison of commercial ground-source heat pump systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the report is to compare capital costs associated with the three designs of ground source heat pumps. Specifically, the costs considered are those associated with the heat source/heat sink or ground source portion of the system. In order to standardize the heat rejection over the three designs, it was assumed that the heat pump loop would operate at a temperature range of 85{degree} (to the heat pumps) to 95{degree} (from the heat pumps) under peak conditions. The assumption of constant loop temperature conditions for all three permits an apples-to-apples comparison of the alternatives.

Rafferty, K.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Advances in Energy Efficiency, Capital Cost, and Installation Schedules for Large Capacity Cooling Applications Using a Packaged Chiller Plant Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cooling equipment, whether used to meet air-conditioning or process cooling loads, represents a large consumer of energy. Even more to the point, cooling loads and the associated cooling equipment energy consumption tend to be at maximum levels during periods of high ambient air temperatures. It is precisely at those times that the general demand for energy is at its peak and therefore the price or value of energy is also at its highest level. Cooling loads often drive the peak electric power demand of energy users and thus affect not only the level of consumption of high cost energy, but also affect the peak power demand. Together, the energy and demand costs equate to very high unit costs for operating cooling equipment. Accordingly, it is of interest to minimize cooling energy use and costs by maximizing the energy efficiency of cooling equipment installations. A relatively new approach has been developed and is being increasingly used to maximize chiller plant efficiency. The approach involves the use of a standardized, pre-engineered, shop-fabricated approach to entire chiller plant installations. Compared to the traditional, piece-meal approach to chiller plants that utilize individual component specification, procurement and installation, the "packaged" or modular chiller plant approach often delivers substantially improved energy efficiencies. Also, the packaged plant approach achieves further benefits for large cooling system owners and operators. These additional benefits include: 1) dramatic reductions in unit capital costs of installed chiller plant capacity on a dollar per ton basis, 2) marked improvements in total procurement and installation schedules, 3) significantly smaller space requirements, and 4) enhanced control over total system quality and performance. The capacities and performance characteristics of available chiller plant modules are described, including both electric and non-electric chiller technologies. Examples are presented to illustrate the typical sizes and locations of actual installations as well as the growth and extent of the use of this technology to-date. Case studies document the energy efficiency improvements, cost reductions in both operating and capital costs, and improvements in schedule and space utilization, of the packaged chiller plant approach relative to the traditional chiller plant approach.

Pierson, T. L.; Andrepont, J. S.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

OpenEI - Unit Cost Natural Gas  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for years 1989 through 2010 for UT at Austin; specifically, electricity usage (kWh), natural gas usage (Mcf), associated costs. Also provides water consumption for 2005...

45

Rocky Flats Closure Unit Cost Data  

SciTech Connect

The Rocky Flats Closure Project has completed the process of stabilizing residual nuclear materials, decommissioning nuclear facilities, remediating environmental media and closing the Rocky Flats Site (Site). The project cost approximately $4.1 B and included the decommissioning of over 700 structures including 5 major plutonium facilities and 5 major uranium facilities, shipping over 14,600 cubic meters of transuranic and 565,000 cubic meters of low level radioactive waste, and remediating a 385-acre industrial area and the surrounding land. Actual costs were collected for a large variety of closure activities. These costs can be correlated with metrics associated with the facilities and environmental media to capture cost factors from the project that could be applicable to a variety of other closure projects both within and outside of the Department of Energy's weapons complex. The paper covers four general topics: the process to correlate the actual costs and metrics, an example of the correlated data for one large sub-project, a discussion of the results, and the additional activities that are planned to correlate and make this data available to the public. The process to collect and arrange the project control data of the Closure Project relied on the actual Closure Project cost information. It was used to correlate these actual costs with the metrics for the physical work, such as building area or waste generated, to support the development of parametric cost factors. The example provides cost factors for the Industrial Sites Project. The discussion addresses the strengths and weaknesses of the data, followed by a section identifying future activities to improve and extend the analyses and integrate it within the Department's Environmental Cost Analysis System. (authors)

Sanford, P.C. [1129 Business Parkway South, Westminister, MD (United States); Skokan, B. [United States Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: United Irrigation District of Hidalgo County (United) – Rehabilitation of Main Canal, Laterals, and Diversion Pump Station – Final  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a three-component capital renovation project proposed by the United Irrigation District to the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR). The proposed project involves: installing 4.66 miles of pipeline in the Main Canal and Lateral 7N, installing 13.46 miles of pipeline in several laterals and sub-laterals, and rehabilitating the District’s Rio Grande diversion pumping plant. Both nominal and real estimates of water and energy savings and expected economic and financial costs of those savings are identified throughout the anticipated useful lives for all three components. Sensitivity results for both the cost of saving water and the cost of saving energy are presented for several important parameters. Annual water and energy savings forthcoming from the total project are estimated, using amortization procedures, to be 1,522 ac-ft of water per year and 3,520,302,471 BTUs (1,031,742 kwh) of energy per year. The calculated economic and financial cost of saving water is estimated to be $341.51 per ac-ft. The calculated economic and financial cost of saving energy is estimated at $0.0001574 per BTU ($0.537 per kwh). In addition, real (vs. nominal) values are estimated for the USBRs three principal evaluation measures specified in the U.S. Public Law 106-576. The aggregate initial construction cost per ac-ft of water savings measure is $359.42 per ac-ft of water savings. The aggregate initial construction cost per BTU (kwh) of energy savings measure is $0.0003468 per BTU ($1.183 per kwh). The aggregate ratio of initial construction costs per dollar of total annual economic savings is estimated to be -3.551.

Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: United Irrigation District of Hidalgo County (United) - Rehabilitation of Main Canal, Laterals, and Diversion Pump Station - Preliminary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a three-component capital renovation project proposed by the United Irrigation District to the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR). The proposed project involves: installing 4.66 miles of pipeline in the Main Canal and Lateral 7N, installing 13.46 miles of pipeline in several laterals and sub-laterals, and rehabilitating the District’s Rio Grande diversion pumping plant. Both nominal and real estimates of water and energy savings and expected economic and financial costs of those savings are identified throughout the anticipated useful lives for all three components. Sensitivity results for both the cost of saving water and the cost of saving energy are presented for several important parameters. Annual water and energy savings forthcoming from the total project are estimated, using amortization procedures, to be 1,409 ac-ft of water per year and 4,506,882,727 BTUs (1,320,892 kwh) of energy per year. The calculated economic and financial cost of saving water is estimated to be $325.20 per ac-ft. The calculated economic and financial cost of saving energy is estimated at $0.0001113 per BTU ($0.380 per kwh). In addition, real (vs. nominal) values are estimated for the USBRs three principal evaluation measures specified in the U.S. Public Law 106-576. The aggregate initial construction cost per ac-ft of water savings measure is $354.30 per ac-ft of water savings. The aggregate initial construction cost per BTU (kwh) of energy savings measure is $0.0003376 per BTU ($1.152 per kwh). The aggregate ratio of initial construction costs per dollar of total annual economic savings is estimated to be -3.442.

Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

The unit cost factors and calculation methods for decommissioning - Cost estimation of nuclear research facilities  

SciTech Connect

Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The uncertainties of decommissioning costs increase high due to several conditions. Decommissioning cost estimation depends on the complexity of nuclear installations, its site-specific physical and radiological inventories. Therefore, the decommissioning costs of nuclear research facilities must be estimated in accordance with the detailed sub-tasks and resources by the tasks of decommissioning activities. By selecting the classified activities and resources, costs are calculated by the items and then the total costs of all decommissioning activities are reshuffled to match with its usage and objectives. And the decommissioning cost of nuclear research facilities is calculated by applying a unit cost factor method on which classification of decommissioning works fitted with the features and specifications of decommissioning objects and establishment of composition factors are based. Decommissioning costs of nuclear research facilities are composed of labor cost, equipment and materials cost. Of these three categorical costs, the calculation of labor costs are very important because decommissioning activities mainly depend on labor force. Labor costs in decommissioning activities are calculated on the basis of working time consumed in decommissioning objects and works. The working times are figured out of unit cost factors and work difficulty factors. Finally, labor costs are figured out by using these factors as parameters of calculation. The accuracy of decommissioning cost estimation results is much higher compared to the real decommissioning works. (authors)

Kwan-Seong Jeong; Dong-Gyu Lee; Chong-Hun Jung; Kune-Woo Lee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Deokjin-dong 150, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Prospects for hydrogen production by water electrolysis to be competitive with conventional methods. [Areas of research to reduce capital costs and approach 100 percent energy efficiencies  

SciTech Connect

With the impending unavailability of oil and natural gas, hydrogen will be produced on a large scale in the United States (1) from coal, or (2) by water electrolysis using electricity derived from nuclear or solar energy. In many parts of the world which lack fossil fuels, the latter will be the only possible method. The cost of purification of hydrogen produced from fossil fuels will increase its cost to about the same level as that of electrolytic hydrogen. When hydrogen is required in relatively small quantities too, the electrolytic method is advantageous. To minimize the cost of hydrogen produced by water electrolysis, it is necessary to reduce capital costs and approach 100 percent energy efficiencies. Areas of research, which will be necessary to achieve these goals are: (1) maximization of surface areas of electrodes; (2) use of thin electrolyte layers; (3) increase of operating temperature in alkaline water electrolysis cells to about 120-150/sup 0/C; (4) selection and evaluation of separator materials; (5) electrocatalysis of the hydrogen and oxygen electrode reaction; (6) mixed oxides as oxygen electrodes; and (7) photoelectrochemical effects. The progress made to date and proposed studies on these topics are briefly dealt with in this paper. The General Electric Solid Polymer Water Electrolyzer and Teledyne Alkaline Water Electrolysis Cells, both operating at about 120-150/sup 0/C, look mostpromising in achieving the goals of low capital cost and high energy efficiency. (auth)

Srinivasan, S.; Salzano, F.J.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Estimation of Capital and Levelized Cost for Redox Flow Batteries - Vilayanur Viswanathan, PNNL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Estimation of Capital and Levelized Estimation of Capital and Levelized Cost for Redox Flow Batteries V. Viswanathan, A. Crawford, L. Thaller 1 , D. Stephenson, S. Kim, W. Wang, G. Coffey, P. Balducci, Z. Gary Yang 2 , Liyu Li 2 , M. Kintner-Meyer, V. Sprenkle 1 Consultant 2 UniEnergy Technology September 28, 2012 USDOE-OE ESS Peer Review Washington, DC Dr. Imre Gyuk - Energy Storage Program Manager, Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability 1 What are we trying to accomplish? PNNL grid analytics team has established ESS cost targets for various applications PNNL cost/performance model estimates cost for redox flow battery systems of various chemistries drives research internally to focus on most important components/parameters/metrics for cost reduction and performance improvement

51

ANALYSIS OF THE PERFORMANCE AND COST EFFECTIVENESS OF NINE SMALL WIND ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMS FUNDED BY THE DOE SMALL GRANTS PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AND COST EFFECTIVENESS OF NINE SMALL WIND ENERGY CONVERSIONAND COST EFFECTIVENESS OF NINE SMALL WIND ENERGY CONVERSIONscale wind energy commer- is high capital costs per unit of

Kay, J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

How much does it cost to build different types of power plants in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How much does it cost to build different types of power plants in the United States? EIA publishes estimates for the capital costs for different types of electricity ...

53

Conceptual HALT (Hydrate Addition at Low Temperature) scaleup design: Capital and operating costs: Part 5. [Hydrate addition at low temperature for the removal of SO/sub 2/  

SciTech Connect

Hydrate addition at low temperature (or the HALT process) is a retrofit option for moderate SO/sub 2/ removal efficiency in coal burning utility plants. This dry FGD process involves injecting calcium based dry hydrate particles into flue gas ducting downstream of the air preheater where the flue gas temperature is typically in the range of 280-325/degree/F. This report is comprised of the conceptual scaleup design of the HALT process to a 180 MW and a 500 MW coal fired utility station followed by detailed capital and operating cost estimates. A cost sensitivity analysis of major process variables for the 500 MW unit is also included. 1 fig.

Babu, M.; Kerivan, D.; Hendrick, C.; Kosek, B.; Tackett, D.; Golightley, M.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Low-Cost Hydrogen-from-Ethanol: A Distributed Production System...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Calculate: Power Law Cost Scaling Actual Single Unit Capital Cost Estimate 500 unityear production costs with progress ratios Estimate Cost Using Power Law Cost Scaling 7 The H 2...

55

CHARACTERIZING COSTS, SAVINGS AND BENEFITS OF A SELECTION OF ENERGY EFFICIENT EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES IN THE UNITED STATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

some cases by absorption cooling (Mottal, 1995). Electricitybasis. With the absorption cooling, the project decreasedsystem (without absorption cooling) has capital costs twice

Xu, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Costs of Saving Water in South Texas with Irrigation District Infrastructure Rehabilitation - Using Capital Budgeting with RGIDECON©  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a part of the irrigation district plans, economists with Texas AgriLife Research and the Texas AgriLife Extension Service (through the Rio Grande Basin Initiative), developed and applied a spreadsheet model RGIDECON© (Rio Grande Irrigation District Economics) to facilitate unbiased comparisons of real project costs. That is, a Capital Budgeting – Net Present Value (NPV) methodology, combined with calculation of annuity equivalent (AE) values, was developed to incorporate different initial construction costs, annual operation and maintenance costs, quantity of water saved, expected useful life, etc. of the various alternative projects. Using this combined approach allows for calculation of a single, annual $/acre-foot (af) {or $/1,000 gal} life-cycle cost, comprehensive of all relevant financial and economic parameters, thereby facilitating comparisons across and priority ranking among ID projects.

Rister, E.; Lacewell, R.; Sturdivant, A.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Capital cost models for geothermal power plants and fluid transmission systems. [GEOCOST  

SciTech Connect

The GEOCOST computer program is a simulation model for evaluating the economics of developing geothermal resources. The model was found to be both an accurate predictor of geothermal power production facility costs and a valid designer of such facilities. GEOCOST first designs a facility using thermodynamic optimization routines and then estimates costs for the selected design using cost models. Costs generated in this manner appear to correspond closely with detailed cost estimates made by industry planning groups. Through the use of this model, geothermal power production costs can be rapidly and accurately estimated for many alternative sites making the evaluation process much simpler yet more meaningful.

Schulte, S.C.

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Sustainability and socio-enviro-technical systems: modeling total cost of ownership in capital facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Investment in sustainability strategies and technologies holds promise for significant cost savings over the operational phase of a facility's life cycle, while more effectively meeting stakeholder needs. However, accurately estimating the first costs ...

Annie R. Pearce; Kristen L. Sanford Bernhardt; Michael J. Garvin

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Valuing Rail Transit: Comparing Capital and Operating Costs to Consumer Benefits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimating the effects of light rail transit on health caredesirability of urban rail transit systems. In Journal ofcapital costs : heavy rail and busway HOV lane. Federal

Guerra, Erick

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Optimal weight tuning method for unit selection cost functions in syllable based text-to-speech synthesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a method for tuning the weights of unit selection cost functions in syllable based text-to-speech (TTS) synthesis system. In this work, unit selection cost functions, namely target cost and concatenation cost, are designed appropriate ... Keywords: Concatenation cost, Genetic algorithm, Target cost, Text-to-speech synthesis, Tuning of weights, Unit selection

N. P. Narendra; K. Sreenivasa Rao

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "units capital costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Rail costs and capital adjustments in a quasi-regulated environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reports on results obtained from estimation of a rail cost function using a pooled time-series cross section of Class I U.S. railroads for the period 1973-1986. Based on the results of this cost function, an ...

Friedlaender, Ann Fetter

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Transaction Costs and Tradable Permit Markets: The United  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We econometrically estimate the effect of transaction costs on the cost-effectiveness of the tradable permit market created during the US lead phasedown. We develop a methodology to identify transaction costs in the absence of price data. We find that refineries generally trade efficiently. We also, however, find evidence that transaction costs affect trading. We find evidence that refineries are less likely to trade in cases where theory suggests they will face high transaction costs. The data were collected from 30 major oil companies and include the trading partners and quantities traded for all permit trades carried out by each of 87 refineries over 8 quarters. 2 1

Suzi Kerr; David Maré

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

SunShot: Making Solar Energy Cost Competitive Throughout the United States (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's SunShot Initiative focuses on making solar energy cost competitive throughout the United States.

McCamey, D.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

SunShot: Making Solar Energy Cost Competitive Throughout the United States (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's SunShot Initiative focuses on making solar energy cost competitive throughout the United States.

McCamey, D.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

SunShot: Making Solar Energy Cost Competitive Throughout the United States (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's SunShot Initiative focuses on making solar energy cost competitive throughout the United States.

Not Available

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Capital and O and M cost estimates for attached-growth biological waste-water-treatment processes  

SciTech Connect

Data for projecting process capabilities of attached-growth biological waste-water-treatment systems and procedures for making design calculations are presented in the report. Carbonaceous oxidation (secondary treatment) and single stage nitrification design examples are given. Information for estimating average construction costs and operation and maintenance requirements are presented for typical wastewater treatment plants ranging in size from 1 to 100-Mgd capacity. Estimated average construction costs and operation and maintenance requirements for individual unit processes are related graphically to appropriate single parameters for each component. Construction costs are broken down into labor and materials components; operation and maintenance requirements are given for labor, energy, and maintenance materials and supplies. The data in the report provide a means of estimating anticipated average performance and costs for facilities.

Benjes, H.H.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Cost-effective ceramics program in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 5-year Cost-Effective Ceramics for Heat Engines program began in 1993. This effort reflects the realization that the problems with reliability of structural ceramics have been largely overcome, but the high cost of structural ceramics is limited their use in commercial applications. The technical causes of high cost were identified, and a technical plan developed. The work elements in the program include the following: economic cost modeling, ceramic machining, powder synthesis, alternative forming and densification processes, yield improvement, standards development, and low-expansion ceramics.

Schulz, R.B. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Johnson, D.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Development of Simpler, Cost Effective Oil Conditioning Units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It was recognized that the flexibility and complexity associated with the multipurpose on-line continuous oil-conditioning unit (Mark I), developed in this project in prior years, might not be needed in some cases. Furthermore, it was anticipated that simpler or single purpose units might have equal or higher merit. Subsequent efforts were focused towards the development of stand-alone units for dehydration, decontamination, and degassing/dehydration. This technical update describes work to date on the d...

2003-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

69

Impact on the steam electric power industry of deleting Section 316(a) of the Clean Water Act: Capital costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many power plants discharge large volumes of cooling water. In some cases, the temperature of the discharge exceeds state thermal requirements. Section 316(a) of the Clean Water Act (CWA) allows a thermal discharger to demonstrate that less stringent thermal effluent limitations would still protect aquatic life. About 32% of total US steam electric generating capacity operates under Section 316(a) variances. In 1991, the US Senate proposed legislation that would delete Section 316(a) from the CWA. This study, presented in two companion reports, examines how this legislation would affect the steam electric power industry. This report describes alternatives available to nuclear and coal-fired plants currently operating under variances. Data from 38 plants representing 14 companies are used to estimate the national cost of implementing such alternatives. Although there are other alternatives, most affected plants would be retrofitted with cooling towers. Assuming that all plants currently operating under variances would install cooling towers, the national capital cost estimate for these retrofits ranges from $22.7 billion to $24.4 billion (in 1992 dollars). The second report quantitatively and qualitatively evaluates the energy and environmental impacts of deleting the variance. Little justification has been found for removing the Section 316(a) variance from the CWA.

Veil, J.A.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Market Cost of Renewable Jet Fuel Adoption in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Market Cost of Renewable Jet Fuel Adoption in the United States Niven Winchester, Dominic Mc on recycled paper #12;1 Market Cost of Renewable Jet Fuel Adoption in the United States Niven Winchester Administration (FAA) has a goal that one billion gallons of renewable jet fuel is consumed by the US aviation

71

The Cost of Climate Policy in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the cost of meeting emissions reduction targets consistent with a G8 proposal of a 50 percent global reduction in emissions by 2050, and an Obama Administration proposal of an 80 percent reduction over this ...

Morris, Jennifer F.

72

The Cost of Climate Policy in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the cost of meeting emissions reduction targets consistent with a G8 proposal of a 50 percent global reduction in emissions by 2050, and an Obama Administration proposal of an 80 percent reduction over this ...

Morris, Jennifer F.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

A Framework to Support A Systematic Approach to Unit Cost Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Availability of historical unit cost data is an important factor in developing accurate project cost estimates. State highway agencies (SHAs) collect data on historical bids and/or production rates, crew sizes and mixes, material costs, and equipment costs, including contractor overhead and profit. The objective of this research is to create a framework to define a standardized and a systematic approach for developing unit costs for construction project estimating. A literature review was conducted that provided an overview of estimating techniques used in project estimating, estimation guidelines maintained by SHAs, and information systems used in the estimation process. After gaining a broad overview of the industry‘s approach to unit cost development, a survey was then conducted. The purpose of the survey was to identify the state of practice in SHAs for unit cost development. The survey helped to identify SHAs doing considerable work in unit cost development and interviews were conducted with these agencies to know their unit cost development process in detail. The results from survey and the interviews were then used in defining the framework. The framework provides a standardized way to use historical data for preparing construction project estimates.

Ramesh, Sushanth

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Residential, Commercial, and Utility-Scale Photovoltaic (PV) System Prices in the United States: Current Drivers and Cost-Reduction Opportunities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The price of photovoltaic (PV) systems in the United States (i.e., the cost to the system owner) has dropped precipitously in recent years, led by substantial reductions in global PV module prices. However, system cost reductions are not necessarily realized or realized in a timely manner by many customers. Many reasons exist for the apparent disconnects between installation costs, component prices, and system prices; most notable is the impact of fair market value considerations on system prices. To guide policy and research and development strategy decisions, it is necessary to develop a granular perspective on the factors that underlie PV system prices and to eliminate subjective pricing parameters. This report's analysis of the overnight capital costs (cash purchase) paid for PV systems attempts to establish an objective methodology that most closely approximates the book value of PV system assets.

Goodrich, A.; James, T.; Woodhouse, M.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Impacts of Renewable Generation on Fossil Fuel Unit Cycling: Costs and Emissions (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prepared for the Clean Energy Regulatory Forum III, this presentation looks at the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study and reexamines the cost and emissions impacts of fossil fuel unit cycling.

Brinkman, G.; Lew, D.; Denholm, P.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Breakeven Cost for Residential Photovoltaics in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities (Report Summary) (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

"Break-even cost" for photovoltaic (PV) technology is defined as the point where the cost of PV-generated electricity equals the cost of electricity purchased from the grid. Break-even cost is expressed in $/W of an installed system. Achieving break-even cost is a function of many variables. Consequently, break-even costs vary by location and time for a country, such as the United States, with a diverse set of resources, electricity prices, and other variables. In this presentation, we introduce an analysis of PV break-even costs for residential customers in the United States, including an evaluation of some of the key drivers of PV breakeven both regionally and over time. This presentation includes our methodology and presents results for both near-term residential breakeven costs(2009) and future market sensitivities of break-even costs (2015). See also the the report "Break-Even Cost for Residential Photovoltaics in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities". Presentation for NREL/TP-6A2-45991.

Denholm, P.; Margolis, R. M.; Ong, S.; Roberts, B.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Replacement energy costs for nuclear electricity-generating units in the United States: 1997--2001. Volume 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report updates previous estimates of replacement energy costs for potential short-term shutdowns of 109 US nuclear electricity-generating units. This information was developed to assist the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in its regulatory impact analyses, specifically those that examine the impacts of proposed regulations requiring retrofitting of or safety modifications to nuclear reactors. Such actions might necessitate shutdowns of nuclear power plants while these changes are being implemented. The change in energy cost represents one factor that the NRC must consider when deciding to require a particular modification. Cost estimates were derived from probabilistic production cost simulations of pooled utility system operations. Factors affecting replacement energy costs, such as random unit failures, maintenance and refueling requirements, and load variations, are treated in the analysis. This report describes an abbreviated analytical approach as it was adopted to update the cost estimates published in NUREG/CR-4012, Vol. 3. The updates were made to extend the time frame of cost estimates and to account for recent changes in utility system conditions, such as change in fuel prices, construction and retirement schedules, and system demand projects.

VanKuiken, J.C.; Guziel, K.A.; Tompkins, M.M.; Buehring, W.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Social capital and microfinance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter one is titled "Social Capital and Group Banking." Lending to the poor is costly due to high screening, monitoring, and enforcement costs. Group lending advocates believe individuals are able to select creditworthy ...

Karlan, Dean S

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Regulation and Property Values in the United States: The High Cost of Monopoly  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

land, L(x), and a capital intensity, S(x)—that is, a ratio3) determines the capital intensity for profit-maximizing

Quigley, John M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Capital Investment Tax Credit for Clean Energy (Florida) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Category Renewable Energy Incentive Programs Amount 5% of eligible capital costs 5% of eligible capital costs Start Date 712008 Maximum Incentive 20 year maximum...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "units capital costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Services Provided for Boyce Thompson Institute Research Laboratories Service Description Unit Unit Cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

our growth facilities found by visiting: http://bti.cornell.edu/Greenhouse.php Per square foot See Cost Media Preparation Maintenance of regular media inventory in each lab, media requests, preparation at the bench. Per lab member $103.00 Glassware Dirty glassware is collected, cleaned, autoclaved, and returned

Pawlowski, Wojtek

82

Break-Even Cost for Residential Photovoltaics in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Grid parity--or break-even cost--for photovoltaic (PV) technology is defined as the point where the cost of PV-generated electricity equals the cost of electricity purchased from the grid. Break-even cost is expressed in $/W of an installed system. Achieving break-even cost is a function of many variables. Consequently, break-even costs vary by location and time for a country, such as the United States, with a diverse set of resources, electricity prices, and other variables. In this report, we analyze PV break-even costs for U.S. residential customers. We evaluate some key drivers of grid parity both regionally and over time. We also examine the impact of moving from flat to time-of-use (TOU) rates, and we evaluate individual components of the break-even cost, including effect of rate structure and various incentives. Finally, we examine how PV markets might evolve on a regional basis considering the sensitivity of the break-even cost to four major drivers: technical performance, financing parameters, electricity prices and rates, and policies. We find that local incentives rather than ?technical? parameters are in general the key drivers of the break-even cost of PV. Additionally, this analysis provides insight about the potential viability of PV markets.

Denholm, P.; Margolis, R. M.; Ong, S.; Roberts, B.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

2. Government Accession No. 3. Recipient's Catalog No. 4. Title and Subtitle SYNTHESIS ON CONSTRUCTION UNIT COST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Availability of historical unit cost data is an important factor in developing accurate project cost estimates. State highway agencies (SHAs) collect data on historical bids and/or production rates, crew sizes and mixes, material costs, and equipment costs, including contractor overhead and profit. The goal of this synthesis is to identify how state highway agencies develop unit prices for construction and maintenance projects. The synthesis approach consists of a comprehensive online survey, covering every aspect of unit cost development, to identify the state of practice in state highway agencies and interviews with several representative SHAs to gain a better understanding of the practices followed for unit cost development. This study finds that even though SHAs collect and store historical cost data, they do not have a formal and documented process for adjusting unit costs for project characteristics and market conditions. 17. Key Words

Stuart Anderson; Ivan Damnjanovic; Ali Nejat; Sushanth Ramesh

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Break-Even Cost for Residential Photovoltaics in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

09 09 December 2009 Break-Even Cost for Residential Photovoltaics in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities Paul Denholm, Robert M. Margolis, Sean Ong, and Billy Roberts National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A2-46909 December 2009 Break-Even Cost for Residential Photovoltaics in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities Paul Denholm, Robert M. Margolis, Sean Ong, and Billy Roberts Prepared under Task No. PVD9.1210 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

85

EM Capital Asset Project List  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Read the EM Capital Asset Project List, which includes the project's name, site, current critical decision and current total project cost.

86

Hazel Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hazel Capital Hazel Capital Jump to: navigation, search Name Hazel Capital Place London, England, United Kingdom Zip WC2A 1AL Sector Efficiency, Renewable Energy Product Hazel Capital is an asset management company investing in Renewable Energy, Energy Efficiency (in energy transmission, building construction, electronic and engineered products), Water, Transportation, Waste Management, Recycling & Pollution Control. References Hazel Capital[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Hazel Capital is a company located in London, England, United Kingdom . References ↑ "Hazel Capital" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Hazel_Capital&oldid=346400

87

CAPITAL REGION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

t 09/20/07 15:28 FAX 301 903 4656 t 09/20/07 15:28 FAX 301 903 4656 CAPITAL REGION 0 j002 SDOE F 1325.8 (8-89) EFG (0790) Energy United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum DATE. September 18, 2007 Audit Report No.: OAS-L-07-23 REPLY TO: IG-34 (A07TG036) SUBJECT: Evaluation of "The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Cyber Security Program-2007" TO: Chairman, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission The purpose of this report is to inform you of the results o Four evaluation of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's (Commission) cyber security program. The evaluation was initiated in May 2007, and our fieldwork was conducted through September 2007. Our methodology is described in the attachment to this report. . INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Commission reports that it is constantly improving thl stability, reliability, and

88

Cost of Capital and Regulator’s Preferences: Investigation into a new method of estimating regulatory bias  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and in the north-eastern section of the United States. They also own liquefied natural gas storage facilitites in Britain and provide infrastructure services to the mobile telecom industry. PNN LN Equity: Pennon Group Plc Pennon Group Plc operates and invests... precise there. 4 Application to Regulated UK Companies In this section we report the results we obtained by computing the beta coeffi- cient for many UK regulated companies which are listed in the FTSE all share. Our time series sample comprises weekly...

Sancetta, Alessio; Satchell, Stephen E

89

Economic Evaluation of Particulate Control Technologies: Volume 1: New Units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Baghouses (reverse-gas, shake-deflate, and pulse-jet) and electrostatic precipitators are the principal options for controlling particulate emissions at coal-fired power plants. This report provides the latest cost information and cost models for determining the capital and O&M costs of the two technologies for various design conditions in new units.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408: Mining the equipment for reclamation? Types of Costs #12;· Marginal Cost: ­ Change in total cost ­ Any production process involves fixed and variable costs. As production increases/expands, fixed costs are unchanged, so

Boisvert, Jeff

91

Economic impacts of oil spills: Spill unit costs for tankers, pipelines, refineries, and offshore facilities. [Task 1, Final report  

SciTech Connect

The impacts of oil spills -- ranging from the large, widely publicized Exxon Valdez tanker incident to smaller pipeline and refinery spills -- have been costly to both the oil industry and the public. For example, the estimated costs to Exxon of the Valdez tanker spill are on the order of $4 billion, including $2.8 billion (in 1993 dollars) for direct cleanup costs and $1.125 billion (in 1992 dollars) for settlement of damages claims caused by the spill. Application of contingent valuation costs and civil lawsuits pending in the State of Alaska could raise these costs appreciably. Even the costs of the much smaller 1991 oil spill at Texaco`s refinery near Anacortes, Washington led to costs of $8 to 9 million. As a result, inexpensive waming, response and remediation technologies could lower oil spin costs, helping both the oil industry, the associated marine industries, and the environment. One means for reducing the impact and costs of oil spills is to undertake research and development on key aspects of the oil spill prevention, warming, and response and remediation systems. To target these funds to their best use, it is important to have sound data on the nature and size of spills, their likely occurrence and their unit costs. This information could then allow scarce R&D dollars to be spent on areas and activities having the largest impact. This report is intended to provide the ``unit cost`` portion of this crucial information. The report examines the three key components of the US oil supply system, namely, tankers and barges; pipelines and refineries; and offshore production facilities. The specific purpose of the study was to establish the unit costs of oil spills. By manipulating this key information into a larger matrix that includes the size and frequency of occurrence of oil spills, it will be possible` to estimate the likely future impacts, costs, and sources of oil spills.

Not Available

1993-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

92

Renewable Energy Cost Modeling: A Toolkit for Establishing Cost-Based Incentives in the United States; March 2010 -- March 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is intended to serve as a resource for policymakers who wish to learn more about establishing cost-based incentives. The report will identify key renewable energy cost modeling options, highlight the policy implications of choosing one approach over the other, and present recommendations on the optimal characteristics of a model to calculate rates for cost-based incentives, feed-in tariffs (FITs), or similar policies. These recommendations will be utilized in designing the Cost of Renewable Energy Spreadsheet Tool (CREST). Three CREST models will be publicly available and capable of analyzing the cost of energy associated with solar, wind, and geothermal electricity generators. The CREST models will be developed for use by state policymakers, regulators, utilities, developers, and other stakeholders to assist them in current and future rate-setting processes for both FIT and other renewable energy incentive payment structures and policy analyses.

Gifford, J. S.; Grace, R. C.; Rickerson, W. H.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

CAPITAL STRUCTURE, LIQUIDITY AND TRANSFERABLE HUMAN CAPITAL IN COMPETITIVE EQUILIBRIUM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper analyzes how human capital and economic uncertainty affect capital structure and managerial compensation. We model a competitive industry where wealth constrained managers provide human capital that can be transferred across firms, and where equityholders give managers access to the physical assets of the firm. Equityholders and managers bargain for the firm’s stochastic free cash flows. We show that the level of net debt acts as a tool to attract and retain human capital. Negative net debt occurs in volatile and human capital intensive industries. Cash holdings (or unused lines of credit) in booms serve as a costly hedge against liquidity shocks in recession. The cost of holding cash is internalized by managers, unlike the cost associated with raising cash in recession through a dilutive equity issue. We obtain simple expressions for the equilibrium payout rate and the managerial compensation rate and we show how, in recessions, they are influenced by each party’s outside option.

Bart M. Lambrecht; Grzegorz Pawlina

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Energy Savings and Breakeven Cost for Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters in the United States  

SciTech Connect

Heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) have recently reemerged in the U.S. residential water heating market and have the potential to provide homeowners with significant energy savings. However, there are questions as to the actual performance and energy savings potential of these units, in particular in regards to the heat pump's performance in unconditioned space and the impact of the heat pump on space heating and cooling loads when it is located in conditioned space. To help answer these questions, simulations were performed of a HPWH in both conditioned and unconditioned space at over 900 locations across the continental United States and Hawaii. Simulations included a Building America benchmark home so that any interaction between the HPWH and the home's HVAC equipment could be captured. Comparisons were performed to typical gas and electric water heaters to determine the energy savings potential and cost effectiveness of a HPWH relative to these technologies. HPWHs were found to have a significant source energy savings potential when replacing typical electric water heaters, but only saved source energy relative to gas water heater in the most favorable installation locations in the southern US. When replacing an electric water heater, the HPWH is likely to break even in California, the southern US, and parts of the northeast in most situations. However, the HPWH will only break even when replacing a gas water heater in a few southern states.

Maguire, J.; Burch, J.; Merrigan, T.; Ong, S.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Cost of Power Interruptions to Electricity Consumers in the United States (U.S.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ever power-quality- cost estimate of $26 billion per yearcovers. Typically, outage-cost estimates are based on whatof uncertainty in the cost estimates that have been prepared

Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina; Eto, Joseph H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Health Capital and Finance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The coefficient on capital intensity is positive andby total assets Capital Intensity Capital stock scaled by0.858 ??? 4.804 ??? Capital Intensity Free Cash Flow

Holland, Sara Bryant

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Break-Even Cost for Residential Solar Water Heating in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines the break-even cost for residential rooftop solar water heating (SWH) technology, defined as the point where the cost of the energy saved with a SWH system equals the cost of a conventional heating fuel purchased from the grid (either electricity or natural gas). We examine the break-even cost for the largest 1,000 electric and natural gas utilities serving residential customers in the United States as of 2008. Currently, the break-even cost of SWH in the United States varies by more than a factor of five for both electricity and natural gas, despite a much smaller variation in the amount of energy saved by the systems (a factor of approximately one and a half). The break-even price for natural gas is lower than that for electricity due to a lower fuel cost. We also consider the relationship between SWH price and solar fraction and examine the key drivers behind break-even costs. Overall, the key drivers of the break-even cost of SWH are a combination of fuel price, local incentives, and technical factors including the solar resource location, system size, and hot water draw.

Cassard, H.; Denholm, P.; Ong, S.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Economic and Financial Costs of Saving Water and Energy: Preliminary Analysis for Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Juan) – Replacement of Pipeline Units I-7A, I-18, and I-22  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a three-component capital renovation project proposed by Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2. The proposed project primarily consists of replacing aged mortar-joint pipe in pipeline units I-7A, I-18, and I-22 with new rubber-gasketed, reinforced concrete pipe. Both nominal and real estimates of water and energy savings and expected economic and financial costs of those savings are identified throughout the anticipated useful life for the proposed project. Sensitivity results for the cost of saving water are presented for several important parameters. Annual water and energy savings forthcoming from the total project are estimated, using amortization procedures, to be 485 ac-ft of water per year and 179,486,553 BTUs {52,604 kwh} of energy per year. The calculated economic and financial cost-of-saving water is estimated to be $385.46 per ac-ft. The calculated economic and financial cost-of-saving energy is estimated to be $0.0010735 per BTU {$3.663 per kwh}. In addition, expected real (vs. nominal) values are provided for the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation’s three principal evaluation measures specified in U.S. Public Law 106-576. The aggregate initial construction cost per ac-ft of water saved measure is $510.92. The aggregate initial construction cost per unit of energy saved measure is $0.0013798 per BTU {$4.708 per kwh}. The aggregate ratio of initial construction costs per dollar of total annual economic savings is estimated to be -2.53.

Sturdivant, Allen W.; Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

SunShot Initiative: Access to Capital  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Access to Capital to someone by Access to Capital to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Access to Capital on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Access to Capital on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Access to Capital on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Access to Capital on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Access to Capital on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: Access to Capital on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Photovoltaics Systems Integration Balance of Systems Reducing Non-Hardware Costs Lowering Barriers Fostering Growth Access to Capital Photo of a room full of people seated in rows with a few standing in the background. Two hands in the crowd are holding up sheets of paper with 'Like'. Participants at the SunShot Summit breakout session "Big and Small Ideas:

100

Break-Even Cost for Residential Solar Water Heating in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Break-even Cost for Residential Break-even Cost for Residential Solar Water Heating in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities Hannah Cassard, Paul Denholm, and Sean Ong Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-48986 February 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Break-even Cost for Residential Solar Water Heating in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities Hannah Cassard, Paul Denholm, and Sean Ong Prepared under Task No. SS10.2110 Technical Report

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "units capital costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Benchmarking Soft Costs for PV Systems in the United States (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents results from the first U.S. based data collection effort to quantify non-hardware, business process costs for PV systems at the residential and commercial scales, using a bottom-up approach. Annual expenditure and labor hour productivity data are analyzed to benchmark business process costs in the specific areas of: (1) customer acquisition; (2) permitting, inspection, and interconnection; (3) labor costs of third party financing; and (4) installation labor.

Ardani, K.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

A spreadsheet for geothermal direct use cost evaluation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to be seriously considered as an alternative in any project, an energy source must be easily characterized in terms of cost, both capital and unit energy cost. Historically, this has been a difficult hurdle for geothermal energy. Its costs vary with the depth and character of the resource, number of production and injection wells, and a host of other parameters. As a result, even in cases where developers are interested in using the geothermal, identifying its costs has been a cumbersome process. To address this problem, the Geo-Heat Center has developed a spreadsheet which allows potential users to quickly evaluate the capital cost and unit energy cost of accessing a geothermal resource.

Rafferty, K.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

05-1 · Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408) costs apply to those items that are consumed in production process and are roughly proportional to level in cash flow analysis and in the decision to use the equipment for reclamation? Types of Costs #12

Boisvert, Jeff

104

Climate Human Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Human Capital Climate Human Capital Jump to: navigation, search Name Climate Human Capital Place London, United Kingdom Zip W1K 6NG Sector Carbon, Renewable Energy, Services Product Green executive search company, listed in London's PLUS marketplace since 30 MArch 2010, focusing on the following target sectors: Carbon Markets, Environmental Sciences, Research and Advisory, Financial Services, Renewable Energy Generation and Policy. References Climate Human Capital[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Climate Human Capital is a company located in London, United Kingdom . References ↑ "Climate Human Capital" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Climate_Human_Capital&oldid=343709

105

Plane Tree Capital LLP | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plane Tree Capital LLP Plane Tree Capital LLP Jump to: navigation, search Name Plane Tree Capital LLP Place London, United Kingdom Zip W1J 8DY Sector Carbon Product London-based investment management firm established in to provide investors with well managed exposure to the clean energy and carbon sectors. References Plane Tree Capital LLP[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Plane Tree Capital LLP is a company located in London, United Kingdom . References ↑ "Plane Tree Capital LLP" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Plane_Tree_Capital_LLP&oldid=349778" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here

106

Tracking the Sun III; The Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998-2009  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Installations of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems have been growing at a rapid pace in recent years. In 2009, approximately 7,500 megawatts (MW) of PV were installed globally, up from approximately 6,000 MW in 2008, consisting primarily of grid-connected applications. With 335 MW of grid-connected PV capacity added in 2009, the United States was the world's fourth largest PV market in 2009, behind Germany, Italy, and Japan. The market for PV in the United States is driven by national, state, and local government incentives, including up-front cash rebates, production-based incentives, requirements that electricity suppliers purchase a certain amount of solar energy, and federal and state tax benefits. These programs are, in part, motivated by the popular appeal of solar energy, and by the positive attributes of PV - modest environmental impacts, avoidance of fuel price risks, coincidence with peak electrical demand, and the possible deployment of PV at the point of use. Given the relatively high cost of PV, however, a key goal of these policies is to encourage cost reductions over time. Therefore, as policy incentives have become more significant and as PV deployment has accelerated, so too has the desire to track the installed cost of PV systems over time, by system characteristics, by system location, and by component. Despite the significant year-on-year growth, however, the share of global and U.S. electricity supply met with PV remains small, and annual PV additions are currently modest in the context of the overall electric system. To address this need, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory initiated a report series focused on describing trends in the installed cost of grid-connected PV systems in the United States. The present report, the third in the series, describes installed cost trends from 1998 through 2009, and provides preliminary cost data for systems installed in 2010. The analysis is based on project-level cost data from approximately 78,000 residential and non-residential PV systems in the U.S., all of which are installed at end-use customer facilities (herein referred to as 'customer-sited' systems). The combined capacity of systems in the data sample totals 874 MW, equal to 70% of all grid-connected PV capacity installed in the United States through 2009 and representing one of the most comprehensive sources of installed PV cost data for the U.S. The report also briefly compares recent PV installed costs in the United States to those in Germany and Japan. Finally, it should be noted that the analysis presented here focuses on descriptive trends in the underlying data, serving primarily to summarize the data in tabular and graphical form; later analysis may explore some of these trends with more-sophisticated statistical techniques. The report begins with a summary of the data collection methodology and resultant dataset (Section 2). The primary findings of the analysis are presented in Section 3, which describes trends in installed costs prior to receipt of any financial incentives: over time and by system size, component, state, system ownership type (customer-owned vs. third party-owned), host customer segment (residential vs. commercial vs. public-sector vs. non-profit), application (new construction vs. retrofit), and technology type (building-integrated vs. rack-mounted, crystalline silicon vs. thin-film, and tracking vs. fixed-axis). Section 4 presents additional findings related to trends in PV incentive levels over time and among states (focusing specifically on state and utility incentive programs as well as state and federal tax credits), and trends in the net installed cost paid by system owners after receipt of such incentives. Brief conclusions are offered in the final section, and several appendices provide additional details on the analysis methodology and additional tabular summaries of the data.

Barbose, Galen; Darghouth, Naim; Wiser, Ryan

2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

107

Market Cost of Renewable Jet Fuel Adoption in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has a goal that one billion gallons of renewable jet fuel is consumed by the US aviation industry each year from 2018. We examine the cost to US airlines of meeting this goal ...

Winchester, N.

108

Dependence on Ore Grade of the Unit Cost of Uranium Metal from Domestic Sources  

SciTech Connect

A. M. Gaudin and collaborators have published a curve of refining costs versus ore grade in terms of dollars per pound of U308 recovered on the basis of 90% recovery.

Huston, N.E.

1951-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

109

THE NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE: PROSPECTS FOR REDUCING ITS COST  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear fuel cost of 1.25 mills/kwh would make nuclear power competitive with conventional power in lowcost coal areas if capital and operating costs can be brought to within about 10 percent of those of coal-fired plants. Substantial decreases in fuel fabrication cost are anticipated by 1970: other costs in the fuel cycle are expccted to remain about the same as at present. Unit costs and irradiation levels that would be needed to give a fuel cost of 1.25 mills/kwh are believed to be attainable by 1970. (auth)

Albrecht, W.L.

1959-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

110

High Speed Trains for California (Volume II: Detailed Segment Descriptions, Cost Estimates, and Travel Time Calculations)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

~ o~ CalSpeed:Capital Cost Estimates OAKLAND-RICHMOND (SP r/minutes). CalSpeed:Capital Cost Estimates HERCULES-FAIRFIELDCalSpeed:Capital Cost Estimates GRAPEVINE:5.0% ALTERNATIVE

Hall, Peter; Leavitt, Dan; Vaca, Erin

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Analysis of Cycling Costs in Western Wind and Solar Integration Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS) examined the impact of up to 30% penetration of variable renewable generation on the Western Electricity Coordinating Council system. Although start-up costs and higher operating costs because of part-load operation of thermal generators were included in the analysis, further investigation of additional costs associated with thermal unit cycling was deemed worthwhile. These additional cycling costs can be attributed to increases in capital as well as operations and maintenance costs because of wear and tear associated with increased unit cycling. This analysis examines the additional cycling costs of the thermal fleet by leveraging the results of WWSIS Phase 1 study.

Jordan, G.; Venkataraman, S.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Free Stream Capital Partners Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Capital Partners Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name Free Stream Capital Partners Limited Place London, Greater London, United Kingdom Zip SW1Y 4AA Sector Wind energy Product...

113

Cost of Power Interruptions to Electricity Consumers in the UnitedStates (U.S.)  

SciTech Connect

The massive electric power blackout in the northeastern U.S.and Canada on August 14-15, 2003 catalyzed discussions about modernizingthe U.S. electricity grid. Industry sources suggested that investments of$50 to $100 billion would be needed. This work seeks to better understandan important piece of information that has been missing from thesediscussions: What do power interruptions and fluctuations in powerquality (power-quality events) cost electricity consumers? We developed abottom-up approach for assessing the cost to U.S. electricity consumersof power interruptions and power-quality events (referred to collectivelyas "reliability events"). The approach can be used to help assess thepotential benefits of investments in improving the reliability of thegrid. We developed a new estimate based on publicly availableinformation, and assessed how uncertainties in these data affect thisestimate using sensitivity analysis.

Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina; Eto, Joseph H.

2006-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

114

2011 Cost of Wind Energy Review  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) for a typical land-based wind turbine installed in the United States in 2011, as well as the modeled LCOE for a fixed-bottom offshore wind turbine installed in the United States in 2011. Each of the four major components of the LCOE equation are explained in detail, such as installed capital cost, annual energy production, annual operating expenses, and financing, and including sensitivity ranges that show how each component can affect LCOE. These LCOE calculations are used for planning and other purposes by the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Program.

Tegen, S.; Lantz, E.; Hand, M.; Maples, B.; Smith, A.; Schwabe, P.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

2011 Cost of Wind Energy Review  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) for a typical land-based wind turbine installed in the United States in 2011, as well as the modeled LCOE for a fixed-bottom offshore wind turbine installed in the United States in 2011. Each of the four major components of the LCOE equation are explained in detail, such as installed capital cost, annual energy production, annual operating expenses, and financing, and including sensitivity ranges that show how each component can affect LCOE. These LCOE calculations are used for planning and other purposes by the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Program.

Tegen, S.; Lantz, E.; Hand, M.; Maples, B.; Smith, A.; Schwabe, P.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Osmosis Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Osmosis Capital Osmosis Capital Jump to: navigation, search Name Osmosis Capital Place London, United Kingdom Zip EC4M 9DN Sector Carbon Product An investment firm seeking low carbon economy opportunity investments through its Osmosis Capital Fund. Coordinates 51.506325°, -0.127144° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.506325,"lon":-0.127144,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

117

Tracking the Sun IV: An Historical Summary of the Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998 to 2010  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tracking Tracking the Sun IV Tracking the Sun IV An Historical Summary of the Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998 to 2010 Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998 to 2010 Galen Barbose, Naïm Darghouth, Ryan Wiser, and Joachim Seel g y Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory - Report Summary - p y September 2011 Environmental Energy Technologies Division * Energy Analysis Department Thanks to the U.S. DOE's Solar Energy Technologies Program and the Clean Energy States Alliance for supporting this work Project Overview Objective: Using project-level data, evaluate trends in the installed cost of grid-connected PV systems throughout the United States: g y g * Changes in total system installed cost and component-level costs over time * Variation in total installed cost by system size

118

Building a market for small wind: The break-even turnkey cost of residential wind systems in the United States  

SciTech Connect

Although small wind turbine technology and economics have improved in recent years, the small wind market in the United States continues to be driven in large part by state incentives, such as cash rebates, favorable loan programs, and tax credits. This paper examines the state-by-state economic attractiveness of small residential wind systems. Economic attractiveness is evaluated primarily using the break-even turnkey cost (BTC) of a residential wind system as the figure of merit. The BTC is defined here as the aggregate installed cost of a small wind system that could be supported such that the system owner would break even (and receive a specified return on investment) over the life of the turbine, taking into account current available incentives, the wind resource, and the retail electricity rate offset by on-site generation. Based on the analysis presented in this paper, we conclude that: (1) the economics of residential, grid-connected small wind systems is highly variable by state and wind resource class, (2) significant cost reductions will be necessary to stimulate widespread market acceptance absent significant changes in the level of policy support, and (3) a number of policies could help stimulate the market, but state cash incentives currently have the most significant impact, and will be a critical element of continued growth in this market.

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

The Cost Escalation of Rail Projects: Using Previous Experience to Re-Evaluate the CalSpeed Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RevisedCapital Cost Estimates, LowEstimate GRAPEVINE: 5.0%CalSpeed:RevisedCapital Cost Estimates, LowEstimate CENTRALRevisedCapital Cost Estimates, High Estimate CENTRAL

Leavitt, Dan; Ennis, Sean; McGovern, Pat

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Foundation Capital.txt - Notepad  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Foundation Capital.txt Foundation Capital.txt From: Michael Bauer [MBauer@FoundationCap.com] Sent: Thursday, April 16, 2009 11:20 AM To: GC-62 Subject: Fed Register comments Dear Sir or Lady, Per Wendolyn Holland's request, here are my comments: (i) What improvements to the existing transactions (e.g. CRADAs, WFOs, User Agreements, etc.) would you suggest that DOE consider? Most obvious problem is cost of resources at national labs, which is much higher than at universities and other institutions due to imputed overhead. These costs should be reviewed to find whether they're a) really reflective of real costs at the labs, b)whether they truly reflect unique capabilities that justify the higher cost vs. comparable institutions. It's telling that many of the labs themselves tend to outsource certain research

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "units capital costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

A Review of the Literature on the Social Cost of Motor Vehicle Use in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E. 1997. Full Social Costs of Transportation in Europe.the Full Social Costs and Benefits of Transportation.the Full Social Costs and Benefits of Transportation. Edited

Murphy, James; Delucchi, Mark

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

MSU CAPITAL ASSET POLICY 1. CAPITALIZATION POLICY and USEFUL LIFE: MSU records as capital assets those  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Furniture $ 5,000 10 yrs Data Processing/ Computer Hardware $ 5,000 5 yrs Office Equipment $ 5,000 5 yrs, museum and related items not meeting the above criteria are capitalized at cost or our best estimate yrs Land $ 5,000 N/A Land Improvements $ 25,000 20 yrs Infrastructure $ 500,000 20 - 75 yrs Equipment

Maxwell, Bruce D.

123

CAES Updated Cost Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Compressed Air Energy Storage Systems (CAES) for bulk energy storage applications have been receiving renewed interest. Increased penetration of large quantities of intermittent wind generation are requiring utilities to re-examine the cost and value of CAES systems. New second generation CAES cycles have been identified which offer the potential for lower capital and operating costs. This project was undertaken to update and summarize the capital and operating costs and performance features of second ge...

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

124

Carbon Capital Markets | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbon Capital Markets Place London, United Kingdom Zip W1J 8DY Sector Carbon Product London-based fund manager and trader specialising in the carbon and clean energy markets....

125

Electric Utility Rate Design Study: embedded generation costs on a time-of-day basis for Iowa Southern Utilities Company  

SciTech Connect

This report develops a method for determining average embedded generation costs on a time-of-day basis and describes the application of the method to Iowa Southern Utilities. These costs are not allocated to customer classes. Since average embedded costs are composed of the running (or variable) costs and the capital costs, the analysis examines each of these separately. Running costs on a time-of-day basis are determined through the use of a generation dispatch model that reports the loadings by generating unit and the running costs of meeting the load. These costs are reported on an hour-by-hour basis. The dispatch model takes into account the operating characteristics of each unit and the major engineering constraints on a system; e.g., must-run units, minimum up and down time, startup cost. After reviewing several suggested capital-cost allocation procedures, a method is developed that allocates capital costs on a time-of-day basis by using a recontracting-for-capacity procedure that allows capacity to vary by hour for each month. The method results in allocations to customers who benefit from its use. An important and distinguishing feature of this method is that it allows calculation of the costs before rating periods are chosen.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Pulsar Energy Capital L L P | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pulsar Energy Capital L L P Pulsar Energy Capital L L P Jump to: navigation, search Name Pulsar Energy Capital L.L.P. Place London, United Kingdom Zip SW20 0PU Product Pulsar Energy Capital LLP is a private equity firm that invests in high growth companies in the energy sector. References Pulsar Energy Capital L.L.P.[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Pulsar Energy Capital L.L.P. is a company located in London, United Kingdom . References ↑ "Pulsar Energy Capital L.L.P." Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Pulsar_Energy_Capital_L_L_P&oldid=350046" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes

127

UCSC Major Capital Improvement Projects -Anticipated Construction Times Showing Total Project Costs 11/20/07 2007-8 July 2008-9 July 2009-10 July 2010-11 July 2011-12 July 2012-13 July 2013-14 July  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Projects - Anticipated Construction Times Showing Total Project Costs 11/20/07 2007-8 July 2008-9 July 2009UCSC Major Capital Improvement Projects - Anticipated Construction Times Showing Total Project Costs 11/20/07 2007-8 July 2008-9 July 2009-10 July 2010-11 July 2011-12 July 2012-13 July 2013-14 July

California at Santa Cruz, University of

128

A Review of the Literature on the Social Cost of Motor Vehicle Use in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L. Parker. 1992. External Costs of Oil Used in Transporta-such as gas, oil and parts; the indirect costs, such asTABLE 3 Estimated External Costs of Oil Used in Transport

Murphy, James; Delucchi, Mark

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Impacts of Motor Vehicle Operation on Water Quality in the United States - Clean-up Costs and Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oil and oil filter reimbursement checks, so check processing costsCosts of remediating underground storage tank leaks exceed benefits. Oil andOil Companies Pay US EPA to Settle Santa Monica MTBE Cleanup Costs,

Nixon, Hilary; Saphores, Jean-Daniel

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Tracking the Sun III; The Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998-2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VT Renewable Energy Incentive 10-100 kW Avg. Cost Programlevel cost data from Wisconsin’s Focus on Energy RenewableRenewable WI Energy Cash-Back Rewards 10-100 kW Avg. Cost

Barbose, Galen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Tracking the Sun III; The Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998-2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from 1998-2009 Tracking the Sun III: The Installed Cost ofSystems MW Total Tracking the Sun III: The Installed Cost ofthrough 2009. Tracking the Sun III: The Installed Cost of

Barbose, Galen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Networks, Information & Social Capital  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper investigates how information flows enable social networks to constitute social capital. By analyzing

Aral, Sinan

2008-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

133

A Review of the Literature on the Social Cost of Motor Vehicle Use in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

accidents, air pollution, noise, land use, and “dissociationpollution Total societal costs Unquantified costs Wetlands lost Agricultural landland use Vehicle ownership and operation Vibration damage to buildings Water pollution

Murphy, James; Delucchi, Mark

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

NREL: Energy Analysis - Distributed Generation Energy Technology Capital  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capital Costs Capital Costs Transparent Cost Database Button The following charts indicate recent capital cost estimates for distributed generation (DG) renewable energy technologies. The estimates are shown in dollars per installed kilowatt of generating capacity or thermal energy capacity for thermal technologies. The charts provide a compilation of available national-level cost data from a variety of sources. Costs in your specific location will vary. The red horizontal lines represent the first standard deviation of the mean. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) sponsored the distributed generation data used within these charts. If you are seeking utility-scale technology capital cost estimates, please visit the Transparent Cost Database website for NREL's information

135

Tracking the Sun IV: An Historical Summary of the Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998 to 2010  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IV IV An Historical Summary of the Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998 to 2010 Galen Barbose Naïm Darghouth Ryan Wiser Joachim Seel September 2011 Tracking the Sun IV Contents An Historical Summary of the Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998 to 2010 Environmental Energy Technologies Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Primary Authors: Galen Barbose, Naïm Darghouth, Ryan Wiser, and Joachim Seel Executive Summary ...................................................................................................... 1 1. Introduction .............................................................................................................. 5 2. Data Summary .......................................................................................................... 8

136

Huge amounts of capital needed  

SciTech Connect

Investor-owned electric utilities will require $24 to $25 billion in capital funds in 1979, up about $2 billion from 1978. Public utility and rural electric cooperative systems will need, perhaps, another $8 billion. Rural electric cooperatives--some with big loan guarantees from the Rural Electrification Administration--and municipals ought to be able to raise the money they need for their projects. The investor-owned companies will have to go into a tight capital market-place for nearly 60% of the money they need for their projects. Most companies will be able to raise the capital they need through stock or bond offerings, partnerships with foreign banks and institutions, or a combination of these. Some companies already have turned to leveraged leasing (explained in-depth in this article) and others are investigating leasing, even of base-load generating units. But for all investor-owned companies the key to the capital market is continuing, prompt and adequate rate relief provided by state and Federal regulatory agencies. In states where commissions have balked at providing companies with adequate rates of return utilities are into the capital market for only the barest necessities. New methods for raising funds are discussed for TVA and Duke Power. (MCW)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Tracking the Sun IV: An Historical Summary of the Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998 to 2010  

SciTech Connect

The present report describes installed cost trends for grid-connected PV projects installed from 1998 through 2010 (with some limited and preliminary results presented for projects installed in the first six months of 2011). The analysis is based on project-level cost data from approximately 116,500 residential, non-residential, and utility-sector PV systems in the United States. The inclusion of utility-sector PV is a new element in this year’s report. The combined capacity of all systems in the data sample totals 1,685 MW, equal to 79% of all grid-connected PV capacity installed in the United States through 2010 and representing one of the most comprehensive sources of installed PV cost data for the U.S. Based on this dataset, the report describes historical installed cost trends over time, and by location, market segment, technology type, and component. The report also briefly compares recent PV installed costs in the United States to those in Germany and Japan, and describes trends in customer incentives for PV installations and net installed costs after receipt of such incentives. The analysis presented here focuses on descriptive trends in the underlying data, serving primarily to summarize the data in tabular and graphical form.

Darghouth, Naim; Wiser, Ryan

2011-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

138

An examination of the costs and critical characteristics of electric utility distribution system capacity enhancement projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report classifies and analyzes the capital and total costs (e.g., income tax, property tax, depreciation, centralized power generation, insurance premiums, and capital financing) associated with 130 electricity distribution system capacity enhancement projects undertaken during 1995-2002 or planned in the 2003-2011 time period by three electric power utilities operating in the Pacific Northwest. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in cooperation with participating utilities, has developed a large database of over 3,000 distribution system projects. The database includes brief project descriptions, capital cost estimates, the stated need for each project, and engineering data. The database was augmented by additional technical (e.g., line loss, existing substation capacities, and forecast peak demand for power in the area served by each project), cost (e.g., operations, maintenance, and centralized power generation costs), and financial (e.g., cost of capital, insurance premiums, depreciations, and tax rates) data. Though there are roughly 3,000 projects in the database, the vast majority were not included in this analysis because they either did not clearly enhance capacity or more information was needed, and not available, to adequately conduct the cost analyses. For the 130 projects identified for this analysis, capital cost frequency distributions were constructed, and expressed in terms of dollars per kVA of additional capacity. The capital cost frequency distributions identify how the projects contained within the database are distributed across a broad cost spectrum. Furthermore, the PNNL Energy Cost Analysis Model (ECAM) was used to determine the full costs (e.g., capital, operations and maintenance, property tax, income tax, depreciation, centralized power generation costs, insurance premiums and capital financing) associated with delivering electricity to customers, once again expressed in terms of costs per kVA of additional capacity. The projects were sorted into eight categories (capacitors, load transfer, new feeder, new line, new substation, new transformer, reconductoring, and substation capacity increase) and descriptive statistics (e.g., mean, total cost, number of observations, and standard deviation) were constructed for each project type. Furthermore, statistical analysis has been performed using ordinary least squares regression analysis to identify how various project variables (e.g., project location, the primary customer served by the project, the type of project, the reason for the upgrade, size of the upgrade) impact the unit cost of the project.

Balducci, Patrick J.; Schienbein, Lawrence A.; Nguyen, Tony B.; Brown, Daryl R.; Fathelrahman, Eihab M.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Tracking the Sun III; The Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998-2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

capacity installed in the United States through 2009 and representing one of the most comprehensive sources

Barbose, Galen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Capital and Maintenance Projects for Efficiency Improvements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) project developed a methodology to assess the costs and benefits of potential maintenance improvements to coal-fired power plants, refined the methodology developed in 2008 to assess the net annual benefit of potential capital improvements to these plants, and applied the methodologies to a hypothetical plant. The calculations are captured in two spreadsheets8212one for capital projects and the other for maintenance projects8212that are included in the report...

2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "units capital costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

CHARACTERIZING COSTS, SAVINGS AND BENEFITS OF A SELECTION OF ENERGY EFFICIENT EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES IN THE UNITED STATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technologies. (1993a). Energy-saving roller kiln - TechnicalEnergy Savings .6  Analyses of energy savings, cost, other

Xu, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Heliostat cost reduction study.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Power towers are capable of producing solar-generated electricity and hydrogen on a large scale. Heliostats are the most important cost element of a solar power tower plant. Since they constitute {approx} 50% of the capital cost of the plant it is important to reduce heliostat cost as much as possible to improve the economic performance of power towers. In this study we evaluate current heliostat technology and estimate a price of $126/m{sup 2} given year-2006 materials and labor costs for a deployment of {approx}600 MW of power towers per year. This 2006 price yields electricity at $0.067/kWh and hydrogen at $3.20/kg. We propose research and development that should ultimately lead to a price as low as $90/m{sup 2}, which equates to $0.056/kWh and $2.75/kg H{sup 2}. Approximately 30 heliostat and manufacturing experts from the United States, Europe, and Australia contributed to the content of this report during two separate workshops conducted at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility.

Jones, Scott A.; Lumia, Ronald. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Davenport, Roger (Science Applications International Corporation, San Diego, CA); Thomas, Robert C. (Advanced Thermal Systems, Centennial, CO); Gorman, David (Advanced Thermal Systems, Larkspur, CO); Kolb, Gregory J.; Donnelly, Matthew W.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Solar central receiver prototype heliostat. Volume III. Cost estimates  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Boeing heliostat design can be produced and installed for a Capital Cost of $42 per square meter at high commercial plant quantities and rates. This is 14% less than the DOE cost target. Even at a low commercial plant production rate of 25,000 heliostats per year the Capital Cost of $48 per square meter is 2% less than the cost goal established by the DOE. Projected capital costs and 30 year maintenance costs for three scenarios of production and installation are presented: (1) commercial rate production of 25,000, 250,000, and 1,000,000 heliostats per year; (2) a one-time only production quantity of 2500 heliostats; and (3) commercial rate production of 25,000 heliostats per year with each plant (25,000 heliostats) installed at widely dispersed sites throughout the Southwestern United States. These three scenarios for solar plant locations and the manufacturing/installation processes are fully described, and detailed cost breakdowns for the three scenarios are provided.

None

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

RM Capital Investment Plans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capital Investment Plans FY 2004 (568kb pdf) FY 2005 (625kb pdf) FY 2006 (625kb pdf) FY 2007 (1.45mb pdf) Meter policy Capital Investment Plans...

145

Avoided Gigawatts Through Utility Capital Recovery Fees  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electric rate structures can be used to provide customers with the proper pricing signals as well as provide economic incentives for increased market penetration for energy efficient new buildings. An innovative, marginal (replacement cost) rate structure is possible through the use of capital recovery fees for new electric meter hookups similar to those commonly used for new water and wastewater hookups where the developer/owner is required to capitalize the marginal cost of new demand. By giving credit for the more efficient loads placed on an electric utility system, a utility could rapidly advance the market penetration of commercially available, highly efficient building systems and equipment resulting in potential gigawatts of conserved energy. Simultaneously, the capital costs of new generating plants could be shifted to the end-user from the already debt-burdened electric utility industry. This paper will explore this pricing option and analyze its potential on future electric load growth and the design of efficient new buildings.

Frosenfeld, A. N.; Verdict, M. E.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Tracking the Sun IV: An Historical Summary of the Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998 to 2010  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

approximately 116,500 residential, non-residential, and utility-sector PV systems in the United States. The inclusion of utility-sector PV is a new element in this year’s report. The combined capacity of all systems in the data sample totals 1,685 MW, equal to 79% of all grid-connected PV capacity installed in the United States through 2010 and representing one of the most comprehensive sources of installed PV cost data for the U.S. Based on this dataset, the report describes historical installed cost trends over time, and by location, market segment, technology type, and component. The report also briefly compares recent PV installed costs in the United States to those in Germany and Japan, and describes trends in customer incentives for PV installations and net installed costs after receipt of such incentives. The analysis presented here focuses on descriptive trends in the underlying data, serving primarily to summarize the data in tabular and graphical form.

Darghouth, Naim; Wiser, Ryan

2011-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

147

Building a market for small wind: The break-even turnkey cost of residential wind systems in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

higher average state electricity rates, which increase thethe average state retail electricity rate, meaning thatsensitivities on state retail electricity rates, O&M costs,

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Tracking the Sun III; The Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998-2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wholesale module prices and PV system installations (owinglag between wholesale module price movements and PV systemmodule prices and retail installed costs for PV systems, the

Barbose, Galen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

NREL Analysis: Cost-Effective and Reliable Integration of High-Penetration Solar in the Western United States (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

SunShot Initiative awardee posters describing the different technologies within the four subprograms of the DOE Solar Program (Photovoltaics, Concentrating Solar Power, Soft Costs, and Systems Integration).

Lew, D.; Brinkman, G.; Ibanez, E.; Hodge, B.; Lefton, S.; Kumar, N.; Agan, D.; Jordan, G.; Venkatataman, S.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

DOE G 430.1-1 Chp 9, Operating Costs  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This chapter is focused on capital costs for conventional construction and environmental restoration and waste management projects and examines operating cost ...

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

151

Cost-Effectiveness of Home Energy Retrofits in Pre-Code Vintage Homes in the United States  

SciTech Connect

This analytical study examines the opportunities for cost-effective energy efficiency and renewable energy retrofits in residential archetypes constructed prior to 1980 (Pre-Code) in fourteen U.S. cities. These fourteen cities are representative of each of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) climate zones in the contiguous U.S. The analysis is conducted using an in-house version of EnergyGauge USA v.2.8.05 named CostOpt that has been programmed to perform iterative, incremental economic optimization on a large list of residential energy efficiency and renewable energy retrofit measures. The principle objectives of the study are as follows: to determine the opportunities for cost effective source energy reductions in this large cohort of existing residential building stock as a function of local climate and energy costs; and to examine how retrofit financing alternatives impact the source energy reductions that are cost effectively achievable.

Fairey, P.; Parker, D.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

User manual for PACTOLUS: a code for computing power costs.  

SciTech Connect

PACTOLUS is a computer code for calculating the cost of generating electricity. Through appropriate definition of the input data, PACTOLUS can calculate the cost of generating electricity from a wide variety of power plants, including nuclear, fossil, geothermal, solar, and other types of advanced energy systems. The purpose of PACTOLUS is to develop cash flows and calculate the unit busbar power cost (mills/kWh) over the entire life of a power plant. The cash flow information is calculated by two principal models: the Fuel Model and the Discounted Cash Flow Model. The Fuel Model is an engineering cost model which calculates the cash flow for the fuel cycle costs over the project lifetime based on input data defining the fuel material requirements, the unit costs of fuel materials and processes, the process lead and lag times, and the schedule of the capacity factor for the plant. For nuclear plants, the Fuel Model calculates the cash flow for the entire nuclear fuel cycle. For fossil plants, the Fuel Model calculates the cash flow for the fossil fuel purchases. The Discounted Cash Flow Model combines the fuel costs generated by the Fuel Model with input data on the capital costs, capital structure, licensing time, construction time, rates of return on capital, tax rates, operating costs, and depreciation method of the plant to calculate the cash flow for the entire lifetime of the project. The financial and tax structure for both investor-owned utilities and municipal utilities can be simulated through varying the rates of return on equity and debt, the debt-equity ratios, and tax rates. The Discounted Cash Flow Model uses the principal that the present worth of the revenues will be equal to the present worth of the expenses including the return on investment over the economic life of the project. This manual explains how to prepare the input data, execute cases, and interpret the output results. (RWR)

Huber, H.D.; Bloomster, C.H.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Current (2009) State-of-the-Art Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

capital costs and improving efficiency have lead to substantially improved electrolysis production costs compared to DOE's H2A assessment of 2005 technology costs (forecourt...

154

United States Government Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1/03 07:45 FAX 301 903 4656 CAPITAL REGION -* FORS FIVEA I002/004 1/03 07:45 FAX 301 903 4656 CAPITAL REGION -* FORS FIVEA I002/004 DOE F 1325 ' (8-69) EFO (07-90) United States Government Department of Eneray memorandum DATE: PR17 2003 Audit Report No.: OAS-L-03-14 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-34 (A03PT040) SUBJECT: Audit of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's (EE) Grants, Subsidies, and Cost Sharing Arrangements TO: Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, EE-1 The purpose of this report is to inform you of the results of our review of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's (EE) incentive payments and cost-share arrangements. The review was initiated in February 2003, and fieldwork was conducted through April 2003 at Department of Energy (Department) Headquarters. Our methodology is described in the attachment to this report.

155

CHARACTERIZING COSTS, SAVINGS AND BENEFITS OF A SELECTION OF ENERGY EFFICIENT EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES IN THE UNITED STATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Environmental ProtectionUnlocking Energy Efficiency in the U.S. Economy. Mohebali,in material and energy costs ([DOE-OIT], U.S. Department of

Xu, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Home-based work, human capital accumulation and women's labor force participation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation examines the effect of changes in the stock of human capital on the labor force participation decision of women aged 25-54. Without the option of homebased work, some women choose to leave the labor market and stay at home temporarily for family reasons. Working women realize that time out of the labor force could impose penalties on their work careers. This is because during the break, they do not accumulate any new human capital while the existing job skills continuously depreciate. Nowadays, home-based work becomes possible for many jobs because rapid development in personal computers and advances in information and communications technology have reduced employers� cost of offering home-based work arrangements. Working women can resolve the time conflict between demand for paid work and family responsibility by working from home. In a previous study, the home-based work decision depends on the fixed cost of working and potential home production. Women who are disabled, have small children, or live in rural areas are likely to work from home because they have high fixed costs of working and high potential home production. However, none of the existing studies applies the human capital theory of labor supply to the home-based work decision. Using data on the female labor force from the Integrated Public Use Microdata Series (IPUMS) of housing units from the 2000 U.S. Census, I estimate a nested logit model to examine the effects of expected costs of non-participation, in terms of forgone earnings, forgone human capital accumulation and human capital depreciation, on women�s labor force participation decision. I find that, other things being equal, women aged 25 to 44 who have potentially high human capital accumulation and high human capital depreciation are likely to stay in the labor force. In the case that the value of their home time is so high that they choose to stay at home, they prefer to work for pay at home than to be out of the labor force.

Chutubtim, Piyaluk

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Capital Access Program (Vermont)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Capital Access Program provides loan guarantees to small businesses seeking access to commercial credit. Premiums paid by the borrower and matched by Vermont Economic Development Authority fund...

158

Does Competition for Capital Discipline Governments? Decentralization, Globalization and Corruption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many political economists believe that competition among countries—or regions within them—to attract mobile capital should discipline their governments, rendering them less corrupt and more friendly toward business. This argument surfaces repeatedly in debates over both political decentralization and globalization. We argue that it is based on an assumption— countries or regions start out identical—that is quite unrealistic. We reexamine the standard model that predicts a disciplining effect of capital mobility, and show that if units are sufficiently heterogeneous exactly the opposite prediction often follows. If some units are exogenously much more attractive to investors than others (and competition for capital is intense), the only equilibrium under capital mobility will involve polarization. Initially disadvantaged units will actually be more corrupt, more starved of capital, and slower to grow if capital is mobile than if it is not. By contrast, exogenously attractive units will do more to woo investors, suck capital out of their lower productivity counterparts, and grow faster. We suggest this may help explain the disappointing results of liberalizing capital flows within the Russian federation and in sub-Saharan Africa.

Hongbin Cai A; Daniel Treisman B

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and future renewable energy costs, while less volatile thandifference between renewable energy costs and the cost ofto be the least-cost renewable energy source and, as noted

Chen, Cliff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Income Tax Capital Credit (Alabama) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Income Tax Capital Credit (Alabama) Income Tax Capital Credit (Alabama) Income Tax Capital Credit (Alabama) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Alabama Program Type Corporate Tax Incentive The purpose of this law is to create jobs and to stimulate business and economic growth in the state by providing an income tax capital credit for approved projects. The Income Tax Capital Credit is a credit of five percent (5%) of the capital costs of a qualifying project offered by the Alabama Department of Revenue. The credits is applied to the Alabama income tax liability or financial institution excise tax generated by the project income, each year for 20 years. This credit cannot be carried forward or

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "units capital costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Replacement energy, capacity, and reliability costs for permanent nuclear reactor shutdowns  

SciTech Connect

Average replacement power costs are estimated for potential permanent shutdowns of nuclear electricity-generating units. Replacement power costs are considered to include replacement energy, capacity, and reliability cost components. These estimates were developed to assist the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission in evaluating regulatory issues that potentially affect changes in serious reactor accident frequencies. Cost estimates were derived from long-term production-cost and capacity expansion simulations of pooled utility-system operations. Factors that affect replacement power cost, such as load growth, replacement sources of generation, and capital costs for replacement capacity, were treated in the analysis. Costs are presented for a representative reactor and for selected subcategories of reactors, based on estimates for 112 individual reactors.

VanKuiken, J.C., Buehring, W.A.; Hamilton, S.; Kavicky, J.A.; Cavallo, J.D.; Veselka, T.D.; Willing, D.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Renewable Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Capital Jump to: navigation, search Name Renewable Capital Place Las Vegas, Nevada Zip 89109 Sector Solar Product Investment vehicle of Ed Stevenson, founder of Solar Integrated...

163

Swiftsure Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Capital Place San Francisco, California Product Swiftsure Capital, US-based private investment corporation focusing on the financing of early-stage businesses in the software,...

164

Final project report - CRADA with United Solar Technologies and Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL-021): Thin film materials for low-cost high performance solar concentrators  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this project were as follows: To develop and evaluate promising low-cost dielectric and polymer-protected thin-film reflective metal coatings to be applied to preformed continuously-curved solar reflector panels to enhance their solar reflectance, and to demonstrate protected solar reflective coatings on preformed solar concentrator panels. The opportunity for this project arose from a search by United Solar Technologies (UST) for organizations and facilities capable of applying reflective coatings to large preformed panels. PNL was identified as being uniquely qualified to participate in this collaborative project.

Martin, P.M.; Affinito, J.D.; Gross, M.E.; Bennett, W.D.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

CHARACTERIZING COSTS, SAVINGS AND BENEFITS OF A SELECTION OF ENERGY EFFICIENT EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES IN THE UNITED STATES  

SciTech Connect

Implementation and adoption of efficient end-use technologies have proven to be one of the key measures for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions throughout the industries. In many cases, implementing energy efficiency measures is among one of the most cost effective investments that the industry could make in improving efficiency and productivity while reducing CO2 emissions. Over the years, there have been incentives to use resources and energy in a cleaner and more efficient way to create industries that are sustainable and more productive. With the working of energy programs and policies on GHG inventory and regulation, understanding and managing the costs associated with mitigation measures for GHG reductions is very important for the industry and policy makers around the world. Successful implementation of emerging technologies not only can help advance productivities and competitiveness but also can play a significant role in mitigation efforts by saving energy. Providing evaluation and estimation of the costs and energy savings potential of emerging technologies is the focus of our work in this project. The overall goal of the project is to identify and select emerging and under-utilized energy-efficient technologies and practices as they are important to reduce energy consumption in industry while maintaining economic growth. This report contains the results from performing Task 2"Technology evaluation" for the project titled"Research Opportunities in Emerging and Under-Utilized Energy-Efficient Industrial Technologies," which was sponsored by California Energy Commission and managed by CIEE. The project purpose is to analyze market status, market potential, and economic viability of selected technologies applicable to the U.S. In this report, LBNL first performed re-assessments of all of the 33 emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies, including re-evaluation of the 26 technologies that were previously identified by Martin et al. (2000) and their potential significance to energy use in the industries, and new evaluation of additional seven technologies. The re-assessments were essentially updated with recent information that we searched and collected from literature to the extent possible. The progress of selected technologies as they diffused into the marketplace from 2000 to 2010 was then discussed in this report. The report also includes updated detailed characterizations of 15 technologies studied in 2000, with comparisons noted.

Xu, T.; Slaa, J.W.; Sathaye, J.

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

166

Parameter Unit Name Unit Symbol Capacitance (C) Farad F  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and nuclear facilities: · Capital Cost · Operating & Maintenance Cost · Fuel Cost · Decommissioning CostNuclear Technology & Canadian Oil Sands: Integration of Nuclear Power with In-Situ Oil Extraction A.E. FINAN, K. MIU, A.C. KADAK Massachusetts Institute of Technology Department of Nuclear Science

167

Texas Capital Fund (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Texas Capital Fund is designed to promote growth in rural non-entitlement areas, generally defined as cities with less than 50,000 residents or counties with less than 200,000 residents....

168

Essays in capital markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis consists of three essays in capital markets. The first essay presents a dynamic asset pricing model with heterogeneously informed agents. Unlike previous research, the general case where differential information ...

Makarov, Igor, 1976-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Tracking the Sun IV: An Historical Summary of the Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998 to 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that likely increased project costs (e.g. , brownfieldlevel based on underlying project costs. Conversely, someProgram database where project cost data were not available

Darghouth, Naim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Sindicatum Carbon Capital SCC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sindicatum Carbon Capital SCC Sindicatum Carbon Capital SCC Jump to: navigation, search Name Sindicatum Carbon Capital (SCC) Place London, United Kingdom Zip W1S 1HX Product SCC is a specialist end-to-end developer of climate change related projects, from conception to operation. Coordinates 51.506325°, -0.127144° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.506325,"lon":-0.127144,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

171

Emerging Edge Capital EEC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edge Capital EEC Edge Capital EEC Jump to: navigation, search Name Emerging Edge Capital (EEC) Place London, United Kingdom Zip SW1Y 4RS Sector Renewable Energy Product London-based company which sources and develops projects in renewable energy and other strategic sectors in emerging markets. Coordinates 51.506325°, -0.127144° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.506325,"lon":-0.127144,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

172

Absolut Energy Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Absolut Energy Capital Absolut Energy Capital Jump to: navigation, search Name Absolut Energy Capital Place London, England, United Kingdom Zip W1H - 6HN Sector Renewable Energy Product London-based private equity firm. The firm offers financing for renewable energy ventures. Coordinates 51.506325°, -0.127144° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.506325,"lon":-0.127144,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

173

Transmission Capital Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Capital Limited Capital Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name Transmission Capital Limited Place London, United Kingdom Zip EC2V 7HR Sector Renewable Energy, Services Product String representation "Provides adviso ... y arrangements." is too long. Coordinates 51.506325°, -0.127144° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.506325,"lon":-0.127144,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

174

COST COMPARISONS OF CAPITOL INVESTMENT IN VARIOUS NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS FOR CENTRAL STATION APPLICATION  

SciTech Connect

The capital costs for a number of power reactors are compared after escalation to equivalent construction dates. It is shown that the most important factor affecting nuclear power plant capital costs is the net capacity of the plant. Steam conditions are shown to have a relatively minor effect on capital costs. (auth)

Bender, M.; Stulting, R.D.

1958-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

175

US nuclear power plant operating cost and experience summaries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NUREG/CR-6577, U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries, has been prepared to provide historical operating cost and experience information on U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Cost incurred after initial construction are characterized as annual production costs, representing fuel and plant operating and maintenance expenses, and capital expenditures related to facility additions/modifications which are included in the plant capital asset base. As discussed in the report, annual data for these two cost categories were obtained from publicly available reports and must be accepted as having different degrees of accuracy and completeness. Treatment of inconclusive and incomplete data is discussed. As an aid to understanding the fluctuations in the cost histories, operating summaries for each nuclear unit are provided. The intent of these summaries is to identify important operating events; refueling, major maintenance, and other significant outages; operating milestones; and significant licensing or enforcement actions. Information used in the summaries is condensed from annual operating reports submitted by the licensees, plant histories contained in Nuclear Power Experience, trade press articles, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) web site (www.nrc.gov).

Kohn, W.E.; Reid, R.L.; White, V.S.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2005. Large Scale Integration of Wind Energy in the Europeanincreases in wind costs; Transmission and integration costs

Chen, Cliff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost Study Report II. Albany, New York: New York DepartmentOrder Cost Analysis. Albany, New York: New York Public

Chen, Cliff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

An Olefin Unit's Energy Audit and Implementation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper will discuss an Energy Audit conducted in 1976 on Union Carbide's Texas City No. 3 Olefins Ethylene Unit. Staffing, planning, and conduct of an Audit are reviewed. Project endorsement by the multifunctional Energy Audit Team is used to prioritize capital programs. The paper will describe several projects having possible application in other Olefin plants. Preparation and use of an Energy Curve reviewed. An Energy Index graph projects improvements to be achieved by implementation of a four-year $44 million capital program which resulted from the Audit. Reorganization of the Olefin unit technical staff to complete the energy conservation program is covered. Several techniques being used to insure operator and maintenance commitment to energy conservation are reviewed. The Texas City No. 3 Olefins Unit is an LPG based ethylene plant rated in excess of one billion pounds per year. Since start-up in 1968, energy costs have escalated by a factor of ten. The unit's current energy bill exceeds $45 million per year. Between 1972 and 1977 the Olefin plant conversion energy index increased by 40%. Concerned with rising fuel price and decreasing energy efficiency, management decided to conduct an Energy Audit on the Olefins Unit. This paper discusses the audit and implementation of the resulting conservation program. The paper is divided into four sections: I. The Energy Audit II. Energy Curve III. Energy Index and Energy Projects IV. Operating Department Organization

Buehler, J. H.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Cost reduction through improved seismic design  

SciTech Connect

During the past decade, many significnt seismic technology developments have been accomplished by the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) programs. Both base technology and major projects, such as the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) plant, have contributed to seismic technology development and validation. Improvements have come in the areas of ground motion definitions, soil-structure interaction, and structural analysis methods and criteria for piping, equipment, components, reactor core, and vessels. Examples of some of these lessons learned and technology developments are provided. Then, the highest priority seismic technology needs, achievable through DOE actions and sponsorship are identified and discussed. Satisfaction of these needs are expected to make important contributions toward cost avoidances and reduced capital costs of future liquid metal nuclear plants. 23 references, 12 figures.

Severud, L.K.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Contribution of site assessment toward prioritising investment in natural capital  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In prioritising investment in natural capital, site-scale indicators are increasingly used to capture fine-scale variation inherent in complex ecosystems. However, site assessment is costly, has high skill demand, and is time-consuming. We assess the ... Keywords: Agri-environment schemes, Analytical hierarchy process, Conservation investment, Cost-effective, GIS, Stewardship

Neville D. Crossman; Brett A. Bryan; Darran King

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "units capital costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Cost effective energy strategies for the reduction of CO[sub 2] emissions in the United States: Country report for ETSAP Annex IV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The energy system of the United States of America was analyzed using MARKAL. The time period of the study was 1990--2030. Projected energy demands over this period for a Reference Scenario were largely modeled after the US Energy Information Administration's 1992 Annual Energy Outlook for 1990--2010 and from the National Energy Strategy for the period 2010--2030. Expectations of maximum growth rates of conservation and renewable energy technologies were based on the same sources. Reductions in CO[sub 2] emissions were achieved by setting absolute constraints on total emissions levels by year and by carbon taxes. A 10% reduction in CO[sub 2] emissions was near the limit of technical feasibility for this scenario. This resulted in an overall cost increase of $1.1 trillion present value, but marginal costs on CO[sub 2] emissions reductions ranged up to $3300/ton. Over 70% of the CO[sub 2] emissions reduction occurred in electrical generation, partly resulting from decreases in demand for electricity. Additional scenarios were run for conditions of low economic growth and with the addition of carbon sequestering technologies.

Morris, S.C.; Marcuse, J.L.W.; Goldstein, G.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Cost effective energy strategies for the reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions in the United States: Country report for ETSAP Annex IV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The energy system of the United States of America was analyzed using MARKAL. The time period of the study was 1990--2030. Projected energy demands over this period for a Reference Scenario were largely modeled after the US Energy Information Administration`s 1992 Annual Energy Outlook for 1990--2010 and from the National Energy Strategy for the period 2010--2030. Expectations of maximum growth rates of conservation and renewable energy technologies were based on the same sources. Reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions were achieved by setting absolute constraints on total emissions levels by year and by carbon taxes. A 10% reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions was near the limit of technical feasibility for this scenario. This resulted in an overall cost increase of $1.1 trillion present value, but marginal costs on CO{sub 2} emissions reductions ranged up to $3300/ton. Over 70% of the CO{sub 2} emissions reduction occurred in electrical generation, partly resulting from decreases in demand for electricity. Additional scenarios were run for conditions of low economic growth and with the addition of carbon sequestering technologies.

Morris, S.C.; Marcuse, J.L.W.; Goldstein, G.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Land Use Regulation with Durable Capital  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

prices, land rents, capital intensity of housing and housingrents and capital intensities. A richer formulation, inof development and the capital intensity of development. His

Quigley, John M.; Swoboda, Aaron

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Venture Capital and the New Energy Opportunity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

venture capital is increasingly providing expansion capital for new companies in the energy sector. The result is a dramatic increase of private capital flows supporting an...

185

Human Capital Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plan Human Capital Plan More Documents & Publications Strategic Use of Human Capital DOE Strategic Human Capital Plan (FY 2011 - 2015) Energy.gov Careers & Internships For Staff &...

186

IT Capital Planning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IT Capital Planning IT Capital Planning and Architecture Division (IM-21) Peter Lenentine, Director IM Organization Structure (as of 12/19/2013) Chief Information Officer (IM-1) Robert Brese Deputy Chief Information Officer Donald Adcock Associate CIO for Cyber Security (IM-30) Paul Cunningham (Acting) Corporate IT Project Management Office (IM-40) Frank Husson, Director Associate CIO for IT Planning, Architecture, and E-Government (IM-20) TheAnne Gordon Technology Evaluation Office (IM-50) Peter Tseronis, Director (Acting) Associate CIO for IT Corporate Management (IM-10) Sarah Gamage Associate CIO for Energy IT Services (IM-60) Virginia Arreguin Deputy Associate CIO for Cyber Security Paul Cunningham Deputy Associate CIO for Energy IT Services John Berthiaume (Acting) Human Capital and Administrative

187

ANALYSIS OF THE PERFORMANCE AND COST EFFECTIVENESS OF NINE SMALL WIND ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMS FUNDED BY THE DOE SMALL GRANTS PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to be less. Item Battery Mode Cost Hours required Backgroundwiring Total battery mode capital costs Adjustments fora detailed list of costs in the battery mode of operation.

Kay, J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Biomass Power Project Cost Analysis Database  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of biomass power projects presents a variety of challenges that result in high capital costs associated with developing, engineering, procuring, constructing, and operating biomass power projects. Although projects that rely on more homogeneous fuels such as natural gas must still account for site-specific issues when estimating development and construction costs, the complexities are not comparable.Recognizing the difficulties in estimating the capital costs for ...

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

189

The economics of alternative fuel cycles on sodium-cooled fast reactors and uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of cost estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Previous work was done to create a baseline capital cost model for the SFR in which case studies were performed to identify ways to decrease the capital costs while maintaining safety and performance. This thesis expands ...

Russo, Genevieve V. (Genevieve Virgina)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Capitalize on Existing Assets with Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industrial facilities universally struggle with escalating energy costs. EnerNOC will demonstrate how commercial, industrial, and institutional end-users can capitalize on their existing assets—at no cost and no risk. Demand response, the voluntary reduction of electric demand in response to grid instability, provides financial incentives to participating facilities that agree to conserve energy. With demand response, facilities also receive advance notice of potential blackouts and can proactively protect their equipment and machinery from sudden losses of power. A detailed case study, focusing on a sample industrial customer’s participation in demand response, will support the presentation.

Collins, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Tracking the Sun IV: An Historical Summary of the Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998 to 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in 2007-2010. Tracking the Sun IV: The Installed Cost of$/W) Total Tracking the Sun IV: The Installed Cost of$/W) Total Tracking the Sun IV: The Installed Cost of

Darghouth, Naim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost Assumptions Wind power is often found to be the least-cost renewable energycost studies. The capacity value of renewable energy (wind,wind costs persist. Natural Gas Price Forecasts The difference between renewable energy

Chen, Cliff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Historical plant cost and annual production expenses for selected electric plants, 1982  

SciTech Connect

This publication is a composite of the two prior publications, Hydroelectric Plant Construction Cost and Annual Production Expenses and Thermal-Electric Plant Construction Cost and Annual Production Expenses. Beginning in 1979, Thermal-Electric Plant Construction Cost and Annual Production Expenses contained information on both steam-electric and gas-turbine electric plant construction cost and annual production expenses. The summarized historical plant cost described under Historical Plant Cost in this report is the net cumulative-to-date actual outlays or expenditures for land, structures, and equipment to the utility. Historical plant cost is the initial investment in plant (cumulative to the date of initial commercial operation) plus the costs of all additions to the plant, less the value of retirements. Thus, historical plant cost includes expenditures made over several years, as modifications are made to the plant. Power Production Expenses is the reporting year's plant operation and maintenance expenses, including fuel expenses. These expenses do not include annual fixed charges on plant cost (capital costs) such as interest on debt, depreciation or amortization expenses, and taxes. Consequently, total production expenses and the derived unit costs are not the total cost of producing electric power at the various plants. This publication contains data on installed generating capacity, net generation, net capability, historical plant cost, production expenses, fuel consumption, physical and operating plant characteristics, and other relevant statistical information for selected plants.

1984-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

194

Capital Investment Incentive (Nova Scotia, Canada) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Capital Investment Incentive (Nova Scotia, Canada) Capital Investment Incentive (Nova Scotia, Canada) Eligibility Commercial Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer...

195

Estimation of costs for applications of remediation technologies for the Department of Energy`s Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect

The Programmatic Environmental impact Statement (PEIS) being developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) for environmental restoration (ER) and waste management (WM) activities expected to be carried out across the DOE`s nationwide complex of facilities is assessing the impacts of removing, transporting, treating, storing, and disposing of waste from these ER and WM activities. Factors being considered include health and safety impacts to the public and to workers, impacts on the environment, costs and socio-economic impacts, and near-term and residual risk during those ER and WM operations. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the methodology developed specifically for the PEIS to estimate costs associated with the deployment and application of individual remediation technologies. These individual costs are used in developing order-of-magnitude cost estimates for the total remediation activities. Costs are developed on a per-unit-of-material-to-be-treated basis (i.e., $/m{sup 3}) to accommodate remediation projects of varying sizes. The primary focus of this cost-estimating effort was the development of capital and operating unit cost factors based on the amount of primary media to be removed, handled, and treated. The unit costs for individual treatment technologies were developed using information from a variety of sources, mainly from periodicals, EPA documentation, handbooks, vendor contacts, and cost models. The unit cost factors for individual technologies were adjusted to 1991 dollars.

Villegas, A.J.; Hansen, R.I.; Humphreys, K.K.; Paananen, J.M.; Gildea, L.F.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Beetle Capital Partners | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Beetle Capital Partners Beetle Capital Partners Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Beetle Capital Partners Name Beetle Capital Partners Address Medici Court, 67-69 New Bond Street Place London, United Kingdom Zip W1S 1UA Product Private Equity and Managed Assets Number of employees 11-50 Website http://www.beetlecapitalpartne Coordinates 51.5134598°, -0.1456882° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.5134598,"lon":-0.1456882,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

197

FY95 capital asset implementation plan  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Isolation Division (WID) is committed to providing good stewardship for the capital assets under its operational and physical control. To achieve this goal, the WID has developed the Capital Asset Implementation Plan (CAIP) to continue to implement for FY95 Department of Energy (DOE) Order 4320.2A, Capital Asset Management Process (CAMP). The Order provides policy and elements needed to establish a credible, consistent, auditable, and technically sound process for the DOE to forecast, plan, and budget for capital assets on a functional unit level. The objective of the WIPP CAMP program is to meet the goals of DOE Order 4320.2A in the most effective and efficient manner possible in support of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) mission. As a result, this CAIP provides a way to implement the CAMP Program using a graded approach. Continued implementation will be accomplished by improving the existing process, and establishing future goals to promote growth for the CAMP Program. The CAIP is issued annually by the WID with quarterly progress reports submitted to the DOE. This document describes the current-year program staffing, roles, responsibilities, funding, and near-term milestones. In addition, the results of past goals are discussed.

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

IT Capital Planning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IT Capital Planning IT Capital Planning and Architecture Division (IM-21) Carol Blackston, Director (Acting) IM Organization Structure (as of 1/13/2014) Chief Information Officer (IM-1) Robert Brese Deputy Chief Information Officer Donald Adcock Associate CIO for Cyber Security (IM-30) Paul Cunningham (Acting) Corporate IT Project Management Office (IM-40) Frank Husson, Director Associate CIO for IT Planning, Architecture, and E-Government (IM-20) Russell Pereira (Acting) Associate CIO for Technology Evaluation and Chief Technology Officer (IM-50) Peter Tseronis Associate CIO for IT Corporate Management (IM-10) Sarah Gamage Associate CIO for Energy IT Services (IM-60) Virginia Arreguin Deputy Associate CIO for Cyber Security Paul Cunningham Deputy Associate CIO for Energy IT Services Steve Cox (Acting)

199

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Busbar Cost Data 47 Windanalysis. energy (wind, in particular), as well as the costwind capital cost estimates from EPRI/DOE Renewable Energy

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Tracking the Sun IV: An Historical Summary of the Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998 to 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

capacity installed in the United States through 2010 and representing one of the most comprehensive sources

Darghouth, Naim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "units capital costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Nuclear fuel fabrication and refabrication cost estimation methodology  

SciTech Connect

The costs for construction and operation of nuclear fuel fabrication facilities for several reactor types and fuels were estimated, and the unit costs (prices) of the fuels were determined from these estimates. The techniques used in estimating the costs of building and operating these nuclear fuel fabrication facilities are described in this report. Basically, the estimation techniques involve detailed comparisons of alternative and reference fuel fabrication plants. Increases or decreases in requirements for fabricating the alternative fuels are identified and assessed for their impact on the capital and operating costs. The impact on costs due to facility size or capacity was also assessed, and scaling factors for the various captial and operating cost categories are presented. The method and rationale by which these scaling factors were obtained are also discussed. By use of the techniques described herein, consistent cost information for a wide variety of fuel types can be obtained in a relatively short period of time. In this study, estimates for 52 fuel fabrication plants were obtained in approximately two months. These cost estimates were extensively reviewed by experts in the fabrication of the various fuels, and, in the opinion of the reviewers, the estimates were very consistent and sufficiently accurate for use in overall cycle assessments.

Judkins, R.R.; Olsen, A.R.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Absolute Energy Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Absolute Energy Capital Absolute Energy Capital Place London, United Kingdom Zip SW1Y 5NQ Product London-based private equity firm. Coordinates 51.506325°, -0.127144° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.506325,"lon":-0.127144,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

203

Throughput-cost analysis of optical flow switching  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we employ a cost model embodying major sources of capital expenditure (CapEx) to compare the throughput-cost tradeoff offered by optical flow switching to that of more traditional optical network architectures.

Chan, Vincent W. S.

204

Maryland-National Capital Building Industry Association Regulatory Burden  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Maryland-National Capital Building Industry Association Regulatory Maryland-National Capital Building Industry Association Regulatory Burden RFI (Federal Register August 8, 2012) Maryland-National Capital Building Industry Association Regulatory Burden RFI (Federal Register August 8, 2012) On behalf of the Maryland-National Capital Building Industry Association, I am providing the following comments and information in response to DOE's request. The Association represents residential builders, developers and associated professionals and service firms. Final Letter to DOE Regulatory Burden 9_7_2012.pdf More Documents & Publications National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) Ex Parte Memorandum Energy Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid. May 2011 Frederick County (Maryland) Department of Permits and Inspections (FCDPI

205

Financing U.S. Renewable Energy Projects Through Public Capital Vehicles: Qualitative and Quantitative Benefits  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper explores the possibility of financing renewable energy projects through raising capital in the public markets. It gives an overview of the size, structure, and benefits of public capital markets, as well as showing how renewable energy projects might take advantage of this source of new funds to lower the cost of electricity.

Mendelsohn, M.; Feldman, D.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Report: EM Human Capital Initiatives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HUMAN CAPITAL HUMAN CAPITAL September 25, 2008 Submitted by the EMAB Human Capital Subcommittee Background: The enhancement of the Office of Environmental Management's (EM) human capital has been a central tenet of the Assistant Secretary's tenure, reflecting the critical nature of this resource to the achievement of EM's mission. Beginning in Fiscal Year (FY) 2006, the Environmental Management Advisory Board (EMAB or Board) has reviewed the program's human capital issues and the plans EM has developed to address them. This review produced a number of recommendations that were presented in the Board's FY 2006 report to the Assistant Secretary and were later approved and implemented to varying degrees. * Recommendation 2006-01: Develop accountability for the Human Capital Plan

207

Principal Associate Director - Capital Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Principal Associate Director - Capital Projects Principal Associate Director - Capital Projects As Principal Associate Director for Capital Projects, Henry is responsible for institutional large-project construction and management and environmental cleanup functions. Contact Operator Los Alamos National Laboratory (505) 667-5061 Before coming to the Lab in 2011, he served as manager of the $3.2 billion project to safely destroy the stockpile of deadly mustard chemical agent at the Pueblo Chemical Depot in Colorado. Paul Henry Principal Associate Director for Capital Projects Paul Henry, Principal Associate Director for Capital Projects As Principal Associate Director for Capital Projects, Henry is responsible for institutional large-project construction and management and environmental cleanup functions.

208

NREL: Energy Analysis - Energy Technology Cost and Performance Data for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bookmark and Share Bookmark and Share Energy Technology Cost and Performance Data for Distributed Generation Transparent Cost Database Button Recent cost estimates for distributed generation (DG) renewable energy technologies are available across capital costs, operations and maintenance (O&M) costs, and levelized cost of energy (LCOE). Use the tabs below to navigate the charts. The LCOE tab provides a simple calculator for both utility-scale and DG technologies that compares the combination of capital costs, O&M, performance, and fuel costs. If you are seeking utility-scale technology cost and performance estimates, please visit the Transparent Cost Database website for NREL's information regarding vehicles, biofuels, and electricity generation. Capital Cost (September 2013 Update)

209

Costs of Urban Stormwater Control Practices Arvind Narayanan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The life-cycle project costs include the initial construction costs, in addition to long- term maintenance)......................................................................................................................76 Table 64. Estimated Capital Cost of a 1.5-foot Deep, 10-feet Wide, 1,000-feet Long Grass Swale (SEWRPC)......................................................................................................................78 Table 65. Estimated Capital Cost of a 3.0-feet Deep, 21-feet Wide, 1,000-feet Long Grass Swale (SEWRPC

Pitt, Robert E.

210

Capital Account Openness and Bankruptcies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents a model where opening the capital account of an economy causes more bankruptcies to take place in the non tradables sector. Non tradable …rms must forecast the future state of the economy when investing since the demand for their goods depends on this. In our model the interest rate is a powerful signal that non tradable …rms use when the capital account is closed, but its informational content decreases once the capital account opens up and international (as well as domestic) shocks a¤ect it. Keywords: Capital Account Openness, Bankruptcies. 1

Luis Angeles; Luis Angeles

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Strategic Use of Human Capital | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

use of human capital. Strategic Use of Human Capital More Documents & Publications DOE Strategic Human Capital Plan (FY 2011 - 2015) Inspection Report: DOEIG-0888 Human Capital...

212

Cost of Fuel to General Electricity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Fuel to Generate Electricity of Fuel to Generate Electricity Cost of Fuel to Generate Electricity Herb Emmrich Gas Demand Forecast, Economic Analysis & Tariffs Manager SCG/SDG&E SCG/SDG&E Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) 2009 Fall Meeting November 18, 2009 Ontario, California The Six Main Costs to Price Electricity are:  Capital costs - the cost of capital investment (debt & equity), depreciation, Federal & State income taxes and property taxes and property taxes  Fuel costs based on fuel used to generate electricity - hydro, natural gas, coal, fuel oil, wind, solar, photovoltaic geothermal biogas photovoltaic, geothermal, biogas  Operating and maintenance costs  Transmission costs  Distribution costs  Social adder costs - GHG adder, low income adder,

213

Sustainable Investments Capital SI Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SI Capital SI Capital Jump to: navigation, search Name Sustainable Investments Capital (SI Capital) Place Barcelona, Spain Zip 8021 Sector Renewable Energy, Services Product SI Capital is an independent financial institution set up to develop investment products and services for renewable energy and other sustainable projects. Coordinates 41.385589°, 2.168745° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.385589,"lon":2.168745,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

214

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cost studies project retail electricity rate increases of nochanges in retail electricity rates, and (2) monthlydeployment on retail electricity rates and bills. Direct

Chen, Cliff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rates, and (2) monthly electricity bill impacts for a typical residentialElectricity Rate Impacts by RPS Cost Study Study - Incremental RPS Target % Figure 6. Typical Residential

Chen, Cliff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Requirements for low cost electricity and hydrogen fuel production from multi-unit intertial fusion energy plants with a shared driver and target factory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

steam generators (SG),steam turbines(T), generators andawith the costs of modern steam turbine generator plants forSteam generators Remote maintenance equipment Turbine plant

Logan, B. Grant; Moir, Ralph; Hoffman, Myron A.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Tracking the Sun IV: An Historical Summary of the Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998 to 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost_Basis_for_Solar_PV_Properties%20final.doc Most of the PV projectscost of projects funded through the California Solar

Darghouth, Naim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 006 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that Value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 Project Performance and Capital Costs Drive Wind Power Prices . . . . .14 Installed Project Costs Are On the Rise, After a Long Period of Decline. .15 Project Cost Increases Are a Function of Turbine Prices . . . . . . . . . . . .16 Wind Project

219

U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ''U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries'' (NUREG/CR-6577, Supp. 2) report has been prepared to provide historical operating cost and experience information on U.S. commercial nuclear power plants during 2000-2001. Costs incurred after initial construction are characterized as annual production costs, which represent fuel and plant operating and maintenance expenses, and capital expenditures related to facility additions/modifications, which are included in the plant capital asset base. As discussed in the report, annual data for these two cost categories were obtained from publicly available reports and must be accepted as having different degrees of accuracy and completeness. Treatment of inconclusive and incomplete data is discussed. As an aid to understanding the fluctuations in the cost histories, operations summaries for each nuclear unit are provided. The intent of these summaries is to identify important operating events; refueling, major maintenance, and other significant outages; operating milestones; and significant licensing or enforcement actions. Information used in the summaries is condensed from operating reports submitted by the licensees, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) database for enforcement actions, and outage reports.

Reid, RL

2003-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

220

CAPITAL PROGRAMMING GUIDE (PART 7)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CAPITAL PROGRAMMING GUIDE CAPITAL PROGRAMMING GUIDE V 2.0 SUPPLEMENT TO OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET CIRCULAR A-11, PART 7: PLANNING, BUDGETING, AND ACQUISITION OF CAPITAL ASSETS JUNE 2006 CAPITAL PROGRAMMING GUIDE LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS ACP Agency Capital Plan CI Commercial Items COTS Commercial-off-the-shelf ESPC Energy Savings Performance Contract EVM Earned Value Management FAR Federal Acquisition Regulation FARA Federal Acquisition Reform Act (Clinger-Cohen Act) of 1996 1 (Division D of Pub. L. No. 104-106) FASA Federal Acquisition Streamlining Act of 1994 (Pub. L. No. 103-355) FRPC Federal Real Property Council GAO Government Accountability Office GPRA Government Performance and Results Act of 1993 (Pub. L. No. 103-62)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "units capital costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Yellowstone Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yellowstone Capital Yellowstone Capital Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Yellowstone Capital Name Yellowstone Capital Address 5555 San Felipe, Suite 1650 Place Houston, Texas Zip 77056 Region Texas Area Product Private equity and venture capital investment firm Phone number (713) 650-0065 Website http://www.yellowstonecapital. Coordinates 29.749479°, -95.471973° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.749479,"lon":-95.471973,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

222

BEV Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BEV Capital BEV Capital Jump to: navigation, search Logo: BEV Capital Name BEV Capital Address 263 Tresser Blvd., 9th Floor Place Stamford, Connecticut Zip 06901 Region Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Product Venture capital firm. Phone number (203) 724-1100 Website http://www.bevcapital.com/ Coordinates 41.0518165°, -73.535274° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.0518165,"lon":-73.535274,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

223

Commons Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commons Capital Commons Capital Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Commons Capital Name Commons Capital Address 320 Washington Street, 4th floor Place Brookline, Massachusetts Zip 02445 Region Greater Boston Area Product Early-stage venture capital fund. Phone number (617) 739-3500 Website http://www.commonscapital.com/ Coordinates 42.3333887°, -71.1201943° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.3333887,"lon":-71.1201943,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

224

Ethanol Capital Management | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Ethanol Capital Management Jump to: navigation, search Name Ethanol Capital Management Place Tucson, Arizona...

225

Persimmon Tree Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tree Capital Jump to: navigation, search Name Persimmon Tree Capital Place Washington, DC Zip 20037 Sector Renewable Energy Product Persimmon is a private equity fund...

226

KRK Capital Partners | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

by expanding it. KRK Capital Partners is a company located in Washington DC, Washington, DC . References "KRK Capital Partners" Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

227

Green Capital Management | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

"Green Capital Management" Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleGreenCapitalManagement&oldid346004" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies...

228

Blue Green Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Capital Jump to: navigation, search Name Blue Green Capital Place Spain Zip 8860 Sector Renewable Energy, Solar Product String representation "Spanish develop ... their projects."...

229

West Virginia Venture Capital (West Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The West Virginia Venture Capital provides investment funds to eligible businesses stimulating economic growth and providing or retaining jobs within the state through qualified venture capital...

230

Sustainable World Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

"Sustainable World Capital" Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleSustainableWorldCapital&oldid351925" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies...

231

Nimes Capital LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

equity firm that provides growth capital to companies focused on sustainable development, alternative energy, infrastructure, or clean technology. References Nimes Capital LLC1...

232

Solar Capital Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Capital Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Solar Capital Inc Place Benicia, California Zip 94510 Sector Solar Product Start-up investment firm seeking control positions in...

233

Wind Farm Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Wind Farm Capital Jump to: navigation, search Name Wind Farm Capital Place Connecticut...

234

CAPITAL PROGRAMMING GUIDE | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and disposition of capital assets. CAPITAL PROGRAMMING GUIDE More Documents & Publications Chapter 7 - Acquisition Planning Audit Report: IG-0841 REAL ESTATE PROPERTY GUIDE 2013...

235

Capital Energy Offshore | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Offshore Jump to: navigation, search Name Capital Energy Offshore Place Spain Sector Wind energy Product JV between Gamesa and Capital Energy to develop offshore wind farms...

236

Certified Capital Companies (Missouri) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Missouri Program Type Equity Investment Certified Capital Companies (CAPCO), the creation of the Department of Economic Development (DED,) are venture capital firms which have...

237

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

estimates that electricity rates in the state could increasethe state RPS cost studies project retail electricity rateelectricity rate impacts in percentage and ¢/kWh terms, for each individual state

Chen, Cliff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State renewables portfolio standards (RPS) have emerged as one of the most important policy drivers of renewable energy capacity expansion in the U.S. As RPS policies have been proposed or adopted in an increasing number of states, a growing number of studies have attempted to quantify the potential impacts of these policies, focusing primarily on cost impacts, but sometimes also estimating macroeconomic, risk reduction, and environmental effects. This article synthesizes and analyzes the results and methodologies of 31 distinct state or utility-level RPS cost-impact analyses completed since 1998. Together, these studies model proposed or adopted RPS policies in 20 different states. We highlight the key findings of these studies on the projected costs of state RPS policies, examine the sensitivity of projected costs to model assumptions, evaluate the reasonableness of key input assumptions, and suggest possible areas of improvement for future RPS analyses. We conclude that while there is considerable uncertainty in the study results, the majority of the studies project modest cost impacts. Seventy percent of the state RPS cost studies project retail electricity rate increases of no greater than one percent. Nonetheless, there is considerable room for improving the analytic methods, and therefore accuracy, of these estimates.

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Mills, Andrew; Bolinger, Mark

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

239

Tracking the Sun IV: An Historical Summary of the Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998 to 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

indicative of SREC prices that PV projects would receiveSolar Photovoltaic (PV) System Prices in the United States.average wholesale PV module prices in each year. Over the

Darghouth, Naim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

A CRITICAL REVIEW OF WIND TRANSMISSION COST ESTIMATES FROM MAJOR TRANSMISSION PLANNING EFFORTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in calculating the unit cost of wind energy transmissionimpacts of the cost of transmission for wind energy. Only inj = Transmission cost per unit of wind energy weighted by

Mills, Andrew; Wiser, Ryan; Porter, Kevin

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "units capital costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Integration of photovoltaic units into electric utility grids: experiment information requirements and selected issues  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A number of investigations, including those conducted by The Aerospace Corporation and other contractors, have led to the recognition of technical, economic, and institutional issues relating to the interface between solar electric technologies and electric utility systems. These issues derive from three attributes of solar electric power concepts, including (1) the variability and unpredictability of the solar resources, (2) the dispersed nature of those resources which suggests the feasible deployment of small dispersed power units, and (3) a high initial capital cost coupled with relatively low operating costs. It is imperative that these integration issues be pursued in parallel with the development of each technology if the nation's electric utility systems are to effectively utilize these technologies in the near to intermediate term. Analyses of three of these issues are presented: utility information requirements, generation mix and production cost impacts, and rate structures in the context of photovoltaic units integrated into the utility system. (WHK)

Not Available

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Nite Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nite Capital Nite Capital Jump to: navigation, search Name Nite Capital Place Libertyville, Illinois Zip 60048 Product Nite Capital provides private financing for small-cap and micro-cap public companies. Coordinates 40.95912°, -92.049669° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.95912,"lon":-92.049669,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

243

Infield Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Infield Capital Infield Capital Jump to: navigation, search Name Infield Capital Place Boulder, Colorado Product Infield Capital was founded in 2008, and is focused on investment in early-stage clean technologies for the transportation industry, with an emphasis on future powertrain technologies. Coordinates 42.74962°, -109.714163° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.74962,"lon":-109.714163,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

244

Greenview Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenview Capital Greenview Capital Jump to: navigation, search Name Greenview Capital Place Libertyville, Illinois Zip 60048 Product Greenview Capital is a U.S. based consulting firm and merchant bank specialising in taking private companies public through a reverse merger or alternative public offering. Coordinates 40.95912°, -92.049669° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.95912,"lon":-92.049669,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

245

CMEA Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CMEA Capital CMEA Capital Jump to: navigation, search Logo: CMEA Capital Name CMEA Capital Address 1 Embarcadero Center Place San Francisco, California Zip 94111 Region Bay Area Number of employees 11-50 Year founded 1989 Phone number 415-352-1250 Website http://www.cmea.com/ Coordinates 37.794497°, -122.39962° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.794497,"lon":-122.39962,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

246

Atrium Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Atrium Capital Atrium Capital Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Atrium Capital Name Atrium Capital Address 3000 Sand Hill Road, Building 2, Suite 240 Place Menlo Park, California Zip 94025 Region Bay Area Product Corporate strategic venture investing Year founded 1991 Phone number (650) 233-7878 Website http://www.atriumcapital.com/ Coordinates 37.4244767°, -122.1942422° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.4244767,"lon":-122.1942422,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

247

Vintage Capital and Creditor Protection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We provide novel evidence linking the level of creditor protection provided by law to the degree of usage of technologically older, vintage capital in the airline industry. Using a panel of aircraft-level data around the ...

Benmelech, Efraim

248

Essays on international capital flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation consists of three chapters on international capital flows. Chapter 1 emphasizes the importance of innovations in the investment opportunity set, captured by changes in expected asset returns, as an important ...

Brandão, Tatiana Glindmeier Didier

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Greener Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

clean technology VC. References Greener Capital1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI...

250

Venture Capital Program (North Dakota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Venture Capital Program, provided by the ND Department of Commerce, is an innovative financial program that provides flexible financing through debt and equity investments for new or expanding...

251

Cost-effectiveness of freeway median high occupancy vehicle (HOV) facility conversion to rail guideway transit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many freeways in the United States contain median high occupancy vehicle (HOV) facilities. These facilities have been envisioned by some as reserved space for future rail guideway transit. This thesis examines the cost-effectiveness of converting a freeway median HOV lane into a guideway transit line. A full-cost model was developed to determine the cost effectiveness of converting an HOV lane into a rail transit line. The measure of cost-effectiveness used was the benefit-to-cost ratio. The full-cost model contained two cost categories (capital and operating costs) and two benefit categories (travel time and externality benefits). This fullcost model was adopted to conditions on the Katy Freeway in Houston Texas which served as a case study for this thesis. It was found that 29 percent of the person-miles of travel on the Katy Freeway under given conditions must utilize guideway transit for conversion to be cost-effective. It was also found that the model is sensitive to assumptions of the value of time, project soft costs (administrative, planning, and design costs) and the operating cost of the rail transit system. The model is also sensitive to assumptions regarding latent demand. It was concluded that conversion to rail guideway transit in the case study example is not cost-effective. It was reconunended that further investigation be taken into full-cost model components to allow more certain estimates of cost components. Also recommended was further consideration of the effects of latent demand on HOV to rail guideway transit conversions.

Best, Matthew Evans

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

110 BULLETIN O F THE UNITED STATES FIST1 COMMISSION. The cost of the utensils required for the preserration OS fish accord-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

being S4?and of a pressure-pump SZg. The cask isvery strong, ma& of steel, and reckoned to last" antiseptic. One pump is of course sufficient for a large number of casks. If the cost of the utensils. --..----- .--.-..--__..---..__.. .-..-.- -.-- 175 25 salmon canucrics, estimated value.. .......................... 449,500 1 oil factory, Queen

253

The development of an improved human capital index for assessing and forecasting national capacity and development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Human capital theory is accepted as one of the foundational theories of socioeconomic development. Although, according to founding scholars, any acquired qualities and abilities that help individuals and groups be economically productive can be considered as individual or group human capital, the classical human capital model focuses on schooling and training as the major factors comprising human capital on individual, group, and national levels. Consequently, current human capital measurement tools generally assess only educational attainment on these levels. Because of this overly simplified approach, the present manner in which human capital is commonly measured by national and international entities creates difficulty in accurately assessing the strengths and weaknesses of human capital within and between countries. A major challenge to improvement of human capital variables is identification and availability of data. The factors suggested to have significant impact on human capital are mostly intangible. Collecting such data is cost prohibitive for many developing countries. Consequently, national policy-makers, multinational corporations and international aid organizations use simplified estimates of human capital. The purpose of this dissertation is to construct and validate a more comprehensive human capital index. Study research questions include: 1) What are the significant factors that affect national human capital as revealed in the literature? 2) Can an expanded measure of national human capital be developed to reflect adequate content of HC identified in the literature? 3) What is the preliminary evidence supporting the validity of the newly developed human capital index? This analysis resulted in the formation of a new human capital index, which is expanded due to the incorporation of new variables together with the routinely used education measures. The sample panel data is from 163 countries for the years 2000-2005. Literature content analysis, factor analysis and regression analyses are used to support the exploration of the research questions. The results of the analyses suggest that a human capital model, which includes additional variables together with currently used education variables, predicts the level of national economic development significantly better than the model which includes only education measures. These results have implications for human resource development, corporate human capital management, national education, and international aid policies.

Verkhohlyad, Olha

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 1 (Edinburg) - Curry Main - Final  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a single-component capital renovation project proposed by Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 1 to the Bureau of Reclamation and North American Development Bank. The proposed project involves installing 1 mile of 72" pipeline to replace a segment of the Curry Main canal. Both nominal and real estimates of water and energy savings and expected economic and financial costs of those savings are identified throughout the anticipated 49-year useful life for the proposed project. Sensitivity results for both the cost of water savings and cost of energy savings are presented for several important parameters. Annual water and energy savings forthcoming from the total project are estimated, using amortization procedures, to be 2,258 ac-ft of water per year and 1,092,823,269 BTUs (320,288 kwh) of energy per year. The calculated economic and financial cost of water savings is estimated to be $24.68 per ac-ft. The calculated economic and financial cost of energy savings is estimated at $0.0000598 per BTU ($0.204 per kwh). In addition, expected real (rather than nominal) values are indicated for the Bureau of Reclamation’s three principal evaluation measures specified in the United States Public Law 106-576 legislation. The initial construction cost per ac-ft of water savings measure is $27.49 per ac-ft of water savings. The initial construction cost per BTU (kwh) of energy savings measure is $0.0000568 per BTU ($0.194 per kwh). The ratio of initial construction costs per dollar of total annual economic savings is estimated to be -2.84.

Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 1 (Edinburg) - North Branch / East Main - Final  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a single-component capital renovation project proposed by Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 1 to the Bureau of Reclamation and North American Development Bank. The proposed project involves installing 4.83 miles of multi-size pipeline to replace a segment of the North Branch / East Main canal. Both nominal and real estimates of water and energy savings and expected economic and financial costs of those savings are identified throughout the anticipated 48-year useful life for the proposed project. Sensitivity results for both the cost of water savings and cost of energy savings are presented for several important parameters. Annual water and energy savings forthcoming from the total project are estimated, using amortization procedures, to be 5,838 ac-ft of water per year and 3,293,049,926 BTUs (965,138 kwh) of energy per year. The calculated economic and financial cost of water savings is estimated to be $15.58 per ac-ft. The calculated economic and financial cost of energy savings is estimated at $0.0000392 per BTU ($0.134 per kwh). In addition, expected real (rather than nominal) values are indicated for the Bureau of Reclamation’s three principal evaluation measures specified in the United States Public Law 106-576 legislation. The initial construction cost per ac-ft of water savings measure is $30.68 per ac-ft of water savings. The initial construction cost per BTU (kwh) of energy savings measure is $0.0000544 per BTU ($0.186 per kwh). The ratio of initial construction costs per dollar of total annual economic savings is estimated to be -1.58.

Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Juan) - Relining Lateral A - Final  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a single-component capital renovation project proposed by Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2, (a.k.a. San Juan) to the North American Development Bank (NADBank) and Bureau of Reclamation. The proposed project involves relining “Lateral A” with a geomembrane and shotcrete cover. Both nominal and real estimates of water and energy savings and expected economic and financial costs of those savings are identified throughout the anticipated useful life for the proposed project. Sensitivity results for both the cost of water savings and cost of energy savings are presented for several important parameters. Annual water and energy savings forthcoming from the total project are estimated, using amortization procedures, to be 2,542 ac-ft of water per year and 551,738,646 BTUs (161,705 kwh) of energy per year. The calculated economic and financial cost of water savings is estimated to be $74.49 per ac-ft. The calculated economic and financial cost of energy savings is estimated to be $0.0003698 per BTU ($1.262 per kwh). In addition, expected real (vs nominal) values are indicated for the Bureau of Reclamation’s three principal evaluation measures specified in the United States Public Law 106-576 legislation. The initial construction cost per ac-ft of water savings measure is $57.76 per ac-ft of water savings. The initial construction cost per BTU (kwh) of energy savings measure is $0.0002661 per BTU ($0.908 per kwh). The ratio of initial construction costs per dollar of total annual economic savings is estimated to be -14.29.

Popp, Michael; Robinson, John; Sturdivant, Allen; Lacewell, Ronald; Rister, Edward

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Brownsville Irrigation District – 72" and 54" Pipeline Replacing Main Canal – Preliminary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a single-component capital renovation project proposed by Brownsville Irrigation District to the North American Development Bank (NADB) and Bureau of Reclamation (BOR). The proposed project involves constructing a 72" and 54" pipeline to replace 2.29 miles of the “Main Canal.” Both nominal and real estimates of water and energy savings and expected economic and financial costs of those savings are identified throughout the anticipated 49-year useful life for the proposed project. Sensitivity results for both the cost of water savings and cost of energy savings are presented for several important parameters. Annual water and energy savings forthcoming from the total project are estimated, using amortization procedures, to be 1,844 ac-ft of water per year and 313,797,977 BTUs (91,969 kwh) of energy per year. The calculated economic and financial cost of water savings is estimated to be $24.70 per ac-ft. The calculated economic and financial cost of energy savings is estimated at $0.0001740 per BTU ($0.594 per kwh). In addition, expected real (rather than nominal) values are indicated for the Bureau of Reclamation’s three principal evaluation measures specified in the United States Public Law 106-576 legislation. The initial construction cost per ac-ft of water savings measure is $56.74 per ac-ft of water savings. The initial construction cost per BTU (kwh) of energy savings measure is $0.0003335 per BTU ($1.138 per kwh). The ratio of initial construction costs per dollar of total annual economic savings is estimated to be -1.46.

Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Project: Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Juan) - Relining Lateral A – Preliminary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a single-component capital renovation project proposed by Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2, (a.k.a. San Juan) to the North American Development Bank (NADBank) and Bureau of Reclamation. The proposed project involves relining “Lateral A” with a geomembrane and shotcrete cover. Both nominal and real estimates of water and energy savings and expected economic and financial costs of those savings are identified throughout the anticipated useful life for the proposed project. Sensitivity results for both the cost of water savings and cost of energy savings are presented for several important parameters. Annual water and energy savings forthcoming from the total project are estimated, using amortization procedures, to be 2,542 ac-ft of water per year and 551,738,646 BTUs (161,705 kwh) of energy per year. The calculated economic and financial cost of water savings is estimated to be $74.49 per ac-ft. The calculated economic and financial cost of energy savings is estimated to be $0.0003698 per BTU ($1.262 per kwh). In addition, expected real (vs nominal) values are indicated for the Bureau of Reclamation’s three principal evaluation measures specified in the United States Public Law 106-576 legislation. The initial construction cost per ac-ft of water savings measure is $57.76 per ac-ft of water savings. The initial construction cost per BTU (kwh) of energy savings measure is $0.0002661 per BTU ($0.908 per kwh). The ratio of initial construction costs per dollar of total annual economic savings is estimated to be -14.29.

Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Brownsville Irrigation District – 72" and 48" Pipeline Replacing Main Canal – Final  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a single-component capital renovation project proposed by Brownsville Irrigation District to the North American Development Bank (NADB) and Bureau of Reclamation (BOR). The proposed project involves constructing a 72" and 48" pipeline to replace 2.31 miles of the “Main Canal.” Both nominal and real estimates of water and energy savings and expected economic and financial costs of those savings are identified throughout the anticipated 49-year useful life for the proposed project. Sensitivity results for both the cost of water savings and cost of energy savings are presented for several important parameters. Annual water and energy savings forthcoming from the total project are estimated, using amortization procedures, to be 1,872 ac-ft of water per year and 318,479,103 BTUs (93,341 kwh) of energy per year. The calculated economic and financial cost of water savings is estimated to be $27.98 per ac-ft. The calculated economic and financial cost of energy savings is estimated at $0.0001933 per BTU ($0.660 per kwh). In addition, expected real (rather than nominal) values are indicated for the Bureau of Reclamation’s three principal evaluation measures specified in the United States Public Law 106-576 legislation. The initial construction cost per ac-ft of water savings measure is $58.60 per ac-ft of water savings. The initial construction cost per BTU (kwh) of energy savings measure is $0.0003444 per BTU ($1.175 per kwh). The ratio of initial construction costs per dollar of total annual economic savings is estimated to be -1.53.

Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Cameron County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Benito) – Infrastructure Rehabilitation – Preliminary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a five-component capital renovation project proposed by Cameron County Irrigation District No. 2, (a.k.a. San Benito) to the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR). The proposed project involves rehabilitating 42+ miles of canals, laterals, and pipelines. Both nominal and real estimates of water and energy savings and expected economic and financial costs of those savings are identified throughout the anticipated useful lives for all five components of the proposed project. Sensitivity results for both the cost of water savings and cost of energy savings are presented for several important parameters. Annual water and energy savings forthcoming from the total project are estimated, using amortization procedures, to be 19,580 ac-ft of water per year and 2,151,277,209 BTUs (630,503 kwh) of energy per year. The calculated economic and financial cost of water savings is estimated to be $45.60 per ac-ft. The calculated economic and financial cost of energy savings is estimated at $0.0004399 per BTU ($1.501 per kwh). In addition, expected real (vs nominal) values are indicated for the Bureau of Reclamation’s three principal evaluation measures specified in the United States Public Law 106-576 legislation. The aggregate initial construction cost per ac-ft of water savings measure is $46.98 per ac-ft of water savings. The aggregate initial construction cost per BTU (kwh) of energy savings measure is $0.0004275 per BTU ($1.459 per kwh). The aggregate ratio of initial construction costs per dollar of total annual economic savings is estimated to be -9.04.

Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

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261

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Cameron County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Benito) - Infrastructure Rehabilitation - Final  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a five-component capital renovation project proposed by Cameron County Irrigation District No. 2, (a.k.a. San Benito) to the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR). The proposed project involves rehabilitating 42+ miles of canals, laterals, and pipelines. Both nominal and real estimates of water and energy savings and expected economic and financial costs of those savings are identified throughout the anticipated useful lives for all five components of the proposed project. Sensitivity results for both the cost of water savings and cost of energy savings are presented for several important parameters. Annual water and energy savings forthcoming from the total project are estimated, using amortization procedures, to be 19,580 ac-ft of water per year and 2,151,277,209 BTUs (630,503 kwh) of energy per year. The calculated economic and financial cost of water savings is estimated to be $45.60 per ac-ft. The calculated economic and financial cost of energy savings is estimated at $0.0004399 per BTU ($1.501 per kwh). In addition, expected real (vs nominal) values are indicated for the Bureau of Reclamation’s three principal evaluation measures specified in the United States Public Law 106-576 legislation. The aggregate initial construction cost per ac-ft of water savings measure is $46.98 per ac-ft of water savings. The aggregate initial construction cost per BTU (kwh) of energy savings measure is $0.0004275 per BTU ($1.459 per kwh). The aggregate ratio of initial construction costs per dollar of total annual economic savings is estimated to be -9.04.

Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.; Popp, Michael C.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Low Cost Hydrogen Production Platform  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A technology and design evaluation was carried out for the development of a turnkey hydrogen production system in the range of 2.4 - 12 kg/h of hydrogen. The design is based on existing SMR technology and existing chemical processes and technologies to meet the design objectives. Consequently, the system design consists of a steam methane reformer, PSA system for hydrogen purification, natural gas compression, steam generation and all components and heat exchangers required for the production of hydrogen. The focus of the program is on packaging, system integration and an overall step change in the cost of capital required for the production of hydrogen at small scale. To assist in this effort, subcontractors were brought in to evaluate the design concepts and to assist in meeting the overall goals of the program. Praxair supplied the overall system and process design and the subcontractors were used to evaluate the components and system from a manufacturing and overall design optimization viewpoint. Design for manufacturing and assembly (DFMA) techniques, computer models and laboratory/full-scale testing of components were utilized to optimize the design during all phases of the design development. Early in the program evaluation, a review of existing Praxair hydrogen facilities showed that over 50% of the installed cost of a SMR based hydrogen plant is associated with the high temperature components (reformer, shift, steam generation, and various high temperature heat exchange). The main effort of the initial phase of the program was to develop an integrated high temperature component for these related functions. Initially, six independent concepts were developed and the processes were modeled to determine overall feasibility. The six concepts were eventually narrowed down to the highest potential concept. A US patent was awarded in February 2009 for the Praxair integrated high temperature component design. A risk analysis of the high temperature component was conducted to identify any potential design deficiency related to the concept. The analysis showed that no fundamental design flaw existed with the concept, but additional simulations and prototypes would be required to verify the design prior to fabricating a production unit. These identified risks were addressed in detail during Phase II of the development program. Along with the models of the high temperature components, a detailed process and 3D design model of the remainder of system, including PSA, compression, controls, water treatment and instrumentation was developed and evaluated. Also, in Phase II of the program, laboratory/fullscale testing of the high temperature components was completed and stable operation/control of the system was verified. The overall design specifications and test results were then used to develop accurate hydrogen costs for the optimized system. Praxair continued development and testing of the system beyond the Phase II funding provided by the DOE through the end of 2008. This additional testing is not documented in this report, but did provide significant additional data for development of a prototype system as detailed in the Phase III proposal. The estimated hydrogen product costs were developed (2007 basis) for the 4.8 kg/h system at production rates of 1, 5, 10, 100 and 1,000 units built per year. With the low cost SMR approach, the product hydrogen costs for the 4.8 kg/h units at 50 units produced per year were approximately $3.02 per kg. With increasing the volume production to 1,000 units per year, the hydrogen costs are reduced by about 12% to $2.67 per kg. The cost reduction of only 12% is a result of significant design and fabrication efficiencies being realized in all levels of production runs through utilizing the DFMA principles. A simplified and easily manufactured design does not require large production volumes to show significant cost benefits. These costs represent a significant improvement and a new benchmark in the cost to produce small volume on-site hydrogen using existing process technologies. The cost mo

Timothy M. Aaron, Jerome T. Jankowiak

2009-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

263

Geothermal Energy Development in the Eastern United States: Technical assistance report No. 6 geothermal space heating and airconditioning -- McGuire Air Force Base, New Jersey  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A method of utilizing the geothermal (66 F) water resource for space heating and cooling of 200 of the 1452 housing units at McGuire AFB is suggested. Using projections of future costs of gas, coal and electricity made by DOD and by industry (Westinghouse), the relative costs of the geothermal-water-plus-heat-pump system and the otherwise-planned central gas heating (to be converted to coal in 1984) and air-conditioning (using individual electric units) system are compared. For heating with the geothermal/heat-pump system, an outlet temperature of 130 F is selected, requiring a longer running time than the conventional system (at 180 F) but permitting a COP (coefficient of performance) of the heat pump of about 3.4. For cooling (obtained in this study by changing directions of water flow, not refrigerant cycles), the change in temperature is less, and a COP near 4.5 is obtained. The cost of cooling in the summer months would be significantly less than the cost of using individual electric air-conditioners. Thus, by using nonreversible heat pumps, geothermal water is used to heat and to cool a section of the housing compound, minimizing operating expenditures. It is estimated that, to drill 1000 ft deep production and reinjection wells and to install ten heat pumps, heat exchangers and piping, would require a capital outlay of $643 K. This cost would replace the capital cost of purchasing and installing 200 air-conditioning units and 14% of the cost of the future coal-fired central heating system (which would otherwise serve all 1452 housing units at McGuire). The net additional capital outlay would be $299 K, which could be amortized in 10 years by the lower operating cost of the geothermal system if electricity and coal prices escalate as industry suggests. If the coal and electricity costs rise at the more modest rates that DOD projects, the capital costs would be amortized in a 15 year period.

Hill, F.K.; Briesen R. von

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

The effects of the implementation of grey water reuse systems on construction cost and project schedule  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the factors emphasized by Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED), a national consensus-based standard under the United States Green Building Council (USGBC) for developing sustainable or high performance buildings, is water efficiency. A LEED registered project can attain up to five points under water efficiency upon successful integration of various techniques to conserve water. Many techniques are available to conserve water and grey water reuse is one option considered by many LEED registered projects. In spite of widespread popularity, some of the sustainable techniques including grey water reuse, which is recommended by the USGBC and various agencies engaged in green building constructions, are not viable in many parts of the United States due to their effects on construction cost and project schedules. Even though a project could get one or multiple points upon successful implementation of a grey water reuse system and conserving potable water, the following factors may have a positive or negative effect on the design team’s decision to implement a grey water reuse system: capital cost, maintenance cost, LEED credits, local plumbing codes, project schedule, local water conservation issues, complexity of the system, etc. Implementation of a grey water reuse system has a significant effect on the capital cost of a project. The increase in cost may be attributed to dual sanitary and grey water distribution piping which doubles construction piping costs. Disinfection treatment, filtration, overflow protection, grey water storage tanks, etc. also add to the cost of construction. Ninety percent of the projects claim that project schedule is not affected by the implementation of a grey water reuse system in a green building project. The factors which prevent the project team from implementing a grey water reuse system include capital cost, maintenance cost, local plumbing codes, local water conservation issues, complexity of the system, etc. LEED credits and the spirit of sustainability are the factors which have a positive effect on the design team’s decision to implement a grey water reuse system.

Kaduvinal Varghese, Jeslin

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Selected bibliography: cost and energy savings of conservation and renewable energy technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This bibliography is a compilation of reports on the cost and energy savings of conservation and renewable energy applications throughout the United States. It is part of an overall effort to inform utilities of technological developments in conservation and renewable energy technologies and so aid utilities in their planning process to determine the most effective and economic combination of capital investments to meet customer needs. Department of Energy assessments of the applications, current costs and cost goals for the various technologies included in this bibliography are presented. These assessments are based on analyses performed by or for the respective DOE Program Offices. The results are sensitive to a number of variables and assumptions; however, the estimates presented are considered representative. These assessments are presented, followed by some conclusions regarding the potential role of the conservation and renewable energy alternative. The approach used to classify the bibliographic citations and abstracts is outlined.

None

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and juvenile progeny will be sampled and genotyped for 16 microsatellite markers (0). Estimate Connectivity altered the routes and conditions resident salmonids must undertake to connect with neighboring for the status of mountain whitefish. Population connectivity is a measurement of interbreeding among arbitrary

267

Earthrise Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Earthrise Capital Earthrise Capital Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Earthrise Capital Name Earthrise Capital Address 45 Rockefeller Plaza, 20th Floor Place New York, New York Zip 10111 Region Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Product Venture capital fund primarily focused on energy, power and water production and use Phone number (212) 757-1007 Website http://www.earthrisecapital.co Coordinates 40.758928°, -73.977127° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.758928,"lon":-73.977127,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

268

Letting The Sun Shine On Solar Costs: An Empirical Investigation Of Photovoltaic Cost Trends In California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PHOTOVOLTAIC COST TRENDS IN CALIFORNIA Ryan Wiser Lawrencein the United States: California. We find that: (1) solarof PV system costs in California. Through mid-November 2005,

Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Cappers, Peter; Margolis, Robert

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Venezuelan ``apertura`` invites private exploration capital  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Congress of the Republic of Venezuela on July 4, 1995, approved the conditions for an Exploration Association Contract. This action opened Venezuela to exploration for light and medium crudes by private companies in association with a special-purpose affiliate of Petroleos de Venezuela (Pdvsa). The objective of the apertura, or opening, is to attract private capital to Venezuela`s petroleum sector and thereby accelerate exploration and development of light and medium crude oil. An important parallel objective is for this incremental investment into the country to stimulate the domestic economy and encourage development and growth across all sectors. The paper discusses the geology of the four primary sedimentary basins in Venezuela, source rocks and maturity, and the costs and terms of Venezuela`s contract.

Carnevali, J. [Petroleos de Venezuela SA, Caracas (Venezuela)

1995-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

270

The Department's Controls over Leased Space in the National Capital Area |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Department's Controls over Leased Space in the National Capital The Department's Controls over Leased Space in the National Capital Area The Department's Controls over Leased Space in the National Capital Area The Department of Energy (Department) manages a sizeable inventory of real property, including both owned and leased properties. The Office of Management is responsible for the Department's real estate function, which includes acquisition by lease or purchase, inventory, utilization surveys, tracking and disposal of real property assets. In Fiscal Year 2007, the Department had approximately 10 million square feet of leased property at a cost of approximately $168 million. This included approximately 2.3 million square feet in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area costing approximately $45.6 million. The Department's Controls over Leased Space in the National Capital Area

271

New Roads to Capitalism: China and Global Value Chains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in technology or capital-intensity between these sub-levels of capital- and labor-intensities, asset specificity,technologies, capital- and labor-intensities, representing

Dallas, Mark Peter

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

What Matters for Financial Development? Capital Controls, Institutions, and Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the extent and intensity of capital account controls, themeasure of the intensity of capital controls,” Internationalto account for the intensity of capital controls. The most

Chinn, Menzie David; Ito, Hiro

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Cost and schedule reduction for next-generation Candu  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AECL has developed a suite of technologies for Candu{sup R} reactors that enable the next step in the evolution of the Candu family of heavy-water-moderated fuel-channel reactors. These technologies have been combined in the design for the Advanced Candu Reactor TM1 (ACRTM), AECL's next generation Candu power plant. The ACR design builds extensively on the existing Candu experience base, but includes innovations, in design and in delivery technology, that provide very substantial reductions in capital cost and in project schedules. In this paper, main features of next generation design and delivery are summarized, to provide the background basis for the cost and schedule reductions that have been achieved. In particular the paper outlines the impact of the innovative design steps for ACR: - Selection of slightly enriched fuel bundle design; - Use of light water coolant in place of traditional Candu heavy water coolant; - Compact core design with unique reactor physics benefits; - Optimized coolant and turbine system conditions. In addition to the direct cost benefits arising from efficiency improvement, and from the reduction in heavy water, the next generation Candu configuration results in numerous additional indirect cost benefits, including: - Reduction in number and complexity of reactivity mechanisms; - Reduction in number of heavy water auxiliary systems; - Simplification in heat transport and its support systems; - Simplified human-machine interface. The paper also describes the ACR approach to design for constructability. The application of module assembly and open-top construction techniques, based on Candu and other worldwide experience, has been proven to generate savings in both schedule durations and overall project cost, by reducing premium on-site activities, and by improving efficiency of system and subsystem assembly. AECL's up-to-date experience in the use of 3-D CADDS and related engineering tools has also been proven to reduce both engineering and construction costs through more efficient work planning and use of materials, through reduced re-work and through more precise configuration management. Full-scale exploitation of AECL's electronic engineering and project management tools enables further reductions in cost. The Candu fuel-channel reactor type offers inherent manufacturing and construction advantages through the application of a simple, low-pressure low-temperature reactor vessel along with modular fuel channel technology. This leads to cost benefits and total project schedule benefits. As a result, the targets which AECL has set for replication units - overnight capital cost of $1000 US/kW and total project schedule (engineering/manufacturing/construction/commissioning) of 48 months, have been shown to be achievable for the reference NG Candu design. (authors)

Hopwood, J.M.; Yu, S.; Pakan, M.; Soulard, M. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, 2251 Speakman Drive, Mississauga, Ontario, L5K 1B2 (Canada)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Dragonfly Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dragonfly Capital Dragonfly Capital Jump to: navigation, search Name Dragonfly Capital Place Charlotte, North Carolina Zip 28203 Sector Renewable Energy, Services Product Charlotte-based investment bank providing corporate finance and M&A advisory services to middle market companies, primarily in renewable energy Coordinates 35.2225°, -80.837539° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.2225,"lon":-80.837539,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

275

Ardour Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ardour Capital Ardour Capital Jump to: navigation, search Name Ardour Capital Investments LLC Address 350 5th ave Place New York, New York Zip 10118 Region Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Number of employees 11-50 Year founded 2002 Phone number 2123752950 Website http://www.ardourcapital.com Coordinates 40.74807°, -73.984959° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.74807,"lon":-73.984959,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

276

Cascadia Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cascadia Capital Cascadia Capital Jump to: navigation, search Name Cascadia Capital Address 701 Fifth Avenue Place Seattle, Washington Zip 98104 Region Pacific Northwest Area Product Investment bank focusing on cleantech deals Website http://www.cascadiacapital.com Coordinates 47.6044155°, -122.3298997° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.6044155,"lon":-122.3298997,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

277

A case study of cost overruns in a Thai condominium project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Construction managers confront many problems. Still, this industry plays a vital role in the healthy growth of the economy of many countries throughout the developed and developing world. Effective management of construction projects has been a major research subject in the last century due to the importance of this industry and the amount of money it attracts. One critical problem facing construction managers is inefficient cost control procedures, particularly in developing regions of the world. Since the end of the Second World War, the use of sophisticated cost control procedures in managing and controlling project costs have been accepted and applied widely in many parts of the world such as the United States and the United Kingdom. These procedures are important in a growing economy to ensure delivery of projects on time and within budget, but they are equally important during an economic recession when project viability becomes marginal. In the early 1990s, the construction industry in Thailand played a critical role during a period of strong economic growth. Construction cost control was not a major concern as developers rushed to capitalize on the booming market. In the late 1990s, the economy of Southeast Asia sank into recession. Project cost control became a critical issue for the developers as well as the construction companies in managing construction projects. A significant number of projects in Thailand in the late 1990s had significant cost overruns. Cost overruns had been a problem during the high growth period in the early 1990s, but demand overcame the problems created by poor cost control. The use of good project cost control procedures has become a concern of project investors and construction companies in Thailand since the recession of the late 1990s. Project managers and developers are now aware that the failure of a cost control system or use of a poor system can lead to project failure. Project cost control methods need to be improved in Thailand to ensure that owners and contractors manage construction costs and meet project goals on time and within budget. In this study, project cost controls in the United States and Thailand will be examined. These procedures will be analyzed to identify their similarities and differences. The causes and solutions for cost overruns in the two countries will also be examined. The results from the study will illustrate how the project cost control procedures used in the United States can be applied to the construction industry in Thailand to improve the procedures used by Thai contractors.

Roachanakanan, Kwanchai

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Costs and benefits of industrial reporting and voluntary targets for energy efficiency. A report to the Congress of the United States. Volume I: Main report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Section 131(c) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT) (Public Law 102-486) requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate the costs and benefits of federally mandated energy efficiency reporting requirements and voluntary energy efficiency improvement targets for energy-intensive industries. It also requires DOE to evaluate the role of reporting and targets in improving energy efficiency. Specifically, the legislation states: Not later than one year after the data of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall, in consultation with affected industries, evaluate and report to the Congress regarding the establishment of Federally mandated energy efficiency reporting requirements and voluntary energy efficiency improvement targets for energy intensive industries. Such report shall include an evaluation of the costs and benefits of such reporting requirements and voluntary energy efficiency improvement targets, and recommendations regarding the role of such activities in improving energy efficiency in energy intensive industries. This report is DOE`s response to that directive. It is the culmination of a year-long study that included (1) analysis of documents pertaining to a previous reporting and targets effort, the industrial Energy Efficiency Improvements Program (or the CE-189 program, following the designation of the reporting form used to collect data in that program), administered by DOE from 1976 to 1985, as well as other important background information; (2) extensive consultations with government and industry officials regarding the CE-189 Program, experience with other programs that have reporting elements, and the attributes of possible alternative strategies for reporting and targets; and (3) analyses of the costs and benefits of the CE-189 Program and several alternatives to the CE-189 approach.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Capitalizing on coal  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) predicts that the equivalent of 44 baseload coal fired power plants will be needed to keep pace with US electricity demand by 2025. Potential builders are looking for greater certainty on a number of energy, environmental and regulatory issues before they invest. The work of the Edison Electric Institute (EEI) in advocating solutions to create this certainty is reported in this article. It is asking Congress to put transmission assets on a par with other major assets and reduce their depreciable lives from 20 to 15 years, and calling for repeal legislation that limits investment in the regulated energy industry. EEI is advocating federal environmental legislation similar to the Clean Skies Act that would lower emissions faster, with greater certainty, and with greater cost savings. EEI is encouraging FERC to work with states to increase certainty of builders recovering their investment in coal plants. 2 photos.

McMahon, F. [Edison Electric Institute (United States). Alliance of Energy Suppliers

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Beetle Capital Partners BCP | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BCP BCP Jump to: navigation, search Name Beetle Capital Partners (BCP) Place London, United Kingdom Zip W1S 1UA Sector Carbon Product London-based asset management company focussed on investment opportunities created by the transition to a low carbon economy. Coordinates 51.506325°, -0.127144° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.506325,"lon":-0.127144,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "units capital costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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281

Sustainable Development Capital LLP | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LLP LLP Jump to: navigation, search Name Sustainable Development Capital LLP Place London, United Kingdom Zip W1S 3AT Product Investment bank working with financial institutions, governments, developers and corporates on large scale sustainable development projects. Coordinates 51.506325°, -0.127144° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.506325,"lon":-0.127144,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

282

Measuring Cost Variability in Provision of Transit Service  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pro- vide separate cost estimates for two periods—the peakvehicle-hour unit-cost estimates for the peak and base= vehicle-hour unit-cost estimate for peak, U BVH = vehicle-

Taylor, Brian D.; Garrett, Mark; Iseki, Hiroyuki

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Venture Capital, High Technology and Regional Development’  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper explores the role ofventure capital in technological innovation and regional development. Both aggregate data and a unique firm level data base are employed to determine the location of major centres of venture capital, flows of venture capital investments, and patterns of investment syndication or coinvestment among venture capital firms. Three major centres of venture capital arc identified: California (San Francisco-Silicon Valley); New York; and Ncw England (Massachusetts-Connecticut): as well as three minor venture capital centres: Illinois (Chicago); Texas; and Minnesota. Venture capital firms are found to cluster in areas with high concentrations of financial institutions and those with high concentrations of technology-intensive enterprises. Venture capital firms which are based in financial centres are typically export-oriented, while those in technology centres tend to invest in their own region and attract outside venture capital. Venture capital investmcnts flow predominantly toward established high technology areas such as Silicon Valley and Boston-Iioute 128, and venturc investing is also characterized by high degrees of intra-and inter-regional syndication or coinvestment. The venture capital industry displays a high level of agglomeration due to the information intensive nature of the investment process and the importance of venture capital networks in locating investments, mobilizing resources, and establishing business start-ups. The existence of well developed venture capital networks in technology-based regions significantly accelerates the pace of technological innovation and economic development in those regions.

Richard L. Florida; Martin Kenneyt

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Assessment of light water reactor power plant cost and ultra-acceleration depreciation financing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although in many regions of the U.S. the least expensive electricity is generated from light-water reactor (LWR) plants, the fixed (capital plus operation and maintenance) cost has increased to the level where the cost ...

El-Magboub, Sadek Abdulhafid.

285

National Lab Uses OGJ Data to Develop Cost Equations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the past 30 years, the Oil and Gas Journal (OGJ) has published data on the costs of onshore and offshore oil and gas pipelines and related equipment. This article describes the methodology employed and resulting equations developed for conceptual capital cost estimating of onshore pipelines. Also described are cost trends uncovered during the course of the analysis.

Brown, Daryl R.; Cabe, James E.; Stout, Tyson E.

2011-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

286

Human Capital Management | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Human Capital Management Human Capital Management Human Capital Management The strategic management of human capital requires comprehensive planning and analysis in order to develop, implement, and evaluate programs that support every facet of employee work life. DOE human capital initiatives are designed to support continuous improvement and accountability in accordance with the DOE Human Capital Management Accountability Program (HCMAP), which is an internal DOE audit process of servicing human resources offices and addresses those documents that require coordination with the Office of the Chief Human Capital Officer before being implemented; Human Resource Directors; the Department's 5-year Strategic Human Capital Management Plan; Departmental element workforce plans; the Department's personnel accountability program that is used

287

Mont Vista Capital LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vista Capital LLC Vista Capital LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Mont Vista Capital LLC Place New York, New York Zip 10167 Sector Services Product Mont Vista Capital is a leading global provider of services to clients in the alternative energy industry. Mont Vista also seeks proprietary trading and growth equity opportunities in alternative energy markets which add value for our stakeholders. References Mont Vista Capital LLC[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Mont Vista Capital LLC is a company located in New York, New York . References ↑ "Mont Vista Capital LLC" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Mont_Vista_Capital_LLC&oldid=348916"

288

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Edinburg Irrigation District Hidalgo County No. 1 - 72" Pipeline Replacing Delivery Canal and Multi-Size Pipeline Replacing Delivery Canal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for the capital renovation project proposed by Edinburg Irrigation District Hidalgo County No. 1 to the North American Development Bank (NADBank). Both nominal and real, expected economic and financial costs of water and energy savings are identified throughout the anticipated useful lives for both components of the proposed project (i.e., 72" pipeline replacing a segment of delivery canal along the "Curry Main" and multi-size pipeline replacing a segment of delivery canal along the "North Branch / East Main"). Sensitivity results for both the cost of water savings and cost of energy savings are presented for several important parameters. Expected cost of water savings and cost of energy savings for both components are aggregated into a composite set of cost measures for the total proposed project. Aggregate cost of water savings is estimated to be $29.87 per ac-ft and energy savings are measured at an aggregate value of $0.0000595 per BTU (i.e., $0.203 per kwh). In addition, expected values are indicated for the Bureau of Reclamation's three principal evaluation measures specified in the United States Public Law 106-576 legislation. The aggregate initial construction cost per ac-ft of water savings measure is $50.90 per ac-ft of water savings. The aggregate initial construction cost per BTU (kwh) of energy savings measure is $0.0000777 per BTU ($0.265 per kwh). The ratio of initial construction costs per dollar of total annual economic savings is estimated to be -2.01.

Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.; Ellis, John R.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

EM Contractors for Capital Asset Projects  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Read the EM Contractors for Capital Asset Projects list, which includes the project name, number, site, and contractor.

290

DID J. P. MORGAN’S MEN ADD VALUE? An Economist’s Perspective on Financial Capitalism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The pre-WWI period saw the heyday of “financial capitalism”—the dominance of investment bankers in their dealings with firm managers—in the United States. This form of organization had costs: it created conflicts of interest that investment bankers could exploit for their own profit. It also had benefits: investment banker representation on boards allowed bankers to quickly replace managers whose performance was unsatisfactory and signal to ultimate investors that a company was well managed and sound. In 1911–12 the presence on one’s board of directors of a partner in J.P. Morgan and Co. added about 30 percent to common stock equity value, and about 15 percent to the total market value of the firm. Sat, Aug 12, 1995 1 J. Bradford De Long

J. Bradford; De Long; J. Bradford; De Long

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Valuing the Treasury's Capital Assistance Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Capital Assistance Program (CAP) was created by the U.S. government in February 2009 to provide backup capital to large financial institutions unable to raise sufficient capital from private investors. Under the terms of the CAP, a participating ... Keywords: applications, banks, dynamic programming, finance, financial institutions, securities

Paul Glasserman; Zhenyu Wang

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

MOTOR-VEHICLE INFRASTRUCTURE AND SERVICES PROVIDED BY THE PUBLIC SECTOR Report #7 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

based on the cost estimates for private parking, in Report #and institutional parking The cost estimates for 1991 area complete social-cost estimate would include, in addition,

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Motor-Vehicle Infrastructure and Services Provided by the Public Sector: Report #7 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

based on the cost estimates for private parking, in Report #and institutional parking The cost estimates for 1991 area complete social-cost estimate would include, in addition,

Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

A GIS COST MODEL TO ASSESS THE AVAILABILITY OF FRESHWATER, SEAWATER, AND SALINE GROUNDWATER FOR ALGAL BIOFUEL PRODUCTION IN THE UNITED STATES  

SciTech Connect

A key advantage of using microalgae for biofuel production is the ability of some algal strains to thrive in waters unsuitable for conventional crop irrigation such as saline groundwater or seawater. Nonetheless, the availability of sustainable water supplies will provide significant challenges for scale-up and development of algal biofuels. We conduct a limited techno-economic assessment based on the availability of freshwater, saline groundwater, and seawater for use in open pond algae cultivation systems. We explore water issues through GIS-based models of algae biofuel production, freshwater supply, and cost models for supplying seawater and saline groundwater. We estimate that combined, within the coterminous US these resources can support production on the order of 9.46E+7 m3 yr-1 (25 billion gallons yr-1) of renewable biodiesel. Achievement of larger targets requires the utilization of less water efficient sites and relatively expensive saline waters. Geographically, water availability is most favorable for the coast of the Gulf of Mexico and Florida peninsula, where evaporation relative to precipitation is moderate and various saline waters are economically available. As a whole, barren and scrub lands of the southwestern US have limited freshwater supplies so accurate assessment of alternative waters is critical.

Venteris, Erik R.; Skaggs, Richard; Coleman, Andre M.; Wigmosta, Mark S.

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

295

Cost-Energy Dynamics: An Engineering - Economic Basis for Industrial Energy Conservation Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper develops a theory called cost-energy dynamics that can be used to shape policies for industrial energy conservation. It is built on two hypotheses commonly observed in process engineering; namely, cost varies as positive power function while energy varies as negative power function of the system size and/ or complexity. These two hypotheses, which have roots in thermodynamics, give rise to a technological parameter (denoted c) that can be determined for each unit process. Cost-energy dynamics ranks energy conservation potentials of industrial processes by the technology parameter c, aggregates energy consumption by unit processes, considers energy embodied in the investment, considers the trade-offs between cost and energy, and distinguishes bases for decision making in the public and private sectors. Five unit processes are used to represent the U.S. manufacturing industry. The aggregated technology parameter for industry is determined to be about 3.5. This value and the data on existing energy consumption allow the determination of energy conservation potentials, extra capital investment requirements, and the possible energy picture by the year 2000. Several public policy tools are evaluated for their effectiveness in stimulating energy conservation.

Phung, D. L.; van Gool, W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

2013 Snapshot of NGSI Human Capital Development and Future Roadmap  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since its creation in 2008, the Human Capital Development (HCD) subprogram of NNSA s Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) has been striving to develop sustainable academic and technical programs that support the recruitment, education, training, and retention of the next generation of international safeguards professionals. This effort endeavors to develop additional human resources to equip a new cadre of safeguards and nonproliferation experts to meet the needs of both the United States and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) for decades to come, specifically in response to data that indicates that 82% of the 2009 safeguards experts at U.S. Laboratories will have left the workforce within 15 years. This paper provides an update on the status of the program since its last presentation at the INMM Annual Meeting in 2010, including strengthened and integrated efforts in the areas of graduate and post-doctoral fellowships, young and mid-career professional support, additional short safeguards coursework, and expanded university engagement. In particular, the paper will cover the NGSI Human Capital Roadmap currently being developed in safeguards and nonproliferation education, training, and knowledge retention. The NGSI Human Capital Roadmap aims to provide additional data points and metrics on where the human capital demand lies, which disciplines and skill sets are needed in the field, and how NGSI HCD can best address these issues to meet future demand.

Scholz, Melissa A [ORNL; Poe, Sarah M [ORNL; Dewji, Shaheen A [ORNL; Finklea, Lauren R [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Mr. Walter Huber, Director Capital Improvements Division National Capital Region  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Walter Huber, Director Walter Huber, Director Capital Improvements Division National Capital Region 7th & D Streets, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20407 Dear Mr. Huber: As you may know, the Department of Energy (DOE) is evaluating the radiological condition of sites that were utilized under the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) during the early years of nuclear development to determine whether they need remedial action and whether the Department has authority to perform such action. General Services Administration (GSA) was contacted through correspondence with Mr. John P. Allen, Project Director, Special Projects Division of GSA, that the former National Bureau of Standards (NBS) building on Van Ness Street was identified as one such site. This building was used by NBS

298

Effects of regional insolation differences upon advanced solar thermal electric power plant performance and energy costs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study determines the performance and cost of four 10 MWe advanced solar thermal electric power plants sited in various regions of the continental United States. The solar plants are conceptualized to begin commercial operation in the year 2000. It is assumed that major subsystem performance will have improved substantially as compared to that of pilot plants currently operating or under construction. The net average annual system efficiency is therefore roughly twice that of current solar thermal electric power plant designs. Similarly, capital costs reflecting goals based on high-volume mass production that are considered to be appropriate for the year 2000 have been used. These costs, which are approximately an order of magnitude below the costs of current experimental projects, are believed to be achievable as a result of the anticipated sizeable solar penetration into the energy market in the 1990 to 2000 timeframe. The paraboloidal dish, central receiver, cylindrical parabolic trough, and compound parabolic concentrators comprise the advanced collector concepts studied. All concepts exhibit their best performance when sited in regional areas such as the sunbelt where the annual insolation is high. The regional variation in solar plant performance has been assessed in relation to the expected rise in the future cost of residential and commercial electricity in the same regions. A discussion of the regional insolation data base, a description of the solar systems performance and costs, and a presentation of a range for the forecast cost of conventional electricity by region and nationally over the next several decades are given.

Latta, A.F.; Bowyer, J.M.; Fujita, T.; Richter, P.H.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

MOTOR-VEHICLE INFRASTRUCTURE AND SERVICES PROVIDED BY THE PUBLIC SECTOR Report #7 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OIL - HOLDING COSTS .AND MANAGEMENT, AND OIL-HOLDING COSTS 7.12.1 Background TheO & M costs, and oil–holding costs -- can be estimated from

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

U. S. Military Expenditures to Protect the Use of Persian Gulf Oil for Motor Vehicles: Report #15 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the cost of crude oil and the cost of the products is notare related to the amount and cost of oil imported from theDivision, The External Costs of Oil Used in Transportation,

Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "units capital costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Motor-Vehicle Infrastructure and Services Provided by the Public Sector: Report #7 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OIL - HOLDING COSTS .AND MANAGEMENT, AND OIL-HOLDING COSTS 7.12.1 Background TheO & M costs, and oil–holding costs -- can be estimated from

Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Microsoft PowerPoint - Cost Escalation.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydroelectric Design Center Hydroelectric Design Center Hydroelectric Design Center " " Cost Trends for Cost Trends for Hydropower Capital Hydropower Capital Replacements" Replacements" Presentation Outline Presentation Outline A little about HDC A little about HDC Cost Escalation of materials Cost Escalation of materials Issues impacting interest & bids Issues impacting interest & bids Discussion Discussion HDC Expertise HDC Expertise Mission Mission The Hydroelectric Design Center performs The Hydroelectric Design Center performs engineering and design, maintains engineering and design, maintains expertise, and develops standards for the expertise, and develops standards for the US Army Corps of Engineers hydroelectric US Army Corps of Engineers hydroelectric

303

Certified Capital Companies (Missouri) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Certified Capital Companies (Missouri) Certified Capital Companies (Missouri) Certified Capital Companies (Missouri) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Retail Supplier Systems Integrator Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Missouri Program Type Equity Investment Provider Missouri Department of Economic Development Certified Capital Companies (CAPCO), the creation of the Department of Economic Development (DED,) are venture capital firms which have certain requirements to make equity investments in eligible businesses in Missouri. To qualify for CAPCO funding, businesses must be independently owned, headquartered in Missouri and employ less than 200 persons before the

304

Optimization of Transmission Line Design Using Life Cycle Costing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When an overhead line is designed, all costs incurred during the expected life of the line should be considered. The total cost during the life or life-cycle cost of a transmission line is a combination of the initial capital cost, operation and maintenance (O&M) cost, cost of electrical losses over its entire life, and dependability associated costs. The option that has the lowest life-cycle cost is selected as the optimized design. A tool is required by utility engineers to help them readily select an ...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

305

Optimization of Transmission Line Design Using Life-Cycle Costing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When an overhead line is designed, all costs incurred during the expected life of the line should be considered. The total cost during the life, or life-cycle cost, of a transmission line is a combination of the initial capital cost, operation and maintenance (O&M) cost, cost of electrical losses over its entire life, and dependability-associated costs. The option that has the lowest life-cycle cost is selected as the optimized design. A tool is required by utility engineers to help them readily select a...

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

306

Birch Tree Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tree Capital Tree Capital Jump to: navigation, search Name Birch Tree Capital Place Framingham, Massachusetts Zip 1701 Sector Renewable Energy Product Financial advisory service with a project finance focus that has investor as well a project developer clients. Specialise in renewable power projects generating Federal tax credits and on-site cogeneration projects. References Birch Tree Capital[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Birch Tree Capital is a company located in Framingham, Massachusetts . References ↑ "Birch Tree Capital" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Birch_Tree_Capital&oldid=342882" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

307

RAM Capital Management Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RAM Capital Management Group RAM Capital Management Group Jump to: navigation, search Name RAM Capital Management Group Place Boca Raton, Florida Zip 33486 Sector Hydro, Hydrogen Product Private VC fund and investment banking advisory firm investing in fuel cells and hydrogen. References RAM Capital Management Group[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. RAM Capital Management Group is a company located in Boca Raton, Florida . References ↑ "RAM Capital Management Group" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=RAM_Capital_Management_Group&oldid=350184" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes

308

Green Energy Capital Partners | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Capital Partners Capital Partners Jump to: navigation, search Name Green Energy Capital Partners Place Plymouth Meeting, Pennsylvania Zip 19462 Sector Wind energy Product Pennsylvania-based project developer, founded in 2007. Planning PV as well as wind projects in the state as well as overseas. References Green Energy Capital Partners[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Green Energy Capital Partners is a company located in Plymouth Meeting, Pennsylvania . References ↑ "Green Energy Capital Partners" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Green_Energy_Capital_Partners&oldid=346013" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies

309

Eco Capital LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Capital LLC Capital LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Eco Capital LLC Place New York, New York Zip 10166 Sector Carbon, Renewable Energy Product New York-based advisory and investment firm prioritizing activity in renewable energy, clean technology and carbon finance. References Eco Capital LLC[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Eco Capital LLC is a company located in New York, New York . References ↑ "Eco Capital LLC" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Eco_Capital_LLC&oldid=344441" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link

310

Viresco International Capital Management | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Viresco International Capital Management Viresco International Capital Management Jump to: navigation, search Name Viresco International Capital Management Place San Diego, California Zip 92130 Product San Diego-based hedge fund, who recently initiated a fund that will prioritize activity towards clean technology - Viresco Opportunities Global Fund. References Viresco International Capital Management[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Viresco International Capital Management is a company located in San Diego, California . References ↑ "Viresco International Capital Management" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Viresco_International_Capital_Management&oldid=352843

311

Quadrant Capital Advisors Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Quadrant Capital Advisors Inc Quadrant Capital Advisors Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Quadrant Capital Advisors Inc. Place New York, New York Zip 10022 Sector Hydro, Wind energy Product US based Private Equity investor in small hydro and wind, mostly in LatAm. References Quadrant Capital Advisors Inc.[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Quadrant Capital Advisors Inc. is a company located in New York, New York . References ↑ "Quadrant Capital Advisors Inc." Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Quadrant_Capital_Advisors_Inc&oldid=350132" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes

312

Haywood Dorland Energy Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dorland Energy Capital Dorland Energy Capital Jump to: navigation, search Name Haywood Dorland Energy Capital Place New York, New York Sector Renewable Energy Product New York-based private equity and debt firm that invests in renewable energy companies and projects. References Haywood Dorland Energy Capital[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Haywood Dorland Energy Capital is a company located in New York, New York . References ↑ "Haywood Dorland Energy Capital" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Haywood_Dorland_Energy_Capital&oldid=346399" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes

313

Capital E | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

E E Jump to: navigation, search Name Capital E Place Washington, Washington, DC Zip DC 20003 Sector Services, Solar Product Capital E is a consulting firm which provides services such as technology evaluation and strategic marketing support for mainly fuel cell and solar power industries. Coordinates 38.89037°, -77.031959° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.89037,"lon":-77.031959,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

314

Integration of photovoltaic units into electric utility grids: experiment information requirements and selected issues  

SciTech Connect

A number of investigations have led to the recognition of technical, economic, and institutional issues relating to the interface between solar electric technologies and electric utility systems. These issues derive from three attributes of solar electric power concepts, including (1) the variability and unpredictability of the solar resources, (2) the dispersed nature of those resources which suggest the deployment of small dispersed power units, and (3) a high initial capital cost coupled with relatively low operating costs. An important part of the DOE programs to develop new source technologies, in particular photovoltaic systems, is the experimental testing of complete or nearby complete power units. These experiments provide an opportunity to examine operational and integration issues which must be understood before widespread commercial deployment of these technologies can be achieved. Experiments may also be required to explicitly examine integration, operational, and control aspects of single and multiple new source technology power units within a utility system. An identification of utility information requirements, a review of planned experiments, and a preliminary determination of additional experimental needs and opportunities are presented. Other issues discussed include: (1) the impacts of on-site photovoltaic units on load duration curves and optimal generation mixes are considered; (2) the impacts of on-site photovoltaic units on utility production costs, with and without dedicated storage and with and without sellback, are analyzed; and (3) current utility rate structure experiments, rationales, policies, practices, and plans are reviewed.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Rates of Return and Alternative Measures of Capital  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We employ the EU KLEMS database to estimate the real rate of return to capital in 14 countries (11 in the EU, three outside the EU) in 10 branches of the market economy plus the market economy as a whole. Our measure of capital is an aggregate over seven types of asset: three ICT assets (computers, communications equipment, and software) and four non-ICT assets (machinery and equipment, nonresidential structures, transport equipment, and other). The real rate of return in the market economy does not vary very much across countries, with the exception of Spain where it is exceptionally high and in Italy where it is exceptionally low. The real rate appears to be trendless in most countries. Within each country however, the rate varies widely across the 10 branches, often being implausibly high or low. We also estimate the growth of capital services by two different methods: ex-post and exante, and the contribution of capital to output growth by three methods: ex-post, ex-ante and hybrid. Our implementation of the ex-ante method uses an estimate of the required rate of return for each country instead of the actual, average rate of return to calculate user costs and also employs the expected growth of asset prices rather than the actual growth. These estimates are derived from exactly the same data as for the ex-post method, ie without any extraneous data being employed. For estimating the contribution of capital to output growth, the ex-ante method uses ex-ante profit as the weight, while both the ex-post and the hybrid method use ex-post profit. We find that the three methods produce very similar results at the market economy level. But differences are much larger at the branch level, particularly between the ex-post and ex-ante methods.

Nicholas Oulton; Ana Rincon-aznar Abstract

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Economic impacts of the total nuclear waste management program envisioned for the United States  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents information on the costs of nuclear waste management and on the impacts of those costs on the price of power and on the capital and labor markets. It is assumed that the LWR would be the sole commercial reactor used through the year 2000. Two fuel cycle options are considered: the throwaway mode (spent fuel is waste), and the full recycle for comparison. Total costs are calculated for all facilities needed to store, package, and reposit all the spent fuel through the lifetime of 380 GW capacity installed by 2000 and operating for 30 y. The economic impact is: the price of power produced by the reactors would be increased by 1.4%; the capital for nuclear plants would apply to waste management; the average annual labor effort needed over the next 50 to 75 years is 3000 to 5000 man years; and the unit cost of spent fuel disposal is $129/kg ($119/kg for full recycle). 7 tables. (DLC)

Busch, L.; Zielen, A.J.; Parry, S.J.S.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

EUV lithography cost of ownership analysis  

SciTech Connect

The cost of fabricating state-of-the-art integrated circuits (ICs) has been increasing and it will likely be economic rather than technical factors that ultimately limit the progress of ICs toward smaller devices. It is estimated that lithography currently accounts for approximately one-third the total cost of fabricating modem ICs({sup 1}). It is expected that this factor will be fairly stable for the forseeable future, and as a result, any lithographic process must be cost-effective before it can be considered for production. Additionally, the capital equipment cost for a new fabrication facility is growing at an exponential rate (2); it will soon require a multibillion dollar investment in capital equipment alone to build a manufacturing facility. In this regard, it is vital that any advanced lithography candidate justify itself on the basis of cost effectiveness. EUV lithography is no exception and close attention to issues of wafer fabrication costs have been a hallmark of its early history. To date, two prior cost analyses have been conducted for EUV lithography (formerly called {open_quotes}Soft X-ray Projection Lithography{close_quotes}). The analysis by Ceglio, et. al., provided a preliminary system design, set performance specifications and identified critical technical issues for cost control. A follow-on analysis by Early, et.al., studied the impact of issues such as step time, stepper overhead, tool utilization, escalating photoresist costs and limited reticle usage on wafer exposure costs. This current study provides updated system designs and specifications and their impact on wafer exposure costs. In addition, it takes a first cut at a preliminary schematic of an EUVL fabrication facility along with an estimate of the capital equipment costs for such a facility.

Hawryluk, A.M.; Ceglio, N.M.

1995-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

318

HTGR Cost Model Users' Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The High Temperature Gas-Cooler Reactor (HTGR) Cost Model was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project. The HTGR Cost Model calculates an estimate of the capital costs, annual operating and maintenance costs, and decommissioning costs for a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. The user can generate these costs for multiple reactor outlet temperatures; with and without power cycles, including either a Brayton or Rankine cycle; for the demonstration plant, first of a kind, or nth of a kind project phases; for a single or four-pack configuration; and for a reactor size of 350 or 600 MWt. This users manual contains the mathematical models and operating instructions for the HTGR Cost Model. Instructions, screenshots, and examples are provided to guide the user through the HTGR Cost Model. This model was design for users who are familiar with the HTGR design and Excel. Modification of the HTGR Cost Model should only be performed by users familiar with Excel and Visual Basic.

A.M. Gandrik

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

U-AVLIS feed conversion using continuous metallothermic reduction of UF{sub 4}: System description and cost estimate  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to present a system description and develop baseline capital and operating cost estimates for commercial facilities which produced U-Fe feedstock for AVLIS enrichment plants using the continuous fluoride reduction (CFR) process. These costs can then be used together with appropriate economic assumptions to calculate estimated unit costs to the AVLIS plant owner (or utility customer) for such conversion services. Six cases are being examined. All cases assume that the conversion services are performed by a private company at a commercial site which has an existing NRC license to possess source material and which has existing uranium processing operations. The cases differ in terms of annual production capacity and whether the new process system is installed in a new building or in an existing building on the site. The six cases are summarized here.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: H2 Fueling Appliances Cost and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

H2 Fueling Appliances Cost and Performance H2 Fueling Appliances Cost and Performance Project Summary Full Title: H2 Production Infrastructure Analysis - Task 2: Cost and Performance of H2 Fueling Appliances Project ID: 80 Principal Investigator: Brian James Keywords: Costs; steam methane reforming (SMR); autothermal reforming (ATR); hydrogen fueling Purpose The purpose of the analysis was to estimate the capital cost and the resulting cost of hydrogen of several types of methane-fueled hydrogen production systems. A bottoms-up cost analysis was conducted of each system to generate a system design and detailed bill-of-materials. Estimates of the overall capital cost of the hydrogen production appliance were generated. This work supports Systems Analysis Milestone A1. ("Complete techno-economic analysis on production and delivery technologies currently

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "units capital costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Energy Conservation Fund: Helping Corporations Develop Energy Conservation Strategies and Reduce Utility Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy conservation projects can save companies significant money over time and often pay for themselves very quickly. This is especially true with the dramatic increase in energy costs over the past few years. Yet convincing corporate decision makers of their value is challenging, since most plants with limited capital tend to direct resources toward projects that increase production rather than toward those that save energy. The irony is that production projects may not realize savings if markets change, while conservation improvements usually change a plant's infrastructure in ways that ensure continued savings. Establishing a business unit or department focused on energy cost reduction and investing its profits in an Energy Conservation Fund (ECF) is part of a total energy approach that helps corporations identify projects, dedicate funds and implement changes. It makes conservation improvement projects more attractive on the front end, so companies can enjoy the long-term benefits.

Swanson, G. A.; Houston, W.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Effects of a shortened depreciation schedule on the investment costs for combined heat and power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate and compare several generic depreciation methods to assess the effectiveness of possible policy measures with respect to the depreciation schedules for investments in combined heat and power plants in the United States. We assess the different depreciation methods for CHP projects of various sizes (ranging from 1 MW to 100 MW). We evaluate the impact of different depreciation schedules on the tax shield, and the resulting tax savings to potential investors. We show that a shorter depreciation cycle could have a substantial impact on the cost of producing power, making cogeneration more attractive. The savings amount to approximately 6-7 percent of capital and fixed operation and maintenance costs, when changing from the current system to a 7 year depreciation scheme with switchover from declining balance to straight line depreciation. Suggestions for further research to improve the analysis are given.

Kranz, Nicole; Worrell, Ernst

2001-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

323

United States Government Memorandum  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8/16/07 09:15 FAX 301 903 4656 CAPITAL REGION 8/16/07 09:15 FAX 301 903 4656 CAPITAL REGION * 002 DOE F 1325.8 (08-93) Department of Energy United States Government Memorandum DATE: August 15, 2007 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-07-22 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-34 (A06GT006) SUBJECT: Report on "Hazardous Chemicals Inventory Management at the Savannah River Site" TO: Manager, Savannah River Operations Office BACKGROUND The Savannah River Site (Savannah River) maintains large inventories of hazardous chemicals for its scientific, environmental cleanup and production operations. Many of these chemicals are known carcinogens; some are corrosive, while others are highly flammable. As such, these chemicals can pose serious health and safety risks to workers and members of the public, the environment, and to emergency first responders if not properly managed and controlled.

324

United States Goverment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6/03 15:37 FAX 301 903 4656 _ CAPITAL REGION * FORS FIVEA 91002/004 6/03 15:37 FAX 301 903 4656 _ CAPITAL REGION * FORS FIVEA 91002/004 DOE-F 1325.8 (68-93) Depament of Energy United States Goverment Department of Energy Memorandum OFFICE OF .NSPECTOR GENERAL DATE: February 26, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-34 (A02CG004) Audit Report No.: OAS-L-03-11 SUBJECT: Audit of the Office of Science Infrastructure Modernization Initiatives TO: Acting Associate Director, Office of Laboratory Operations and Environment, Safety and Health, SC-80 The purpose of this report is to inform you of the results of our audit of the Office of Science's infrastructure modernization initiatives. The audit was performed between May and September 2002 at Departmental Headquarters, Brookhaven National Laboratory, and Argonne National Laboratory. The audit methodology is described in

325

COST FUNCTION STUDIES FOR POWER REACTORS  

SciTech Connect

A function to evaluate the cost of electricity produced by a nuclear power reactor was developed. The basic equation, revenue = capital charges + profit + operating expenses, was expanded in terms of various cost parameters to enable analysis of multiregion nuclear reactors with uranium and/or plutonium for fuel. A corresponding IBM 704 computer program, which will compute either the price of electricity or the value of plutonium, is presented in detail. (auth)

Heestand, J.; Wos, L.T.

1961-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Aquifer thermal energy storage costs with a seasonal heat source.  

SciTech Connect

The cost of energy supplied by an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system from a seasonal heat source was investigated. This investigation considers only the storage of energy from a seasonal heat source. Cost estimates are based upon the assumption that all of the energy is stored in the aquifer before delivery to the end user. Costs were estimated for point demand, residential development, and multidistrict city ATES systems using the computer code AQUASTOR which was developed specifically for the economic analysis of ATES systems. In this analysis the cost effect of varying a wide range of technical and economic parameters was examined. Those parameters exhibiting a substantial influence on ATES costs were: cost of purchased thermal energy; cost of capital; source temperature; system size; transmission distance; and aquifer efficiency. ATES-delivered energy costs are compared with the costs of hot water heated by using electric power or fuel-oils. ATES costs are shown as a function of purchased thermal energy. Both the potentially low delivered energy costs available from an ATES system and its strong cost dependence on the cost of purchased thermal energy are shown. Cost components for point demand and multi-district city ATES systems are shown. Capital and thermal energy costs dominate. Capital costs, as a percentage of total costs, increase for the multi-district city due to the addition of a large distribution system. The proportion of total cost attributable to thermal energy would change dramatically if the cost of purchased thermal energy were varied. It is concluded that ATES-delivered energy can be cost competitive with conventional energy sources under a number of economic and technical conditions. This investigation reports the cost of ATES under a wide range of assumptions concerning parameters important to ATES economics. (LCL)

Reilly, R.W.; Brown, D.R.; Huber, H.D.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Nuclear economics 2000: Deterministic and probabilistic projections of nuclear and coal electric power generation costs for the year 2000  

SciTech Connect

The total busbar electric generating costs were estimated for locations in ten regions of the United States for base-load nuclear and coal-fired power plants with a startup date of January 2000. For the Midwest region a complete data set that specifies each parameter used to obtain the comparative results is supplied. When based on the reference set of input variables, the comparison of power generation costs is found to favor nuclear in most regions of the country. Nuclear power is most favored in the northeast and western regions where coal must be transported over long distances; however, coal-fired generation is most competitive in the north central region where large reserves of cheaply mineable coal exist. In several regions small changes in the reference variables could cause either option to be preferred. The reference data set reflects the better of recent electric utility construction cost experience (BE) for nuclear plants. This study assumes as its reference case a stable regulatory environment and improved planning and construction practices, resulting in nuclear plants typically built at the present BE costs. Today's BE nuclear-plant capital investment cost model is then being used as a surrogate for projected costs for the next generation of light-water reactor plants. An alternative analysis based on today's median experience (ME) nuclear-plant construction cost experience is also included. In this case, coal is favored in all ten regions, implying that typical nuclear capital investment costs must improve for nuclear to be competitive.

Williams, K.A.; Delene, J.G.; Fuller, L.C.; Bowers, H.I.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Maverick County Water Control and Improvement District No. 1 (Eagle Pass) – Lining Main Canal – Preliminary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a capital renovation project proposed by Maverick County Water Control and Improvement District No. 1 to the Bureau of Reclamation and North American Development Bank. The proposed project involves lining 3 miles of the “Main Canal” with a urethane lining and a concrete anchor and ballast system. Both nominal and real estimates of water and energy savings and expected economic and financial costs of those savings are identified throughout the anticipated 49-year useful life for the proposed project. Sensitivity results for both the cost of water savings and cost of energy savings are presented for several important parameters. Annual water and energy savings forthcoming from the total project are estimated, using amortization procedures, to be 8,084 ac-ft of water per year and 2,041,095,338 BTUs (598,211 kwh) of energy per year. The calculated economic and financial cost of water savings is estimated to be $33.37 per ac-ft. The calculated economic and financial cost of energy savings is estimated to be $0.0001322 per BTU ($0.451 per kwh). In addition, expected real (rather than nominal) values are indicated for the Bureau of Reclamation’s three principal evaluation measures specified in the United States Public Law 106-576 legislation. The initial construction cost per ac-ft of water savings measure is $25.97 per ac-ft of water savings. The initial construction cost per BTU (kwh) of energy savings measure is $0.0001029 per BTU ($0.351 per kwh). The ratio of initial construction costs per dollar of total annual economic savings is estimated to be -13.65.

Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Juan) - Rehabilitation of Alamo Main Canal - Final  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a two-component capital renovation project proposed by Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2, to the U. S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR). The proposed project primarily consists of relining the Alamo Main canal and installing a flow-management system in the Alamo Main canal. Both nominal and real estimates of water and energy savings and expected economic and financial costs of those savings are identified throughout the anticipated useful life for the proposed project. Sensitivity results for both the cost of water savings and cost of energy savings are presented for several important parameters. Annual water and energy savings forthcoming from the total project are estimated, using amortization procedures, to be 876 ac-ft of water per year and 331,389,647 BTUs (97,125 kwh) of energy per year. The calculated economic and financial cost of water savings is estimated to be $201.50 per ac-ft. The calculated economic and financial cost of energy savings is estimated to be $0.0005592 per BTU ($1.908 per kwh). In addition, expected real (vs nominal) values are indicated for the USBRs three principal evaluation measures specified in the United States Public Law 106-576 legislation. The aggregate initial construction cost per ac-ft of water savings measure is $182.98 per ac-ft of water savings. The aggregate initial construction cost per BTU (kwh) of energy savings measure is $0.0004837 per BTU ($1.650 per kwh). The aggregate ratio of initial construction costs per dollar of total annual economic savings is estimated to be -20.74.

Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Juan) – 48" Pipeline Replacing Wisconsin Canal – Preliminary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a single-component capital renovation project proposed by Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2, (a.k.a. San Juan) to the North American Development Bank (NADBank) and Bureau of Reclamation. The proposed project involves constructing a 48" pipeline to replace the “Wisconsin Canal.” Both nominal and real estimates of water and energy savings and expected economic and financial costs of those savings are identified throughout the anticipated useful life for the proposed project. Sensitivity results for both the cost of water savings and cost of energy savings are presented for several important parameters. Annual water and energy savings forthcoming from the total project are estimated, using amortization procedures, to be 977 ac-ft of water per year and 372,892,700 BTUs (109,289 kwh) of energy per year. The calculated economic and financial cost of water savings is estimated to be $70.97 per ac-ft. The calculated economic and financial cost of energy savings is estimated at $0.0002124 per BTU ($0.725 per kwh). In addition, expected real (vs nominal) values are indicated for the Bureau of Reclamation’s three principal evaluation measures specified in the United States Public Law 106-576 legislation. The initial construction cost per ac-ft of water savings measure is $75.29 per ac-ft of water savings. The initial construction cost per BTU (kwh) of energy savings measure is $0.0001973 per BTU ($0.673 per kwh). The ratio of initial construction costs per dollar of total annual economic savings is estimated to be -3.12.

Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Maverick County Water Control and Improvement District No. 1 (Eagle Pass) – Lining Main Canal – Final  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a capital renovation project proposed by Maverick County Water Control and Improvement District No. 1 to the Bureau of Reclamation and North American Development Bank. The proposed project involves lining 3 miles of the “Main Canal” with a urethane lining and a concrete anchor and ballast system. Both nominal and real estimates of water and energy savings and expected economic and financial costs of those savings are identified throughout the anticipated 49-year useful life for the proposed project. Sensitivity results for both the cost of water savings and cost of energy savings are presented for several important parameters. Annual water and energy savings forthcoming from the total project are estimated, using amortization procedures, to be 8,084 ac-ft of water per year and 2,041,095,338 BTUs (598,211 kwh) of energy per year. The calculated economic and financial cost of water savings is estimated to be $33.37 per ac-ft. The calculated economic and financial cost of energy savings is estimated to be $0.0001322 per BTU ($0.451 per kwh). In addition, expected real (rather than nominal) values are indicated for the Bureau of Reclamation’s three principal evaluation measures specified in the United States Public Law 106-576 legislation. The initial construction cost per ac-ft of water savings measure is $25.97 per ac-ft of water savings. The initial construction cost per BTU (kwh) of energy savings measure is $0.0001029 per BTU ($0.351 per kwh). The ratio of initial construction costs per dollar of total annual economic savings is estimated to be -13.65.

Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Juan) - 48" Pipeline Replacing Wisconsin Canal - Final  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a single-component capital renovation project proposed by Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2, (a.k.a. San Juan) to the North American Development Bank (NADBank) and Bureau of Reclamation. The proposed project involves constructing a 48" pipeline to replace the “Wisconsin Canal.” Both nominal and real estimates of water and energy savings and expected economic and financial costs of those savings are identified throughout the anticipated useful life for the proposed project. Sensitivity results for both the cost of water savings and cost of energy savings are presented for several important parameters. Annual water and energy savings forthcoming from the total project are estimated, using amortization procedures, to be 977 ac-ft of water per year and 372,892,700 BTUs (109,289 kwh) of energy per year. The calculated economic and financial cost of water savings is estimated to be $70.97 per ac-ft. The calculated economic and financial cost of energy savings is estimated at $0.0002124 per BTU ($0.725 per kwh). In addition, expected real (vs nominal) values are indicated for the Bureau of Reclamation’s three principal evaluation measures specified in the United States Public Law 106-576 legislation. The initial construction cost per ac-ft of water savings measure is $75.29 per ac-ft of water savings. The initial construction cost per BTU (kwh) of energy savings measure is $0.0001973 per BTU ($0.673 per kwh). The ratio of initial construction costs per dollar of total annual economic savings is estimated to be -3.12.

Rister, Edward; Lacewell, Ronald; Sturdivant, Allen; Robinson, John; Popp, Michael

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

The Cost of Transmission for Wind Energy: A Review of Transmission Planning Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

low unit transmission costs, there were still numerous studies with high transmission voltages that had much higher unit costs than studies with transmission lines

Mills, Andrew D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Unit Conversion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unit Conversion. ... Unit Conversion Example. "If you have an amount of unit of A, how much is that in unit B?"; Dimensional Analysis; ...

2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

335

Geothermal power plant R and D: an analysis of cost-performance tradeoffs and the Heber Binary-Cycle Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect

A study of advancements in power plant designs for use at geothermal resources in the low to moderate (300 to 400F) temperature range is reported. In 3 case studies, the benefits of R and D to achieve these advancements are evaluated in terms of expected increases in installed geothermal generating capacity over the next 2 decades. A parametric sensitivity study is discussed which analyzes differential power development for combinations of power plant efficiency and capitol cost. Affordable tradeoffs between plant performance and capital costs are illustrated. The independent review and analysis of the expected costs of construction, operation and maintenance of the Heber Binary Cycle Geothermal Power Demonstration Plant are described. Included in this assessment is an analysis of each of the major cost components of the project, including (1) construction cost, (2) well field development costs, (3) fluid purchase costs, and (4) well field and power plant operation and maintenance costs. The total cost of power generated from the Heber Plant (in terms of mills per kWh) is then compared to the cost of power from alternative fossil-fueled base load units. Also evaluated are the provisions of both: (a) the Cooperative Agreement between the federal government and San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG and E); and (b) the Geothermal Heat Sales Contract with Union Oil Company.

Cassel, T.A.V.; Amundsen, C.B.; Blair, P.D.

1983-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

336

Lifecycle Costs of Ultracapacitors in Electric Vehicle Applications A. G. Simpson G. R. Walker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and cost of the battery under consideration. However, it is likely that the lifecycle cost benefits that examines the lifecycle costs of ultracapacitors in battery electric vehicle applications. The lifecycle). · The high capital cost and relatively short lifetime (commonly 3 years) of electrochemical batteries, which

Walker, Geoff

337

TAX AND FEE PAYMENTS BY MOTOR VEHICLE USERS FOR THE USE OF HIGHWAYS, FUELS, AND VEHICLES Report #17 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Full Social Costs and Benefits of Transportation, ed. bythe Full Social Costs and Benefits of Transportation, ed. bytransportation infrastructure and services, then we should set prices on the infrastructure and services equal to marginal social costs.

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

On EOQ Cost Models with Arbitrary Purchase and Transportation ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: We analyze an economic order quantity cost model with unit ... For the remaining purchase-transportation cost functions, when this problem becomes a  ...

339

Human Capital Management Accountability Program (HCMAP)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Human Capital Management Accountability Program (HCMAP) is an online program which serves as the vehicle for identifying and measuring these three factors, effectiveness, efficiency, and timeliness...

340

IT Capital Planning | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Management IT Services PKI Remote Access Training As defined by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular A-11, "Capital planning and investment control means the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "units capital costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Ambata Capital Partners | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

York-based global investment and advisory firm specializing in clean energy and sustainability with a strategic focus on the Middle East and Africa. References Ambata Capital...

342

Carbon Credit Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Capital Place New York, New York Zip 10012 Sector Carbon, Services Product Project Advisory Services and Carbon Financial Services to sustainable energy companies and governments....

343

Overview of Rocky Mountain Region's Capital Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capital Investment Plan 2 Transmission Planning Workshop 2011 10-YR Network Load Forecast Study and Process Transmission Planning Loveland, CO June 21, 2011 3 Purpose ...

344

united stadium. united station.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??DC United is one of Major League Soccerâs most decorated franchises, yet it still plays its home games within the crumbling confines of RFK Stadium.… (more)

Groff, David R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Cost estimates for commercial plasma source ion implantation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A semiempirical model for the cost of a commercial plasma sourceion implantation (PSII) facility is presented. Amortized capital and operating expenses are estimated as functions of the surface area throughput T. The impact of secondary electron emission and batch processing time is considered. Treatment costs are found to decrease monotonically with T until they saturate at large T when capital equipment payback and space rental dominate the expense. A reasonably sized PSII treatment facility should be able to treat a surface area of 104 m2 per year at a cost of $0.01 per cm2.

Donald J. Rej; Ralph B. Alexander

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Advanced IGCC power systems for the United States  

SciTech Connect

Integrated coal gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power systems offer the potential of superior efficiency and environmental performance over power plants using pulverized coal-fired boilers with scrubbers to generate electricity in the United States. The Cool Water plant is demonstrating the feasibility of an IGCC system using an entrained-bed gasifier and ''cold'' gas cleanup technology. Technology is now being developed to simplify the IGCC system, increase its efficiency and reduce its capital costs. Hot gas sulfur and particulate cleanup is the most promising technology option for the gas supply block. Improved performance is also available from the power island by use of high-efficiency aircraft derivative turbines. Progress in these technologies and the exceptional match of these IGCC systems to the projected needs of the utility industry is presented.

Wieber, P.R.; Halow, J.S.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

OpenEI - Unit Cost Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

at University of Texas at Austin http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode62

Provides annual energy usage for years 1989 through 2010 for UT at Austin; specifically, electricity usage...

348

Electricity Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Emissions Caps and the Impact of a Radical Change in Nuclear Electricity Costs journal International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy volume year month chapter...

349

Cost analysis of NOx control alternatives for stationary gas turbines  

SciTech Connect

The use of stationary gas turbines for power generation has been growing rapidly with continuing trends predicted well into the future. Factors that are contributing to this growth include advances in turbine technology, operating and siting flexibility and low capital cost. Restructuring of the electric utility industry will provide new opportunities for on-site generation. In a competitive market, it maybe more cost effective to install small distributed generation units (like gas turbines) within the grid rather than constructing large power plants in remote locations with extensive transmission and distribution systems. For the customer, on-site generation will provide added reliability and leverage over the cost of purchased power One of the key issues that is addressed in virtually every gas turbine application is emissions, particularly NO{sub x} emissions. Decades of research and development have significantly reduced the NO{sub x} levels emitted from gas turbines from uncontrolled levels. Emission control technologies are continuing to evolve with older technologies being gradually phased-out while new technologies are being developed and commercialized. The objective of this study is to determine and compare the cost of NO{sub x} control technologies for three size ranges of stationary gas turbines: 5 MW, 25 MW and 150 MW. The purpose of the comparison is to evaluate the cost effectiveness and impact of each control technology as a function of turbine size. The NO{sub x} control technologies evaluated in this study include: Lean premix combustion, also known as dry low NO{sub x} (DLN) combustion; Catalytic combustion; Water/steam injection; Selective catalytic reduction (SCR)--low temperature, conventional, high temperature; and SCONO{sub x}{trademark}.

Bill Major

1999-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

350

Optimizing Capital Investment Decisions at Intel Corporation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intel Corporation spends over $5 billion annually on manufacturing equipment. With increasing lead times from equipment suppliers and increasing complexity in forecasting market demand, optimizing capital investment decisions is a significant ... Keywords: Monte Carlo simulation, capacity expansion, capital-intensive industries, dual sourcing, expedited equipment lead times, forecast revision, isoprofit analysis, option contracts, stochastic programming

Karl G. Kempf; Feryal Erhun; Erik F. Hertzler; Timothy R. Rosenberg; Chen Peng

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Firm Heterogeneity in Capital labor Ratios and Wage Inequality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

n d the dispersion of capital intensity across i r m s . TheThe upward trend i n capital intensity dispersion is commonof wages a n d of capital intensity across i r m s is

Leonardi, Marco

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Essays on Human Capital Mobility and Asset Pricing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

associated to capital intensity. This finding suggests that? B . B (2.12b) The intensity of physical capital K i in the? i ). The intensity of general human capital input is given

Donangelo, Andres Francisco

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

GAO Cost Estimating and Assessment Guide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U.S. Government Accountability Office is responsible for, among other things, assisting the Congress in its oversight of the federal government, including agencies ’ stewardship of public funds. To use public funds effectively, the government must meet the demands of today’s changing world by employing effective management practices and processes, including the measurement of government program performance. In addition, legislators, government officials, and the public want to know whether government programs are achieving their goals and what their costs are. To make those evaluations, reliable cost information is required and federal standards have been issued for the cost accounting that is needed to prepare that information. 1 We developed the Cost Guide in order to establish a consistent methodology that is based on best practices and that can be used across the federal government for developing, managing, and evaluating capital program cost estimates. For the purposes of this guide, a cost estimate is the summation of individual cost elements, using established methods and valid data, to estimate the future costs of a program, based on what is known today. 2 The management of a cost estimate involves continually updating the estimate with actual data as they become available, revising the estimate to reflect changes, and analyzing differences between estimated and actual costs—for example, using data from a reliable earned value management (EVM) system. 3 The ability to generate reliable cost estimates is a critical function, necessary to support the Office of Management and Budget’s (OMB) capital programming process. 4 Without this ability, agencies are at risk of experiencing cost overruns, missed deadlines, and performance shortfalls—all recurring problems that our program assessments too often reveal. Furthermore, cost increases often mean that the government

Best Practices For Developing

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Environmental Capital Group LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Group LLC Group LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Environmental Capital Group LLC Place Grass Valley, California Zip 95945 Product String representation "Environmental C ... tartup forward." is too long. References Environmental Capital Group LLC[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Environmental Capital Group LLC is a company located in Grass Valley, California . References ↑ "Environmental Capital Group LLC" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Environmental_Capital_Group_LLC&oldid=345025" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version

355

Flexible Capital Fund (Vermont) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Flexible Capital Fund (Vermont) Flexible Capital Fund (Vermont) Flexible Capital Fund (Vermont) < Back Eligibility Commercial Agricultural Construction Rural Electric Cooperative Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Vermont Program Type Loan Program Provider Vermont Sustainable Jobs Fund The Vermont Sustainable Jobs Fund's Flexible Capital Fund (the "Flex Fund") is designed for companies in Vermont's rural areas that are smaller and work on a less-than global scale, offering a return on investment that does not always meet venture capital levels. These rural companies may need a form of "equity" to fuel growth but need it in lesser amounts and perhaps at lower returns than traditional venture

356

Environmental Capital Partners LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Partners LLC Partners LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Environmental Capital Partners LLC Place New York, New York Zip 10017 Sector Services Product Private equity firm funded with USD 100m for investment in middle-market companies specialising in green consumer products, building materials, alternative energy, and industrial environmental services. References Environmental Capital Partners LLC[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Environmental Capital Partners LLC is a company located in New York, New York . References ↑ "Environmental Capital Partners LLC" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Environmental_Capital_Partners_LLC&oldid=345026"

357

Impact Capital Partners Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Limited Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name Impact Capital Partners Limited Place Los Angeles, California Zip CA 90067-1509 Product Los Angeles-based, investment intermediary that designs financial solutions and innovative strategies for achieving sustained growth and intrinsic value. References Impact Capital Partners Limited[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Impact Capital Partners Limited is a company located in Los Angeles, California . References ↑ "Impact Capital Partners Limited" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Impact_Capital_Partners_Limited&oldid=346814" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies

358

Specializing Financial Intermediation: Evidence from venture capital  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While many parts of the financial systems are becoming increasingly commoditized, there is a concurrent trend towards greater specialization of financial intermediaries, especially in information-intensive market segments. This paper examines the impact of this specialization, focusing on venture capital. We use a unique hand-collected dataset on European venture capital deals that includes detail on the services provided by venture capital firms. We find that the willingness to invest in information-intensive deals, and the extent to which investor provide services (from corporate governance to additional financing) to their companies, critically depends on how specialized investors are. This applies not only to the organizational structure of the venture capital firm, but also to the human capital of its venture partners.

Laura Bottazzi; Marco Da Rin; Thomas Hellmann

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Realistic costs of carbon capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a growing interest in carbon capture and storage (CCS) as a means of reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. However there are substantial uncertainties about the costs of CCS. Costs for pre-combustion capture with compression (i.e. excluding costs of transport and storage and any revenue from EOR associated with storage) are examined in this discussion paper for First-of-a-Kind (FOAK) plant and for more mature technologies, or Nth-of-a-Kind plant (NOAK). For FOAK plant using solid fuels the levelised cost of electricity on a 2008 basis is approximately 10 cents/kWh higher with capture than for conventional plants (with a range of 8-12 cents/kWh). Costs of abatement are found typically to be approximately US$150/tCO2 avoided (with a range of US$120-180/tCO2 avoided). For NOAK plants the additional cost of electricity with capture is approximately 2-5 cents/kWh, with costs of the range of US$35-70/tCO2 avoided. Costs of abatement with carbon capture for other fuels and technologies are also estimated for NOAK plants. The costs of abatement are calculated with reference to conventional SCPC plant for both emissions and costs of electricity. Estimates for both FOAK and NOAK are mainly based on cost data from 2008, which was at the end of a period of sustained escalation in the costs of power generation plant and other large capital projects. There are now indications of costs falling from these levels. This may reduce the costs of abatement and costs presented here may be 'peak of the market' estimates. If general cost levels return, for example, to those prevailing in 2005 to 2006 (by which time significant cost escalation had already occurred from previous levels), then costs of capture and compression for FOAK plants are expected to be US$110/tCO2 avoided (with a range of US$90-135/tCO2 avoided). For NOAK plants costs are expected to be US$25-50/tCO2. Based on these considerations a likely representative range of costs of abatement from CCS excluding transport and storage costs appears to be US$100-150/tCO2 for first-of-a-kind plants and perhaps US$30-50/tCO2 for nth-of-a-kind plants.The estimates for FOAK and NOAK costs appear to be broadly consistent in the light of estimates of the potential for cost reductions with increased experience. Cost reductions are expected from increasing scale, learning on individual components, and technological innovation including improved plant integration. Innovation and integration can both lower costs and increase net output with a given cost base. These factors are expected to reduce abatement costs by approximately 65% by 2030. The range of estimated costs for NOAK plants is within the range of plausible future carbon prices, implying that mature technology would be competitive with conventional fossil fuel plants at prevailing carbon prices.

Al Juaied, Mohammed (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (US). Belfer Center for Science and International Affiaris); Whitmore, Adam (Hydrogen Energy International Ltd., Weybridge (GB))

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Cameron County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Benito) – Interconnect Between Canals 39 and 13-A1 and Replacement of Rio Grande Diversion Pumping Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for the capital renovation project proposed by the Cameron County Irrigation District No. 2 (a.k.a. San Benito) to the North American Development Bank (NADBank) and Bureau of Reclamation. Both nominal and real, expected economic and financial costs of water and energy savings are identified throughout the anticipated useful lives for both components of the proposed project (i.e., a lined interconnect between Canals 39 and 13-A1 and replacement of the Rio Grande diversion pumping plant). Sensitivity results for both the cost of water savings and cost of energy savings are presented for several important parameters. Expected cost of water savings and cost of energy savings for both components are aggregated into a composite set of cost measures for the total proposed project. Aggregate cost of water savings is estimated to be $41.26 per ac-ft and energy savings are measured at an aggregate value of $0.0001586 per BTU (i.e., $0.541 per kwh). In addition, expected values are indicated for the Bureau of Reclamation’s three principal evaluation measures specified in the United States Public Law 106-576 legislation. The aggregate initial construction cost per ac-ft of water savings measure is $157.07 per ac-ft of water savings. The aggregate initial construction cost per BTU (kwh) of energy savings measure is $0.0001777 per BTU ($0.606 per kwh). The ratio of initial construction costs per dollar of total annual economic savings is estimated to be -3.80.

Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.; Ellis, John R.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "units capital costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Provides comprehensive information concerning the quality, quantity, and cost of fossil fuels used to produce electricity in the United States.

Dean Fennell

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Regional comparison of nuclear and fossil electric power generation costs  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear's main disadvantages are its high capital investment cost and uncertainty in schedule compared with alternatives. Nuclear plant costs continue to rise whereas coal plant investment costs are staying relative steady. Based on average experience, nuclear capital investment costs are nearly double those of coal-fired generation plants. The capital investment cost disadvantage of nuclear is balanced by its fuel cost advantages. New base load nuclear power plants were projected to be competitive with coal-fired plants in most regions of the country. Nuclear power costs wre projected to be significantly less (10% or more) than coal-fired power costs in the South Atlantic region. Coal-fired plants were projected to have a significant economic advantage over nuclear plants in the Central and North Central regions. In the remaining seven regions, the levelized cost of power from either option was projected to be within 10%. Uncertainties in future costs of materials, services, and financing affect the relative economics of the nuclear and coal options significantly. 10 figures.

Bowers, H.I.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Ricmore Capital PLC Formerly Energy Asset Management Plc | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Ricmore Capital PLC Formerly Energy Asset Management Plc Jump to: navigation, search Name Ricmore Capital PLC (Formerly Energy Asset...

364

Maryland-National Capital Building Industry Association Regulatory...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Maryland-National Capital Building Industry Association Regulatory Burden RFI (Federal Register August 8, 2012) Maryland-National Capital Building Industry Association Regulatory...

365

Process-Based Cost Modeling to Support Target Value Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

elemental analysis (cost-per-square-foot) are referred to asTraditional’ models (cost per square foot, elementalunit costs per an area unit (i.e. , $/Square Foot) or per a

Nguyen, Hung Viet

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Process designs and cost estimates for a medium Btu gasification plant using a wood feedstock  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A gasification plant to effect the conversion of wood to medium-Btu gas has been designed. The Purox gasifier and associated equipment were selected as a prototype, since this system is nearer to commercialization than others considered. The object was to determine the cost of those processing steps common to all gasification schemes and to identify specific research areas. A detailed flowsheet and mass-balance are presented. Capital investment statements for three plant sizes (400, 800, 1,600 oven-dry tons per day) are included along with manufacturing costs for each of these plants at three feedstock prices: $10, $20, $30 per green ton (or $20, $40, $60 per dry ton). The design incorporates a front-end handling system, package cryogenic oxygen plant, the Purox gasifier, a gas-cleaning train consisting of a spray scrubber, ionizing wet scrubber, and condenser, and a wastewater treatment facility including a cooling tower and a package activated sludge unit. Cost figures for package units were obtained from suppliers and used for the oxygen and wastewater treatment plants. The gasifier is fed with wood chips at 20% moisture (wet basis). For each pound of wood, 0.32 lb of oxygen are required, and 1.11 lb of gas are produced. The heating value of the gas product is 300 Btu/scf. For each Btu of energy input (feed + process energy) to the plant, 0.91 Btu exists with the product gas. Total capital investments required for the plants considered are $9, $15, and $24 million (1978) respectively. In each case, the oxygen plant represents about 50% of the total investment. For feedstock prices from $10 to $30 per green ton ($1.11 to $3.33 per MM Btu), break-even costs of fuel gas range from $3 to $7 per MM Btu. At $30/ton, the feedstock cost represents approximately 72% of the total product cost for the largest plant size; at $10/ton, it represents only 47% of product cost.

Desrosiers, R. E.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Electricity Energy Storage Technology Options 2012 System Cost Benchmarking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an update on the current capital and lifecycle costs estimates of electric energy storage options for a variety of grid and end-user applications. Data presented in this report update 2010 data provided in EPRI Technical Report 1020676. The goal of this research was to develop objective and consistent installed costs and operational and maintenance costs for a set of selected energy storage systems in the identified applications. Specific objectives included development of ...

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

368

Motor-Vehicle Infrastructure and Services Provided by the Public Sector: Report #7 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Blincoe, The Economic Cost of Motor Vehicle Crashes, 1994,M. Faigin, The Economic Cost of Motor Vehicle Crashes, 1990,Q. Wang, and D. L. Greene, Motor Vehicle Fuel Economy, The

Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

MOTOR-VEHICLE INFRASTRUCTURE AND SERVICES PROVIDED BY THE PUBLIC SECTOR Report #7 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Blincoe, The Economic Cost of Motor Vehicle Crashes, 1994,M. Faigin, The Economic Cost of Motor Vehicle Crashes, 1990,Q. Wang, and D. L. Greene, Motor Vehicle Fuel Economy, The

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Low-Cost Options for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low-Cost Options for Moderate Levels of Mercury Control Low-Cost Options for Moderate Levels of Mercury Control ADA- Environmental Solutions will test two new technologies for mercury control. The TOXECON II(tm) technology injects activated carbon directly into the downstream collecting fields of an electrostatic precipitator. The benefit of this technology is that the majority of the fly ash is collected in the upstream collecting fields which results in only a small portion of carbon-contaminated ash. Additionally, the TOXECON II(tm) technology requires minimal capital investment as only minor retrofits to the electrostatic precipitator are needed. The second technology is injection of novel sorbents for mercury removal on units with hot-side electrostatic precipitators (ESPs). Mercury removal from hot-side electrostatic precipitators is difficult as their high operating temperature range keeps the mercury in the vapor phase and prevents the mercury from adsorbing onto sorbents. The TOXECON II(tm) technology will be tested at Entergy's Independence Station which burns PRB coal. The novel sorbents for hot-side ESPs technology will be tested at MidAmerican's Council Bluffs Energy Center and MidAmerican's Louisa Station, both of which burn PRB coal. Additional project partners include EPRI, MidAmerican, Entergy, Alliant, ATCO Power, DTE Energy, Oglethorpe Power, Norit Americas Inc., Xcel Energy, Southern Company, Arch Coal, and EPCOR.

371

Development of a low-cost, rapid-cycle hot embossing system for microscale parts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hot embossing is an effective technology for reproducing micro-scale features in polymeric materials, but large-scale adoption of this method is hindered by high capital costs and low cycle times relative to other technologies, ...

Hale, Melinda (Melinda Rae)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

The Cost of Heat Exchanger Fouling in the U. S. Industries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fouling of heat exchangers costs the U.S. industries hundreds of millions of dollars every year in increased equipment costs, maintenance costs, energy losses and losses in production. The designer of heat exchangers usually allows for fouling by using a fouling factor in the design which results in additional capital cost of the heat exchanger. As fouling deposits build up in a heat exchanger, its performance will start to deteriorate and less energy will be transferred through the unit. A plot is provided that gives the percent decrease in heat flux, for a constant driving temperature difference, as a function of the clean overall heat transfer coefficient and the fouling factor. Another plot gives the increase in surface area due to fouling for the same heat transfer rate and driving temperature difference, as a function of the clean overall heat transfer coefficient and the fouling factor. The overall heat transfer market was divided into four sectors: the chemical, petroleum, electric utility and other industries. The 1982 U.S. sales of all industrial heat exchangers, excepting boilers and automotive radiators, was about 285,000 units amounting to about $1.6 billion. The total heat duty of all the heat exchangers in industrial operation, including electric utilities, was estimated at 11.7 Quads. If this represented the amount of heat transferred through clean heat exchangers, the decrease in energy transferred due to fouling or the cost of fouling in terms of energy lost was estimated at 2.9 Quads annually. The cost of fouling, in providing for additional surface area to compensate for a decrease in heat transfer, was conservatively estimated at $180 million in 1982.

Rebello, W. J.; Richlen, S. L.; Childs, F.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Life-Cycle Cost Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Life-Cycle Cost Analysis October 16, 2013 - 4:41pm Addthis Constructed Costs of a Net-Zero Office Building Facility: Research Support Facility at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado Operational: August 2010 Constructed cost: $259/ft2 to achieve 50% less energy use than code Constructed cost of similar office buildings in area: $225 to $300/ft2 Reaching Net-Zero: A 1.27 MW photovoltaic system was added to the project in two phases to bring the system to net-zero. This system was financed through a power purchase agreement and did not add to the constructed cost of the building. If those costs were included in the capital costs, the total constructed cost would have been 291/ft2 to reach net-zero energy use. Learn more about the Research Support

374

WREF 2012: THE PAST AND FUTURE COST OF WIND ENERGY  

SciTech Connect

The future of wind power will depend on the ability of the industry to continue to achieve cost reductions. To better understand the potential for cost reductions, this report provides a review of historical costs, evaluates near-term market trends, and summarizes the range of projected costs. It also notes potential sources of future cost reductions. Our findings indicate that steady cost reductions were interrupted between 2004 and 2010, but falling turbine prices and improved turbine performance are expected to drive a historically low LCOE for current installations. In addition, the majority of studies indicate continued cost reductions on the order of 20%-30% through 2030. Moreover, useful cost projections are likely to benefit from stronger consideration of the interactions between capital cost and performance as well as trends in the quality of the wind resource where projects are located, transmission, grid integration, and other cost variables.

NREL,; Wiser, Ryan; Lantz, Eric; Hand, Maureen

2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

375

Estimate Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Using  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Using Renewable Energy in Buildings Estimate Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Using Renewable Energy in Buildings October 7, 2013 - 11:25am Addthis After determining the best greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction strategies using renewable energy, a Federal agency should estimate the cost of implementing them in a building or buildings. There are several cost factors that need to be considered when developing a renewable energy project. Capital costs, fixed and variable operations and maintenance (O&M) costs and in the case of biomass and waste-to-energy projects, fuel costs all contribute to the total cost of operating a renewable energy system. The levelized system cost takes into account these

376

ErgyCapital SpA formerly Greenergy Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ErgyCapital SpA formerly Greenergy Capital ErgyCapital SpA formerly Greenergy Capital Jump to: navigation, search Name ErgyCapital SpA (formerly Greenergy Capital) Place Milan, Italy Zip 20121 Sector Efficiency, Renewable Energy Product Investment company specializing in renewable energy and energy efficiency. Coordinates 45.468945°, 9.18103° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.468945,"lon":9.18103,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

377

2 Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2007 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Capital Costs Drive Wind Power Prices . . . . .20 Installed Project Costs Continued to Rise in 2007, After. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 Project Cost Increases Are a Function of Turbine Prices, and Turbine Prices Have Increased . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 Operations and Maintenance Costs Are Affected by the Age and Size of the Project, Among Other

378

Greenwood Capital Partners | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenwood Capital Partners Greenwood Capital Partners Jump to: navigation, search Name Greenwood Capital Partners Place Charlotte, North Carolina Zip 28266 Product Corporate finance boutique working on capital-raising for clean energy companies. Coordinates 35.2225°, -80.837539° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.2225,"lon":-80.837539,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

379

Long Branch Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Branch Capital Branch Capital Jump to: navigation, search Name Long Branch Capital Place Austin, Texas Zip 78744 Sector Efficiency, Renewable Energy Product Long Branch Capital makes minority investments in private companies focused on renewable energy, clean technology, and efficiency Coordinates 30.267605°, -97.742984° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.267605,"lon":-97.742984,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

380

GreenCore Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GreenCore Capital GreenCore Capital Jump to: navigation, search Logo: GreenCore Capital Name GreenCore Capital Address 10509 Vista Sorrento Parkway Place San Diego, California Zip 92121 Region Southern CA Area Product Invests in developing promising renewable energy companies Website http://www.greencorecapital.co Coordinates 32.898095°, -117.215736° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.898095,"lon":-117.215736,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "units capital costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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381

Hereford Capital Advisors | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hereford Capital Advisors Hereford Capital Advisors Jump to: navigation, search Name Hereford Capital Advisors Place Denver, Colorado Product US-based firm offering PV project management and capital structuring. Coordinates 39.74001°, -104.992259° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.74001,"lon":-104.992259,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

382

2011-2015 Human Capital Management Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Office of Legacy Management (LM) needs skilled and engaged staff to accomplish our mission and carry out our responsibilities to the American people. This Human Capital Management Plan (HCMP or...

383

L A Investment Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name L.A. Investment Capital Place Beverly Hills, California Zip CA 90210 Sector Biofuels Product Investment firm with funds in real estate and biofuels References L.A....

384

North Carolina Capital Access Program (North Carolina)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The North Carolina Capital Access Program provides matching reserve funds for business loans that are beyond the traditional lending means of a lender’s usual standards. The average CAP loan is ...

385

Cost Study for Large Wind Turbine Blades  

SciTech Connect

The cost study for large wind turbine blades reviewed three blades of 30 meters, 50 meters, and 70 meters in length. Blade extreme wind design loads were estimated in accordance with IEC Class I recommendations. Structural analyses of three blade sizes were performed at representative spanwise stations assuming a stressed shell design approach and E-glass/vinylester laminate. A bill of materials was prepared for each of the three blade sizes using the laminate requirements prepared during the structural analysis effort. The labor requirements were prepared for twelve major manufacturing tasks. TPI Composites developed a conceptual design of the manufacturing facility for each of the three blade sizes, which was used for determining the cost of labor and overhead (capital equipment and facilities). Each of the three potential manufacturing facilities was sized to provide a constant annual rated power production (MW per year) of the blades it produced. The cost of the production tooling and overland transportation was also estimated. The results indicate that as blades get larger, materials become a greater proportion of total cost, while the percentage of labor cost is decreased. Transportation costs decreased as a percentage of total cost. The study also suggests that blade cost reduction efforts should focus on reducing material cost and lowering manufacturing labor, because cost reductions in those areas will have the strongest impact on overall blade cost.

ASHWILL, THOMAS D.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Estimating Renewable Energy Costs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Estimating Renewable Energy Costs Estimating Renewable Energy Costs Estimating Renewable Energy Costs October 16, 2013 - 4:40pm Addthis Some renewable energy measures, such as daylighting, passive solar heating, and cooling load avoidance, do not add much to the cost of a building. However, renewable energy technologies typically require large, additional capital investments with savings accruing over the project's life. It is crucial that these systems are considered early on in the budgeting process. Early budget requests need to include a set of technologies that could be used to meet the project's design requirements and their associated implementation costs. The design team may respond with a different set of feasible technologies, but it is wise to have an existing placeholder in the budget. Federal agencies can continue to update the budget as decisions

387

Interruption Cost Estimate Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Interruption Cost Estimate Calculator Interruption Cost Estimate Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Interruption Cost Estimate (ICE) Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: Freeman, Sullivan & Co. Sector: Energy Focus Area: Grid Assessment and Integration, Energy Efficiency Resource Type: Online calculator, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: icecalculator.com/ Country: United States Cost: Free Northern America References: [1] Logo: Interruption Cost Estimate (ICE) Calculator This calculator is a tool designed for electric reliability planners at utilities, government organizations or other entities that are interested in estimating interruption costs and/or the benefits associated with reliability improvements. About The Interruption Cost Estimate (ICE) Calculator is an electric reliability

388

Transparent Cost Database | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transparent Cost Database Transparent Cost Database Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Transparent Cost Database Agency/Company /Organization: Department of Energy Partner: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Solar, Transportation Topics: Baseline projection, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Resource assessment, Technology characterizations Resource Type: Dataset, Lessons learned/best practices, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Web Application Link: en.openei.org/apps/TCDB/ Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): Featured Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/united-states-transparent-cost-databa Language: English The Transparent Cost Database collects program cost and performance

389

Costs in the Norwegian Payment System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate social and private cost for the use and production of payment services in Norway for 2007. The calculations include banks’, merchants ’ and households ’ cost for cash, cards and giro payments. The social cost is calculated to be 0.49 % of GDP, or NOK 11.16 billion. Costs are also calculated on a per-service basis. The results are compared with data from earlier cost surveys by Norges Bank. The unit costs of the most popular services have decreased over the years. Efficiency and productivity of banks ’ payment service operations has improved. We also make comparisons between frameworks, methodologies, and results from cost surveys in five European countries.

Olaf Gresvik; Harald Haare; Norges Bank; Sigbjørn Atle Berg; Gunnvald Grønvik; Asbjørn Enge

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Annual Capital Expenditures Survey | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Annual Capital Expenditures Survey Annual Capital Expenditures Survey BusinessUSA Data/Tools Apps Challenges Let's Talk BusinessUSA You are here Data.gov » Communities » BusinessUSA » Data Annual Capital Expenditures Survey Dataset Summary Description Provides national estimates of investment in new and used buildings and other structures, machinery, and equipment by U.S. nonfarm businesses with and without employees. Data are published by industry for companies with employees for NAICS 3-digit and selected 4-digit industries. Data on the amount of business expenditures for new plant and equipment and measures of the stock of existing facilities are critical to evaluate productivity growth, the ability of U.S. business to compete with foreign business, changes in industrial capacity, and measures of overall economic performance. In addition, ACES data provide industry analysts with capital expenditure data for market analysis, economic forecasting, identifying business opportunities and developing new and strategic plans. The ACES is an integral part of the Federal Government's effort to improve and supplement ongoing statistical programs. Private companies and organizations,, educators and students, and economic researchers use the survey results for analyzing and conducting impact evaluations on past and current economic performance, short-term economic forecasts, productivity, long-term economic growth, tax policy, capacity utilization, business fixed capital stocks and capital formation, domestic and international competitiveness trade policy, market research, and financial analysis.

391

Industrial Structure and Financial Capital Flows ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commodity trade and financial asset trade are both integral parts of globalization, yet little has been studied on their interplay. In a framework that integrates these two paradigms of trade, a new force driving international capital flows emerges: capital tends to flow towards countries that become more specialized in capital-intensive industries (a composition effect). This force competes with the standard, “convergence force ” which channels capital towards the location where it is more scarce, in response shocks such as globalization, country-specific labor force or labor-technology shock shocks. If the composition effect dominates, capital flows away from the country hit by a positive shock—“a flow reversal”—and asset prices rise globally rather than locally. Two implications arise: rich countries ’ current account deficits may be a consequence of their shifting towards capital-intensive industries; young and fast growing developing countries may help sustain asset prices in an aging industrialized world. Predictions of the current account and specialization patterns are shown to be consistent with the data.

Keyu Jin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Summary Max Total Units  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Max Total Units Max Total Units *If All Splits, No Rack Units **If Only FW, AC Splits 1000 52 28 28 2000 87 59 35 3000 61 33 15 4000 61 33 15 Totals 261 153 93 ***Costs $1,957,500.00 $1,147,500.00 $697,500.00 Notes: added several refrigerants removed bins from analysis removed R-22 from list 1000lb, no Glycol, CO2 or ammonia Seawater R-404A only * includes seawater units ** no seawater units included *** Costs = (total units) X (estimate of $7500 per unit) 1000lb, air cooled split systems, fresh water Refrig Voltage Cond Unit IF-CU Combos 2 4 5 28 References Refrig Voltage C-U type Compressor HP R-404A 208/1/60 Hermetic SA 2.5 R-507 230/1/60 Hermetic MA 2.5 208/3/60 SemiHerm SA 1.5 230/3/60 SemiHerm MA 1.5 SemiHerm HA 1.5 1000lb, remote rack systems, fresh water Refrig/system Voltage Combos 12 2 24 References Refrig/system Voltage IF only

393

EIA-Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Early Release Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and refine fuels per unit supplied Revised capital costs for capital-intensive projects to reflect recent sharp increases in those costs Revised handling of hybrid vehicles,...

394

Economic Evaluation of Particulate Control Technologies: Volume 2: Retrofit Units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A number of options are available to upgrade the performance of existing electrostatic precipitators. This report assesses precipitator performance improvements achievable through various upgrade options and provides the latest cost information and analytical models for determining the capital and O&M costs associated with each approach.

1995-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

395

Wind Levelized Cost of Energy: A Comparison of Technical and Financing Input Variables  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The expansion of wind power capacity in the United States has increased the demand for project development capital. In response, innovative approaches to financing wind projects have emerged and are proliferating in the U.S. renewable energy marketplace. Wind power developers and financiers have become more efficient and creative in structuring their financial relationships, and often tailor them to different investor types and objectives. As a result, two similar projects may use very different cash flows and financing arrangements, which can significantly vary the economic competitiveness of wind projects. This report assesses the relative impact of numerous financing, technical, and operating variables on the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) associated with a wind project under various financing structures in the U.S. marketplace. Under this analysis, the impacts of several financial and technical variables on the cost of wind electricity generation are first examined individually to better understand the relative importance of each. Then, analysts examine a low-cost and a high-cost financing scenario, where multiple variables are modified simultaneously. Lastly, the analysis also considers the impact of a suite of financial variables versus a suite of technical variables.

Cory, K.; Schwabe, P.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Assessment of official development assistance from the OPEC capital-exporting countries (1974-1979)  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the study was to assess whether the benefits derived from Official Development Assistance (ODA) from the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) exceed the extra costs of imported oil paid by the Oil-Importing Developing Countries (OIDCs) since the fall of 1973. For purposes of analysis, the OIDCs were divided into four regions of Africa, Asia, the Middle East and Latin America. The additional oil expenditures that these four regions had to pay to OPEC were calculated. This was folowed by a derivation of estimates for the total grants disbursed by OPEC to the four regions. The results were then compared to the additional costs for imported oil previously derived. It was found that the additional costs for imported oil exceeded the benefits derived from the ODA of the OPEC capital-exporting countries for the Middle East, Asia and Latin America. In the case of Africa, however, the benefits more than equaled the costs. In conclusion, it was recommended that the area of joint ventures could provide excellent opportunities for the OPEC capital-exporting countries and the OIDCs to explore. However, before joint ventures between the OPEC capital-exporting countries and the OIDSs become an attractive option for channeling OPEC surpluses, there need to be intensive research in making such a co-operation feasible in the future.

Al-Riyami, S.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

TAX AND FEE PAYMENTS BY MOTOR VEHICLE USERS FOR THE USE OF HIGHWAYS, FUELS, AND VEHICLES Report #17 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

July (1996). Motor Vehicle Manufacturers Association of theaddition, some motor-vehicle manufacturers have been finedEPA charges motor-vehicle manufacturers to cover the cost of

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Novel Low Cost, High Reliability Wind Turbine Drivetrain  

SciTech Connect

Clipper Windpower, in collaboration with United Technologies Research Center, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and Hamilton Sundstrand Corporation, developed a low-cost, deflection-compliant, reliable, and serviceable chain drive speed increaser. This chain and sprocket drivetrain design offers significant breakthroughs in the areas of cost and serviceability and addresses the key challenges of current geared and direct-drive systems. The use of gearboxes has proven to be challenging; the large torques and bending loads associated with use in large multi-MW wind applications have generally limited demonstrated lifetime to 8-10 years [1]. The large cost of gearbox replacement and the required use of large, expensive cranes can result in gearbox replacement costs on the order of $1M, representing a significant impact to overall cost of energy (COE). Direct-drive machines eliminate the gearbox, thereby targeting increased reliability and reduced life-cycle cost. However, the slow rotational speeds require very large and costly generators, which also typically have an undesirable dependence on expensive rare-earth magnet materials and large structural penalties for precise air gap control. The cost of rare-earth materials has increased 20X in the last 8 years representing a key risk to ever realizing the promised cost of energy reductions from direct-drive generators. A common challenge to both geared and direct drive architectures is a limited ability to manage input shaft deflections. The proposed Clipper drivetrain is deflection-compliant, insulating later drivetrain stages and generators from off-axis loads. The system is modular, allowing for all key parts to be removed and replaced without the use of a high capacity crane. Finally, the technology modularity allows for scalability and many possible drivetrain topologies. These benefits enable reductions in drivetrain capital cost by 10.0%, levelized replacement and O&M costs by 26.7%, and overall cost of energy by 10.2%. This design was achieved by: (1) performing an extensive optimization study that deter-mined the preliminary cost for all practical chain drive topologies to ensure the most competitive configuration; (2) conducting detailed analysis of chain dynamics, contact stresses, and wear and efficiency characteristics over the chain�������¢����������������s life to ensure accurate physics-based predictions of chain performance; and (3) developing a final product design, including reliability analysis, chain replacement procedures, and bearing and sprocket analysis. Definition of this final product configuration was used to develop refined cost of energy estimates. Finally, key system risks for the chain drive were defined and a comprehensive risk reduction plan was created for execution in Phase 2.

Anthony Chobot; Debarshi Das; Tyler Mayer; Zach Markey; Tim Martinson; Hayden Reeve; Paul Attridge; Tahany El-Wardany

2012-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

399

New England Wind Forum: Cost Trends  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Cost Trends Cost Trends Figure 1: Cost of Energy and Cumulative Domestic Capacity This graph shows how the cumulative domestic wind capacity (MW) has increased since 1980, while the cost of energy from wind power has declined by a factor of approximately 20 times during the same period but has increased slightly since 2001. Click on the image to view a larger version. This graph shows how the cumulative domestic wind capacity (MW) has increased since 1980, while the cost of energy from wind power has declined by a factor of approximately 20 times during the same period but has increased slightly since 2001. View a larger version of the graph. Overall, the wind industry is experiencing long-term decreases in the cost to produce wind-generated electricity (Figure 1), despite recent short-term increases in upfront equipment costs. Even in the short term, however, the effect of increases in up-front capital costs on the cost of energy from wind power projects has been dampened by improvements in energy capture from the wind and decreases in operating and maintenance costs.

400

EFFICIENT PARALLELIZATION OF STOCHASTIC SIMULATION ALGORITHM FOR CHEMICALLY REACTING SYSTEMS ON THE GRAPHICS PROCESSING UNIT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REACTING SYSTEMS ON THE GRAPHICS PROCESSING UNIT H. Li ? L.The current generation of graphics processing units (GPU) issystems on the low cost graphics processing unit (GPU)

Li, Hong; Petzold, Linda

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "units capital costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Legend Units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Syntax: LEGEND UNIT units> where is an integer number or parameter in the range 1 to 100 that specifies the legend identifier; and ...

2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

402

MOTOR-VEHICLE INFRASTRUCTURE AND SERVICES PROVIDED BY THE PUBLIC SECTOR Report #7 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACF = B + AF (short-run cost) ACF 91 (1.0) ACF 0 ACF ²ACM ²ACM ACF = AF k (long-run cost) B ²AM AF ²AM AF 0 AF 91 (1.0)is simply: DRAFT FOR REVIEW ACF = AF k ACF ? AF ? where: ACF

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Motor-Vehicle Infrastructure and Services Provided by the Public Sector: Report #7 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACF = B + AF (short-run cost) ACF 91 (1.0) ACF 0 ACF ²ACM ²ACM ACF = AF k (long-run cost) B ²AM AF ²AM AF 0 AF 91 (1.0)is simply: DRAFT FOR REVIEW ACF = AF k ACF ? AF ? where: ACF

Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Rural electric cooperatives and the cost structure of the electric power industry: A multiproduct analysis  

SciTech Connect

Since 1935, the federal government of the United States has administered a program designed to make electricity available to rural Americans. This dissertation traces the history of the rural electrification program, as well as its costs. While the Congress intended to simply provide help in building the capital structure of rural electric distribution systems, the program continues to flourish some 35 years after these systems first fully covered the countryside. Once the rural distribution systems were built, the government began to provide cooperatives with billions of dollars in subsidized loans for the generation of electric power. Although this program costs the taxpayers nearly $1 billion per year, no one has ever tested its efficacy. The coops' owner/members do not have the right to trade their individual ownership shares. The RECs do not fully exploit the scale and scope economies observed in the investor-owned sector of this industry. This dissertation compares the relative productive efficiencies of the RECs and the investor-owned electric utilities (IOUs) in the United States. Using multiproduct translog cost functions, the estimated costs of cooperatives are compared to those of IOUs in providing identical output bundles. Three separate products are considered as outputs: (1) wholesale power; (2) power sold to large industrial customers; and (3) power sold to residential and commercial customers. It is estimated that, were the RECs forced to pay market prices for their inputs, their costs would exceed those incurred by the IOUs by about 24 percent. Several policy recommendations are made: (1) the RECs should be converted to stockholder-owned, tax-paying corporations; (2) the government should discontinue its subsidized loan program; (3) the government should sell its hydroelectric power at market prices, nullifying the current preference given to cooperatives and municipal distributors in the purchase of this currently underpriced power.

Berry, D.M.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Human Capital, the Structure of Production, and Growth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Do high levels of human capital foster economic growth by facilitating technology adoption? If so, countries with more human capital should have adopted more rapidly the skilled-labor augmenting technologies becoming available since the 1970’s. High human capital levels should therefore have translated into fast growth in more compared to less human-capital-intensive industries in the 1980’s. Theories of international specialization point to human capital accumulation as another important determinant of growth in human-capital-intensive industries. Using data for a large sample of countries, we find significant positive effects of human capital levels and human capital accumulation on output and employment growth in human-capital-intensive industries.

Antonio Ciccone; Elias Papaioannou; Luc Laeven; Pablo Fleiss

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Chrysalix Energy Venture Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chrysalix Energy Venture Capital Chrysalix Energy Venture Capital Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Chrysalix Energy Venture Capital Name Chrysalix Energy Venture Capital Address 1367 West Broadway, Suite 400 Place Vancouver, Canada Zip V6H 4A7 Product Venture capital firm. Phone number (604) 659-5499 Website http://www.chrysalix.com/ Coordinates 49.2635735°, -123.1352545° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":49.2635735,"lon":-123.1352545,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

407

Jane Capital Partners | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jane Capital Partners Jane Capital Partners Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Jane Capital Partners Name Jane Capital Partners Address 505 Montgomery, 2nd Floor Place San Francisco, California Zip 94111 Region Bay Area Product Advisory services, venture capital, investment banking. Year founded 2001 Phone number (415) 277-0180 Website http://www.janecapital.com/ Coordinates 37.794024°, -122.403552° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.794024,"lon":-122.403552,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

408

EnerTech Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EnerTech Capital EnerTech Capital Jump to: navigation, search Logo: EnerTech Capital Name EnerTech Capital Address 625 W. Ridge Pike, Building D, Suite 105 Place Conshohocken, Pennsylvania Zip 19428 Region Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Product Venture capital Year founded 1996 Phone number (484) 539-1860 Website http://www.enertechcapital.com Coordinates 40.098246°, -75.3000871° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.098246,"lon":-75.3000871,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

409

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

uq/Uu.3/uo U-L:i ' rAA OuL a uo oUu. 0tri.l± i m,.i,*, u". run.' r.yrcir V e.u uq/Uu.3/uo U-L:i ' rAA OuL a uo oUu. 0tri.l± i m,.i,*, u". run.' r.yrcir V e.u O000DOE F 1325.8 (08-93) Department of Energy United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL DATE: March 31,2006 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-34 (A05TG028) Audit Report No.: OAS-L-06-10 SUBJECT: Report on Audit of "The Department's Information Technology Capital Planning and Investment Control Process" TO: Chief Information Officer, IM-1 INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE Federal guidance requires that Agencies develop and implement capital planning and investment control (CPIC) processes to help ensure that their major information technology investments achieve intended outcomes, represent the best allocation of resources, and reach strategic goals and objectives. The Department of Energy

410

Electric vehicle propulsion batteries: design and cost study for nickel/zinc battery manufacture. Task A. [25 kWh, 700 pounds, 245 Ah at 100+ V, 4. 77 ft/sup 3/  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For satisfying the 25-kWh energy requirement necessary for vehicle propulsion, a 700-pound nickel--zinc battery was configured. Containing 64 individual cells, the unit was selected for minimum weight from computed packaging possibilities. Unit volume was projected to be 4.77 cubic feet. Capacity of the cells delivering 100+ volts was set at 245 ampere-hours. Selection was made primarily because of the compatibility with expressed vehicle requirements of a lower-current system. Manufacturing costs were computed for a unit using sintered positive electrodes at $86/kWh, pilot plant rate, and $78/kWh, production plant rate. Based on a lower than anticipated cost differential between sintered and nonsintered positive electrodes and certain other performance differences, the sintered electrode was chosen for the battery design. Capital expenditures for a production rate of 10,000 batteries per year are estimated to be $2,316,500. Capital expenditure for demonstrating production rates in a pilot plant facility is approximately $280,000, with the use of some shared available equipment. 29 figures, 9 tables.

None

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Low Cost, High Performance, 50-year Electrode  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

this ARPA-E project, Primus Power will develop an this ARPA-E project, Primus Power will develop an extremely durable, highly active, conductive, and inexpensive electrode for flow batteries. Flow batteries offer one of the most exciting opportunities for affordable grid storage, however electrodes are costly and are the single largest cost component in a well integrated design. Grid storage can yield numerous benefits in utility and customer- owned applications:  renewable firming  peak load reduction  load shifting  capital deferral  frequency regulation By incorporating volume production practices from the chlorine, filter media, and electroplating industries, Primus Power will effectively reduce electrode costs to exceed GRIDS cost targets while providing the durability essential for widespread grid-scale adoption.

412

CRSP South Capital Investment Plan FY12-FY21 Detail  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9/2011 9/2011 CRSP South Capital Investment Plan FY12-FY21 Detail Yellow Highlight = New Project to list W Total = Western Only Costs Red Text = Change from previous version O Total = Trust and Joint Participation Costs Blue Text = will be removed from list FY Total = Sum of W Total and O Total Green Highlight = Annual Equipment Replacement Programs MPS Split = Multiple Power System Cost Split. Fund PROJECT PROJECT Power Sys TOTAL W Total W PD W Non-PD O Total FY TOTAL W Total W PD W Non-PD O Total FY TOTAL Transmission Lines Environmental Support for Lands, Access Roads, and ROW's CRSPVMF 450 110 10 100 110 110 10 100 110 Lidar Closeout at Pinnacle Peak and Rogers CRSPVMF 15 15 15 15 Pinnacle Peak-Rogers ROW Agreement CRSPVMF 6,100 6,100 100 6,000 6,100 T-Line SubTotal 6,565 125 25 100 125 6,210 110

413

The Quality of Law: Judicial Incentives, Legal Human Capital and the Evolution of Law  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into systemic error-reducing legal human capital. In thenition, legal human capital reduces legal error: @K 2 human capital and judicial error. Even if

Hadfield, Gillian

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

The Knowledge-Led Accumulation Regime: A Theory of Contemporary Capitalism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

intensity of capital ( ) and knowledge intensity ofintensity of capital and knowledge intensity of labor arewith low knowledge intensity of capital and low knowledge

Kim, Hyungkee

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Arctas Capital Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Arctas Capital Group Arctas Capital Group Jump to: navigation, search Name Arctas Capital Group Place Houston, Texas Zip 77056 Sector Geothermal energy, Renewable Energy, Wind energy Product A Houston-based investment and project development firm focusing on multiple energy technologies including renewables wind and geothermal. Coordinates 29.76045°, -95.369784° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.76045,"lon":-95.369784,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

416

Starlight Capital Advisors | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Starlight Capital Advisors Starlight Capital Advisors Jump to: navigation, search Name Starlight Capital Advisors Place Carlsbad, California Zip 92011 Sector Renewable Energy Product California-based investment banking boutique focused on providing financial and strategic advice to project developers in renewables. Coordinates 31.60396°, -100.641609° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.60396,"lon":-100.641609,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

417

American Wind Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Capital Capital Place Essex, Connecticut Zip 64260 Sector Wind energy Product Connecticut-based American Wind Capital buys wind leases from farmers and landowners in the US, providing an upfront lump sum in exchange for the long-term royalty rights. Coordinates 44.511005°, -73.058204° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.511005,"lon":-73.058204,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

418

Black Coral Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coral Capital Coral Capital Jump to: navigation, search Name Black Coral Capital Address 55 Union Street, 3rd Floor Place Boston, Massachusetts Zip 02108 Region Greater Boston Area Product Cleantech private equity Number of employees 1-10 Website [www.blackcoralcapital.com www.blackcoralcapital.com ] Coordinates 42.3615754°, -71.0572318° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.3615754,"lon":-71.0572318,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

419

Ethanol Capital Funding | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Capital Funding Capital Funding Jump to: navigation, search Name Ethanol Capital Funding Place Atlanta, Georgia Zip 30328 Product Provides funding for ethanol and biodiesel plants. Coordinates 33.748315°, -84.391109° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.748315,"lon":-84.391109,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

420

New Energy Capital Corp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Capital Corp Capital Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name New Energy Capital Corp. Place Hanover, New Hampshire Zip 3755 Sector Renewable Energy Product Private equity fund focused on investments in renewable energy, distributed generation and energy productivity projects. Coordinates 37.5677°, -81.795392° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.5677,"lon":-81.795392,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "units capital costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Walnut Capital Acquisitions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Acquisitions Acquisitions Jump to: navigation, search Name Walnut Capital Acquisitions Place Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Zip 15232 Product Walnut Capital Acquisitions is the project development arm of Walnut Capital, one of Pittsburgh's largest and fastest growing real estate management, development and brokerage companies. Coordinates 40.438335°, -79.997459° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.438335,"lon":-79.997459,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

422

American Capital Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

American Capital Energy American Capital Energy Name American Capital Energy Address 15 Tyngsboro Rd. Suite 4A Place North Chelmsford, Massachusetts Zip 01863 Sector Solar Product solar electric systems Phone number (866) 307-5370 Website http://www.americancapitalener Coordinates 42.640998°, -71.3857514° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.640998,"lon":-71.3857514,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

423

Report: Human Capital Discussion and Observations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Human Capital Discussion, Human Capital Discussion, Observations, and Recommendations August 24, 2006 Submitted by: Mr. A. James Barnes and Mr. Dennis Ferrigno Background: During the March 23-24, 2006 EMAB Public Meeting, Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management (EM-1), James Rispoli, asked the EMAB members to pursue a review of EM Human Capital issues. Although the National Academy of Public Administration (NAPA) is also conducting a review of this topic - the results of which will be available in October 2007 - Mr. Rispoli instructed EMAB to identify areas that need improvement and make recommendations to begin bettering the program now. EMAB focused specifically on the areas of: Morale/Workplace Census Planning/Accountability Training/Certification

424

Clean Cities: Capital District Clean Communities (Albany) coalition  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Capital District Clean Communities (Albany) Coalition Capital District Clean Communities (Albany) Coalition The Capital District Clean Communities (Albany) coalition works with vehicle fleets, fuel providers, community leaders, and other stakeholders to reduce petroleum use in transportation. Capital District Clean Communities (Albany) coalition Contact Information Jennifer Ceponis 518-458-2161 jceponis@cdtcmpo.org Coalition Website Clean Cities Coordinator Jennifer Ceponis Photo of Jennifer Ceponis Jennifer Ceponis has been the coordinator of Capital District Clean Communities Coalition since 2012. Ceponis is a Senior Transportation Planner at the Capital District Transportation Committee (CDTC), where she worked since 2008 on bicycle and pedestrian planning, transportation demand management programs and community planning. The Clean Communities Coalition

425

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities forpetroleum refineries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The petroleum refining industry in the United States is the largest in the world, providing inputs to virtually any economic sector,including the transport sector and the chemical industry. The industry operates 146 refineries (as of January 2004) around the country,employing over 65,000 employees. The refining industry produces a mix of products with a total value exceeding $151 billion. Refineries spend typically 50 percent of cash operating costs (i.e., excluding capital costs and depreciation) on energy, making energy a major cost factor and also an important opportunity for cost reduction. Energy use is also a major source of emissions in the refinery industry making energy efficiency improvement an attractive opportunity to reduce emissions and operating costs. Voluntary government programs aim to assist industry to improve competitiveness through increased energy efficiency and reduced environmental impact. ENERGY STAR (R), a voluntary program managed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, stresses the need for strong and strategic corporate energy management programs. ENERGY STAR provides energy management tools and strategies for successful corporate energy management programs. This Energy Guide describes research conducted to support ENERGY STAR and its work with the petroleum refining industry.This research provides information on potential energy efficiency opportunities for petroleum refineries. This Energy Guide introduces energy efficiency opportunities available for petroleum refineries. It begins with descriptions of the trends, structure, and production of the refining industry and the energy used in the refining and conversion processes. Specific energy savings for each energy efficiency measure based on case studies of plants and references to technical literature are provided. If available, typical payback periods are also listed. The Energy Guide draws upon the experiences with energy efficiency measures of petroleum refineries worldwide. The findings suggest that given available resources and technology, there are opportunities to reduce energy consumption cost-effectively in the petroleum refining industry while maintaining the quality of the products manufactured. Further research on the economics of the measures, as well as the applicability of these to individual refineries, is needed to assess the feasibility of implementation of selected technologies at individual plants.

Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2005-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

426

U. S. Military Expenditures to Protect the Use of Persian Gulf Oil for Motor Vehicles: Report #15 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on U.S. dependence on foreign oil: “…protecting againston U.S. dependence on foreign oil, that the cost of the 1991U.S. dependence on foreign oil is not to reduce military

Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

NREL: Energy Analysis - Levelized Cost of Energy Calculator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Levelized Cost of Energy Calculator Levelized Cost of Energy Calculator Transparent Cost Database Button The levelized cost of energy (LCOE) calculator provides a simple calculator for both utility-scale and distributed generation (DG) renewable energy technologies that compares the combination of capital costs, operations and maintenance (O&M), performance, and fuel costs. Note that this does not include financing issues, discount issues, future replacement, or degradation costs. Each of these would need to be included for a thorough analysis. To estimate simple cost of energy, use the slider controls or enter values directly to adjust the values. The calculator will return the LCOE expressed in cents per kilowatt-hour (kWh). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program

428

The focus of the human capital management portion of the Departments efforts to achieve the Presidents Management Agenda has  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Strategic Use of Human Capital Our human capital management (HCM) efforts have been focused on establishing a systematic and comprehensive process for improving the Department of Energy with the principle goal of meeting our mission objectives for American citizens. These efforts have resulted in an integrated approach that ensures human capital programs and policies are linked to the Department's missions, strategies and goals, while providing for continuous improvement in efficiency and effectiveness while reducing costs. Within the Department, senior managers of the individual program and staff offices are responsible for successfully accomplishing their organization's missions. They are also responsible for

429

How the full opening of the capital account to highly liquid financial markets led Latin America to two and a half cycles of 'mania, panic and crash'  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s, the first two ending in major financial crises. The first cycle took place between the oil price increase that followed the 1973 ‘Yom Kippur’ war and the 1982 debt-crisis, with Chile (the only country in the region that had already fully... , when they implemented ‘price-based’ capital controls) show that a more selective path of participation in international capital markets is a far more effective way of avoiding the pro-cyclical dynamics of unrestricted capital flows — or the huge costs...

Palma, José Gabriel

2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

430

Human Capital: The Role of Ombudsmen in Dispute Resolution  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to the Ranking Member, to the Ranking Member, Subcommittee on International Security, Proliferation, and Federal Services, Committee on Government Affairs, U.S. Senate United States General Accounting Office GAO April 2001 HUMAN CAPITAL The Role of Ombudsmen in Dispute Resolution GAO-01-466 Page i GAO-01-466 The Role of Ombudsmen in Dispute Resolution Letter 1 Results in Brief 2 Background 5 Objectives, Scope, and Methodology 12 Some Agencies Use Ombudsmen to Deal With Workplace Issues 14 The Case Illustrations: Varied Approaches to a Shared Goal 15 Forums Exist for Sharing Best Practices and Lessons Learned 24 Conclusions 27 Recommendation to the Attorney General 28 Comments of Experts 28 Comments from the Attorney General 29 Appendix I Ombudsman-Related Internet Resources 31 Appendix II Federal Workplace Ombudsman Offices as of

431

Solar Thermal Technology Status, Performance, and Cost Estimates -- 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar thermal power plants use mirrors to focus solar radiation onto a solar receiver, which heats a heat transfer fluid that drives either a turbine or heat engine to generate electricity. This study provides cost and performance information for three commercial or early commercial solar thermal electric technologies: parabolic trough (with and without thermal storage), molten salt power tower with thermal energy storage, and parabolic dish engine. Capital, operations, and maintenance cost estimates are...

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

432

Electricity Generation Cost Simulation Model (GenSim)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electricity Generation Cost Simulation Model (GenSim) is a user-friendly, high-level dynamic simulation model that calculates electricity production costs for variety of electricity generation technologies, including: pulverized coal, gas combustion turbine, gas combined cycle, nuclear, solar (PV and thermal), and wind. The model allows the user to quickly conduct sensitivity analysis on key variables, including: capital, O&M, and fuel costs; interest rates; construction time; heat rates; and capacity factors. The model also includes consideration of a wide range of externality costs and pollution control options for carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and mercury. Two different data sets are included in the model; one from the US. Department of Energy (DOE) and the other from Platt's Research Group. Likely users of this model include executives and staff in the Congress, the Administration and private industry (power plant builders, industrial electricity users and electric utilities). The model seeks to improve understanding of the economic viability of various generating technologies and their emissions trade-offs. The base case results, using the DOE data, indicate that in the absence of externality costs, or renewable tax credits, pulverized coal and gas combined cycle plants are the least cost alternatives at 3.7 and 3.5 cents/kwhr, respectively. A complete sensitivity analysis on fuel, capital, and construction time shows that these results coal and gas are much more sensitive to assumption about fuel prices than they are to capital costs or construction times. The results also show that making nuclear competitive with coal or gas requires significant reductions in capital costs, to the $1000/kW level, if no other changes are made. For renewables, the results indicate that wind is now competitive with the nuclear option and is only competitive with coal and gas for grid connected applications if one includes the federal production tax credit of 1.8cents/kwhr.

DRENNEN, THOMAS E.; KAMERY, WILLIAM

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Electricity Generation Cost Simulation Model (GenSim).  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electricity Generation Cost Simulation Model (GenSim) is a user-friendly, high-level dynamic simulation model that calculates electricity production costs for variety of electricity generation technologies, including: pulverized coal, gas combustion turbine, gas combined cycle, nuclear, solar (PV and thermal), and wind. The model allows the user to quickly conduct sensitivity analysis on key variables, including: capital, O&M, and fuel costs; interest rates; construction time; heat rates; and capacity factors. The model also includes consideration of a wide range of externality costs and pollution control options for carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and mercuty. Two different data sets are included in the model; one from the US. Department of Energy (DOE) and the other from Platt's Research Group. Likely users of this model include executives and staff in the Congress, the Administration and private industry (power plant builders, industrial electricity users and electric utilities). The model seeks to improve understanding of the economic viability of various generating technologies and their emissions trade-offs. The base case results, using the DOE data, indicate that in the absence of externality costs, or renewable tax credits, pulverized coal and gas combined cycle plants are the least cost alternatives at 3.7 and 3.5 cents/kwhr, respectively. A complete sensitivity analysis on fuel, capital, and construction time shows that these results coal and gas are much more sensitive to assumption about fuel prices than they are to capital costs or construction times. The results also show that making nuclear competitive with coal or gas requires significant reductions in capital costs, to the $1000/kW level, if no other changes are made. For renewables, the results indicate that wind is now competitive with the nuclear option and is only competitive with coal and gas for grid connected applications if one includes the federal production tax credit of 1.8cents/kwhr.

Kamery, William (Hobart and William Smith Colleges, Geneva, NY); Baker, Arnold Barry; Drennen, Thomas E.

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Fuel Cell System Cost for Transporationa--2008 Cost Estimate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell System Cost for Fuel Cell System Cost for Transportation-2008 Cost Estimate National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard * Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Independent Review Published for the U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Program NREL/BK-6A1-45457 May 2009 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or

435

Wind Electrolysis: Hydrogen Cost Optimization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a hydrogen production cost analysis of a collection of optimized central wind based water electrolysis production facilities. The basic modeled wind electrolysis facility includes a number of low temperature electrolyzers and a co-located wind farm encompassing a number of 3MW wind turbines that provide electricity for the electrolyzer units.

Saur, G.; Ramsden, T.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Essays on human capital and financial economics by Jialan Wang.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis consists of three essays examining issues related to human capital, careers, and financial economics. In the first chapter, I examine how the process of corporate bankruptcy varies by human capital intensity ...

Wang, Jialan, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Knowledge Capital: How Knowledge-Based Enterprises are Really Built  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From the Publisher:"Knowledge Capital: How Knowledge-Based Enterprises Really Get Built begins by defining the parameters of knowledge management and intellectual capital. An important task of a modern organization is to create an integrated strategy ...

Jay L. Chatzkel

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Methane production from hog manure in small-scale units  

SciTech Connect

Fuel gas production from manure on small-sized (100 to 500 hogs) family-operated farms can become an economically sound proposition within a decade if current price rise trends for fossil fuels continue. Minimum plant cost resulting from an optimistic assumption of the state of digestion technology leads to a fuel gas cost about equal to LPG cost on a Btu basis. Hog farms with over 3000 animals would permit digester gas costs, which would match LPG cost. It may be better to build a plant before LPG costs rise to meet gas costs in order to take advantage of lower plant costs, which will generate future cost savings. The credit for gas produced makes digestion competitive with aerobic methods for manure disposal whose capital costs are much lower.

Silveston, P.L.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Marathon Capital LLC (Illinois) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marathon Capital LLC (Illinois) Marathon Capital LLC (Illinois) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Marathon Capital LLC (Illinois) Name Marathon Capital LLC (Illinois) Address 2801 Lakeside Drive, Suite 210 Place Bannockburn, Illinois Zip 60015 Product Investment banking firm providing services to global energy, infrastructure and project finance markets Phone number (847) 574-2670 Website http://marathon-cap.com/ Coordinates 42.202995°, -87.88451° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.202995,"lon":-87.88451,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

440

MVP Capital Partners | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MVP Capital Partners MVP Capital Partners Jump to: navigation, search Logo: MVP Capital Partners Name MVP Capital Partners Address 201 King of Prussia Road, Suite 240 Place Radnor, Pennsylvania Zip 19087 Region Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Product Makes equity investments in growing later-stage companies and also provides equity financing for acquisitions and recapitalizations Phone number (610) 254-2999 Website http://www.mvpcapitalpartners. Coordinates 40.0428319°, -75.3567351° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.0428319,"lon":-75.3567351,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

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441

Energy Capital Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Capital Solutions Energy Capital Solutions Name Energy Capital Solutions Address 2651 North Harwood Street, Suite 410 Place Dallas, Texas Zip 75201 Region Texas Area Product Investment banking firm focused on rainsing private capital and providing advisory services to public and private energy companies Phone number (214) 219-8200 Website http://www.energycapitalsoluti Coordinates 32.792857°, -96.806504° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.792857,"lon":-96.806504,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

442

Sustainable Technology Capital, LP | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technology Capital, LP Technology Capital, LP Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Sustainable Technology Capital, LP Name Sustainable Technology Capital, LP Address 625 Liberty Ave., Suite 3200 Place Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Zip 15222 Region Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Number of employees 1-10 Year founded 2005 Phone number 412 497 5700 Website http://www.stechcapital.com/ Coordinates 40.442424°, -80.000746° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.442424,"lon":-80.000746,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

443

Expansion Capital Partners LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Expansion Capital Partners LLC Expansion Capital Partners LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Expansion Capital Partners LLC Address One Embarcadero Center, Suite 4100 Place San Francisco, California Zip 94111 Region Bay Area Product Venture capital firm that invests in expansion-stage, clean technology enterprises Year founded 2001 Phone number (415) 788-8802 Website http://www.expansioncapital.co Coordinates 37.794497°, -122.39962° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.794497,"lon":-122.39962,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

444

Prospect Capital Corporation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Prospect Capital Corporation Prospect Capital Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Prospect Capital Corporation Name Prospect Capital Corporation Address 10 East 40th Street, 44th Floor Place New York, New York Zip 10016 Region Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Product Mezzanine debt and private equity firm. Stock Symbol PSEC Phone number (212) 448-0702 Website http://www.prospectstreet.com/ Coordinates 40.751592°, -73.981323° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.751592,"lon":-73.981323,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

445

Human Resource Management on Social Capital  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past years, several researchers have analysed the relational dynamics that takes place inside and between organizations concept, mediating and moderating variables, effects, etc. considering it as a resource capable of contributing to the orientation ... Keywords: Human Resource Policy, Human Resources Management, Information Technology, Proposed a Model, Social Capital

Macarena López-Fernández; Fernando Martín-Alcázar; Pedro Miguel Romero-Fernández

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

English Units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

English Units. A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J. 1, Steam Point Calculator: English Units, ... 6, Height of steam point apparatus above ground (ft.), 0, ft. ...

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

447

Unit Conversions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... volume flow units, which contain "atm", assume that the gas is: ideal; at a pressure of 101325 Pa; at a temperature of 0 °C. Be aware that the unit "atm ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

448

Connecting Small Manufacturers with the Capital Needed to ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... facility, or (4) to refinance or restructure their balance ... Refinancing, Capital Restructuring ... by the Small Business Administration Office of Technology ...

2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

449

DOE O 328.1, Human Capital Management Accountability Program  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The Order establishes requirements, roles and responsibilities for the Human Capital Management Accountability Program (HCMAP) for human resources programs and ...

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z