Sample records for united nations development

  1. United Nations geothermal activities in developing countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beredjick, N.

    1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United Nations implements technical cooperation projects in developing countries through its Department of Technical Cooperation for Development (DTCD). The DTCD is mandated to explore for and develop natural resources (water, minerals, and relevant infrastructure) and energy - both conventional and new and renewable energy sources. To date, the United Nations has been involved in over 30 geothermal exploration projects (completed or underway) in 20 developing countries: 8 in Africa (Djibouti, Ethiopia, Kenya, Madagascar); 8 in Asia (China, India, Jordan, Philippines, Thailand); 9 in Latin America (Bolivia, Chile, El Salvador, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama) and 6 in Europe (Greece, Romania, Turkey, Yugoslavia). Today, the DTCD has seven UNDP geothermal projects in 6 developing countries. Four of these (Bolivia, China, Honduras, and Kenya) are major exploration projects whose formulation and execution has been possible thanks to the generous contributions under cost-sharing arrangements from the government of Italy. These four projects are summarized.

  2. IRD Sige, 44, boulevard de dunkerque 13572 Marseille cedex 02 United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on Sustainable Development Rio+20: IRD and AIRD join forces Launch of the first scientific cooperation programme United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio+20), will take place in Brazil on 20 and 22 United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development, Rio+20 will offer the opportunity to report

  3. United Nations Conference on Trade and Development Making Certification Work for Sustainable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United Nations Conference on Trade and Development Making Certification Work for Sustainable ..................................................................... 31 Chapter 5. Making certification work for sustainable development: the way ahead Development: The Case of Biofuels United Nations New York and Geneva, 2008 #12;ii Note The designations

  4. United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin BaxinUmwelt Management AG UMaAG Jump to:UnipersonalUnitedUnitedUnited

  5. United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global Energy LLC Place:UnalakleetInformation United

  6. Bosnia: War, History, and Nationality A curriculum unit developed by Steven Boyce for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    Bosnia: War, History, and Nationality A curriculum unit developed by Steven Boyce of the War in Bosnia 18-23 Day 4: War and Politics 24 Map 4: 1991 Ethnic Composition 25 Handout 3: Key Dates in Yugoslavia's War 26 Day 5: Begin Independent Research Projects 27 Annotated Resource List 28-33 #12

  7. UNITED NATIONS BEST PRACTICES IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Catlica de Chile)

    UNITED NATIONS BEST PRACTICES IN INVESTMENT FOR DEVELOPMENT CASE STUDIES IN FDI How to Utilize FDI Practices in Investment for Development is a programme of case studies in making foreign direct investment and development. UNCTAD's approach is to undertake case studies of a pair of developed and developing

  8. Second United Nations International Conference

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Second United Nations International Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy ON THE ANALYSIS O F BUBBLE CHAMBER TRACKS Q Hugh Bradner and F r a n k Solmitz INTRODUCTION A j...

  9. Second United Nations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  10. United Nations Development Programme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technologies To Convert Biomass Into Modern Energy Chapter 5 5.1. Gasification 5.2. Anaerobic Digestion 5 Chapter 7 7.1. Biogas-Based Electricity and Water Supply in Indian Villages 7.2. Sustainable

  11. United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization Economic Commission for Europe of the United Nations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UNECE United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization Economic Commission for Europe of the United Forestry Commission of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, to promote sustainable? UNITED NATIONS #12;#12;ECE/TIM/DP/44 United Nations Economic Commission for Europe/ Food and Agriculture

  12. United Nations Human Space Technology Initiative (HSTI)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ochiai, M; Steffens, H; Balogh, W; Haubold, H J; Othman, M; Doi, T

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Human Space Technology Initiative was launched in 2010 within the framework of the United Nations Programme on Space Applications implemented by the Office for Outer Space Affairs of the United Nations. It aims to involve more countries in activities related to human spaceflight and space exploration and to increase the benefits from the outcome of such activities through international cooperation, to make space exploration a truly international effort. The role of the Initiative in these efforts is to provide a platform to exchange information, foster collaboration between partners from spacefaring and non-spacefaring countries, and encourage emerging and developing countries to take part in space research and benefit from space applications. The Initiative organizes expert meetings and workshops annually to raise awareness of the current status of space exploration activities as well as of the benefits of utilizing human space technology and its applications. The Initiative is also carrying out primary ...

  13. United States National Energy Technology Laboratory's (NETL)...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    National Energy Technology Laboratory's (NETL) Smart Grid Implementation Strategy Reference Library Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: United States...

  14. United States Government National Nuclear Security Administration...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    United States Government National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Savannah River Field Office (SRFO) Memorandum DATE: January 10, 2014 REPLY TO ATTN OF: sv (McAlhany,...

  15. United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    products market developments in 2002 and 2003 Highlights · Availability on world markets of wood products for a policy response from Governments. · Energy markets and international biofuel trade are developing rapidly consequences in the long term for wood supply and for the market position of forest products. · Changes

  16. Second United Nations International Conference

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementingnpitcheResearchPhysicsDepartment of Energy MonizBiofuelsNations

  17. United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization Economic Commission for Europe of the United Nations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UNECE United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization Economic Commission for Europe of the United (trade by species). Although in theory these two should correspond, in a number of cases the figure

  18. Second United Nations International Conference

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found The item you requested, OSTISciTech Connect

  19. FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION OF THE UNITED NATIONS Community-based tree and forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION OF THE UNITED NATIONS ROME, 2011 Community-based tree of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) concerning the legal or development

  20. National Fertilizer Development Center

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 August 2008REGULATORY,.COMMISSION; I.-'h-L

  1. United Nations Basic Space Science Initiative (UNBSSI) 1991-2012 and Beyond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathai, A M; Balogh, W R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper contains an overview and summary on the achievements of the United Nations basic space science initiative in terms of donated and provided planetariums, astronomical telescopes, and space weather instruments, particularly operating in developing nations. This scientific equipment has been made available to respective host countries, particularly developing nations, through the series of twenty basic space science workshops, organized through the United Nations Programme on Space Applications since 1991. Organized by the United Nations, the European Space Agency (ESA), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) of the United States of America, and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), the basic space science workshops were organized as a series of workshops that focused on basic space science (1991-2004), the International Heliophysical Year 2007 (2005-2009), and the International Space Weather Initiative (2010-2012) proposed by the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Spac...

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: advanced auxiliary power units...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    auxiliary power units (including biofuels) Sandia Participated in the 3rd Annual Technology Forum of the U.S.-China Clean Energy Research Center - Clean Vehicles Consortium...

  3. Host nation security force development : a new roadmap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzgerald, Shawn (Shawn Michael)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new model concerning the concepts of host nation security force development, or security sector reform (SSR), is proposed. This model is rooted in scholarly literature and seeks to fill current gaps in United States Army ...

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: Crystalline Rock Repository Developments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the United States Conceptual Framework for Developing Resilience Metrics for the Electricity, Oil, and Gas Sectors in the United States View all EC Publications Related Topics...

  5. United Nations Atomic Energy Commission stalls out

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    commission would be short-lived and would not result in the desired control of atomic energy. In the wake of the disappointing results of the Moscow meeting, the United States...

  6. Topaz-II reactor control unit development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wyant, F.J.; Jensen, D.; Logothetis, J.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The development for a new digital reactor control unit for the Topaz-II reactor is described. The unit is expected to provide the means for automated control during a possible Topaz flight experiment. The breadboard design and development is discussed.

  7. Thermochemical Process Development Unit: Researching Fuels from Biomass, Bioenergy Technologies (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Thermochemical Process Development Unit (TCPDU) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a unique facility dedicated to researching thermochemical processes to produce fuels from biomass.

  8. Rwanda-Project to Develop a National Strategy on Climate Change...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for International Development, United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Partner Smith School for Enterprise and Environment, University of Oxford Sector Climate, Energy,...

  9. UNITED STATES AIR FORCE OUTSIDE THE NATIONAL CAPITAL REGION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    program in order to reduce Federal employee's contribution to traffic congestion and air pollutionUNITED STATES AIR FORCE OUTSIDE THE NATIONAL CAPITAL REGION PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION BENEFIT PROGRAM): ____________ City (Residence): __________________________State: _______________ Zip Code: ________________ Air Force

  10. Sandia National Laboratories for the United States

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementingnpitche Home About npitcheSandian Wins AwardNational

  11. United Nations Foundation (UNF) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCalifornia Sector:Shreniksource History ViewFarmingUnited

  12. United Nations Foundation (UNF) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin BaxinUmwelt Management AG UMaAG JumpEurope Jump to:sourceUnited

  13. United Nations Foundation Feed | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin BaxinUmwelt Management AG UMaAG JumpEurope Jump to:sourceUnitedNO

  14. UNITED NATIONS ENVIRONMENT PROGRAMME PROJECT DOCUMENT SUMMARY

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, IndianaTurtle Airships JumpTypefor Africa | Open EnergyUNITED

  15. Sandia National Laboratories is developing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  16. September 2006 United Nations Environment Programme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boudouresque, Charles F.

    of the relative importance of human impact on biodiversity must take into account the time necessary introduction, species extinction and global warming are of major concern. (i) Coastal development especially" species are known to have become extinct due to human impact, but many species and communities are vulne

  17. INFORMATION NOTE United Nations/Nigeria Workshop on Space Law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glass, Ian S.

    1 INFORMATION NOTE United Nations/Nigeria Workshop on Space Law "Meeting international responsibilities and addressing domestic needs" Hosted by the Government of Nigeria 21-24 November 2005 Abuja, Nigeria Background Given the growing number of benefits derived from the use of space applications

  18. United Nations Climate Change Conference Durban, South Africa 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viola, Ronald

    United Nations Climate Change Conference Durban, South Africa 2011 COP17/CMP7 #12; The Conferences presents a unique opportunity for South Africa to promote and publicly initiate the transition to a green, President of South Africa Maite Nkoana-Mashabane, Minister of Foreign Affairs of South Africa President

  19. Foreign Fishery Developments United States-Spain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foreign Fishery Developments United States-Spain Fisheries Trade, 1980-85 Introduction The U though Spain was forced to become a net importer of fishery products in 1977. due to the extension of 200-mile Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZ) by coastal coun tries. U.S. exports of edible seafoods to Spain

  20. Argonne National Laboratory's Solar Energy Development Programmatic...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Website Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Argonne National Laboratory's Solar Energy Development Programmatic EIS Website Abstract This...

  1. United Nations Global Compact The UN Global Compact is a strategic policy initiative for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatziantoniou, Damianos

    United Nations Global Compact The UN Global Compact is a strategic policy initiative for businesses in the world. The Global Compact pursues two complementary objectives: 1. Mainstream the ten principles the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). Participation in the Global Compact is open to degree-granting academic

  2. United States National Waste Terminal Storage argillaceous rock studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brunton, G.D.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The past and present argillaceous rock studies for the US National Waste Terminal Storage Program consist of: (1) evaluation of the geological characteristics of several widespread argillaceous formations in the United States; (2) laboratory studies of the physical and chemical properties of selected argillaceous rock samples; and (3) two full-scale in situ surface heater experiments that simulate the emplacement of heat-generating radioactive waste in argillaceous rock.

  3. Leadership Development | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Professional Development Resource WIST Talk: The Art of Networking video Leadership Development Argonne has a long-term vision for its workforce, recognizing that future challenges...

  4. Leadership Development | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Connect with Argonne LinkedIn Facebook Twitter YouTube Google+ More Social Media Leadership Development Argonne's excellence and innovation is driven by exemplary leadership....

  5. United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCalifornia Sector:Shreniksource History ViewFarmingUnited Nations

  6. United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global Energy LLC Place:UnalakleetInformation United Nations

  7. DEVELOPING NATIONS September 19, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Somnath

    of Sales, Marketing, and International Relations, Johns Hopkins Technology Transfer PANEL 3: MOBILE HEALTH Moderator: Rachel Cassidy, Portfolio Director, Johns Hopkins Technology Transfer Panelists Jonathan Weiner, Co-Developer of ACG System and Professor of Health Policy and Management, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF A HYDRONIC ROOFTOP UNIT -- HYPAK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric Lee; Dick Bourne; Mark Berman

    2004-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The majority of US commercial floor space is cooled by rooftop HVAC units (RTU's). RTU popularity derives chiefly from their low initial cost and relative ease of service access without disturbing building occupants. Unfortunately, current RTU's are inherently inefficient due to a combination of characteristics that unnecessarily increase cooling loads and energy use. Existing RTU's in the U.S. consume an estimated 2.4 quads annually. Inefficient RTU's create an estimated 3.5% of U.S. CO{sub 2} emissions, thus contributing significantly to global warming. Also, RTU's often fail to maintain adequate ventilation air and air filtration. This project was developed to evaluate the feasibility of a radically new ''HyPak'' RTU design that significantly and cost-effectively increases RTU performance and delivered air quality. The objective of the HyPak Project was to design, develop and test a hydronic RTU that provides a quantum improvement over conventional RTU performance. Our proposal targeted 60% and 50% reduction in electrical energy use by the HyPak RTU for dry and humid climates, respectively, when compared with a conventional unit.

  9. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Facility Radionuclide Emissions Units and Sampling Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, J. M.; Brown, Jason H.; Walker, Brian A.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Battelle-Pacific Northwest Division operates numerous research and development (R and D) laboratories in Richland, WA, including those associated with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Hanford Site and PNNL Site that have the potential for radionuclide air emissions. The National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP 40 CFR 61, Subparts H and I) requires an assessment of all emission units that have the potential for radionuclide air emissions. Potential emissions are assessed annually by PNNL staff members. Sampling, monitoring, and other regulatory compliance requirements are designated based upon the potential-to-emit dose criteria found in the regulations. The purpose of this document is to describe the facility radionuclide air emission sampling program and provide current and historical facility emission unit system performance, operation, and design information. For sampled systems, a description of the buildings, exhaust units, control technologies, and sample extraction details is provided for each registered emission unit. Additionally, applicable stack sampler configuration drawings, figures, and photographs are provided. Deregistered emission unit details are provided as necessary for up to 5 years post closure.

  10. MONGOLIA'S INVESTMENT PRIORITIES FROM A NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    1 MONGOLIA'S INVESTMENT PRIORITIES FROM A NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT PERSPECTIVE SHAGDAR ENKHBAYAR, DAVID FOR MONGOLIA 17 4 RESULTS 25 5 CONCLUDING REMARKS 29 6 REFERENCES 30 ANNEX 1: SUMMARY OF THE MONGOLIA calibration 36 #12;3 ABSTRACT Mongolia is an economy remarkably rich in natural resources, at the outset

  11. National Laboratory Concentrating Solar Power Research and Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    National Laboratory Concentrating Solar Power Research and Development National Laboratory Concentrating Solar Power Research and Development This fact sheet describes the current...

  12. CHP Research and Development - Presentation by Oak Ridge National...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Research and Development - Presentation by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, June 2011 CHP Research and Development - Presentation by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, June 2011...

  13. Unit Leadership Development Program and Evaluation for P Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raybon, Felicia K.

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Division P undertook the Unit Leadership Development Program in March 2005. This Program was designed to facilitate leadership development in the workplace and develop those men and women who work everyday to accomplish the mission of Organization...

  14. United Nations Economic Commission for Europe Note for the Press ECE/TIM/08/N01

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United Nations Economic Commission for Europe Note for the Press ECE/TIM/08/N01 Geneva, 29 October combats climate change The Timber Committee of the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE and forest biomass; Panel and pulp manufacturers continue to be concerned about the competition for their raw

  15. Sandia National Laboratories: Portable Hydrogen Fuel-Cell Unit...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Green, Sustainable Power to Honolulu Port Portable Hydrogen Fuel-Cell Unit to Provide Green, Sustainable Power to Honolulu Port Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool Available for...

  16. Gambia-Support the Development of a National Climate Compatible...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name CDKN-Gambia-Support the Development of a National Climate Compatible Development Strategy AgencyCompany Organization Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN),...

  17. UNITED STATES ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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  18. UNITED STATES ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3uj: ;;IDEC. i' ,' ,' ' .:,:

  19. UNITED STATES ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3uj: ;;IDEC. i' ,' ,' ' .:,:.BJ'

  20. Expedient benevolence : international development and the United Kingdom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pandit, Ninad (Ninad Ravindra)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis examines the role of International Development in the United Kingdom during its transition from a colonial ruler to a neo-liberal capitalist state. Starting with the inter-war period, it looks at the changing ...

  1. A review of nuclear fuel cycle options for developing nations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, R.K.; Scopatz, A.M.; Ernesti, M. [The University of Texas at Austin, Pickle Research Campus, Building 159, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of several nuclear reactor and fuel cycle options for developing nations was performed. All reactor choices were considered under a GNEP framework. Two advanced alternative reactor types, a nuclear battery-type reactor and a fuel reprocessing fast reactor were examined and compared with a conventional Generation III+ LWR reactor. The burn of nuclear fuel was simulated using ORIGEN 2.2 for each reactor type and the resulting information was used to compare the options in terms of waste produced, waste quality and repository impact. The ORIGEN data was also used to evaluate the economics of the fuel cycles using unit costs, discount rates and present value functions with the material balances. The comparison of the fuel cycles and reactors developed in this work provides a basis for the evaluation of subsidy programs and cost-benefit comparisons for various reactor parameters such as repository impact and proliferation risk versus economic considerations. (authors)

  2. DOE and Sandia National Laboratories Develop National Rotor Testbed...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) are designing a modern, research-quality wind turbine rotor for use at the new Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWiFT) site at Texas Tech...

  3. Status Report on the United Nations Basic Space Science Initiative (UNBSSI)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haubold, H J

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1990, the UN Programme on Space Applications leads the United Nations Basic Space Science Initiative by contributing to the international and regional development of astronomy and space science through annual UN/ESA/NASA/JAXA workshops on basic space science, International Heliophysical Year 2007, and the International Space Weather Initiative. Space weather is the conditions on the Sun and in the solar wind, magnetosphere, ionosphere and thermosphere that can influence the performance and reliability of space-borne and ground-based technological systems and can endanger human life or health. The programme also coordinates the development of IHY/ISWI low-cost, ground-based, world-wide instrument arrays. To date, 14 world-wide instrument arrays comprising approximately 1000 instruments (GPS receivers, magnetometers, spectrometers, particle detectors) are operating in more than 71 countries. The most recent workshop was hosted by the Republic of Korea in 2009 for Asia and the Pacific. Annual workshops on ...

  4. The Scales of Sustainable Design in Developing Nations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn, S.; Cho, S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Source (L): United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA), Addis Ababa; Global Environment Outlook 2000 (GEO), UNEP, Earthscan, London, 1999. ESL-HH-10-08-04 IMPACT OF CLIMATE CHANGE IN RWANDA Current Impacts... Commission for Africa (UNECA), Addis Ababa; Global Environment Outlook 2000 (GEO), UNEP, Earthscan, London, 1999. Mukankomeje, Rose. Impact of Climate Change in Rwanda. 2009. World Meteorological Organization (WMO), United Nation Environment Programme (UNEP...

  5. Blue Helmeted Dragons : explaining China's participation in United Nations peace operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin-Greenberg, Erik

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    China's personnel contributions to United Nations peace operations has significantly increased in the first decade of the twenty-first century, however little academic or policy attention has been given to examining patterns ...

  6. Printed in the United States of America. Available from National Technical information Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    #12;Printed in the United States of America. Available from National Technical information Service.5.3 Integration of Evacuated or Sealed Insulation Systems and Appliances 2-27 2.5.4 Edge Losses 2-29 2

  7. Idaho National Laboratory Research & Development Impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicole Stricker

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technological advances that drive economic growth require both public and private investment. The U.S. Department of Energys national laboratories play a crucial role by conducting the type of research, testing and evaluation that is beyond the scope of regulators, academia or industry. Examples of such work from the past year can be found in these pages. Idaho National Laboratorys engineering and applied science expertise helps deploy new technologies for nuclear energy, national security and new energy resources. Unique infrastructure, nuclear material inventory and vast expertise converge at INL, the nations nuclear energy laboratory. Productive partnerships with academia, industry and government agencies deliver high-impact outcomes. This edition of INLs Impacts magazine highlights national and regional leadership efforts, growing capabilities, notable collaborations, and technology innovations. Please take a few minutes to learn more about the critical resources and transformative research at one of the nations premier applied science laboratories.

  8. Developing Integrated National Design Standards for Offshore...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    report that summarizes the regulations, standards, and guidelines for the design and operation of offshore wind projects in the United States. In 2012, the American Wind Energy...

  9. A. World Summit on Sustainable Development : A First Critical Assessment, here p. 1-3 B. Lecture at the University of Bonn, BIMUN/Bonn International Model United Nations,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franz, Sven Oliver

    A. World Summit on Sustainable Development : A First Critical Assessment, here p. 1-3 B. Lecture / NACHLESE World Summit on Sustainable Development: A First Critical Assessment By Prof. Dr. Uwe Holtz on Sustainable Development (WSSD) in Johannesburg was a failure, an opportunity wasted, the triumph of "hard" neo

  10. United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global Energy LLC Place:UnalakleetInformation UnitedInformation

  11. National Energy Modeling System (United States) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose BendMiasoleTremor(Question)8/14/2007NCPV Jump to: navigation,United

  12. David Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States) USDOE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management Fermi SitePARTOfficeOctoberDanielDTNTopL.David PaulScale

  13. United States-Japan Nuclear Security Working Group | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City,EnrichedSupplemental Directives |and

  14. National Nuclear Security Administration United States Department of Energy

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved: 5-13-14 FEDERALAmerica Treaty Organization NCT Nuclear Counterterrorism

  15. National Nuclear Security Administration United States Department of Energy

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved: 5-13-14 FEDERALAmerica Treaty Organization NCT Nuclear

  16. Pantex makes large donation to United Way | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved: 5-13-14 FEDERALAmerica TreatyWaste PolicyWind Farmfirefighters

  17. Pantex kicks off United Way campaign | National Nuclear Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding access toTestPhysics Lab PPPLEIA-815, MonthlyNuclearveterans

  18. Research, Washington, DC (United States) Sandia National Labs.,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements RecentlyElectronic Public ReadingResearch Nuclear Physics (NP) NP4878

  19. DOE and Sandia National Laboratories Develop National Rotor Testbed |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,Office of Policy, OAPM |TRUJuly 29, 2013SavannahRenewableofof Energy

  20. Sandia National Laboratories: Lighting Developments to 2030

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ClimateLighting Developments to 2030 Lighting Developments to 2030 videobanner Lighting Technologies, Costs, and Energy Demand: Global Developments to 2030 V iew Slides: Lighting...

  1. Tri-National Agricultural Accord Rural Development Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deYoung, Brad

    Tri-National Agricultural Accord Rural Development Workshop Overview of Canadian Provinces April 14. Structure Structures: Federal and provincial government organization Municipal / County Community / Regional

  2. Hydrogen & Fuel Cells: Review of National Research and Development...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hydrogen & Fuel Cells: Review of National Research and Development (R&D) Programs Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Hydrogen & Fuel Cells: Review of...

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: Integrated Research and Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ClimateEnergy InfrastructureAdvanced Electric SystemsIntegrated Research and Development Integrated Research and Development Sandia's Renewable Systems and Energy Infrastructure...

  4. Site descriptions of environmental restoration units at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhaida, A.J. Jr.; Parker, A.F.

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides summary information on Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Restoration (ER) sites as listed in the Oak Ridge Reservation Federal Facility Agreement (FFA), dated January 1, 1992, Appendix C. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory was built in 1943 as part of the World War II Manhattan Project. The original mission of ORNL was to produce and chemically separate the first gram-quantities of plutonium as part of the national effort to produce the atomic bomb. The current mission of ORNL is to provide applied research and development in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs in nuclear fusion and fission, energy conservation, fossil fuels, and other energy technologies and to perform basic scientific research in selected areas of the physical, life, and environmental sciences. ER is also tasked with clean up or mitigation of environmental impacts resulting from past waste management practices on portions of the approximately 37,000 acres within the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Other installations located within the ORR are the Gaseous Diffusion Plant (K-25) and the Y-12 plant. The remedial action strategy currently integrates state and federal regulations for efficient compliance and approaches for both investigations and remediation efforts on a Waste Area Grouping (WAG) basis. As defined in the ORR FFA Quarterly Report July - September 1995, a WAG is a grouping of potentially contaminated sites based on drainage area and similar waste characteristics. These contaminated sites are further divided into four categories based on existing information concerning whether the data are generated for scoping or remedial investigation (RI) purposes. These areas are as follows: (1) Operable Units (OU); (2) Characterization Areas (CA); (3) Remedial Site Evaluation (RSE) Areas; and (4) Removal Site Evaluation (RmSE) Areas.

  5. Integral Development: Taking 'The Middle Path' Towards Gross National Happiness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hargens, Sean Boyd Frye

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Bhutanese culture: an alloy forged from such ingredients as Buddhism, feudalism, national security issues, and the absence of colonization. In the vision document, Bhutan 2020, the role Integral Development 31 of GNH for Bhutans development...

  6. Sandia National Laboratories Develops Tool for Evaluating Wind...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Develops Tool for Evaluating Wind Turbine-Radar Impacts Sandia National Laboratories Develops Tool for Evaluating Wind Turbine-Radar Impacts September 12, 2014 - 11:30am Addthis...

  7. Institutional Research & Development News | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    newsreleasesradiationdetection. Livermore researchers developed the first plastic material capable of efficiently distinguishing neutrons from gamma rays, something...

  8. Implementation of Strategies to Leverage Public and Private Resources for National Security Workforce Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents implementation strategies to leverage public and private resources for the development of an adequate national security workforce as part of the National Security Preparedness Project (NSPP), being performed under a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) grant. There are numerous efforts across the United States to develop a properly skilled and trained national security workforce. Some of these efforts are the result of the leveraging of public and private dollars. As budget dollars decrease and the demand for a properly skilled and trained national security workforce increases, it will become even more important to leverage every education and training dollar. This report details some of the efforts that have been implemented to leverage public and private resources, as well as implementation strategies to further leverage public and private resources.

  9. Broadband Model Performance for an Updated National Solar Radiation Database in the United States of America: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, D. R.; Wilcox, S.; Marion, W.; George, R.; Anderberg, M.

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Updated review of broadband model performance in a project being done to update the existing United States National Solar Radiation Database (NSRDB).

  10. United Nations/Nigeria Workshop on Space Law "Meeting international responsibilities and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glass, Ian S.

    United Nations/Nigeria Workshop on Space Law "Meeting international responsibilities and addressing domestic needs" 21-24 November 2005 Abuja, Nigeria Rockview Hotel (Royale), Plot 374/789 Cad Zone A8, Adetokunbo Ademola Crescent, Wuse II Abuja, Nigeria PRELIMINARY DRAFT PROGRAMME (as at 03 August 2005

  11. United Nations Association -Nebraska Division Hears Roger Gold's "World's Water Problems"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    water problem there is the lack of water during the dry season. In the monsoons, water is collectedUnited Nations Association - Nebraska Division Hears Roger Gold's "World's Water Problems Dictionary (1980), and the New York Times Everyday Dictionary (1982). One-toorders are many of the 54 Water

  12. United Nations S/RES/1810 (2008) Security Council Distr.: General

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for in the United Nations Charter, Reaffirming its decision that none of the obligations in resolution 1540 (2004 to the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, the Chemical Weapons Convention and the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention or alter the responsibilities of the International Atomic Energy Agency or the Organization

  13. 36 SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN July 2008 In a dramatic call to action in April, United Nations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OPINION 36 SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN July 2008 In a dramatic call to action in April, United Nations on an accelerated timeta- ble. The international system is a congeries of overlapping public and private effectively take a shared action. Success will enable us to consider similarly urgent challenges in food

  14. Part IV: Other International Arrangements of Interest Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Part IV: Other International Arrangements of Interest 176 Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) Committee on Fisheries (COFI) FAO The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) was founded in October 1945 with a mandate to raise levels of nutrition and standards of living, to improve

  15. Printed in the United States of America. Available from National Technical Information Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    #12;Printed in the United States of America. Available from National Technical Information Service) of powders with high thermal resistance (R) showed that heat losses from the ends of the cylindrical specimen to reduce uncertainties introduced by end losses. Numerically derived factors were pre- pared for use

  16. Printed in the United States of America. Available from National Technical Information Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    #12;Printed in the United States of America. Available from National Technical Information Service ......................... 20 4.3 Map-Based Compressor Model ........................... 23 4.4 Loss and Efficiency Performance ........................... 56 6.6 Fan Motor and Compressor Shell Heat Losses ........... 64 7

  17. Ongoing Space Nuclear Systems Development in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Bragg-Sitton; J. Werner; S. Johnson; Michael G. Houts; Donald T. Palac; Lee S. Mason; David I. Poston; A. Lou Qualls

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reliable, long-life power systems are required for ambitious space exploration missions. Nuclear power and propulsion options can enable a bold, new set of missions and introduce propulsion capabilities to achieve access to science destinations that are not possible with more conventional systems. Space nuclear power options can be divided into three main categories: radioisotope power for heating or low power applications; fission power systems for non-terrestrial surface application or for spacecraft power; and fission power systems for electric propulsion or direct thermal propulsion. Each of these areas has been investigated in the United States since the 1950s, achieving various stages of development. While some nuclear systems have achieved flight deployment, others continue to be researched today. This paper will provide a brief overview of historical space nuclear programs in the U.S. and will provide a summary of the ongoing space nuclear systems research, development, and deployment in the United States.

  18. Advanced Technology Development and Mitigation | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Technology Development and Mitigation This sub-program includes laboratory code and computer engineering and science projects that pursue long-term simulation and computing goals...

  19. Institutional Research & Development Reports | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    and Development (LDRD) supports experiment studies that combine irradiation and corrosion effects: (Left) Irradiation and corrosion experiments chamber; (right) Lead bismuth...

  20. Research and Development | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    collaborations. The Office of Research and Development is responsible for managing the Science Campaign which conducts new scientific research and combines it with existing data...

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: cooperative research and development...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    research and development agreement Caterpillar, Sandia CRADA Opens Door to Multiple Research Projects On April 17, 2013, in Capabilities, Computational Modeling & Simulation, CRF,...

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: PV system development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    system development Sandians Win 'Best Paper' Award at Photovoltaic Conference in Japan On March 4, 2015, in Computational Modeling & Simulation, Energy, Facilities, News, News &...

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: fueling infrastructure development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fueling infrastructure development New Report Describes Joint Opportunities for Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuel-Cell Vehicle Markets On March 6, 2015, in Capabilities, Center for...

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: MHK Technology Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MHK Technology Development Biofouling Studies on Sandia's Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Coatings Initiated at PNNL's Sequim Bay On June 18, 2014, in Energy, News, News & Events,...

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: PV module development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    module development Sandians Win 'Best Paper' Award at Photovoltaic Conference in Japan On March 4, 2015, in Computational Modeling & Simulation, Energy, Facilities, News, News &...

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Research & Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Power Personnel Water Power in the News Geothermal Advanced Bit Development Geothermal Energy & Drilling Technology Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Materials & Components...

  7. United Nations Conference on Trade and Development Biofuel production technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ................................................................................................... 5 3 Second-generation biofuels............................................................................................... 9 3.1 Second-generation biochemical biofuels................................................................. 10 3.2 Second-generation thermochemical biofuels

  8. United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global Energy LLC Place:Unalakleet JumpInformation Department

  9. United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin BaxinUmwelt Management AG UMaAG JumpEurope Jump

  10. United Nations Industrial Development Organization Feed | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin BaxinUmwelt Management AG UMaAG JumpEurope JumpInformation

  11. United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, IndianaTurtleCooperative Place: Beaver Dam,

  12. Research and Development | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City,Enriched UraniumPhysical Security Systems(PA)About| |AboutDefense

  13. Research and Development | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City,Enriched UraniumPhysical Security Systems(PA)About|

  14. Institutional Research & Development | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTubahq.na.gov Office ofDepartmentAdministrationto SubmitIND |If

  15. Sandia National Laboratories: Cooperative Research and Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear PressLaboratorySoftware100Life atCareersAgreement

  16. Sandia National Laboratories: cooperative research & development...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cooperative research & development agreement Cool Earth Solar and Sandia Team Up in First-Ever Public-Private Partnership on Livermore Valley Open Campus On February 26, 2013, in...

  17. Geothermal resource areas database for monitoring the progress of development in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence, J.D.; Lepman, S.R.; Leung, K.; Phillips, S.L.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Geothermal Resource Areas Database (GRAD) and associated data system provide broad coverage of information on the development of geothermal resources in the United States. The system is designed to serve the information requirements of the National Progress Monitoring System. GRAD covers development from the initial exploratory phase through plant construction and operation. Emphasis is on actual facts or events rather than projections and scenarios. The selection and organization of data are based on a model of geothermal development. Subjects in GRAD include: names and addresses, leases, area descriptions, geothermal wells, power plants, direct use facilities, and environmental and regulatory aspects of development. Data collected in the various subject areas are critically evaluated, and then entered into an on-line interactive computer system. The system is publically available for retrieval and use. The background of the project, conceptual development, software development, and data collection are described here. Appendices describe the structure of the database in detail.

  18. Identification of Strategies to Leverage Public and Private Resources for National Security Workforce Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the identification of strategies to leverage public and private resources for the development of an adequate national security workforce as part of the National Security Preparedness Project (NSPP).There are numerous efforts across the United States to develop a properly skilled and trained national security workforce. Some of these efforts are the result of the leveraging of public and private dollars. As budget dollars decrease and the demand for a properly skilled and trained national security workforce increases, it will become even more important to leverage every education and training dollar. The leveraging of dollars serves many purposes. These include increasing the amount of training that can be delivered and therefore increasing the number of people reached, increasing the number and quality of public/private partnerships, and increasing the number of businesses that are involved in the training of their future workforce.

  19. 2011 Beamline Development Proposals National Synchrotron Light Source II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    2011 Beamline Development Proposals National Synchrotron Light Source II 1. High-energy x-ray micro- uniformity in the X-Ray and Gamma-ray Response of Large-Area/Volume Radiation Detectors (MDM) Ralph James) Konstantine Kaznatcheev, Brookhaven National Laboratory Insertion device 11. Scanning Transmission X

  20. Argonne National Laboratory has been actively involved in the development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    Argonne National Laboratory has been actively involved in the development of advanced batteries at Argonne and named it the National Battery Test Laboratory (NBTL), for the purpose of conducting in these early days of the battery program, Argonne was internationally respected for its advanced battery work

  1. research and development | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, ,Development of NovelHigh( (Improving theA

  2. Investigating successful implementation of technologies in Developing nations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsieh, Edward F. (Edward Fang)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study was performed to determine possible factors that contribute to successful implementation of new technologies in developing nations. Engineers and other inventors have devoted great effort to Appropriate Technology ...

  3. Available at: http://publications.ictp.it IC/2010/075 United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­Ain University of Science and Technology, Abu Dhabi Campus, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates and The Abdus SalamAvailable at: http://publications.ictp.it IC/2010/075 United Nations Educational, Scientific], that in order for an operator to be hypercyclic, every component of its spectrum must intersect the unit circle

  4. Available at: http://publications.ictp.it IC/2010/075 United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Ain University of Science and Technology, Abu Dhabi Campus, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates and The Abdus SalamAvailable at: http://publications.ictp.it IC/2010/075 United Nations Educational, Scientific to be hypercyclic, every component of its spectrum must intersect the unit circle. The question arises whether

  5. Hepatics of the Turkey Creek Unit of the Big Thicket National Preserve: a floristic and ecological study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bazan, Evangelina

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Botanically, The Turkey Creek Unit is of particular interest be- cause it includes 10 distinct vascular plant associations, according to a recent vegetation analysis of the Big Thicket National Preserve by Harcombe and Marks (1979). The unit was selected... in the Turkey Creek Unit of the Big Thicket National Preserve with approximate acreage and corres- ponding percent area occuppied. Asterisks indicate associations not sampled. (After Harcombe & Marks, 1979. ) Association Acreage Percent * Upland pine (UP...

  6. Development of a Hydronic Rooftop Unit-HyPak-MA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric Lee; Mark Berman

    2009-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The majority of U.S. commercial floor space is cooled by rooftop HVAC units (RTUs). RTU popularity derives chiefly from their low initial cost and relative ease of service access without disturbing building occupants. Unfortunately, current RTUs are inherently inefficient due to a combination of characteristics that unnecessarily increase cooling loads and energy use. 36% percent of annual U.S. energy, and two-thirds of electricity, is consumed in and by buildings. Commercial buildings consume approximately 4.2 quads of energy each year at a cost of $230 billion per year, with HVAC equipment consuming 1.2 quads of electricity. More than half of all U.S. commercial floor space is cooled by packaged HVAC units, most of which are rooftop units (RTUs). Inefficient RTUs create an estimated 3.5% of U.S. CO{sub 2} emissions, thus contributing significantly to global warming5. Also, RTUs often fail to maintain adequate ventilation air and air filtration, reducing indoor air quality. This is the second HyPak project to be supported by DOE through NETL. The prior project, referred to as HyPak-1 in this report, had two rounds of prototype fabrication and testing as well as computer modeling and market research. The HyPak-1 prototypes demonstrated the high performance capabilities of the HyPak concept, but made it clear that further development was required to reduce heat exchanger cost and improve system reliability before HyPak commercialization can commence. The HyPak-1 prototypes were limited to about 25% ventilation air fraction, limiting performance and marketability. The current project is intended to develop a 'mixed-air' product that is capable of full 0-100% modulation in ventilation air fraction, hence it was referred to as HyPak-MA in the proposal. (For simplicity, the -MA has been dropped when referencing the current project.) The objective of the HyPak Project is to design, develop and test a hydronic RTU that provides a quantum improvement over conventional RTU performance. Our proposal targeted 60% and 50% reduction in electrical energy use by the HyPak RTU for dry and humid climates, respectively, when compared with a conventional unit, and reduction in peak energy consumption of 50% and 33% respectively. In addition to performance targets, our goal is to develop a production-ready design with durability, reliability and maintainability similar to air-cooled packaged equipment, and that can be commercialized immediately following the conclusion of this project.

  7. Vascular Plant Survey of the Canyonlands Unit of the Big Thicket National Preserve, Tyler County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haile, Kelly

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    list with scientific name, authority and all compared entities for each plant species can be found in Appendix E. T A B LE 2. Definitio n of co des use d to indic ate o rigi n, longevity, and seaso n of gro w... for all the plants collected can be found in Appendix A. Checklist of the Vascular Plants of the Canyonlands Unit of the Big Thicket National Preserve Pteridophyta ASPLENIACEAE Asplenium platyneuron (L.) B.S.P N P W BLECHNACEAE...

  8. National Master Plan for Development of Waste-to-Energy in India 1 The National Master Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    by the local body. #12;2 National Master Plan for Development of Waste-to-Energy in India Out of these projects1 National Master Plan for Development of Waste-to-Energy in India 1 The National Master Plan The National Bio-energy Board (NBB), Ministry of Non-Conventional Energy Sources (MNES), is developing

  9. Transport Reactor Development Unit Modification to Provide a Syngas Slipstream at Elevated Conditions to Enable Separation of 100 LB/D of Hydrogen by Hydrogen Separation Membranes Year - 6 Activity 1.15 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlasner, Steven

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gasification of coal when associated with carbon dioxide capture and sequestration has the potential to provide low-cost as well as low-carbon hydrogen for electric power, fuels or chemicals production. The key element to the success of this concept is inexpensive, effective separation of hydrogen from carbon dioxide in synthesis gas. Many studies indicate that membrane technology is one of the most, if not the most, economical means of accomplishing separation; however, the advancement of hydrogen separation membrane technology is hampered by the absence of experience or demonstration that the technology is effective economically and environmentally at larger scales. While encouraging performance has been observed at bench scale (less than 12 lb/d hydrogen), it would be imprudent to pursue a largescale demonstration without testing at least one intermediate scale, such as 100 lb/d hydrogen. Among its many gasifiers, the Energy & Environmental Research Center is home to the transport reactor demonstration unit (TRDU), a unit capable of firing 200500 lb/hr of coal to produce 400 scfm of synthesis gas containing more than 200 lb/d of hydrogen. The TRDU and associated downstream processing equipment has demonstrated the capability of producing a syngas over a wide range of temperatures and contaminant levels some of which approximate conditions of commercial-scale gasifiers. Until this activity, however, the maximum pressure of the TRDU s product syngas was 120 psig, well below the 400+ psig pressures of existing large gasifiers. This activity installed a high-temperature compressor capable of accepting the range of TRDU products up to 450F and compressing them to 500 psig, a pressure comparable to some large scale gasifiers. Thus, with heating or cooling downstream of the TRDU compressor, the unit is now able to present a near-raw to clean gasifier synthesis gas containing more than 100 lb/d of hydrogen at up to 500 psig over a wide range of temperatures to hydrogen separation membranes or other equipment for development and demonstration.

  10. 106 The Environment and Sustainable Development Unit (ESDU) 107The Environment and Sustainable Development Unit (ESDU) Graduate Catalogue 201415 Graduate Catalogue 201415

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    106 The Environment and Sustainable Development Unit (ESDU) 107The Environment and Sustainable Development Unit (ESDU) Graduate Catalogue 201415 Graduate Catalogue 201415 The Environment and Sustainable collaboration on sustainable development initiatives among departments at AUB and with a wide variety of other

  11. Final Status Survey Report for Corrective Action Unit 117 - Pluto Disassembly Facility, Building 2201, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeremy Gwin and Douglas Frenette

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains the process knowledge, radiological data and subsequent statistical methodology and analysis to support approval for the radiological release of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 117 Pluto Disassembly Facility, Building 2201 located in Area 26 of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Preparations for release of the building began in 2009 and followed the methodology described in the Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM). MARSSIM is the DOE approved process for release of Real Property (buildings and landmasses) to a set of established criteria or authorized limits. The pre-approved authorized limits for surface contamination values and corresponding assumptions were established by DOE O 5400.5. The release criteria coincide with the acceptance criteria of the U10C landfill permit. The U10C landfill is the proposed location to dispose of the radiologically non-impacted, or clean, building rubble following demolition. However, other disposition options that include the building and/or waste remaining at the NNSS may be considered providing that the same release limits apply. The Final Status Survey was designed following MARSSIM guidance by reviewing historical documentation and radiological survey data. Following this review a formal radiological characterization survey was performed in two phases. The characterization revealed multiple areas of residual radioactivity above the release criteria. These locations were remediated (decontaminated) and then the surface activity was verified to be less than the release criteria. Once remediation efforts had been successfully completed, a Final Status Survey Plan (10-015, Final Status Survey Plan for Corrective Action Unit 117 Pluto Disassembly Facility, Building 2201) was developed and implemented to complete the final step in the MARSSIM process, the Final Status Survey. The Final Status Survey Plan consisted of categorizing each individual room into one of three categories: Class 1, Class 2 or Class 3 (a fourth category is a Non-Impacted Class which in the case of Building 2201 only pertained to exterior surfaces of the building.) The majority of the rooms were determined to fall in the less restrictive Class 3 category, however, Rooms 102, 104, 106, and 107 were identified as containing Class 1 and 2 areas. Building 2201 was divided into survey units and surveyed following the requirements of the Final Status Survey Plan for each particular class. As each survey unit was completed and documented, the survey results were evaluated. Each sample (static measurement) with units of counts per minute (cpm) was corrected for the appropriate background and converted to a value with units of dpm/100 cm2. With a surface contamination value in the appropriate units, it was compared to the surface contamination limits, or in this case the derived concentration guideline level (DCGLw). The appropriate statistical test (sign test) was then performed. If the survey unit was statistically determined to be below the DCGLw, then the survey unit passed and the null hypothesis (that the survey unit is above limits) was rejected. If the survey unit was equal to or below the critical value in the sign test, the null hypothesis was not rejected. This process was performed for all survey units within Building 2201. A total of thirty-three Class 1, four Class 2, and one Class 3 survey units were developed, surveyed, and evaluated. All survey units successfully passed the statistical test. Building 2201 meets the release criteria commensurate with the Waste Acceptance Criteria (for radiological purposes) of the U10C landfill permit residing within NNSS boundaries. Based on the thorough statistical sampling and scanning of the buildings interior, Building 2201 may be considered radiologically clean, or free of contamination.

  12. Monolithic circuit development for RHIC at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alley, G.T.; Britton, C.L. Jr.; Kennedy, E.J.; Newport, D.F.; Wintenberg, A.L.; Young, G.R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The work performed for RHIC at Oak Ridge National Laboratory during FY 91 is presented in this paper. The work includes preamplifier, analog memory, and analog-digital converter development for Dimuon Pad Readout, and evaluation and development of preamplifier-shapers for silicon strip readout. The approaches for implementation are considered as well as measured data for the various circuits that have been developed.

  13. A study on the lead-times in the United Nations World Food Programme supply chain : a focus on the country offices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lpez, Marc

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP), the largest humanitarian agency in the world and the logistical arm of the United Nations, reached more than 113 million people in 80 countries in 2004 and delivered more than ...

  14. Post-Closure Inspection Letter Report for Corrective Action Units on the Nevada National Security Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boehleke, R. F.

    2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This letter serves as the post-closure inspection letter report for Corrective Action Units (CAUs) on the Nevada National Security Site for calendar year 2013. The inspections identified maintenance and repair is required at the following sites: sign and/or fence repair is necessary at CAUs 113, 137, 139, 140, 143, 262, 370, 371, 372, 374, 476, 478, 529, 542, and 560; animal burrows were identified at CAU 547; and erosion was identified at CAUs 366, 367, 383, 551, and 574. In addition, the following use restrictions were removed during 2013 and will no longer be inspected in 2014: 165, 357, and 528.

  15. Geothermal direct use developments in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lienau, P.J.; Culver, G.; Lund, J.W.

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Direct heat use of geothermal energy in the United States is recognized as one of the alternative energy resources that has proven itself technically and economically, and is commercially available. Developments include space conditioning of buildings, district heating, groundwater heat pumps, greenhouse heating, industrial processing, aquaculture, and swimming pool heating. Forty-four states have experienced significant geothermal direct use development in the last ten years. The total installed capacity is 5.7 billion Btu/hr (1700 MW/sub t/), with an annual energy use of nearly 17,000 billion Btu/yr (4.5 million barrels of oil energy equivalent). In this report we provide an overview of how and where geothermal energy is used, the extent of that use, the economics and growth trends. The data is based on an extensive site data gathering effort by the Geo-Heat Center in the spring of 1988, under contract to the US Department of Energy. 100 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Printed in the United States of America. Available from National Technical Information Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    meaningful step toward the development of better design models. vii #12;1. INTRODUCTION Stirling engine COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF A STIRLING HEAT PUMP WITH SECOND- AND THIRD-ORDER COMPUTER MODELS N. Domingo Engineering Technology Division Date Published-June 1985 Prepared by the OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY Oak

  17. United States and Italy Sign Agreements to Advance Developments...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    by Secretary Chu and Deputy Secretary of Commerce Dennis F. Hightower, affirms the strong interest of the United States and Italy to encourage their respective nuclear industries...

  18. Development of radiological concentrations and unit liter doses for TWRS FSAR radiological consequence calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowley, W.L.

    1996-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The analysis described in this report develops the Unit Liter Doses for use in the TWRS FSAR. The Unit Liter Doses provide a practical way to calculate conservative radiological consequences for a variety of potential accidents for the tank farms.

  19. NNSA Achieves 50 Percent Production for W76-1 Units | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    and technicians from NNSA's Pantex Plant, the Y-12 National Security Complex, Savannah River Site, National Security Campus, Los Alamos National Laboratory and Sandia National...

  20. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 - -/e),,sand Development Los Alamos National

  1. Oil atlas: National Petroleum Technology Office activities across the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tiedemann, H.A.

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Petroleum imports account for the largest share of the US trade deficit. Over one-third of the 1996 merchandise trade deficit is attributed to imported oil. The good news is that substantial domestic oil resources, both existing and yet-to-be-discovered, can be recovered using advanced petroleum technologies. The Energy Information Agency estimates that advanced technologies can yield 10 billion additional barrels, equal to $240 billion in import offsets. The US Department of Energy`s National Petroleum Technology Office works with industry to develop advanced petroleum technologies and to transfer successful technologies to domestic oil producers. This publication shows the locations of these important technology development efforts and lists DOE`s partners in this critical venture. The National Petroleum Technology Office has 369 active technology development projects grouped into six product lines: Advanced Diagnostics and Imaging Systems; Advanced Drilling, Completion, and Stimulation; Reservoir Life Extension and Management; Emerging Processing Technology Applications; Effective Environmental Protection; and Crosscutting Program Areas.

  2. Solar and Wind Energy Resource Assessment (SWERA) Data from the National Renewable Energy Library and the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The SWERA Programme provides easy access to credible renewable energy data to stimulate investment in, and development of, renewable energy technologies. The Solar and Wind Energy Resource Assessment (SWERA) started in 2001 to advance the large-scale use of renewable energy technologies by increasing the availability and accessibility of high-quality solar and wind resource information. SWERA began as a pilot project with funding from the Global Environment Facility (GEF) and managed by the United Nations Environment Programme's (UNEP) Division of Technology, Industry and Economics (DTIE) in collaboration with more than 25 partners around the world. With the success of the project in 13 pilot countries SWERA expanded in 2006 into a full programme. Its expanded mission is to provide high quality information on renewable energy resources for countries and regions around the world, along with the tools needed to apply these data in ways that facilitate renewable energy policies and investments.[from the SWERA Guide at http://swera.unep.net/index.php?id=sweraguide_chp1] DOE and, in particular, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, has been a functioning partner from the beginning. NREL was part of the original technical team involved in mapping, database, and GIS activities. Solar, wind, and meteorological data for selected countries can be accessed through a variety of different tools and interfaces.

  3. Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts in the United...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    early201202061111769109 Tegen, S.; Hand, M.; Maples, B.; Lantz, E.; Schwabe, P.; Smith, A. (2012). 2010 Cost of Wind Energy Review. NRELTP-5000-52920. National Renewable...

  4. Zeroing and testing units developed for Gerdien atmospheric ion detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolarz, P.; Marinkovic, B.P.; Filipovic, D.M. [Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 68, Pregrevica 118, 11080, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Faculty of Physics, P. O. Box 368, Studentski trg 12-16, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Low current measurements in atmospheric ion detection using a Gerdien condenser are subjected to numerous sources of error. Zeroing and testing units described in this article, connected as modules to this type of detector, enable some of these errors to be found and eliminated. The zeroing unit provides digital compensation of the zero drift with a digital sample and hold circuit of 12-bit resolution. It overcomes difficulties related to zero drift and techniques used in the zero conductivity determination when the accelerating potential or airflow rate are zero. The testing unit is a current reference of nominally 10{sup -12} A intended for testing and correcting the system on current leakage and other measuring deviations due to changes in atmospheric parameters. This unit is an independent battery-powered module, which provides a charge of 10{sup -12} C per cycle (frequency of order 1 Hz) to the collecting electrode. The control of Gerdien devices is substantially simplified using the zeroing and testing units realized here. Both units are used during 'zero conductivity' regime only.

  5. National resources for development -- a suggested decision model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henry, Sam Sherrill

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    December 1973 Ma]or Sub]ect i Political Science NAT1ONAL RESOURCES FOR DEVELOPMENT ? A SUGGESTED DECISION MODEL A Thesis SAM SHERRILL HENRY, JR, Approved as to style and content by& ha rman of Comm ttee Gi uDP 'uu P Head of Depar ment Mem'ber Me... er December 19'73 ABSTRACT National Resources for Development -- A Suggested Decision Model (December 1973) Sam Sherrill Henry, Jr. , B. A. , Texas ARM University Directed bye Dr, Robert A. Bernstein This study is designed to analyze selected...

  6. MONOLITHIC FUEL FABRICATION PROCESS DEVELOPMENT AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glenn A. Moore; Francine J. Rice; Nicolas E. Woolstenhulme; W. David SwanK; DeLon C. Haggard; Jan-Fong Jue; Blair H. Park; Steven E. Steffler; N. Pat Hallinan; Michael D. Chapple; Douglas E. Burkes

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program directed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), UMo fuel-foils are being developed in an effort to realize high density monolithic fuel plates for use in high-flux research and test reactors. Namely, targeted are reactors that are not amenable to Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel conversion via utilization of high density dispersion-based fuels, i.e. 8-9 gU/cc. LEU conversion of reactors having a need for >8-9 gU/cc fuel density will only be possible by way of monolithic fuel forms. The UMo fuel foils under development afford fuel meat density of ~16 gU/cc and thus have the potential to facilitate LEU conversions without any significant reactor-performance penalty. Two primary challenges have been established with respect to UMo monolithic fuel development; namely, fuel element fabrication and in-reactor fuel element performance. Both issues are being addressed concurrently at the Idaho National Laboratory. An overview is provided of the ongoing monolithic UMo fuel development effort at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL); including development of complex/graded fuel foils. Fabrication processes to be discussed include: UMo alloying and casting, foil fabrication via hot rolling, fuel-clad interlayer application via co-rolling and thermal spray processes, clad bonding via Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) and Friction Bonding (FB), and fuel plate finishing.

  7. MONOLITHIC FUEL FABRICATION PROCESS DEVELOPMENT AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY_

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. A. Moore; F. J. Rice; N. E. Woolstenhulme; J-F. Jue; B. H. Park; S. E. Steffler; N. P. Hallinan; M. D. Chapple; M. C. Marshall; B. L. Mackowiak; C. R. Clark; B. H. Rabin

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Full-size/prototypic U10Mo monolithic fuel-foils and aluminum clad fuel plates are being developed at the Idaho National Laboratorys (INL) Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC). These efforts are focused on realizing Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) high density monolithic fuel plates for use in High Performance Research and Test Reactors. The U10Mo fuel foils under development afford a fuel meat density of ~16 gU/cc and thus have the potential to facilitate LEU conversions without any significant reactor-performance penalty. An overview is provided of the ongoing monolithic UMo fuel development effort, including application of a zirconium barrier layer on fuel foils, fabrication scale-up efforts, and development of complex/graded fuel foils. Fuel plate clad bonding processes to be discussed include: Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) and Friction Bonding (FB).

  8. Development of an analysis capability for the National Transportation System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anson, D.; Nelson, R.

    1997-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to examine the Department of Transportation`s (DOT) National Transportation System (NTS) initiative, to document what has been learned, and to outline a National Transportation Network Analysis Capability (NTNAC) based on a ``TRANSIMS-like`` approach. This study was conducted over a two month period at the end of FY1997. The scope of the effort was carefully defined to accommodate the short time horizon and to provide focus to a very large analytical problem. The objectives were to: (1) define the NTS and the NTS problem; (2) identify problem characteristics; (3) describe an analytical solution based on the TRANSIMS approach; (4) identify data requirements and availability; (5) develop criteria for a scenario to be used in a prototype demonstration; and (6) select a scenario for the prototype demonstration.

  9. A Case Study in Developing Process Unit Energy Metrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, J. L.; Van Atta, B.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the 2005 IETC Conference, KBC (Davis and Knight) submitted a paper on Integrating Process Unit Energy Metrics into a Plant Energy Managemenet System. For the 2006 conference, KBC wishes to submit a paper that details an actual case study where...

  10. A Case Study in Developing Process Unit Energy Metrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, J. L.; Van Atta, B.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the 2005 IETC Conference, KBC (Davis and Knight) submitted a paper on Integrating Process Unit Energy Metrics into a Plant Energy Managemenet System. For the 2006 conference, KBC wishes to submit a paper that details an actual case study where...

  11. National RF Test Facility as a multipurpose development tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McManamy, T.J.; Becraft, W.R.; Berry, L.A.; Blue, C.W.; Gardner, W.L.; Haselton, H.H.; Hoffman, D.J.; Loring, C.M. Jr.; Moeller, F.A.; Ponte, N.S.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Additions and modifications to the National RF Test Facility design have been made that (1) focus its use for technology development for future large systems in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF), (2) expand its applicability to technology development in the electron cyclotron range of frequencies (ECRF) at 60 GHz, (3) provide a facility for ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) 60-GHz ring physics studies, and (4) permit engineering studies of steady-state plasma systems, including superconducting magnet performance, vacuum vessel heat flux removal, and microwave protection. The facility will continue to function as a test bed for generic technology developments for ICRF and the lower hybrid range of frequencies (LHRF). The upgraded facility is also suitable for mirror halo physics experiments.

  12. Development of models for series and parallel fan variable air volume terminal units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furr, James C., Jr

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Empirical models of airflow output and power consumption were developed for series and parallel fan powered variable air volume terminal units at typical design pressure conditions. A testing procedure and experimental setup were developed to test...

  13. Arms control is everyone`s business: The United States and the United Nations at the mid-point of the 1990`s

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lehman, R.F. II

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation encourages current efforts in arms control, non- proliferation, and peacekeeping. Verification is heralded as a confidence building method to bring about more openness in international relations. It is purported that openness has already enhanced democratic forces around the world. The insistence on strict compliance with the decisions of the United Nations Security Council is a show of support for international law. It is recommended that international norms on human rights, non-proliferation, and non-aggression be strengthened.

  14. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 365: Baneberry Contamination Area, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit 365 comprises one corrective action site (CAS), CAS 08-23-02, U-8d Contamination Area. This site is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for the CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The site will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on July 6, 2010, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for the Baneberry site. The primary release associated with Corrective Action Unit 365 was radiological contamination from the Baneberry nuclear test. Baneberry was an underground weapons-related test that vented significant quantities of radioactive gases from a fissure located in close proximity to ground zero. A crater formed shortly after detonation, which stemmed part of the flow from the fissure. The scope of this investigation includes surface and shallow subsurface (less than 15 feet below ground surface) soils. Radionuclides from the Baneberry test with the potential to impact groundwater are included within the Underground Test Area Subproject. Investigations and corrective actions associated with the Underground Test Area Subproject include the radiological inventory resulting from the Baneberry test.

  15. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 547: Miscellaneous Contaminated Waste Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 547, Miscellaneous Contaminated Waste Sites, and provides documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and confirmation that closure objectives for CAU 547 were met. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; the U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management (FFACO, 1996 as amended). CAU 547 consists of the following three Corrective Action Sites (CASs), located in Areas 2, 3, and 9 of the Nevada National Security Site: (1) CAS 02-37-02, Gas Sampling Assembly; (2) CAS 03-99-19, Gas Sampling Assembly; AND (3) CAS 09-99-06, Gas Sampling Assembly Closure activities began in August 2011 and were completed in June 2012. Activities were conducted according to the Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) for CAU 547 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2011). The recommended corrective action for the three CASs in CAU 547 was closure in place with administrative controls. The following closure activities were performed: (1) Open holes were filled with concrete; (2) Steel casings were placed over vertical expansion joints and filled with cement; (3) Engineered soil covers were constructed over piping and exposed sections of the gas sampling system components; (4) Fencing, monuments, Jersey barriers, radiological postings, and use restriction (UR) warning signs were installed around the perimeters of the sites; (5) Housekeeping debris was picked up from around the sites and disposed; and (6) Radiological surveys were performed to confirm final radiological postings. UR documentation is included in Appendix D. The post-closure plan was presented in detail in the CADD/CAP for CAU 547 and is included as Appendix F of this report. The requirements are summarized in Section 5.2 of this report. The proposed post-closure requirements consist of visual inspections to determine the condition of postings and radiological surveys to verify contamination has not migrated. NNSA/NSO requests the following: (1) A Notice of Completion from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection to NNSA/NSO for closure of CAU 547; and (2) The transfer of CAU 547 from Appendix III to Appendix IV, Closed Corrective Action Units, of the FFACO.

  16. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 562: Waste Systems, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 562, Waste Systems, and provides documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and confirmation that closure objectives for CAU 562 were met. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; the U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management (FFACO, 1996 as amended). CAU 562 consists of the following 13 Corrective Action Sites (CASs), located in Areas 2, 23, and 25 of the Nevada National Security Site: CAS 02-26-11, Lead Shot CAS 02-44-02, Paint Spills and French Drain CAS 02-59-01, Septic System CAS 02-60-01, Concrete Drain CAS 02-60-02, French Drain CAS 02-60-03, Steam Cleaning Drain CAS 02-60-04, French Drain CAS 02-60-05, French Drain CAS 02-60-06, French Drain CAS 02-60-07, French Drain CAS 23-60-01, Mud Trap Drain and Outfall CAS 23-99-06, Grease Trap CAS 25-60-04, Building 3123 Outfalls Closure activities began in October 2011 and were completed in April 2012. Activities were conducted according to the Corrective Action Plan for CAU 562 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2011). The corrective actions included No Further Action and Clean Closure. Closure activities generated sanitary waste and hazardous waste. Some wastes exceeded land disposal limits and required offsite treatment prior to disposal. Other wastes met land disposal restrictions and were disposed in appropriate onsite or offsite landfills. NNSA/NSO requests the following: A Notice of Completion from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection to NNSA/NSO for closure of CAU 562 The transfer of CAU 562 from Appendix III to Appendix IV, Closed Corrective Action Units, of the FFACO

  17. National Energy Audit Tool for Multifamily Buildings Development Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malhotra, Mini [ORNL; MacDonald, Michael [Sentech, Inc.; Accawi, Gina K [ORNL; New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL; Im, Piljae [ORNL

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) enables low-income families to reduce their energy costs by providing funds to make their homes more energy efficient. In addition, the program funds Weatherization Training and Technical Assistance (T and TA) activities to support a range of program operations. These activities include measuring and documenting performance, monitoring programs, promoting advanced techniques and collaborations to further improve program effectiveness, and training, including developing tools and information resources. The T and TA plan outlines the tasks, activities, and milestones to support the weatherization network with the program implementation ramp up efforts. Weatherization of multifamily buildings has been recognized as an effective way to ramp up weatherization efforts. To support this effort, the 2009 National Weatherization T and TA plan includes the task of expanding the functionality of the Weatherization Assistant, a DOE-sponsored family of energy audit computer programs, to perform audits for large and small multifamily buildings This report describes the planning effort for a new multifamily energy audit tool for DOE's WAP. The functionality of the Weatherization Assistant is being expanded to also perform energy audits of small multifamily and large multifamily buildings. The process covers an assessment of needs that includes input from national experts during two national Web conferences. The assessment of needs is then translated into capability and performance descriptions for the proposed new multifamily energy audit, with some description of what might or should be provided in the new tool. The assessment of needs is combined with our best judgment to lay out a strategy for development of the multifamily tool that proceeds in stages, with features of an initial tool (version 1) and a more capable version 2 handled with currently available resources. Additional development in the future is expected to be needed if more capabilities are to be added. A rough schedule for development of the version 1 tool is presented. The components and capabilities described in this plan will serve as the starting point for development of the proposed new multifamily energy audit tool for WAP.

  18. United Kingdom Department for International Development | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin BaxinUmwelt Management AG UMaAG Jump to:UnipersonalUnited

  19. United States Agency for International Development (USAID) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin BaxinUmwelt Management AG UMaAG JumpEuropeUnited Rural

  20. United States Agency for International Development (USAID) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin BaxinUmwelt Management AG UMaAG JumpEuropeUnited RuralInformation

  1. Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts in the United...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the offshore wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model and provides four case studies of potential offshore wind deployment scenarios in different regions of the...

  2. UNITED STATES ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CHICAGO OPERATIONS OFFICE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3uj: ;;IDEC. i' ,' ,' ' .:,:.BJ'

  3. National human resource development in the developing world: the Republic of Kazakhstan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenzhegaranova, Madina

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was two-fold. The first was to explore, describe and define the emerging construct of Human Resource Development (HRD) in the Republic of Kazakhstan (RKZ). The second was to examine specific national contexts and associated...

  4. Factors driving wind power development in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, Lori A.; Parsons, Brian; Gagliano, Troy; Brown, Matthew H.; Wiser, Ryan H.; Bolinger, Mark

    2003-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the United States, there has been substantial recent growth in wind energy generating capacity, with growth averaging 24 percent annually during the past five years. About 1,700 MW of wind energy capacity was installed in 2001, while another 410 MW became operational in 2002. This year (2003) shows promise of significant growth with more than 1,500 MW planned. With this growth, an increasing number of states are experiencing investment in wind energy projects. Wind installations currently exist in about half of all U.S. states. This paper explores the key factors at play in the states that have achieved a substantial amount of wind energy investment. Some of the factors that are examined include policy drivers, such as renewable portfolio standards (RPS), federal and state financial incentives, and integrated resource planning; as well as market drivers, such as consumer demand for green power, natural gas price volatility, and wholesale market rules.

  5. Update on Ultrasonic Thermometry Development at Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joshua Daw; Joy Rempe; John Crepeau

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has initiated an effort to evaluate the viability of using ultrasonic thermometry technology as an improved sensor for detecting temperature during irradiation testing of advanced fuels proposed within the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCR&D) program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE). Ultrasonic thermometers (UTs) work on the principle that the speed at which sound travels through a material (acoustic velocity) is dependent on the temperature of the material. UTs have several advantages over other types of temperature sensors . UTs can be made very small, as the sensor consists only of a small diameter rod which may or may not require a sheath. Measurements may be made up to very high temperature (near the melting point of the sensor material) and, as no electrical insulation is required, shunting effects observed in traditional high temperature thermocouple applications are avoided. Most attractive, however, is the ability to introduce multiple acoustic discontinuities into the sensor, as this enables temperature profiling with a single sensor. The current paper presents initial results from FCR&D UT development efforts. These developments include improved methods for fabricating magnetostrictive transducers and joining them to waveguides, characterization of candidate sensor materials appropriate for use in FCR&D fuels irradiations (both ceramic fuels in inert gas and sodium bonded metallic fuels), enhanced signal processing techniques, and tests to determine potential accuracy and resolution.

  6. Development of a wireless sensor unit for tunnel monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheekiralla, Sivaram M. S. L., 1980-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis we describe the development of a wireless sensor module for tunnel monitoring. The tunnel in question is a part of the London Underground system. Construction of a new tunnel beneath the existing tunnel is ...

  7. DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT OF POWER-EFFICIENT WIRELESS SENSING UNITS FOR STRUCTURAL HEALTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    unit is designed not only for reliable communication of response measurements but also for power1 DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT OF POWER-EFFICIENT WIRELESS SENSING UNITS FOR STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING is intended to 1) collect measurement data from the sensors installed on a structure, 2) store, manage

  8. 1.Physics Department, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 2. National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO 3. United Solar Ovonic, LLC Troy, MI, United States THERMAL ACTIVATION OF DEEP OXYGEN DEFECT FORMATION AND HYDROGEN EFFUSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    was partially supported by a DOE grant through United Solar Ovonics, Inc., under the Solar America Initiative1.Physics Department, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 2. National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO 3. United Solar Ovonic, LLC Troy, MI, United States BACKGROUND THERMAL ACTIVATION OF DEEP

  9. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 574: Neptune, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 574 is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) as 'Neptune' and consists of the following two Corrective Action Sites (CASs), located in Area 12 of the Nevada National Security Site: (1) CAS 12-23-10, U12c.03 Crater (Neptune); and (2) CAS 12-45-01, U12e.05 Crater (Blanca). This Closure Report presents information supporting closure of CAU 574 according to the FFACO (FFACO, 1996 [as amended March 2010]) and the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for CAU 574 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2011). The following activities were performed to support closure of CAU 574: (1) In situ external dose rate measurements were collected using thermoluminescent dosimeters at CAS 12-45-01, U12e.05 Crater (Blanca). (2) Total effective dose rates were determined at both sites by summing the internal and external dose rate components. (3) A use restriction (UR) was implemented at CAS 12-23-10, U12c.03 Crater (Neptune). Areas that exceed the final action level (FAL) of 25 millirems per year (mrem/yr) based on the Occasional Use Area exposure scenario are within the existing use restricted area for CAU 551. The 25-mrem/yr FAL is not exceeded outside the existing CAU 551 UR for any of the exposure scenarios (Industrial Area, Remote Work Area, and Occasional Use Area). Therefore, the existing UR for CAU 551 is sufficient to bound contamination that exceeds the FAL. (4) An administrative UR was implemented at CAS 12-45-01, U12e.05 Crater (Blanca) as a best management practice (BMP). The 25-mrem/yr FAL was not exceeded for the Remote Work Area or Occasional Use Area exposure scenarios; therefore, a UR is not required. However, because the 25-mrem/yr FAL was exceeded for the Industrial Area exposure scenario, an administrative UR was established as a BMP. UR documentation is included as Appendix B. The UR at CAS 12-23-10, U12c.03 Crater (Neptune), is within the existing UR for CAU 551. Additional postings were not installed, and annual post-closure inspections will be performed in conjunction with the inspections performed for CAU 551. At CAS 12-45-01, U12e.05 Crater (Blanca), the administrative UR does not require postings or inspections. NNSA/NSO requests the following: (1) A Notice of Completion from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection to NNSA/NSO for closure of CAU 574; and (2) The transfer of CAU 574 from Appendix III to Appendix IV, Closed Corrective Action Units, of the FFACO

  10. Remedial investigation work plan for the Groundwater Operable Unit at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Remedial Investigation (RI) Work Plan has been developed as part of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) investigation of the Groundwater Operable Unit (GWOU) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) located near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The first iteration of the GWOU RI Work Plan is intended to serve as a strategy document to guide the ORNL GWOU RI. The Work Plan provides a rationale and organization for groundwater data acquisition, monitoring, and remedial actions to be performed during implementation of environmental restoration activities associated with the ORNL GWOU. It Is important to note that the RI Work Plan for the ORNL GWOU is not a prototypical work plan. The RI will be conducted using annual work plans to manage the work activities, and task reports will be used to document the results of the investigations. Sampling and analysis results will be compiled and reported annually with a review of data relative to risk (screening level risk assessment review) for groundwater. This Work Plan outlines the overall strategy for the RI and defines tasks which are to be conducted during the initial phase of investigation. This plan is presented with the understanding that more specific addenda to the plan will follow.

  11. Implementing the Corrective Action Management Unit at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MOORE,DARLENE R.; SCHRADER,SCOTT A.; KING,GABRIEL G.; CORMIER,JOHN

    2000-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In September 1997, following significant public and regulator interaction, Sandia Corporation (Sandia) was granted a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and Hazardous Solid Waste Amendment (HSWA) permit modification allowing construction and operation of a Correction Action Management Unit (CAMU). The CAMU follows recent regulatory guidance that allows for cost-effective, expedient cleanup of contaminated sites and management of hazardous remediation wastes. The CAMU was designed to store, treat, and provide long-term management for Environmental Restoration (ER) derived wastes. The 154 square meter CAMU site at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM), includes facilities for storing bulk soils and containerized wastes, for treatment of bulk soils, and has a containment cell for long-term disposition of waste. Proposed treatment operations include soil washing and low temperature thermal desorption. The first waste was accepted into the CAMU for temporary storage in January 1999. Construction at the CAMU was completed in March 1999, and baseline monitoring of the containment cell has commenced. At completion of operations the facility will be closed, the waste containment cell will be covered, and long-term post-closure monitoring will begin. Sandia's CAMU is the only such facility within the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Implementing this innovative approach to ER waste management has required successful coordination with community representatives, state and federal regulators, the DOE, Sandia corporate management, and contractors. It is expected that cost savings to taxpayers will be significant. The life-cycle CAMU project cost is currently projected to be approximately $12 million.

  12. A Framework to Support A Systematic Approach to Unit Cost Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramesh, Sushanth

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    , and equipment costs, including contractor overhead and profit. The objective of this research is to create a framework to define a standardized and a systematic approach for developing unit costs for construction project estimating. A literature review...

  13. Wind Power Development in the United States: Current Progress, Future Trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, andWind Power Development in the United States: Current94720 Abstract: The U.S. wind power industry is in an era of

  14. Developing a unified manufacturing and sourcing strategy in a multi-business unit engineering firm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abu-Khalil, Ramy, 1978-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Competitive pressures in manufacturing industries have led to an increased utilization of outsourcing as a strategic alternative to vertical integration. This thesis develops a methodology to aid multi-business unit firms ...

  15. Development of a simplified thermal analysis procedure for insulating glass units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klam, Jeremy Wayne

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A percentage of insulating glass (IG) units break each year due to thermally induced perimeter stresses. The glass industry has known about this problem for many years and an ASTM standard has recently been developed for the design of monolithic...

  16. Operational experience and recent developments at the National Medical Cyclotron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conard, E.; Pac, B.; Arnott, D.W.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Medical Cyclotron is a radioisotope production facility run by ANSTO and located on the grounds of the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital in Sydney, Australia. A CYCLONE 30 (IBA) cyclotron is used in the production of short-lived PET radiopharmaceuticals required by the hospital`s PET Scanner and also to produce a number of bulk radiochemicals for processing and distribution throughout Australasia. Following commissioning of the cyclotron and beam lines in October 1991, and the overcoming of a number of early {open_quote}teething{close_quote} problems especially relating to the reliability of the r.f. and solid target transport systems, a steady program of improvements has been pursued. These improvements have included development of new beam diagnostics and the design and installation of a new beam line for SPECT radioisotope production. The current operations schedule includes the production of {sup 18}FDG, {sup 13}NH{sub 3}, {sup 15}O{sub 2} and {sup 201}Tl, {sup 67}Ga and {sup 123}I. This paper will discuss the process of development of the cyclotron to ably meet the present demands on it, and the problems resolved in the pursuit of this goal.

  17. The Communist revolution in Republican China: the conceptual development of the second united front.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hope, Brian Lannes

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE COMMUNIS( RE'JOLUT ION IN REPUBL ICAN CHINA: THE CONCEPTUAL DEVELOPMENT OF THE SECOND UNITED FRONT A Thesis by BRIAN LANNES HOPE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree oi MASTER OF ARTS December, 1974 Major Subject: Political Science THE COMMUNIST REVOLUTION IN REPUBLICAN CHINA: THE CONCEPTUAL DEVELOPMENT OF THE SECOND UNITED FRONT A Thesis by BRIAN LANNES HOPE Approved as to style and content by: +~9...

  18. REGISTRATION AS SUPPLIER WITH THE NATIONAL RESEARCH FOUNDATION INCLUDING ITS BUSINESS UNITS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jarrett, Thomas H.

    . The National Treasury's General Conditions of Contract is available on application. The National Research Service Mining, Quarrying Catering, Hospitality, Entertainment Technology, Communication Repairs Maintenance Distributor, Agent Exporter ISO Listed Importer Services Manufacturer Repairer Distributor Sales

  19. Testing of the Semikron Validation AIPM Unit at Oak Ridge National Laboratory -- October 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, S.C.

    2004-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the electrical tests performed on the Semikron high-voltage automotive integrated power module (AIPM) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Testing was performed in the 100-hp dynamometer test cell at the National Transportation Research Center.

  20. Hydrogeologic Assessment of the East Bear Creek Unit, San Luis National Wildlife Refuge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Addendum to East Bear Creek Design Data Report, Centraltest wells in East Bear Creek Unit . 41 Appendix B :C : East Bear Creek Refuge Water Supply . 64

  1. Post-Closure Inspection Letter Report for Corrective Action Units on the Nevada National Security Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boehlecke, Robert F.

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This letter serves as the post-closure inspection letter report for corrective action units on the Nevada Naational Security Site for calendar year 2012.

  2. Developing the Next Generation of International Safeguards and Nonproliferation Experts: Highlights of Select Activities at the National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, J; Mathews, C; Kirk, B; Lynch, P; Doyle, J; Meek, E; Pepper, S; Metcalf, R

    2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    With many safeguards experts in the United States at or near retirement age, and with the growing and evolving mission of international safeguards, attracting and educating a new generation of safeguards experts is an important element of maintaining a credible and capable international safeguards system. The United States National Laboratories, with their rich experience in addressing the technical and policy challenges of international safeguards, are an important resource for attracting, educating, and training future safeguards experts. This presentation highlights some of the safeguards education and professional development activities underway at the National Laboratories. These include university outreach, summer courses, internships, mid-career transition, knowledge retention, and other projects. The presentation concludes with thoughts on the challenge of interdisciplinary education and the recruitment of individuals with the right balance of skills and backgrounds are recruited to meet tomorrow's needs.

  3. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 562: Waste Systems, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2011-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Plan has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 562, Waste Systems, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (1996; as amended March 2010). CAU 562 consists of 13 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 2, 23, and 25 of the Nevada National Security Site. Site characterization activities were performed in 2009 and 2010, and the results are presented in Appendix A of the Corrective Action Decision Document for CAU 562. The scope of work required to implement the recommended closure alternatives is summarized. (1) CAS 02-26-11, Lead Shot, will be clean closed by removing shot. (2) CAS 02-44-02, Paint Spills and French Drain, will be clean closed by removing paint and contaminated soil. As a best management practice (BMP), asbestos tile will be removed. (3) CAS 02-59-01, Septic System, will be clean closed by removing septic tank contents. As a BMP, the septic tank will be removed. (4) CAS 02-60-01, Concrete Drain, contains no contaminants of concern (COCs) above action levels. No further action is required; however, as a BMP, the concrete drain will be removed. (5) CAS 02-60-02, French Drain, was clean closed. Corrective actions were completed during corrective action investigation activities. As a BMP, the drain grates and drain pipe will be removed. (6) CAS 02-60-03, Steam Cleaning Drain, will be clean closed by removing contaminated soil. As a BMP, the steam cleaning sump grate and outfall pipe will be removed. (7) CAS 02-60-04, French Drain, was clean closed. Corrective actions were completed during corrective action investigation activities. (8) CAS 02-60-05, French Drain, will be clean closed by removing contaminated soil. (9) CAS 02-60-06, French Drain, contains no COCs above action levels. No further action is required. (10) CAS 02-60-07, French Drain, requires no further action. The french drain identified in historical documentation was not located during corrective action investigation activities. (11) CAS 23-60-01, Mud Trap Drain and Outfall, will be clean closed by removing sediment from the mud trap. As a BMP, the mud trap and outfall pipe will be removed. (12) CAS 23-99-06, Grease Trap, will be clean closed by removing sediment from the grease trap and backfilling the grease trap with grout. (13) CAS 25-60-04, Building 3123 Outfalls, will be clean closed by removing contaminated soil and the sludge-containing outfall pipe.

  4. Idaho National Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY-2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The FY 2009 Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Annual Report is a compendium of the diverse research performed to develop and ensure the INL's technical capabilities can support the future DOE missions and national research priorities. LDRD is essential to the INL - it provides a means for the laboratory to pursue novel scientific and engineering research in areas that are deemed too basic or risky for programmatic investments. This research enhances technical capabilities at the laboratory, providing scientific and engineering staff with opportunities for skill building and partnership development. Established by Congress in 1991, LDRD proves its benefit each year through new programs, intellectual property, patents, copyrights, publications, national and international awards, and new hires from the universities and industry, which helps refresh the scientific and engineering workforce. The benefits of INL's LDRD research are many as shown in the tables below. Last year, 91 faculty members from various universities contributed to LDRD research, along with 7 post docs and 64 students. Of the total invention disclosures submitted in FY 2009, 7 are attributable to LDRD research. Sixty three refereed journal articles were accepted or published, and 93 invited presentations were attributable to LDRD research conducted in FY 2009. The LDRD Program is administered in accordance with requirements set in DOE Order 413.2B, accompanying contractor requirements, and other DOE and federal requirements invoked through the INL contract. The LDRD Program is implemented in accordance with the annual INL LDRD Program Plan, which is approved by the DOE, Nuclear Energy Program Secretarial Office. This plan outlines the method the laboratory uses to develop its research portfolio, including peer and management reviews, and the use of other INL management systems to ensure quality, financial, safety, security and environmental requirements and risks are appropriately handled. The LDRD Program is assessed annually for both output and process efficiency to ensure the investment is providing expected returns on technical capability enhancement. The call for proposals and project selection process for the INL LDRD program begins typically in April, with preliminary budget allocations, and submittal of the technical requests for preproposals. A call for preproposals is made at this time as well, and the preparation of full proposals follows in June and closes in July. The technical and management review follows this, and the portfolio is submitted for DOE-ID concurrence in early September. Project initiation is in early October. The technical review process is independent of, and in addition to the management review. These review processes are very stringent and comprehensive, ensuring technical viability and suitable technical risk are encompassed within each project that is selected for funding. Each proposal is reviewed by two or three anonymous technical peers, and the reviews are consolidated into a cohesive commentary of the overall research based on criteria published in the call for proposals. A grade is assigned to the technical review and the review comments and grade are released back to the principal investigators and the managers interested in funding the proposals. Management criteria are published in the call for proposals, and management comments and selection results are available for principal investigator and other interested management as appropriate. The DOE Idaho Operations Office performs a final review and concurs on each project prior to project authorization, and on major scope/budget changes should they occur during the project's implementation. This report begins with several research highlights that exemplify the diversity of scientific and engineering research performed at the INL in FY 2009. Progress summaries for all projects are organized into sections reflecting the major areas of research focus at the INL. These sections begin with the DOE-NE Nuclear Science and Technology mission support area,

  5. Development and status of the AL Mixed Waste Treatment Plan or I love that mobile unit of mine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bounini, L. [USDOE Grand Junction Project Office, CO (United States); Williams, M. [USDOE Albuquerque Operations Office, NM (United States); Zygmunt, S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nine Department of Energy (DOE) sites reporting to the Albuquerque Office (AL) have mixed waste that is chemically hazardous and radioactive. The hazardous waste regulations require the chemical portion of mixed waste to be to be treated to certain standards. The total volume of low-level mixed waste at the nine sites is equivalent to 7,000 drums, with individual site volumes ranging from 1 gallon of waste at the Pinellas Plant to 4,500 drums at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Nearly all the sites have a diversity of wastes requiring a diversity of treatment processes. Treatment capacity does not exist for much of this waste, and it would be expensive for each site to build the diversity of treatment processes needed to treat its own wastes. DOE-AL assembled a team that developed the AL Mixed Waste Treatment Plan that uses the resources of the nine sites to treat the waste at the sites. Work on the plan started in October 1993, and the plan was finalized in March 1994. The plan uses commercial treatment, treatability studies, and mobile treatment units. The plan specifies treatment technologies that will be built as mobile treatment units to be moved from site to site. Mobile units include bench-top units for very small volumes and treatability studies, drum-size units that treat one drum per day, and skid-size units that handle multiple drum volumes. After the tools needed to treat the wastes were determined, the sites were assigned to provide part of the treatment capacity using their own resources and expertise. The sites are making progress on treatability studies, commercial treatment, and mobile treatment design and fabrication. To date, this is the only plan for treating waste that brings the resources of several DOE sites together to treat mixed waste. It is the only program actively planning to use mobile treatment coordinated between DOE sites.

  6. Report of the National Energy Policy Development Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    cost of energy. Drivers across America are paying higher and higher gasoline prices. Californians have the United States Striking Home The Impacts of High Energy Prices on Families, Communities, and Businesses

  7. The making of a combat unit: a National Guard Regiment goes to war

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, James Scott

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    organization. Federalized in 1940 and shipped to the Pacific Theater in 1942, the unit performed garrison duties on New Caledonia until it transferred to SWPA. In June 1943, the dismounted cavalrymen landed unopposed on Woodlark Island, where they gained...

  8. Printed in the United States of America. Available from National Technical Information Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    .............. 33 5.6.1 Hot water . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 5.6.2 Electrical consumption and people Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees

  9. Printed in the United States of America. Available from National Technical Information Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Technology Division A REVIEW OF STIRLING ENGINE MATHEMATICAL MODELS N. C. J. Chen F. P. Griffin Date or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof. #12;ORNL/CON-135 Engineering

  10. Unit 15: Risk Management To explain the concept of risk & to develop its role

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finkelstein, Anthony

    1 Unit 15: Risk Management Objectives To explain the concept of risk & to develop its role within the software development process To introduce the use of risk management as a means of identifying Techniques & heuristics for the identification, analysis, treatment & monitoring of risk Risk management

  11. Development of a simplified thermal analysis procedure for insulating glass units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klam, Jeremy Wayne

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    glass plates for thermal stresses induced by solar irradiance. It is believed that a similar standard can be developed for IG units if a proper understanding of IG thermal stresses can be developed. The objective of this research is to improve...

  12. Progress on an Updated National Solar Radiation Data Base for the United States: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, S.; Anderberg, M.; George, R.; Marion, W.; Myers, D.; Renne, D.; Beckman, W.; DeGaetano, A.; Gueymard, C.; Perez, R.; Plantico, M.; Stackhouse, P.; Vignola, F.

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1992, The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) released the 1961-1990 National Solar Radiation Data Base (NSRDB), a 30-year set of hourly solar radiation data. In 2003, NREL undertook an NSRDB update project for the decade of 1991-2000.

  13. Heat Pipe Solar Receiver Development Activities at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adkins, D.R.; Andraka, C.E.; Moreno, J.B.; Moss, T.A.; Rawlinson, K.S.; Showalter, S.K.

    1999-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past decade, Sandia National Laboratories has been involved in the development of receivers to transfer energy from the focus of a parabolic dish concentrator to the heater tubes of a Stirling engine. Through the isothermal evaporation and condensation of sodium. a heat-pipe receiver can efficiently transfer energy to an engine's working fluid and compensate for irregularities in the flux distribution that is delivered by the concentrator. The operation of the heat pipe is completely passive because the liquid sodium is distributed over the solar-heated surface by capillary pumping provided by a wick structure. Tests have shown that using a heat pipe can boost the system performance by twenty percent when compared to directly illuminating the engine heater tubes. Designing heat pipe solar receivers has presented several challenges. The relatively large area ({approximately}0.2 m{sup 2}) of the receiver surface makes it difficult to design a wick that can continuously provide liquid sodium to all regions of the heated surface. Selecting a wick structure with smaller pores will improve capillary pumping capabilities of the wick, but the small pores will restrict the flow of liquid and generate high pressure drops. Selecting a wick that is comprised of very tine filaments can increase the permeability of the wick and thereby reduce flow losses, however, the fine wick structure is more susceptible to corrosion and mechanical damage. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the issues encountered in the design of heat pipe solar receivers and solutions to problems that have arisen. Topics include: flow characterization in the receiver, the design of wick systems. the minimization of corrosion and dissolution of metals in sodium systems. and the prevention of mechanical failure in high porosity wick structures.

  14. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 372: Area 20 Cabriolet/Palanquin Unit Craters, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Patrick and Sloop, Christy

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD)/Closure Report (CR) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 372, Area 20 Cabriolet/Palanquin Unit Craters, located within Areas 18 and 20 at the Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Corrective Action Unit 372 comprises four corrective action sites (CASs): 18-45-02, Little Feller I Surface Crater 18-45-03, Little Feller II Surface Crater 20-23-01, U-20k Contamination Area 20-45-01, U-20L Crater (Cabriolet) The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 372 based on the implementation of the corrective action of closure in place with administrative controls at all CASs. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from November 9, 2009, through December 10, 2010, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 372: Area 20 Cabriolet/Palanquin Unit Craters. The approach for the CAI was divided into two facets: investigation of the primary release of radionuclides and investigation of other releases (migration in washes and chemical releases). The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process. The CAU 372 dataset of investigation results was evaluated based on a data quality assessment. This assessment demonstrated the dataset is acceptable for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Investigation results were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) established in this document. A radiological dose FAL was established of 25 millirem per year based on the Remote Work Area exposure scenario (336 hours of annual exposure). Radiological doses exceeding the FAL were found to be present at all four CASs. It is assumed that radionuclide levels present within the Little Feller I and Cabriolet high contamination areas and within the craters at Palanquin and Cabriolet exceed the FAL. It is also assumed that potential source material in the form of lead bricks at Little Feller I and lead-acid batteries at Palanquin and Cabriolet exceed the FAL. Therefore, corrective actions were undertaken that consist of removing potential source material, where present, and implementing a use restriction and posting warning signs at each CAS. These use restrictions were recorded in the FFACO database; the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Facility Information Management System; and the NNSA/NSO CAU/CAS files. Therefore, NNSA/NSO provides the following recommendations: No further corrective actions are necessary for CAU 372. A Notice of Completion to NNSA/NSO is requested from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for closure of CAU 372. Corrective Action Unit 372 should be moved from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the FFACO.

  15. Sandia National Laboratories: support wind-energy development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    support wind-energy development Sandia Develops Tool to Evaluate Wind-TurbineRadar Impacts On December 3, 2014, in Computational Modeling & Simulation, Energy, News, News &...

  16. Printed in the United States of America. Available from National Technical Information Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    -24610/3 DEVELOPMENT OF A RESIDENTIAL GAS FIRED ABSORPTION HEAT PUMP FINAL REPORT COMPONENT DEVELOPMENT AND FIELD TRIAL Ioport Date Development of a Residential Gas Fired Absorption Heat Pump. May, 1983 Component Development on the development of absorption type gas fired heat pumps using organic working fluids. The residential heat pumps

  17. National Geothermal Data System: A Geothermal Data System for Exploration and Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison, Lee [Executive Office of the State of Arizona (Arizona Geological Survey); Richard, Stephen [Executive Office of the State of Arizona (Arizona Geological Survey); Patten, Kim [Executive Office of the State of Arizona (Arizona Geological Survey); Love, Diane [Executive Office of the State of Arizona (Arizona Geological Survey); Coleman, Celia [Executive Office of the State of Arizona (Arizona Geological Survey); Chen, Genhan [Executive Office of the State of Arizona (Arizona Geological Survey)

    2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Geothermal-relevant geosciences data from all 50 states (www.stategeothermaldata.org), federal agencies, national labs, and academic centers are being digitized and linked in a distributed online network funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Data System (GDS) to foster geothermal energy exploration and development through use of interactive online mashups,data integration, and applications. Emphasis is first to make as much information as possible accessible online, with a long range goal to make data interoperable through standardized services and interchange formats. A growing set of more than thirty geoscience data content models is in use or under development to define standardized interchange formats for: aqueous chemistry, borehole temperature data, direct use feature, drill stem test, seismic event hypocenter, fault feature, geologic contact feature, geologic unit feature, thermal/hot spring description, metadata, quaternary fault, volcanic vent description, well header feature, borehole lithology log, crustal stress, gravity, heat flow/temperature gradient, permeability, and feature description data like developed geothermal systems, geologic unit geothermal characterization, permeability, production data, rock alteration description, rock chemistry, and thermal conductivity. Map services are also being developed for isopach maps, aquifer temperature maps, and several states are working on geothermal resource overview maps. Content models are developed based on existing community datasets to encourage widespread adoption and promulgate content quality standards. Geoscience data and maps from other GDS participating institutions, or nodes (e.g., U.S. Geological Survey, Southern Methodist University, Oregon Institute of Technology, Stanford University, the University of Utah) are being supplemented with extensive land management and land use resources from the Western Regional Partnership (15 federal agencies and 5 Western states) to provide access to a comprehensive, holistic set of data critical to geothermal energy development. As of May 2012 , we have nearly 37,000 records registered in the system catalog, and 550,075 data resources online, along with hundreds of Web services to deliver integrated data to the desktop for free downloading or online use. The data exchange mechanism is built on the U.S. Geoscience Information Network (USGIN, http://usgin.org and http://lab.usgin.org) protocols and standards developed as a partnership of the Association of American State Geologists (AASG) and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Keywords Data

  18. Electricity Transmission, Pipelines, and National Trails. An Analysis of Current and Potential Intersections on Federal Lands in the Eastern United States, Alaska, and Hawaii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuiper, James A; Krummel, John R; Hlava, Kevin J; Moore, H Robert; Orr, Andrew B; Schlueter, Scott O; Sullivan, Robert G; Zvolanek, Emily A

    2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    As has been noted in many reports and publications, acquiring new or expanded rights-of-way for transmission is a challenging process, because numerous land use and land ownership constraints must be overcome to develop pathways suitable for energy transmission infrastructure. In the eastern U.S., more than twenty federally protected national trails (some of which are thousands of miles long, and cross many states) pose a potential obstacle to the development of new or expanded electricity transmission capacity. However, the scope of this potential problem is not well-documented, and there is no baseline information available that could allow all stakeholders to study routing scenarios that could mitigate impacts on national trails. This report, Electricity Transmission, Pipelines, and National Trails: An Analysis of Current and Potential Intersections on Federal Lands in the Eastern United States, was prepared by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne). Argonne was tasked by DOE to analyze the footprint of the current network of National Historic and Scenic Trails and the electricity transmission system in the 37 eastern contiguous states, Alaska, and Hawaii; assess the extent to which national trails are affected by electrical transmission; and investigate the extent to which national trails and other sensitive land use types may be affected in the near future by planned transmission lines. Pipelines are secondary to transmission lines for analysis, but are also within the analysis scope in connection with the overall directives of Section 368 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and because of the potential for electrical transmission lines being collocated with pipelines. Based on Platts electrical transmission line data, a total of 101 existing intersections with national trails on federal land were found, and 20 proposed intersections. Transmission lines and pipelines are proposed in Alaska; however there are no locations that intersect national trails. Source data did not indicate any planned transmission lines or pipelines in Hawaii. A map atlas provides more detailed mapping of the topics investigated in this study, and the accompanying GIS database provides the baseline information for further investigating locations of interest. In many cases the locations of proposed transmission lines are not accurately mapped (or a specific route may not yet be determined), and accordingly the specific crossing locations are speculative. However since both national trails and electrical transmission lines are long linear systems, the characteristics of the crossings reported in this study are expected to be similar to both observed characteristics of the existing infrastructure provided in this report, and of the new infrastructure if these proposed projects are built. More focused study of these siting challenges is expected to mitigate some of potential impacts by choosing routes that minimize or eliminate them. The current study primarily addresses a set of screening-level characterizations that provide insights into how the National Trail System may influence the siting of energy transport facilities in the states identified under Section 368(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 2005. As such, it initializes gathering and beginning analysis of the primary environmental and energy data, and maps the contextual relationships between an important national environmental asset and how this asset intersects with energy planning activities. Thus the current study sets the stage for more in-depth analyses and data development activities that begin to solve key transmission siting constraints. Our recommendations for future work incorporate two major areas: (1) database development and analytics and (2) modeling and scenario analysis for energy planning. These recommendations provide a path forward to address key issues originally developed under the Energy Policy Act of 2005 that are now being carried forward under the Presidents Climate Action Plan.

  19. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Development at Topsoe Fuel Cell A/S and Ris National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Development at Topsoe Fuel Cell A/S and Ris National Laboratory N. Hagenb a Topsoe Fuel Cell A/S, Nymllevej 55, DK-2800 Lyngby, Denmark b Ris National Laboratory, DTU, DK-4000 Roskilde, Denmark ABSTRACT Topsoe Fuel Cell A/S (TOFC) and Ris National Laboratory (Ris

  20. Request for Qualifications for Developers for the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (LBNL)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Matthew P.

    Request for Qualifications for Developers for the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (LBNL) Second for the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (LBNL) Second Campus at the Richmond Field Station I. Introduction for the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (LBNL) Second Campus. The Second Campus will be home to a state

  1. Printed in the United States of America. Available from National Technical Information Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    .1.4 Split vs Package Unit Shipments/Applications 25 4.1.5 Residential vs Commercial Heat Pump 27.1.9 Total Residential Central Heating/Cooling 37 System Installations by Region 4.1.10 Heat Pump Shipments-95d ADVANCED ELECTRIC HEAT PUMP MARKET AND BUSINESS ANALYSIS FINAL REPORT J. C. Kastovich, Program

  2. Printed in the United States of America. Available from National Technical Information Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    -stage chiller with numbered state points and units ....................................... 6 2.4 Flow chart LABORATORY Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 operated by MARTIN MARIETTA ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC. for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under Contract DE-AC05-840R21400 #12;CONTENTS LIST OF FIGURES

  3. Printed in the United States of America. Available from National Technical Information Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    ............................................... 2-1 2.1 Heat Pump Water Heater ........................................ 2-1 2.1.1 Sensor Locations those of the United States Government or any agency thereof #12;ORNL/CON-173 Energy Division HEAT PUMP WATER HEATER LABORATORY TEST AND DESIGN MODEL VALIDATION K. H. Zimmerman Date Published: March 1986

  4. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langerhans, Brian

    , for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL; determining rate of spread and social network for smallpox epidemic in Abakaliki, Nigeria (1972) Studying

  5. National Mineral Development Corporation Ltd NMDC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpen Energy Information NationalNational GridMineral

  6. Institutional Research & Development News | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:Administration SandiaAdministration News | National Nuclear

  7. Institutional Research & Development Reports | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:Administration SandiaAdministration News | National

  8. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 573: Alpha Contaminated Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Patrick

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 573 is located in Area 5 of the Nevada National Security Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 573 is a grouping of sites where there has been a suspected release of contamination associated with non-nuclear experiments and nuclear testing. This document describes the planned investigation of CAU 573, which comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): 05-23-02, GMX Alpha Contaminated Area 05-45-01, Atmospheric Test Site - Hamilton These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives.

  9. "Developing Nationally Significant Infrastructure: the Future Role of Energy Planning"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    to about 1/3 of current overall capacity. The 2003 Energy Review placed growing emphasis on renewable energy. There is currently a national target of 5% renewable generation by 2007, and 10% by 2015 infrastructure in 2005.4 Emphasis was placed upon clean energy: renewable energy and the efficient use of natural

  10. Sandia tops $6.5 million in United Way donations | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved: 5-13-14 FEDERALAmerica HighSTART Signedhosts annualNational

  11. Top Wealth Shares in the United States, 19162000 National Tax Journal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoulet, Elisabeth

    the process of development of modern economies has at- tracted enormous attention since Kuznets (1955

  12. Rhetoric, World-view, and Strategy in United States National Security Strategy Documents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cram, Travis J.

    2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    to solve global problems and manage threats requires that these audiences buy-in to the presidents assessment of threats and possible solutions. Evaluating NSS documents as instances of symbolic action may enable critics to understand how NSS documents... the United States as the unwilling, virtuous victim in order to legitimize defense build-ups, explain policy failures, or warrant American military interventions abroad (Ivie, 1984; Klope, 1986). Reagans approach to nuclear weapons and missile defenses...

  13. United States, Russia Sign Agreement to Further Research and Development Collaboration in Nuclear Energy and Security

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz and Director General of the Russian Federation State Corporation Rosatom Sergey Kirienko today signed the Agreement between the Government of the United States of America and the Government of the Russian Federation on Cooperation in Nuclear- and Energy-Related Scientific Research and Development

  14. Catalyzed steam gasification of biomass. Phase III. Biomass process development unit (PDU) construction and initial operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Healey, J.J.; Hooverman, R.H.

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design and construction of the process development unit (PDU) are described in detail, examining each system and component in order. The following are covered: siting, the chip handling system, the reactor feed system, the reactor, the screw conveyor, the ash dump system, the PDU support equipment, control and information management, and shakedown runs. (MHR)

  15. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 550: Smoky Contamination Area Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Evenson

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 550 is located in Areas 7, 8, and 10 of the Nevada National Security Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 550, Smoky Contamination Area, comprises 19 corrective action sites (CASs). Based on process knowledge of the releases associated with the nuclear tests and radiological survey information about the location and shape of the resulting contamination plumes, it was determined that some of the CAS releases are co-located and will be investigated as study groups. This document describes the planned investigation of the following CASs (by study group): (1) Study Group 1, Atmospheric Test - CAS 08-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site T-2C; (2) Study Group 2, Safety Experiments - CAS 08-23-03, Atmospheric Test Site T-8B - CAS 08-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T-8A - CAS 08-23-07, Atmospheric Test Site T-8C; (3) Study Group 3, Washes - Potential stormwater migration of contaminants from CASs; (4) Study Group 4, Debris - CAS 08-01-01, Storage Tank - CAS 08-22-05, Drum - CAS 08-22-07, Drum - CAS 08-22-08, Drums (3) - CAS 08-22-09, Drum - CAS 08-24-03, Battery - CAS 08-24-04, Battery - CAS 08-24-07, Batteries (3) - CAS 08-24-08, Batteries (3) - CAS 08-26-01, Lead Bricks (200) - CAS 10-22-17, Buckets (3) - CAS 10-22-18, Gas Block/Drum - CAS 10-22-19, Drum; Stains - CAS 10-22-20, Drum - CAS 10-24-10, Battery. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each study group. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on January 31, 2012, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 550. The potential contamination sources associated with the study groups are from nuclear testing activities conducted at CAU 550. The DQO process resulted in an assumption that the total effective dose (TED) within the default contamination boundary of CAU 550 exceeds the final action level and requires corrective action. The presence and nature of contamination outside the default contamination boundary at CAU 550 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the TED at sample locations to the dose-based final action level. The TED will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed at the center of each sample location will be used to measure external radiological dose. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each group of CASs.

  16. Development of a design procedure for architectural laminated glass window units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dice, Jeffrey Aaron

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    defensible design procedure for architectural laminated glass The journal model for this thesis is the Journal of Struct 1 ~E ~ 1 1 ~ of th A 1 Society f Ei 11 E Oi erc. window units. The procedure is based on the controlling aspects of laminated glass...DEVELOPMENT OF A DESIGN PROCEDURE FOR ARCHITECTURAL LAMINATED GLASS WINDOW UNITS A Thesis by JEFFREY AARON DICE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

  17. Status of development and licensing support for advanced liquid metal reactors in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pedersen, D.R. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Gyorey, G. (General Electric Co., San Jose, CA (United States))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cornerstones of the United States Advanced Liquid Metal Cooled Reactor (ALMR) program sponsored by the Department of Energy are: the ALMR plant design program at General Electric based on the PRISM (Power Reactor Innovative Small Module) concept, and the Integral Fast Reactor program (IFR) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The goal of the US program is to produce a standard, commercial ALMR, including the associated fuel cycle. The paper addresses the status of the IFR program, the ALMR program and the interaction of the ALMR program with the regulatory environment.

  18. Status of development and licensing support for advanced liquid metal reactors in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pedersen, D.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Gyorey, G. [General Electric Co., San Jose, CA (United States)

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cornerstones of the United States Advanced Liquid Metal Cooled Reactor (ALMR) program sponsored by the Department of Energy are: the ALMR plant design program at General Electric based on the PRISM (Power Reactor Innovative Small Module) concept, and the Integral Fast Reactor program (IFR) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The goal of the US program is to produce a standard, commercial ALMR, including the associated fuel cycle. The paper addresses the status of the IFR program, the ALMR program and the interaction of the ALMR program with the regulatory environment.

  19. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 567: Miscellaneous Soil Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Patrick

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 567: Miscellaneous Soil Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 567 based on the implementation of the corrective actions. The corrective actions implemented at CAU 567 were developed based on an evaluation of analytical data from the CAI, the assumed presence of COCs at specific locations, and the detailed and comparative analysis of the CAAs. The CAAs were selected on technical merit focusing on performance, reliability, feasibility, safety, and cost. The implemented corrective actions meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated. The CAAs meet all applicable federal and state regulations for closure of the site. Based on the implementation of these corrective actions, the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office provides the following recommendations: No further corrective actions are necessary for CAU 567. The Nevada Division of Environmental Protection issue a Notice of Completion to the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office for closure of CAU 567. CAU 567 be moved from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the FFACO.

  20. Sandia National Laboratories: advanced gas-sensor development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    gas-sensor development Joint Hire Increases Materials Science Collaboration for Sandia, UNM On September 16, 2014, in Advanced Materials Laboratory, Capabilities, Energy, Energy...

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: WEC-Sim code development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    development Sandia, NREL Release Wave Energy Converter Modeling and Simulation Code: WEC-Sim On July 29, 2014, in Computational Modeling & Simulation, Energy, News, News & Events,...

  2. Development of Site-Specific Soil Design Basis Earthquake (DBE) Parameters for the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Payne, Suzette

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Horizontal and vertical PC 3 (2,500 yr) Soil Design Basis Earthquake (DBE) 5% damped spectra, corresponding time histories, and strain-compatible soil properties were developed for the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU). The IWTU is located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Mean and 84th percentile horizontal DBE spectra derived from site-specific site response analyses were evaluated for the IWTU. The horizontal and vertical PC 3 (2,500 yr) Soil DBE 5% damped spectra at the 84th percentile were selected for Soil Structure Interaction (SSI) analyses at IWTU. The site response analyses were performed consistent with applicable Department of Energy (DOE) Standards, recommended guidance of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) Standards, and recommendations of the Blue Ribbon Panel (BRP) and Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB).

  3. Making european-style community wind power development work in theUnited States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark A.

    2004-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Once primarily a European phenomenon, community wind power development--defined here as one or more locally owned, utility-scale wind turbines interconnected on either the customer or utility side of the meter--is gaining a foothold in an increasing number of states throughout the United States. This article describes the various policies and incentives that Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa, and Massachusetts are using to support community wind power development, and how state and federal support influences the types of projects and ownership structures that are being developed. Experience in these states demonstrates that, with an array of incentives and creative financing schemes targeted at community-scale projects, there are opportunities to make community wind work in the United States.

  4. NREL: Workforce Development and Education Programs - National Science Bowl

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparency VisitSilver Toyota Prius beingNREL -ResearchHigh

  5. NREL: Workforce Development and Education Programs - National Science Bowl

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparency VisitSilver Toyota Prius beingNREL -ResearchHighMiddle

  6. Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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  7. Advanced Technology Development and Mitigation | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTubahq.na.gov Office of the Administrator NNSAAdministration Technology

  8. KCP hosts top STEM educators to develop curriculum | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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  9. GNEP Nations Hold Infrastructure Development Working Group Meeting |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  10. Leadership and Career Development Programs | National Nuclear Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  11. Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Research & Development 100 Awards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  12. The National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems Development

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found The item youThe Discovery of Archaea,Facility | SciTech

  13. The National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems Development

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found The item youThe Discovery of Archaea,Facility |

  14. Argonne National Laboratory Develops Extreme-Scale Wind Farm Simulation

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'s ReplyApplication of Training April 30, 2008 Training

  15. National Strategy Study on the Clean Development Mechanism in Indonesia |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpen Energy Information NationalNationalsourceOpen Energy

  16. Laboratory Directed Research & Development | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:Administration SandiaAdministration News

  17. National Laboratory Concentrating Solar Power Research and Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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  18. National Laboratory Concentrating Solar Power Research and Development |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaeferApril 1,(EAC)TABLEChallenges|AdvancedofPresentation |3,|

  19. Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'sEnergyTexas1.Space DataEnergy Superior Energy PerformanceSandia is

  20. NNSA Delivers All Scheduled W76-1 Units to Navy for 2012 | Y-12 National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  1. United States-Japan Nuclear Security Working Group Fact Sheet | National

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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  2. NNSA Achieves 50 Percent Production for W76-1 Units | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTubahq.na.govSecurityMaintaining theSan Jose-San|NGSI Safeguards|Security

  3. NNSA Small Business Week Day 2: United Drilling, Inc. | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved: 5-13-14 FEDERAL EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTHN N E ESecurity

  4. The United States Plutonium Balance, 1944-2009 | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved: 5-13-14 FEDERALAmericaAdministrationLast W-79

  5. A National Offshore Wind Strategy: Creating an Offshore Wind Energy Industry in the United States

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartmentDepartment of Energy ThisThis guide isJanuary 2014 |

  6. Los Alamos National Laboratory again top contributor to United Way of Santa

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your HomeLatestCenterLogging inLookingLANLexcellence byFe

  7. Los Alamos National Laboratory again top contributor to United Way of Santa

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your HomeLatestCenterLogging inLookingLANLexcellence byFeFe

  8. Issued by Sandia National Laboratories, operated for the United States Departmen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 Investigation Peer ReviewIronNuclear Physicsii

  9. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY National Electric Transmission Congestion Study )

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian Nuclear Warheads into Fuel for U.S. Electricity3 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

  10. Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update / National

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYear Janthrough2,869,960 Annual Download1.6.

  11. Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update / National

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYear Janthrough2,869,960 Annual Download1.6.Overview

  12. Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update / National

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYear Janthrough2,869,960 Annual

  13. A new interactive map takes you around the United States in 17 national

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  14. Biogas Potential in the United States (Fact Sheet), Energy Analysis, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find Find More Like ThisBioenergyBiofuelFoodEnergy

  15. Michaela G. Farr and Joshua S. Stein Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque, NM, 87185, United States

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighand Retrievals fromprocess used in mining -MODERN GRIDStewart!Spatial

  16. Printed in the United States of America. Available from National Technical Information Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    OF A RESIDENTIAL GAS FIRED ABSORPTION HEAT PUMP FINAL REPORT PHYSICAL AND THERMODYNAMIC PROPERTIES OF R123A Heat Pump. November 1983 Physical and Thermodynamic Properties of R123a/ETFE, System Development sized absorption heat pump using organic type working fluids. This report covers the development work

  17. Printed in the United States of America. Available from National Technical Information Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    -95d RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT OF A HIGH-EFFICIENCY GAS-FIRED WATER HEATER PHASE II - PRODUCTION-Nuclear Division to research, develop, and demon- strate a high-efficiency gas-fired water heater. The water heater of AMTROL, for his assistance, especially in the pricing of the water heaters and Al Heilmann Jr. for his

  18. A national research & development strategy for biomass crop feedstocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, L.L.; Cushman, J.H.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Planning was initiated in 1996 with the objective of reevaluating current biomass feedstock research and development strategies to: (1) assure that by 2005, one or more commercial lignocellulosic to ethanol projects will be able to acquire a dependable supply of biomass crop feedstocks; (2) assure that recently initiated demonstrations of crops to electricity will be successful and; (3) assure that the research base needed to support future biomass industry expansion is being developed. Multiple trends and analyses indicate that biomass energy research and development strategies must take into account the fact that competition for land will define the upper limits of available biomass energy crop supplies and will largely dictate the price of those supplies. Only crop production and utilization strategies which contribute profit to the farmer or landowner and to energy producers will be used commercially for biomass energy production. Strategies for developing biomass {open_quotes}energy{close_quotes} crop supplies must take into consideration all of the methods by which biomass crops will enter biomass energy markets. The lignocellulosic materials derived from crops can be available as primary residues or crop by-products; secondary residues or processing by-products; co-products (at both the crop production and processing stages); or, as dedicated energy crops. Basic research and development (R&D) leading to yield improvement continues to be recommended as a major long-term focus for dedicated energy crops. Many additional near term topics need attention, some of which are also applicable to by-products and co-products. Switchgrass R&D should be expanded and developed with greater collaboration of USDA and state extension groups. Woody crop research should continue with significant cost-share from industries developing the crops for other commercial products. Co-product options need more investigation.

  19. Solr assisted heat pump research and development program in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, J W

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of the historical progress and current status of the solar assisted heat pump research and development, supported by the United States Department of Energy, is presented. Much of this work has had as its focus the need for a better source of auxiliary or backup heat than the electric resistance which has generally been assumed in computer simulations of these systems. The two leading candidates are the use of the ground as an alternate heat source/sink or storage element (ground coupling) and the use of fossil fuel burned on site (the bivalent system). The United States program has emphasized ground coupling. Much of the analytical work and heat pump development is applicable to bivalent systems, and some results of this work are discussed. Project descriptions and technical accomplishments for the currently active projects are presented.

  20. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 374: Area 20 Schooner Unit Crater, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada with ROTC 1, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit 374 comprises five corrective action sites (CASs): 18-22-05, Drum 18-22-06, Drums (20) 18-22-08, Drum 18-23-01, Danny Boy Contamination Area 20-45-03, U-20u Crater (Schooner) The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 374 based on the implementation of corrective actions. The corrective action of closure in place with administrative controls was implemented at CASs 18-23-01 and 20-45-03, and a corrective action of removing potential source material (PSM) was conducted at CAS 20-45-03. The other CASs require no further action; however, best management practices of removing PSM and drums at CAS 18-22-06, and removing drums at CAS 18-22-08 were performed. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from May 4 through October 6, 2010, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 374: Area 20 Schooner Unit Crater, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The approach for the CAI was divided into two facets: investigating the primary release of radionuclides and investigating other releases (migration in washes and chemical releases). The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process. The CAU 374 dataset of investigation results was evaluated based on the data quality indicator parameters. This evaluation demonstrated the dataset is acceptable for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) established in this document. Radiological doses exceeding the FAL of 25 millirem per year were found to be present in the surface soil that was sampled. It is assumed that radionuclide levels present in subsurface media within the craters and ejecta fields (default contamination boundaries) at the Danny Boy and Schooner sites exceed the FAL. It is also assumed that PSM in the form of lead-acid batteries at Schooner exceeds the FAL. Therefore, corrective actions were undertaken that consist of removing PSM, where present, and implementing a use restriction and posting warning signs at the Danny Boy and Schooner sites. These use restrictions were recorded in the FFACO database; the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Facility Information Management System; and the NNSA/NSO CAU/CAS files. Therefore, NNSA/NSO provides the following recommendations: No further corrective actions are necessary for CAU 374. A Notice of Completion to NNSA/NSO is requested from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for closure of CAU 374. Corrective Action Unit 374 should be moved from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the FFACO.

  1. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 367: Area 10 Sedan, Ess and Uncle Unit Craters Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit 367 comprises four corrective action sites (CASs): 10-09-03, Mud Pit 10-45-01, U-10h Crater (Sedan) 10-45-02, Ess Crater Site 10-45-03, Uncle Crater Site The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation of the corrective actions and site closure activities implemented at CAU 367. A corrective action of closure in place with use restrictions was completed at each of the three crater CASs (10-45-01, 10-45-02, and 10-45-03); corrective actions were not required at CAS 10-09-03. In addition, a limited soil removal corrective action was conducted at the location of a potential source material release. Based on completion of these correction actions, no additional corrective action is required at CAU 367, and site closure is considered complete. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from February 2010 through March 2011, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 367: Area 10 Sedan, Ess and Uncle Unit Craters, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The approach for the CAI was divided into two facets: investigation of the primary release of radionuclides, and investigation of non-test or other releases (e.g., migration in washes and potential source material). Based on the proximity of the Uncle, Ess, and Sedan craters, the impact of the Sedan test on the fallout deposited from the two earlier tests, and aerial radiological surveys, the CAU 367 investigation was designed to study the releases from the three crater CASs as one combined release (primary release). Corrective Action Site 10-09-03, Mud Pit, consists of two mud pits identified at CAU 367. The mud pits are considered non-test releases or other releases and were investigated independent of the three crater CASs. The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process. The CAU 367 dataset of investigation results was evaluated based on a data quality assessment. This assessment demonstrated the dataset is complete and acceptable for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) established in this document. For the primary release, radiological doses exceeding the FAL of 25 millirem per year were not found to be present in the surface or shallow subsurface soil outside the default contamination boundary. However, it was assumed that radionuclides are present in subsurface media within each of the three craters (Sedan, Ess, and Uncle) due to prompt injection of radionuclides from the tests. Based on the assumption of radiological dose exceeding the FAL, corrective actions were undertaken that consisted of implementing a use restriction and posting warning signs at each crater CAS. These use restrictions were recorded in the FFACO database; the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Facility Information Management System; and the NNSA/NSO CAU/CAS files. With regard to other releases, no contaminants of concern were identified at the mud pits or any of the other release locations, with one exception. Potential source material in the form of lead was found at one location. A corrective action of clean closure was implemented at this location, and verification samples indicated that no further action is necessary. Therefore, NNSA/NSO provides the following recommendations: A Notice of Completion to NNSA/NSO is requested from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for closure of CAU 367. Corrective Action Unit 367 should be promoted from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the FFACO.

  2. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 544: Cellars, Mud Pits, and Oil Spills, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Krauss and Catherine Birney

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 544: Cellars, Mud Pits, and Oil Spills, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. The corrective action sites (CASs) within CAU 544 are located within Areas 2, 7, 9, 10, 12, 19, and 20 of the Nevada National Security Site. Corrective Action Unit 544 comprises the following CASs: 02-37-08, Cellar & Mud Pit 02-37-09, Cellar & Mud Pit 07-09-01, Mud Pit 09-09-46, U-9itsx20 PS #1A Mud Pit 10-09-01, Mud Pit 12-09-03, Mud Pit 19-09-01, Mud Pits (2) 19-09-03, Mud Pit 19-09-04, Mud Pit 19-25-01, Oil Spill 19-99-06, Waste Spill 20-09-01, Mud Pits (2) 20-09-02, Mud Pit 20-09-03, Mud Pit 20-09-04, Mud Pits (2) 20-09-06, Mud Pit 20-09-07, Mud Pit 20-09-10, Mud Pit 20-25-04, Oil Spills 20-25-05, Oil Spills The purpose of this CR is to provide documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and data confirming that the closure objectives for CASs within CAU 544 were met. To achieve this, the following actions were performed: Review the current site conditions, including the concentration and extent of contamination. Implement any corrective actions necessary to protect human health and the environment. Properly dispose of corrective action and investigation wastes. Document Notice of Completion and closure of CAU 544 issued by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection.

  3. Printed in the United States of America. Available from National Technical Information Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    of this report, emphasizing the key components of the system: the free piston Stirling engine prime mover of the free-piston Stirling engine and mismatching of the dynamic characteristics of the engine. Category UC-95d DEVELOPMENT AND DEMONSTRATION OF A STIRLING/RANKINE HEAT ACTIVATED HEAT PUMP FINAL REPORT

  4. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 566: EMAD Compound, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada with ROTC-1, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Krauss

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 566: EMAD Compound, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 566 comprises Corrective Action Site (CAS) 25-99-20, EMAD Compound, located within Area 25 of the Nevada National Security Site. The purpose of this CR is to provide documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and provide data confirming that the closure objectives for CAU 566 were met. To achieve this, the following actions were performed: Review the current site conditions, including the concentration and extent of contamination. Implement any corrective actions necessary to protect human health and the environment. Properly dispose of corrective action and investigation wastes. Document Notice of Completion and closure of CAU 566 issued by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. From October 2010 through May 2011, closure activities were performed as set forth in the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for CAU 566: EMAD Compound, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. The purposes of the activities as defined during the data quality objectives process were as follows: Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent, implement appropriate corrective actions, and properly dispose of wastes. Analytes detected during the closure activities were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) to determine COCs for CAU 566. Assessment of the data from collected soil samples, and from radiological and visual surveys of the site, indicates the FALs were exceeded for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs), and radioactivity. Corrective actions were implemented to remove the following: Radiologically contaminated soil assumed greater than FAL at two locations Radiologically contaminated soil assumed greater than FAL with lead shot PCB-contaminated soil Radiologically contaminated filters and equipment Fuels, lubricants, engine coolants, and oils Lead debris Electrical and lighting components assumed to be potential source materials, including - fluorescent light bulbs - mercury switches (thermostats) - circuit boards - PCB-containing ballasts Closure of CAU 566 was achieved through a combination of removal activities and closure in place. Corrective actions to remove COCs, and known and assumed potential source materials, were implemented as was practical. The PCBs remaining at the site are bounded laterally, but not vertically, within CAS 25-99-20 based upon step-out sampling; the sources (e.g., PCB transformer oils, diesel fuel from locomotive reservoirs) have been removed; the practice of the application of PCB-containing oils for soil stabilization has ceased; and the COCs are not readily mobile in the environment. Closure in place is necessary, and future land use of the site will be restricted from intrusive activities. This will effectively eliminate inadvertent contact by humans with the contaminated media. The DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, provides the following recommendations: No further corrective action is required at CAS 25-99-20. Closure in place of CAS 25-99-20. A use restriction is required at CAU 566. A Notice of Completion to the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, is requested from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for closure of CAU 566. Corrective Action Unit 566 should be moved from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order.

  5. National Human Radiobiological Tissue Repository (NHRTR) at the United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The NHRTR, one component of the USTUR, contains frozen tissues, tissue solutions, microscope slides, and paraffin blocks that were collected by the USTUR at the autopsy of workers with documented intakes of plutonium, americium, uranium, and thorium. The samples are available to qualified scientists for further research. Thousands of frozen, ashed, dried, and plastic embedded bone samples from the radium studies carried out by Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Cancer Research Hospital, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the New Jersey Radium Research Project are available and linked by case number to de-identified, published case data. These data include the person's source of exposure (dial painter, therapeutic injection, etc.), estimated body burden, radiochemical results, and medical history. Other samples, including organs and whole body donations, have come from volunteer donors who were impacted by elements such as plutonium, throium, etc. See the USTUR website for information on how to apply for research samples or how to become a volunteer donor. [Information taken from http://www.ustur.wsu.edu/NHRTR/index.html#

  6. Joint US/Russian study on the development of a decommissioning strategy plan for RBMK-1000 unit No. 1 at the Leningrad Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this joint U.S./Russian study was to develop a safe, technically feasible, economically acceptable strategy for decommissioning Leningrad Nuclear Power Plant (LNPP) Unit No. 1 as a representative first-generation RBMK-1000 reactor. The ultimate goal in developing the decommissioning strategy was to select the most suitable decommissioning alternative and end state, taking into account the socioeconomic conditions, the regulatory environment, and decommissioning experience in Russia. This study was performed by a group of Russian and American experts led by Kurchatov Institute for the Russian efforts and by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. efforts and for the overall project.

  7. Development of a digital control unit to displace diesel fuel with natural gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talbott, A.D. [AlliedSignal FM& T, Kansas City, MO (United States)]|[Full Circle Engineering, Northglenn, CO (United States)

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Full Circle Engineering (FCE), supported by the Colorado School of Mines (CSM), proposed a Small Business CRADA with Allied Signal Federal Manufacturing & Technologies/Kansas City (FM&T/KC) for the development of a fumigation digital control unit (DCU) that would allow the displacement of diesel fuel with natural gas. Nationwide, diesel trucks and buses consumed over 21 billion gallons of fuel in 1992. The development of systems that allow the use of alternative fuels, natural gas in particular, for transportation would significantly reduce emissions and pollutants. It would also help implement DOE`s mandate for energy security (use of domestic fuels) required by the Energy Policy Act (EPACT).

  8. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 116: Area 25 Test Cell C Facility, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 116, Area 25 Test Cell C Facility. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; the U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management (FFACO, 1996 [as amended March 2010]). CAU 116 consists of the following two Corrective Action Sites (CASs), located in Area 25 of the Nevada National Security Site: (1) CAS 25-23-20, Nuclear Furnace Piping and (2) CAS 25-41-05, Test Cell C Facility. CAS 25-41-05 consisted of Building 3210 and the attached concrete shield wall. CAS 25-23-20 consisted of the nuclear furnace piping and tanks. Closure activities began in January 2007 and were completed in August 2011. Activities were conducted according to Revision 1 of the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for CAU 116 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2008). This CR provides documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and provides data confirming that closure objectives for CAU 116 were met. Site characterization data and process knowledge indicated that surface areas were radiologically contaminated above release limits and that regulated and/or hazardous wastes were present in the facility.

  9. A People's History of Philosophy: The Development and Ideological Segregation of Black Nationalism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bohr, Judith Colleen

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A PEOPLES HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY: THE DEVELOPMENT AND IDEOLOGICAL SEGREGATION OF BLACK NATIONALISM A Thesis by JUDITH COLLEEN BOHR Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF ARTS August 2011 Major Subject: Philosophy A Peoples History of Philosophy: The Development and Ideological Segregation of Black Nationalism Copyright 2011 Judith...

  10. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 375: Area 30 Buggy Unit Craters, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit 375 comprises three corrective action sites (CASs): (1) 25-23-22, Contaminated Soils Site; (2) 25-34-06, Test Cell A Bunker; and (3) 30-45-01, U-30a, b, c, d, e Craters. The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 375 based on the implementation of corrective action of closure in place with administrative controls at CAS 25-23-22, no further action at CAS 25-34-06, and closure in place with administrative controls and removal of potential source material (PSM) at CAS 30-45-01. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from July 28, 2010, through April 4, 2011, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 375: Area 30 Buggy Unit Craters. The approach for the CAI was divided into two facets: investigation of the primary release of radionuclides, and investigation of other releases (migration in washes and chemical releases). The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process. The CAU 375 dataset of investigation results was evaluated based on the data quality assessment. This assessment demonstrated the dataset is acceptable for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Investigation results were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) established in this document. A radiological dose FAL of 25 millirem per year was established based on the Remote Work Area exposure scenario (336 hours of annual exposure). Radiological doses exceeding the FAL were assumed to be present within the default contamination boundaries at CASs 25-23-22 and 30-45-01. No contaminants were identified at CAS 25-34-06, and no corrective action is necessary. Potential source material in the form of lead plate, lead-acid batteries, and oil within an abandoned transformer were identified at CAS 30-45-01, and corrective actions were undertaken that consisted of removing the PSM. Use restrictions and warning signs were implemented for the remaining radiological contamination at CASs 25-23-22 and 30-45-01. These use restrictions were recorded in the FFACO database; the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Facility Information Management System; and the NNSA/NSO CAU/CAS files. Therefore, NNSA/NSO provides the following recommendations: (1) No further corrective actions are necessary for CAU 375; (2) A Notice of Completion to NNSA/NSO is requested from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for closure of CAU 375; and (3) Move CAU 375 from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the FFACO.

  11. Online Catalog of Isotope Products from DOE's National Isotope Development Center

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The National Isotope Development Center (NIDC) interfaces with the User Community and manages the coordination of isotope production across the facilities and business operations involved in the production, sale, and distribution of isotopes. A virtual center, the NIDC is funded by the Isotope Development and Production for Research and Applications (IDPRA) subprogram of the Office of Nuclear Physics in the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science. The Isotope subprogram supports the production, and the development of production techniques of radioactive and stable isotopes that are in short supply for research and applications. Isotopes are high-priority commodities of strategic importance for the Nation and are essential for energy, medical, and national security applications and for basic research; a goal of the program is to make critical isotopes more readily available to meet domestic U.S. needs. This subprogram is steward of the Isotope Production Facility (IPF) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Brookhaven Linear Isotope Producer (BLIP) facility at BNL, and hot cell facilities for processing isotopes at ORNL, BNL and LANL. The subprogram also coordinates and supports isotope production at a suite of university, national laboratory, and commercial accelerator and reactor facilities throughout the Nation to promote a reliable supply of domestic isotopes. The National Isotope Development Center (NIDC) at ORNL coordinates isotope production across the many facilities and manages the business operations of the sale and distribution of isotopes.

  12. Synthetic aperture radar and interferometry development at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental monitoring, earth-resource mapping, and military systems require broad-area imaging at high resolutions. Many times the imagery must be acquired in inclement weather or during night as well as day. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) provides such a capability. SAR systems take advantage of the long-range propagation characteristics of radar signals and the complex information processing capability of modern digital electronics to provide high resolution imagery. SAR complements photographic and other optical imaging capabilities because of the minimum constrains on time-of-day and atmospheric conditions and because of the unique responses of terrain and cultural targets to radar frequencies. Interferometry is a method for generating a three-dimensional image of terrain. The height projection is obtained by acquiring two SAR images from two slightly differing locations. It is different from the common method of stereoscopic imaging for topography. The latter relies on differing geometric projections for triangulation to define the surface geometry whereas interferometry relies on differences in radar propagation times between the two SAR locations. This paper presents the capabilities of SAR, explains how SAR works, describes a few SAR applications, provides an overview of SAR development at Sandia, and briefly describes the motion compensation subsystem.

  13. Developing a tool to estimate water withdrawal and consumption in electricity generation in the United States.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, M.; Peng, J. (Energy Systems); ( NE)

    2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Freshwater consumption for electricity generation is projected to increase dramatically in the next couple of decades in the United States. The increased demand is likely to further strain freshwater resources in regions where water has already become scarce. Meanwhile, the automotive industry has stepped up its research, development, and deployment efforts on electric vehicles (EVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). Large-scale, escalated production of EVs and PHEVs nationwide would require increased electricity production, and so meeting the water demand becomes an even greater challenge. The goal of this study is to provide a baseline assessment of freshwater use in electricity generation in the United States and at the state level. Freshwater withdrawal and consumption requirements for power generated from fossil, nonfossil, and renewable sources via various technologies and by use of different cooling systems are examined. A data inventory has been developed that compiles data from government statistics, reports, and literature issued by major research institutes. A spreadsheet-based model has been developed to conduct the estimates by means of a transparent and interactive process. The model further allows us to project future water withdrawal and consumption in electricity production under the forecasted increases in demand. This tool is intended to provide decision makers with the means to make a quick comparison among various fuel, technology, and cooling system options. The model output can be used to address water resource sustainability when considering new projects or expansion of existing plants.

  14. Alexandria fluidized-bed process-development unit. Hot-mode testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the current test program include validation of predictions from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Coal Combustor System Model, continuation of experimental studies supporting AFBC process development, and collection of transient data for later process control studies. This topical report summarizes results from hot mode testing, i.e., experiments performed with combustion in the Process Development Unit for Model verification. During these tests, coal and limestone were fluidized and combusted with air at temperatures ranging from 1400 to 1580/sup 0/F in the 3' x 3' (nominal) size Process Development Unit (PDU) at Alexandria, Virginia. MIT Model predictions tested include: combustion efficiency, carbon loading, gas and solids concentrations, bed temperature, expanded bed height, overall heat transfer coefficient and sulfur retention by the coal/limestone system. Although not corresponding exactly, the Model predictions and experimental values for the overall heat transfer coefficients were relatively close in agreement. In all other cases, there were some discrepancies between the Model predictions and corresponding experimental PDU results. Transient process data were collected by the Data Acquisition System (DAS). Six parameters were recorded continuously on a six channel recorder. Variances were observed in the recorded transient data in response to input step changes.

  15. Development and Use of Baseline Monthly Utility Models for Eight Army Installations Around the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reddy, T. A.; Saman, N. F.; Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.; Turner, W. D.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3/96-Final Report, p. i ESL-TR-96/03-01 DEVELOPMENT AND USE OF BASELINE MONTHLY UTILITY MODELS FOR EIGHT ARMY INSTALLATIONS AROUND THE UNITED STATES Prepared by: T.A. Reddy, N.F. Saman, D.E. Claridge, J.S. Haberl and W.D. Turner Research Sponsored... and Scope 2 2.1 Objectives 2 2.2 Data provided 3 2.3 Scope of study 7 3.0 Mathematical Basis of Regression Models 8 3.1 Pertinent background 8 3.2 Simple regression models using Emodel 9 3.3 Generation of 95% uncertainty bands for individual months 14 3...

  16. Development of the hydraulically actuated electronically controlled unit injector for diesel engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yudanov, S.V.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The key design factors of a Hydraulically actuated Electronically controlled Unit Injector (HEUI) which determine its injection rate, pressure, energy efficiency and accuracy of fuel delivery, and the correlations between these design factors and performance parameters, have been established. Two methods of fuel metering within an HEUI are compared in terms of injection accuracy, reliability and controllability. An HEUI design guidelines are outlined. The test results of latest HEUI developed for diesel engines with displacement 1--2.2 liter/cyl. are shown. It provides high injection pressure, rate and accuracy, low energy consumption, unusually wide range of fuel deliveries and readily fits into existing engines.

  17. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 104: Area 7 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 104, Area 7 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, and provides documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and confirmation that closure objectives for CAU 104 were met. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; the U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. CAU 104 consists of the following 15 Corrective Action Sites (CASs), located in Area 7 of the Nevada National Security Site: CAS 07-23-03, Atmospheric Test Site T-7C CAS 07-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site T7-1 CAS 07-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site CAS 07-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T7-5a CAS 07-23-07, Atmospheric Test Site - Dog (T-S) CAS 07-23-08, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (T-S) CAS 07-23-09, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (T-S) CAS 07-23-10, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie CAS 07-23-11, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie CAS 07-23-12, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (Bus) CAS 07-23-13, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (Buster) CAS 07-23-14, Atmospheric Test Site - Ruth CAS 07-23-15, Atmospheric Test Site T7-4 CAS 07-23-16, Atmospheric Test Site B7-b CAS 07-23-17, Atmospheric Test Site - Climax Closure activities began in October 2012 and were completed in April 2013. Activities were conducted according to the Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for CAU 104. The corrective actions included No Further Action and Clean Closure. Closure activities generated sanitary waste, mixed waste, and recyclable material. Some wastes exceeded land disposal limits and required treatment prior to disposal. Other wastes met land disposal restrictions and were disposed in appropriate onsite landfills. The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) requests the following: A Notice of Completion from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection to NNSA/NFO for closure of CAU 104 The transfer of CAU 104 from Appendix III to Appendix IV, Closed Corrective Action Units, of the FFACO

  18. Developing Knowledge States: Technology and the Enhancement of National Statistical Capacity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Derrick M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    National statistical systems are the enterprises tasked with collecting, validating and reporting societal attributes. These data serve many purposes - they allow governments to improve services, economic actors to traverse markets, and academics to assess social theories. National statistical systems vary in quality, especially in developing countries. This study examines determinants of national statistical capacity in developing countries, focusing on the impact of general purpose technologies (GPTs). Just as technological progress helps to explain differences in economic growth, states with markets with greater technological attainment (specifically, general purpose technologies) arguably have greater capacity for gathering and processing quality data. Analysis using panel methods shows a strong, statistically significant positive linear relationship between GPTs and national statistical capacity. There is no evidence to support a non-linear function in this relationship. Which is to say, there does not a...

  19. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sidiropoulos, Nikolaos D.

    , for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94ALT i For example: #12;Semantic Graphs Different types of edges Attribute or relationship labels type of edge. DEDICOM PARAFAC Multilinear algebra Adjacency matrix Adjacency tensor #12;Using Tensors

  20. The plight of the parklands. [Exploration, development and pollution of National Parks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudzitis, G.; Schwartz, J.

    1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As Congress continues its debate on the Clean air Act, concern over air pollution, aesthetic deterioration, and encroaching development in national parks is being expressed by many factions. Park superintendants themselves cite increasing threats of irreversible damage. A case study is presented of the Golden Circle of southwestern national parks, current attempts to regulate oil, gas and uranium exploration there, and the consequences of various proposals to protect these public lands. (JMT)

  1. NREL Supports Development of New National Code for Hydrogen Technologies (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On December 14, 2010, the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) issued a new national code for hydrogen technologies - NFPA 2 Hydrogen Technologies Code - which covers critical applications and operations such as hydrogen dispensing, production, and storage. The new code consolidates existing hydrogen-related NFPA codes and standards requirements into a single document and also introduces new requirements. This consolidation makes it easier for users to prepare code-compliant permit applications and to review/approve these applications. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory helped support the development of NFPA 2 on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program.

  2. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 574: Neptune, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan identifies the activities required for closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 574, Neptune. CAU 574 is included in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (1996 [as amended March 2010]) and consists of the following two Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Area 12 of the Nevada National Security Site: (1) CAS 12-23-10, U12c.03 Crater (Neptune); (2) CAS 12-45-01, U12e.05 Crater (Blanca). This plan provides the methodology for the field activities that will be performed to gather the necessary information for closure of the two CASs. There is sufficient information and process knowledge regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 574 using the SAFER process. Based on historical documentation, personnel interviews, site process knowledge, site visits, photographs, field screening, analytical results, the results of the data quality objective (DQO) process (Section 3.0), and an evaluation of corrective action alternatives (Appendix B), closure in place with administrative controls is the expected closure strategy for CAU 574. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a field investigation to verify and support the expected closure strategy and provide a defensible recommendation that no further corrective action is necessary. This will be presented in a Closure Report that will be prepared and submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) for review and approval.

  3. Characterization of seven United States coal regions. The development of optimal terrace pit coal mining systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wimer, R.L.; Adams, M.A.; Jurich, D.M.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report characterizes seven United State coal regions in the Northern Great Plains, Rocky Mountain, Interior, and Gulf Coast coal provinces. Descriptions include those of the Fort Union, Powder River, Green River, Four Corners, Lower Missouri, Illinois Basin, and Texas Gulf coal resource regions. The resource characterizations describe geologic, geographic, hydrologic, environmental and climatological conditions of each region, coal ranks and qualities, extent of reserves, reclamation requirements, and current mining activities. The report was compiled as a basis for the development of hypothetical coal mining situations for comparison of conventional and terrace pit surface mining methods, under contract to the Department of Energy, Contract No. DE-AC01-79ET10023, entitled The Development of Optimal Terrace Pit Coal Mining Systems.

  4. Development of a Carbon Management Geographic Information System (GIS) for the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard Herzog; Holly Javedan

    2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In this project a Carbon Management Geographical Information System (GIS) for the US was developed. The GIS stored, integrated, and manipulated information relating to the components of carbon management systems. Additionally, the GIS was used to interpret and analyze the effect of developing these systems. This report documents the key deliverables from the project: (1) Carbon Management Geographical Information System (GIS) Documentation; (2) Stationary CO{sub 2} Source Database; (3) Regulatory Data for CCS in United States; (4) CO{sub 2} Capture Cost Estimation; (5) CO{sub 2} Storage Capacity Tools; (6) CO{sub 2} Injection Cost Modeling; (7) CO{sub 2} Pipeline Transport Cost Estimation; (8) CO{sub 2} Source-Sink Matching Algorithm; and (9) CO{sub 2} Pipeline Transport and Cost Model.

  5. A framework and methodology for enhancing operational requirements development : United States Coast Guard cutter project case study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schofield, Douglas M. (Douglas MacLean)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Within any major United States Coast Guard cutter acquisition project, developing the operational requirements in the early phases of acquisition is difficult as the complexity of the system is not easily understood until ...

  6. Second United Nations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementingnpitcheResearchPhysicsDepartment of Energy MonizBiofuels

  7. Race and Ethnicity and Latin America's United Nations Millennium Development Goals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Telles, Edward E.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    but very unlikely for Bolivia, Colombia, Paraguay andreduction in Mexico, Bolivia and Guatemala were slower thanin Mexico, Guatemala, Bolivia while blacks and mulattos are

  8. Wind for Schools: A National Data and Curricula Development Activity for Schools (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, I.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the United States dramatically expands wind energy deployment, the industry is challenged with developing a skilled workforce and addressing public resistance. Wind Powering America?s Wind for Schools project addresses these issues by: 1) Developing Wind Application Centers (WACs) at universities; WAC students assist in implementing school wind turbines and participate in wind courses. 2) Installing small wind turbines at community 'host' schools. 3) Implementing teacher training with interactive curricula at each host school.

  9. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho and Component Development and Integration Facility, Butte, Montana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the preliminary findings of the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF), conducted September 14 through October 2, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. The team includes outside experts supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the INEL and CDIF. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. The on-site phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations' carried on at the INEL and the CDIF, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis (S A) Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The S A Plan will be executed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. When completed, the S A results will be incorporated into the INEL/CDIF Survey findings for inclusion into the Environmental Survey Summary Report. 90 refs., 95 figs., 77 tabs.

  10. An Illustration of the Corrective Action Process, The Corrective Action Management Unit at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Irwin, M.; Kwiecinski, D.

    2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Management Units (CAMUs) were established by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to streamline the remediation of hazardous waste sites. Streamlining involved providing cost saving measures for the treatment, storage, and safe containment of the wastes. To expedite cleanup and remove disincentives, EPA designed 40 CFR 264 Subpart S to be flexible. At the heart of this flexibility are the provisions for CAMUs and Temporary Units (TUs). CAMUs and TUs were created to remove cleanup disincentives resulting from other Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous waste provisions--specifically, RCRA land disposal restrictions (LDRs) and minimum technology requirements (MTRs). Although LDR and MTR provisions were not intended for remediation activities, LDRs and MTRs apply to corrective actions because hazardous wastes are generated. However, management of RCRA hazardous remediation wastes in a CAMU or TU is not subject to these stringent requirements. The CAMU at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico (SNL/NM) was proposed through an interactive process involving the regulators (EPA and the New Mexico Environment Department), DOE, SNL/NM, and stakeholders. The CAMU at SNL/NM has been accepting waste from the nearby Chemical Waste Landfill remediation since January of 1999. During this time, a number of unique techniques have been implemented to save costs, improve health and safety, and provide the best value and management practices. This presentation will take the audience through the corrective action process implemented at the CAMU facility, from the selection of the CAMU site to permitting and construction, waste management, waste treatment, and final waste placement. The presentation will highlight the key advantages that CAMUs and TUs offer in the corrective action process. These advantages include yielding a practical approach to regulatory compliance, expediting efficient remediation and site closure, and realizing potentially significant cost savings compared to off-site disposal. Specific examples of CA MU advantages realized by SNL/NM will be presented along with the above highlighted process improvements, Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) performance, and associated lessons learned.

  11. Policies and market factors driving wind power development in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, Lori; Parsons, Brian; Gagliano, Troy; Brown, Matthew; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2003-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In the United States, there has been substantial recent growth in wind energy generating capacity, with growth averaging 24 percent annually during the past five years. About 1,700 MW of wind energy capacity was installed in 2001, while another 410 MW became operational in 2002. This year (2003) shows promise of significant growth with more than 1,100 MW planned. With this growth, an increasing number of states are experiencing investment in wind energy projects. Wind installations currently exist in about half of all U.S. states. This paper explores the key factors at play in the states in which a substantial amount of wind energy capacity has been developed or planned. Some of the factors that are examined include policy drivers, such as renewable portfolio standards (RPS), federal and state financial incentives, and integrated resource planning; as well as market drivers, such as consumer demand for green power, natural gas price volatility, and wholesale market rules.

  12. Developments of Spent Nuclear Fuel Pyroprocessing Technology at Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael F. Simpson

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes research in used fuel pyroprocessing that has been published by Idaho National Laboratory over the last decade. It includes work done both on treatment of Experimental Breeder Reactor-II and development of advanced technology for potential scale-up and commercialization. Collaborations with universities and other laboratories is included in the cited work.

  13. National Policy of Future Nuclear Fusion Research and Development (Tentative Translation)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Policy of Future Nuclear Fusion Research and Development (Tentative Translation) 26 October 2005 Atomic Energy Commission Advisory Committee on Nuclear Fusion #12;2 Contents Preface Chapter and Environmental Problems 1.2 Significance and Necessity of Fusion R&D in Nuclear Energy Policy Chapter 2 Status

  14. Development of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management National Transportation Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macaluso, C. [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, Washington, DC (United States); Offner, J.; Patric, J. [Booz Allen Hamilton, Washington, DC (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Director of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) designated development of the National Transportation Plan (NTP) as one of his four strategic objectives for the program. The Office of Logistics Management (OLM) within OCRWM was tasked to develop the plan, which will accommodate state, local, and tribal concerns and input to the greatest extent practicable. The plan will describe each element of the national transportation system that OCRWM is developing for shipping spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste to the proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The plan will bring together OCRWM's approach for acquiring capital assets (casks, rail cars, and a rail line in Nevada) and its operational planning efforts in a single, comprehensive document. It will also provide a timetable for major transportation decisions and milestones needed to support a 2017 start date for shipments to the Yucca Mountain repository. The NTP will be revised to incorporate new developments and decisions as they are finalized. This paper will describe the elements of the NTP, its importance in providing a comprehensive overview of the national transportation system, and the role of stakeholders in providing input on the NTP and the national transportation system. (authors)

  15. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site Dose-per-Unit-Release Factors for Use in Calculating Radionuclide Air Emissions Potential-to-Emit Doses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, J. M.; Rhoads, Kathleen

    2009-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents assumptions and inputs used to prepare the dose-per-unit-release factors for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Site (including the buildings that make up the Physical Sciences Facility [PSF] as well as the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory [EMSL]) calculated using the EPA-approved Clean Air Act Assessment Package 1988Personal Computer (CAP88-PC) Version 3 software package. The dose-per-unit-release factors are used to prepare dose estimates for a maximum public receptor (MPR) in support of Radioactive Air Pollutants Notice of Construction (NOC) applications for the PNNL Site.

  16. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site Dose-per-Unit-Release Factors for Use in Calculating Radionuclide Air Emissions Potential-to-Emit Doses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, J. M.; Rhoads, Kathleen

    2008-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents assumptions and inputs used to prepare the dose-per-unit-release factors for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Site (including the buildings that make up the Physical Sciences Facility [PSF] as well as the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory [EMSL]) calculated using the EPA-approved Clean Air Act Assessment Package 1988Personal Computer (CAP88-PC) Version 3 software package. The dose-per-unit-release factors are used to prepare dose estimates for a maximum public receptor (MPR) in support of Radioactive Air Pollutants Notice of Construction (NOC) applications for the PNNL Site.

  17. Argonne National Laboratory Annual Report of Laboratory Directed Research and Development program activities FY 2010.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    (Office of The Director)

    2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    As a national laboratory Argonne concentrates on scientific and technological challenges that can only be addressed through a sustained, interdisciplinary focus at a national scale. Argonne's eight major initiatives, as enumerated in its strategic plan, are Hard X-ray Sciences, Leadership Computing, Materials and Molecular Design and Discovery, Energy Storage, Alternative Energy and Efficiency, Nuclear Energy, Biological and Environmental Systems, and National Security. The purposes of Argonne's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel technical concepts, enhance the Laboratory's research and development (R and D) capabilities, and pursue its strategic goals. projects are selected from proposals for creative and innovative R and D studies that require advance exploration before they are considered to be sufficiently developed to obtain support through normal programmatic channels. Among the aims of the projects supported by the LDRD Program are the following: establishment of engineering proof of principle, assessment of design feasibility for prospective facilities, development of instrumentation or computational methods or systems, and discoveries in fundamental science and exploratory development.

  18. Argonne National Laboratory Annual Report of Laboratory Directed Research and Development program activities FY 2011.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    (Office of The Director)

    2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    As a national laboratory Argonne concentrates on scientific and technological challenges that can only be addressed through a sustained, interdisciplinary focus at a national scale. Argonne's eight major initiatives, as enumerated in its strategic plan, are Hard X-ray Sciences, Leadership Computing, Materials and Molecular Design and Discovery, Energy Storage, Alternative Energy and Efficiency, Nuclear Energy, Biological and Environmental Systems, and National Security. The purposes of Argonne's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel technical concepts, enhance the Laboratory's research and development (R and D) capabilities, and pursue its strategic goals. projects are selected from proposals for creative and innovative R and D studies that require advance exploration before they are considered to be sufficiently developed to obtain support through normal programmatic channels. Among the aims of the projects supported by the LDRD Program are the following: establishment of engineering proof of principle, assessment of design feasibility for prospective facilities, development of instrumentation or computational methods or systems, and discoveries in fundamental science and exploratory development.

  19. Funding for Adaptive Optics in the United States by the National Science Foundation 2006-2009: An Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frogel, Jay A

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2006 I published an article in GeminiFocus that examined funding for astronomical adaptive optics related technology and instrumentation in the United States from 1995 through mid-2006. That article concluded that based on projections then current, AO implementation on public and private telescopes in the U.S. will soon seriously lag that on the ESO VLT as measured by funds available. It called for a significant infusion of public funds for AO development and implementation so that when combined with private funds, the U.S. astronomical community as a whole would be able to take full advantage of AO systems on both public and private telescopes. In 2006 I estimated that the total amount of public (NSF) funds that would be available in 2009 for AO related non-science activities would be about $6M. This article updates the analysis done in my previous article. I show that for 2009 the funds for AO related non-science activities are about $7M in spite of the termination of the AODP program. Federal stimulus f...

  20. Rural groundwater supply for the Volcanoes National Park region, Rwanda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zoghbi, Christiane A. (Christiane Antoine)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water scarcity is a major issue faced by both developed and developing countries. According to the Millennium Development Goals set by the United Nations, the number of people that do not have access to an improved water ...

  1. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 567: Miscellaneous Soil Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, with ROTC 1 Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Patrick K.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 567 is located in Areas 1, 3, 5, 20, and 25 of the Nevada National Security Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 567 is a grouping of sites where there has been a suspected release of contamination associated with nuclear testing. This document describes the planned investigation of CAU 567, which comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): 01-23-03, Atmospheric Test Site T-1 03-23-25, Seaweed E Contamination Area 05-23-07, A5b RMA 20-23-08, Colby Mud Spill 25-23-23, J-11 Soil RMA These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the investigation report. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on May 6, 2013, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 567. The site investigation process will also be conducted in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices to be applied to this activity. The potential contamination sources associated with CAU 567 releases are nuclear test operations and other NNSS operations. The DQO process resulted in an assumption that total effective dose (TED) within a default contamination boundary at Atmospheric Test Site T-1 exceeds the final action level (FAL) and requires corrective action. The presence and nature of contamination outside the default contamination boundary at Atmospheric Test Site T-1 and all other CAU 567 CASs will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the TED at sample locations to the dose-based FAL. The TED will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed at the center of each sample location will be used to measure external radiological dose. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS.

  2. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 541: Small Boy Nevada National Security Site and Nevada Test and Training Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Patrick

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 541 is co-located on the boundary of Area 5 of the Nevada National Security Site and Range 65C of the Nevada Test and Training Range, approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 541 is a grouping of sites where there has been a suspected release of contamination associated with nuclear testing. This document describes the planned investigation of CAU 541, which comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): 05-23-04, Atmospheric Tests (6) - BFa Site 05-45-03, Atmospheric Test Site - Small Boy These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the investigation report. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 1, 2014, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Air Force; and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 541. The site investigation process also will be conducted in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices to be applied to this activity. The potential contamination sources associated with CASs 05-23-04 and 05-45-03 are from nuclear testing activities conducted at the Atmospheric Tests (6) - BFa Site and Atmospheric Test Site - Small Boy sites. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 541 will be evaluated based on information collected from field investigations. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose at sample locations to the dose-based final action level. The total effective dose will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed at the center of each sample location will be used to measure external radiological dose. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS.

  3. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 465: Hydronuclear Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, with ROTC 1, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 465, Hydronuclear, identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Corrective Action Unit 465 comprises the following four corrective action sites (CASs) located in Areas 6 and 27 of the Nevada National Security Site: (1) 00-23-01, Hydronuclear Experiment; (2) 00-23-02, Hydronuclear Experiment; (3) 00-23-03, Hydronuclear Experiment; (4) 06-99-01, Hydronuclear. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on July 6, 2011, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to determine and implement appropriate corrective actions for each CAS in CAU 465. For CAU 465, two potential release components have been identified. The subsurface release component includes potential releases of radiological and nonradiological contaminants from the subsurface hydronuclear experiments and disposal boreholes. The surface release component consists of other potential releases of radiological and nonradiological contaminants to surface soils that may have occurred during the pre- and post-test activities. This plan provides the methodology for collection of the necessary information for closing each CAS component. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation, contaminant characteristics, existing regional and site groundwater models, and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 465 using the SAFER process. For potential subsurface releases, flow and transport models will be developed to integrate existing data into a conservative description of contaminant migration in the unsaturated zone from the hydronuclear experiments and disposal boreholes. For the potential surface releases, additional information will be obtained by conducting a field investigation before selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS component. It is anticipated that results of the flow and transport models, the field investigation, and implementation of the corrective action of closure in place will support a defensible recommendation that no further corrective action is necessary. This will be presented in a closure report that will be prepared and submitted to NDEP for review and approval. The following text summarizes the SAFER activities that will support the closure of CAU 465: (1) Perform site preparation activities (e.g., utilities clearances, and radiological and visual surveys). (2) Move or remove and dispose of debris at various CASs, as required. (3) Collect environmental samples from designated target populations (e.g., stained soil) to confirm or disprove the presence of contaminants of concern as necessary to supplement existing information. (4) Evaluate and analyze existing data to develop conservative flow and transport models to simulate the potential for contaminant migration from the hydronuclear experiments and disposal boreholes to the water table within 1,000 years. (5) Confirm the preferred closure option (closure in place with use restrictions) is sufficient to protect human health and the environment.

  4. Research on the pyrolysis of hardwood in an entrained bed process development unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kovac, R.J.; Gorton, C.W.; Knight, J.A.; Newman, C.J.; O'Neil, D.J. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). Research Inst.)

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An atmospheric flash pyrolysis process, the Georgia Tech Entrained Flow Pyrolysis Process, for the production of liquid biofuels from oak hardwood is described. The development of the process began with bench-scale studies and a conceptual design in the 1978--1981 timeframe. Its development and successful demonstration through research on the pyrolysis of hardwood in an entrained bed process development unit (PDU), in the period of 1982--1989, is presented. Oil yields (dry basis) up to 60% were achieved in the 1.5 ton-per-day PDU, far exceeding the initial target/forecast of 40% oil yields. Experimental data, based on over forty runs under steady-state conditions, supported by material and energy balances of near-100% closures, have been used to establish a process model which indicates that oil yields well in excess of 60% (dry basis) can be achieved in a commercial reactor. Experimental results demonstrate a gross product thermal efficiency of 94% and a net product thermal efficiency of 72% or more; the highest values yet achieved with a large-scale biomass liquefaction process. A conceptual manufacturing process and an economic analysis for liquid biofuel production at 60% oil yield from a 200-TPD commercial plant is reported. The plant appears to be profitable at contemporary fuel costs of $21/barrel oil-equivalent. Total capital investment is estimated at under $2.5 million. A rate-of-return on investment of 39.4% and a pay-out period of 2.1 years has been estimated. The manufacturing cost of the combustible pyrolysis oil is $2.70 per gigajoule. 20 figs., 87 tabs.

  5. Reservoir characterization, performance monitoring of waterflooding and development opportunities in Germania Spraberry Unit.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernandez Hernandez, Erwin Enrique

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    .......................................................................................................95 91 Bubble Maps of Estimated Ultimate Recovery (EUR) for Active Wells in Germania Spraberry Unit. .....................................................................................96 92 WOR Behavior and Cumulative Oil Production Due...

  6. Performable Nations: Music and Literature in Late Nineteenth- and Early Twentieth-Century Cuba, Brazil, and the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beyer, Bethany

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magaldi, Cristina. Two Musical Representations of Brazil. Brazil in the Making: Facets of National Identity. Eds.McCann, Bryan. Hello, Hello Brazil: Popular Music in the

  7. Strategies for International Cooperation in Support of Energy Development in Pacific Island Nations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, M.; Voss, P.; Warren, A.; Baring-Gould, I.; Conrad, M.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has been partnering with island communities around the world to address the technical, policy, social, and economic hurdles to deploying energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies (RETs) on small, islanded systems. The lessons learned from these partnerships are briefly summarized in this document with the goal of supporting the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) in the development of specific near-term and longer-term strategies for island RET deployment.

  8. Development of a Novel Depleted Uranium Treatment Process at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gates-Anderson, D; Bowers, J; Laue, C; Fitch, T

    2007-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A three-stage process was developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to treat potentially pyrophoric depleted uranium metal wastes. The three-stage process includes waste sorting/rinsing, acid dissolution of the waste metal with a hydrochloric and phosphoric acid solution, and solidification of the neutralized residuals from the second stage with clay. The final product is a solid waste form that can be transported to and disposed of at a permitted low-level radioactive waste disposal site.

  9. Visitors' attitudes toward the maintenance, preservation and development of Ichkeul National Park, Tunisia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Alanna Lee

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the actions of other group members. Second, the outdoor recreation activities of Ichkeul National Park visitors are surveyed. Third, the relationship between recreation activities and attitudes about resource preservation or development at Ichkeul...). Cross and Guyer (1980) propose that social dilemmas should be divided into two categories. They call the first a "social fence" and the second a "social trap. " In a social fence the disagreeable, short-term consequences of helpful actions discourage...

  10. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 569: Area 3 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews; Christy Sloop

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 569 is located in Area 3 of the Nevada National Security Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 569 comprises the nine numbered corrective action sites (CASs) and one newly identified site listed below: (1) 03-23-09, T-3 Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Annie, Franklin, George, and Moth); (2) 03-23-10, T-3A Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Harry and Hornet); (3) 03-23-11, T-3B Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Fizeau); (4) 03-23-12, T-3S Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Rio Arriba); (5) 03-23-13, T-3T Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Catron); (6) 03-23-14, T-3V Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Humboldt); (7) 03-23-15, S-3G Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Coulomb-B); (8) 03-23-16, S-3H Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Coulomb-A); (9) 03-23-21, Pike Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Pike); and (10) Waste Consolidation Site 3A. Because CAU 569 is a complicated site containing many types of releases, it was agreed during the data quality objectives (DQO) process that these sites will be grouped. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each study group. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the DQOs developed on September 26, 2011, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 569. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 569 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose (TED) at sample locations to the dose-based final action level (FAL). The TED will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed at the center of each sample location will be used to measure external radiological dose. A field investigation will be performed to define any areas where TED exceeds the FAL and to determine whether contaminants of concern are present at the site from other potential releases. The presence and nature of contamination from other types of releases (e.g., excavation, migration, and any potential releases discovered during the investigation) will be evaluated using soil samples collected from biased locations indicating the highest levels of contamination. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the objectives specific to each study group.

  11. The role of cemeteries in the development of municipal and national military parks: the cemetery-park connection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Carlton J

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis examines how cemeteries, both municipal and military, have developed in America based on internal and external influences and the role that they have played in the development of municipal and national military parks, respectively...

  12. Soil Sampling to Demonstrate Compliance with Department of Energy Radiological Clearance Requirements for the ALE Unit of the Hanford Reach National Monument

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fritz, Brad G.; Dirkes, Roger L.; Napier, Bruce A.

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Reach National Monument consists of several units, one of which is the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve (ALE) Unit. This unit is approximately 311 km2 of shrub-steppe habitat located to the south and west of Highway 240. To fulfill internal U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements prior to any radiological clearance of land, DOE must evaluate the potential for residual radioactive contamination on this land and determine compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 5400.5. Historical soil monitoring conducted on ALE indicated soil concentrations of radionuclides were well below the Authorized Limits. However, the historical sampling was done at a limited number of sampling locations. Therefore, additional soil sampling was conducted to determine if the concentrations of radionuclides in soil on the ALE Unit were below the Authorized Limits. This report contains the results of 50 additional soil samples. The 50 soil samples collected from the ALE Unit all had concentrations of radionuclides far below the Authorized Limits. The average concentrations for all detectable radionuclides were less than the estimated Hanford Site background. Furthermore, the maximum observed soil concentrations for the radionuclides included in the Authorized Limits would result in a potential annual dose of 0.14 mrem assuming the most probable use scenario, a recreational visitor. This potential dose is well below the DOE 100-mrem per year dose limit for a member of the public. Spatial analysis of the results indicated no observable statistically significant differences between radionuclide concentrations across the ALE Unit. Furthermore, the results of the biota dose assessment screen, which used the ResRad Biota code, indicated that the concentrations of radionuclides in ALE Unit soil pose no significant health risk to biota.

  13. Assessment of Ports for Offshore Wind Development in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elkinton, Chris [DNV GL] [DNV GL; Blatiak, Alicia; Ameen, Hafsa

    2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    As offshore wind energy develops in the United States, port facilities will become strategic hubs in the offshore wind farm supply chain because all plant and transport logistics must transit through these facilities. Therefore, these facilities must provide suitable infrastructure to meet the specific requirements of the offshore wind industry. As a result, it is crucial that federal and state policy-makers and port authorities take effective action to position ports in the offshore wind value chain to take best advantage of their economic potential. The U.S. Department of Energy tasked the independent consultancy GL Garrad Hassan (GL GH) with carrying out a review of the current capability of U.S. ports to support offshore wind project development and an assessment of the challenges and opportunities related to upgrading this capability to support the growth of as many as 54 gigawatts of offshore wind installed in U.S. waters by 2030. The GL GH report and the open-access web-based Ports Assessment Tool resulting from this study will aid decision-makers in making informed decisions regarding the choice of ports for specific offshore projects, and the types of investments that would be required to make individual port facilities suitable to serve offshore wind manufacturing, installation and/or operations. The offshore wind industry in the United States is still in its infancy and this study finds that additional port facilities capable of supporting offshore wind projects are needed to meet the anticipated project build-out by 2030; however, no significant barriers exist to prevent the development of such facilities. Furthermore, significant port capabilities are in place today with purpose-build port infrastructure currently being built. While there are currently no offshore wind farms operating in the United States, much of the infrastructure critical to the success of such projects does exist, albeit in the service of other industries. This conclusion is based on GL GHs review of U.S. ports infrastructure and its readiness to support the development of proposed offshore wind projects in U.S. waters. Specific examples of facility costs and benefits are provided for five coastal regions (North Atlantic, South Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico, Great Lakes, and Pacific) around the country. GL GH began this study by identifying the logistical requirements of offshore wind ports to service offshore wind. This review was based on lessons learned through industry practice in Northern Europe. A web-based port readiness assessment tool was developed to allow a capability gap analysis to be conducted on existing port facilities based on the identified requirements. Cost models were added to the assessment tool, which allowed GL GH to estimate the total upgrade cost to a port over the period 2014-2030 based on a set of regional project build-out scenarios. Port fee information was gathered from each port allowing an estimate of the potential revenue to the port under this same set of scenarios. The comparison of these revenue and improvement cost figures provides an initial indication of the level of offshore wind port readiness. To facilitate a more in-depth infrastructure analysis, six ports from different geographic regions, with varied levels of interest and preparedness towards offshore wind, were evaluated by modeling a range of installation strategies and port use types to identify gaps in capability and potential opportunities for economic development. Commonalities, trends, and specific examples from these case studies are presented and provide a summary of the current state of offshore wind port readiness in the U.S. and also illustrate the direction some ports have chosen to take to prepare for offshore wind projects. For example, the land area required for wind turbine and foundation manufacturing is substantial, particularly due to the large size of offshore wind components. Also, the necessary bearing capacities of the quayside and storage area are typically greater for offshore wind components than for more conventiona

  14. Low-rank coal study: national needs for resource development. Volume 6. Peat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The requirements and potential for development of US peat resources for energy use are reviewed. Factors analyzed include the occurrence and properties of major peat deposits; technologies for extraction, dewatering, preparation, combustion, and conversion of peat to solid, liquid, or gaseous fuels; environmental, regulatory, and market constraints; and research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) needs. Based on a review of existing research efforts, recommendations are made for a comprehensive national RD and D program to enhance the use of peat as an energy source.

  15. TECHNICAL EVALUATION OF SOIL REMEDIATION ALTERNATIVES AT THE BUILDING 812 OPERABLE UNIT, LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABORATORY SITE 300

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eddy-Dilek, C.; Miles, D.; Abitz, R.

    2009-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy Livermore Site Office requested a technical review of remedial alternatives proposed for the Building 812 Operable Unit, Site 300 at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The team visited the site and reviewed the alternatives proposed for soil remediation in the draft RI/FS and made the following observations and recommendations. Based on the current information available for the site, the team did not identify a single technology that would be cost effective and/or ecologically sound to remediate DU contamination at Building 812 to current remedial goals. Soil washing is not a viable alternative and should not be considered at the site unless final remediation levels can be negotiated to significantly higher levels. This recommendation is based on the results of soil washing treatability studies at Fernald and Ashtabula that suggest that the technology would only be effective to address final remediation levels higher than 50 pCi/g. The technical review team identified four areas of technical uncertainty that should be resolved before the final selection of a preferred remedial strategy is made. Areas of significant technical uncertainty that should be addressed include: (1) Better delineation of the spatial distribution of surface contamination and the vertical distribution of subsurface contamination in the area of the firing table and associated alluvial deposits; (2) Chemical and physical characterization of residual depleted uranium (DU) at the site; (3) Determination of actual contaminant concentrations in air particulates to support risk modeling; and (4) More realistic estimation of cost for remedial alternatives, including soil washing, that were derived primarily from vendor estimates. Instead of conducting the planned soil washing treatability study, the team recommends that the site consider a new phased approach that combines additional characterization approaches and technologies to address the technical uncertainty in the remedial decision making. The site should redo the risk calculations as the future use scenario has changed for the site. As a result, the existing model is based on very conservative assumptions that result in calculation of unreasonably low cleanup goals. Specifically, the review team proposes that LLNL consider: (1) Revising the industrial worker scenario to a reasonable maximum exposure (RME) for a site worker that performs a weekly walk down of the area for two hours for 25 years (or an alternative RME if the exposure scenario changes); (2) Revising the ESSI of 2 mg U per kg soil for the deer mouse to account for less than 0.05 of the total ingested uranium being adsorbed by the gut; (3) Revising bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) for vegetation and invertebrates that are based on 100 mg of soluble uranium per kg of soil, as the uranium concentration in the slope soil does not average 100 mg/kg and it is not all in a soluble form; and (4) Measuring actual contaminant concentrations in air particulates at the site and using the actual values to support risk calculations. The team recommends that the site continue a phased approach during remediation. The activities should focus on elimination of the principal threats to groundwater by excavating (1) source material from the firing table and alluvial deposits, and (2) soil hotspots from the surrounding slopes with concentrations of U-235 and U-238 that pose unacceptable risk. This phased approach allows the remediation path to be driven by the results of each phase. This reduces the possibility of costly 'surprises', such as failure of soil treatment, and reduces the impact of remediation on endangered habitat. Treatment of the excavated material with physical separation equipment may result in a decreased volume of soil for disposal if the DU is concentrated in the fine-grained fraction, which can then be disposed of in an offsite facility at a considerable cost savings. Based on existing data and a decision to implement the recommended phased approach, the cost of characterization, excavation and physical

  16. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 366: Area 11 Plutonium Valley Dispersion Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Plan has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 366, Area 11 Plutonium Valley Dispersion Sites, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996 as amended). CAU 366 consists of the following six Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Area 11 of the Nevada National Security Site: CAS 11-08-01, Contaminated Waste Dump #1 CAS 11-08-02, Contaminated Waste Dump #2 CAS 11-23-01, Radioactively Contaminated Area A CAS 11-23-02, Radioactively Contaminated Area B CAS 11-23-03, Radioactively Contaminated Area C CAS 11-23-04, Radioactively Contaminated Area D Site characterization activities were performed in 2011 and 2012, and the results are presented in Appendix A of the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) for CAU 366 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2012a). The following closure alternatives were recommended in the CADD: No further action for CAS 11-23-01 Closure in place for CASs 11-08-01, 11-08-02, 11-23-02, 11-23-03, and 11-23-04 The scope of work required to implement the recommended closure alternatives includes the following: Non-engineered soil covers approximately 3 feet thick will be constructed at CAS 11-08-01 over contaminated waste dump (CWD) #1 and at CAS 11-08-02 over CWD #2. FFACO use restrictions (URs) will be implemented for the areas where the total effective dose (TED) exceeds the final action level (FAL) of 25 millirems per Occasional Use Area year (mrem/OU-yr). The FAL is based on an assumption that the future use of the site includes occasional work activities and that workers will not be assigned to the area on a regular basis. A site worker under this scenario is assumed to be on site for a maximum of 80 hours per year for 5 years. The FFACO UR boundaries will encompass the areas where a worker would be exposed to 25 millirems of radioactivity per year if they are present for 80 hours per year. These boundaries will be defined as follows: It is assumed that radiological contaminants are present at CAS 11-08-01 and CAS 11-08-02 within CWDs #1 and #2 at levels exceeding the FAL. Therefore, UR boundaries will be established around the perimeters of the soil covers that will be constructed at CWD #1 and CWD #2. A geophysical survey revealed buried metallic debris outside the fence and adjacent to CWD #1. Therefore, the UR boundary for CWD #1 will be expanded to include the mound containing buried material. It is assumed that radiological contaminants are present at CAS 11-23-02, CAS 11-23-03, and CAS 11-23-04, within the three High Contamination Area (HCA) boundaries associated with the 11b, 11c, and 11d test areas at levels exceeding the FAL. Therefore, the UR boundaries will be established around the perimeters of the HCAs. The TED at an area of soil impacted by radiological debris outside the fence and adjacent to the 11c test area HCA exceeds the FAL of 25 mrem/OU-yr. Because the radiological impact from the debris at this location is visible on the aerial flyover radiological survey, all other areas within this isopleth of the flyover survey are conservatively also assumed to exceed the FAL. Therefore, the UR boundaries for the 11b, 11c, and 11d test areas will be expanded to include the areas within this isopleth. The FFACO URs will all be located within the large Contamination Area (CA) that encompasses Plutonium Valley. Because access to the CA is limited and entry into the CA for post-closure inspections and maintenance would be impractical, UR warning signs will be posted along the existing CA fence. In accordance with the Soils Risk-Based Corrective Action Evaluation Process (NNSA/NSO, 2012b), an administrative UR will be implemented as a best management practice for the areas where the TED exceeds 25 millirems per Industrial Area year. This limit is based on continuous industrial use of the site and addresses exposure to industrial workers who would regularly be assigned to the work area for an entire career (250 days

  17. National Wind Technology Center to Debut New Dynamometer (Fact Sheet), Highlights in Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparency VisitSilver Toyota1Resource forNationalA NationalCenter

  18. Low-rank-coal study national needs for resource development. Volume 1. Executive summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliot, Dr., Martin A.; Hill, George R.; Jonakin, James; Crutchfield, Paul W.; Severson, Donald E.; White, David M.; Yeager, Kurt

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Low-rank coals - lignite and subbituminous - are those which have been subjected to the least amount of metamorphic change during the coal-forming process. As such, they retain greater fractions of moisture and volatile matter from the original peat material, and contain less fixed carbon, than the high-rank coals - bituminous and anthracite. The primary measure used to classify the lower ranks of coal is heating value. Other important characteristics which distinguish the low-rank coals from high-rank coals are discussed in this report. Low-rank coals represent a major, and largely untapped, energy resource for this country. Very extensive deposits of lignite and subbituminous coal exist in the western states, the Gulf coast, and Alaska. Major deposits of low-rank coal are also found in many other countries, most notably the USSR, Australia, Canada, and the central and eastern European nations. Worldwide coal statistics indicate that low-rank coals account for roughly one-third of the total resource and current production tonnages. This report recommends a comprehensive national research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) program to enhance the development of low-rank coals. The major conclusion of this study is that the unique properties of these coals affect the technologies for their extraction, preparation, direct use, and conversion and justify a separate focus on low-rank coals in the national RD and D efforts.

  19. Immigration, inequality, and the state : three essays on the employment of foreign nationals in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rissing, Ben A. (Ben Arthur)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation examines how U.S. immigration policies, as implemented by government agents, shape migration and key employment outcomes of foreign nationals. Using unique quantitative and qualitative data, never previously ...

  20. Liquid Phase Methanol LaPorte Process Development Unit: Modification, operation, and support studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas phase and a slurry phase radioactive tracer study was performed on the 12 ton/day Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH) Process Development Unit (PDU) in LaPorte, Texas. To study the gas phase mixing characteristics, a radioactive argon tracer was injected into the feed gas and residence time distribution was generated by measuring the response at the reactor outlet. Radioactive manganese oxide powder was independently injected into the reactor to measure the slurry phase mixing characteristics. A tanks-in-series model and an axial dispersion model were applied to the data to characterize the mixing in the reactor. From the axial dispersion model, a translation to the number of CSTR's (continuous stirred tank reactors) was made for comparison purposes with the first analysis. Dispersion correlations currently available in the literature were also compared. The tanks-in-series analysis is a simpler model whose results are easily interpreted. However, it does have a few drawbacks; among them, the lack of a reliable method for scaleup of a reactor and no direct correlation between mixing in the slurry and gas phases. The dispersion model allows the mixing in the gas and slurry phases to be characterized separately while including the effects of phase transfer. This analysis offers a means for combining the gas and slurry phase dispersion models into an effective dispersion coefficient, which, in turn, can be related to an equivalent number of tanks-in-series. The dispersion methods reported are recommended for scaleup of a reactor system. 24 refs., 18 figs., 8 tabs.

  1. Corporate bodies and chemical bonds : an STS analysis of natural gas development in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wylie, Sara Ann

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural gas extraction in the United States in the early 21st century has transformed social, physical, legal and biological landscapes. The technique of hydraulic fracturing, which entails the high-pressure injection into ...

  2. The development of short sea shipping in the United States : a dynamic alternative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connor, Peter H. (Peter Harold)

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current projections show that U.S. international trade is expected to reach nearly two billion tons by 2020, approximately double today's level. With such a large forecasted growth in trade coming through the United States ...

  3. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 105 is located in Area 2 of the Nevada National Security Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 105 is a geographical grouping of sites where there has been a suspected release of contamination associated with atmospheric nuclear testing. This document describes the planned investigation of CAU 105, which comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): 02-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site - Whitney 02-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site T-2A 02-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T-2B 02-23-08, Atmospheric Test Site T-2 02-23-09, Atmospheric Test Site - Turk These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 30, 2012, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 105. The site investigation process will also be conducted in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices to be applied to this activity. The potential contamination sources associated with all CAU 105 CASs are from atmospheric nuclear testing activities. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 105 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose at sample locations to the dose-based final action level. The total effective dose will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed at the center of each sample location will be used to measure external radiological dose. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; DOE, Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. Under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, this Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Fieldwork will be conducted after the plan is approved.

  4. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 106: Areas 5, 11 Frenchman Flat Atmospheric Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit 106 comprises the four corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: 05-20-02, Evaporation Pond 05-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site - Able 05-45-04, 306 GZ Rad Contaminated Area 05-45-05, 307 GZ Rad Contaminated Area These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on January 19, 2010, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 106. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 106 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. The CAU includes land areas impacted by the release of radionuclides from groundwater pumping during the Radionuclide Migration study program (CAS 05-20-02), a weapons-related airdrop test (CAS 05-23-05), and unknown support activities at two sites (CAS 05-45-04 and CAS 05-45-05). The presence and nature of contamination from surface-deposited radiological contamination from CAS 05-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site - Able, and other types of releases (such as migration and excavation as well as any potential releases discovered during the investigation) from the remaining three CASs will be evaluated using soil samples collected from the locations most likely containing contamination, if present. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS. The scope of the corrective action investigation for CAU 106 includes the following activities: Conduct radiological surveys. Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine internal dose rates and the presence of contaminants of concern. If contaminants of concern are present, collect additional samples to define the extent of the contamination and determine the area where the total effective dose at the site exceeds final action levels (i.e., corrective action boundary). Collect samples of investigation-derived waste, as needed, for waste management purposes.

  5. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 570: Area 9 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Patrick

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 570: Area 9 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. This complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. The purpose of the CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed.

  6. National climate change action plans: Interim report for developing and transition countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benioff, R.; Ness, E.; Hirst, J. [eds.

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under its Support for National Action Plans (SNAP) initiative, the U.S. Country Studies Program is providing financial and technical assistance to 18 countries for the development of climate change action plans. Although most of the countries have not yet completed their plans, the important lessons learned thus far are valuable and should be shared with other countries and international institutions that have an interest in the process of action plan development. This interim report describes the experience of 11 countries that are the furthest along in their planning activity and who have offered to share their results to date with the larger community of interested nations. These action plans delineate specific mitigation and adaptation measures that the countries will implement and integrate into their ongoing development programs. This report focuses on the measures the countries have selected and the methods they used to prepare their action plans. This executive summary presents key lessons and common themes using a structure similar to that used in the individual country chapters.

  7. Development and pilot demonstration program of a waste minimization plan at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, R.W.; Wentz, C.A.; Thuot, J.R.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to US Department of Energy directives, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has developed a waste minimization plan aimed at reducing the amount of wastes at this national research and development laboratory. Activities at ANL are primarily research- oriented and as such affect the amount and type of source reduction that can be achieved at this facility. The objective of ANL's waste minimization program is to cost-effectively reduce all types of wastes, including hazardous, mixed, radioactive, and nonhazardous wastes. The ANL Waste Minimization Plan uses a waste minimization audit as a systematic procedure to determine opportunities to reduce or eliminate waste. To facilitate these audits, a computerized bar-coding procedure is being implemented at ANL to track hazardous wastes from where they are generated to their ultimate disposal. This paper describes the development of the ANL Waste Minimization Plan and a pilot demonstration of the how the ANL Plan audited the hazardous waste generated within a selected divisions of ANL. It includes quantitative data on the generation and disposal of hazardous waste at ANL and describes potential ways to minimize hazardous wastes. 2 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs.

  8. Development and Implementation of a Scaled Saltstone Facility at Savannah River National Laboratory - 13346

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reigel, Marissa M.; Fowley, Mark D.; Hansen, Erich K.; Hera, Kevin R.; Marzolf, Athneal D.; Cozzi, Alex D. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has supported the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) since its conception. However, bench scaled tests have not always provided process or performance data related to the mixing, transfer, and other operations utilized in the SPF. A need was identified to better understand the SPF processes and to have the capabilities at SRNL to simulate the SPF unit operations to support an active low-level radioactive waste (LLW) processing facility. At the SPF, the dry premix is weighed, mixed and transferred to the Readco '10-inch' continuous mixer where it is mixed with the LLW salt solution from the Salt Feed Tank (SFT) to produce fresh Saltstone slurry. The slurry is discharged from the mixer into a hopper. The hopper feeds the grout pump that transfers the slurry through at least 457.2 meters of piping and discharges it into the Saltstone Disposal Units (SDU) for permanent disposal. In conjunction with testing individual SPF processes over several years, SRNL has designed and fabricated a scaled Saltstone Facility. Scaling of the system is primarily based on the volume capacity of the mixer and maintaining the same shear rate and total shear at the wall of the transfer line. At present, SRNL is utilizing the modular capabilities of the scaled Saltstone Facility to investigate the erosion issues related to the augers and paddles inside the SPF mixer. Full implementation of the scaled Saltstone Facility is still ongoing, but it is proving to be a valuable resource for testing alternate Saltstone formulations, cleaning sequences, the effect of pumping Saltstone to farther SDU's, optimization of the SPF mixer, and other operational variables before they are implemented in the SPF. (authors)

  9. Walk the Line: The Development of Route Selection Standards for Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-level Radioactive Waste in the United States - 13519

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dilger, Fred [Black Mountain Research, Henderson, NV 81012 (United States)] [Black Mountain Research, Henderson, NV 81012 (United States); Halstead, Robert J. [State of Nevada Agency for Nuclear Projects, Carson City, NV 80906 (United States)] [State of Nevada Agency for Nuclear Projects, Carson City, NV 80906 (United States); Ballard, James D. [Department of Sociology, California State University, Northridge, CA 91330 (United States)] [Department of Sociology, California State University, Northridge, CA 91330 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although storage facilities for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLRW) are widely dispersed throughout the United States, these materials are also relatively concentrated in terms of geographic area. That is, the impacts of storage occur in a very small geographic space. Once shipments begin to a national repository or centralized interim storage facility, the impacts of SNF and HLRW will become more geographically distributed, more publicly visible, and almost certainly more contentious. The selection of shipping routes will likely be a major source of controversy. This paper describes the development of procedures, regulations, and standards for the selection of routes used to ship spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in the United States. The paper begins by reviewing the circumstances around the development of HM-164 routing guidelines. The paper discusses the significance of New York City versus the Department of Transportation and application of HM-164. The paper describes the methods used to implement those regulations. The paper will also describe the current HM-164 designated routes and will provide a summary data analysis of their characteristics. This analysis will reveal the relatively small spatial scale of the effects of HM 164. The paper will then describe subsequent developments that have affected route selection for these materials. These developments include the use of 'representative routes' found in the Department of Energy (DOE) 2008 Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for the formerly proposed Yucca Mountain geologic repository. The paper will describe recommendations related to route selection found in the National Academy of Sciences 2006 report Going the Distance, as well as recommendations found in the 2012 Final Report of the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future. The paper will examine recently promulgated federal regulations (HM-232) for selection of rail routes for hazardous materials transport. The paper concludes that while the HM 164 regime is sufficient for certain applications, it does not provide an adequate basis for a national plan to ship spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste to centralized storage and disposal facilities over a period of 30 to 50 years. (authors)

  10. Developing El Niño The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign: Potential Application toDeveloping Continuous SCM/CRM Forcing2

  11. Comparison of Software Models for Energy Savings from Cool Roofs Joshua New, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennessee, University of

    , multiple substrate types, and insulation levels. A base case and energy-efficient alternative canComparison of Software Models for Energy Savings from Cool Roofs Joshua New, Oak Ridge National Department of Energy as an industry-consensus tool to help building owners, manufacturers, distributors

  12. Available at: http://publications.ictp.it IC/2010/094 United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , India and The Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, Italy Navin Shankar, Environmental and Marine Science, University of Trieste, Trieste, Italy and S. Masood Ahmed National Geophysical Research Institute, Uppal Road, Hyderabad. MIRAMARE -- TRIESTE December 2010 1 hachyuthan@yahoo.com #12

  13. Available at: http://publications.ictp.it IC/2010/070 United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sciences, University of Trieste, Trieste, Italy dDepartment of Earth Sciences, University of Roma "La National Laboratory, Assergi (AQ), Italy jAbdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, Italy MIRAMARE ­ TRIESTE August 2010 #12;1 Abstract The ability to predict earthquakes is one

  14. The development of an approximate dynamic analysis of insulating glass units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sequeira, Miguel Angel

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of this approximate dynamic analysis of IG units is achieved by modeling the unit with two equivalent single degree of freedom systems consisting of equivalent masses, equivalent structural stiIIhesses, equivalent forces, and by incorporating air space... the deflection of the equivalent mass coincides with that of the base point, the equivalent stiIIhess, K? is found as follows: K, = (Biggs 1964). Then, the resistance factor is found to be: F, K, F?, b ' =K, F, F~( (12) (Biggs 1964). After substitution...

  15. Scale-up of mild gasification to a process development unit. Quarterly report, May 21--August 20, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, J.A.L.; Carty, R.H.; Foster, H.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work performed during the seventh quarterly reporting period on the research program, ``Scale-up of Mild Gasification to a Process Development Unit`` is presented in this report. The overall objective of this project is to develop the IGT Mild-Gasification (MILDGAS) process for near-term commercialization. The specific objectives of the program are to: (1) design, construct, and operate a 24-tons/day adiabatic process development unit (PDU) to obtain process performance data suitable for further design scaleup. (2) Obtain large batches of coal-derived co-products for industrial evaluation. (3) Prepare a detailed design of a demonstration unit. And (4) develop technical and economic plans for commercialization of the MILDGAS process. The MILDGAS process is a continuous closed system for producing liquid and solid (char) co-products at mild operating conditions up to 50 psig and 1300{degree}F. It is capable of processing a wide range of both eastern caking and western noncaking coals. The 1 ton/hr PDU facility is comprised of a 2.5-ft ID adiabatic gasifier for the production of gases, coal liquids, and char; a thermal cracker for upgrading of the coal liquids; a three-stage condensation train to condense and store the liquid products; and coal feeding and char handling equipment. The facility will also incorporate support equipment for environmentally acceptable disposal of process waste.

  16. THE NATIONAL CARBON CAPTURE CENTER AT THE POWER SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) is a state-of-the-art test center sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and dedicated to the advancement of clean coal technology. In addition to the development of advanced coal gasification processes, the PSDF features the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) to study CO2 capture from coal-derived syngas and flue gas. The newly established NCCC will include multiple, adaptable test skids that will allow technology development of CO2 capture concepts using coal-derived syngas and flue gas in industrial settings. Because of the ability to operate under a wide range of flow rates and process conditions, research at the NCCC can effectively evaluate technologies at various levels of maturity. During the Budget Period One reporting period, efforts at the PSDF/NCCC focused on developing a screening process for testing consideration of new technologies; designing and constructing pre- and post-combustion CO2 capture facilities; developing sampling and analytical methods; expanding fuel flexibility of the Transport Gasification process; and operating the gasification process for technology research and for syngas generation to test syngas conditioning technologies.

  17. Audit of Administration of Cooperative Research and Development Agreements at DOE National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE established policies to ensure that Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAS) enhance US competitiveness in the world economy, provide a reasonable return on resources invested, and enable successful commercialization of technologies developed. DOE`s Office of Technology Partnerships issued a General Guidance Memorandum to DOE operations offices establishing policy goals for technology transfer programs, including CRADAS. Our audit disclosed that efforts to manage CRADAs at three national laboratories did not fully achieve DOE`s policy goals outlined in the General Guidance Memorandum. Specifically, the audit showed that: (1) joint work statements did not always contain clearly defined information that allowed DOE to facilitate technology transfer or to evaluate CRADAs potential benefits; (2) CRADA statements of work did not always contain adequate documentation or address potential benefits; (3) the national laboratories reviewed did not have effective mechanisms for continuous self-appraisal or measures of overall program success; and (4) CRADA provisions did not exist to ensure an accurate evaluation of partner contributions.

  18. Influences of aspirations and expectations on contest performance at the National FFA Agricultural Mechanics Career Development Event, 2001-2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Travis Scott

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to examine how performance expectations influence contest performance at the National FFA Agricultural Mechanics Career Development Event. The population for this study included all participants ...

  19. Designing of a prototype heat-sealer to manufacture solar water sterilization pouches for use in developing nations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinlan, Saundra S

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water purification proves to be a difficult task in many developing nations. The SODIS (SOlar water DISinfection) process is a method which improves the microbiological quality of water making it safer for drinking and ...

  20. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 366: Area 11 Plutonium Valley Dispersion Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 366, Area 11 Plutonium Valley Dispersion Sites, and provides documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and confirmation that closure objectives for CAU 366 were met. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; the U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management (FFACO, 1996 as amended).

  1. A comparison of the progression on sustainable procurement between England and Scotland following the United Kingdoms third sustainable development strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woodward, Caitlin

    In 2005, the United Kingdom published its third sustainable development strategy and simultaneously announced its goal to become a leader in the European Union on sustainable procurement by 2009. Four sustainable development priorities and six key...

  2. THE NATIONAL CARBON CAPTURE CENTER AT THE POWER SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) is a state-of-the-art test center sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and dedicated to the advancement of clean coal technology. In addition to the development of advanced coal gasification processes, the PSDF features the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) to study CO2 capture from coal-derived syngas and flue gas. The NCCC includes multiple, adaptable test skids that allow technology development of CO2 capture concepts using coal-derived syngas and flue gas in industrial settings. Because of the ability to operate under a wide range of flow rates and process conditions, research at the NCCC can effectively evaluate technologies at various levels of maturity. During the Budget Period Three reporting period, efforts at the NCCC/PSDF focused on testing of pre-combustion CO2 capture and related processes; commissioning and initial testing at the post-combustion CO2 capture facilities; and operating the gasification process to develop gasification related technologies and for syngas generation to test syngas conditioning technologies.

  3. THE NATIONAL CARBON CAPTURE CENTER AT THE POWER SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2011-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) is a state-of-the-art test center sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and dedicated to the advancement of clean coal technology. In addition to the development of advanced coal gasification processes, the PSDF features the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) to study CO2 capture from coal-derived syngas and flue gas. The NCCC includes multiple, adaptable test skids that allow technology development of CO2 capture concepts using coal-derived syngas and flue gas in industrial settings. Because of the ability to operate under a wide range of flow rates and process conditions, research at the NCCC can effectively evaluate technologies at various levels of maturity. During the Budget Period Two reporting period, efforts at the PSDF/NCCC focused on new technology assessment and test planning; designing and constructing post-combustion CO2 capture facilities; testing of pre-combustion CO2 capture and related processes; and operating the gasification process to develop gasification related technologies and for syngas generation to test syngas conditioning technologies.

  4. Wind Power Development in the United States: Current Progress, Future Trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    prices, environmental improvement, reduced water consumption, rural economic development, and employment opportunities in the renewable energy

  5. Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 547: Miscellaneous Contaminated Waste Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Krauss

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this CADD/CAP is to present the corrective action alternatives (CAAs) evaluated for CAU 547, provide justification for selection of the recommended alternative, and describe the plan for implementing the selected alternative. Corrective Action Unit 547 consists of the following three corrective action sites (CASs): (1) CAS 02-37-02, Gas Sampling Assembly; (2) CAS 03-99-19, Gas Sampling Assembly; and(3) CAS 09-99-06, Gas Sampling Assembly. The gas sampling assemblies consist of inactive process piping, equipment, and instrumentation that were left in place after completion of underground safety experiments. The purpose of these safety experiments was to confirm that a nuclear explosion would not occur in the case of an accidental detonation of the high-explosive component of the device. The gas sampling assemblies allowed for the direct sampling of the gases and particulates produced by the safety experiments. Corrective Action Site 02-37-02 is located in Area 2 of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and is associated with the Mullet safety experiment conducted in emplacement borehole U2ag on October 17, 1963. Corrective Action Site 03-99-19 is located in Area 3 of the NNSS and is associated with the Tejon safety experiment conducted in emplacement borehole U3cg on May 17, 1963. Corrective Action Site 09-99-06 is located in Area 9 of the NNSS and is associated with the Player safety experiment conducted in emplacement borehole U9cc on August 27, 1964. The CAU 547 CASs were investigated in accordance with the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to determine and implement appropriate corrective actions for CAU 547. Existing radiological survey data and historical knowledge of the CASs were sufficient to meet the DQOs and evaluate CAAs without additional investigation. As a result, further investigation of the CAU 547 CASs was not required. The following CAAs were identified for the gas sampling assemblies: (1) clean closure, (2) closure in place, (3) modified closure in place, (4) no further action (with administrative controls), and (5) no further action. Based on the CAAs evaluation, the recommended corrective action for the three CASs in CAU 547 is closure in place. This corrective action will involve construction of a soil cover on top of the gas sampling assembly components and establishment of use restrictions at each site. The closure in place alternative was selected as the best and most appropriate corrective action for the CASs at CAU 547 based on the following factors: (1) Provides long-term protection of human health and the environment; (2) Minimizes short-term risk to site workers in implementing corrective action; (3) Is easily implemented using existing technology; (4) Complies with regulatory requirements; (5) Fulfills FFACO requirements for site closure; (6) Does not generate transuranic waste requiring offsite disposal; (7) Is consistent with anticipated future land use of the areas (i.e., testing and support activities); and (8) Is consistent with other NNSS site closures where contamination was left in place.

  6. Large-Scale Offshore Wind Power in the United States: Assessment of Opportunities and Barriers, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 - -/e),,sand CERNLandLargefor High Offshore

  7. Development of a pilot safety information document (PSID) for the replacement of radioactive liquid waste treatment facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selvage, Ronald Derek

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on recent decisions made by Los Alamos National Laboratory concerning the development of site-wide National Environmental Policy Act documents, an effort was undertaken to develop a Pilot Safety Information Document (PSID) for the replacement...

  8. Co-operation Agreement between the European Organization for Nuclear Research and the Department of Energy of the United States of America and the National Science Foundation of the United States of America concerning Scientific and Technical Co-operation in Nuclear and Particle Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Co-operation Agreement between the European Organization for Nuclear Research and the Department of Energy of the United States of America and the National Science Foundation of the United States of America concerning Scientific and Technical Co-operation in Nuclear and Particle Physics

  9. Faculty and Student Teams and National Laboratories: Expanding the Reach of Research Opportunities and Workforce Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blackburn,N.; White, K.; Stegman, M.

    2009-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Faculty and Student Teams (FaST) Program, a cooperative effort between the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science and the National Science Foundation (NSF), brings together collaborative research teams composed of a researcher at Brookhaven National Laboratory, and a faculty member with two or three undergraduate students from a college or university. Begun by the Department of Energy in 2000 with the primary goal of building research capacity at a faculty member's home institution, the FaST Program focuses its recruiting efforts on faculty from colleges and universities with limited research facilities and those institutions that serve populations under-represented in the fields of science, engineering and technology, particularly women and minorities. Once assembled, a FaST team spends a summer engaged in hands-on research working alongside a laboratory scientist. This intensely collaborative environment fosters sustainable relationships between the faulty members and BNL that allow faculty members and their BNL colleagues to submit joint proposals to federal agencies, publish papers in peer-reviewed journals, reform local curriculum, and develop new or expand existing research labs at their home institutions.

  10. Nevada National Security Site-Directed Research and Development FY 2011 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard Bender, comp.

    2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This fiscal year 2011 annual report of the Site-Directed Research and Development program, the 10th anniversary edition, recognizes a full decade of innovative R&D accomplishments in support of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Last year the NNSS itself was renamed to reflect a diversifying mission, and our R&D program has contributed significantly to shape emerging missions that will continue to evolve. New initiatives in stockpile stewardship science, nonproliferation, and treaty verification and monitoring have had substantial successes in FY 2011, and many more accomplishments are expected. SDRD is the cornerstone on which many of these initiatives rest. Historically supporting our main focus areas, SDRD is also building a solid foundation for new, and non-traditional, emerging national security missions. The program continues its charter to advance science and technology for a broad base of agencies including the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and many others.

  11. Developing State and National Evaluation Infrastructures- Guidance for the Challenges and Opportunities of EM&V

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schiller, Steven R.; Goldman, Charles A.

    2011-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluating the impacts and effectiveness of energy efficiency programs is likely to become increasingly important for state policymakers and program administrators given legislative mandates and regulatory goals and increasing reliance on energy efficiency as a resource. In this paper, we summarize three activities that the authors have conducted that highlight the expanded role of evaluation, measurement and verification (EM&V): a study that identified and analyzed challenges in improving and scaling up EM&V activities; a scoping study that identified issues involved in developing a national efficiency EM&V standard; and lessons learned from providing technical assistance on EM&V issues to states that are ramping up energy efficiency programs. The lessons learned are summarized in 13 EM&V issues that policy makers should address in each jurisdiction and which are listed and briefly described. The paper also discusses how improving the effectiveness and reliability of EM&V will require additional capacity building, better access to existing EM&V resources, new methods to address emerging issues and technologies, and perhaps foundational documents and approaches to improving the credibility and cross jurisdictional comparability of efficiency investments. Two of the potential foundational documents discussed are a national EM&V standard or resource guide and regional deemed savings and algorithm databases.

  12. Prototype prosperity-diversity game for the Laboratory Development Division of Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VanDevender, P.; Berman, M.; Savage, K.

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Prosperity Game conducted for the Laboratory Development Division of National Laboratories on May 24--25, 1995, focused on the individual and organizational autonomy plaguing the Department of Energy (DOE)-Congress-Laboratories` ability to manage the wrenching change of declining budgets. Prosperity Games are an outgrowth and adaptation of move/countermove and seminar War Games. Each Prosperity Game is unique in that both the game format and the player contributions vary from game to game. This particular Prosperity Game was played by volunteers from Sandia National Laboratories, Eastman Kodak, IBM, and AT&T. Since the participants fully control the content of the games, the specific outcomes will be different when the team for each laboratory, Congress, DOE, and the Laboratory Operating Board (now Laboratory Operations Board) is composed of executives from those respective organizations. Nevertheless, the strategies and implementing agreements suggest that the Prosperity Games stimulate cooperative behaviors and may permit the executives of the institutions to safely explore the consequences of a family of DOE concert.

  13. Development of fast cooling pulsed magnets at the Wuhan National High Magnetic Field Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng, Tao; Sun, Quqin; Zhao, Jianlong; Jiang, Fan; Li, Liang; Xu, Qiang [Wuhan National High Magnetic Field Center, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China)] [Wuhan National High Magnetic Field Center, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Herlach, Fritz [Department of Physics, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)] [Department of Physics, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Pulsed magnets with fast cooling channels have been developed at the Wuhan National High Magnetic Field Center. Between the inner and outer sections of a coil wound with a continuous length of CuNb wire, G10 rods with cross section 4 mm 5 mm were inserted as spacers around the entire circumference, parallel to the coil axis. The free space between adjacent rods is 6 mm. The liquid nitrogen flows freely in the channels between these rods, and in the direction perpendicular to the rods through grooves provided in the rods. For a typical 60 T pulsed magnetic field with pulse duration of 40 ms, the cooling time between subsequent pulses is reduced from 160 min to 35 min. Subsequently, the same technology was applied to a 50 T magnet with 300 ms pulse duration. The cooling time of this magnet was reduced from 480 min to 65 min.

  14. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Wireless Power Transfer Development for Sustainable Campus Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onar, Omer C [ORNL] [ORNL; Miller, John M [ORNL] [ORNL; Campbell, Steven L [ORNL] [ORNL; Coomer, Chester [ORNL] [ORNL; White, Cliff P [ORNL] [ORNL; Seiber, Larry Eugene [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wireless power transfer (WPT) is a convenient, safe, and autonomous means for electric and plug-in hybrid electric vehicle charging that has seen rapid growth in recent years for stationary applications. WPT does not require bulky contacts, plugs, and wires, is not affected by dirt or weather conditions, and is as efficient as conventional charging systems. This study summarizes some of the recent Sustainable Campus Initiative activities of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in WPT charging of an on-campus vehicle (a Toyota Prius plug-in hybrid electric vehicle). Laboratory development of the WPT coils, high-frequency power inverter, and overall systems integration are discussed. Results cover the coil performance testing at different operating frequencies, airgaps, and misalignments. Some of the experimental results of insertion loss due to roadway surfacing materials in the air-gap are presented. Experimental lessons learned are also covered in this study.

  15. National Hydropower Map

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    High-resolution map produced by Oak Ridge National Laboratory showing hydropower resources throughout the United States.

  16. Argonne National Laboratory annual report of Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities FY 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Office of the Director

    2010-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    I am pleased to submit Argonne National Laboratory's Annual Report on its Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) activities for fiscal year 2009. Fiscal year 2009 saw a heightened focus by DOE and the nation on the need to develop new sources of energy. Argonne scientists are investigating many different sources of energy, including nuclear, solar, and biofuels, as well as ways to store, use, and transmit energy more safely, cleanly, and efficiently. DOE selected Argonne as the site for two new Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) - the Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations and the Center for Electrical Energy Storage - and funded two other EFRCs to which Argonne is a major partner. The award of at least two of the EFRCs can be directly linked to early LDRD-funded efforts. LDRD has historically seeded important programs and facilities at the lab. Two of these facilities, the Advanced Photon Source and the Center for Nanoscale Materials, are now vital contributors to today's LDRD Program. New and enhanced capabilities, many of which relied on LDRD in their early stages, now help the laboratory pursue its evolving strategic goals. LDRD has, since its inception, been an invaluable resource for positioning the Laboratory to anticipate, and thus be prepared to contribute to, the future science and technology needs of DOE and the nation. During times of change, LDRD becomes all the more vital for facilitating the necessary adjustments while maintaining and enhancing the capabilities of our staff and facilities. Although I am new to the role of Laboratory Director, my immediate prior service as Deputy Laboratory Director for Programs afforded me continuous involvement in the LDRD program and its management. Therefore, I can attest that Argonne's program adhered closely to the requirements of DOE Order 413.2b and associated guidelines governing LDRD. Our LDRD program management continually strives to be more efficient. In addition to meeting all reporting requirements during fiscal year 2009, our LDRD Office continues to enhance its electronic systems to streamline the LDRD management process. You will see from the following individual project reports that Argonne's researchers have once again done a superb job pursuing projects at the forefront of their respective fields and have contributed significantly to the advancement of Argonne's strategic thrusts. This work has not only attracted follow-on sponsorship in many cases, but is also proving to be a valuable basis upon which to continue realignment of our strategic portfolio to better match the Laboratory's Strategic Plan.

  17. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 366: Area 11 Plutonium Valley Dispersion Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit 366 comprises the six corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 11-08-01, Contaminated Waste Dump No.1; (2) 11-08-02, Contaminated Waste Dump No.2; (3) 11-23-01, Radioactively Contaminated Area A; (4) 11-23-02, Radioactively Contaminated Area B; (5) 11-23-03, Radioactively Contaminated Area C; and (6) 11-23-04, Radioactively Contaminated Area D. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed July 6, 2011, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 366. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 366 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose (TED) at sample locations to the dose-based final action level (FAL). The TED will be calculated by summing the estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples collected from sample plots will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed at each sample location will be used to measure external radiological dose. Based on historical documentation of the releases associated with the nuclear tests, it was determined that CASs 11-23-02, 11-23-03, and 11-23-04 will be investigated as one release site. The three test areas associated with these CASs are in close proximity; the devices tested were all composed of plutonium and enriched uranium; and the ground zeroes are all posted high contamination areas (HCAs). Because the device tested at CAS 11-23-01 was composed primarily of enriched uranium and the ground zero is not a posted HCA, the CAS will be investigated as a separate release. The DQO process also resulted in an assumption that TED within the HCAs and contaminated waste dumps exceeds the FAL and requires corrective action. A field investigation will be performed to define where TED exceeds the FAL and to determine whether other contaminants of concern are present at the site associated with other activities that took place at the site or from spills or waste discovered during the investigation. The presence and nature of contamination from other types of releases (such as migration and any potential releases discovered during the investigation) will be evaluated using soil samples collected from the locations most likely containing contamination, if present. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS.

  18. Environmental, safety, and health plan for the remedial investigation of Waste Area Grouping 10, Operable Unit 3, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document outlines the environmental, safety, and health (ES&H) approach to be followed for the remedial investigation of Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 10 at Oak at Ridge National Laboratory. This ES&H Plan addresses hazards associated with upcoming Operable Unit 3 field work activities and provides the program elements required to maintain minimal personnel exposures and to reduce the potential for environmental impacts during field operations. The hazards evaluation for WAG 10 is presented in Sect. 3. This section includes the potential radiological, chemical, and physical hazards that may be encountered. Previous sampling results suggest that the primary contaminants of concern will be radiological (cobalt-60, europium-154, americium-241, strontium-90, plutonium-238, plutonium-239, cesium-134, cesium-137, and curium-244). External and internal exposures to radioactive materials will be minimized through engineering controls (e.g., ventilation, containment, isolation) and administrative controls (e.g., procedures, training, postings, protective clothing).

  19. Hydrogen Production from Biomass via Indirect Gasification: The Impact of NREL Process Development Unit Gasifier Correlations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinchin, C. M.; Bain, R. L.

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a set of updated gasifier correlations developed by NREL to predict biomass gasification products and Minimum Hydrogen Selling Price.

  20. Facilitating the Development of Offshore Wind Energy in the United States |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of YearFLASH2011-17-OPAMDepartmentofofForewordinFYEnergyDepartment of

  1. Facilitating the Development of Offshore Wind Energy in the United States |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic Plan| Department of.pdf6-OPAMDepartment6 FY 2007FY 2014 Solid0612Department of

  2. A History of Geothermal Energy Research and Development in the United

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartmentDepartment of Energy ThisThis guide is designed as a

  3. A History of Geothermal Energy Research and Development in the United

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartmentDepartment of Energy ThisThis guide is designed as aStates:

  4. A History or Geothermal Energy Research and Development in the United

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartmentDepartment of Energy ThisThis guide is designed as

  5. A History or Geothermal Energy Research and Development in the United

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartmentDepartment of Energy ThisThis guide is designed asStates: Energy

  6. Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts in the United States: Four Regional Scenarios

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOilNEWResponse toOctober 2014 National,2008aims toOfficial Use Offshore

  7. Assessment of Ports for Offshore Wind Development in the United States

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 RussianBy:Whether you'reInc.: FederalInter‐stageMarch 18,ContinentalA

  8. Modern Shale Gas Development in the United States: A Primer | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015of 2005 atthe DistrictIndependentDepartment4.docfromImpactProducts

  9. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Patrick

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. CAU 105 comprises the following five corrective action sites (CASs): -02-23-04 Atmospheric Test Site - Whitney Closure In Place -02-23-05 Atmospheric Test Site T-2A Closure In Place -02-23-06 Atmospheric Test Site T-2B Clean Closure -02-23-08 Atmospheric Test Site T-2 Closure In Place -02-23-09 Atmospheric Test Site - Turk Closure In Place The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 105 based on the implementation of the corrective actions. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from October 22, 2012, through May 23, 2013, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites; and in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices.

  10. ?Framework for a Risk-Informed Groundwater Compliance Strategy for Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sam Marutzky

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This document was prepared before the NTS was renamed the Nevada National Security Site (August 23, 2010); thus, all references to the site herein remain NTS. Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 98, Frenchman Flat, at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) was the location of ten underground nuclear tests between 1965 and 1971. As a result, radionuclides were released in the subsurface in the vicinity of the test cavities. Corrective Action Unit 98 and other CAUs at the NTS and offsite locations are being investigated. The Frenchman Flat CAU is one of five Underground Test Area (UGTA) CAUs at the NTS that are being evaluated as potential sources of local or regional impact to groundwater resources. For UGTA sites, including Frenchman Flat, contamination in and around the test cavities will not be remediated because it is technologically infeasible due to the depth of the test cavities (150 to 2,000 feet [ft] below ground surface) and the volume of contaminated groundwater at widely dispersed locations on the NTS. Instead, the compliance strategy for these sites is to model contaminant flow and transport, estimate the maximum spatial extent and volume of contaminated groundwater (over a period of 1,000 years), maintain institutional controls, and restrict access to potentially contaminated groundwater at areas where contaminants could migrate beyond the NTS boundaries.

  11. Phase I Flow and Transport Model Document for Corrective Action Unit 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1 with ROTC 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, Robert

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Underground Test Area (UGTA) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 97, Yucca Flat/Climax Mine, in the northeast part of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) requires environmental corrective action activities to assess contamination resulting from underground nuclear testing. These activities are necessary to comply with the UGTA corrective action strategy (referred to as the UGTA strategy). The corrective action investigation phase of the UGTA strategy requires the development of groundwater flow and contaminant transport models whose purpose is to identify the lateral and vertical extent of contaminant migration over the next 1,000 years. In particular, the goal is to calculate the contaminant boundary, which is defined as a probabilistic model-forecast perimeter and a lower hydrostratigraphic unit (HSU) boundary that delineate the possible extent of radionuclide-contaminated groundwater from underground nuclear testing. Because of structural uncertainty in the contaminant boundary, a range of potential contaminant boundaries was forecast, resulting in an ensemble of contaminant boundaries. The contaminant boundary extent is determined by the volume of groundwater that has at least a 5 percent chance of exceeding the radiological standards of the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) (CFR, 2012).

  12. Scale-up of mild gasification to a process development unit. Progress report, November 21, 1992--February 20, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, J.A.L.; Carty, R.H.; Saladin, N.; Foster, H.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project is to develop the IGT Mild-Gasification (MILDGAS) process for near-term commercialization. The specific objectives of the program are to: design, construct, and operate a 24-tons/day adiabatic process development unit (PDU) to obtain process performance data suitable for further design scaleup obtain large batches of coal-derived co-products for industrial evaluation prepare a detailed design of a demonstration unit develop technical and economic plans for commercialization of the MILDGAS process. The MILDGAS process is a continuous closed system for producing liquid and solid (char) co-products at mild operating conditions up to 50 psig and 1300{degree}F. It is capable of processing a wide range of both eastern caking and western noncaking coals. The 1 ton/hr PDU facility that is to be constructed is comprised of a 2.5-ft ID adiabatic gasifier for the production of gases, coal liquids, and char; a thermal cracker for upgrading of the coal liquids; a three-stage condensation train to condense and store the liquid products; and coal feeding and char handling equipment. The facility will also incorporate support equipment for environmentally acceptable disposal of process waste.

  13. ABPDU - Advanced Biofuels Process Demonstration Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lawrence Berkeley National Lab opened its Advanced Biofuels Process Demonstration Unit on Aug. 18, 2011.

  14. DEVELOPING THE NATIONAL GEOTHERMAL DATA SYSTEM ADOPTION OF CKAN FOR DOMESTIC & INTERNATIONAL DATA DEPLOYMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, Ryan J. [Arizona Geological Survey; Kuhmuench, Christoph [Siemens Corporation; Richard, Stephen M. [Arizona Geological Survey

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Geothermal Data System (NGDS) De- sign and Testing Team is developing NGDS software currently referred to as the NGDS Node-In-A-Box. The software targets organizations or individuals who wish to host at least one of the following: an online repository containing resources for the NGDS; an online site for creating metadata to register re- sources with the NGDS NDGS-conformant Web APIs that enable access to NGDS data (e.g., WMS, WFS, WCS); NDGS-conformant Web APIs that support dis- covery of NGDS resources via catalog service (e.g. CSW) a web site that supports discovery and under- standing of NGDS resources A number of different frameworks for development of this online application were reviewed. The NGDS Design and Testing Team determined to use CKAN (http://ckan.org/), because it provides the closest match between out of the box functionality and NGDS node-in-a-box requirements. To achieve the NGDS vision and goals, this software development project has been inititated to provide NGDS data consumers with a highly functional inter- face to access the system, and to ease the burden on data providers who wish to publish data in the sys- tem. It is important to note that this software package constitutes a reference implementation. The NGDS software is based on open standards, which means other server software can make resources available, and other client applications can utilize NGDS data. A number of international organizations have ex- pressed interest in the NGDS approach to data access. The CKAN node implementation can provide a sim- ple path for deploying this technology in other set- tings.

  15. CleanRooms Magazine, November 2006 Development of a Fan-Filter Unit Test Standard, Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    curves in Figure 1 show the FFU efficiency level as a function of percentile ranking developed from in the graph, e.g., 99 percentile) was as much as over three times of the efficiency level of the least

  16. Starting your career in United Arab Emirates Country Guide for International Students

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neirotti, Juan Pablo

    of reducing the reliance on oil.This,alongside the incorporation of more UAE nationals into the labour market a successful start in your career in the United Arab Emirates' labour market. Included are key facts about With a prospering free-market economy,the United Arab Emirates ranks amongst the most developed nations both

  17. Summary Report of Summer 2009 NGSI Human Capital Development Efforts at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dougan, A; Dreicer, M; Essner, J; Gaffney, A; Reed, J; Williams, R

    2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2009, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) engaged in several activities to support NA-24's Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI). This report outlines LLNL's efforts to support Human Capital Development (HCD), one of five key components of NGSI managed by Dunbar Lockwood in the Office of International Regimes and Agreements (NA-243). There were five main LLNL summer safeguards HCD efforts sponsored by NGSI: (1) A joint Monterey Institute of International Studies/Center for Nonproliferation Studies-LLNL International Safeguards Policy and Information Analysis Course; (2) A Summer Safeguards Policy Internship Program at LLNL; (3) A Training in Environmental Sample Analysis for IAEA Safeguards Internship; (4) Safeguards Technology Internships; and (5) A joint LLNL-INL Summer Safeguards Lecture Series. In this report, we provide an overview of these five initiatives, an analysis of lessons learned, an update on the NGSI FY09 post-doc, and an update on students who participated in previous NGSI-sponsored LLNL safeguards HCD efforts.

  18. Development of a Clean Air Act Title V permit application for Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrett, G.L.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990 instituted major changes in the way that air emission sources are regulated and permitted. Along with being a major research and development laboratory owned by the US Department of Energy, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is also classified as a major source of oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) in the Chicago metropolitan area which has been designated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) as severe (17) for ozone. As a major source ANL is therefore required under Title V of CAAA to apply for a federally enforceable permit for all sources of air emissions at the facility. While the ANL Boiler House represents the most significant emission source at the Laboratory, there are, nevertheless, a large number of other emission sources, some of which are currently permitted by the State of Illinois and others of which are exempt from state permitting requirements. A large number of R & D related sources are of relatively small magnitude. The ability to identify, inventory, characterize and classify all sources under the various titles of CAAA constitutes a major challenge for R & D laboratories of this size.

  19. United States navy fleet problems and the development of carrier aviation, 1929-1933

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wadle, Ryan David

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Navy first took official notice of aviation in 1910, but its development of carrier aviation lagged behind Great Britain??s until the 1920s. The first American aircraft carrier, the Langley, commissioned in 1919, provided the Navy with a...

  20. Model Evaluation Report for Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruskauff, Greg; Marutzky, Sam

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Model evaluation focused solely on the PIN STRIPE and MILK SHAKE underground nuclear tests contaminant boundaries (CBs) because they had the largest extent, uncertainty, and potential consequences. The CAMBRIC radionuclide migration experiment also had a relatively large CB, but because it was constrained by transport data (notably Well UE-5n), there was little uncertainty, and radioactive decay reduced concentrations before much migration could occur. Each evaluation target and the associated data-collection activity were assessed in turn to determine whether the new data support, or demonstrate conservatism of, the CB forecasts. The modeling teamin this case, the same team that developed the Frenchman Flat geologic, source term, and groundwater flow and transport modelsanalyzed the new data and presented the results to a PER committee. Existing site understanding and its representation in numerical groundwater flow and transport models was evaluated in light of the new data and the ability to proceed to the CR stage of long-term monitoring and institutional control.

  1. The role of the United States Water Resources Engineering Community in responding to the water related needs of the developing world

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ormond, Timothy Paul

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THK ROLE OF THK UNITED STATES WATER RESOURCES ENGINEERING COMMUNITY IN RESPONDING TO THE WATER- RELATED NEEDS OF THK DEVELOPING WORLD A Thesis by TIMOTHY PAUL ORMOND Submitted to thc Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AdtM Vnivcrsdy... in partial fulfdlmcnt of the requirements for thc dcgrcc of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1993 Major Subject: Civil Engineering THF. ROLE OF THE UNITED STATES WATER RESOURCES ENGINEERING COMMUNITY IN RESPONDING TO THE WATER-RELATED NEEDS OF THE DEVELOPING...

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: IAEA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the United States Conceptual Framework for Developing Resilience Metrics for the Electricity, Oil, and Gas Sectors in the United States Conceptual Framework for Developing...

  3. Low-rank coal study : national needs for resource development. Volume 2. Resource characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Comprehensive data are presented on the quantity, quality, and distribution of low-rank coal (subbituminous and lignite) deposits in the United States. The major lignite-bearing areas are the Fort Union Region and the Gulf Lignite Region, with the predominant strippable reserves being in the states of North Dakota, Montana, and Texas. The largest subbituminous coal deposits are in the Powder River Region of Montana and Wyoming, The San Juan Basin of New Mexico, and in Northern Alaska. For each of the low-rank coal-bearing regions, descriptions are provided of the geology; strippable reserves; active and planned mines; classification of identified resources by depth, seam thickness, sulfur content, and ash content; overburden characteristics; aquifers; and coal properties and characteristics. Low-rank coals are distinguished from bituminous coals by unique chemical and physical properties that affect their behavior in extraction, utilization, or conversion processes. The most characteristic properties of the organic fraction of low-rank coals are the high inherent moisture and oxygen contents, and the correspondingly low heating value. Mineral matter (ash) contents and compositions of all coals are highly variable; however, low-rank coals tend to have a higher proportion of the alkali components CaO, MgO, and Na/sub 2/O. About 90% of the reserve base of US low-rank coal has less than one percent sulfur. Water resources in the major low-rank coal-bearing regions tend to have highly seasonal availabilities. Some areas appear to have ample water resources to support major new coal projects; in other areas such as Texas, water supplies may be constraining factor on development.

  4. United States Department of Energy large commercial absorption chiller development program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garland, P.W.; DeVault, R.C.; Zaltash, A.

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is working with partners from the gas cooling industry to improve energy efficiency and US competitiveness by using advanced absorption technologies that eliminate the use of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), refrigerants that contribute to ozone depletion and global warming. Absorption cooling uses natural gas as the heat source, which produces much lower NO{sub x} emissions than oil- or coal-generated electricity. Gas-fired chillers also have the advantage of helping reduce peak electrical usage during summer months. To assist industry in developing advanced absorption cooling technologies, DOE sponsors the Large Commercial Chiller Development Program. The goal of the program is to improve chiller cooling efficiency by 30--50% compared with the best currently available absorption systems.

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF A CARBON MANAGEMENT GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM (GIS) FOR THE UNITED STATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard J. Herzog

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lab for Energy and Environment (LFEE) at MIT is developing a Geographic Information System (GIS) for carbon management. The GIS will store, integrate, and manipulate information relating to the components of carbon management systems. Additionally, the GIS can be used to interpret and analyze the effect of developing these systems. In the first year of this three year project, we focused on two tasks: (1) specifying the system design--defining in detail the GIS data requirements, the types of analyses that can be conducted, and the forms of output we will produce, as well as designing the computer architecture of the GIS and (2) creating the ''core'' datasets--identifying data sources and converting them into a form accessible by the GIS.

  6. The Communist revolution in Republican China: the conceptual development of the second united front.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hope, Brian Lannes

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    among European socialist movements which eventually split the First International in 1872. The overall emphasis of Bakuninism, most popular in less industrially-developed countries of southern Europe and among radical intel- lectuals in Russia... The embryonic Marxist party in Russia, grandilo- quently titled the League of Struggle for the Emancipa- tion of the Working Class, had several political com- petitors representing various political strategies to be employed in the effort to overthrow...

  7. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT WASTE PROCESSING ANNUAL TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bush, S.

    2009-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Office of Waste Processing identifies and reduces engineering and technical risks and uncertainties of the waste processing programs and projects of the Department of Energy's Environmental Management (EM) mission through the timely development of solutions to technical issues. The risks, and actions taken to mitigate those risks, are determined through technology readiness assessments, program reviews, technology information exchanges, external technical reviews, technical assistance, and targeted technology development and deployment. The Office of Waste Processing works with other DOE Headquarters offices and project and field organizations to proactively evaluate technical needs, identify multi-site solutions, and improve the technology and engineering associated with project and contract management. Participants in this program are empowered with the authority, resources, and training to implement their defined priorities, roles, and responsibilities. The Office of Waste Processing Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) supports the goals and objectives of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - Office of Environmental Management Engineering and Technology Roadmap by providing direction for technology enhancement, development, and demonstration that will lead to a reduction of technical risks and uncertainties in EM waste processing activities. The MYPP summarizes the program areas and the scope of activities within each program area proposed for the next five years to improve safety and reduce costs and environmental impacts associated with waste processing; authorized budget levels will impact how much of the scope of activities can be executed, on a year-to-year basis. Waste Processing Program activities within the Roadmap and the MYPP are described in these seven program areas: (1) Improved Waste Storage Technology; (2) Reliable and Efficient Waste Retrieval Technologies; (3) Enhanced Tank Closure Processes; (4) Next-Generation Pretreatment Solutions; (5) Enhanced Stabilization Technologies; (6) Spent Nuclear Fuel; and (7) Challenging Materials. This report provides updates on 35 technology development tasks conducted during calendar year 2008 in the Roadmap and MYPP program areas.

  8. Food irradiation as a method of limiting crop loss in developing nations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parmar, Nishaal Jitendra

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Introduction: Introduction: The world today contains an estimated 6.7 billion humans, and our population is growing at an unprecedented rate, consuming an ever-increasing amount of global resources. According to United ...

  9. Contacts @CRCTUCRCTU Cancer Research UK Clinical Trials Unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    scientists in the development of new treatments and biomarkers for cancer. The CRCTU also collaborateContacts @CRCTUCRCTU Cancer Research UK Clinical Trials Unit School of Cancer Sciences University... A National Cancer Research Institute Accredited Trials Unit Linked Groups @CRCTUCRCTU Birmingham

  10. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 539: Areas 25 and 26 Railroad Tracks Nevada National Security Site, Nevada with ROTC-1, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Kauss

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 539: Areas 25 and 26 Railroad Tracks, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. The corrective action sites (CASs) within CAU 539 are located within Areas 25 and 26 of the Nevada National Security Site. Corrective Action Unit 539 comprises the following CASs: 25-99-21, Area 25 Railroad Tracks 26-99-05, Area 26 Railroad Tracks The purpose of this CR is to provide documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and provide data confirming that the closure objectives for CASs within CAU 539 were met. To achieve this, the following actions were performed: Reviewed documentation on historical and current site conditions, including the concentration and extent of contamination. Conducted radiological walkover surveys of railroad tracks in both Areas 25 and 26. Collected ballast and soil samples and calculated internal dose estimates for radiological releases. Collected in situ thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements and calculated external dose estimates for radiological releases. Removed lead bricks as potential source material (PSM) and collected verification samples. Implemented corrective actions as necessary to protect human health and the environment. Properly disposed of corrective action and investigation wastes. Implemented an FFACO use restriction (UR) for radiological contamination at CAS 25-99-21. The approved UR form and map are provided in Appendix F and will be filed in the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), Facility Information Management System; the FFACO database; and the NNSA/NSO CAU/CAS files. From November 29, 2010, through May 2, 2011, closure activities were performed as set forth in the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 539: Areas 25 and 26 Railroad Tracks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The purposes of the activities as defined during the data quality objectives process were as follows: Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent, implement appropriate corrective actions, and properly dispose of wastes. Analytes detected during the closure activities were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) to determine COCs for CAU 539. Assessment of the data generated from closure activities revealed the following: At CAS 26-99-05, the total effective dose for radiological releases did not exceed the FAL of 25 millirem per Industrial Area year. Potential source material in the form of lead bricks was found at three locations. A corrective action of clean closure was implemented at these locations, and verification samples indicated that no further action is necessary. At CAS 25-99-21, the total effective dose for radiological releases exceeds the FAL of 25 millirem per Industrial Area year. Potential source material in the form of lead bricks was found at eight locations. A corrective action was implemented by removing the lead bricks and soil above FALs at these locations, and verification samples indicated that no further action is necessary. Pieces of debris with high radioactivity were identified as PSM and remain within the CAS boundary. A corrective action of closure in place with a UR was implemented at this CAS because closure activities showed evidence of remaining soil contamination and radioactive PSM. Future land use will be restricted from surface and intrusive activities. Closure activities generated waste streams consisting of industrial solid waste, recyclable materials, low-level radioactive waste, and mixed low-level radioactive waste. Wastes were disposed of in the appropriate onsite landfills. The NNSA/NSO prov

  11. Closure Report for the 92-Acre Area and Corrective Action Unit 111: Area 5 WMD Retired Mixed Waste Pits, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2012-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting closure of the 92-Acre Area, which includes Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 111, 'Area 5 WMD Retired Mixed Waste Pits.' This CR provides documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and confirmation that the closure objectives were met. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (FFACO, 1996 [as amended March 2010]). Closure activities began in January 2011 and were completed in January 2012. Closure activities were conducted according to Revision 1 of the Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) for the 92-Acre Area and CAU 111 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2010). The following closure activities were performed: (1) Construct an engineered evapotranspiration cover over the boreholes, trenches, and pits in the 92-Acre Area; (2) Install use restriction (UR) warning signs, concrete monuments, and subsidence survey monuments; and (3) Establish vegetation on the covers. UR documentation is included as Appendix C of this report. The post-closure plan is presented in detail in Revision 1 of the CADD/CAP for the 92-Acre Area and CAU 111, and the requirements are summarized in Section 5.2 of this document. When the next request for modification of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit NEV HW0101 is submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP), the requirements for post-closure monitoring of the 92-Acre Area will be included. NNSA/NSO requests the following: (1) A Notice of Completion from NDEP to NNSA/NSO for closure of CAU 111; and (2) The transfer of CAU 111 from Appendix III to Appendix IV, Closed Corrective Action Units, of the FFACO.

  12. The Thirty-First United States Congress and the development of the trans-Mississippi West

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vandergrift, Kennard Smith

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of 1850; the Oregon Donation Act; the Bounty Act of 1850; the settlement of the western boundary of Texas and the establishment of the Territory of New Piexico; the act es ablishing the Territory of Utah; and the act admitting California as a state... measure--the settlement of the western boundary of Texas and the creation of the Terri- tory of New Nexico; the admission of California as a state; and the creation of the Territory of Utah--which enhanced the development of the West. Chapter V...

  13. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 548: Areas 9, 10, 18, 19, and 20 Housekeeping Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This Closure Report (CR) documents closure activities for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 548, Areas 9, 10, 18, 19, and 20 Housekeeping Sites, and complies with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; the U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management (FFACO, 1996 as amended). CAU 548 consists of the following Corrective Action Sites (CASs), located in Areas 9, 10, 12, 18, 19, and 20 of the Nevada National Security Site: CAS 09-99-02, Material Piles (2) CAS 09-99-04, Wax, Paraffin CAS 09-99-05, Asbestos, Vermiculite CAS 09-99-07, Tar Spill CAS 10-22-02, Drums CAS 10-22-05, Gas Block CAS 10-22-07, Gas Block CAS 10-22-34, Drum CAS 10-22-38, Drum; Cable CAS 12-99-04, Epoxy Tar Spill CAS 12-99-08, Cement Spill CAS 18-14-01, Transformers (3) CAS 19-22-01, Drums CAS 19-22-11, Gas Block (2) CAS 19-44-01, Fuel Spill CAS 20-22-07, Drums (2) CAS 20-22-09, Drums (3) CAS 20-22-14, Drums (2) CAS 20-22-16, Drums (2) CAS 20-24-09, Battery Closure activities began in July 2011 and were completed in December 2011 and included removal and disposal of material piles, spills, sanitary debris, a lead acid battery, lead and steel shot, and stained soil. Activities were conducted according to the Sectored Clean-up Work Plan for Housekeeping Category Waste Sites (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2003). Closure activities generated sanitary waste, hydrocarbon waste, low-level waste, hazardous waste, and mixed waste. Some wastes exceeded land disposal limits and required offsite treatment prior to disposal. Other wastes met land disposal restrictions and were disposed in appropriate onsite or offsite landfills. NNSA/NSO requests the following: A Notice of Completion from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection to NNSA/NSO for closure of CAU 548 The transfer of CAU 548 from Appendix III to Appendix IV, Closed Corrective Action Units, of the FFACO

  14. United Nations TD/B/WP/203 United Nations Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and communication technology IFOAM International Federation of Organic Agriculture Movements IFRS International investment policy review ISAR International Standards of Accounting and Reporting ITC International Trade country DFQF duty-free and quota-free DITC Division on International Trade in Goods and Services

  15. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT REPORT FISCAL YEAR 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bush, S.

    2010-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Environmental Management (EM) is to clean up the environmental legacy of nuclear weapons research and production during the Cold War. That mission includes cleaning up nuclear waste, contaminated groundwater and soil, nuclear materials, and contaminated facilities covering two million acres of land in thirty-five states. EM's principal program goals include timely completion of tank waste treatment facilities, reduction of the life-cycle costs and acceleration of the cleanup of the Cold War legacy, and reduction of the EM footprint. The mission of the EM Technology Innovation and Development program is to transform science and innovation into practical solutions to achieve the EM mission. During fiscal year 2010 (October 2009-September 2010), EM focused upon accelerating environmental cleanup by expeditiously filling identified gaps in available knowledge and technology in the EM program areas. This report describes some of the approaches and transformational technologies in tank waste processing, groundwater and soil remediation, nuclear materials disposition, and facility deactivation and decommissioning developed during fiscal year 2010 that will enable EM to meet its most pressing program goals.

  16. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 365: Baneberry Contamination Area, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit 365 comprises one corrective action site (CAS), CAS 08-23-02, U-8d Contamination Area. The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 365 based on the implementation of the corrective action of closure in place with a use restriction (UR). Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from January 18, 2011, through August 2, 2011, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 365: Baneberry Contamination Area. The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process. The CAU 365 dataset of investigation results was evaluated based on a data quality assessment. This assessment demonstrated the dataset is complete and acceptable for use in supporting the DQO decisions. Investigation results were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) established in this document. A radiological dose FAL of 25 millirem per year was established based on the Remote Work Area exposure scenario (336 hours of annual exposure). Radiological doses exceeding the FAL were found to be present to the southwest of the Baneberry crater. It was also assumed that radionuclide levels present within the crater and fissure exceed the FAL. Corrective actions were undertaken that consisted of establishing a UR and posting warning signs for the crater, fissure, and the area located to the southwest of the crater where soil concentrations exceeded the FAL. These URs were recorded in the FFACO database; the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Facility Information Management System; and the NNSA/NSO CAU/CAS files. Therefore, NNSA/NSO provides the following recommendations: (1) No further corrective actions beyond what are described in this document are necessary for CAU 365. (2) A Notice of Completion to NNSA/NSO is requested from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for closure of CAU 365. (3) Corrective Action Unit 365 should be moved from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the FFACO.

  17. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 106: Area 5, 11 Frenchman Flat Atmospheric Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews and Dawn Peterson

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit 106 comprises four corrective action sites (CASs): (1) 05-20-02, Evaporation Pond; (2) 05-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site - Able; (3) 05-45-04, 306 GZ Rad Contaminated Area; (4) 05-45-05, 307 GZ Rad Contaminated Area. The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 106 based on the implementation of corrective actions. The corrective action of clean closure was implemented at CASs 05-45-04 and 05-45-05, while no corrective action was necessary at CASs 05-20-02 and 05-23-05. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from October 20, 2010, through June 1, 2011, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 106: Areas 5, 11 Frenchman Flat Atmospheric Sites. The approach for the CAI was divided into two facets: investigation of the primary release of radionuclides, and investigation of other releases (mechanical displacement and chemical releases). The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process. The CAU 106 dataset of investigation results was evaluated based on a data quality assessment. This assessment demonstrated the dataset is complete and acceptable for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Investigation results were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) established in this document. A radiological dose FAL of 25 millirem per year was established based on the Industrial Area exposure scenario (2,250 hours of annual exposure). The only radiological dose exceeding the FAL was at CAS 05-45-05 and was associated with potential source material (PSM). It is also assumed that additional PSM in the form of depleted uranium (DU) and DU-contaminated debris at CASs 05-45-04 and 05-45-05 exceed the FAL. Therefore, corrective actions were undertaken at these CASs that consisted of removing PSM and collecting verification samples. Results of verification samples show that remaining soil does not contain contamination exceeding the FALs. Therefore, the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) provides the following recommendations: (1) No further corrective actions are necessary for CAU 106. (2) A Notice of Completion to NNSA/NSO is requested from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for closure of CAU 106. (3) Corrective Action Unit 106 should be moved from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the FFACO.

  18. Nuclear Operations Application to Environmental Restoration at Corrective Action Unit 547, Miscellaneous Contaminated Waste Sites, at the Nevada National Security Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin Cabble (NSO), Mark Krauss and Patrick Matthews (N-I)

    2011-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office has responsibility for environmental restoration at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly the Nevada Test Site). This includes remediation at locations where past testing activities have resulted in the release of plutonium to the environment. One of the current remediation efforts involves a site where an underground subcritical nuclear safety test was conducted in 1964. The underground test was vented through a steel pipe to the surface in a closed system where gas samples were obtained. The piping downstream of the gas-sampling apparatus was routed belowground to a location where it was allowed to vent into an existing radioactively contaminated borehole. The length of the pipe above the ground surface is approximately 200 meters. This pipe remained in place until remediation efforts began in 2007, at which time internal plutonium contamination was discovered. Following this discovery, an assessment was conducted to determine the quantity of plutonium present in the pipe. This site has been identified as Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 547, Miscellaneous Contaminated Waste Sites. The quantity of plutonium identified at CAU 547 exceeded the Hazard Category 3 threshold but was below the Hazard Category 2 threshold specified in DOE Standard DOE-STD-1027-92. This CAU, therefore, was initially categorized as a Hazard Category 3 environmental restoration site. A contaminated facility or site that is initially categorized as Hazard Category 3, however, may be downgraded to below Hazard Category 3 if it can be demonstrated through further analysis that the form of the material and the energy available for release support reducing the hazard category. This is an important consideration when performing hazard categorization of environmental restoration sites because energy sources available for release of material are generally fewer at an environmental restoration site than at an operating facility and environmental restoration activities may result in the complete removal of source material.

  19. Addendum to the Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 372: Area 20 Cabriolet/Palanquin Unit Craters Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews and Christy Sloop

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document constitutes an addendum to the Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 372: Area 20 Cabriolet/Palanquin Unit Craters, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Revision 0), April 2011.

  20. Energy Development in Island Nations (EDIN), Partnering to Increase Island Energy Security Around the World (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet provides an overview of the international partnership for Energy Development in Island nations, including mission, goals, and organization. It also includes background on EDIN's three pilot projects: U.S. Virgin Islands, Iceland-Dominica Collaboration, and New Zealand-Geothermal Potential in the Pacific.

  1. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WASTE PROCESSING ANNUAL TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bush, S

    2008-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Office of Environmental Management's (EM) Roadmap, U.S. Department of Energy--Office of Environmental Management Engineering & Technology Roadmap (Roadmap), defines the Department's intent to reduce the technical risk and uncertainty in its cleanup programs. The unique nature of many of the remaining facilities will require a strong and responsive engineering and technology program to improve worker and public safety, and reduce costs and environmental impacts while completing the cleanup program. The technical risks and uncertainties associated with cleanup program were identified through: (1) project risk assessments, (2) programmatic external technical reviews and technology readiness assessments, and (3) direct site input. In order to address these needs, the technical risks and uncertainties were compiled and divided into the program areas of: Waste Processing, Groundwater and Soil Remediation, and Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D). Strategic initiatives were then developed within each program area to address the technical risks and uncertainties in that program area. These strategic initiatives were subsequently incorporated into the Roadmap, where they form the strategic framework of the EM Engineering & Technology Program. The EM-21 Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) supports the goals and objectives of the Roadmap by providing direction for technology enhancement, development, and demonstrations that will lead to a reduction of technical uncertainties in EM waste processing activities. The current MYPP summarizes the strategic initiatives and the scope of the activities within each initiative that are proposed for the next five years (FY2008-2012) to improve safety and reduce costs and environmental impacts associated with waste processing; authorized budget levels will impact how much of the scope of activities can be executed, on a year-to-year basis. As a result of the importance of reducing technical risk and uncertainty in the EM Waste Processing programs, EM-21 has focused considerable effort on identifying the key areas of risk in the Waste Processing programs. The resulting summary of technical risks and needs was captured in the Roadmap. The Roadmap identifies key Waste Processing initiative areas where technology development work should be focused. These areas are listed below, along with the Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) designation given to each initiative area. The WBS designations will be used throughout this document.

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: Jawaharlal Nehru Solar National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jawaharlal Nehru Solar National Solar Energy Mission Solar Energy Research Institute for India and the United States Kick-Off On November 27, 2012, in Concentrating Solar Power,...

  3. The Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) was initiated in 1974 to identify, investigate, and clean up or control sites throughout the United States that were part of the Nation's early atomic weapons and energy programs during the 1940

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    , investigate, and clean up or control sites throughout the United States that were part of the Nation's early atomic weapons and energy programs during the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s. Activities at the sites were performed by the Manhattan Engineer District or under the Atomic Energy Commission. Both were predecessors

  4. Alexandria fluidized-bed process development unit: cold-mode testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the current test program include: validation of predictions from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Coal Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustor System Model; experimental studies supporting AFBC process developments; and the collection of transient data for process control design. This topical report summarizes results from cold mode testing, i.e., experiments performed without combustion for MIT Model verification. During these tests, sulfated limestone (generated from normal AFBC operations) was fluidized with air at temperatures ranging from 80 to 500/sup 0/F in the 3' x 3' (nominal) size PDU at Alexandria, VA. The MIT Model predictions tested include: slumped bed height, minimum fluidization velocity, and expanded bed height. In all cases, there were large discrepancies between the Model predictions and corresponding experimental results. Other results obtained included solids size distribution and particle size profiles in the bed. Size distribution was adequately modeled by the Rosin-Rammler equation. No transient process data was collected due to hardware problems with the Data Acquisition System. Tests were also performed to determine the effect of maldistribution of air, caused by leaks in the air distributor, on experimental results. The data indicated that effects of these leaks seemed to be undetectable.

  5. Waste Management Plan for the Remedial Investigation of Waste Area Grouping 10, Operable Unit 3, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Waste Management Plan (WMP) supplements the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Project WMP and defines the criteria and methods to be used for managing and characterizing waste generated during activities associated with the RI of 23 wells near the Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF). These wells are within the Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5 area of contamination (AOC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Field activities for the limited RI of Operable Unit (OU) 3 of WAG 10 will involve sampling and measurement of various environmental media (e.g., liquids and gases). Many of these activities will occur in areas known to be contaminated with radioactive materials or hazardous chemical substances, and it is anticipated that contaminated solid and liquid wastes and noncontaminated wastes will be generated as a result of these activities. On a project-wide basis, handling of these waste materials will be accomplished in accordance with the RI/FS Project WMP and the procedures referenced throughout the plan.

  6. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 575: Area 15 Miscellaneous Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Patrick

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 575, Area 15 Miscellaneous Sites, identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). CAU 575 comprises the following four corrective action sites (CASs) located in Area 15 of the Nevada National Security Site: 15-19-02, Waste Burial Pit 15-30-01, Surface Features at Borehole Sites 15-64-01, Decontamination Area 15-99-03, Aggregate Plant This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing each CAS. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 575 using the SAFER process. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a field investigation to document and verify the adequacy of existing information, to affirm the predicted corrective action decisions, and to provide sufficient data to implement the corrective actions. This will be presented in a closure report that will be prepared and submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) for review and approval.

  7. The design and development of an environmental surveillance network at Argonne National Laboratory-West

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tharakan, Binesh Korah

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ). An environmental surveillance program represents half of the facility's EMP. The other half is an effluent monitoring program. Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) is a DOE facility which does not currently have an environmental surveillance program...

  8. Mountain lion use of an area of high recreational development in Big Bend National Park, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruth, Toni Karen

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    /Site Restrictions and Closures Habitat/Site Alterations. . . . . . . . . . . . Protocol for Incidents of Attack or Depredation. 113 113 120 128 135 141 147 150 Recommendations f or Management. . . . . . . . . Education of Visitors and Residents... subadults should be considered high risk. Alternative management actions for reducing risk to visitors were identified and evaluated. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS This study was cooperatively funded by Big Bend National Park (BIBE), Texas; The National Park Service...

  9. Second United Nations International Conference

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementingnpitcheResearchPhysicsDepartment of Energy

  10. Second United Nations International Conference

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementingnpitcheResearchPhysicsDepartment of EnergyConfidential until

  11. Second United Nations International Conference

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementingnpitcheResearchPhysicsDepartment of EnergyConfidential

  12. United Nations | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, IndianaTurtleCooperative Place: Beaver Dam,Population

  13. S. 2166: A bill to reduce the Nation's dependence on imported oil, to provide for the energy security of the Nation, and for other purposes, introduced in the United States Senate, One Hundred Second Congress, Second Session, January 29, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This bill, also referred to as the National Energy Security Act of 1992, contains the following: Title I - Findings and purposes: Goals, least-cost energy strategy, and Director of climate protection: Title II - Definitions; Title III (none); Title IV - Fleets and alternative fuels: Alternative fuel fleets, Electric and electric-hybrid vehicle demonstration, infrastructure development, and conforming amendments, Alternative fuels, Mass transit and training; Title V - Renewable energy: CORECT and COEECT, Renewable energy initiatives, Hydropower; Title VI - Energy efficiency: Industrial, commercial, and residential, Federal energy management, Utilities, State, local, insular, and tribal energy assistance, LIHEAP options pilot program; Title VII (none); Title VIII - Advanced nuclear reactor commercialization; Title IX - Nuclear reactor licensing; Title X - Uranium: Uranium enrichment, Uranium; Title XI - Natural gas; Title XII - Outer continental shelf; Title XIII - Research, development, demonstration and commercialization activities; Title XIV - Coal, coal technology, and electricity; Title XV - Public Utility Holding Company Act reform; Title XVI - Strategic Petroleum Reserve.

  14. Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology: A Summary Report of Activities Completed at the National Center for Hydrogen Technology - Year 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmes, Michael

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) located in Grand Forks, North Dakota, has operated the National Center for Hydrogen Technology? (NCHT?) since 2005 under a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The EERC has a long history of hydrogen generation and utilization from fossil fuels, and under the NCHT Program, the EERC has accelerated its research on hydrogen generation and utilization topics. Since the NCHT?s inception, the EERC has received more than $65 million in funding for hydrogen-related projects ($24 million for projects in the NCHT, which includes federal and corporate partner development funds) involving more than 85 partners (27 with the NCHT). The NCHT Program?s nine activities span a broad range of technologies that align well with the Advanced Fuels Program goals and, specifically, those described in the Hydrogen from Coal Program research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) plan that refers to realistic testing of technologies at adequate scale, process intensification, and contaminant control. A number of projects have been completed that range from technical feasibility of several hydrogen generation and utilization technologies to public and technical education and outreach tools. Projects under the NCHT have produced hydrogen from natural gas, coal, liquid hydrocarbons, and biomass. The hydrogen or syngas generated by these processes has also been purified in many of these instances or burned directly for power generation. Also, several activities are still undergoing research, development, demonstration, and commercialization at the NCHT. This report provides a summary overview of the projects completed in Year 6 of the NCHT. Individual activity reports are referenced as a source of detailed information on each activity.

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF A NATIONAL CENTER FOR HYDROGEN TECHNOLOGY: A SUMMARY REPORT OF ACTIVITIES COMPLETED AT THE NATIONAL CENTER FOR HYDROGEN TECHNOLOGY FROM 2005 TO 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Holmes

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) located in Grand Forks, North Dakota, has operated the National Center for Hydrogen Technology® (NCHT®) since 2005 under a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy??s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The EERC has a long history of hydrogen generation and utilization from fossil fuels, and under the NCHT Program, the EERC has accelerated its research of hydrogen generation and utilization topics. Since the NCHT??s inception, the EERC has received more than $65 million in funding of hydrogen-related projects ($20 million for the NCHT project which includes federal and corporate development partner funds) involving more than 85 partners (27 with the NCHT). The NCHT project??s 19 activities span a broad range of technologies that align well with the Advanced Fuels Program goals and, specifically, those described in the Hydrogen from Coal Program research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) plan. A number of projects have been completed which range from technical feasibility of several hydrogen generation and utilization technologies to public and technical education and outreach tools. Projects under the NCHT have produced hydrogen from natural gas, coal, liquid hydrocarbons, and biomass. The hydrogen or syngas generated by these processes has also been purified to transportation-grade quality in many of these instances or burned directly for power generation. Also, several activities are still undergoing research, development, demonstration, and commercialization at the NCHT. This report provides a summary overview of the projects completed in the first 5 years of the NCHT. Individual activity reports are referenced as a source of detailed information on each activity.

  16. Developing the Sandia National Laboratories transportation infrastructure for isotope products and wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trennel, A.J.

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) plans to establish a medical isotope project that would ensure a reliable domestic supply of molybdenum-99 ({sup 99}Mo) and related medical isotopes (Iodine-125, Iodine-131, and Xenon-133). The Department`s plan for production will modify the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) and associated hot cell facility at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)/New Mexico and the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Transportation activities associated with such production is discussed.

  17. New hardware, software boost unit performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hardware and software developed by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) over the last several years can help utilities monitor the performance of fossil-fired powerplants, diagnose and correct operating problems, and detect equipment degradation at an early stage. These products, 19 in all, have been combined at Potomac Electric Power Co's (Pepco) Morgantown Unit 2 to form an integrated performance monitoring system that has already reduced heat rate by 100 Btu/kWh on a unit that historically has been one of the better-performing plants in the nation. Maintenance planning and unit capacity have improved as well. Additional benefits also are likely, according to EPRI.

  18. National Environmental Research Institute Ministry of the Environment . Denmark

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inventories Denmark's National Inventory Report 2005 Submitted under the United Nations Framework Convention Research Institute Ministry of the Environment . Denmark Emission Inventories Denmark's National Inventory's National Inventory Report 2005 - Submitted under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change

  19. Earthquake risk reduction in the United States: An assessment of selected user needs and recommendations for the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This Assessment was conducted to improve the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP) by providing NEHRP agencies with information that supports their user-oriented setting of crosscutting priorities in the NEHRP strategic planning process. The primary objective of this Assessment was to take a ``snapshot`` evaluation of the needs of selected users throughout the major program elements of NEHRP. Secondary objectives were to conduct an assessment of the knowledge that exists (or is being developed by NEHRP) to support earthquake risk reduction, and to begin a process of evaluating how NEHRP is meeting user needs. An identification of NEHRP`s strengths also resulted from the effort, since those strengths demonstrate successful methods that may be useful to NEHRP in the future. These strengths are identified in the text, and many of them represent important achievements since the Earthquake Hazards Reduction Act was passed in 1977.

  20. A comparison of dose and dose-rate conversion factors from the Soviet Union, United Kingdom, US Department of Energy, and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Fusion Safety Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rood, A.S.; Abbott, M.L.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several independent data sets of radiological dose and dose-rate conversion factors (DCF/DRCF) have been tabulated or developed by the international community both for fission and fusion safety purposes. This report compares sets from the US Department of Energy, the Soviet Union, and the United Kingdom with those calculated by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Fusion Safety Program. The objectives were to identify trends and potential outlying values for specific radionuclides and contribute to a future benchmark evaluation of the CARR computer code. Fifty-year committed effective dose equivalent factors were compared for the inhalation and ingestion pathways. External effective dose equivalent rates were compared for the air immersion and ground surface exposure pathways. Comparisons were made by dividing dose factors in the different data bases by the values in the FSP data base. Differences in DCF/DRCF values less than a factor of 2 were considered to be in good agreement and are likely due to the use of slightly different decay data, variations in the number of organs considered for calculating CEDE, and rounding errors. DCF/DRCF values that differed by greater than a factor of 10 were considered to be significant. These differences are attributed primarily to the use of different radionuclide decay data, selection and nomenclature for different isomeric states, treatment of progeny radionuclides, differences in calculational methodology, and assumptions on a radionuclide's chemical form.

  1. A comparison of dose and dose-rate conversion factors from the Soviet Union, United Kingdom, US Department of Energy, and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Fusion Safety Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rood, A.S.; Abbott, M.L.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several independent data sets of radiological dose and dose-rate conversion factors (DCF/DRCF) have been tabulated or developed by the international community both for fission and fusion safety purposes. This report compares sets from the US Department of Energy, the Soviet Union, and the United Kingdom with those calculated by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Fusion Safety Program. The objectives were to identify trends and potential outlying values for specific radionuclides and contribute to a future benchmark evaluation of the CARR computer code. Fifty-year committed effective dose equivalent factors were compared for the inhalation and ingestion pathways. External effective dose equivalent rates were compared for the air immersion and ground surface exposure pathways. Comparisons were made by dividing dose factors in the different data bases by the values in the FSP data base. Differences in DCF/DRCF values less than a factor of 2 were considered to be in good agreement and are likely due to the use of slightly different decay data, variations in the number of organs considered for calculating CEDE, and rounding errors. DCF/DRCF values that differed by greater than a factor of 10 were considered to be significant. These differences are attributed primarily to the use of different radionuclide decay data, selection and nomenclature for different isomeric states, treatment of progeny radionuclides, differences in calculational methodology, and assumptions on a radionuclide`s chemical form.

  2. Assessment of the National Wind Coordinating Collaborative: Addressing Environmental and Siting Issues Associated with Wind Energy Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Cleve, Frances B.; States, Jennifer C.

    2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Wind Coordinating Collaborative (NWCC) is a consensus-based stakeholder group comprised of representatives from the utility, wind industry, environmental, consumer, regulatory, power marketer, agricultural, tribal, economic development, and state and federal government sectors. The purpose of the NWCC is to support the development of an environmentally, economically, and politically sustainable commercial market for wind power (NWCC 2010). The NWCC has been funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) since its inception in 1994. In order to evaluate the impact of the work of the NWCC and how this work aligns with DOEs strategic priorities, DOE tasked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to conduct a series of informal interviews with a small sample of those involved with NWCC.

  3. Idaho National Laboratory Ten-year Site Plan (2012 through 2021) -- DOE-NE's National Nuclear Capability -- Developing and Maintaining the INL Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cal Ozaki

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To meet long-term objectives to transform the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), we are providing an integrated, long-term vision of infrastructure requirements that support research, development and demonstration (RD&D) goals outlined in the DOE strategic plans, including the NE Roadmap and reports such as Facilities for the Future of Nuclear Energy Research: A Twenty-year Outlook. The goal of the INL Ten-year Site Plan (TYSP) is to clearly link RD&D mission goals and INL core capabilities with infrastructure requirements (single and multi-program), establish the 10-year end-state vision for INL complexes, identify and prioritize infrastructure and capability gaps, as well as the most efficient and economic approaches to closing those gaps.

  4. Skill development among student affairs professionals in the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators Region III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberts, Darby Michelle

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Student affairs practitioners develop a variety of skills in order to serve students and the institutions in which they work. This research study used a newly developed instrument to assess the perceived performance of a variety of skills...

  5. Application of Advanced Exploration Technologies for the Development of Mancos Formation Oil Reservoirs, Jicarilla Apache Indian Nation, San Juan Basin, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reeves, Scott; Billingsley, Randy

    2002-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project are to: (1) develop an exploration rationale for the Mancos shale in the north-eastern San Juan basin; (2) assess the regional prospectivity of the Mancos in the northern Nation lands based on that rationale; (3) identify specific leads in the northern Nation as appropriate; (4) forecast pro-forma production, reserves and economics for any leads identified; and (5) package and disseminate the results to attract investment in Mancos development on the Nation lands.

  6. OFFICE OF ELECTRICITY DELIVERY AND ENERGY RELIABILITY (OE) NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY (NETL) AMERICAN RECOVERY AND REINVESTMENT ACT 2009 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Mohit; Grape, Ulrik

    2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project was for Seeo to deliver the first ever large-scale or grid-scale prototype of a new class of advanced lithium-ion rechargeable batteries. The technology combines unprecedented energy density, lifetime, safety, and cost. The goal was to demonstrate Seeos entirely new class of lithium-based batteries based on Seeos proprietary nanostructured polymer electrolyte. This technology can enable the widespread deployment in Smart Grid applications and was demonstrated through the development and testing of a 10 kilowatt-hour (kWh) prototype battery system. This development effort, supported by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) enabled Seeo to pursue and validate the transformational performance advantages of its technology for use in grid-tied energy storage applications. The focus of this project and Seeos goal as demonstrated through the efforts made under this project is to address the utility market needs for energy storage systems applications, especially for residential and commercial customers tied to solar photovoltaic installations. In addition to grid energy storage opportunities Seeos technology has been tested with automotive drive cycles and is seen as equally applicable for battery packs for electric vehicles. The goals of the project were outlined and achieved through a series of specific tasks, which encompassed materials development, scaling up of cells, demonstrating the performance of the cells, designing, building and demonstrating a pack prototype, and providing an economic and environmental assessment. Nearly all of the tasks were achieved over the duration of the program, with only the full demonstration of the battery system and a complete economic and environmental analysis not able to be fully completed. A timeline over the duration of the program is shown in figure 1.

  7. Joint U.S./Russian Study on the Development of a Preliminary Cost Estimate of the SAFSTOR Decommissioning Alternative for the Leningrad Nuclear Power Plant Unit #1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SM Garrett

    1998-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the two joint Russian/U.S. Leningrad Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) Unit #1 studies were the development of a safe, technically feasible, economically acceptable decom missioning strategy, and the preliminary cost evaluation of the developed strategy. The first study, resulting in the decommissioning strategy, was performed in 1996 and 1997. The preliminary cost estimation study, described in this report, was performed in 1997 and 1998. The decommissioning strategy study included the analyses of three basic RBM.K decommission- ing alternatives, refined for the Leningrad NPP Unit #1. The analyses included analysis of the requirements for the planning and preparation as well as the decommissioning phases.

  8. Sandia National Laboratories: SRAO

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the United States Conceptual Framework for Developing Resilience Metrics for the Electricity, Oil, and Gas Sectors in the United States View all EC Publications Related Topics...

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the United States Conceptual Framework for Developing Resilience Metrics for the Electricity, Oil, and Gas Sectors in the United States View all EC Publications Related Topics...

  10. Sandia National Laboratories: NSTTF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Events, Partnership, Renewable Energy, Solar, Solar Newsletter SolarReserve is testing engineering units at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) operated by Sandia....

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: solar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gas Sectors in the United States View all EC Publications Related Topics Concentrating Solar Power CRF CSP EFRC Energy Energy Efficiency Energy Security National Solar Thermal...

  12. National mission on biodiesel: a study of science, development and policy processes in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hirvonen, Maija

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biofuel has caught the imagination of countries worldwide as a tool for providing energy security, advancing rural development, promoting environmental sustainability, mitigating climate change, and enhancing international ...

  13. Report on Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) at the DOE National Laboratories

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR -Department of Energyasto| DepartmentDepartment of

  14. Sandia Energy - WEC-Sim Code Development Meeting at the National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol Home DistributionTransportation Safety Home StationaryUpper RioVideosRenewable

  15. JEDI: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) (Fact Sheet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 Investigation PeerNOON 2004 February 12, 2004 ¢CJEDI: Jobs

  16. Laboratory Directed Research & Development Page National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 - -/e),,s -LabgrantsLabperformance

  17. NETL-Developed Process for Capturing CO2 Emissions Wins National Award for

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015of 2005 attheMohammed Khan - TechnologyJanuary 29,guidance onEnergy

  18. Los Alamos National Laboratory, LANS develop new mentor-protégé

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is YourAwardspublic Environmental data now viewable by

  19. The Development of a Virtual Science Museum for the Public Understanding of Science in Eastern China and in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delello, Julie A.

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    of historical documents, this descriptive dissertation presents a research project that explores a dimension of the development of the Giant Panda Exhibit. This study takes the reader on a journey, first to China and then to a classroom within the United States...

  20. The Center for Water-Energy Efficiency is a not-for-profit research and development unit at the University of California, Davis, leading innovations in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    The Center for Water-Energy Efficiency is a not-for-profit research and development unit at the University of California, Davis, leading innovations in water and energy efficient technologies and policies between water and energy and to use and allocate both more efficiently. Collaborating with partners

  1. Development of a Laboratory Verified Single-Duct VAV System Model with Fan Powered Terminal Units Optimized Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Michael A.

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    the static pressure drop as air passed through the unit over the full operating range of the FPTU. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of typical a FPTU were developed and used to investigate opportunities for optimizing the design of FPTUs. The CFD...

  2. Scale-up of mild gasification to be a process development unit mildgas 24 ton/day PDU design report. Final report, November 1991--July 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From November 1991 to April 1996, Kerr McGee Coal Corporation (K-M Coal) led a project to develop the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) Mild Gasification (MILDGAS) process for near-term commercialization. The specific objectives of the program were to: design, construct, and operate a 24-tons/day adiabatic process development unit (PDU) to obtain process performance data suitable for further design scale-up; obtain large batches of coal-derived co-products for industrial evaluation; prepare a detailed design of a demonstration unit; and develop technical and economic plans for commercialization of the MILDGAS process. The project team for the PDU development program consisted of: K-M Coal, IGT, Bechtel Corporation, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC), General Motors (GM), Pellet Technology Corporation (PTC), LTV Steel, Armco Steel, Reilly Industries, and Auto Research.

  3. Utility of the US National Ignition Facility for development of inertial fusion energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logan, B.G.; Anderson, A.T.; Tobin, M.T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Schrock, V.E. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States); Meier, W.R. [Schafer (W.J.) Associates, Inc., Livermore, CA (United States); Bangerter, R.O. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Tokheim, R.E. [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States). Poulter Lab.; Abdou, M.A. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States); Schultz, K.R. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The demonstration of inertial fusion ignition and gain in the proposed US National Ignition Facility (NIF), along with the parallel demonstration of the feasibility of an efficient, high-repetition-rate driver, would provide the basis for a follow-on Engineering Test Facility (ETF), a facility for integrated testing of the technologies needed for inertial fusion-energy (IFE) power plants. A workshop was convened at the University of California, Berkeley on February 22--24, 1994, attended by 61 participants from 17 US organizations, to identify possible NIF experiments relevant to IFE. We considered experiments in four IFE areas: Target physics, target chamber dynamics, fusion power ethnology, and target systems, as defined in the following sections.

  4. X-ray area backlighter development at the National Ignition Facility (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrios, M. A., E-mail: barriosgarci1@llnl.gov; Fournier, K. B.; Smith, R.; Lazicki, A.; Rygg, R.; Fratanduono, D. E.; Eggert, J.; Park, H.-S.; Huntington, C.; Bradley, D. K.; Landen, O. L.; Collins, G. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Regan, S. P.; Epstein, R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    1D spectral imaging was used to characterize the K-shell emission of Z ? 3035 and Z ? 4042 laser-irradiated foils at the National Ignition Facility. Foils were driven with up to 60 kJ of 3? light, reaching laser irradiances on target between 0.5 and 20 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. Laser-to-X-ray conversion efficiency (CE) into the He{sub ?} line (plus satellite emission) of 1.0%1.5% and 0.15%0.2% was measured for Z ? 3032 and Z ? 4042, respectively. Measured CE into He{sub ?} (plus satellite emission) of Br (Z = 35) compound foils (either KBr or RbBr) ranged between 0.16% and 0.29%. Measured spectra are compared with 1D non-local thermodynamic equilibrium atomic kinetic and radiation transport simulations, providing a fast and accurate predictive capability.

  5. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Next-Generation Safeguards Initiative: Human Capital Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilligan, Kimberly [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2007, the US Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) Office of Nonproliferation and International Security (NA-24) completed a comprehensive review of the current and potential future challenges facing the international safeguards system. The review examined trends and events that have an effect on the mission of international safeguards; the implications of expanding and evolving mission requirements of the legal authorities and institutions that serve as the foundation of the international safeguards system; and the technological, financial, and human resources required for effective safeguards implementation. The reviews findings and recommendations were summarized in the report International Safeguards: Challenges and Opportunities for the 21st Century (October 2007).1 The executive summary is available at the following link: http://nnsa.energy.gov/sites/default/files/nnsa/inlinefiles/NGSI_Report.pdf.

  6. Making the national farmer : progressive educational reforms and transformation of rural society in the United States (1902-1918) and Japan (1920-1945)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabian, Rika

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is the Ravenna township in Portage County, where the localthe nation. At the Portage County Improvement Association,appointed County Agents in Portage County, for example,

  7. Developing the Sandia National Laboratories transportation infrastructure for isotope products and wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trennel, A.J.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Certain radioactive isotopes for North American and especially the United States` needs are enormously important to the medical community and their numerous patients. The most important medical isotope is {sup 99}Mo, which is currently manufactured by Nordion International Inc. in a single, aging reactor operated by Atomic Energy of Canada, Ltd. The reactor`s useful life is expected to end at the turn of the century. Production loss because of reactor shutdown possibilities prompted the US Congress to direct the DOE to provide for a US backup source for this crucial isotope. The SNL Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) was evaluated as a site to provide {sup 99}Mo initially and other isotopes that can be economically extracted from the process. Medical isotope production at SNL is a new venture in manufacturing. Should SNL be selected and the project reach the manufacturing stage, SNL would expect to service up to 30% of the US market under normal circumstances as a backup to the Canadian supply with the capability to service 100% should the need arise. The demand for {sup 99}Mo increases each year; hence, the proposed action accommodates growth in demand to meet this increase. The proposed project would guarantee the supply of medical isotopes would continue if either the irradiation or processing activities in Canada were interrupted.

  8. The Development of a Human Systems Simulation Laboratory at Idaho National Laoboratory: Progress, Requirements and Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David I Gertman; Katya L. LeBlanc; William phoenix; Alan R Mecham

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Next generation nuclear power plants and digital upgrades to the existing nuclear fleet introduce potential human performance issues in the control room. Safe application of new technologies calls for a thorough understanding of how those technologies affect human performance and in turn, plant safety. In support of advancing human factors for small modular reactors and light water reactor sustainability, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed a reconfigurable simulation laboratory capable of testing human performance in multiple nuclear power plant (NPP) control room simulations. This paper discusses the laboratory infrastructure and capabilities, the laboratory s staffing requirements, lessons learned, and the researchers approach to measuring human performance in the simulation lab.

  9. Boosting Accuracy of Testing Multijunction Solar Cells (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights in Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccess Stories Site MapSolarAbout Neutrinos Generalhas developed a

  10. Low-rank coal study: national needs for resource development. Volume 3. Technology evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technologies applicable to the development and use of low-rank coals are analyzed in order to identify specific needs for research, development, and demonstration (RD and D). Major sections of the report address the following technologies: extraction; transportation; preparation, handling and storage; conventional combustion and environmental control technology; gasification; liquefaction; and pyrolysis. Each of these sections contains an introduction and summary of the key issues with regard to subbituminous coal and lignite; description of all relevant technology, both existing and under development; a description of related environmental control technology; an evaluation of the effects of low-rank coal properties on the technology; and summaries of current commercial status of the technology and/or current RD and D projects relevant to low-rank coals.

  11. Uranium in granites from the southwestern United States: actinide parent-daughter systems, sites and mobilization. Second year report. National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silver, L.T.; Woodhead, J.A.; Williams, I.S.; Chappell, B.W.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of detailed field and laboratory studies are reported on the primary distribution of uranium (and thorium and lead) in the radioactive minerals of five radioactive granite bodies in Arizona and California. This distribution was examined in a granite pluton. Granites with uranium concentrations ranging from 4 to 47 ppM, thorium concentrations from 11 to 181 ppM, and Th/U ratios of 0.6 to 16.0 were compared. Evidence for secondary mobilization, migration, fixation and/or loss of uranium, thorium and radiogenic leads was explored. Uranium distribution in radioactive granites is hosted in a far greater diversity of sites than has previously been known. Uranium and thorium distribution in primary minerals of granites is almost entirely a disequilibrium product involving local fractionation processes during magmatic crystallization. Every radioactive granite studied contains minerals that contain uranium and/or thorium as major stoichiometric components. When the granites are subject to secondary geochemical events and processes, the behavior of uranium is determined by the stability fields of the different radioactive minerals in the rocks. The two most powerful tools for evaluating uranium migration in a granite are (a) isotope dilution mass spectrometry and (b) the electron microprobe. Uranium mobilization and loss is a common feature in radioactive granites of the southwestern United States. A model for the evaluation of uranium loss from granites has been developed. The mineral zircon can be used as an independent indicator of uranium and thorium endowment. The weathering products show surprising differences in the response of different granites in arid region settings. Significant losses of primary uranium (up to 70%) has been a common occurrence. Uranium, thorium and radiogenic lead exist in labile (movable) form on surfaces of cleavages, fractures and grain boundaries in granites.

  12. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) develop a new complex modeling and analysis tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and analysis tool capable of analyzing floating platform concepts for offshore wind turbines. The new modeling tool combines the computational methodologies used to analyze land-based wind turbines dynamic simulation tool will enable the development of cost-effective offshore technologies capable

  13. Argonne National Laboratory Annual Report of Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities for FY 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1995-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The purposes of Argonne's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel concepts, enhance the Laboratory's R and D capabilities, and further the development of its strategic initiatives. Projects are selected from proposals for creative and innovative R and D studies which are not yet eligible for timely support through normal programmatic channels. Among the aims of the projects supported by the Program are establishment of engineering proof-of-principle; assessment of design feasibility for prospective facilities; development of an instrumental prototype, method, or system; or discovery in fundamental science. Several of these projects are closely associated with major strategic thrusts of the Laboratory as described in Argonne's Five-Year Institutional Plan, although the scientific implications of the achieved results extend well beyond Laboratory plans and objectives. The projects supported by the Program are distributed across the major programmatic areas at Argonne as indicated in the Laboratory's LDRD Plan for FY 1994. Project summaries of research in the following areas are included: (1) Advanced Accelerator and Detector Technology; (2) X-ray Techniques for Research in Biological and Physical Science; (3) Nuclear Technology; (4) Materials Science and Technology; (5) Computational Science and Technology; (6) Biological Sciences; (7) Environmental Sciences: (8) Environmental Control and Waste Management Technology; and (9) Novel Concepts in Other Areas.

  14. Argonne National Laboratory: Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 1993 program activities. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1993-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The purposes of Argonne`s Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel concepts, enhance the Laboratory`s R&D capabilities, and further the development of its strategic initiatives. Projects are selected from proposals for creative and innovative R&D studies which are not yet eligible for timely support through normal programmatic channels. Among the aims of the projects supported by the Program are establishment of engineering ``proof-of-principle`` assessment of design feasibility for prospective facilities; development of an instrumental prototype, method, or system; or discovery in fundamental science. Several of these projects are closely associated with major strategic thrusts of the Laboratory as described in Argonne`s Five Year Institutional Plan, although the scientific implications of the achieved results extend well beyond Laboratory plans and objectives. The projects supported by the Program are distributed across the major programmatic areas at Argonne as indicated in the Laboratory LDRD Plan for FY 1993.

  15. Leadership development study :success profile competencies and high-performing leaders at Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, Katherine M.; Mulligan, Deborah Rae; Szenasi, Gail L.; Crowder, Stephen Vernon

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia is undergoing tremendous change. Sandia's executive management recognized the need for leadership development. About ten years ago the Business, Leadership, and Management Development department in partnership with executive management developed and implemented the organizational leadership Success Profile Competencies to help address some of the changes on the horizon such as workforce losses and lack of a skill set in the area of interpersonal skills. This study addresses the need for the Business, Leadership, and Management Development department to provide statistically sound data in two areas. One is to demonstrate that the organizational 360-degree success profile assessment tool has made a difference for leaders. A second area is to demonstrate the presence of high performing leaders at the Labs. The study utilized two tools to address these two areas. Study participants were made up of individuals who have solid data on Sandia's 360-degree success profile assessment tool. The second assessment tool was comprised of those leaders who participated in the Lockheed Martin Corporation Employee Preferences Survey. Statistical data supports the connection between leader indicators and the 360-degree assessment tool. The study also indicates the presence of high performing leaders at Sandia.

  16. Sandia National Laboratories: solar thermal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the United States Conceptual Framework for Developing Resilience Metrics for the Electricity, Oil, and Gas Sectors in the United States Conceptual Framework for Developing...

  17. SOME RECENT TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENTS FROM THE UK'S NATIONAL NUCLEAR LABORATORY TO ENABLE HAZARD CHARACTERISATION FOR NUCLEAR DECOMMISSIONING APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farfan, E.; Foley, T.

    2010-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Under its programme of self investment Internal Research and Development (IR&D), the UK's National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) is addressing the requirement for development in technology to enable hazard characterisation for nuclear decommissioning applications. Three such examples are described here: (1) RadBall developed by the NNL (patent pending) is a deployable baseball-sized radiation mapping device which can, from a single location, locate and quantify radiation hazards. RadBall offers a means to collect information regarding the magnitude and distribution of radiation in a given cell, glovebox or room to support the development of a safe, cost effective decontamination strategy. RadBall requires no electrical supplies and is relatively small, making it easy to be deployed and used to map radiation hazards in hard to reach areas. Recent work conducted in partnership with the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is presented. (2) HiRAD (patent pending) has been developed by the NNL in partnership with Tracerco Ltd (UK). HiRAD is a real-time, remotely deployed, radiation detection device designed to operate in elevated levels of radiation (i.e. thousands and tens of thousands of Gray) as seen in parts of the nuclear industry. Like the RadBall technology, the HiRAD system does not require any electrical components, the small dimensions and flexibility of the device allow it to be positioned in difficult to access areas (such as pipe work). HiRAD can be deployed as a single detector, a chain, or as an array giving the ability to monitor large process areas. Results during the development and deployment of the technology are presented. (3) Wireless Sensor Network is a NNL supported development project led by the University of Manchester (UK) in partnership with Oxford University (UK). The project is concerned with the development of wireless sensor network technology to enable the underwater deployment and communication of miniaturised probes allowing pond monitoring and mapping. The potential uses, within the nuclear sector alone, are both numerous and significant in terms of the proceeding effort to clean up the UK's nuclear waste legacy.

  18. National Energy Efficiency and Conservation Policies and Programs in Developed Countries and Middle East

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tyrer, C. F.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    policy agenda favours a better electricity infrastructure, bringing more and more wind power online and driving down prices for consumers? Modern electricity infrastructure?. ?Over the next 12 years, Europe must use the opportunity created... relatively low emissions per head mainly because much of its electricity comes from nuclear power, and its industries are some of the most energy efficient in the world. ? Innovative Industry and research and development: Japan is the world biggest...

  19. National Utility Rate Database: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ong, S.; McKeel, R.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When modeling solar energy technologies and other distributed energy systems, using high-quality expansive electricity rates is essential. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed a utility rate platform for entering, storing, updating, and accessing a large collection of utility rates from around the United States. This utility rate platform lives on the Open Energy Information (OpenEI) website, OpenEI.org, allowing the data to be programmatically accessed from a web browser, using an application programming interface (API). The semantic-based utility rate platform currently has record of 1,885 utility rates and covers over 85% of the electricity consumption in the United States.

  20. Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for the 92-Acre Area and Corrective Action Unit 111: Area 5 WMD Retired Mixed Waste Pits, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2010-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) has been prepared for the 92-Acre Area, the southeast quadrant of the Radioactive Waste Management Site, located in Area 5 of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The 92-Acre Area includes Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 111, 'Area 5 WMD Retired Mixed Waste Pits.' Data Quality Objectives (DQOs) were developed for the 92-Acre Area, which includes CAU 111. The result of the DQO process was that the 92-Acre Area is sufficiently characterized to provide the input data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives (CAAs) without the collection of additional data. The DQOs are included as Appendix A of this document. This CADD/CAP identifies and provides the rationale for the recommended CAA for the 92-Acre Area, provides the plan for implementing the CAA, and details the post-closure plan. When approved, this CADD/CAP will supersede the existing Pit 3 (P03) Closure Plan, which was developed in accordance with Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 265, 'Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities.' This document will also serve as the Closure Plan and the Post-Closure Plan, which are required by 40 CFR 265, for the 92-Acre Area. After closure activities are complete, a request for the modification of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit that governs waste management activities at the NNSS will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection to incorporate the requirements for post-closure monitoring. Four CAAs, ranging from No Further Action to Clean Closure, were evaluated for the 92-Acre Area. The CAAs were evaluated on technical merit focusing on performance, reliability, feasibility, safety, and cost. Based on the evaluation of the data used to develop the conceptual site model; a review of past, current, and future operations at the site; and the detailed and comparative analysis of the potential CAAs, Closure in Place with Administrative Controls is the preferred CAA for the 92-Acre Area. Closure activities will include the following: (1) Constructing an engineered evapotranspiration cover over the 92-Acre Area; (2) Installing use restriction (UR) warning signs, concrete monuments, and subsidence survey monuments; (3) Establishing vegetation on the cover; (4) Implementing a UR; and (5) Implementing post-closure inspections and monitoring. The Closure in Place with Administrative Controls alternative meets all requirements for the technical components evaluated, fulfills all applicable federal and state regulations for closure of the site, and will minimize potential future exposure pathways to the buried waste at the site.

  1. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 570: Area 9 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CAU 570 comprises the following six corrective action sites (CASs): 02-23-07, Atmospheric Test Site - Tesla 09-23-10, Atmospheric Test Site T-9 09-23-11, Atmospheric Test Site S-9G 09-23-14, Atmospheric Test Site - Rushmore 09-23-15, Eagle Contamination Area 09-99-01, Atmospheric Test Site B-9A These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 30, 2012, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 570. The site investigation process will also be conducted in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices to be applied to this activity. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 570 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose at sample locations to the dose-based final action level. The total effective dose will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed near the center of each sample location will be used to measure external radiological dose. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS.

  2. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 571: Area 9 Yucca Flat Plutonium Dispersion Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, Bernadine; Matthews, Patrick

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CAU 571 is a grouping of sites where there has been a suspected release of contamination associated with nuclear testing. This document describes the planned investigation of CAU 571, which comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): 09-23-03, Atmospheric Test Site S-9F 09-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site T9-C 09-23-12, Atmospheric Test Site S-9E 09-23-13, Atmospheric Test Site T-9D 09-45-01, Windrows Crater These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the investigation report. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on March 6, 2013, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (now the Nevada Field Office). The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 571. The site investigation process will also be conducted in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices to be applied to this activity. The potential contamination sources associated with CAU 571 CASs are from nuclear testing activities. The DQO process resulted in an assumption that total effective dose (TED) within a default contamination boundary exceeds the final action level (FAL) and requires corrective action. The presence and nature of contamination outside the default contamination boundaries at CAU 571 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the TED at sample locations to the dose-based FAL. The TED will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed at the center of each sample location will be used to measure external radiological dose. Chemical contamination will be evaluated by comparing soil sample results to the FAL. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS.

  3. EA-1958: Future Development in proximity to the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) evaluates U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities associated with proposed future development on the South Federal Campus of the DOE Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Site, in Benton County, Washington.

  4. DEVELOPING AN INTEGRATED NATIONAL STRATEGY FOR THE DISPOSITION OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelles, C.M.

    2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes the Department of Energy's (DOE's) current efforts to strengthen its activities for the management and disposition of DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel (SNF). In August 2002 an integrated, ''corporate project'' was initiated by the Office of Environmental Management (EM) to develop a fully integrated strategy for disposition of the approximately {approx}250,000 DOE SNF assemblies currently managed by EM. Through the course of preliminary design, the focus of this project rapidly evolved to become DOE-wide. It is supported by all DOE organizations involved in SNF management, and represents a marked change in the way DOE conducts its business. This paper provides an overview of the Corporate Project for Integrated/Risk-Driven Disposition of SNF (Corporate SNF Project), including a description of its purpose, scope and deliverables. It also summarizes the results of the integrated project team's (IPT's) conceptual design efforts, including the identification of project/system requirements and alternatives. Finally, this paper highlights the schedule of the corporate project, and its progress towards development of a DOE corporate strategy for SNF disposition.

  5. Leveraging Regional Exploration to Develop Geologic Framework for CO2 Storage in Deep Formations in Midwestern United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neeraj Gupta

    2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Obtaining subsurface data for developing a regional framework for geologic storage of CO{sub 2} can require drilling and characterization in a large number of deep wells, especially in areas with limited pre-existing data. One approach for achieving this objective, without the prohibitive costs of drilling costly standalone test wells, is to collaborate with the oil and gas drilling efforts in a piggyback approach that can provide substantial cost savings and help fill data gaps in areas that may not otherwise get characterized. This leveraging with oil/gas drilling also mitigates some of the risk involved in standalone wells. This collaborative approach has been used for characterizing in a number of locations in the midwestern USA between 2005 and 2009 with funding from U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE award: DE-FC26-05NT42434) and in-kind contributions from a number of oil and gas operators. The results are presented in this final technical report. In addition to data collected under current award, selected data from related projects such as the Midwestern Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP), the Ohio River Valley CO{sub 2} storage project at and near the Mountaineer Plant, and the drilling of the Ohio Stratigraphic well in Eastern Ohio are discussed and used in the report. Data from this effort are also being incorporated into the MRCSP geologic mapping. The project activities were organized into tracking and evaluation of characterization opportunities; participation in the incremental drilling, basic and advanced logging in selected wells; and data analysis and reporting. Although a large number of opportunities were identified and evaluated, only a small subset was carried into the field stage. Typical selection factors included reaching an acceptable agreement with the operator, drilling and logging risks, and extent of pre-existing data near the candidate wells. The region of study is primarily along the Ohio River Valley corridor in the Appalachian Basin, which underlies large concentrations of CO{sub 2} emission sources. In addition, some wells in the Michigan basin are included. Assessment of the geologic and petrophysical properties of zones of interest has been conducted. Although a large number of formations have been evaluated across the geologic column, the primary focus has been on evaluating the Cambrian sandstones (Mt. Simon, Rose Run, Kerbel) and carbonates layers (Knox Dolomite) as well as on the Silurian-Devonian carbonates (Bass Island, Salina) and sandstones (Clinton, Oriskany, Berea). Factors controlling the development of porosity and permeability, such as the depositional setting have been explored. In northern Michigan the Bass Islands Dolomite appears to have favorable reservoir development. In west central Michigan the St. Peter sandstone exhibits excellent porosity in the Hart and Feuring well and looks promising. In Southeastern Kentucky in the Appalachian Basin, the Batten and Baird well provided valuable data on sequestration potential in organic shales through adsorption. In central and eastern Ohio and western West Virginia, the majority of the wells provided an insight to the complex geologic framework of the relatively little known Precambrian through Silurian potential injection targets. Although valuable data was acquired and a number of critical data gaps were filled through this effort, there are still many challenges ahead and questions that need answered. The lateral extent to which favorable potential injection conditions exist in most reservoirs is still generally uncertain. The prolongation of the characterization of regional geologic framework through partnership would continue to build confidence and greatly benefit the overall CO{sub 2} sequestration effort.

  6. Examining the Impact of Spatial Development Patterns on Regional Heat Island Effect in Metropolitan Regions of the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Heeju

    2013-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The urban heat island effect is considered one of the main causes of global warming and is contributing to increasing temperatures in the urban United States. This phenomenon enhances the intensity of summer heat waves and the risk to public health...

  7. Development of a waste dislodging and retrieval system for use in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory gunite tank

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randolph, J.D.; Lloyd, P.D.; Burks, B.L. [and others

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Gunite And Associated Tanks (GAAT) Treatability Study the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed a tank waste retrieval system capable of removing wastes varying from liquids to thick sludges. This system is also capable of scarifying concrete walls and floors. The GAAT Treatability Study is being conducted by the Department of Energy Oak Ridge Environmental Restoration Program. Much of the technology developed for this project was cosponsored by the DOE Office of Science and Technology through the Tanks Focus Area (TFA) and the Robotics Technology Development Program. The waste dislodging and conveyance (WD&C) system was developed jointly by ORNL and participants from the TFA. The WD&C system is comprised of a four degree-of-freedom arm with back driveable motorized joints. a cutting and dislodging tool, a jet pump and hose management system for conveyance of wastes, confined sluicing end-effector, and a control system, and must be used in conjunction with a robotic arm or vehicle. Other papers have been submitted to this conference describing the development and operation of the arm and vehicle positioning systems. This paper will describe the development of the WD&C system and its application for dislodging and conveyance of ORNL sludges from the GAAT tanks. The confined sluicing end-effector relies on medium pressure water jets to dislodge waste that is then pumped by the jet pump through the conveyance system out of the tank. This paper will describe the results of cold testing of the integrated system. At the conference presentation there will also be results from the field deployment. ORNL has completed fabrication of the WD&C system for waste removal and is full-scale testing, including testing of the confined sluicing end-effector.

  8. The Development of a Method for the Identification and Selection of Preservation Values for the Protection of WWII United States Army Airbases in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bunch, Michael A

    2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    THE DEVELOPMENT OF A METHOD FOR THE IDENTIFICATION AND SELECTION OF PRESERVATION VALUES FOR THE PROTECTION OF WWII UNITED STATES ARMY AIRBASES IN TEXAS A Dissertation by MICHAEL ANTHONY BUNCH Submitted to the Office of Graduate... PX Post Exchange/Variety Retail Sales ROIC Resident Officer in Charge SAC Strategic Air Command/Bomber Command SHPO State Historical Preservation Office SRAM Short Range Attack Missile SE South East SV Services TB Training Bomber T...

  9. How emissions, climate, and land use change will impact mid-century air quality over the United States: a focus on effects at national parks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Val Martin, M.

    We use a global coupled chemistryclimateland model (CESM) to assess the integrated effect of climate, emissions and land use changes on annual surface O[subscript 3] and PM[subscript 2.5] in the United States with a focus ...

  10. This study is funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) through grant EF1049251: "Assessing Decadal Climate Change Impacts on Urban Populations in the Southwestern United States."

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Decadal Climate Change Impacts on Urban Populations in the Southwestern United States." Data calibrates a point-scale soil water balance model to available soil moisture data, using historical, despite its notable effects on water, energy and biomass conditions. This omission is noteworthy

  11. IRM National Reference Series: Japan: An evaluation of government-sponsored energy conservation research and development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard, C.D.

    1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite the recent drop in world oil prices, the Japanese government is continuing to stress energy conservation, because Japan relies on imports for 85% of its total energy requirements and virtually 100% of its petroleum. Japan stresses long-term developments and sees conservation as an integral part of its 50- to 100-year transition from fossil fuels to nuclear and renewable sources of energy. The Japanese government is targeting new materials, biotechnology, and electronics technologies as the foundation of Japan's economy in the 21st century. Most government research programs in Japan are governed by aggressive timetables and fixed technical goals and are usually guaranteed funding over a 5- to 10-year period. Of the major energy conservation research programs, the best known is the Moonlight Project, administered by the Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI), and oriented towards end-use technologies such as Stirling engines and advanced heat pumps. Parts of MITI's Basic Technologies for Future Industries Program involve research in new materials and bioreactors. The Science and Technology Agency's Exploratory Research in Advanced Technologies (ERATO) Program is also investigating these technologies while emphasizing basic research. Other ministries supporting research related to energy conservation are the Ministry of Education, Science, and Culture and the Ministry of Construction. For 1985, government spending for energy conservation research was at least $50 million. Private sector funding of energy conservation research was $500 million in 1984. A brief outline of major programs and key participants is included for several of the most relevant technologies. An overview of Japan's experience in international scientific collaboration is also included.

  12. Hanford High-Level Waste Vitrification Program at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: technology development - annotated bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, D.E.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a collection of annotated bibliographies for documents prepared under the Hanford High-Level Waste Vitrification (Plant) Program. The bibliographies are for documents from Fiscal Year 1983 through Fiscal Year 1995, and include work conducted at or under the direction of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The bibliographies included focus on the technology developed over the specified time period for vitrifying Hanford pretreated high-level waste. The following subject areas are included: General Documentation; Program Documentation; High-Level Waste Characterization; Glass Formulation and Characterization; Feed Preparation; Radioactive Feed Preparation and Glass Properties Testing; Full-Scale Feed Preparation Testing; Equipment Materials Testing; Melter Performance Assessment and Evaluations; Liquid-Fed Ceramic Melter; Cold Crucible Melter; Stirred Melter; High-Temperature Melter; Melter Off-Gas Treatment; Vitrification Waste Treatment; Process, Product Control and Modeling; Analytical; and Canister Closure, Decontamination, and Handling

  13. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 104: Area 7 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CAU 104 comprises the 15 CASs listed below: (1) 07-23-03, Atmospheric Test Site T-7C; (2) 07-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site T7-1; (3) 07-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site; (4) 07-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T7-5a; (5) 07-23-07, Atmospheric Test Site - Dog (T-S); (6) 07-23-08, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (T-S); (7) 07-23-09, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (T-S); (8) 07-23-10, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie; (9) 07-23-11, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie; (10) 07-23-12, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (Bus); (11) 07-23-13, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (Buster); (12) 07-23-14, Atmospheric Test Site - Ruth; (13) 07-23-15, Atmospheric Test Site T7-4; (14) 07-23-16, Atmospheric Test Site B7-b; (15) 07-23-17, Atmospheric Test Site - Climax These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 28, 2011, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 104. The releases at CAU 104 consist of surface-deposited radionuclides from 30 atmospheric nuclear tests. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 104 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose (TED) to the dose-based final action level (FAL). The presence of TED exceeding the FAL is considered a radiological contaminant of concern (COC). Anything identified as a COC will require corrective action. The TED will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters will be used to measure external radiological dose. Based on process knowledge of the releases associated with the nuclear tests and radiological survey information about the location and shape of the resulting contamination plume, it was determined that the releases from the nuclear tests are co-located and will be investigated concurrently. A field investigation will be performed to define areas where TED exceeds the FAL and to determine whether other COCs are present at the site. The investigation will also collect information to determine the presence and nature of contamination associated with migration and excavation, as well as any potential releases discovered during the investigation. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS.

  14. NREL Assesses National Design Standards for Offshore Wind (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights in Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparency Visit | National Nuclear SecurityJune 4,Report summarizes

  15. 2013 CAMBRIDGE INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT REPORT Working out our future together

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Nations Global Compact, a global platform which convenes companies together with United Nations agencies

  16. Post-Closure Report for Closed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Corrective Action Units, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada for fiscal year 2013 (October 2012 - September 2013)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None,

    2014-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report serves as the combined annual report for post-closure activities for the following closed Corrective Action Units (CAUs): CAU 90, Area 2 Bitcutter Containment; CAU 91, Area 3 U-3fi Injection Well; CAU 92, Area 6 Decon Pond Facility; CAU 110, Area 3 WMD U-3ax/bl Crater; CAU 111, Area 5 WMD Retired Mixed Waste Pits; and, CAU 112, Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches.

  17. United States

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    - I United States Department of Energy D lSCk Al M E R "This book was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United...

  18. Geothermal Development and the Use of Categorical Exclusions Under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levine, A.; Young, K. R.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The federal environmental review process under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) can be complex and time consuming. Currently, a geothermal developer may have to complete the NEPA process multiple times during the development of a geothermal project. One mechanism to reduce the timeframe of the federal environmental review process for activities that do not have a significant environmental impact is the use of Categorical Exclusions (CXs), which can exempt projects from having to complete an Environmental Assessment or Environmental Impact Statement. This study focuses primarily on the CX process and its applicability to geothermal exploration. In this paper, we: Provide generalized background information on CXs, including previous NEPA reports addressing CXs, the process for developing CXs, and the role of extraordinary circumstances; Examine the history of the Bureau of Land Management's (BLM) geothermal CXs; Compare current CXs for oil, gas, and geothermal energy; Describe bills proposing new statutory CXs; Examine the possibility of standardizing geothermal CXs across federal agencies; and Present analysis from the Geothermal NEPA Database and other sources on the potential for new geothermal exploration CXs. As part of this study, we reviewed Environmental Assessments (EAs) conducted in response to 20 geothermal exploration drilling permit applications (Geothermal Drilling Permits or Notices of Intents) since the year 2001, the majority of which are from the last 5 years. All 20 EAs reviewed for this study resulted in a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). While many of these FONS's involved proponent proposed or federal agency required mitigation, this still suggests it may be appropriate to create or expand an exploration drilling CX for geothermal, which would have a significant impact on reducing geothermal exploration timelines and up-front costs. Ultimately, federal agencies tasked with permitting and completing environmental reviews for geothermal exploration drilling activities and/or legislative representatives are the responsible parties to discuss the merits and implementation of new or revised CXs for geothermal development.

  19. WHEREAS, The State of California has a long history of leading the nation and the world in energy conservation, development and deployment of renewable energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowles, David William

    conservation, development and deployment of renewable energy technologies, and research and developmentWHEREAS, The State of California has a long history of leading the nation and the world in energy into new environmentally sustainable energy technologies and practices; and WHEREAS, The Governor

  20. Synthesis of national reports for Rio+20

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the lead up to the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio+20), which took place in Brazil in June 2012, there were numerous efforts in countries around the world to help governments, civil society organizations and individuals prepare for the event. One of the more significant efforts led by UNDP in collaboration with the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UN DESA) was a support programme to 72 countries across all regions to build a consensus on national views around the themes and objectives of the Rio+20 Conference. This report highlights significant advances in sustainable development from almost 60 country reports and underscores the challenges and bottlenecks to moving beyond the economic-led growth strategies of the past 20 years.

  1. A review of vacuum insulation research and development in the Building Materials Group of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kollie, T.G.; McElroy, D.L.; Fine, H.A.; Childs, K.W.; Graves, R.S.; Weaver, F.J.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a summary of the development work on flat-vacuum insulation performed by the Building Materials Group (BMG) in the Metals and Ceramics Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the last two years. A historical review of the technology of vacuum insulation is presented, and the role that ORNL played in this development is documented. The ORNL work in vacuum insulation has been concentrated in Powder-filled Evacuated Panels (PEPs) that have a thermal resistivity over 2.5 times that of insulating foams and seven times that of many batt-type insulations, such as fiberglass. Experimental results of substituting PEPs for chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) foal insulation in Igloo Corporation ice coolers are summarized. This work demonstrated that one-dimensional (1D) heat flow models overestimated the increase in thermal insulation of a foam/PEP-composite insulation, but three-dimensional (3D) models provided by a finite-difference, heat-transfer code (HEATING-7) accurately predicted the resistance of the composites. Edges and corners of the ice coolers were shown to cause the errors in the 1D models as well as shunting of the heat through the foam and around the PEPs. The area of coverage of a PEP in a foam/PEP composite is established as an important parameter in maximizing the resistance of such composites. 50 refs., 27 figs,. 22 tabs.

  2. National Geothermal Association Trade Mission to Central America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States (US) geothermal industry, the world's most technically proficient, has been unable to achieve penetration into the markets of the developing nations. This report details the findings of an industry Trade Mission to Central America, tasked with determining the reasons for this shortfall and with developing a US industry geothermal export strategy designed to achieve immediate and long-term export benefits.

  3. Geothermal energy in the western United States and Hawaii: Resources and projected electricity generation supplies. [Contains glossary and address list of geothermal project developers and owners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geothermal energy comes from the internal heat of the Earth, and has been continuously exploited for the production of electricity in the United States since 1960. Currently, geothermal power is one of the ready-to-use baseload electricity generating technologies that is competing in the western United States with fossil fuel, nuclear and hydroelectric generation technologies to provide utilities and their customers with a reliable and economic source of electric power. Furthermore, the development of domestic geothermal resources, as an alternative to fossil fuel combustion technologies, has a number of associated environmental benefits. This report serves two functions. First, it provides a description of geothermal technology and a progress report on the commercial status of geothermal electric power generation. Second, it addresses the question of how much electricity might be competitively produced from the geothermal resource base. 19 figs., 15 tabs.

  4. UNITED STATES: 1 Program Planned to Prevent Deple -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INDEX Page UNITED STATES: 1 Program Planned to Prevent Deple - tion of Lobsters 2 U.S . & Soviets Is Developing National Sport Fish Statistics Program 10 Scientists Seek to Reduce Cost of Oceanographic Data 10 -Culture Experi- ments 71 20% More Vessel-Construction Licenses Issued in 1971 #12;Page 71 72 72 72 72 73

  5. Post-Closure Report for Closed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Corrective Action Units, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, For Fiscal Year 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2011-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This report serves as the combined annual report for post-closure activities for the following closed Corrective Action Units (CAUs): (1) CAU 90, Area 2 Bitcutter Containment; (2) CAU 91, Area 3 U-3fi Injection Well; (3) CAU 92, Area 6 Decon Pond Facility; (4) CAU 110, Area 3 WMD U-3ax/bl Crater; and (5) CAU 112, Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches. The locations of the sites are shown in Figure 1. This report covers fiscal year 2010 (October 2009-September 2010). The post-closure requirements for these sites are described in Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit Number NEV HW0021 and summarized in each CAU-specific section in Section 1.0 of this report. Site inspections are conducted semiannually at CAUs 90 and 91 and quarterly at CAUs 92, 110, and 112. Additional inspections are conducted at CAU 92 if precipitation occurs in excess of 0.50 inches in a 24-hour period. Inspections include an evaluation of the condition of the units and identification of any deficiencies that may compromise the integrity of the units. The condition of covers, fencing, signs, gates, and locks is documented. In addition, soil moisture monitoring and subsidence surveys are conducted at CAU 110. The results of the inspections, summary of maintenance activities, results of vegetations surveys, and analysis of monitoring data are presented in this report. Copies of the inspection checklists are included as Appendix A. Field notes completed during each inspection are included in Appendix B. Photographs taken during the site inspections are included in Appendix C.

  6. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Patrick

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 105 based on the implementation of the corrective actions. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from October 22, 2012, through May 23, 2013, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites; and in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices.

  7. AVTA Federal Fleet PEV Readiness Data Logging and Characterization Study for the United States Forest Service: Caribou-Targhee National Forest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Schey; Jim Francfort; Ian Nienhueser

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, managing and operating contractor for the U.S. Department of Energys Idaho National Laboratory, is the lead laboratory for U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Vehicle Testing. Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC contracted with Intertek Testing Services, North America (ITSNA) to collect and evaluate data on federal fleet operations as part of the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activitys Federal Fleet Vehicle Data Logging and Characterization study. The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity study seeks to collect and evaluate data to validate the utilization of advanced electric drive vehicle transportation. This report focuses on the Caribou-Targhee National Forest (CTNF) fleet to identify daily operational characteristics of select vehicles and report findings on vehicle and mission characterizations to support the successful introduction of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) into the agencies fleets. Individual observations of these selected vehicles provide the basis for recommendations related to electric vehicle adoption and whether a battery electric vehicle (BEV) or plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) (collectively plug-in electric vehicles, or PEVs) can fulfill the mission requirements. ITSNA acknowledges the support of Idaho National Laboratory and CTNF for participation in the study. ITSNA is pleased to provide this report and is encouraged by enthusiasm and support from the Forest Service and CTNF personnel.

  8. What is the NICHD? The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) is a health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rau, Don C.

    improvements: Overall infant death rates in the United States have dropped more than 70 percent. Survival today. The rate of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) has dropped more than 50 percent. Mother-to-child transmission of HIV has dropped to less than 1 percent in the United States. Sonograms are used routinely

  9. DEVELOPMENT AND ON-LINE TESTS OF DIFFERENT TARGET-ION SOURCE UNITS FOR PRODUCTION OF NUCLIDES FAR FROM STABILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Titov, Anatoly

    as a general goal the development of a massive (up to 1 kg) uranium carbide target prototype for the third beams. For more than thirty years UCx targets have been explored for the production of a large set of neutron-rich and neutron-deficient heavy nuclei. The main line of uranium carbide target development

  10. announced united states: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the Royal Academy of Engineering, the United Kingdom's National Academy 6 FISHERY STATISTICS UNITED STATES Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: FISHERY...

  11. Post-Closure Report for Closed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Corrective Action Units, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada for Fiscal Year 2011 (October 2010-September 2011)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2012-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This report serves as the combined annual report for post-closure activities for the following closed Corrective Action Units (CAUs): (1) CAU 90, Area 2 Bitcutter Containment; (2) CAU 91, Area 3 U-3fi Injection Well; (3) CAU 92, Area 6 Decon Pond Facility; (4) CAU 110, Area 3 WMD U-3ax/bl Crater; and (5) CAU 112, Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches. This report covers fiscal year 2011 (October 2010-September 2011). The post-closure requirements for these sites are described in Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit Number NEV HW0101 and summarized in each CAU-specific section in Section 1.0 of this report. Site inspections are conducted semiannually at CAUs 90 and 91 and quarterly at CAUs 92, 110, and 112. Additional inspections are conducted at CAU 92 if precipitation occurs in excess of 0.50 inches in a 24-hour period. Inspections include an evaluation of the condition of the units and identification of any deficiencies that may compromise the integrity of the units. The condition of covers, fencing, signs, gates, and locks is documented. In addition, soil moisture monitoring and subsidence surveys are conducted at CAU 110. The results of the inspections, summary of maintenance activities, results of vegetations surveys, and analysis of monitoring data are presented in this report. Copies of the inspection checklists are included as Appendix A. Field notes completed during each inspection are included in Appendix B. Photographs taken during the inspections are included in Appendix C. It is recommended to continue semiannual inspections at CAUs 90 and 91; quarterly inspections at CAUs 92, 110, and 112; and additional inspections at CAU 92 if precipitation occurs in excess of 0.50 inches in a 24-hour period. At CAU 92, it is recommended to remove the wave barriers, as they have not proven to be necessary to protect the cover. At CAU 110, it is recommended to continue annual vegetation monitoring and soil moisture monitoring, and to reduce the frequency of subsidence surveys from twice per year to once every other year (biennially).

  12. Redesigning Radiotherapy Quality Assurance: Opportunities to Develop an Efficient, Evidence-Based System to Support Clinical Trials-Report of the National Cancer Institute Work Group on Radiotherapy Quality Assurance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bekelman, Justin E., E-mail: bekelman@uphs.upenn.edu [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Deye, James A.; Vikram, Bhadrasain [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Bentzen, Soren M. [University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Bruner, Deborah [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Curran, Walter J. [Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Dignam, James [University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Efstathiou, Jason A. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); FitzGerald, T.J. [University of Massachusetts, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hurkmans, Coen [European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, Brussels (Belgium); Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Lee, J. Jack [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Merchant, Thomas E. [St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Michalski, Jeff [University of Washington, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Palta, Jatinder R. [University of Florida, Miami, Florida (United States); Simon, Richard [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Ten Haken, Randal K. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Timmerman, Robert [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Tunis, Sean [Center for Medical Technology Policy, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Coleman, C. Norman [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); and others

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: In the context of national calls for reorganizing cancer clinical trials, the National Cancer Institute sponsored a 2-day workshop to examine challenges and opportunities for optimizing radiotherapy quality assurance (QA) in clinical trial design. Methods and Materials: Participants reviewed the current processes of clinical trial QA and noted the QA challenges presented by advanced technologies. The lessons learned from the radiotherapy QA programs of recent trials were discussed in detail. Four potential opportunities for optimizing radiotherapy QA were explored, including the use of normal tissue toxicity and tumor control metrics, biomarkers of radiation toxicity, new radiotherapy modalities such as proton beam therapy, and the international harmonization of clinical trial QA. Results: Four recommendations were made: (1) to develop a tiered (and more efficient) system for radiotherapy QA and tailor the intensity of QA to the clinical trial objectives (tiers include general credentialing, trial-specific credentialing, and individual case review); (2) to establish a case QA repository; (3) to develop an evidence base for clinical trial QA and introduce innovative prospective trial designs to evaluate radiotherapy QA in clinical trials; and (4) to explore the feasibility of consolidating clinical trial QA in the United States. Conclusion: Radiotherapy QA can affect clinical trial accrual, cost, outcomes, and generalizability. To achieve maximum benefit, QA programs must become more efficient and evidence-based.

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: Nuclear Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the United States Conceptual Framework for Developing Resilience Metrics for the Electricity, Oil, and Gas Sectors in the United States View all EC Publications Related Topics...

  14. Sandia National Laboratories: Crystalline Rock

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the United States Conceptual Framework for Developing Resilience Metrics for the Electricity, Oil, and Gas Sectors in the United States View all EC Publications Related Topics...

  15. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 366: Area 11 Plutonium Valley Dispersion Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CAU 366 comprises six corrective action sites (CASs): 11-08-01, Contaminated Waste Dump #1 11-08-02, Contaminated Waste Dump #2 11-23-01, Radioactively Contaminated Area A 11-23-02, Radioactively Contaminated Area B 11-23-03, Radioactively Contaminated Area C 11-23-04, Radioactively Contaminated Area D The purpose of this CADD is to identify and provide the rationale for the recommendation of corrective action alternatives (CAA) for the six CASs within CAU 366. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from October 12, 2011, to May 14, 2012, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 366: Area 11 Plutonium Valley Dispersion Sites.

  16. Development of Commercial-Length Nuclear Fuel Post-Irradiation Examination Capabilities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ott, Larry J [ORNL; Spellman, Donald J [ORNL; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom [ORNL; Chesser, Joel B [ORNL; Morris, Robert Noel [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy Fissile Materials Disposition Program is pursuing disposal of surplus weapons-usable plutonium by reactor irradiation as the fissile constituent of mixed oxide (MOX) fuel. Lead test assemblies (LTAs) have been irradiated for approximately 36 months in Duke Energy s Catawba-1 nuclear power plant. Per the MOX fuel qualification plan, destructive post-irradiation examinations (PIEs) are to be performed on second-cycle rods (irradiated to an average burnup of approximately 42 GWd/MTHM). These LTA bundles are planned to be returned to the reactor and further irradiated to approximately 52 GWd/MTHM. Nondestructive and destructive PIEs of these commercially irradiated weapons-derived MOX fuel rods will be conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in the Irradiated Fuels Examination Laboratory (IFEL). PIE began in early 2009. In order to support the examination of the irradiated full-length (~3.66 m) MOX fuel rods, ORNL in 2004 began to develop the necessary infrastructure and equipment for the needed full-scope PIE capabilities. The preparations included modifying the IFEL building to handle a commercial spent-fuel shipping cask; procurement of cask-handling equipment and a skid to move the cask inside the building; development of in-cell handling equipment for cask unloading; and design, fabrication, and testing of the automated, state-of-the-art PIE examination equipment. This paper describes these activities and the full-scope PIE capabilities available at ORNL for commercial full-length fuel rods.

  17. Development of the CD Symcap platform to study gas-shell mix in implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, D. T.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Tipton, R. E.; Pino, J. E.; Remington, B. A.; Rowley, D. P.; Weber, S. V.; Barrios, M.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bleuel, D. L.; Bond, E. J.; Bradley, D. K.; Caggiano, J. A.; Callahan, D. A.; Cerjan, C. J.; Edwards, M. J.; Fittinghoff, D.; Glenn, S.; Haan, S. W.; Hamza, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Surrogate implosions play an important role at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for isolating aspects of the complex physical processes associated with fully integrated ignition experiments. The newly developed CD Symcap platform has been designed to study gas-shell mix in indirectly driven, pure T{sub 2}-gas filled CH-shell implosions equipped with 4 ?m thick CD layers. This configuration provides a direct nuclear signature of mix as the DT yield (above a characterized D contamination background) is produced by D from the CD layer in the shell, mixing into the T-gas core. The CD layer can be placed at different locations within the CH shell to probe the depth and extent of mix. CD layers placed flush with the gas-shell interface and recessed up to 8??m have shown that most of the mix occurs at the inner-shell surface. In addition, time-gated x-ray images of the hotspot show large brightly radiating objects traversing through the hotspot around bang-time, which are likely chunks of CH/CD plastic. This platform is a powerful new capability at the NIF for understanding mix, one of the key performance issues for ignition experiments.

  18. Sorbent Testing For Solidification of Process Waste streams from the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bickford, J. [MSE Technology Applications, Inc., MT (United States); Taylor, P. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) tasked MSE Technology Applications, Inc. (MSE) to evaluate sorbents identified by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to solidify the radioactive liquid organic waste from the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) at ORNL. REDC recovers and purifies heavy elements (berkelium, californium, einsteinium, and fermium) from irradiated targets for research and industrial applications. Both organic and aqueous waste streams are discharged from REDC. The organic waste is generated from the plutonium/uranium extraction (Purex), Cleanex, and Pubex processes. The Purex waste derives from an organic-aqueous isotope separation process for plutonium and uranium fission products, the Cleanex waste derives from the removal of fission products and other impurities from the americium/curium product, and the Pubex waste is derived from the separation process of plutonium from dissolved targets. MSE had also been tasked to test a grouting formula for the aqueous waste stream that includes radioactive shielding material. The aqueous waste is a mixture of the raffinate streams from the various extraction processes plus the caustic solution that is used to dissolve the aluminum cladding from the irradiated targets. (authors)

  19. Development of the CD symcap platform to study gas-shell mix in implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Casey, D. T.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Tipton, R. E.; Pino, J. E.; Grim, G. P.; Remington, B. A.; Rowley, D. P.; Weber, S. V.; Barrios, M.; Benedetti, L. R.; et al

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surrogate implosions play an important role at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for isolating aspects of the complex physical processes associated with fully integrated ignition experiments. The newly developed CD Symcap platform has been designed to study gas-shell mix in indirectly driven, pure T?-gas filled CH-shell implosions equipped with 4 ?m thick CD layers. This configuration provides a direct nuclear signature of mix as the DT yield (above a characterized D contamination background) is produced by D from the CD layer in the shell, mixing into the T-gas core. The CD layer can be placed at different locations within themoreCH shell to probe the depth and extent of mix. CD layers placed flush with the gas-shell interface and recessed up to 8 ?m have shown that most of the mix occurs at the inner-shell surface. In addition, time-gated x-ray images of the hotspot show large brightly-radiating objects traversing through the hotspot around bang-time, which are likely chunks of CH/CD plastic. This platform is a powerful new capability at the NIF for understanding mix, one of the key performance issues for ignition experiments.less

  20. The development of an aquatic spill model for the White Oak Creek watershed, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.O.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study develops an aquatic spill model applicable to the White Oak Creek watershed draining the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Hazardous, toxic, and radioactive chemicals are handled and stored on the laboratory reservation. An accidental spill into the White Oak Creek watershed could contaminate downstream water supplies if insufficient dilution did not occur. White Oak Creek empties into the Clinch River, which flows into the Tennessee River. Both rivers serve as municipal water supplies. The aquatic spill model provides estimates of the dilution at sequential downstream locations along White Oak creek and the Clinch River after an accidental spill of a liquid containing a radioactively decaying constituent. The location of the spill on the laboratory is arbitrary, while hydrologic conditions range from drought to extreme flood are simulated. The aquatic spill model provides quantitative estimates with which to assess water quality downstream from the site of the accidental spill, allowing an informed decision to be made whether to perform mitigating measures so that the integrity of affected water supplies is not jeopardized.