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Sample records for united electric co-op

  1. New Hampshire Electric Co-Op- Small Business Energy Solutions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New Hampshire Electric Co-Op offers incentives for its small commercial customers (those using less than 100 kW) through the Small Business Energy Solutions Program. The Co-op will conduct a free...

  2. New Hampshire Electric Co-Op- Residential Energy Efficiency Loan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New Hampshire Electric Co-op offers loans to be used for eligible projects under the NHEC Home Performance with ENERGY STAR program for weatherization. This loan program can be combined with NHEC...

  3. New Hampshire Electric Co-op- Solar Photovoltaic Incentive Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New Hampshire Electric Co-op (NHEC) is offering rebates for residential and commercial, grid-tied solar photovoltaic (PV) systems up to one megawatt (MW) in capacity. The rebate is equal to $0.25...

  4. New Hampshire Electric Co-Op - Large Business Energy Solutions...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Speed Drives: 1,050 - 4,400 Custom: lesser of 35% of the total installed cost or buy down to 1 year pay Summary New Hampshire Electric Co-Op offers incentives for its large...

  5. New Hampshire Electric Co-Op- Business Energy Efficiency Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New Hampshire Electric Co-op offers incentives to commercial and municipal members for both new construction and retrofit projects. Incentives vary by demand and size of the customer:

  6. Itasca-Mantrap Co-op Electrical Assn | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    www.facebook.compagesItasca-Mantrap-Co-op-Electrical-Association443726809007201?refstream Outage Hotline: 8887133377 Outage Map: outage.itasca-mantrap.com References:...

  7. Energy Department Names Virginia and Illinois Electric Co-ops the 2013 Wind

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cooperatives of the Year | Department of Energy Virginia and Illinois Electric Co-ops the 2013 Wind Cooperatives of the Year Energy Department Names Virginia and Illinois Electric Co-ops the 2013 Wind Cooperatives of the Year March 6, 2014 - 1:57pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy and the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA) today recognized Old Dominion Electric Cooperative (ODEC) of Virginia and the Rural Electric Convenience Cooperative (RECC) of Illinois as the

  8. New Hampshire Electric Co-Op- New Equipment and Construction Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New Hampshire Electric Co-Op offers incentives to its commercial and industrial customers to encourage energy efficiency. The program targets any commercial/industrial member building a new...

  9. New Hampshire Electric Co-Op- SmartSTART Energy Efficiency Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New Hampshire Electric Co-Op's SmartSTART (Savings Through Affordable Retrofit Technologies) Program is a no-money-down option to have energy efficient products installed in a business. The cost...

  10. Winning with Wind: Electric Co-ops Providing Clean Energy to Customers |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Winning with Wind: Electric Co-ops Providing Clean Energy to Customers Winning with Wind: Electric Co-ops Providing Clean Energy to Customers March 12, 2014 - 12:02pm Addthis Mehoopany wind farm in Pennsylvania can produce enough energy to power more than 40,000 homes under a contract with Old Dominion Electric Cooperative and the Southern Maryland Electric Cooperative. Old Dominion was named one of the winners of the Wind Cooperative of the Year Award last week. | Photo

  11. United Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Number: (208)-679-2222 Website: www.unitedelectric.coop Twitter: @unitedelectricc Facebook: https:www.facebook.compagesUnited-Electric-Co-op298510305296 Outage Hotline:...

  12. BPA, electric co-op and irrigation district testing aquifer recharge

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    during future incidents of springtime electricity oversupply. The pilot allows SWID to pump water from the Snake River for a longer period in the shoulder months of March and...

  13. Co-op

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-05-25

    Co-op is primarily middleware software, a runtime system for the support of the Cooperative Parallel Programming model. This model is based on using whole SPMD applications as components in a scalable programming, and having them treat one another as single objects and communicate via remote method invocation. Also included is some application level software: (1) a metric space database library for managing data items located in an arbitrary metric space and retrieving based on nearestmore » neighbor queries; and (2) a Krieging extrapolation library for use in implementing adaptive sampling for generic multiscale simulations.« less

  14. Sandia National Laboratories: Careers: Internships & Co-ops

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Internships & Co-ops Internships & Co-ops Technical Institute Programs How to Apply Intern Benefits Intern FAQs Fellowships Postdoctoral Positions Campus Recruiting Careers ...

  15. The CO-OP Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael, J.; /Fermilab

    1991-08-16

    You are at D0, the newest and most advanced experiment at Fermilab. Its goal is to find the 'top quark', nicknamed 'truth'. theoretically one of the six fundamental building blocks of matter. Combinations of the six quarks are said to make up electrons, protons and neutrons. Your group at D0 is the cryogenic division. Its goal is to provide and maintain a cryogenic system which ultimately supplies and controls the liquid argon used in the giant cryostats for the experiment. The high purity liquid argon is needed to keep the detector modules inside the cryostats cold, so that they will operate properly. Your job at D0 is to be a co-op for the research and development group of the cryogenics division. Your goals are dependent on the needs of the cryo group. D0 is where you will spend most of your time. The co-op office is located on what is known as the 3rd floor, but is actually on the ground floor. The floor directly above the 3rd floor is the 5th floor, which contains your immediate superiors and the D0 secretary. The 6th and top floor is above that, and contains the D0 secretary for official and important business. On the other side of the D0 assembly building is the cryo control room. This is where the cryogenic piping system is remotely monitored and controlled. Other important sites at D0 include the trailer city on the north parking lot, which has the D0 secretary who handles all the payroll matters (among other duties), and the portakamp in the south parking lot. Besides D0, which is named for its location on the particle accelerator ring. the most important place is Wilson Hall. That is the large building shaped like a big Atact symbol. It contains various important people such as the safety group. the personnel department (which you have already encountered. being hired), the minor stock room, the cafeteria, the Fermi library. Ramsey Auditorium. etc. Behind Wilson Hall is the Booster Ring, which accelerates particles before they are injected into the main ring. Inside the booster ring are the East and West Booster towers, which contain cryogenic support groups. The D0 cryo group offices used to be in the West Booster Portakamps. Away from Wilson Hall, there are various buildings strewn about the Fermilab property that have important functional uses to D0. One such example is Lab A. This is where the now unused bubble chamber resides. which was used to take pictures of particle motion. Many of our group is from the bubble chamber, and occasionally stories from the 'bubble chamber days' can be heard as someone waxes nostalgic. Lab A has a machine shop and many technicians. All three of the cryostats used in the D0 experiment went through Lab A for preparation and installation work. Lab A is located directly up the road from the front of Wilson Hall (north-east). Its unmistakable dark geodesic dome makes it easy to find. The Feynman Computer building, located east and just a little bit north of Wilson Hall, houses the computer repair people. If any of the computers used in our group crash and burn, we must take them to the third floor of Feynman to be fixed or exchanged. On one side is the Prep department, which handles the VAX mainframe computers, and on the other is personal computer repair, which handles Fermi Macs and IBMs. Directly north of Wilson Hall is Site 38. This site is the location of many important Fermilab facilities, such as the Fermi fire department, the carpenter's shop, the Fermi gas pumps, the main stock room, and shipping and receiving. Lastly, but perhaps most significantly, is the Fermilab Village. In addition to the machine shops, the cut shop, welding facilities, and the garishly painted physicist dorms, there are such things as a gym, a pool and other facilities to take the edge off a weary mind. The village is located just north off Batavia road on the east side of Fermilab. The village barn is the first and most notable building as one approaches.

  16. Current CO-OP Open Positions | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cooperative Education Frequently Asked Questions Program Openings National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering Contact education@anl.gov Current CO-OP Open Positions We...

  17. High School Co-op Program Salary Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Salary Structure High School Co-op Program Salary Structure Point your career towards Los Alamos Lab: work with the best minds on the planet in an inclusive environment that is...

  18. Kauai Island Utility Co-op (KIUC) PV integration study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellis, Abraham; Mousseau, Tom

    2011-08-01

    This report investigates the effects that increased distributed photovoltaic (PV) generation would have on the Kauai Island Utility Co-op (KIUC) system operating requirements. The study focused on determining reserve requirements needed to mitigate the impact of PV variability on system frequency, and the impact on operating costs. Scenarios of 5-MW, 10-MW, and 15-MW nameplate capacity of PV generation plants distributed across the Kauai Island were considered in this study. The analysis required synthesis of the PV solar resource data and modeling of the KIUC system inertia. Based on the results, some findings and conclusions could be drawn, including that the selection of units identified as marginal resources that are used for load following will change; PV penetration will displace energy generated by existing conventional units, thus reducing overall fuel consumption; PV penetration at any deployment level is not likely to reduce system peak load; and increasing PV penetration has little effect on load-following reserves. The study was performed by EnerNex under contract from Sandia National Laboratories with cooperation from KIUC.

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: Careers: Internships & Co-ops: Technical

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Institute Programs Technical Institute Programs Internships & Co-ops Technical Institute Programs Center for Computing Research Enabling Predictive Simulation Research Institute National Security Engineering Institute Physical Sciences Institute Sandia Institute for Modeling and Simulation Science of Extreme Environments Research Institute SENTINL: Energy Surety Incubator SENTINL: Interns for Security, Arms Control, and Force Protection Engineering TITANS: Center for Analysis Systems and

  20. High School Co-op Program Salary Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Salary Structure High School Co-op Program Salary Structure Point your career towards Los Alamos Lab: work with the best minds on the planet in an inclusive environment that is rich in intellectual vitality and opportunities for growth. Contact Student Programs (505) 667-4866 Email High school internship program salary structure Program Description Yearly Hourly High school intern High school senior $21,320/yr $10.25/hr Post HS graduate High school graduate (limited to 90-day appointment)

  1. High School Co-op Program Selection Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Selection Process High School Co-op Program Selection Process Point your career towards Los Alamos Lab: work with the best minds on the planet in an inclusive environment that is rich in intellectual vitality and opportunities for growth. Contact Student Programs (505) 665-0987 Email Student selection process Once all application materials are submitted, they will be reviewed for program eligibility. Students who meet the minimum program requirements will have their application materials posted

  2. Energy Department Names Virginia and Illinois Electric Co-ops...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    outstanding leadership in advancing U.S. wind power. ... ODEC has entered into four separate contracts to purchase ... a long-term lease agreement for the site with the ...

  3. New Hampshire Electric Co-Op - Residential Energy Efficiency...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    efficiency incentive programs for its residential members. First, members can receive a free Home Energy Analysis through the Home Performance with Energy Star Program. The...

  4. Milk, Eggs and Solar: Grocery Co-Op Puts Photovoltaics to Work

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Grocery shoppers in Burlington, Vt., are picking up much more than food and household items these days. Strolling the aisles of community-owned City Market, the 3,000 daily customers also learn about the co-op's 136 rooftop photovoltaic panels and monthly "Solar Made Simple" seminars.

  5. United States Electricity Industry Primer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The United States Electricity Industry Primer provides a high-level overview of the U.S. electricity supply chain, including generation, transmission, and distribution; markets and ownership structures, including utilities and regulatory agencies; and system reliability and vulnerabilities.

  6. Ion electric propulsion unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Light, Max E; Colestock, Patrick L

    2014-01-28

    An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) thruster is disclosed having a plasma chamber which is electrically biased with a positive voltage. The chamber bias serves to efficiently accelerate and expel the positive ions from the chamber. Electrons follow the exiting ions, serving to provide an electrically neutral exhaust plume. In a further embodiment, a downstream shaping magnetic field serves to further accelerate and/or shape the exhaust plume.

  7. New Hampshire Electric Co-op- Solar Hot Water Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Systems must be pre-approved to receive a rebate. Program funds are available on a first-come, first-served basis. See the program website listed above for more information and an application for...

  8. New Hampshire Electric Co-Op- Low-Income Energy Assistance Grant Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Assistance Program is designed to help NHEC's income-qualified members manage energy use with the goal of lowering total energy costs. Qualified members living in an apartment or house,...

  9. Renewable Electricity Futures for the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, Trieu; Hand, Maureen; Baldwin, Sam F.; Wiser , Ryan; Brinkman, G.; Denholm, Paul; Arent, Doug; Porro, Gian; Sandor, Debra; Hostick, Donna J.; Milligan, Michael; DeMeo, Ed; Bazilian, Morgan

    2014-04-14

    This paper highlights the key results from the Renewable Electricity (RE) Futures Study. It is a detailed consideration of renewable electricity in the United States. The paper focuses on technical issues related to the operability of the U. S. electricity grid and provides initial answers to important questions about the integration of high penetrations of renewable electricity technologies from a national perspective. The results indicate that the future U. S. electricity system that is largely powered by renewable sources is possible and the further work is warranted to investigate this clean generation pathway. The central conclusion of the analysis is that renewable electricity generation from technologies that are commercially available today, in combination with a more flexible electric system, is more than adequate to supply 80% of the total U. S. electricity generation in 2050 while meeting electricity demand on an hourly basis in every region of the United States.

  10. Electric trade in the United States 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-08-01

    Wholesale trade in electricity plays an important role for the US electric utility industry. Wholesale, or bulk power, transactions allow electric utilities to reduce power costs, increase power supply options, and improve reliability. In 1994, the wholesale trade market totaled 1.9 trillion kilowatthours, about 66% of total sales to ultimate consumers. This publication, Electric Trade in the United States 1994 (ELECTRA), is the fifth in a series of reports on wholesale power transactions prepared by the Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA). The electric trade data are published biennially. The first report presented 1986 data, and this report provides information on the electric power industry during 1994.

  11. Department of Energy Names Virginia and Illinois Electric Cooperatives Wind

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Co-ops of the Year | Department of Energy Department of Energy Names Virginia and Illinois Electric Cooperatives Wind Co-ops of the Year Department of Energy Names Virginia and Illinois Electric Cooperatives Wind Co-ops of the Year March 31, 2014 - 10:31am Addthis A photo graph of three people standing in front of a brown drape. The U.S. Department of Energy and the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA) recognized Old Dominion Electric Cooperative (ODEC) of Virginia and the

  12. Electric trade in the United States, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-12-01

    Wholesale trade in electricity plays an important role for the US electric utility industry. Wholesale, or bulk power, transactions allow electric utilities to reduce power costs, increase power supply options, and improve reliability. In 1996, the wholesale trade market totaled 2.3 trillion kilowatthours, over 73% of total sales to ultimate consumers. This publication, Electric Trade in the United States 1996 (ELECTRA), is the sixth in a series of reports on wholesale power transactions prepared by the Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA). The electric trade data are published biennially. The first report presented 1986 data, and this report provides information on the electric power industry during 1996. The electric trade data collected and presented in this report furnish important information on the wholesale structure found within the US electric power industry. The patterns of interutility trade in the report support analyses of wholesale power transactions and provide input for a broader understanding of bulk power market issues that define the emerging national electric energy policies. The report includes information on the quantity of power purchased, sold, exchanged, and wheeled; the geographical locations of transactions and ownership classes involved; and the revenues and costs. 1 fig., 43 tabs.

  13. Indoor unit for electric heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Draper, R.; Lackey, R.S.; Fagan, T.J. Jr.; Veyo, S.E.; Humphrey, J.R.

    1984-05-22

    An indoor unit for an electric heat pump is provided in modular form including a refrigeration module, an air mover module, and a resistance heat package module, the refrigeration module including all of the indoor refrigerant circuit components including the compressor in a space adjacent the heat exchanger, the modules being adapted to be connected to air flow communication in several different ways as shown to accommodate placement of the unit in various orientations. 9 figs.

  14. Indoor unit for electric heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Draper, Robert; Lackey, Robert S.; Fagan, Jr., Thomas J.; Veyo, Stephen E.; Humphrey, Joseph R.

    1984-01-01

    An indoor unit for an electric heat pump is provided in modular form including a refrigeration module 10, an air mover module 12, and a resistance heat package module 14, the refrigeration module including all of the indoor refrigerant circuit components including the compressor 36 in a space adjacent the heat exchanger 28, the modules being adapted to be connected to air flow communication in several different ways as shown in FIGS. 4-7 to accommodate placement of the unit in various orientations.

  15. United States Industrial Electric Motor Systems Market Opportunities...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric Motor Systems Market Opportunities Assessment United States Industrial Electric Motor Systems Market Opportunities Assessment The objectives of the Market Assessment were ...

  16. Electric Wholesale Market Regimes in the United States: Implications...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wholesale Market Regimes in the United States: Implications for Investment Electric Wholesale Market Regimes in the United States: Implications for Investment PowerPoint ...

  17. Electric Wholesale Market Regimes in the United States: Implications for

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Investment | Department of Energy Wholesale Market Regimes in the United States: Implications for Investment Electric Wholesale Market Regimes in the United States: Implications for Investment PowerPoint presentation to the Electricity Advisory Committee by Charles Whitmore, Senior Market Advisor at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on electric wholesale market regimes in the United States and the implications for investment in those markets. PDF icon Electric Wholesale Market Regimes

  18. Inventory of Electric Utility Power Plants in the United States

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2002-01-01

    Final issue of this report. Provides detailed statistics on existing generating units operated by electric utilities as of December 31, 2000, and certain summary statistics about new generators planned for operation by electric utilities during the next 5 years.

  19. Electric trade in the United States 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This publication, Electric Trade in the US 1992 (ELECTRA), is the fourth in a series of reports on wholesale power transactions prepared by the Electric Data Systems Branch, Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA). The electric trade data are published biennially. The first report presented 1986 data, and this report provides information on the electric power industry during 1992. The electric trade data collected and presented in this report furnish important information on the wholesale structure found within the US electric power industry. The patterns of interutility trade in the report support analyses of wholesale power transactions and provide input for a broader understanding of bulk power market issues that define the emerging national electric energy policies. The report includes information on the quantity of power purchased, sold, exchanged, and wheeled; the geographical locations of transactions and ownership classes involved; and the revenues and costs. Information on the physical transmission system are being included for the first time in this publication. Transmission data covering investor-owned electric utilities were shifted from the Financial Statistics of Selected Investor-Owned Electric Utilities to the ELECTRA publication. Some of the prominent features of this year`s report include information and data not published before on transmission lines for publicly owned utilities and transmission lines added during 1992 by investor-owned electric utilities.

  20. Renewable Electricity Futures for the United States

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Renewable Electricity Futures Study (RE Futures) provides an analysis of the grid integration opportunities, challenges, and implications of high levels of renewable electricity generation for the U.S. electric system. The study is not a market or policy assessment. Rather, RE Futures examines renewable energy resources and many technical issues related to the operability of the U.S. electricity grid, and provides initial answers to important questions about the integration of high penetrations of renewable electricity technologies from a national perspective. RE Futures results indicate that a future U.S. electricity system that is largely powered by renewable sources is possible and that further work is warranted to investigate this clean generation pathway.

  1. Fact #874: May 25, 2015 Number of Electric Stations and Electric Charging Units Increasing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    There are more electric stations than any other alternative fuel (10,710 stations). The number of charging units is of particular importance for electric vehicles due to the length of time it takes...

  2. Renewable Electricity Futures: Exploration of Up to 80% Renewable Electricity Penetration in the United States (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M.; DeMeo, E.; Hostick, D.; Mai, T.; Schlosser, C. A.

    2013-04-01

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

  3. United States Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    United States Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of U.S. ...

  4. United States Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    United States" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Per...

  5. United Electric Coop, Inc (Iowa) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Website: www.ueci.coop Facebook: https:www.facebook.comUnitedElectricCoop Outage Hotline: 1-800-748-1488 Outage Map: www.iowarec.orgoutages References: EIA Form...

  6. Outdoor unit construction for an electric heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Draper, R.; Lackey, R.S.

    1984-09-11

    The outdoor unit for an electric heat pump is provided with an upper portion containing propeller fan means for drawing air through the lower portion containing refrigerant coil means in the form of four discrete coils connected together in a subassembly forming a W shape, the unit being provided with four adjustable legs which are retracted in shipment, and are adjusted on site to elevate the unit to a particular height suitable for the particular location in which the unit is installed. 4 figs.

  7. Outdoor unit construction for an electric heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Draper, Robert; Lackey, Robert S.

    1984-01-01

    The outdoor unit for an electric heat pump is provided with an upper portion 10 containing propeller fan means 14 for drawing air through the lower portion 12 containing refrigerant coil means 16 in the form of four discrete coils connected together in a subassembly forming a W shape, the unit being provided with four adjustable legs 64 which are retracted in shipment, and are adjusted on site to elevate the unit to a particular height suitable for the particular location in which the unit is installed.

  8. The Outlook for Renewable Electricity in the United States

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    The Outlook for Renewable Electricity in the United States For 2014 EIA Energy Conference July 14, 2014 | Washington, DC By Gwen Bredehoeft Assessing the role of policy and other uncertainties Renewables have accounted for an increasing share of capacity additions over the last decade U.S. annual electricity generation capacity additions gigawatts Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2014 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 Other renewables Solar Wind Hydropower and other Natural gas and

  9. Envisioning a Renewable Electricity Future for the United States

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This paper presents high renewable electricity penetration scenarios in the United States using detailed capacity expansion modeling that is designed to properly account for the variability and uncertainty of wind and solar resources. The scenarios focus solely on the electricity system, an important sector within the larger energy sector, and demonstrate long-term visions of a U.S. power system where renewable technologies, including biomass, geothermal, hydropower, solar, and wind, contribute 80% of 2050 annual electricity, including 49–55% from wind and solar photovoltaic generation. We also present the integration challenges of achieving this high penetration and characterize the options to increase grid flexibility to manage variability.

  10. EIS-0476: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Units 3 and 4

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of construction and startup of the proposed Units 3 and 4 at the Vogtle Electric Generating Plant in Burke County, Georgia. DOE adopted two Nuclear Regulatory Commission EISs associated with this project (i.e., NUREG-1872, issued 8/2008, and NUREG-1947, issued 3/2011).

  11. United Parcel Service Evaluates Hybrid Electric Delivery Vans (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-02-01

    This fact sheet describes how the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Fleet Test and Evaluation team evaluated the 12-month, in-service performance of six Class 4 hybrid electric delivery vans - fueled by regular diesel - and six comparable conventional diesel vans operated by the United Parcel Service.

  12. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Charging for Multi-Unit

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Dwellings Electricity Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Charging for Multi-Unit Dwellings to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Charging for Multi-Unit Dwellings on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Charging for Multi-Unit Dwellings on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Charging for Multi-Unit Dwellings on Google Bookmark

  13. Inventory of Nonutility Electric Power Plants in the United States

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2003-01-01

    Final issue of this report. Provides annual aggregate statistics on generating units operated by nonutilities in the United States and the District of Columbia. Provides a 5-year outlook for generating unit additions and changes.

  14. United Electric Coop Service Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Twitter: @UnitedCoop Facebook: https:www.facebook.comUnitedCoopServices Outage Hotline: 817-556-4000 Outage Map: outage.united-cs.com References: EIA Form EIA-861...

  15. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF ELECTRICITY DELIVERY AND ENERGY RELIABILITY

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF ELECTRICITY DELIVERY AND ENERGY RELIABILITY National Electric Transmission ) Draft for Public Comment Congestion Study ) 79 Fed Reg. 49076 (2014) ) ) COMMENTS OF WIRES AND THE NATIONAL ELECTRICAL MANUFACTURERS ASSOCIATION ON THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REQUEST FOR PUBLIC COMMENT WIRES 1 and the National Electrical Manufacturers Association ("NEMA) 2 respectfully submits these comments in response to the Draft National Electric Transmission

  16. Energy Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Grid Electricity Advisory Committee Energy Storage Technologies Subcommittee Members ... Duncan General Manager (Ret.) Austin Energy Robert Gramlich Senior Vice President, ...

  17. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY National Electric...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Ancillary Services market through the Demand-Side Ancillary Services Program ("DSASP")." Middle of Page 22: Textual ... and Constraints in the Eastern Interconnection 4 United ...

  18. Case Study - National Rural Electric Cooperative Association Smart Grid Investment Grant

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    National Rural Electric Cooperative Association Smart Grid Investment Grant 1 Helping America's Electric Cooperatives Build a Smarter Grid to Streamline Operations and Improve Service Electric cooperatives play an important role in the U.S. energy infrastructure, delivering electricity to 44 million consumers across over 70% of the geography of the country every day. Implementing smart grid technology is seen by co-ops as a cost-effective way to improve reliability, streamline the restoration of

  19. Highway vehicle electric drive in the United States : 2009 status and issues.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santini, D. J.; Energy Systems

    2011-02-16

    The status of electric drive technology in the United States as of early 2010 is documented. Rapidly evolving electric drive technologies discussed include hybrid electric vehicles, multiple types of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, and battery electric vehicles. Recent trends for hybrids are quantified. Various plug-in vehicles entering the market in the near term are examined. The technical and economic requirements for electric drive to more broadly succeed in a wider range of highway vehicle applications are described, and implications for the most promising new markets are provided. Federal and selected state government policy measures promoting and preparing for electric drive are discussed. Taking these into account, judgment on areas where increased Clean Cities funds might be most productively focused over the next five years are provided. In closing, the request by Clean Cities for opinion on the broad range of research needs providing near-term support to electric drive is fulfilled.

  20. Energy Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid. May 2011 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Activities in the United States Electricity Grid. May 2011 Energy Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid. May 2011 Energy storage technologies offer cost-effective flexibility and ancillary services needed by the U.S power grid. As policy reforms and decreasing technology costs facilitate market penetration, energy storage technologies offer increasingly competitive alternative means for utilities to engage these ancillary services. This report prepared

  1. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF ELECTRICITY DELIVERY AND ENERGY RELIABILITY

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF ELECTRICITY DELIVERY AND ENERGY RELIABILITY Improving Performance of Federal ) 78 Fed Reg. 53,436 (Aug. 29, 2013) Permitting and Review of ) FR Doc 2013 -- 21098 Infrastructure Projects ) COMMENTS OF WIRES ON THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REQUEST FOR INFORMATION WIRES 1 respectfully submits these comments in response to the Request for Information ("RFI") issued by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability ("OEDER") of

  2. Carbon Dioxide Emissions from the Generation of Electric Power in the United States 1998

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1999-01-01

    The President issued a directive on April 15, 1999, requiring an annual report summarizing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions produced by electricity generation in the United States, including both utilities and nonutilities. In response, this report is jointly submitted by the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

  3. Geographic Variation in Potential of Rooftop Residential Photovoltaic Electric Power Production in the United States

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This paper describes a geographic evaluation of Zero Energy Home (ZEH) potential, specifically an assessment of residential roof-top solar electric photovoltaic (PV) performance around the United States and how energy produced would match up with very-efficient and super-efficient home designs. We performed annual simulations for 236 TMY2 data locations throughout the United States on two highly-efficient one-story 3-bedroom homes with a generic grid-tied solar electric 2kW PV system. These annual simulations show how potential annual solar electric power generation (kWh) and potential energy savings from PV power vary geographically around the U.S. giving the user in a specific region an indication of their expected PV system performance.

  4. Developing a tool to estimate water withdrawal and consumption in electricity generation in the United States.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, M.; Peng, J.

    2011-02-24

    Freshwater consumption for electricity generation is projected to increase dramatically in the next couple of decades in the United States. The increased demand is likely to further strain freshwater resources in regions where water has already become scarce. Meanwhile, the automotive industry has stepped up its research, development, and deployment efforts on electric vehicles (EVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). Large-scale, escalated production of EVs and PHEVs nationwide would require increased electricity production, and so meeting the water demand becomes an even greater challenge. The goal of this study is to provide a baseline assessment of freshwater use in electricity generation in the United States and at the state level. Freshwater withdrawal and consumption requirements for power generated from fossil, nonfossil, and renewable sources via various technologies and by use of different cooling systems are examined. A data inventory has been developed that compiles data from government statistics, reports, and literature issued by major research institutes. A spreadsheet-based model has been developed to conduct the estimates by means of a transparent and interactive process. The model further allows us to project future water withdrawal and consumption in electricity production under the forecasted increases in demand. This tool is intended to provide decision makers with the means to make a quick comparison among various fuel, technology, and cooling system options. The model output can be used to address water resource sustainability when considering new projects or expansion of existing plants.

  5. Estimated winter 1980-1981 electric demand and supply, contiguous United States. Staff report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-12-01

    This report summarizes the most recent data available concerning projected electrical peak demands and available power resouces for the 1980-1981 winter peak period, as reported by electric utilities in the contiguous United States. The data, grouped by Regional Reliability Council areas and by Electrical Regions within the Council areas, was obtained from the Form 12E-2 reports filed by utilities with the Department of Energy on October 15, 1980 (data as of September 30). In some instances the data were revised or verified by telephone. Considerations affecting reliability, arising from Nuclear Regulatory Commission actions based on lessons learned from the forced outage of Three Mile Island Nuclear Unit No. 2, were factored into the report. No widespread large-scale reliability problems are foreseen for electric power supply this winter, on the basis of the supply and demand projections furnished by the electric utilities. Reserve margins could drop in some electric regions to levels considered inadequate for reliable service, if historical forced-outage magnitudes recur.

  6. Toward a 20% Wind Electricity Supply in the United States: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flowers, L.; Dougherty, P.

    2007-05-01

    Since the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated the Wind Powering America (WPA) program in 1999, installed wind power capacity in the United States has increased from 2,500 MW to more than 11,000 MW. In 1999, only four states had more than 100 MW of installed wind capacity; now 16 states have more than 100 MW installed. In addition to WPA's efforts to increase deployment, the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA) is building a network of support across the country. In July 2005, AWEA launched the Wind Energy Works! Coalition, which is comprised of more than 70 organizations. In February 2006, the wind deployment vision was enhanced by President George W. Bush's Advanced Energy Initiative, which refers to a wind energy contribution of up to 20% of the electricity consumption of the United States. A 20% electricity contribution over the next 20 to 25 years represents 300 to 350 gigawatts (GW) of electricity. This paper provides a background of wind energy deployment in the United States and a history of the U.S. DOE's WPA program, as well as the program's approach to increasing deployment through removal of institutional and informational barriers to a 20% wind electricity future.

  7. Tampa Electric Company, Polk Power Station Unit No. 1, preliminary public design report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-06-01

    This preliminary Public Design Report (PDR) provides design information about Tampa Electric Company`s Polk Power Station Unit No. 1, which will demonstrate in a commercial 250 MW unit the benefits of the integration of oxygen-blown, entrained-flow coal gasification with advanced combined cycle technology. This project is partially funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under Round III of its Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Program under the provisions of Cooperative Agreement between DOE and Tampa Electric Company, novated on March 5,1992. The project is highlighted by the inclusion of a new hot gas cleanup system. DOE`s project management is based at its Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) in West Virginia. This report is preliminary, and the information contained herein is subject to revision. Definitive information will be available in the final PDR, which will be published at the completion of detailed engineering.

  8. Interim Project Results: United Parcel Service's Second-Generation Hybrid-Electric Delivery Vans (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-01-01

    This fact sheet describes the performance evaluation of United Parcel Service's second-generation hybrid-electric delivery vans. The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is evaluating the 18-month, in-service performance of 11 of these vans along with 11 comparable conventional diesel vans operating in Minneapolis, Minnesota. As a complement to the field study, the team recently completed fuel economy and emissions testing at NREL's Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) laboratory.

  9. Development of auxiliary power units for electric hybrid vehicles. Interim report, July 1993-February 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owens, E.C.; Steiber, J.

    1997-06-01

    Larger urban commercial vehicles (such as shuttle and transit buses), various delivery and service vehicles (such as panel and step vans), and garbage trucks and school buses are particularly well suited for electric drive propulsion systems due to their relatively short operating routes, and operation and maintenance from central sites. Furthermore, these vehicles contribute a proportionately large amount to metropolitan air pollution by virtue of their continuous operation in those areas. It is necessary to develop auxiliary power units (APUs) that minimize emissions and in addition, increase range of electric vehicles. This report focuses on the first phase study of the development of APUs for large, electric drive commercial vehicles, intended primarily for metropolitan applications. This paper (1) summarizes the differences between available mobile APUs and Electric Vehicle APU requirements, (2) describes the major components in APUs, and (3) discusses APU integration issues. During this phase, three potential APU manufacturers were identified and selected for development of prototype units at 25 kW and 50 kW power levels.

  10. Replacement energy costs for nuclear electricity-generating units in the United States: 1997--2001. Volume 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VanKuiken, J.C.; Guziel, K.A.; Tompkins, M.M.; Buehring, W.A.

    1997-09-01

    This report updates previous estimates of replacement energy costs for potential short-term shutdowns of 109 US nuclear electricity-generating units. This information was developed to assist the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in its regulatory impact analyses, specifically those that examine the impacts of proposed regulations requiring retrofitting of or safety modifications to nuclear reactors. Such actions might necessitate shutdowns of nuclear power plants while these changes are being implemented. The change in energy cost represents one factor that the NRC must consider when deciding to require a particular modification. Cost estimates were derived from probabilistic production cost simulations of pooled utility system operations. Factors affecting replacement energy costs, such as random unit failures, maintenance and refueling requirements, and load variations, are treated in the analysis. This report describes an abbreviated analytical approach as it was adopted to update the cost estimates published in NUREG/CR-4012, Vol. 3. The updates were made to extend the time frame of cost estimates and to account for recent changes in utility system conditions, such as change in fuel prices, construction and retirement schedules, and system demand projects.

  11. Corrosion of packaged cadmium plated electrical control units from paint vapors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brough, L.A.

    1987-08-01

    One of the most widely used methods of controlling the degradation of steel is the application of paint. It is relatively easy to accomplish and very economical. Painted steel is used successfully for many applications, including industrial equipment with electrical enclosures. Unless the proper paint and application procedures are selected, corrosion problems may develop directly from the paint, as the following incident will illustrate. A few years ago, a large electrical control enclosure (30 x 72 x 18 in. (76 x 183 x 46 cm)) was supplied to a customer with the control wiring and hardware mounted inside, which included a number of cadmium plated components. The enclosure had been painted inside with a fast drying, vinyl alkyd white enamel shortly before assembly. Since it was known that the completed unit would probably be stored at the customer's plant site for some time before installation, elaborate procedures were followed to retard or prevent degradation of any part of the system.

  12. United States Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Generation, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Generation, by Energy Source, 2006 - 2010" "(Thousand Megawatthours)" "United States" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal",14568,14637,14840,15009,15219 "Hydro Conventional",289246,247510,254831,273445,260203 "Solar",508,612,864,891,1212 "Wind",26589,34450,55363,73886,94652 "Wood/Wood Waste",38762,39014,37300,36050,37172 "MSW Biogenic/Landfill

  13. United States Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source, 2006 - 2010" "(Megawatts)" "United States" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal",2274,2214,2229,2382,2405 "Hydro Conventional",77821,77885,77930,78518,78825 "Solar",411,502,536,619,941 "Wind",11329,16515,24651,34296,39135 "Wood/Wood Waste",6372,6704,6864,6939,7037 "MSW/Landfill Gas",3166,3536,3644,3645,3690

  14. United States Total Electric Power Industry Net Generation, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Electric Power Industry Net Generation, by Energy Source, 2006 - 2010" "(Thousand Megawatthours)" "United States" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",2885295,2992238,2926731,2726452,2883361 " Coal",1990511,2016456,1985801,1755904,1847290 " Petroleum",64166,65739,46243,38937,37061 " Natural Gas",816441,896590,882981,920979,987697 " Other Gases",14177,13453,11707,10632,11313

  15. United States Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source, 2006 - 2010" "(Megawatts)" "United States" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",761603,763994,770221,774279,782176 " Coal",312956,312738,313322,314294,316800 " Petroleum",58097,56068,57445,56781,55647 " Natural Gas",388294,392876,397460,401272,407028 " Other Gases",2256,2313,1995,1932,2700

  16. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    New Hampshire Electric Co-Op- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs New Hampshire Electric Co-Op provides a number of energy efficiency incentive programs for its...

  17. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building Insulation, Windows, Doors, Wind (Small) New Hampshire Electric Co-Op- Business Energy Efficiency Programs New Hampshire Electric Co-op offers incentives to...

  18. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LED Lighting, Commercial Refrigeration Equipment New Hampshire Electric Co-Op- Business Energy Efficiency Programs New Hampshire Electric Co-op offers incentives to...

  19. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Insulation, Windows, Other EE, Tankless Water Heater New Hampshire Electric Co-Op- Business Energy Efficiency Programs New Hampshire Electric Co-op offers incentives to...

  20. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    New Hampshire Electric Co-Op- New Equipment and Construction Program New Hampshire Electric Co-Op offers incentives to its commercial and industrial customers to encourage energy...

  1. AMERICAN ELECTRIC POWER'S CONESVILLE POWER PLANT UNIT NO.5 CO2 CAPTURE RETROFIT STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carl R. Bozzuto; Nsakala ya Nsakala; Gregory N. Liljedahl; Mark Palkes; John L. Marion

    2001-06-30

    ALSTOM Power Inc.'s Power Plant Laboratories (ALSTOM) has teamed with American Electric Power (AEP), ABB Lummus Global Inc. (ABB), the US Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL), and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) to conduct a comprehensive study evaluating the technical feasibility and economics of alternate CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration technologies applied to an existing US coal-fired electric generation power plant. The motivation for this study was to provide input to potential US electric utility actions concerning GHG emissions reduction. If the US decides to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions, action would need to be taken to address existing power plants. Although fuel switching from coal to natural gas may be one scenario, it will not necessarily be a sufficient measure and some form of CO{sub 2} capture for use or disposal may also be required. The output of this CO{sub 2} capture study will enhance the public's understanding of control options and influence decisions and actions by government, regulators, and power plant owners in considering the costs of reducing greenhouse gas CO{sub 2} emissions. The total work breakdown structure is encompassed within three major reports, namely: (1) Literature Survey, (2) AEP's Conesville Unit No.5 Retrofit Study, and (3) Bench-Scale Testing and CFD Evaluation. The report on the literature survey results was issued earlier by Bozzuto, et al. (2000). Reports entitled ''AEP's Conesville Unit No.5 Retrofit Study'' and ''Bench-Scale Testing and CFD Evaluation'' are provided as companion volumes, denoted Volumes I and II, respectively, of the final report. The work performed, results obtained, and conclusions and recommendations derived therefrom are summarized.

  2. Tampa Electric Company Polk Power Station Unit Number 1. Annual report, January--December, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This report satisfies the requirements of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC21-91MC27363, novated as of March 5, 1992, to provide an annual update report on the year`s activities associated with Tampa Electric Company`s 250 MW IGCC demonstration project for the year 1993. Tampa Electric Company`s Polk Power Station Unit 1 (PPS-1) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) demonstration project will use a Texaco pressurized, oxygen-blown, entrained-flow coal gasifier to convert approximately 2,000 tons per day of coal (dry basis) coupled with a combined cycle power block to produce a net 250 MW electrical power output. Approximately 50% of the raw, hot syngas is cooled to 900 F and passed through a moving bed of zinc-based sorbent which removes sulfur containing compounds from the syngas. The remaining portion of the raw, hot syngas is cooled to 400 F for conventional acid gas removal. Sulfur-bearing compounds from both cleanup systems are sent to a conventional sulfuric acid plant to produce a marketable, high-purity sulfuric acid by-product. The cleaned medium-BTU syngas from these processes is routed to the combined cycle power generation system where it is mixed with air and burned in the combustion section of the combustion turbine. Heat is extracted from the expanded exhaust gases in a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) to produce steam at three pressure levels for use throughout the integrated process. A highly modular, microprocessor-based distributed control system (DCS) is being developed to provide continuous and sequential control for most of the equipment on PPS-1.

  3. Project Overview: United Parcel Service's Second-Generation Hybrid-Electric Delivery Vans (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-11-01

    This fact sheet describes UPS second generation hybrid-electric delivery vehicles as compared to conventional delivery vehicles. Medium-duty commercial vehicles such as moving trucks, beverage-delivery trucks, and package-delivery vans consume almost 2,000 gal of fuel per year on average. United Parcel Service (UPS) operates hybrid-electric package-delivery vans to reduce the fuel use and emissions of its fleet. In 2008, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) Fleet Test and Evaluation Team evaluated the first generation of UPS' hybrid delivery vans. These hybrid vans demonstrated 29%-37% higher fuel economy than comparable conventional diesel vans, which contributed to UPS' decision to add second-generation hybrid vans to its fleet. The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team is now evaluating the 18-month, in-service performance of 11 second-generation hybrid vans and 11 comparable conventional diesel vans operated by UPS in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The evaluation also includes testing fuel economy and emissions at NREL's Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory and comparing diesel particulate filter (DPF) regeneration. In addition, a followup evaluation of UPS' first-generation hybrid vans will show how those vehicles performed over three years of operation. One goal of this project is to provide a consistent comparison of fuel economy and operating costs between the second-generation hybrid vans and comparable conventional vans. Additional goals include quantifying the effects of hybridization on DPF regeneration and helping UPS select delivery routes for its hybrid vans that maximize the benefits of hybrid technology. This document introduces the UPS second-generation hybrid evaluation project. Final results will be available in mid-2012.

  4. Tampa Electric Company, Polk Power Station Unit No. 1. Annual report, January--December 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1993-10-01

    As part of the Tampa Electric Polk Power Unit No. 1, a Texaco pressurized, oxygen-blown entrained-flow coal gasifier will convert approximately 2300 tons per day of coal (dry basis) into a medium-BTU fuel gas with a heat content of about 250 BTU/scf (LHV). Syngas produced in the gasifier flows through a high-temperature heat recovery unit which cools the gases prior to entering two parallel clean-up areas. A portion (up to 50%) of the hot syngas is cooled to 1000{degrees}F and passed through a moving bed of zinc titanate sorbent which removed sulfur containing components of the fuel gas. The project will be the first in the world to demonstrate this advanced metal oxide hot gas desulfurization technology at a commercial scale. The remaining portion of the syngas is cooled to 400{degrees}F for conventional acid gas removal. This portion of the plant is capable of processing between 50% and 100% of the dirty syngas. The cleaned low-BTU syngas is then routed to the combined cycle power generation system where it is mixed with air and burned in the gas turbine combustor. Heat is extracted from the expanded exhaust gases by a heat recovery steam generator to produce high pressure steam. This steam, along with the steam generated in the gasification process, drives a steam turbine to generate an additional 132MW of power. Internal process power consumption is approximately 62MW, and includes power for coal grinding, air separation, and feed pumps. Net output from the IGCC demonstration plant will be 260MW.

  5. Electric power supply and demand for the contiguous United States, 1980-1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-06-01

    A limited review is presented of the outlook for the electric power supply and demand during the period 1980 to 1989. Only the adequacy and reliability aspects of bulk electric power supply in the contiguous US are considered. The economic, financial and environmental aspects of electric power system planning and the distribution of electricity (below the transmission level) are topics of prime importance, but they are outside the scope of this report.

  6. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA BEFORE THE OFFICE OF ELECTRICITY DELIVERY AND ENERGY RELIABILITY

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    COMMENTS OF FLORIDA MUNICIPAL POWER AGENCY ON DRAFT NATIONAL ELECTRIC TRANSMISSION CONGESTION STUDY Pursuant to the notice issued August 19, 2014, Florida Municipal Power Agency ("FMPA") hereby submits its comments on the Department of Energy's draft National Electric Transmission Congestion Study (the "Study"). I. INTERESTS OF FMPA FMPA is a joint action municipal power supply agency that is owned by 31 municipal electric systems in Florida. It was created in 1978 under

  7. Northeast United States U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships: Advanced Lighting Controls Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships: Advanced Lighting Controls Credit: Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships Credit: Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships Lead Performer: Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships, Lexington, MA Partners: -- Burlington Electric Department -- Cape Light Compact -- Connecticut Light and Power -- Efficiency Vermont -- National Grid -- NSTAR Electric and Gas --

  8. Fuel cell system including a unit for electrical isolation of a fuel cell stack from a manifold assembly and method therefor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kelley; Dana A. , Farooque; Mohammad , Davis; Keith

    2007-10-02

    A fuel cell system with improved electrical isolation having a fuel cell stack with a positive potential end and a negative potential, a manifold for use in coupling gases to and from a face of the fuel cell stack, an electrical isolating assembly for electrically isolating the manifold from the stack, and a unit for adjusting an electrical potential of the manifold such as to impede the flow of electrolyte from the stack across the isolating assembly.

  9. Cost of Power Interruptions to Electricity Consumers in the UnitedStates (U.S.)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina; Eto, Joseph H.

    2006-02-16

    The massive electric power blackout in the northeastern U.S.and Canada on August 14-15, 2003 catalyzed discussions about modernizingthe U.S. electricity grid. Industry sources suggested that investments of$50 to $100 billion would be needed. This work seeks to better understandan important piece of information that has been missing from thesediscussions: What do power interruptions and fluctuations in powerquality (power-quality events) cost electricity consumers? We developed abottom-up approach for assessing the cost to U.S. electricity consumersof power interruptions and power-quality events (referred to collectivelyas "reliability events"). The approach can be used to help assess thepotential benefits of investments in improving the reliability of thegrid. We developed a new estimate based on publicly availableinformation, and assessed how uncertainties in these data affect thisestimate using sensitivity analysis.

  10. Residential electricity rates for the United States for Solcost Data Bank cities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, L. E.

    1981-05-01

    Electricity rates are given for selected cities in each state, first of the Southern Solar Energy Center region and then of the rest of the US, for an average residence that uses 1000 kWh a month. (LEW)

  11. Decision-Making for High Renewable Electricity Futures in the United States

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This short Report Review highlights aspects of policy, regulation, finance, markets and operations that can help enable high penetration renewable energy electricity generation futures. It uses analytical results from the NREL Renewable Electricity Futures (REF) Study as a basis for discussion. As technical issues have been shown not to be key impediments for this pathway at the hourly level for the bulk system, we focus on other aspects of public and private decision-making. We conclude by describing how the REF might inform future research and development by the scientific community.

  12. ELECTRIC

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    you nay give us will be greatly uppreckted. VPry truly your23, 9. IX. Sin0j3, Mtinager lclectronics and Nuclear Physics Dept. omh , WESTINGHOUSE-THE NAT KING IN ELECTRICITY

  13. Estimated Value of Service Reliability for Electric Utility Customers in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, M.J.; Mercurio, Matthew; Schellenberg, Josh

    2009-06-01

    Information on the value of reliable electricity service can be used to assess the economic efficiency of investments in generation, transmission and distribution systems, to strategically target investments to customer segments that receive the most benefit from system improvements, and to numerically quantify the risk associated with different operating, planning and investment strategies. This paper summarizes research designed to provide estimates of the value of service reliability for electricity customers in the US. These estimates were obtained by analyzing the results from 28 customer value of service reliability studies conducted by 10 major US electric utilities over the 16 year period from 1989 to 2005. Because these studies used nearly identical interruption cost estimation or willingness-to-pay/accept methods it was possible to integrate their results into a single meta-database describing the value of electric service reliability observed in all of them. Once the datasets from the various studies were combined, a two-part regression model was used to estimate customer damage functions that can be generally applied to calculate customer interruption costs per event by season, time of day, day of week, and geographical regions within the US for industrial, commercial, and residential customers. Estimated interruption costs for different types of customers and of different duration are provided. Finally, additional research and development designed to expand the usefulness of this powerful database and analysis are suggested.

  14. Updated greenhouse gas and criteria air pollutant emission factors and their probability distribution functions for electricity generating units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, H.; Wang, M.; Elgowainy, A.; Han, J.

    2012-07-06

    Greenhouse gas (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O, hereinafter GHG) and criteria air pollutant (CO, NO{sub x}, VOC, PM{sub 10}, PM{sub 2.5} and SO{sub x}, hereinafter CAP) emission factors for various types of power plants burning various fuels with different technologies are important upstream parameters for estimating life-cycle emissions associated with alternative vehicle/fuel systems in the transportation sector, especially electric vehicles. The emission factors are typically expressed in grams of GHG or CAP per kWh of electricity generated by a specific power generation technology. This document describes our approach for updating and expanding GHG and CAP emission factors in the GREET (Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation) model developed at Argonne National Laboratory (see Wang 1999 and the GREET website at http://greet.es.anl.gov/main) for various power generation technologies. These GHG and CAP emissions are used to estimate the impact of electricity use by stationary and transportation applications on their fuel-cycle emissions. The electricity generation mixes and the fuel shares attributable to various combustion technologies at the national, regional and state levels are also updated in this document. The energy conversion efficiencies of electric generating units (EGUs) by fuel type and combustion technology are calculated on the basis of the lower heating values of each fuel, to be consistent with the basis used in GREET for transportation fuels. On the basis of the updated GHG and CAP emission factors and energy efficiencies of EGUs, the probability distribution functions (PDFs), which are functions that describe the relative likelihood for the emission factors and energy efficiencies as random variables to take on a given value by the integral of their own probability distributions, are updated using best-fit statistical curves to characterize the uncertainties associated with GHG and CAP emissions in life-cycle modeling with GREET.

  15. Electricity rate effects of 150 MW shop assembled turbocharged boiler generating units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drenker, S.; Fancher, R.

    1984-08-01

    Major upheavals in the environment in which electric utilities operate began in the 1960's. Modular construction, developed and perfected by process industry engineering firms, in conjuction with small turbocharged boiler power plants (currently under development), can respond to these forces by shortening construction time. Benefits from this approach, resulting from better matching of load growth and reducing planning horizon, can equal 15% to 60% of the capital cost of large pulverized coal plants.

  16. Analysis of drought impacts on electricity production in the Western and Texas interconnections of the United States.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harto, C. B.; Yan, Y. E.; Demissie, Y. K.; Elcock, D.; Tidwell, V. C.; Hallett, K.; Macknick, J.; Wigmosta, M. S.; Tesfa, T. K.

    2012-02-09

    Electricity generation relies heavily on water resources and their availability. To examine the interdependence of energy and water in the electricity context, the impacts of a severe drought to assess the risk posed by drought to electricity generation within the western and Texas interconnections has been examined. The historical drought patterns in the western United States were analyzed, and the risk posed by drought to electricity generation within the region was evaluated. The results of this effort will be used to develop scenarios for medium- and long-term transmission modeling and planning efforts by the Western Electricity Coordination Council (WECC) and the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT). The study was performed in response to a request developed by the Western Governors Association in conjunction with the transmission modeling teams at the participating interconnections. It is part of a U.S. Department of Energy-sponsored, national laboratory-led research effort to develop tools related to the interdependency of energy and water as part of a larger interconnection-wide transmission planning project funded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. This study accomplished three main objectives. It provided a thorough literature review of recent studies of drought and the potential implications for electricity generation. It analyzed historical drought patterns in the western United States and used the results to develop three design drought scenarios. Finally, it quantified the risk to electricity generation for each of eight basins for each of the three drought scenarios and considered the implications for transmission planning. Literature on drought impacts on electricity generation describes a number of examples where hydroelectric generation capacity has been limited because of drought but only a few examples of impact on thermoelectric generation. In all documented cases, shortfalls of generation were met by purchasing power from the market, albeit at higher prices. However, sufficient excess generation and transmission must be available for this strategy to work. Although power purchase was the most commonly discussed drought mitigation strategy, a total of 12 response strategies were identified in the literature, falling into four main categories: electricity supply, electricity demand response, alternative water supplies, and water demand response. Three hydrological drought scenarios were developed based on a literature review and historical data analysis. The literature review helped to identify key drought parameters and data on drought frequency and severity. Historical hydrological drought data were analyzed for the western United States to identify potential drought correlations and estimate drought parameters. The first scenario was a West-wide drought occurring in 1977; it represented a severe drought in five of the eight basins in the study area. A second drought scenario was artificially defined by selecting the conditions from the 10th-percentile drought year for each individual basin; this drought was defined in this way to allow more consistent analysis of risk to electricity generation in each basin. The final scenario was based upon the current low-flow hydro modeling scenario defined by WECC, which uses conditions from the year 2001. These scenarios were then used to quantify the risk to electricity generation in each basin. The risk calculations represent a first-order estimate of the maximum amount of electricity generation that might be lost from both hydroelectric and thermoelectric sources under a worst-case scenario. Even with the conservative methodology used, the majority of basins showed a limited amount of risk under most scenarios. The level of risk in these basins is likely to be amenable to mitigation by known strategies, combined with existing reserve generation and transmission capacity. However, the risks to the Pacific Northwest and Texas Basins require further study. The Pacific Northwest is vulnerable because of its heavy reliance on hydroelectric generation. Texas, conversely, is vulnerable because of its heavy dependence on thermoelectric generation, which relies on surface water for cooling, along with the fact that this basin seems to experience more severe drought events on average. Further modeling analysis will be performed in conjunction with the modeling teams at the participating interconnections (WECC and ERCOT) to explore the transmission implications of the drought scenarios in more detail. Given the first-order nature of this analysis, more detailed study of the potential impacts of drought on electricity generation is recommended. Future analyses should attempt to model the potential impacts of drought at the power-plant level, including potential mitigation strategies; include the effects of drought duration; understand the impacts of climate change; and consider economic impacts.

  17. Fuel cell assembly unit for promoting fluid service and electrical conductivity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, Daniel O.

    1999-01-01

    Fluid service and/or electrical conductivity for a fuel cell assembly is promoted. Open-faced flow channel(s) are formed in a flow field plate face, and extend in the flow field plate face between entry and exit fluid manifolds. A resilient gas diffusion layer is located between the flow field plate face and a membrane electrode assembly, fluidly serviced with the open-faced flow channel(s). The resilient gas diffusion layer is restrained against entering the open-faced flow channel(s) under a compressive force applied to the fuel cell assembly. In particular, a first side of a support member abuts the flow field plate face, and a second side of the support member abuts the resilient gas diffusion layer. The support member is formed with a plurality of openings extending between the first and second sides of the support member. In addition, a clamping pressure is maintained for an interface between the resilient gas diffusion layer and a portion of the membrane electrode assembly. Preferably, the support member is spikeless and/or substantially flat. Further, the support member is formed with an electrical path for conducting current between the resilient gas diffusion layer and position(s) on the flow field plate face.

  18. Geothermal energy in the western United States and Hawaii: Resources and projected electricity generation supplies. [Contains glossary and address list of geothermal project developers and owners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    Geothermal energy comes from the internal heat of the Earth, and has been continuously exploited for the production of electricity in the United States since 1960. Currently, geothermal power is one of the ready-to-use baseload electricity generating technologies that is competing in the western United States with fossil fuel, nuclear and hydroelectric generation technologies to provide utilities and their customers with a reliable and economic source of electric power. Furthermore, the development of domestic geothermal resources, as an alternative to fossil fuel combustion technologies, has a number of associated environmental benefits. This report serves two functions. First, it provides a description of geothermal technology and a progress report on the commercial status of geothermal electric power generation. Second, it addresses the question of how much electricity might be competitively produced from the geothermal resource base. 19 figs., 15 tabs.

  19. High School Co-op Program Selection Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    student will be scheduled for the new hire orientation. Please note: Students should not report to their worksite until they have gone through the hiring and orientation process....

  20. High School Co-op Program Recruitment Calendar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Salazar Wed, Feb 18 Mesa Vista High School Mark Richmond TBD New Mexico School for the Arts Acacia McCombs Wed, Mar 4 Pecos High School Emily Ortiz Mon, Mar 2 Peasco High School...

  1. Supply Curves for Solar PV-Generated Electricity for the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.

    2008-11-01

    Energy supply curves attempt to estimate the relationship between the cost of an energy resource and the amount of energy available at or below that cost. In general, an energy supply curve is a series of step functions with each step representing a particular group or category of energy resource. The length of the step indicates how much of that resource is deployable or accessible at a given cost. Energy supply curves have been generated for a number of renewable energy sources including biomass fuels and geothermal, as well as conservation technologies. Generating a supply curve for solar photovoltaics (PV) has particular challenges due to the nature of the resource. The United States has a massive solar resource base -- many orders of magnitude greater than the total consumption of energy. In this report, we examine several possible methods for generating PV supply curves based exclusively on rooftop deployment.

  2. ELECTRIC

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ELECTRIC cdrtrokArJclaeT 3 I+ &i, y$ \I &OF I*- j< t j,fci..- ir )(yiT !E-li, ( \-,v? Cl -p/4.4 RESEARCH LABORATORIES EAST PITTSBURGH, PA. 8ay 22, 1947 Mr. J. Carrel Vrilson General ?!!mager Atomic Qxzgy Commission 1901 Constitution Avenue Kashington, D. C. Dear Sir: In the course of OUT nuclenr research we are planning to study the enc:ri;y threshold anti cross section for fission. For thib program we require a s<>piAroted sample of metallic Uranium 258 of high purity. A

  3. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    United States Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (United States) Item Value Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 1,068,422 Electric ...

  4. Use of GTE-65 gas turbine power units in the thermal configuration of steam-gas systems for the refitting of operating thermal electric power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lebedev, A. S.; Kovalevskii, V. P.; Getmanov, E. A.; Ermaikina, N. A.

    2008-07-15

    Thermal configurations for condensation, district heating, and discharge steam-gas systems (PGU) based on the GTE-65 gas turbine power unit are described. A comparative multivariant analysis of their thermodynamic efficiency is made. Based on some representative examples, it is shown that steam-gas systems with the GTE-65 and boiler-utilizer units can be effectively used and installed in existing main buildings during technical refitting of operating thermal electric power plants.

  5. EIS-0105: Conversion to Coal, Baltimore Gas & Electric Company, Brandon Shores Generating Station Units 1 and 2, Anne Arundel County, Maryland

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Economic Regulatory Administration Office of Fuels Program, Coal and Electricity Division prepared this statement to assess the potential environmental and socioeconomic impacts associated with prohibiting the use of petroleum products as a primary energy source for Units 1 and 2 of the Brandon Shores Generating Station, located in Anne Arundel County, Maryland.

  6. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    New Hampshire Electric Co-Op- Large Business Energy Solutions New Hampshire Electric Co-Op offers incentives for its large business customers (using 100 kW or more) to increase the...

  7. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    New Hampshire Electric Co-Op- Small Business Energy Solutions New Hampshire Electric Co-Op offers incentives for its small commercial customers (those using less than 100 kW)...

  8. Illinois Rural Electric Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Place: Illinois Phone Number: (800) 468-4732 or (217) 742-3128 Website: www.e-co-op.com Twitter: @1936coop Facebook: https:www.facebook.comillinoisruralelectric Outage...

  9. Southeast Regional Assessment Study: an assessment of the opportunities of solar electric power generation in the Southeastern United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-07-01

    The objective of this study was to identify and assess opportunities for demonstration and large scale deployment of solar electric facilities in the southeast region and to define the technical, economic, and institutional factors that can contribute to an accelerated use of solar energy for electric power generation. Graphs and tables are presented indicating the solar resource potential, siting opportunities, energy generation and use, and socioeconomic factors of the region by state. Solar electric technologies considered include both central station and dispersed solar electric generating facilities. Central stations studied include solar thermal electric, wind, photovoltaic, ocean thermal gradient, and biomass; dispersed facilities include solar thermal total energy systems, wind, and photovoltaic. The value of solar electric facilities is determined in terms of the value of conventional facilities and the use of conventional fuels which the solar facilities can replace. Suitable cost and risk sharing mechanisms to accelerate the commercialization of solar electric technologies in the Southeast are identified. The major regulatory and legal factors which could impact on the commercialization of solar facilities are reviewed. The most important factors which affect market penetration are reviewed, ways to accelerate the implementation of these technologies are identified, and market entry paths are identified. Conclusions and recommendations are presented. (WHK)

  10. Impacts of Rising Air Temperatures and Emissions Mitigation on Electricity Demand and Supply in the United States. A Multi-Model Comparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McFarland, James; Zhou, Yuyu; Clarke, Leon; Sullivan, Patrick; Colman, Jesse; Jaglom, Wendy S.; Colley, Michelle; Patel, Pralit; Eom, Jiyon; Kim, Son H.; Kyle, G. Page; Schultz, Peter; Venkatesh, Boddu; Haydel, Juanita; Mack, Charlotte; Creason, Jared

    2015-06-10

    The electric power sector both affects and is affected by climate change. Numerous studies highlight the potential of the power sector to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Fewer studies have explored the physical impacts of climate change on the power sector. Our present analysis examines how projected rising temperatures affect the demand for and supply of electricity. We apply a common set of temperature projections to three well-known electric sector models in the United States: the US version of the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM-USA), the Regional Electricity Deployment System model (ReEDS), and the Integrated Planning Model (IPM®). Incorporating the effects of rising temperatures from a control scenario without emission mitigation into the models raises electricity demand by 1.6 to 6.5 % in 2050 with similar changes in emissions. Moreover, the increase in system costs in the reference scenario to meet this additional demand is comparable to the change in system costs associated with decreasing power sector emissions by approximately 50 % in 2050. This result underscores the importance of adequately incorporating the effects of long-run temperature change in climate policy analysis.

  11. Impacts of Rising Air Temperatures and Emissions Mitigation on Electricity Demand and Supply in the United States. A Multi-Model Comparison

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    McFarland, James; Zhou, Yuyu; Clarke, Leon; Sullivan, Patrick; Colman, Jesse; Jaglom, Wendy S.; Colley, Michelle; Patel, Pralit; Eom, Jiyon; Kim, Son H.; et al

    2015-06-10

    The electric power sector both affects and is affected by climate change. Numerous studies highlight the potential of the power sector to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Fewer studies have explored the physical impacts of climate change on the power sector. Our present analysis examines how projected rising temperatures affect the demand for and supply of electricity. We apply a common set of temperature projections to three well-known electric sector models in the United States: the US version of the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM-USA), the Regional Electricity Deployment System model (ReEDS), and the Integrated Planning Model (IPM®). Incorporating the effectsmore » of rising temperatures from a control scenario without emission mitigation into the models raises electricity demand by 1.6 to 6.5 % in 2050 with similar changes in emissions. Moreover, the increase in system costs in the reference scenario to meet this additional demand is comparable to the change in system costs associated with decreasing power sector emissions by approximately 50 % in 2050. This result underscores the importance of adequately incorporating the effects of long-run temperature change in climate policy analysis.« less

  12. Impacts of rising air temperatures and emissions mitigation on electricity demand and supply in the United States: a multi-model comparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McFarland, Jim; Zhou, Yuyu; Clarke, Leon E.; Sullivan, Patrick; Colman, Jesse; Jaglom, Wendy; Colley, Michelle; Patel, Pralit L.; Eom, Jiyong; Kim, Son H.; Kyle, G. Page; Schultz, Peter; Venkatesh, Boddu; Haydel, Juanita; Mack, Charlotte; Creason, Jared

    2015-10-09

    The electric power sector both affects and is affected by climate change. Numerous studies highlight the potential of the power sector to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Yet fewer studies have explored the physical impacts of climate change on the power sector. The present analysis examines how projected rising temperatures affect the demand for and supply of electricity. We apply a common set of temperature projections to three well-known electric sector models in the United States: the US version of the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM-USA), the Regional Electricity Deployment System model (ReEDS), and the Integrated Planning Model (IPM®). Incorporating the effects of rising temperatures from a control scenario without emission mitigation into the models raises electricity demand by 1.6 to 6.5 % in 2050 with similar changes in emissions. The increase in system costs in the reference scenario to meet this additional demand is comparable to the change in system costs associated with decreasing power sector emissions by approximately 50 % in 2050. This result underscores the importance of adequately incorporating the effects of long-run temperature change in climate policy analysis.

  13. Erratum to: Impacts of rising air temperatures and emissions mitigation on electricity demand and supply in the United States: a multi-model comparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McFarland, Jim; Zhou, Yuyu; Clarke, Leon E.; Sullivan, Patrick; Colman, Jesse; Jaglom, Wendy; Colley, Michelle; Patel, Pralit L.; Eom, Jiyong; Kim, Son H.; Kyle, G. Page; Schultz, Peter; Venkatesh, Boddu; Haydel, Juanita; Mack, Charlotte; Creason, Jared

    2015-10-07

    The electric power sector both affects and is affected by climate change. Numerous studies highlight the potential of the power sector to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Yet fewer studies have explored the physical impacts of climate change on the power sector. The present analysis examines how projected rising temperatures affect the demand for and supply of electricity. We apply a common set of temperature projections to three well-known electric sector models in the United States: the US version of the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM-USA), the Regional Electricity Deployment System model (ReEDS), and the Integrated Planning Model (IPM®). Incorporating the effects of rising temperatures from a control scenario without emission mitigation into the models raises electricity demand by 1.6 to 6.5 % in 2050 with similar changes in emissions. The increase in system costs in the reference scenario to meet this additional demand is comparable to the change in system costs associated with decreasing power sector emissions by approximately 50 % in 2050. This result underscores the importance of adequately incorporating the effects of long-run temperature change in climate policy analysis.

  14. Electrical switching effect of a single-unit-cell CrO{sub 2} layer on rutile TiO{sub 2} surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Si-Da; Liu, Bang-Gui

    2014-03-24

    Rutile CrO{sub 2} is the most important half-metallic material with nearly 100% spin polarization at the Fermi level, and rutile TiO{sub 2} is a wide-gap semiconductor with many applications. Here, we show through first-principles investigation that a single-unit-cell CrO{sub 2} layer on rutile TiO{sub 2} (001) surface is ferromagnetic and semiconductive with a gap of 0.54 eV, and its electronic state transits abruptly to a typical metallic state when an electrical field is applied. Consequently, this makes an interesting electrical switching effect which may be useful in designing spintronic devices.

  15. Examination of the Regional Supply and Demand Balance for Renewable Electricity in the United States through 2015: Projecting from 2009 through 2015 (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, L.; Hurlbut, D.; Donohoo, P.; Cory, K.; Kreycik, C.

    2010-06-01

    This report examines the balance between the demand and supply of new renewable electricity in the United States on a regional basis through 2015. It expands on a 2007 NREL study that assessed the supply and demand balance on a national basis. As with the earlier study, this analysis relies on estimates of renewable energy supplies compared to demand for renewable energy generation needed to meet existing state renewable portfolio standard (RPS) policies in 28 states, as well as demand by consumers who voluntarily purchase renewable energy. However, it does not address demand by utilities that may procure cost-effective renewables through an integrated resource planning process or otherwise.

  16. Statement Of Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary For Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Before The United States House of Representatives Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development, March 25, 2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Statement Of Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary For Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, U.S. Department of Energy, Before The United States House of Representatives Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development, March 25, 2014, to discuss the President’s Fiscal Year (FY) 2015 budget for the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE).

  17. Statement Of Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary For Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Before The United States House of Representatives Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development, March 17, 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Statement Of Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary For Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, U.S. Department of Energy, Before The United States House of Representatives Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development, March 17, 2015, to discuss the President’s Fiscal Year (FY) 2016 budget for the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE).

  18. EIA - Electricity Generating Capacity

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electricity Generating Capacity Release Date: January 3, 2013 | Next Release: August 2013 Year Existing Units by Energy Source Unit Additions Unit Retirements 2011 XLS XLS XLS 2010 XLS XLS XLS 2009 XLS XLS XLS 2008 XLS XLS XLS 2007 XLS XLS XLS 2006 XLS XLS XLS 2005 XLS XLS XLS 2004 XLS XLS XLS 2003 XLS XLS XLS Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." Related links Electric Power Monthly Electric Power Annual Form EIA-860 Source Data

  19. Electricity Transmission, Pipelines, and National Trails. An Analysis of Current and Potential Intersections on Federal Lands in the Eastern United States, Alaska, and Hawaii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuiper, James A; Krummel, John R; Hlava, Kevin J; Moore, H Robert; Orr, Andrew B; Schlueter, Scott O; Sullivan, Robert G; Zvolanek, Emily A

    2014-03-25

    As has been noted in many reports and publications, acquiring new or expanded rights-of-way for transmission is a challenging process, because numerous land use and land ownership constraints must be overcome to develop pathways suitable for energy transmission infrastructure. In the eastern U.S., more than twenty federally protected national trails (some of which are thousands of miles long, and cross many states) pose a potential obstacle to the development of new or expanded electricity transmission capacity. However, the scope of this potential problem is not well-documented, and there is no baseline information available that could allow all stakeholders to study routing scenarios that could mitigate impacts on national trails. This report, Electricity Transmission, Pipelines, and National Trails: An Analysis of Current and Potential Intersections on Federal Lands in the Eastern United States, was prepared by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne). Argonne was tasked by DOE to analyze the “footprint” of the current network of National Historic and Scenic Trails and the electricity transmission system in the 37 eastern contiguous states, Alaska, and Hawaii; assess the extent to which national trails are affected by electrical transmission; and investigate the extent to which national trails and other sensitive land use types may be affected in the near future by planned transmission lines. Pipelines are secondary to transmission lines for analysis, but are also within the analysis scope in connection with the overall directives of Section 368 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and because of the potential for electrical transmission lines being collocated with pipelines. Based on Platts electrical transmission line data, a total of 101 existing intersections with national trails on federal land were found, and 20 proposed intersections. Transmission lines and pipelines are proposed in Alaska; however there are no locations that intersect national trails. Source data did not indicate any planned transmission lines or pipelines in Hawaii. A map atlas provides more detailed mapping of the topics investigated in this study, and the accompanying GIS database provides the baseline information for further investigating locations of interest. In many cases the locations of proposed transmission lines are not accurately mapped (or a specific route may not yet be determined), and accordingly the specific crossing locations are speculative. However since both national trails and electrical transmission lines are long linear systems, the characteristics of the crossings reported in this study are expected to be similar to both observed characteristics of the existing infrastructure provided in this report, and of the new infrastructure if these proposed projects are built. More focused study of these siting challenges is expected to mitigate some of potential impacts by choosing routes that minimize or eliminate them. The current study primarily addresses a set of screening-level characterizations that provide insights into how the National Trail System may influence the siting of energy transport facilities in the states identified under Section 368(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 2005. As such, it initializes gathering and beginning analysis of the primary environmental and energy data, and maps the contextual relationships between an important national environmental asset and how this asset intersects with energy planning activities. Thus the current study sets the stage for more in-depth analyses and data development activities that begin to solve key transmission siting constraints. Our recommendations for future work incorporate two major areas: (1) database development and analytics and (2) modeling and scenario analysis for energy planning. These recommendations provide a path forward to address key issues originally developed under the Energy Policy Act of 2005 that are now being carried forward under the President’s Climate Action Plan.

  20. Termination unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Traeholt, Chresten [Frederiksberg, DK; Willen, Dag [Klagshamn, SE; Roden, Mark [Newnan, GA; Tolbert, Jerry C [Carrollton, GA; Lindsay, David [Carrollton, GA; Fisher, Paul W [Heiskell, TN; Nielsen, Carsten Thidemann [Jaegerspris, DK

    2014-01-07

    This invention relates to a termination unit comprising an end-section of a cable. The end section of the cable defines a central longitudinal axis and comprising end-parts of N electrical phases, an end-part of a neutral conductor and a surrounding thermally insulation envelope adapted to comprising a cooling fluid. The end-parts of the N electrical phases and the end-part of the neutral conductor each comprising at least one electrical conductor and being arranged in the cable concentrically around a core former with a phase 1 located relatively innermost, and phase N relatively outermost in the cable, phase N being surrounded by the neutral conductor, electrical insulation being arrange between neighboring electrical phases and between phase N and the neutral conductor, and wherein the end-parts of the neutral conductor and the electrical phases each comprise a contacting surface electrically connected to at least one branch current lead to provide an electrical connection: The contacting surfaces each having a longitudinal extension, and being located sequentially along the longitudinal extension of the end-section of the cable. The branch current leads being individually insulated from said thermally insulation envelope by individual electrical insulators.

  1. Tidal Electric | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tidal Electric Place: London, Greater London, United Kingdom Zip: SW19 8UY Product: Developed a technology named 'tidal lagoons' to build tidal electric projects. Coordinates:...

  2. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1. Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," ...

  3. Roles of electricity: Electric steelmaking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burwell, C.C.

    1986-07-01

    Electric steel production from scrap metal continues to grow both in total quantity and in market share. The economics of electric-steel production in general, and of electric minimills in particular, seem clearly established. The trend towards electric steelmaking provides significant economic and competitive advantages for producers and important overall economic, environmental, and energy advantages for the United States at large. Conversion to electric steelmaking offers up to a 4-to-1 advantage in terms of the overall energy used to produce a ton of steel, and s similar savings in energy cost for the producer. The amount of old scrap used to produce a ton of steel has doubled since 1967 because of the use of electric furnaces.

  4. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2012-10-01

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

  5. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2012-11-01

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

  6. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2013-04-01

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

  7. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M. M.

    2012-09-01

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

  8. Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures, 2003" ,"All Buildings* Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of Buildings...

  9. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lighting ControlsSensors Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings New Hampshire Electric Co-Op- Business Energy Efficiency Programs New Hampshire Electric...

  10. Electricity Monthly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Wholesale Markets: February 2014 The United States has many regional wholesale electricity markets. Below we look at monthly and annual ranges of on-peak, daily wholesale...

  11. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regional Wholesale Markets: May 2015 The United States has many regional wholesale electricity markets. Below we look at monthly and annual ranges of on-peak, daily wholesale...

  12. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wholesale Markets: August 2015 The United States has many regional wholesale electricity markets. Below we look at monthly and annual ranges of on-peak, daily wholesale...

  13. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and fuel consumption In this section, we look at the resources used to produce electricity. Generating units are chosen to run primarily on their operating costs, of which...

  14. United States

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    BP Energy Company OE Docket No. EA- 3 14 Order Authorizing Electricity Exports to Mexico Order No. EA-3 14 February 22,2007 BP Energy Company Order No. EA-314 I. BACKGROUND Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated by the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to sections 301(b) and 402(Q of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7 15 l(b), 7172(f)) and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C.S24a(e)) .

  15. Electricity Generation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electricity Generation Electricity Generation The United States of America continues to generate the most geothermal electricity in the world: more than 3.5 gigawatts, predominantly from the western United States. That's enough to power about three and half million homes! Pictured above, the Raft River geothermal plant is located in Idaho. Source: Geothermal Resources Council The United States of America continues to generate the most geothermal electricity in the world: more than 3.5 gigawatts,

  16. Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of...

  17. Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    C9. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures, 1999" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of Buildings...

  18. Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    DIV. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures by Census Division, 1999" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number...

  19. Proposed changes to generating capacity 1980-1989 for the contiguous United States: as projected by the Regional Electric Reliability Councils in their April 1, 1980 long-range coordinated planning reports to the Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-12-01

    The changes in generating capacity projected for 1980 to 1989 are summarized. Tabulated data provide summaries to the information on projected generating unit construction, retirements, and changes, in several different categories and groupings. The new generating units to be completed by the end of 1989 total 699, representing 259,490 megawatts. This total includes 10 wind power and one fuel cell installations totaling 48.5 MW to be completed by the end of 1989. There are 321 units totaling 13,222 MW to be retired. There are capacity changes due to upratings and deratings. Summary data are presented for: total requirement for electric energy generation for 1985; hydroelectric energy production for 1985; nuclear energy production for 1985; geothermal and other energy production for 1985; approximate non-fossil generation for 1985; range of fossil energy requirements for 1985; actual fossil energy sources 1974 to 1979; estimated range of fossil fuel requirements for 1985; coal capacity available in 1985; and computation of fuel use in 1985. Power plant capacity factors are presented. Extensive data on proposed generating capacity changes by individual units in the 9 Regional Electric Reliability Councils are presented.

  20. EVO Electric Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Greater London, United Kingdom Zip: GU21 5JY Product: EVO Electric Limited develops electrical motors and generators for use in gensets, powertrains, and traction motors in...

  1. Northern Ireland Electricity | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ireland Electricity Jump to: navigation, search Name: Northern Ireland Electricity Place: Belfast, United Kingdom Zip: BT9 5HT Product: NIE is reponsible for the regulated...

  2. International Electricity Regulation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Regulation International Electricity Regulation U.S. trade in electric energy with Canada and Mexico is rising, bringing economic and reliability benefits to the United States and ...

  3. Success Stories | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Judging Google's Inverter Competition NRECA Helping Electric Co-ops Integrate Solar Energy Studying Solar Evolution Sowing Seeds for Solar Success Falling Particle Receiver ...

  4. United States

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Tenaslta Power Services Co. OE Docket No. EA-243-A Order Authorizing Electricity Exports to Canada Order No. EA-243-A March 1,2007 Tenaska Power Services Co. Order No. EA-243-A I. BACKGROUND Exports of elcctricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated by the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to sections 30 I(b) and 402(f) of the Departrncnt of' Energy Organizatio~l Act (42 U, S.C. 7 15 1 (b), 7 1 72Cf)) and rcquirc authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act

  5. Quadrennial Energy Review Second Installment Electricity: Generation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Quadrennial Energy Review Second Installment Electricity: Generation to End-Use ... Ernest Moniz, United States Secretary of Energy As United States Secretary of Energy, Dr. ...

  6. October 2012 Electrical Safety Occurrences

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    subcontractor removed parts on a heating, ventilation and cooling (HVAC) unit. The prime contractor removed electrical power to the work area with the exception of the...

  7. Current Electric | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: Current Electric Region: United States Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology...

  8. Electric $ales and revenue 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-01

    This publication provides information on electricity sales, associated revenue, average revenue per kilowatthour sold, and number of consumers in the United States.

  9. National Electricity Delivery Division

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    (DOE) Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) National Electricity Delivery Division Julie Ann Smith, PhD September 24, 2015 The Federal Indian Trust Responsibility is a legal obligation under which the United States has charged itself with moral obligations of the highest responsibility and trust toward American Indian tribes. (Seminole Nation v. United States, 1942; Cherokee Nation v. Georgia, 1831). "When the trust responsibility is acknowledged and upheld by the

  10. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M.

    2012-10-01

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It is being presented at the Utility Variable-Generation Integration Group Fall Technical Workshop on October 24, 2012.

  11. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M.; Mai, T.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented in an Union of Concerned Scientists webinar on June 12, 2012.

  12. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. This presentation was presented in a Wind Powering America webinar on August 15, 2012 and is now available through the Wind Powering America website.

  13. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented in a Power Systems Engineering Research Center webinar on September 4, 2012.

  14. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M. M.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented in a webinar given by the California Energy Commission.

  15. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    United States Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (United States) Item Value Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 1,068,422 Electric utilities 616,632 IPP & CHP 451,791 Net generation (megawatthours) 4,093,606,005 Electric utilities 2,382,473,495 IPP & CHP 1,711,132,510 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 3,842,005 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 2,400,375 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 2,160,342 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 Nitrogen Oxide

  16. Electric sales and revenue 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. Information is provided on electricity sales, associated revenue, average revenue per kilowatthour sold, and number of consumers throughout the United States. The data provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels. The information is based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1994.

  17. Northeastern Summer Electricity Market Alert

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2013-01-01

    The National Weather Service declared an excessive-heat warning for much of the Mid-Atlantic and northeastern United States, including major electric markets covering Philadelphia, Boston, Washington, D.C., and New York City. This report highlights the wholesale electricity market activity occurring in response to the higher-than-normal electricity demand caused by the heat wave.

  18. Modeling analyses of the effects of changes in nitrogen oxides emissions from the electric power sector on ozone levels in the eastern United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edith Gego; Alice Gilliland; James Godowitch

    2008-04-15

    In this paper, we examine the changes in ambient ozone concentrations simulated by the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model for summer 2002 under three different nitrogen oxides (NOx) emission scenarios. Two emission scenarios represent best estimates of 2002 and 2004 emissions; they allow assessment of the impact of the NOx emissions reductions imposed on the utility sector by the NOx State Implementation Plan (SIP) Call. The third scenario represents a hypothetical rendering of what NOx emissions would have been in 2002 if no emission controls had been imposed on the utility sector. Examination of the modeled median and 95th percentile daily maximum 8-hr average ozone concentrations reveals that median ozone levels estimated for the 2004 emission scenario were less than those modeled for 2002 in the region most affected by the NOx SIP Call. Comparison of the 'no-control' with the '2002' scenario revealed that ozone concentrations would have been much higher in much of the eastern United States if the utility sector had not implemented NOx emission controls; exceptions occurred in the immediate vicinity of major point sources where increased NO titration tends to lower ozone levels. 13 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Electric power monthly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares the Electric Power Monthly (EPM) for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. This publication provides monthly statistics for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source, consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead.

  20. Statement Of Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary For Electricity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Of Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary For Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, ... For Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Before The United States House of ...

  1. Guide to Federal Regulation of Sales of Imported Electricity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal Regulation of Sales of Imported Electricity in Canada, Mexico and the United States Guide to Federal Regulation of Sales of Imported Electricity in Canada, Mexico and the ...

  2. Table 11.2 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2010;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Electricity Components; Unit: Million ...

  3. Electric sales and revenue 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. This publication provides information about sales of electricity, its associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour sold to residential, commercial, industrial, and other consumers throughout the United States. Previous publications presented data on typical electric bills at specified consumption levels as well as sales, revenue, and average revenue. The sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in this report are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels.

  4. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M. M.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented to the 2012 Western Conference of Public Service Commissioners, during their June, 2012, meeting. The Western Conference of Public Service Commissioners is a regional association within the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC).

  5. Mountain View Electric Association, Inc - Energy Efficiency Credit...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    75 for controlled unit, additional 25 for lifetime warranty Marathon Water Heater: 300unit, plus 2gallon Electric Motor: 10hp RefrigeratorFreezer: 40 Clothes Washer: 40...

  6. AFTER A Framework for electrical power sysTems vulnerability...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    United Kingdom) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name AFTER A Framework for electrical power sysTems vulnerability identification, dEfense and Restoration Country United Kingdom...

  7. United States

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Rainbow Energy Marketing Corporation Docket No. EA-375 Order Authorizing Electricity Exports to Mexico Order No. EA-375 December 15, 2010

  8. Celebrating Electric Vehicles | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric Vehicles Celebrating Electric Vehicles September 29, 2015 - 4:01pm Addthis The United States has the largest electric vehicle fleet in the world, which includes cars like the Chevrolet Volt. | Photo courtesy of General Motors The United States has the largest electric vehicle fleet in the world, which includes cars like the Chevrolet Volt. | Photo courtesy of General Motors Paul Lester Paul Lester Digital Content Specialist, Office of Public Affairs KEY FACTS More than 1 million plug-in

  9. Florida's electric industry and solar electric technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Camejo, N.

    1983-12-01

    The Florida Electric Industry is in a process of diversifying its generation technology and its fuel mix. This is being done in an effort to reduce oil consumption, which in 1981 accounted for 46.5% of the electric generation by fuel type. This does not compare well with the rest of the nation where oil use is lower. New coal and nuclear units are coming on line, and probably more will be built in the near future. However, eventhough conservation efforts may delay their construction, new power plants will have to be built to accomodate the growing demand for electricity. Other alternatives being considered are renewable energy resources. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of a research project in which 10 electric utilities in Florida and the Florida Electric Power Coordinating Group rated six Solar Electric options. The Solar Electric options considered are: 1) Wind, 2) P.V., 3) Solar thermal-electric, 4) OTEC, 5) Ocean current, and 6) Biomass. The questionaire involved rating the economic and technical feasibility, as well as, the potential environmental impact of these options in Florida. It also involved rating the difficulty in overcoming institutional barriers and assessing the status of each option. A copy of the questionaire is included after the references. The combined capacity of the participating utilities represent over 90% of the total generating capacity in Florida. A list of the participating utilities is also included. This research was done in partial fulfillment for the Mater's of Science Degree in Coastal Zone Management. This paper is complementary to another paper (in these condensed conference proceedings) titled COASTAL ZONE ENERGY MANAGEMENT: A multidisciplinary approach for the integration of Solar Electric Systems with Florida's power generation system, which present a summary of the Master's thesis.

  10. Electric Trade in the United States

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1998-01-01

    Final Issue. Presents information on bulk power transactions by investor-owned utilities, federal and other publicly-owned utilities, and cooperative utilities.

  11. Small Wind Electric Systems | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    lines extended to a remote location Help uninterruptible power supplies ride through extended utility outages. ... conditioning unit) Wiring Electrical disconnect switch Grounding ...

  12. Ocean Electric Power | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ocean Electric Power Place: United Kingdom Sector: Renewable Energy Product: UK-based offshore project developer. The firm is actively engaged in the development of offshore...

  13. Battery Chargers | Electrical Power Conversion and Storage

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Battery Chargers | Electrical Power Conversion and Storage 625 West A Street | Lincoln, NE 68522-1794 ... TO: United States Department of Energy (DOE), Via Email, ...

  14. Electric sales and revenue, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-21

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. This publication provides information about sales of electricity, its associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour sold to residential, commercial, industrial, and other consumers throughout the United States. Previous publications presented data on typical electric bills at specified consumption levels as well as sales, revenues, and average revenue. The sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1990. The electric revenue reported by each electric utility includes the revenue billed for the amount of kilowatthours sold, revenue from income, unemployment and other State and local taxes, energy or demand charges, consumer services charges, environmental surcharges, franchise fees, fuel adjustments, and other miscellaneous charges. Average revenue per kilowatthour is defined as the cost per unit of electricity sold and is calculated by dividing retail sales into the associated electric revenue. The sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in this report are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels.

  15. International Electricity Regulation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Regulation International Electricity Regulation U.S. trade in electric energy with Canada and Mexico is rising, bringing economic and reliability benefits to the United States and its trading partners. Within the Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability, the Permitting, Siting and Analysis Division is responsible for authorizing exports of electric energy and issuing Presidential permits for the construction, operation, maintenance and connection of electric transmission

  16. United States

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    be applicable to electric capacity and energy available from the Dale Hollow, Center Hill, Wolf Creek, Cheatham, Old Hickory, Barkley, J. Percy Priest, and Cordell Hull Projects...

  17. United States

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project sold under agreement between the Department of Energy and the Customer. Character of Service: The electric capacity and energy supplied hereunder will be three-phase ...

  18. United States

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This rate schedule does not apply to energy from pumping operations at the Carters and Richard B. Russell Projects. Character of Service: The electric capacity and energy supplied ...

  19. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    United States Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 United States profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 1,039,137 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 132,711 12.8 Geothermal 2,405 0.2 Hydro Conventional 78,825 7.6 Solar 941 0.1 Wind 39,135 3.8

  20. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    United States Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 United States profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 1,039,137 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 132,711 12.8 Geothermal 2,405 0.2 Hydro Conventional 78,825 7.6 Solar 941 0.1 Wind 39,135 3.8

  1. Electric sales and revenue: 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-01-01

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. This publication provides information about sales of electricity, its associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour sold to residential, commercial, industrial, and other consumers throughout the United States. The sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour data provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1993. Operating revenue includes energy charges, demand charges, consumer service charges, environmental surcharges, fuel adjustments, and other miscellaneous charges. The revenue does not include taxes, such as sales and excise taxes, that are assessed on the consumer and collected through the utility. Average revenue per kilowatthour is defined as the cost per unit of electricity sold and is calculated by dividing retail sales into the associated electric revenue. Because electric rates vary based on energy usage, average revenue per kilowatthour are affected by changes in the volume of sales. The sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour data provided in this report are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels.

  2. Electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    Quiet, clean, and efficient, electric vehicles (EVs) may someday become a practical mode of transportation for the general public. Electric vehicles can provide many advantages for the nation's environment and energy supply because they run on electricity, which can be produced from many sources of energy such as coal, natural gas, uranium, and hydropower. These vehicles offer fuel versatility to the transportation sector, which depends almost solely on oil for its energy needs. Electric vehicles are any mode of transportation operated by a motor that receives electricity from a battery or fuel cell. EVs come in all shapes and sizes and may be used for different tasks. Some EVs are small and simple, such as golf carts and electric wheel chairs. Others are larger and more complex, such as automobile and vans. Some EVs, such as fork lifts, are used in industries. In this fact sheet, we will discuss mostly automobiles and vans. There are also variations on electric vehicles, such as hybrid vehicles and solar-powered vehicles. Hybrid vehicles use electricity as their primary source of energy, however, they also use a backup source of energy, such as gasoline, methanol or ethanol. Solar-powered vehicles are electric vehicles that use photovoltaic cells (cells that convert solar energy to electricity) rather than utility-supplied electricity to recharge the batteries. This paper discusses these concepts.

  3. Statement of Patricia Hoffman, Acting Assistant Secretary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, U.S. Department of Energy Before the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, United States Senate, March 3, 2009

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Statement of Patricia Hoffman, Acting Assistant Secretary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, DOE, before the Senate Committe on Energy and Natural Resources on the department's...

  4. United States

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    l 0 United States Office of Research and Environmental Protection Agency Development Washington, DC 20460 EPA 600/R-94/209 January 1993 Offsite Environment itoring Report adiation Monitoring Around United States Nuclear Test Areas, Calendar Year 1992 UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING SYSTEMS LABORATORY-LAS VEGAS P.O. BOX 93478 LAS VEGAS, NEVADA 89193-3478 , 702/798-2100 April 20, 1995 Dear Reader: Since 1954, the U.S.

  5. United States

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    - I United States Department of Energy D lSCk Al M E R "This book was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe

  6. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeMeo, E.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented at Wind Powering America States Summit. The Summit, which follows the American Wind Energy Association's (AWEA's) annual WINDPOWER Conference and Exhibition, provides state Wind Working Groups, state energy officials, U.S. Energy Department and national laboratory representatives, and professional and institutional partners an opportunity to review successes, opportunities, and challenges for wind energy and plan future collaboration.

  7. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented at the 2012 RE AMP Annual Meeting. RE-AMP is an active network of 144 nonprofits and foundations across eight Midwestern states working on climate change and energy policy with the goal of reducing global warming pollution economy-wide 80% by 2050.

  8. United States

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Bangor Hydro-Electric Company OE Docket No. PP-89-1 Amendment to Presidential Permit Order No. PP-89-1 December 30,2005 PRESIDENTIAL PERMIT AMENDMENT Bangor Hydro-Electric Company Order No. PP-89-1 I. BACKGROUND The Department of Energy (DOE) has responsibility for implementing Executive Order (E.O.) 10485, as amended by E.O. 12038, which requires the issuance of a Presidential permit by DOE before electric trans~nission facilities may be constructed, operated, maintained, or connected at the

  9. United States

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... by contract between the Administrator and TVA. Big Rivers Electric Corporation 32.660 % Exhibit B-1 City of Henderson, Kentucky 2.202 % Energy to be Furnished by the ...

  10. United States

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    CBR-1-I Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to Big Rivers Electric Corporation and the City of Henderson, Kentucky (hereinafter called the Customer). Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to electric capacity and energy available from the Dale Hollow, Center Hill, Wolf Creek, Cheatham, Old Hickory, Barkley, J. Percy Priest, and Cordell Hull Projects (all of such projects being hereinafter called collectively the "Cumberland Projects") and sold in

  11. Electrical Safety

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... Electrical Design Criteria ... of High-Voltage and Low-Current ... as a higher level of authority. Per the Integrated Safety Management model, ...

  12. Electric Vehicles

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ozpineci, Burak

    2014-07-23

    Burak Ozpineci sees a future where electric vehicles charge while we drive them down the road, thanks in part to research under way at ORNL.

  13. Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozpineci, Burak

    2014-05-02

    Burak Ozpineci sees a future where electric vehicles charge while we drive them down the road, thanks in part to research under way at ORNL.

  14. Alternative Fuels Data Center: San Diego Prepares for Electric Vehicles in

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Multi-Unit Dwelling Communities San Diego Prepares for Electric Vehicles in Multi-Unit Dwelling Communities to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: San Diego Prepares for Electric Vehicles in Multi-Unit Dwelling Communities on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: San Diego Prepares for Electric Vehicles in Multi-Unit Dwelling Communities on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: San Diego Prepares for Electric Vehicles in Multi-Unit Dwelling

  15. Electric power monthly, May 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. This publication provides monthly statistics for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Statistics by company and plant are published on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels.

  16. Electric power annual 1997. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-07-01

    The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric power industry statistics at national, regional, and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policy-makers, analysts, and the general public with data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. Volume 1 -- with a focus on US electric utilities -- contains final 1997 data on net generation and fossil fuel consumption, stocks, receipts, and cost; preliminary 1997 data on generating unit capability, and retail sales of electricity, associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold (based on a monthly sample: Form EIA-826, ``Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Report with State Distributions``). Additionally, information on net generation from renewable energy sources and on the associated generating capability is included in Volume 1 of the EPA.

  17. Renewable Electricity: How do you know you have it? (Fact Sheet...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    consumer of electricity claim to be using renewables? In the United States, renewable energy certificates (RECs) are used to track renewable electricity from the point of...

  18. Electric machine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    El-Refaie, Ayman Mohamed Fawzi; Reddy, Patel Bhageerath

    2012-07-17

    An interior permanent magnet electric machine is disclosed. The interior permanent magnet electric machine comprises a rotor comprising a plurality of radially placed magnets each having a proximal end and a distal end, wherein each magnet comprises a plurality of magnetic segments and at least one magnetic segment towards the distal end comprises a high resistivity magnetic material.

  19. NREL: Transmission Grid Integration - Wholesale Electricity Market

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Operations Wholesale Electricity Market Operations Researchers at NREL are studying wholesale electricity market operations to understand how they currently maximize competition, efficiency, and fairness and the ways that renewable energy resources and other emerging technologies may be impacting the outcomes of these markets. About two-thirds of the United States' electricity load is operated under restructured electricity markets administered by independent system operators (ISOs) and

  20. Statement of Patricia A. Hoffman, Deputy Director of Research and Development and Acting Chief Operating Officer, Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability, Department of Energy before the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources United States

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Statement of Patricia A. Hoffman, Deputy Director of R&D and Acting Chief Operating Officer, Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability, Department of Energy, before the Senate...

  1. Benefits of Using Mobile Transformers and Mobile Substations for Rapidly Restoring Electrical Service: a Report to the United States Congress Pursuant to Section 1816 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (August 2006)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Section 1816 of EPACT calls for a report on the benefits of using mobile transformers and mobile substations (MTS) to rapidly restore electrical service to areas subjected to blackouts as a result...

  2. Electric sales and revenue 1991. [Contains Glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. This publication provides information about sales of electricity, its associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour sold to residential, commercial, industrial, and other consumers throughout the United States. Previous publications presented data on typical electric bills at specified consumption levels as well as sales, revenue, and average revenue. The sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in this report are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels.

  3. Electrical connector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dilliner, Jennifer L.; Baker, Thomas M.; Akasam, Sivaprasad; Hoff, Brian D.

    2006-11-21

    An electrical connector includes a female component having one or more receptacles, a first test receptacle, and a second test receptacle. The electrical connector also includes a male component having one or more terminals configured to engage the one or more receptacles, a first test pin configured to engage the first test receptacle, and a second test pin configured to engage the second test receptacle. The first test receptacle is electrically connected to the second test receptacle, and at least one of the first test pin and the second test pin is shorter in length than the one or more terminals.

  4. Inventory of power plants in the United States 1990. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-23

    The purpose of this publication is to provide year-end statistics about electric generating units operated by electric utilities in the United States (the 50 States and the District of Columbia). The publication also provides a 10-year outlook of future generating unit additions. The Summary Statistics chapter contains aggregate capacity statistics at the national and various regional levels for operable electric generating units and planned electric generating unit additions. Aggregate capacity data at the national level are presented by energy source and by prime mover. Aggregate capacity data at the various regional levels are presented by prime energy source. Planned capacity additions in new units are summarized by year, 1991 through 2000. Additionally, this chapter contains a summary of electric generating unit retirements, by energy source and year, from 1991 through 2000. The chapter on Operable Electric Generating Units contains data about each operable electric generating unit and each electric generating unit that was retired from service during the year. Additionally, it contains a summary by energy source of electric generating unit capacity additions and retirements during 1990. Finally, the chapter on Projected Electric Generating Unit Additions contains data about each electric generating unit scheduled by electric utilities to start operation between 1991 and 2000. 11 figs., 22 tabs.

  5. National Electric Transmission Congestion Study

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Electric Transmission Congestion Study September 2015 United States Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Department of Energy | September 2015 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study | Page i Message from the Secretary In this study, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE, the Department) seeks to provide information about transmission congestion by focusing on specific indications of transmission constraints and congestion and their consequences. The study focuses primarily on a

  6. Electrical Safety

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Fig. 1-1. Flow down of Electrical AHJ and worker responsibility. 3 DOE-HDBK-1092-2013 2.0 ... When equipment contains storage batteries, workers should be protected from the various ...

  7. Project Overview: United Parcel Service's Second-Generation Hybrid...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Project Overview: United Parcel Service's Second-Generation Hybrid-Electric Delivery Vans Medium-duty commercial vehicles such as moving trucks, beverage-delivery trucks, and ...

  8. Seismic hazard methodology for the Central and Eastern United...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Methodology for the Central and Eastern United States.'' This topical report was submitted jointly by the Seismicity Owners Group (SOG) and the Electric Power Research ...

  9. Green Power Marketing in the United States: A Status Report ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    green power marketing activities and trends in the United States, focusing on consumer decisions to purchase electricity supplied from renewable energy sources. Date October 2008 ...

  10. Operation of Grand Gulf Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2, Dockets Nos. 50-416 and 50-417: Mississippi Power and Light Company, Middle South Energy, Inc. , South Mississippi Electric Power Association. Final environmental statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-09-01

    The information in this Final Environmental Statement is the second assessment of the environmental impacts associated with the construction and operation of the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2, located on the Mississippi River in Claiborne County, Mississippi. The Draft Environmental Statement was issued in May 1981. The first assessment was the Final Environmental Statement related to construction, which was issued in August 1973 prior to issuance of the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station construction permits. In September 1981 Grand Gulf Unit 1 was 92% complete and Unit 2 was 22% complete. Fuel loading for Unit 1 is scheduled for December 1981. The present assessment is the result of the NRC staff review of the activities associated with the proposed operation of the Station, and includes the staff responses to comments on the Draft Environmental Statement.

  11. Electric generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foster, Jr., John S.; Wilson, James R.; McDonald, Jr., Charles A.

    1983-01-01

    1. In an electrical energy generator, the combination comprising a first elongated annular electrical current conductor having at least one bare surface extending longitudinally and facing radially inwards therein, a second elongated annular electrical current conductor disposed coaxially within said first conductor and having an outer bare surface area extending longitudinally and facing said bare surface of said first conductor, the contiguous coaxial areas of said first and second conductors defining an inductive element, means for applying an electrical current to at least one of said conductors for generating a magnetic field encompassing said inductive element, and explosive charge means disposed concentrically with respect to said conductors including at least the area of said inductive element, said explosive charge means including means disposed to initiate an explosive wave front in said explosive advancing longitudinally along said inductive element, said wave front being effective to progressively deform at least one of said conductors to bring said bare surfaces thereof into electrically conductive contact to progressively reduce the inductance of the inductive element defined by said conductors and transferring explosive energy to said magnetic field effective to generate an electrical potential between undeformed portions of said conductors ahead of said explosive wave front.

  12. United States

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    onp5fGonal Ruord United States of America . I. .' - PROCEEDINGS AND DEBATES OF THE 9t?lh CONGRESS, FIRST SESSION United States Government Printing Office SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS Wash!ogtm. 0.C 20402 OFFICIAL BUSINESS Penalty for pwate use. sco Congressmal Record (USPS 087-390) Postage and Fees Pad I.) s ~lJ"er"ment Prlntlng OffIce 375 SECOND CLASS NEWSPAPER -...~-- -~- -- --- H 45' 78 ' cCJ~GRESSIONAL RECORD - HOUSE June 28, 1983 H.J. Res. 213: Mr. BOLAND, Mr. WAXM.UG Mr. OBERSTAR.

  13. United States

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    onSres;eional atecord United States of America :- PROCEEDINGS AND DEBATES OF THE 981h CONGRESS, FIRST SESSION United States Government Printing Office SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS Washwtn. D C 20402 OFFICIAL BUSINESS Penalty for plvate use. $300 Congressmnal Record (USPS 087-390) Postage and Fees Pad U S Government Prtnttng Offlce 375 SECOND CLASS NEWSPAPER H 45' 78 * C.QvGRESSIONAL RECORD - HOUSE .-. June 28, 1983 H.J. Res. 273: Mr. BOLAND. Mr. Whxrdhr?. Mr. OBERsThx. Mi. BEDELL, Mr. BONER of

  14. How to Read Your Electric Meter | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Your Electric Meter How to Read Your Electric Meter The difference between one month's reading and the next is the amount of energy units that have been used for that billing...

  15. Electric Cooperatives Channel Solar Resources to Rural American Communities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Some of the most remote areas in the United States were also some of the last places to get access to electricity, with as many as nine out of ten rural homes without electricity in the mid-1930s....

  16. Green Button Initiative Makes Headway with Electric Industry...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... including San Diego Gas & Electric (SDG&E), Pacific Gas & Electric, Southern California Edison, ComEd, and Pepco in the United States, and London Hydro and Hydro One in Canada. ...

  17. United States

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2-C Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to public bodies and cooperatives (any one of whom is hereinafter called the Customer) in Virginia to whom power may be transmitted pursuant to contracts between the Government, American Electric Power Service Corporation (hereinafter called the Company), the Company's Transmission Operator, currently PJM Interconnection LLC (hereinafter called PJM), and the Customer. The Customer has chosen to self-schedule and does not receive Government

  18. United States

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3-C Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to public bodies and cooperatives (any one of whom is hereinafter called the Customer) in Virginia to whom power may be scheduled pursuant to contracts between the Government, American Electric Power Service Corporation (hereinafter called the Company), PJM Interconnection LLC (hereinafter called PJM), and the Customer. The Government is responsible for providing the scheduling. The Customer is responsible for providing a transmission

  19. United States

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    CC-1-J Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to public bodies and cooperatives served through the facilities of Duke Energy Progress (formerly known as Carolina Power & Light Company), Western Division (hereinafter called the Customers). Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to electric capacity and energy available from the Dale Hollow, Center Hill, Wolf Creek, Cheatham, Old Hickory, Barkley, J. Percy Priest, and Cordell Hull Projects (all of such projects

  20. United States

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    CEK-1-I Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to East Kentucky Power Cooperative (hereinafter called the Customer). Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to electric capacity and energy available from the Dale Hollow, Center Hill, Wolf Creek, Cheatham, Old Hickory, Barkley, J. Percy Priest, and Cordell Hull Projects (all of such projects being hereinafter called collectively the "Cumberland Projects") and power available from the Laurel Project and sold in

  1. United States

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Southeastern Power Administration Wholesale Power Rate Schedule CSI-1-I Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to Southern Illinois Power Cooperative (hereinafter the Customer). Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to electric capacity and energy available from the Dale Hollow, Center Hill, Wolf Creek, Cheatham, Old Hickory, Barkley, J. Percy Priest, and Cordell Hull Projects (all of such projects being hereinafter called collectively the

  2. United States

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    CTV-1-I Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to the Tennessee Valley Authority (hereinafter called TVA) on behalf of members of the Tennessee Valley Public Power Association (hereinafter called TVPPA). Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to electric capacity and energy generated at the Dale Hollow, Center Hill, Wolf Creek, Old Hickory, Cheatham, Barkley, J. Percy Priest, and Cordell Hull Projects (all of such projects being hereafter called collectively the

  3. United States

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    CTVI-1-B Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to customers (hereinafter called the Customer) who are or were formerly in the Tennessee Valley Authority (hereinafter called TVA) service area. Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to electric capacity and energy generated at the Dale Hollow, Center Hill, Wolf Creek, Old Hickory, Cheatham, Barkley, J. Percy Priest, and Cordell Hull Projects (all of such projects being hereafter called collectively the "Cumberland

  4. United States

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    4-C Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to public bodies and cooperatives (any one of whom is hereinafter called the Customer) in Virginia served through the facilities of American Electric Power Service Corporation (hereinafter called the Company) and PJM Interconnection LLC (hereinafter called PJM). The Customer has chosen to self- schedule and does not receive Government power under an arrangement where the Company schedules the power and provides a credit on the Customer's

  5. United States

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    NC-1-C Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to public bodies and cooperatives (any one of whom is hereinafter called the Customer) in Virginia and North Carolina to whom power may be transmitted pursuant to a contract between the Government and Virginia Electric and Power Company (hereinafter called the Virginia Power) and PJM Interconnection LLC (hereinafter called PJM), scheduled pursuant to a contract between the Government and Duke Energy Progress (formerly known as Carolina

  6. United States

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1-C Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to public bodies and cooperatives (any one of whom is hereinafter called the Customer) in Virginia and North Carolina to whom power may be transmitted and scheduled pursuant to contracts between the Government, Virginia Electric and Power Company (hereinafter called the Company), the Company's Transmission Operator, currently PJM Interconnection LLC (hereinafter called PJM), and the Customer. This rate schedule is applicable to customers

  7. United States

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2-C Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to public bodies and cooperatives (any one of whom is hereinafter called the Customer) in Virginia and North Carolina to whom power may be transmitted pursuant to contracts between the Government, Virginia Electric and Power Company (hereinafter called the Company), the Company's Transmission Operator, currently PJM Interconnection LLC (hereinafter called PJM), and the Customer. The Customer has chosen to self-schedule and does not receive

  8. United States

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    3-C Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to public bodies and cooperatives (any one of whom is hereinafter called the Customer) in Virginia and North Carolina to whom power may be scheduled pursuant to contracts between the Government, Virginia Electric and Power Company (hereinafter called the Company), the Company's Transmission Operator, currently PJM Interconnection LLC (hereinafter called PJM), and the Customer. The Government is responsible for providing the scheduling. The

  9. United States

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    4-C Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to public bodies and cooperatives (any one of whom is hereinafter called the Customer) in Virginia and North Carolina served through the transmission facilities of Virginia Electric and Power Company (hereinafter called the Company) and PJM Interconnection LLC (hereinafter called PJM). The Customer has chosen to self-schedule and does not receive Government power under an arrangement where the Company schedules the power and provides a

  10. CX-010162: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Revenue Meter Replacement at Oregon Trail Electric Co-ops (OTEC's) West John Day Substation CX(s) Applied: B1.7 Date: 03/13/2013 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  11. Noah Golding | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Noah Golding About Us Noah Golding - Communications Specialist, Wind and Water Power Technologies Office Most Recent Winning with Wind: Electric Co-ops Providing Clean Energy to Customers March 12

  12. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    New Hampshire Electric Co-Op- Low-Income Energy Assistance Grant Program The Energy Assistance Program is designed to help NHEC's income-qualified members manage energy use with...

  13. Conceptual Framework for Developing Resilience Metrics for the Electricity,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Oil, and Gas Sectors in the United States (September 2015) | Department of Energy Conceptual Framework for Developing Resilience Metrics for the Electricity, Oil, and Gas Sectors in the United States (September 2015) Conceptual Framework for Developing Resilience Metrics for the Electricity, Oil, and Gas Sectors in the United States (September 2015) This report has been written for the Department of Energy's Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability to support the Office of

  14. North American Electric Reliability Council Power Outage Update |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Power Outage Update North American Electric Reliability Council Power Outage Update The bulk electric transmission system in the United States and Canada has been restored and is operating reliably. Many of the generating units that tripped off line during the outage have returned to service and additional generating units are expected to return to service over the weekend. Virtually all customers have been returned to electric service, although some customers will

  15. Twelve-Month Evaluation of UPS Diesel Hybrid Electric Delivery...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... reduces petroleum use. 15. SUBJECT TERMS fuel economy; fuel savings; emissions reduction; hybrid electric diesel trucks; medium duty hybrid vehicles; United Parcel Service ; NREL

  16. Large Power Transformers and the U.S. Electric Grid

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... gas, and electric power, except for hydroelectric and commercial nuclear power facilities. ... being Japan, Germany, United States, France, Korea, and China (see Figure 5). 50 ...

  17. Spin relaxation and linear-in-electric-field frequency shift...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; APPROXIMATIONS; DIFFUSION; ELECTRIC FIELDS; GEOMETRY; MAGNETIC FIELDS; ...

  18. Statement of Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary for Electricity...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE). PDF icon Statement of Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, before the United States ...

  19. Development of YBCO Superconductor for Electric Systems: Cooperative...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Research Org: National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO. Sponsoring Org: USDOE Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Country of Publication: United ...

  20. Development of YBCO Superconductor for Electric Systems: Cooperative

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    technology. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO. USDOE Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability United States 2013-03-01 English Technical Report...

  1. Oncor Electric Delivery Company, LLC Smart Grid Demonstration...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Grid Demonstration Project Jump to: navigation, search Project Lead Oncor Electric Delivery Company, LLC Country United States Headquarters Location Dallas, Texas Recovery Act...

  2. Pacific Gas and Electric Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Company Jump to: navigation, search Name: Pacific Gas and Electric Company Address: PO Box 770000 Place: San Francisco Zip: 94177 Region: United States Sector: Marine and...

  3. Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Recommendations...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Recommendations for Achieving Them. A report to the United States Congress Pursuant to Section 1252 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 ...

  4. U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2002-01-01

    Final issue of this report. - Presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand side management (DSM) activities in the United States at the national, regional, and utility levels.

  5. Low Interest Energy Efficiency Loan Program (Electric and Gas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energize CT offers low interest loans for commercial and industrial customers for investments in energy efficiency improvements. Electric customers of Connecticut Light & Power, United...

  6. Electric sales and revenue, 1990. [Contains Glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-21

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. This publication provides information about sales of electricity, its associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour sold to residential, commercial, industrial, and other consumers throughout the United States. Previous publications presented data on typical electric bills at specified consumption levels as well as sales, revenues, and average revenue. The sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1990. The electric revenue reported by each electric utility includes the revenue billed for the amount of kilowatthours sold, revenue from income, unemployment and other State and local taxes, energy or demand charges, consumer services charges, environmental surcharges, franchise fees, fuel adjustments, and other miscellaneous charges. Average revenue per kilowatthour is defined as the cost per unit of electricity sold and is calculated by dividing retail sales into the associated electric revenue. The sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in this report are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels.

  7. Electric vehicle climate control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dauvergne, J.

    1994-04-01

    EVs have insufficient energy sources for a climatic comfort system. The heat rejection of the drivetrain is dispersed in the vehicle (electric motor, batteries, electronic unit for power control). Its level is generally low (no more than 2-kW peaks) and variable according to the trip profile, with no heat rejection at rest and a maximum during regenerative braking. Nevertheless, it must be used for heating. It is not realistic to have the A/C compressor driven by the electric traction motor: the motor does not operate when the vehicle is at rest, precisely when maximum cooling power is required. The same is true for hybrid vehicles during electric operation. It is necessary to develop solutions that use stored onboard energy either from the traction batteries or specific storage source. In either case, it is necessary to design the climate control system to use the energy efficiently to maximize range and save weight. Heat loss through passenger compartment seals and the walls of the passenger compartment must be limited. Plastic body panes help to reduce heat transfer, and heat gain is minimized with insulating glazing. This article describes technical solutions to solve the problem of passenger thermal comfort. However, the heating and A/C systems of electrically operated vehicles may have marginal performance at extreme outside temperatures.

  8. Energy Intensity Indicators: Electricity Generation Energy Intensity

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A kilowatt-hour (kWh) of electric energy delivered to the final user has an energy equivalent to 3,412 British thermal units (Btu). Figure E1, below, tracks how much energy was used by the various...

  9. O:\ELECTRIC\EA-177.ORD

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    BURKE-DIVIDE ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE, INC. ORDER NO. EA-177 I. BACKGROUND Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C. §824a(e)). On March 18, 1998, Burke-Divide Electric Cooperative, Inc. (Burke-Divide) applied to the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy (DOE) for authorization to transmit electric energy to Canada. Burke-Divide is a rural electric

  10. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Final" ,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ... ,,"RSEs for Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ...

  11. Electrically powered hand tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Myers, Kurt S.; Reed, Teddy R.

    2007-01-16

    An electrically powered hand tool is described and which includes a three phase electrical motor having a plurality of poles; an electrical motor drive electrically coupled with the three phase electrical motor; and a source of electrical power which is converted to greater than about 208 volts three-phase and which is electrically coupled with the electrical motor drive.

  12. Electricity transactions across international borders, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-10-01

    This report summarizes the electricity exchanges between the United States and Mexico and Canada during Calendar Year 1986. The construction, connection, operation and maintenance of any electric transmission facility which crosses an international border of the United States requires a Presidential permit. Presidential permits require that an annual report be filed by the permit holder detailing all transactions with the foreign country. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. UNITED STEELWORKERS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FOIARequestNovember 13, 2015 UNITED STEELWORKERS " ' " ' " USW Local 12-369 797 Stevens Drive Richland, Washington 99352 --P-hone-509-7-1-3-~J.180-or-FA-X:-509-71-3-1-783- - - * - - - UNRY AND $JIU!N$'!'H FQ.11; wc:HU<Elt5 November 13, 2015 USW-DLR-015-075 Dorothy Riehle, FOIA Officer Depa.rtment of Energy Richland Operations (RL) and (ORP) P.O. Box 550, Mail Stop A7-75 . Richland, WA 99352 SUBJECT: FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT AND/OR PRIVACY ACT REQUEST Dear Ms. Riehle: I am

  14. Electric sales and revenue 1992, April 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-20

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. This publication provides information about sales of electricity, its associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour sold to residential, commercial, industrial, and other consumers throughout the United States. The sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1992. The electric revenue reported by each electric utility includes the applicable revenue from kilowatthours sold; revenue from income; unemployment and other State and local taxes; energy, demand, and consumer service charges; environmental surcharges; franchise fees; fuel adjustments; and other miscellaneous charges. The revenue does not include taxes, such as sales and excise taxes, that are assessed on the consumer and collected through the utility. Average revenue per kilowatthour is defined as the cost per unit of electricity sold and is calculated by dividing retail sales into the associated electric revenue. The sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in this report are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels.

  15. North America: Regulation of International Electricity Trade | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy America: Regulation of International Electricity Trade North America: Regulation of International Electricity Trade North America: Regulation of International Electricity Trade prepared by North American Energy Working Group on December 2002. PDF icon North America: Regulation of International Electricity Trade More Documents & Publications Regulatory Side-by-Side Governing Permitting of Cross-Border Electricity Transmission Facilities Between the United States and Canada Guide

  16. Electric power monthly, October 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-20

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels.

  17. Electric power monthly, January 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-26

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels.

  18. Electric power monthly, February 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-16

    The Electric Power Monthly (EMP) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels.

  19. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Methodology and Documentation General The Electricity Monthly Update is prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics,...

  20. Electricity Monthly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Contact Information and Staff The Electricity Monthly Update is prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics, U.S. ...

  1. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contact Information and Staff The Electricity Monthly Update is prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics, U.S....

  2. UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    A.' +4 @4.dY MDDC - 1613 UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION 34.27 : . Production of Rarer Metals by George Meister Westinghouse Electric Corporation This document consists ofllpages. Date of ianuscrtpt: unknown Date Declassified: February 11, 1948 This document is issued for official use. Its issuance does not constitute authority to declassify coptes or versions of the same or similar content and title and by the same author(s). Technical Information Division. Oak Ridge DIrected Operations

  3. Electricity Reform Abroad and U.S. Investment

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1997-01-01

    Reviews and analyzes the recent electricity reforms in Argentina, Australia, and the United Kingdom in an attempt to better understand how different models of privatization and reform have worked in practice. This report also analyzes the motivations of the U.S. companies who have invested in the electricity industries of Argentina, Australia, and the United Kingdom.

  4. Electrical receptacle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leong, Robert

    1993-01-01

    The invention is a receptacle for a three prong electrical plug which has either a tubular or U-shaped grounding prong. The inventive receptacle has a grounding prong socket which is sufficiently spacious to prevent the socket from significantly stretching when a larger, U-shaped grounding prong is inserted into the socket, and having two ridges to allow a snug fit when a smaller tubular shape grounding prong is inserted into the socket. The two ridges are made to prevent the socket from expanding when either the U-shaped grounding prong or the tubular grounding prong is inserted.

  5. Electrical receptacle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leong, R.

    1993-06-22

    The invention is a receptacle for a three prong electrical plug which has either a tubular or U-shaped grounding prong. The inventive receptacle has a grounding prong socket which is sufficiently spacious to prevent the socket from significantly stretching when a larger, U-shaped grounding prong is inserted into the socket, and having two ridges to allow a snug fit when a smaller tubular shape grounding prong is inserted into the socket. The two ridges are made to prevent the socket from expanding when either the U-shaped grounding prong or the tubular grounding prong is inserted.

  6. Energy conservation and electricity sector liberalization: Case-studies on the development of cogeneration, wind energy and demand-side management in the Netherlands, Denmark, Germany and the United Kingdom

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slingerland, S.

    1998-07-01

    In this paper, the development of cogeneration, wind energy and demand-side management in the Netherlands, Denmark, Germany and the United Kingdom are compared. It is discussed to what extent these developments are determined by the liberalization process. Three key liberalization variables are identified: unbundling, privatization and introduction of competition. The analysis suggests that unbundling prior to introduction of full competition in generation is particularly successful in stimulating industrial cogeneration; simultaneous introduction of competition and unbundling mainly stimulates non-cogeneration gas-based capacity; and introduction of competition in itself is likely to impede the development of district-heating cogeneration. Furthermore, it is argued that development of wind energy and demand-side management are primarily dependent on the kind of support system set up by policy makers rather than on the liberalization process. Negative impacts of introduction of competition on integrated resource planning and commercial energy services could nevertheless be expected.

  7. Electric power monthly, July 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended. The EPM is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels. Data on quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels lag data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, electricity sales, and average revenue per kilowatthour by 1 month. This difference in reporting appears in the US, Census division, and State level tables. However, for purposes of comparison, plant-level data are presented for the earlier month.

  8. Guide to Federal Regulation of Sales of Imported Electricity in Canada,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mexico and the United States | Department of Energy Federal Regulation of Sales of Imported Electricity in Canada, Mexico and the United States Guide to Federal Regulation of Sales of Imported Electricity in Canada, Mexico and the United States A Publication of The North American Energy Working Group on January 2005 PDF icon Guide to Federal Regulation of Sales of Imported Electricity in Canada, Mexico and the United States More Documents & Publications North America: Regulation of

  9. Projecting Electricity Demand in 2050

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hostick, Donna J.; Belzer, David B.; Hadley, Stanton W.; Markel, Tony; Marnay, Chris; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW

    2014-07-01

    This paper describes the development of end-use electricity projections and load curves that were developed for the Renewable Electricity (RE) Futures Study (hereafter RE Futures), which explored the prospect of higher percentages (30% − 90%) of total electricity generation that could be supplied by renewable sources in the United States. As input to RE Futures, two projections of electricity demand were produced representing reasonable upper and lower bounds of electricity demand out to 2050. The electric sector models used in RE Futures required underlying load profiles, so RE Futures also produced load profile data in two formats: 8760 hourly data for the year 2050 for the GridView model, and in 2-year increments for 17 time slices as input to the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model. The process for developing demand projections and load profiles involved three steps: discussion regarding the scenario approach and general assumptions, literature reviews to determine readily available data, and development of the demand curves and load profiles.

  10. Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Recommendations for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Achieving Them. A report to the United States Congress Pursuant to Section 1252 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (February 2006) | Department of Energy Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Recommendations for Achieving Them. A report to the United States Congress Pursuant to Section 1252 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (February 2006) Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Recommendations for Achieving Them. A report to the United States Congress Pursuant to Section

  11. Inventory of Power Plants in the United States, October 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-27

    The Inventory of Power Plants in the United States is prepared annually by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), US Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of this publication is to provide year-end statistics about electric generating units operated by electric utilities in the United States (the 50 States and the District of Columbia). The publication also provides a 10-year outlook of future generating unit additions. Data summarized in this report are useful to a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. Data presented in this report were assembled and published by the EIA to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended. The report is organized into the following chapters: Year in Review, Operable Electric Generating Units, and Projected Electric Generating Unit Additions. Statistics presented in these chapters reflect the status of electric generating units as of December 31, 1992.

  12. Electric power annual 1996. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-08-01

    The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric power industry statistics at national, regional, and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policy-makers, analysts, and the general public with data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. Volume 1--with a focus on US electric utilities--contains final 1996 data on net generation and fossil fuel consumption, stocks, receipts, and cost; preliminary 1996 data on generating unit capability, and retail sales of electricity, associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Additionally, information on net generation from renewable energy sources and on the associated generating capability is included in Volume 1 of the EPA. Data published in the Electric Power Annual Volume 1 are compiled from three statistical forms filed monthly and two forms filed annually by electric utilities. These forms are described in detail in the Technical Notes. 5 figs., 30 tabs.

  13. State Renewable Electricity Profiles 2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Renewable Electricity Profiles 2010 March 2012 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as

  14. Electricity reform abroad and US investment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-10-01

    This report reviews and analyzes the recent electricity reforms in Argentina, Australia, and the United Kingdom (UK) to illustrate how different models of privatization and reform have worked in practice. This report also analyzes the motivations of the U.S. companies who have invested in the electricity industries in these countries, which have become the largest targets of U.S. foreign investment in electricity. Two calculations of foreign investment are used. One is the foreign direct investment series produced by the U.S. Department of Commerce. The other is based on transactions in electric utilities of the three countries. The electricity reform and privatization experiences reviewed may offer some insight as to how the U.S. electricity industry might develop as a result of recent domestic reform efforts and deregulation at the state and national levels. 126 refs., 23 figs., 27 tabs.

  15. Electrically conductive alternating copolymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aldissi, M.; Jorgensen, B.S.

    1987-08-31

    Polymers which are soluble in common organic solvents and are electrically conductive, but which also may be synthesized in such a manner that they become nonconductive. Negative ions from the electrolyte used in the electrochemical synthesis of a polymer are incorporated into the polymer during the synthesis and serve as a dopant. A further electrochemical step may be utilized to cause the polymer to be conductive. The monomer repeat unit is comprised of two rings, a pyrrole molecule joined to a thienyl group, or a furyl group, or a phenyl group. The individual groups of the polymers are arranged in an alternating manner. For example, the backbone arrangement of poly(furylpyrrole) is -furan-pyrrole-furan-pyrrole- furan-pyrrole. An alkyl group or phenyl group may be substituted for either or both of the hydrogen atoms of the pyrrole ring.

  16. Optimal Electric Utility Expansion

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1989-10-10

    SAGE-WASP is designed to find the optimal generation expansion policy for an electrical utility system. New units can be automatically selected from a user-supplied list of expansion candidates which can include hydroelectric and pumped storage projects. The existing system is modeled. The calculational procedure takes into account user restrictions to limit generation configurations to an area of economic interest. The optimization program reports whether the restrictions acted as a constraint on the solution. All expansionmore » configurations considered are required to pass a user supplied reliability criterion. The discount rate and escalation rate are treated separately for each expansion candidate and for each fuel type. All expenditures are separated into local and foreign accounts, and a weighting factor can be applied to foreign expenditures.« less

  17. TO: Honorable Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary for Electricity Delivery

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    TO: Honorable Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, U.S. Department of Energy FROM: Electricity Advisory Committee (EAC) Richard Cowart, Chair DATE: September 25, 2014 RE: Expanding and Modernizing the Electric Power Delivery System for the 21 st Century Introduction The United States electricity system is undergoing more change than it has in many decades. The causes are numerous: a changing mix of resources driven by lowering prices, climate

  18. Electric Utility Sales and Revenue - EIA-826 detailed data file

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    826 detailed data Find detailed data at right for: net metering | advanced metering | solar (PV) estimates | sales and revenue | green pricing The Form EIA-826 "Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Report with State Distributions" collects sales of electricity and associated revenue, each month, from a statistically chosen sample of electric utilities in the United States. The respondents to the Form EIA-826 are chosen from the Form EIA-861, "Annual Electric Utility

  19. An Updated Assessement of Copper Wire Thefts from Electric Utilities -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    October 2010 | Department of Energy An Updated Assessement of Copper Wire Thefts from Electric Utilities - October 2010 An Updated Assessement of Copper Wire Thefts from Electric Utilities - October 2010 The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability monitors changes, threats, and risks to the energy infrastructure in the United States. This report updates a previously published report on copper wire theft. The combined efforts of electric

  20. Inventory of power plants in the United States 1989. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-09-21

    This document is prepared annually by the Electric Power Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), US Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of this publication is to provide year-end statistics about electric generating units in operation and to provide a 10-year outlook of future generating unit additions by electric utilities in the United States (the 50 states and the District of Columbia). Data summarized in this report are useful to a wide audience including Congress, federal and state agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The data presented in this report were assembled and published by the EIA, to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended. The report is organized into the following chapters: Summary Statistics; Operable Electric Generating Units; and Projected Electric Generating Unit Additions.

  1. The renewable electric plant information system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinclair, K.

    1995-12-01

    This report explains the procedures used for creating the Renewable Electric Plant Information System (REPiS) database, describes the database fields, and summarizes the data. The REPiS database contains comprehensive information on grid-connected renewable electric generation plants in the United States. Originally designed in 1987 and updated in 1990, the database includes information through 1994. The report also illustrates ways of using the data for analysis is and describes how researchers validated the data.

  2. North American Electric Reliability Council Outage Announcement |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Outage Announcement North American Electric Reliability Council Outage Announcement Starting at about 4:11 p.m. EDT, major losses of electric load occurred in the northeastern United States and Canada in the Eastern Interconnection. Although the exact cause is not known at present, the outages are not the result of a terrorist attack. The areas most affected center around the Great Lakes: Michigan, Ohio, New York City, Ontario, Quebec, northern New Jersey, Massachusetts,

  3. Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Sales: December 2010 - June...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Sales: December 2010 - June 2013 Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Sales: December 2010 - June 2013 Sales data for various models of ...

  4. Estimating the Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Electricity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Electricity Markets - EAC 2011 Estimating the Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Electricity Markets - EAC 2011 The purpose of this ...

  5. Technology Roadmap - Electric and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Roadmap - Electric and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Technology Roadmap - Electric and Plug-in Hybrid Electric...

  6. Electricity exchanges across international borders - 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-09-01

    This report summarizes the electricity exchanges between the US and Mexico and Canada during calendar year 1983. The construction, operation and maintenance of any electric transmission facility which crosses an international border of the United States requires a Presidential Permit. These permits have been granted by the Department of Energy (DOE) since its formation in 1977. Between 1953 and 1977, these permits were issued by the former Federal Power Commission. Prior to 1953, they were issued by the President of the United States. Presidential Permits require that an annual report be filed by the permit holder detailing all transactions with the foreign country.

  7. Electrical safety guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The Electrical Safety Guidelines prescribes the DOE safety standards for DOE field offices or facilities involved in the use of electrical energy. It has been prepared to provide a uniform set of electrical safety standards and guidance for DOE installations in order to affect a reduction or elimination of risks associated with the use of electrical energy. The objectives of these guidelines are to enhance electrical safety awareness and mitigate electrical hazards to employees, the public, and the environment.

  8. DOE handbook electrical safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-01

    Electrical Safety Handbook presents the Department of Energy (DOE) safety standards for DOE field offices or facilities involved in the use of electrical energy. It has been prepared to provide a uniform set of electrical safety guidance and information for DOE installations to effect a reduction or elimination of risks associated with the use of electrical energy. The objectives of this handbook are to enhance electrical safety awareness and mitigate electrical hazards to employees, the public, and the environment.

  9. How to Read Your Electric Meter | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Appliances & Electronics » How to Read Your Electric Meter How to Read Your Electric Meter The difference between one month's reading and the next is the amount of energy units that have been used for that billing period. | Photo courtesy of Warren Gretz, NREL. The difference between one month's reading and the next is the amount of energy units that have been used for that billing period. | Photo courtesy of Warren Gretz, NREL. The basic unit of measure of electric power is the Watt. One

  10. Estimated United States Transportation Energy Use 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, C A; Simon, A J; Belles, R D

    2011-11-09

    A flow chart depicting energy flow in the transportation sector of the United States economy in 2005 has been constructed from publicly available data and estimates of national energy use patterns. Approximately 31,000 trillion British Thermal Units (trBTUs) of energy were used throughout the United States in transportation activities. Vehicles used in these activities include automobiles, motorcycles, trucks, buses, airplanes, rail, and ships. The transportation sector is powered primarily by petroleum-derived fuels (gasoline, diesel and jet fuel). Biomass-derived fuels, electricity and natural gas-derived fuels are also used. The flow patterns represent a comprehensive systems view of energy used within the transportation sector.

  11. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Oregon Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Oregon) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Hydroelectric Net summer capacity (megawatts) 15,662 27 Electric ...

  12. Electricity Advisory Committee

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Coe Millennium Energy Phyllis Currie Pasadena Water and Power Clark Gellings Electric Power Research Institute Mark Lauby North American Electric Reliability Corporation Janice ...

  13. Electricity Advisory Committee

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Carlos Coe Millennium Energy Robert Curry Jr. CurryEnergy Clark Gellings Electric Power Research Institute Michael Heyeck American Electric Power (Ret.) Paul Hudson Stratus ...

  14. Electricity Advisory Committee

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Carlos Coe Millennium Energy Robert Curry Jr. CurryEnergy Clark Gellings Electric Power Research Institute Paul Hudson Stratus Energy Group Mark Lauby North American Electric ...

  15. Edison Electric Institute Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Fall 2011 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—discusses the Edison Electric Institute (EEI) and the current electricity landscape.

  16. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Virginia Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Virginia) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 26,292 16 Electric ...

  17. Electricity Monthly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Update November 28, 2012 Map of Electric System Selected for Daily Peak Demand was replaced with the correct map showing Selected Wholesale Electricity and Natural Gas Locations....

  18. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of electricity. End-use data is the first "data page" based on the assumption that information about retail electricity service is of greatest interest to a general...

  19. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Electric Power Sector comprises electricity-only and combined heat and power (CHP) plants within the North American Industrial Classification System 22 category whose...

  20. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    See all Electricity Reports Electricity Monthly Update With Data for November 2014 | Release Date: Jan. 26, 2015 | Next Release Date: Feb. 24, 2015 Previous Issues Issue:...

  1. Electricity Monthly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Electricity Monthly Update Explained Highlights The Highlights page features in the center ... presents statistics on end-use: retail ratesprices and consumption of electricity. ...

  2. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Retail ratesprices and consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and ... and these competitive retail suppliers offer electricity at a market-based price. ...

  3. Electric vehicles: Likely consequences of US and other nations` programs and policies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, Kwai-Cheung

    1994-12-30

    This report examines international electric vehicle development and commercialization programs. The study encompassed a review of current barriers to widespread electric vehicle implementation, field visits in seven nations and the United States to examine electric vehicle programs and policies, and analyses of electric vehicle effects on economics, energy, and the environment.

  4. Inventory of power plants in the United States 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-10-18

    The Inventory of Power Plants in the US provides year-end statistics on generating units operated by electric utilities in the US (the 50 States and the District of Columbia). Statistics presented in this report reflect the status of generating units as of December 31, 1994. The publication also provides a 10-year outlook for generating unit additions. This report is prepared annually by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy (DOE). Data summarized in this report are useful to a wide audience including Congress, Federal, and State agencies; the electric utility industry; and the general public. This is a report of electric utility data; in cases where summary data of nonutility capacity are presented, it is specifically noted as such.

  5. Inventory of power plants in the United States, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    The Inventory of Power Plants in the United States is prepared annually by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of this publication is to provide year-end statistics about electric generating units operated by electric utilities in the United States (the 50 States and the District of Columbia). The publication also provides a 10-year outlook of future generating unit additions. Data summarized in this report are useful to a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. Data presented in this report were assembled and published by the EIA to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended.

  6. Green Power Marketing in the United States: A Status Report (11th Edition)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report documents green power marketing activities and trends in the United States, focusing on consumer decisions to purchase electricity supplied from renewable energy sources.

  7. Ancillary Services in the United States: Independent System Operator (ISO) Perspective (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cochran, J.

    2013-05-01

    The presentation provides an overview of how increasing penetrations of variable renewable energy on the electricity grid are impacting ancillary services markets in the United States.

  8. Integrated electrical connector (Patent) | DOEPatents

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Integrated electrical connector Title: Integrated electrical connector An electrical ... The opening is also smaller than the diameter of an electrically conductive contact pin. ...

  9. O:\ELECTRIC\EA-178.ORD

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    78 I. BACKGROUND Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C. §824a(e)). On March 19, 1998, Citizens Power Sales (CP Sales) applied to the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy (DOE) for authorization to transmit electric energy to Mexico as a power marketer. CP Sales does not own or control any electric generating or transmission facilities, nor does

  10. O:\ELECTRIC\EA-181.ORD

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1 I. BACKGROUND Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C. §824a(e)). On April 27, 1998, H.Q. Energy Services (U.S.) Inc. (HQUS) applied to the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy (DOE) for authorization to transmit electric energy to Mexico as a power marketer. HQUS is a wholly-owned indirect subsidiary of Hydro- Quebec, the provincial electric

  11. O:\ELECTRIC\EA-184.ORD

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    4 I. BACKGROUND Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C. §824a(e)). On May 15, 1998, Morgan Stanley Capital Group Inc. (Morgan Stanley) applied to the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy (DOE) for authorization to transmit electric energy to Mexico as a power marketer. Morgan Stanley does not own or control any electric generating or transmission

  12. Tri-County Electric Cooperative- Energy Efficient Water Heater Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tri-County Electric Cooperative offers a $75 rebate on the purchase of energy-efficient electric water heaters. The rebate is valid for new or replacement units which have an Energy Factor Rating...

  13. Electric Vehicle Manufacturing Taking Off in the U.S. | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The LEAF is the first all-electric model to reach 50,000 sales in the United States. ... Nissan also used the loan to develop an electric power train manufacturing line for the ...

  14. "Regulatory Side-by-Side Governing Permitting of Cross-Border Electricity

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transmission Facilities between the United States and Canada" Now Available | Department of Energy "Regulatory Side-by-Side Governing Permitting of Cross-Border Electricity Transmission Facilities between the United States and Canada" Now Available "Regulatory Side-by-Side Governing Permitting of Cross-Border Electricity Transmission Facilities between the United States and Canada" Now Available July 14, 2015 - 1:49pm Addthis The Office of Electricity Delivery and

  15. EIS-0476: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant in Burke County, GA | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy 6: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant in Burke County, GA EIS-0476: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant in Burke County, GA February 8, 2012 EIS-0476: Final Environmental Impact Statement Department of Energy Loan Guarantees for Proposed Units 3 and 4 at the Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Burke County, GA February 25, 2014 EIS-0476: Record of Decision Department of Energy Loan Guarantees for Proposed Units 3 and 4 at the Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Burke County, GA

  16. Career Map: Electrical Engineer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Wind Program's Career Map provides job description information for Electrical Engineer positions.

  17. "Characteristic(a)","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.5;" " Unit: Percents." " ",," "," ",," "," " "Economic",,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and" "Characteristic(a)","Electricity","Fuel ...

  18. "Economic","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7.4;" " Unit: Percents." " ",," "," ",," "," " ,,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and" "Economic","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal" ...

  19. NREL Uses Fuel Cells to Increase the Range of Battery Electric Vehicles (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-01-01

    NREL analysis identifies potential cost-effective scenarios for using small fuel cell power units to increase the range of medium-duty battery electric vehicles.

  20. Electric energy sector in Argentina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bastos, C.M.

    1994-06-01

    This article describes how the organization of the electric energy sector in Argentina has changed dramatically from a sector in which state-owned companies worked under a central planning to one in which private companies make their own decisions. The way that the electrical system used to work can be shown by these statements: demand growth estimated by central planning team; projects to be developed and the timetable determined by the same team; unit operations ruled by central dispatch, and under state-owned companies responsibility; integration with neighbor countries focused on physical projects, such as Salto Grande with Uruguay and Yacyreta with Paraguay. Today the electrical system works under these rules: the system has been vertically separated and the companies cannot be integrated; electric energy is considered as an ordinary wealth and the value that consumers give it is taken into account, (the distribution companies pay consumers a penalty for the energy that they cannot supply, the penalty is worth the economic damage consumers suffer due to its lack); producers have to compete for demand. They can sell in two ways: sell under private agreements or sell to the system. Both ways of selling compete with each other because the system buys giving priority to lower costs and, as a consequence, some of the producers do not sell at all.

  1. United Electric Coop, Inc (Pennsylvania) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 40219 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  2. United States Industrial Electric Motor Systems Market Opportunities Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The objectives of the Market Assessment were to: Develop a detailed profile of the stock of motor-driven equipment in U.S. industrial facilities; Characterize and estimate the magnitude of opportunities to improve the energy efficiency of industrial motor systems; Develop a profile of motor system purchase and maintenance practices; Develop and implement a procedure to update the detailed motor profile on a regular basis using readily available market information; and, Develop methods to estimate the energy savings and market effects attributable to the Motor Challenge Program.

  3. United States Industrial Electric Motor Systems Market Opportunities...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Among all manufacturing facilities, 24 percent reported that they had not taken any of a long list of potential system efficiency mea- sures over the past 2 years. 2 Standards ...

  4. United States Industrial Electric Motor Systems Market Opportunities...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Pump, Fan, Compressor System Efficiency ... . . 17 E-7: Energy Saving Opportunities in Pump Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...

  5. U.S. electric utility demand-side management 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-01

    This report presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand-side management activities in the United States at the national, regional, and utility levels. Data is included for energy savings, peakload reductions, and costs.

  6. Monthly Electric Generator data - EIA-860M data file

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    EIA estimates the current and near-term unit inventory of electric power generating capacity by integrating the information on these surveys along with ongoing EIA research of new ...

  7. Energy efficiency indicators for high electric-load buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aebischer, Bernard; Balmer, Markus A.; Kinney, Satkartar; Le Strat, Pascale; Shibata, Yoshiaki; Varone, Frederic

    2003-06-01

    Energy per unit of floor area is not an adequate indicator for energy efficiency in high electric-load buildings. For two activities, restaurants and computer centres, alternative indicators for energy efficiency are discussed.

  8. ConEd (Electric)- Multifamily Energy Efficiency Incentives Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Con Edison offers New York Multifamily electric customers a rebate program for energy efficient cooling and lighting equipment in 5-75 unit buildings in the eligible service area. All equipment...

  9. Smith Electric Vehicles SEV Group Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SEV Group Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Smith Electric Vehicles (SEV) Group Ltd Place: Tyne & Wear, United Kingdom Zip: NE38 9DA Sector: Vehicles Product: UK-based...

  10. Baltimore Gas & Electric Company (Electric) - Residential Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AC: 30 Recycling RefrigeratorFreezer: 50 ACDehumidifier: 25 Summary The Baltimore Gas & Electric Company (BGE) offers rebates for residential customers to improve the...

  11. Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) National Energy

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technology Laboratory (NETL) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act 2009 United States Department of Energy (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Technical Report: Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act 2009 United States Department of Energy Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) National Energy

  12. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.; Sandor, D.; Wiser, R.; Schneider, T.

    2012-12-01

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

  13. Winter Fuels Outlook Conference Rescheduled for November 1 | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Winning with Wind: Electric Co-ops Providing Clean Energy to Customers Winning with Wind: Electric Co-ops Providing Clean Energy to Customers March 12, 2014 - 12:02pm Addthis Mehoopany wind farm in Pennsylvania can produce enough energy to power more than 40,000 homes under a contract with Old Dominion Electric Cooperative and the Southern Maryland Electric Cooperative. Old Dominion was named one of the winners of the Wind Cooperative of the Year Award last week. | Photo

  14. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Plug-In Electric Vehicle (PEV) Financing and Charging - Illinois Electric Cooperative Cooperative (Co-op) members are eligible for loan financing at 0.5% for 60 months or the purchase of new PEVs. Members must apply and be approved for financing before purchase. The Co-op also offers a PEV time-of-use electricity rate for residential customers who own PEV. The PEV rate is optional and does require installation of a separate meter. For more information, see the Illinois Electric Cooperativ

  15. Cooling devices and methods for use with electric submersible pumps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jankowski, Todd A; Hill, Dallas D

    2014-12-02

    Cooling devices for use with electric submersible pump motors include a refrigerator attached to the end of the electric submersible pump motor with the evaporator heat exchanger accepting all or a portion of the heat load from the motor. The cooling device can be a self-contained bolt-on unit, so that minimal design changes to existing motors are required.

  16. Blackout 2003: Transcript of Technical Conference with the Electric System

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Investigation Team | Department of Energy Transcript of Technical Conference with the Electric System Investigation Team Blackout 2003: Transcript of Technical Conference with the Electric System Investigation Team Electric System Investigation Team: 8 Reliability Recommendation consultation Transcript of the technical conference sponsored by the U.S. Canada task force investigating the August 14, 2003 blackout across Canada and the Northeastern United States. The transcript includes reports

  17. Electric arc saw apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deichelbohrer, Paul R [Richland, WA

    1986-01-01

    A portable, hand held electric arc saw has a small frame for supporting an electrically conducting rotary blade which serves as an electrode for generating an electric arc to erode a workpiece. Electric current is supplied to the blade by biased brushes and a slip ring which are mounted in the frame. A pair of freely movable endless belts in the form of crawler treads stretched between two pulleys are used to facilitate movement of the electric arc saw. The pulleys are formed of dielectric material to electrically insulate the crawler treads from the frame.

  18. Summary Max Total Units

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Summary Max Total Units *If All Splits, No Rack Units **If Only FW, AC Splits 1000 52 28 28 2000 87 59 35 3000 61 33 15 4000 61 33 15 Totals 261 153 93 ***Costs $1,957,500.00 $1,147,500.00 $697,500.00 Notes: added several refrigerants removed bins from analysis removed R-22 from list 1000lb, no Glycol, CO2 or ammonia Seawater R-404A only * includes seawater units ** no seawater units included *** Costs = (total units) X (estimate of $7500 per unit) 1000lb, air cooled split systems, fresh water

  19. Utility Sector Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coughlin, Katie

    2014-12-01

    This report presents a new approach to estimating the marginal utility sector impacts associated with electricity demand reductions. The method uses publicly available data and provides results in the form of time series of impact factors. The input data are taken from the Energy Information Agency's Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) projections of how the electric system might evolve in the reference case, and in a number of side cases that incorporate different effciency and other policy assumptions. The data published with the AEO are used to define quantitative relationships between demand-side electricity reductions by end use and supply-side changes to capacity by plant type, generation by fuel type and emissions of CO2, Hg, NOx and SO2. The impact factors define the change in each of these quantities per unit reduction in site electricity demand. We find that the relative variation in these impacts by end use is small, but the time variation can be significant.

  20. Electric Efficiency Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In December 2009, the Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission's (IURC) ordered utilities to establish demand-side management (DSM) electric savings goals leading to 2.0% reduction of electricity sa...

  1. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    End Use: August 2015 Retail ratesprices and consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based...

  2. Electric Power Monthly

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Electric Power Monthly Data for January 2016 | Release Date: March 25, 2016 | Next ... Revisions made to the March 2016 Electric Power Monthly: March 30, 2016 Tables 2.8.A-B ...

  3. Electricity Monthly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    cheap price of natural gas reduced coals share of electricity production. Days of Burn Days of burn Coal capacity The average number of days of burn held at electric power...

  4. Electricity Monthly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    sales volumes are presented as a proxy for end-use electricity consumption. Average Revenue per kWh by state Percent Change Per KWh map showing U.S. electric industry percent...

  5. Table 2a. Electricity Consumption and Electricity Intensities...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Administration Home Page Home > Commercial Buildings Home > Sq Ft Tables > Table 2a. Electricity Consumption per Sq Ft Table 2a. Electricity Consumption and Electricity...

  6. Panasonic Electric Works Ltd formerly Matsushita Electric Works...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Electric Works Ltd (formerly Matsushita Electric Works) Place: Kadoma-shi, Osaka, Japan Zip: 571-8686 Product: Japanese manufacturer of mainly electric appliances including...

  7. Ohio Electricity Restructuring Active

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Restructuring Ohio Restructuring Active Other Links Ohio Electricity Profile Ohio Energy Profile Ohio Web Sites Acronyms for the State of Ohio AEP-American Electric Power CG&E-Cincinnati Gas and Electric Company CRES-Certified Retail Electric Supplier DP&L-Dayton Power and Light Company FERC-Federal Energy Regulatory Commission ISO-Independent System Operator OCC-Ohio Consumers' Counsel PUCO-Public Utilities Commission of Ohio Last Updated: September 2010 08/09: Dominion Energy offered

  8. Electric arc saw apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deichelbohrer, P.R.

    1983-08-08

    A portable, hand-held electric arc saw apparatus comprising a small frame for supporting an electrically conducting rotary blade which serves as an electrode for generating an electric arc between the blade and a workpiece of opposite polarity. Electrically conducting means are provided on said frame for transmitting current to said blade. A pair of freely movable endless belts in the form of crawler treads are employed to facilitate movement of the apparatus relative to the workpiece.

  9. Annual Power Electric

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electric Power Annual Update / Revision Data for 2014 updated: February 16, 2016 February 16, 2016 Table update: The following tables are being withheld pending the availability of additional data: Table 8.5. Revenue and Expense Statistics for U.S. Cooperative Borrower-Owned Electric Utilities Table 8.6.A. Noncoincident Peak Load by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, Actual Table 8.6.B. Noncoincident Peak Load by North American Electric Reliability Corporation

  10. Electrical utilities relay settings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HACHE, J.M.

    1999-02-24

    This document contains the Hanford transmission and distribution system relay settings that are under the control of Electrical Utilities.

  11. United States Government

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Corp., Nitro, WV General Electric Plant, Shelbyvi Gleason Works, Rochester, NV ... Alexander W illiams , PhD Designation ad Certificatiorr Uanrger O ff-SiteSavannah River ...

  12. Volume I, Summary Report: A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States by 2010:

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Nuclear power plants in the United States currently produce about 20 percent of the nation’s electricity. This nuclear-generated electricity is safe, clean and economical, and does not emit...

  13. Integrating Electricity Subsector

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Integrating Electricity Subsector Failure Scenarios into a Risk Assessment Methodology 3002001181 | DEC 2013 Program Leads Jason D. Christopher Technical Lead, Cyber Security Capabilities & Risk Management Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) Annabelle Lee Senior Technical Executive, Cyber Security Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) For more information on the DOE's cyber security risk management programs, please contact

  14. DOE Electricity Advisory Committee

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Electricity Advisory Committee March 2015 1 MEMORANDUM TO: Honorable Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, U.S. Department of Energy FROM: Electricity Advisory Committee (EAC) Richard Cowart, Chair DATE: March 27, 2015 RE: Recommendations on Smart Grid Research and Development Needs _________________________________________________________________________ Overview The Smart Grid is envisioned to provide the enhancements to ensure higher levels of

  15. Epcot Electric | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Epcot Electric Jump to: navigation, search Name: Epcot Electric Place: Texas Facebook: https:www.facebook.compagesEpcot-Electric108882552477023 References: EIA Form EIA-861...

  16. EWEB- Solar Electric Program (Rebate)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Eugene Water & Electric Board's (EWEB) Solar Electric Program offers financial incentives for residential, nonprofit, and government customers that generate electricity solar photovoltaic...

  17. Lincoln Electric | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Electric Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Lincoln Electric Developer Lincoln Electric Energy Purchaser Lincoln...

  18. Electric power monthly, May 1995 with data for February 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-05-24

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisiommakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuel, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant.

  19. Electric power monthly, December 1997 with data for September 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 63 tabs.

  20. Renewable Electricity Futures Study Volume 1: Exploration of High-Penetration Renewable Electrcity Futures

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Renewable Electricity Futures Study (RE Futures) is an initial investigation of the extent to which renewable energy supply can meet the electricity demands of the contiguous United States1 over the next several decades. This study includes geographic and electric system operation resolution that is unprecedented for long-term studies of the U.S. electric sector. The analysis examines the implications and challenges of renewable electricity generation levels—from 30% up to 90%, with a focus on 80%, of all U.S. electricity generation from renewable technologies—in 2050. The study focuses on some key technical implications of this environment, exploring whether the U.S. power system can supply electricity to meet customer demand with high levels of renewable electricity, including variable wind and solar generation. The study also begins to address the potential economic, environmental, and social implications of deploying and integrating high levels of renewable electricity in the United States.

  1. Electricity transactions across international borders, 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-10-01

    This report summarizes the electricity exchanges between the United States and Mexico and Canada during calendar year 1984. The construction, operation and maintenance of any electric transmission facility which crosses an international border of the United States requires a Presidential permit. These permits have been granted by DOE since its formation in 1977. During 1984, the US imported 42,219,259 MWh of electric energy at a cost of $1,070,046,345. Of this total, 42,034,392 MWh were imported from Canada and the remainder (184,867 MWh) were received from Mexico. During this same period, US exports of electric energy totaled 2,558,293 MWh with gross revenues of $21,795,733. Of this, 2,479,487 MWh representing $21,115,413 in revenues were delivered to Canada, and 78,806 MWh representing $680,320 in revenues were delivered to Mexico. On a net basis, the US was an importer of 39,660,966 MWh of electric energy. These 1984 values constitute an increase of 9.2% in gross imports and a decrease of 23.3% in gross exports compared to 1983 levels.

  2. Electric power monthly, February 1998 with data for November 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-02-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 63 tabs.

  3. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 1. Exploration of High-Penetration Renewable Electricity Futures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M. M.; Baldwin, S.; DeMeo, E.; Reilly, J. M.; Mai, T.; Arent, D.; Porro, G.; Meshek, M.; Sandor, D.

    2012-06-15

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%–90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Learn more at the RE Futures website. http://www.nrel.gov/analysis/re_futures/

  4. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 4: Bulk Electric Power Systems: Operations and Transmission Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milligan, M.; Ela, E.; Hein, J.; Schneider, T.; Brinkman, G.; Denholm, P.

    2012-06-01

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

  5. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 4: Bulk Electric Power Systems. Operations and Transmission Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milligan, Michael; Ela, Erik; Hein, Jeff; Schneider, Thomas; Brinkman, Gregory; Denholm, Paul

    2012-06-15

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%–90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Learn more at the RE Futures website. http://www.nrel.gov/analysis/re_futures/

  6. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 2: Renewable Electricity Generation and Storage Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Augustine, C.; Bain, R.; Chapman, J.; Denholm, P.; Drury, E.; Hall, D.G.; Lantz, E.; Margolis, R.; Thresher, R.; Sandor, D.; Bishop, N.A.; Brown, S.R.; Cada, G.F.; Felker, F.

    2012-06-01

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

  7. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 2. Renewable Electricity Generation and Storage Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Augustine, Chad; Bain, Richard; Chapman, Jamie; Denholm, Paul; Drury, Easan; Hall, Douglas G.; Lantz, Eric; Margolis, Robert; Thresher, Robert; Sandor, Debra; Bishop, Norman A.; Brown, Stephen R.; Felker, Fort; Fernandez, Steven J.; Goodrich, Alan C.; Hagerman, George; Heath, Garvin; O'Neil, Sean; Paquette, Joshua; Tegen, Suzanne; Young, Katherine

    2012-06-15

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%–90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Learn more at the RE Futures website. http://www.nrel.gov/analysis/re_futures/

  8. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 3: End-Use Electricity Demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hostick, D.; Belzer, D.B.; Hadley, S.W.; Markel, T.; Marnay, C.; Kintner-Meyer, M.

    2012-06-01

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

  9. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 1: Exploration of High-Penetration Renewable Electricity Futures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.; Wiser, R.; Sandor, D.; Brinkman, G.; Heath, G.; Denholm, P.; Hostick, D.J.; Darghouth, N.; Schlosser, A.; Strzepek, K.

    2012-06-01

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

  10. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 3. End-Use Electricity Demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hostick, Donna; Belzer, David B.; Hadley, Stanton W.; Markel, Tony; Marnay, Chris; Kintner-Meyer, Michael

    2012-06-15

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%–90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Learn more at the RE Futures website. http://www.nrel.gov/analysis/re_futures/

  11. Method and system for managing an electrical output of a turbogenerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stahlhut, Ronnie Dean; Vuk, Carl Thomas

    2009-06-02

    The system and method manages an electrical output of a turbogenerator in accordance with multiple modes. In a first mode, a direct current (DC) bus receives power from a turbogenerator output via a rectifier where turbogenerator revolutions per unit time (e.g., revolutions per minute (RPM)) or an electrical output level of a turbogenerator output meet or exceed a minimum threshold. In a second mode, if the turbogenerator revolutions per unit time or electrical output level of a turbogenerator output are less than the minimum threshold, the electric drive motor or a generator mechanically powered by the engine provides electrical energy to the direct current bus.

  12. Method and system for managing an electrical output of a turbogenerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stahlhut, Ronnie Dean; Vuk, Carl Thomas

    2010-08-24

    The system and method manages an electrical output of a turbogenerator in accordance with multiple modes. In a first mode, a direct current (DC) bus receives power from a turbogenerator output via a rectifier where turbogenerator revolutions per unit time (e.g., revolutions per minute (RPM)) or an electrical output level of a turbogenerator output meet or exceed a minimum threshold. In a second mode, if the turbogenerator revolutions per unit time or electrical output level of a turbogenerator output are less than the minimum threshold, the electric drive motor or a generator mechanically powered by the engine provides electrical energy to the direct current bus.

  13. Electricity 101 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Resources » Electricity 101 Electricity 101 FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS: Why do other countries use different shaped plugs? Why do outlets have three holes? Why do we have AC electricity? Can we harness lightning as an energy source? Can we have wireless transmission of electricity? SYSTEM: What is electricity? Where does electricity come from? What is the "grid"? How much electricity does a typical household use? How did the electric system evolve? What does the future look like?

  14. Advanced Rooftop Unit Control

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced-Rooftop-Unit-Control Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search Policy & Reporting Expand Policy & Reporting EE Sectors Expand EE Sectors...

  15. Integrated electrical connector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benett, William J.; Ackler, Harold D.

    2005-05-24

    An electrical connector is formed from a sheet of electrically conductive material that lies in between the two layers of nonconducting material that comprise the casing of an electrical chip. The connector is electrically connected to an electrical element embedded within the chip. An opening in the sheet is concentrically aligned with a pair of larger holes respectively bored through the nonconducting layers. The opening is also smaller than the diameter of an electrically conductive contact pin. However, the sheet is composed flexible material so that the opening adapts to the diameter of the pin when the pin is inserted therethrough. The periphery of the opening applies force to the sides of the pin when the pin is inserted, and thus holds the pin within the opening and in contact with the sheet, by friction. The pin can be withdrawn from the connector by applying sufficient axial force.

  16. Electrical system architecture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Algrain, Marcelo C.; Johnson, Kris W.; Akasam, Sivaprasad; Hoff, Brian D.

    2008-07-15

    An electrical system for a vehicle includes a first power source generating a first voltage level, the first power source being in electrical communication with a first bus. A second power source generates a second voltage level greater than the first voltage level, the second power source being in electrical communication with a second bus. A starter generator may be configured to provide power to at least one of the first bus and the second bus, and at least one additional power source may be configured to provide power to at least one of the first bus and the second bus. The electrical system also includes at least one power consumer in electrical communication with the first bus and at least one power consumer in electrical communication with the second bus.

  17. Thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1984-11-16

    A thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator includes an intrinsically irreversible thermoacoustic heat engine coupled to a magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator. The heat engine includes an electrically conductive liquid metal as the working fluid and includes two heat exchange and thermoacoustic structure assemblies which drive the liquid in a push-pull arrangement to cause the liquid metal to oscillate at a resonant acoustic frequency on the order of 1000 Hz. The engine is positioned in the field of a magnet and is oriented such that the liquid metal oscillates in a direction orthogonal to the field of the magnet, whereby an alternating electrical potential is generated in the liquid metal. Low-loss, low-inductance electrical conductors electrically connected to opposite sides of the liquid metal conduct an output signal to a transformer adapted to convert the low-voltage, high-current output signal to a more usable higher voltage, lower current signal.

  18. Thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1986-01-01

    A thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator includes an intrinsically irreversible thermoacoustic heat engine coupled to a magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator. The heat engine includes an electrically conductive liquid metal as the working fluid and includes two heat exchange and thermoacoustic structure assemblies which drive the liquid in a push-pull arrangement to cause the liquid metal to oscillate at a resonant acoustic frequency on the order of 1,000 Hz. The engine is positioned in the field of a magnet and is oriented such that the liquid metal oscillates in a direction orthogonal to the field of the magnet, whereby an alternating electrical potential is generated in the liquid metal. Low-loss, low-inductance electrical conductors electrically connected to opposite sides of the liquid metal conduct an output signal to a transformer adapted to convert the low-voltage, high-current output signal to a more usable higher voltage, lower current signal.

  19. Electricity Monthly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... Gas-fired combined-cycle units tend to be more efficient than coal-fired steam units. The second tab shows coal and natural gas prices on an equivalent energy content and ...

  20. Electric Power Research Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2015 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Electric Power Monthly Appendix C Technical notes This appendix describes how the U. S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) collects, estimates, and reports electric power data in the EPM. Data quality The EPM is prepared by the Office of Electricity, Renewables & Uranium Statistics (ERUS), Energy Information Administration (EIA), U. S. Department of Energy. Quality statistics begin with the collection of the correct data. To assure this,

  1. Electric Power Monthly

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Electric Power Monthly > Electric Power Monthly Back Issues Electric Power Monthly Back Issues Monthly Excel files zipped 2010 January February March April May June July August September October November December 2009 January February March April May June July August September October November December 2008 January February March March Supplement April May June July August September October November December 2007 January February March April May June July August September October November

  2. Office of Electricity Delivery

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    4 DOE Resilient Electric Distribution Grid R&D Workshop June 11, 2014 Upton, New York 2014 DOE Resilient Electric Distribution Grid R&D Workshop Report Page i June 24, 2014 Acknowledgment The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) acknowledges the support provided by the organizations represented at the Resilient Electric Distribution Grid R&D Workshop. The report content is based on the workshop session discussions, with session summary descriptions taken from the report-out presentations

  3. The commercialization of magnetohydrodynamic electric power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weinstein, R.E.

    1993-12-31

    The successful development of Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) will provide an ultra clean, highly efficient alternative to other methods of coal-fired electric Power generation. A development path that could bring coal-fired MHD electric power plants to competitive commercial status is described in this paper. The paper discusses the scale-ups, the timing, and technical hurdles that face this technology as it progresses from its present status of small-scale demonstrations and begins its competition for electric utility acceptance. Coal-fired MHD power has at least four major markets: (1) New utility generation. (2) Utility retrofit/repowering applications. (3) New independent power production (IPP). (4) Large industrial cogeneration application. Of these, the largest market for MHD is expected to be the new electric utility/IPP generation market, those new units required to supply growth in power demand and to replace retired capacity. This market sector is the focus of this discussion. This paper describes the commercial pressures and inertias that motivate the entry of any new technology into the generation supply market. It then shows a development path that could bring coal-fired MHD electric power plants to competitive commercial status in the electric power industry.

  4. 2012 National Electricity Forum

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and Planning, Arizona Public Service * Jan Strack, Grid Planning, Regulatory & Economics Manager, San Diego Gas & Electric * Mario Villar, Vice President, Transmission, NV ...

  5. Renewable Electricity Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-09-01

    This document highlights DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's advancements in renewable electricity generation technologies including solar, water, wind, and geothermal.

  6. Electricity Advisory Committee

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Carlos Coe Millennium Energy Robert Curry Jr. CurryEnergy Clark Gellings Electric Power Research Institute Paul Hudson Stratus Energy Group Susan Kelly American Public Power ...

  7. Electricity Advisory Committee

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Carlos Coe Millennium Energy Robert Curry Jr. CurryEnergy Clark Gellings Electric Power Research Institute Michael Heyeck The Grid Group Paul Hudson Stratus Energy Group Susan ...

  8. Electricity Advisory Committee

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Robert Curry New York State Public Service Commission Clark Gellings Electric Power Research Institute Dian Grueneich Dian Grueneich Consulting, LLC. Michael Heyeck ...

  9. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT), and two locations in the California ISO (CAISO). Also shown are wholesale prices at trading hubs in Louisiana (into Entergy),...

  10. 2015 Electricity Form Proposals

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Quarterly Electricity Imports and Exports Report (EIA-111) OMB Clearance Renewal in 2015 ... Report (EIA-111) survey on August 26, 2015. The initial proposals were announced to ...

  11. Electrical Circuit Tester

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Love, Frank

    2006-04-18

    An electrical circuit testing device is provided, comprising a case, a digital voltage level testing circuit with a display means, a switch to initiate measurement using the device, a non-shorting switching means for selecting pre-determined electrical wiring configurations to be tested in an outlet, a terminal block, a five-pole electrical plug mounted on the case surface and a set of adapters that can be used for various multiple-pronged electrical outlet configurations for voltages from 100 600 VAC from 50 100 Hz.

  12. Electricity Monthly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Electricity Monthly Update With Data for February 2016 | Release Date: April ... to the gains of other renewable energy sources (such as solar and wind), these recent NPD ...

  13. Energy 101: Electric Vehicles

    K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

    This edition of Energy 101 highlights the benefits of electric vehicles, including improved fuel efficiency, reduced emissions, and lower maintenance costs.

  14. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    costs, of which fuel costs account for the lion's share. Therefore, we present below, electricity generation output by fuel type and generator type. Since the generatorfuel...

  15. Electricity Monthly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    (ISO-NE), New York ISO (NYISO), PJM Interconnection (PJM), Midwest ISO (MISO), Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT), and two locations in the California ISO (CAISO). ...

  16. Electricity Transmission, A Primer

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... Biomass plants are best built near their source of fuel for ... the transmission grid by an authorized scheduling utility. ... Power Pool: Two or more inter- connected electric systems ...

  17. Electricity Monthly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: February 2016 Stocks In February, U.S. coal stockpiles remained relatively flat compared to the previous month, deviating from the normal ...

  18. Electric Utility Industry Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the April 2012 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—covers significant electric industry trends and industry priorities with federal customers.

  19. Perforation patterned electrical interconnects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frey, Jonathan

    2014-01-28

    This disclosure describes systems and methods for increasing the usable surface area of electrical contacts within a device, such as a thin film solid state device, through the implementation of electrically conductive interconnects. Embodiments described herein include the use of a plurality of electrically conductive interconnects that penetrate through a top contact layer, through one or more multiple layers, and into a bottom contact layer. The plurality of conductive interconnects may form horizontal and vertical cross-sectional patterns. The use of lasers to form the plurality of electrically conductive interconnects from reflowed layer material further aids in the manufacturing process of a device.

  20. Electrical Utility Materials Handler

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Join the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for a challenging and rewarding career, while working, living, and playing in the Pacific Northwest. The Electrical Utility Material Handler (EUMH)...

  1. Electrically conductive cellulose composite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Barbara R.; O'Neill, Hugh M.; Woodward, Jonathan

    2010-05-04

    An electrically conductive cellulose composite includes a cellulose matrix and an electrically conductive carbonaceous material incorporated into the cellulose matrix. The electrical conductivity of the cellulose composite is at least 10 .mu.S/cm at 25.degree. C. The composite can be made by incorporating the electrically conductive carbonaceous material into a culture medium with a cellulose-producing organism, such as Gluconoacetobacter hansenii. The composites can be used to form electrodes, such as for use in membrane electrode assemblies for fuel cells.

  2. Electric Storage Water Heaters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Residential Residential Lighting Energy Star Appliances Consumer Electronics Heat Pump Water Heaters Electric Storage Water...

  3. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electricity Monthly Update Explained Highlights The Highlights page features in the center a short article about a major event or an informative topic. The left column contains...

  4. CASL - Westinghouse Electric Company

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nuclear technology is helping to provide future generations with safe, clean and reliable electricity. Key Contributions Definition of CASL challenge problems Existing codes and...

  5. Electricity Monthly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    New York ISO (NYISO), PJM Interconnection (PJM), Midwest ISO (MISO), Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT), and two locations in the California ISO (CAISO). Also...

  6. DOE Electricity Advisory Committee

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... In larger buildings they can be Energy Management Systems operating end- uses, electrical and thermal storage and guiding participation in Demand Response programs. 2 Distributed ...

  7. Department of Energy - Electricity

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    opportunities and challenges that lie ahead. Secretary Moniz headed down to Florida to talk about Grid Modernization. Learn more about our nation's electric grid in this fact...

  8. Electric power annual 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-06

    The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric utility statistics at national, regional and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policymakers, analysts and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. ``The US Electric Power Industry at a Glance`` section presents a profile of the electric power industry ownership and performance, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent sections present data on generating capability, including proposed capability additions; net generation; fossil-fuel statistics; retail sales; revenue; financial statistics; environmental statistics; electric power transactions; demand-side management; and nonutility power producers. In addition, the appendices provide supplemental data on major disturbances and unusual occurrences in US electricity power systems. Each section contains related text and tables and refers the reader to the appropriate publication that contains more detailed data on the subject matter. Monetary values in this publication are expressed in nominal terms.

  9. Integrating Electricity Subsector

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... The electric sector cyber security domain threat model incorporates the following elements: * Adversaries with intent, driven by money, politics, religion, activist causes, ...

  10. 2013 Electricity Form Proposals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Form EIA-861, "Annual Electric Power Industry Report" The EIA-861 survey has historically collected retail sales, revenue, and a variety of information related to demand response ...

  11. Composite stabilizer unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ebaugh, Larry R.; Sadler, Collin P.; Carter, Gary D.

    1992-01-01

    An improved fin stabilized projectile including multiple stabilizer fins upon a stabilizer unit situated at the aft end of the projectile is provided, the improvement wherein the stabilizer fins are joined into the stabillizer unit by an injection molded engineering grade polymer.

  12. Associative list processing unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hemmert, Karl Scott; Underwood, Keith D.

    2013-01-29

    An associative list processing unit and method comprising employing a plurality of prioritized cell blocks and permitting inserts to occur in a single clock cycle if all of the cell blocks are not full. Also, an associative list processing unit and method comprising employing a plurality of prioritized cell blocks and using a tree of prioritized multiplexers descending from the plurality of cell blocks.

  13. Status of Tampa Electric Company IGCC Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenkins, S.D.

    1992-01-01

    Tampa Electric Company will utilize Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle technology for its new Polk Power Station Unit [number sign]1. The project is partially funded under the Department of Energy Clean Coal Technology Program Round III. This paper describes the technology to be used, process details, demonstration of a new hot gas clean-up system, and the schedule, leading to commercial operation in July 1996.

  14. Status of Tampa Electric Company IGCC Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenkins, S.D.

    1992-10-01

    Tampa Electric Company will utilize Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle technology for its new Polk Power Station Unit {number_sign}1. The project is partially funded under the Department of Energy Clean Coal Technology Program Round III. This paper describes the technology to be used, process details, demonstration of a new hot gas clean-up system, and the schedule, leading to commercial operation in July 1996.

  15. Medium Duty Electric Vehicle Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackie, Robin J. D.

    2015-05-31

    The Smith Electric Vehicle Demonstration Project (SDP) was integral to the Smith business plan to establish a manufacturing base in the United States (US) and produce a portfolio of All Electric Vehicles (AEV’s) for the medium duty commercial truck market. Smith focused on the commercial depot based logistics market, as it represented the market that was most ready for the early adoption of AEV technology. The SDP enabled Smith to accelerate its introduction of vehicles and increase the size of its US supply chain to support early market adoption of AEV’s that were cost competitive, fully met the needs of a diverse set of end users and were compliant with Federal safety and emissions requirements. The SDP accelerated the development and production of various electric drive vehicle systems to substantially reduce petroleum consumption, reduce vehicular emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG), and increase US jobs.

  16. Electric power monthly, December 1996 with data for September 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-01

    The report presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatt hour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 57 tabs.

  17. Electric power monthly, July 1999, with data for April 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-07-01

    The Electric Power Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the Electric Power Monthly (EPM). This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatt hour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 1 fig., 64 tabs.

  18. United States Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Maryland Electric Cooperative, Potomac Electric Power Co., the PJM Interconnection, NRG Energy and Exelon Generation or Exelon Corp. dating from April 7, 2015 to June 4,...

  19. Inventory of power plants in the United States as of January 1, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-01

    The Inventory of Power Plants in the United States provides annual statistics on generating units operated by electric utilities in the United States (the 50 States and the District of Columbia). Statistics presented in this report reflect the status of generating units as of January 1, 1997. The publication also provides a 10-yr outlook for generating unit additions. This report is prepared annually by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Data summarized in this report are useful to a wide audience including Congress; Federal and State agencies; the electric utility industry; and the general public. Data presented in this report were assembled and published by the EIA to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended.

  20. Inventory of power plants in the United States as of January 1, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-01

    The Inventory of Power Plants in the United States provides annual statistics on generating units operated by electric utilities in the United States (the 50 States and the District of Columbia). Statistics presented in this report reflect the status of generating units as of January 1, 1996. The publication also provides a 10-year outlook for generating unit additions. This report is prepared annually by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Data summarized in this report are useful to a wide audience including Congress; Federal and State agencies; the electric utility industry; and the general public. Data presented in this report were assembled and published by the EIA to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 as amended.

  1. Power Sales to Electric Utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1989-02-01

    The Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) of 1979 requires that electrical utilities interconnect with qualifying facilities and purchase electricity at a rate based upon their full avoided costs (i.e., costs of providing both capacity and energy). Qualifying facilities (QF) include solar or geothermal electric units, hydropower, municipal solid waste or biomass-fired power plants, and cogeneration projects that satisfy maximum size, fuel use, ownership, location, and/or efficiency criteria. In Washington State, neither standard power purchase prices based upon a proxy ''avoided plant'', standard contracts, or a standard offer process have been used. Instead, a variety of power purchase contracts have been negotiated by developers of qualifying facilities with investor-owned utilities, public utility districts, and municipally-owned and operated utilities. With a hydro-based system, benefits associated with resource acquisition are determined in large part by how compatible the resource is with a utility's existing generation mix. Power purchase rates are negotiated and vary according to firm energy production, guarantees, ability to schedule maintenance or downtime, rights of refusal, power plant purchase options, project start date and length of contract; front-loading or levelization provisions; and the ability of the project to provide ''demonstrated'' capacity. Legislation was also enacted which allows PURPA to work effectively. Initial laws established ownership rights and provided irrigation districts, PUDs, and municipalities with expanded enabling powers. Financial processes were streamlined and, in some cases, simplified. Finally, laws were passed which are designed to ensure that development proceeds in an environmentally acceptable manner. In retrospect, PURPA has worked well within Washington. In the state of Washington, 20 small-scale hydroelectric projects with a combined generating capacity of 77 MW, 3 solid waste-to-energy facilities with 55 MW of electrical output, 4 cogeneration projects with 34.5 MW of generating capability, and 4 wastewater treatment facility digester gas-to-energy projects with 5 MW of electrical production have come on-line (or are in the final stages of construction) since the passage of PURPA. These numbers represent only a small portion of Washington's untapped and underutilized cogeneration and renewable resource generating potentials. [DJE-2005

  2. Electrically conductive diamond electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swain, Greg; Fischer, Anne ,; Bennett, Jason; Lowe, Michael

    2009-05-19

    An electrically conductive diamond electrode and process for preparation thereof is described. The electrode comprises diamond particles coated with electrically conductive doped diamond preferably by chemical vapor deposition which are held together with a binder. The electrodes are useful for oxidation reduction in gas, such as hydrogen generation by electrolysis.

  3. Electrical Circuit Simulation Code

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2001-08-09

    Massively-Parallel Electrical Circuit Simulation Code. CHILESPICE is a massively-arallel distributed-memory electrical circuit simulation tool that contains many enhanced radiation, time-based, and thermal features and models. Large scale electronic circuit simulation. Shared memory, parallel processing, enhance convergence. Sandia specific device models.

  4. Hawaii electric system reliability.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silva Monroy, Cesar Augusto; Loose, Verne William

    2012-09-01

    This report addresses Hawaii electric system reliability issues; greater emphasis is placed on short-term reliability but resource adequacy is reviewed in reference to electric consumers' views of reliability %E2%80%9Cworth%E2%80%9D and the reserve capacity required to deliver that value. The report begins with a description of the Hawaii electric system to the extent permitted by publicly available data. Electrical engineering literature in the area of electric reliability is researched and briefly reviewed. North American Electric Reliability Corporation standards and measures for generation and transmission are reviewed and identified as to their appropriateness for various portions of the electric grid and for application in Hawaii. Analysis of frequency data supplied by the State of Hawaii Public Utilities Commission is presented together with comparison and contrast of performance of each of the systems for two years, 2010 and 2011. Literature tracing the development of reliability economics is reviewed and referenced. A method is explained for integrating system cost with outage cost to determine the optimal resource adequacy given customers' views of the value contributed by reliable electric supply. The report concludes with findings and recommendations for reliability in the State of Hawaii.

  5. Energy 101: Electric Vehicles

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-29

    This edition of Energy 101 highlights the benefits of electric vehicles, including improved fuel efficiency, reduced emissions, and lower maintenance costs. For more information on electric vehicles from the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, visit the Vehicle Technologies Program website: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/vehiclesandfuels/

  6. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Electricity Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center:

  7. Review of Operational Water Consumption and Withdrawal Factors for Electricity Generating Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macknick, J.; Newmark, R.; Heath, G.; Hallett, K. C.

    2011-03-01

    Various studies have attempted to consolidate published estimates of water use impacts of electricity generating technologies, resulting in a wide range of technologies and values based on different primary sources of literature. The goal of this work is to consolidate the various primary literature estimates of water use during the generation of electricity by conventional and renewable electricity generating technologies in the United States to more completely convey the variability and uncertainty associated with water use in electricity generating technologies.

  8. Electric power monthly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Sandra R.; Johnson, Melvin; McClevey, Kenneth; Calopedis, Stephen; Bolden, Deborah

    1992-05-01

    The Electric Power Monthly is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, cost of fuel, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fuel are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Additionally, statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, new generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fuel.

  9. Electric turbocompound control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Algrain, Marcelo C.

    2007-02-13

    Turbocompound systems can be used to affect engine operation using the energy in exhaust gas that is driving the available turbocharger. A first electrical device acts as a generator in response to turbocharger rotation. A second electrical device acts as a motor to put mechanical power into the engine, typically at the crankshaft. Apparatus, systems, steps, and methods are described to control the generator and motor operations to control the amount of power being recovered. This can control engine operation closer to desirable parameters for given engine-related operating conditions compared to actual. The electrical devices can also operate in "reverse," going between motor and generator functions. This permits the electrical device associated with the crankshaft to drive the electrical device associated with the turbocharger as a motor, overcoming deficient engine operating conditions such as associated with turbocharger lag.

  10. Performance of Gas-Engine Driven Heat Pump Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdi Zaltash; Randy Linkous; Randall Wetherington; Patrick Geoghegan; Ed Vineyard; Isaac Mahderekal; Robert Gaylord

    2008-09-30

    Air-conditioning (cooling) for buildings is the single largest use of electricity in the United States (U.S.). This drives summer peak electric demand in much of the U.S. Improved air-conditioning technology thus has the greatest potential impact on the electric grid compared to other technologies that use electricity. Thermally-activated technologies (TAT), such as natural gas engine-driven heat pumps (GHP), can provide overall peak load reduction and electric grid relief for summer peak demand. GHP offers an attractive opportunity for commercial building owners to reduce electric demand charges and operating expenses. Engine-driven systems have several potential advantages over conventional single-speed or single-capacity electric motor-driven units. Among them are variable speed operation, high part load efficiency, high temperature waste heat recovery from the engine, and reduced annual operating costs (SCGC 1998). Although gas engine-driven systems have been in use since the 1960s, current research is resulting in better performance, lower maintenance requirements, and longer operating lifetimes. Gas engine-driven systems are typically more expensive to purchase than comparable electric motor-driven systems, but they typically cost less to operate, especially for commercial building applications. Operating cost savings for commercial applications are primarily driven by electric demand charges. GHP operating costs are dominated by fuel costs, but also include maintenance costs. The reliability of gas cooling equipment has improved in the last few years and maintenance requirements have decreased (SCGC 1998, Yahagi et al. 2006). Another advantage of the GHP over electric motor-driven is the ability to use the heat rejected from the engine during heating operation. The recovered heat can be used to supplement the vapor compression cycle during heating or to supply other process loads, such as water heating. The use of the engine waste heat results in greater operating efficiency compared to conventional electric motor-driven units (SCGC 1998). In Japan, many hundreds of thousands of natural gas-driven heat pumps have been sold (typically 40,000 systems annually) (Yahagi et al. 2006). The goal of this program is to develop dependable and energy efficient GHPs suitable for U.S. commercial rooftop applications (the single largest commercial product segment). This study describes the laboratory performance evaluation of an integrated 10-ton GHP rooftop unit (a 900cc Daihatsu-Aisin natural gas engine) which uses R410A as the refrigerant (GEDAC No.23). ORNL Thermally-Activated Heat Pump (TAHP) Environmental Chambers were used to evaluate this unit in a controlled laboratory environment.

  11. Electric Resistance Heating Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric Resistance Heating Basics Electric Resistance Heating Basics August 16, 2013 - 3:10pm Addthis Electric resistance heat can be supplied by centralized forced-air electric furnaces or by heaters in each room. Electric resistance heating converts nearly all of the energy in the electricity to heat. Types of Electric Resistance Heaters Electric resistance heat can be provided by electric baseboard heaters, electric wall heaters, electric radiant heat, electric space heaters, electric

  12. United Cool Air

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    While our process may start with a "basic model" it is seldom that we fabricate more than a few units that are identical.  Therefore, the definition of "basic model" has a large impact on the...

  13. Associative list processing unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hemmert, Karl Scott; Underwood, Keith D

    2014-04-01

    An associative list processing unit and method comprising employing a plurality of prioritized cell blocks and permitting inserts to occur in a single clock cycle if all of the cell blocks are not full.

  14. Voltage verification unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, Edward J.

    2008-01-15

    A voltage verification unit and method for determining the absence of potentially dangerous potentials within a power supply enclosure without Mode 2 work is disclosed. With this device and method, a qualified worker, following a relatively simple protocol that involves a function test (hot, cold, hot) of the voltage verification unit before Lock Out/Tag Out and, and once the Lock Out/Tag Out is completed, testing or "trying" by simply reading a display on the voltage verification unit can be accomplished without exposure of the operator to the interior of the voltage supply enclosure. According to a preferred embodiment, the voltage verification unit includes test leads to allow diagnostics with other meters, without the necessity of accessing potentially dangerous bus bars or the like.

  15. United States Government

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    81278 United States Government Department of Energy memorandum - ?71 S.EP 23 F; i: 54 DATE: SEP 1 8 1991 REPLY TO ATTNOF: EM-421 (P. Blom, 3-8148) SUBJECT: Approved Categorical...

  16. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arkansas Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Arkansas) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 14,754 30 Electric utilities 11,526 23 IPP & CHP 3,227 29 Net generation (megawatthours) 61,592,137 24 Electric utilities 48,752,895 18 IPP & CHP 12,839,241 28 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 89,528 15 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 47,048 20 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 37,289 23 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.9 9 Nitrogen oxide

  17. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Washington Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Washington) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Hydroelectric Net summer capacity (megawatts) 30,949 10 Electric utilities 27,376 5 IPP & CHP 3,573 26 Net generation (megawatthours) 116,334,363 11 Electric utilities 102,294,256 5 IPP & CHP 14,040,107 24 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 13,716 36 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 18,316 40 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 12,427 398 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.2 44

  18. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    West Virginia Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (West Virginia) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 16,276 25 Electric utilities 11,981 21 IPP & CHP 4,295 21 Net generation (megawatthours) 81,059,577 19 Electric utilities 63,331,833 15 IPP & CHP 17,727,743 17 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 102,406 12 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 72,995 11 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 73,606 9 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.5 14

  19. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Wisconsin) Item Value Rank Primary Energy Source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 17,166 23 Electric utilities 14,377 18 IPP & CHP 2,788 32 Net generation (megawatthours) 61,064,796 25 Electric utilities 47,301,782 20 IPP & CHP 13,763,014 26 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 81,239 17 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 39,597 27 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 43,750 19 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 12 Nitrogen

  20. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wyoming Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Wyoming) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 8,458 37 Electric utilities 7,233 32 IPP & CHP 1,225 43 Net generation (megawatthours) 49,696,183 32 Electric utilities 45,068,982 23 IPP & CHP 4,627,201 41 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 45,704 24 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 49,638 18 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 47,337 17 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 22 Nitrogen Oxide

  1. BEEST: Electric Vehicle Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-07-01

    BEEST Project: The U.S. spends nearly a $1 billion per day to import petroleum, but we need dramatically better batteries for electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles (EV/PHEV) to truly compete with gasoline-powered cars. The 10 projects in ARPA-E’s BEEST Project, short for “Batteries for Electrical Energy Storage in Transportation,” could make that happen by developing a variety of rechargeable battery technologies that would enable EV/PHEVs to meet or beat the price and performance of gasoline-powered cars, and enable mass production of electric vehicles that people will be excited to drive.

  2. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Arizona Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Arizona) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 28,249 13 Electric utilities 21,311 11 IPP & CHP 6,938 17 Net generation (megawatthours) 112,257,187 13 Electric utilities 94,847,135 8 IPP & CHP 17,410,053 19 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 22,597 32 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 56,726 17 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 53,684 16 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 41 Nitrogen oxide

  3. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    California Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (California) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 74,646 2 Electric utilities 28,201 4 IPP & CHP 46,446 2 Net generation (megawatthours) 198,807,622 5 Electric utilities 71,037,135 14 IPP & CHP 127,770,487 4 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 3,102 46 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 98,348 5 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 57,223 14 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.0 49

  4. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Colorado Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Colorado) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 14,933 29 Electric utilities 10,204 28 IPP & CHP 4,729 18 Net generation (megawatthours) 53,847,386 30 Electric utilities 43,239,615 26 IPP & CHP 10,607,771 30 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 28,453 30 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 44,349 24 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 38,474 22 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 32 Nitrogen

  5. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Connecticut Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Connecticut) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 8,832 35 Electric utilities 161 45 IPP & CHP 8,671 12 Net generation (megawatthours) 33,676,980 38 Electric utilities 54,693 45 IPP & CHP 33,622,288 11 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 1,897 47 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 8,910 45 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 7,959 41 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.1 46 Nitrogen oxide

  6. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Delaware Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Delaware) Item Value U.S. rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 3,086 46 Electric utilities 102 46 IPP & CHP 2,984 31 Net generation (megawatthours) 7,703,584 47 Electric utilities 49,050 46 IPP & CHP 7,654,534 35 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 824 48 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 2,836 48 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 4,276 43 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.2 45 Nitrogen oxide

  7. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    District of Columbia Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (District of Columbia) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 9 51 Electric utilities IPP & CHP 9 51 Net generation (megawatthours) 67,612 51 Electric utilities IPP & CHP 67,612 51 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 0 51 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 147 51 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 48 50 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.0 51 Nitrogen oxide (lbs/MWh) 4.3 3

  8. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Florida Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Florida) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 59,440 3 Electric utilities 51,775 1 IPP & CHP 7,665 15 Net generation (megawatthours) 230,015,937 2 Electric utilities 211,970,587 1 IPP & CHP 18,045,350 15 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 126,600 10 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 91,356 6 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 111,549 2 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 30 Nitrogen

  9. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Georgia Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Georgia) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 38,250 7 Electric utilities 28,873 3 IPP & CHP 9,377 10 Net generation (megawatthours) 125,837,224 10 Electric utilities 109,523,336 4 IPP & CHP 16,313,888 20 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 105,998 11 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 58,144 14 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 62,516 12 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.7 24 Nitrogen oxide

  10. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Hawaii Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Hawaii) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Petroleum Net summer capacity (megawatts) 2,672 47 Electric utilities 1,732 40 IPP & CHP 939 45 Net generation (megawatthours) 10,204,158 46 Electric utilities 5,517,389 39 IPP & CHP 4,686,769 40 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 21,670 33 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 26,928 31 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 7,313 42 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 4.2 4 Nitrogen oxide

  11. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Illinois Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Illinois) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 44,727 4 Electric utilities 5,263 35 IPP & CHP 39,464 4 Net generation (megawatthours) 202,143,878 4 Electric utilities 10,457,398 36 IPP & CHP 191,686,480 3 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 187,536 6 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 58,076 15 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 96,624 6 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 20 Nitrogen

  12. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Indiana Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Indiana) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 27,499 14 Electric utilities 23,319 7 IPP & CHP 4,180 23 Net generation (megawatthours) 115,395,392 12 Electric utilities 100,983,285 6 IPP & CHP 14,412,107 22 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 332,396 3 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 133,412 3 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 103,391 3 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.8 1 Nitrogen oxide

  13. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Iowa Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Iowa) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 16,507 24 Electric utilities 12,655 20 IPP & CHP 3,852 25 Net generation (megawatthours) 56,853,282 28 Electric utilities 43,021,954 27 IPP & CHP 13,831,328 25 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 74,422 19 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 41,793 25 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 39,312 21 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 13 Nitrogen oxide

  14. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Kansas Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Kansas) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 14,227 31 Electric utilities 11,468 24 IPP & CHP 2,759 33 Net generation (megawatthours) 49,728,363 31 Electric utilities 39,669,629 29 IPP & CHP 10,058,734 31 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 31,550 29 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 29,014 29 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 31,794 29 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 29 Nitrogen oxide

  15. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Kentucky Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Kentucky) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 20,878 21 Electric utilities 19,473 15 IPP & CHP 1,405 40 Net generation (megawatthours) 90,896,435 17 Electric utilities 90,133,403 10 IPP & CHP 763,032 49 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 204,873 5 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 89,253 7 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 85,795 7 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 4.5 3 Nitrogen oxide

  16. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Louisiana Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Louisiana) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 26,657 15 Electric utilities 18,120 16 IPP & CHP 8,537 13 Net generation (megawatthours) 104,229,402 15 Electric utilities 58,518,271 17 IPP & CHP 45,711,131 8 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 96,240 14 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 83,112 8 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 57,137 15 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 21

  17. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Maine Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Maine) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 4,470 43 Electric utilities 10 49 IPP & CHP 4,460 20 Net generation (megawatthours) 13,248,710 44 Electric utilities 523 49 IPP & CHP 13,248,187 27 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 10,990 38 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 8,622 46 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 3,298 46 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.7 25 Nitrogen oxide (lbs/MWh)

  18. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Maryland Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Maryland) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 12,264 33 Electric utilities 85 47 IPP & CHP 12,179 8 Net generation (megawatthours) 37,833,652 35 Electric utilities 20,260 47 IPP & CHP 37,813,392 9 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 41,370 26 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 20,626 35 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 20,414 34 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 18 Nitrogen oxide

  19. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Massachusetts Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Massachusetts) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 13,128 32 Electric utilities 971 42 IPP & CHP 12,157 9 Net generation (megawatthours) 31,118,591 40 Electric utilities 679,986 43 IPP & CHP 30,438,606 12 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 6,748 41 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 13,831 43 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 12,231 39 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 40

  20. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Michigan Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Michigan) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 30,435 12 Electric utilities 22,260 9 IPP & CHP 8,175 14 Net generation (megawatthours) 106,816,991 14 Electric utilities 84,075,322 12 IPP & CHP 22,741,669 13 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 173,521 7 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 77,950 9 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 64,062 11 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.2 7 Nitrogen oxide

  1. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Minnesota Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Minnesota) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 15,621 28 Electric utilities 11,557 22 IPP & CHP 4,064 24 Net generation (megawatthours) 56,998,330 27 Electric utilities 45,963,271 22 IPP & CHP 11,035,059 29 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 39,272 27 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 38,373 28 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 32,399 28 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.4 27 Nitrogen

  2. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Mississippi Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Mississippi) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 16,090 26 Electric utilities 13,494 19 IPP & CHP 2,597 34 Net generation (megawatthours) 55,127,092 29 Electric utilities 47,084,382 21 IPP & CHP 8,042,710 34 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 101,093 13 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 23,993 32 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 24,037 33 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 5

  3. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Missouri Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Missouri) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 21,790 19 Electric utilities 20,538 13 IPP & CHP 1,252 42 Net generation (megawatthours) 87,834,468 18 Electric utilities 85,271,253 11 IPP & CHP 2,563,215 46 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 149,842 9 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 77,749 10 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 75,735 8 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 6 Nitrogen oxide

  4. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Montana Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Montana) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 6,330 41 Electric utilities 3,209 38 IPP & CHP 3,121 30 Net generation (megawatthours) 30,257,616 41 Electric utilities 12,329,411 35 IPP & CHP 17,928,205 16 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 14,426 34 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 20,538 36 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 17,678 36 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 34 Nitrogen oxide

  5. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Nebraska Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Nebraska) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 8,732 36 Electric utilities 7,913 30 IPP & CHP 819 46 Net generation (megawatthours) 39,431,291 34 Electric utilities 36,560,960 30 IPP & CHP 2,870,331 45 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 63,994 22 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 27,045 30 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 26,348 31 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.2 8 Nitrogen oxide

  6. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Nevada Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Nevada) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 10,485 34 Electric utilities 8,480 29 IPP & CHP 2,006 35 Net generation (megawatthours) 36,000,537 37 Electric utilities 27,758,728 33 IPP & CHP 8,241,809 33 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 10,229 40 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 18,606 39 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 16,222 37 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 38 Nitrogen

  7. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Hampshire Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (New Hampshire) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 4,413 44 Electric utilities 1,121 41 IPP & CHP 3,292 30 Net generation (megawatthours) 19,778,520 42 Electric utilities 2,266,903 41 IPP & CHP 17,511,617 20 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 3,733 44 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 5,057 47 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 3,447 46 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 45 Nitrogen

  8. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jersey Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (New Jersey) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 19,399 22 Electric utilities 544 43 IPP & CHP 18,852 7 Net generation (megawatthours) 68,051,086 23 Electric utilities -117,003 50 IPP & CHP 68,168,089 7 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 3,369 44 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 15,615 41 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 17,905 35 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.1 47 Nitrogen oxide

  9. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Mexico Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (New Mexico) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 8,072 39 Electric utilities 6,094 33 IPP & CHP 1,978 37 Net generation (megawatthours) 32,306,210 39 Electric utilities 26,422,867 34 IPP & CHP 5,883,343 38 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 12,064 37 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 46,192 22 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 24,712 32 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.7 37 Nitrogen

  10. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    York Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (New York) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural Gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 40,404 6 Electric utilities 10,989 27 IPP & CHP 29,416 5 Net generation (megawatthours) 137,122,202 7 Electric utilities 34,082 31 IPP & CHP 103,039,347 5 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 31,878 28 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 46,971 21 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 33,240 26 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 39 Nitrogen oxide

  11. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Carolina Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (North Carolina) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 30,048 12 Electric utilities 26,706 6 IPP & CHP 3,342 29 Net generation (megawatthours) 125,936,293 9 Electric utilities 116,317,050 2 IPP & CHP 9,619,243 31 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 71,293 20 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 62,397 12 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 56,940 14 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 32 Nitrogen

  12. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Dakota Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (North Dakota) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 6,566 40 Electric utilities 5,292 34 IPP & CHP 1,274 41 Net generation (megawatthours) 35,021,673 39 Electric utilities 31,044,374 32 IPP & CHP 3,977,299 42 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 56,854 23 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 48,454 22 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 30,274 28 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.2 11 Nitrogen oxide

  13. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Ohio Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Ohio) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 31,507 9 Electric utilities 11,134 26 IPP & CHP 20,372 6 Net generation (megawatthours) 134,476,405 8 Electric utilities 43,290,512 25 IPP & CHP 91,185,893 7 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 355,108 1 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 105,688 4 Carbon dioxide (thousand metrictons) 98,650 5 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.3 2 Nitrogen oxide (lbs/MWh)

  14. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Oklahoma) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 24,048 17 Electric utilities 17,045 17 IPP & CHP 7,003 16 Net generation (megawatthours) 70,155,504 22 Electric utilities 48,096,026 19 IPP & CHP 22,059,478 14 Emissions Sulfur dioxide 78,556 18 Nitrogen oxide 44,874 23 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 43,994 18 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 17 Nitrogen oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 26

  15. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Pennsylvania) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 42,723 5 Electric utilities 39 48 IPP & CHP 42,685 3 Net generation (megawatthours) 221,058,365 3 Electric utilities 90,994 44 IPP & CHP 220,967,371 2 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 297,598 4 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 141,486 2 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 101,361 4 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 11 Nitrogen oxide

  16. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Rhode Island Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Rhode Island) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 1,810 49 Electric utilities 8 50 IPP & CHP 1,803 38 Net generation (megawatthours) 6,281,748 49 Electric utilities 10,670 48 IPP & CHP 6,271,078 36 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 100 49 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 1,224 49 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 2,566 48 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.0 48 Nitrogen oxide

  17. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Carolina Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (South Carolina) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 22,824 18 Electric utilities 20,836 12 IPP & CHP 1,988 36 Net generation (megawatthours) 97,158,465 16 Electric utilities 93,547,004 9 IPP & CHP 3,611,461 43 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 43,659 25 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 21,592 34 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 33,083 27 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 35

  18. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Tennessee Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Tennessee) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 20,998 20 Electric utilities 20,490 14 IPP & CHP 508 47 Net generation (megawatthours) 79,506,886 20 Electric utilities 76,986,629 13 IPP & CHP 2,520,257 47 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 89,357 16 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 23,913 33 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 41,405 20 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 16 Nitrogen oxide

  19. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Texas Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Texas) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 112,914 1 Electric utilities 29,113 2 IPP & CHP 83,800 1 Net generation (megawatthours) 437,629,668 1 Electric utilities 94,974,953 7 IPP & CHP 342,654,715 1 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 349,245 2 Nitrogen Oxide short tons) 229,580 1 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 254,488 1 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 26 Nitrogen Oxide

  20. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Vermont Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Vermont) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 650 50 Electric utilities 337 44 IPP & CHP 313 49 Net generation (megawatthours) 7,031,394 48 Electric utilities 868,079 42 IPP & CHP 6,163,315 37 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 71 50 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 737 50 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 14 51 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.0 50 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.2 51

  1. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Virginia Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Virginia) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 26,292 16 Electric utilities 22,062 10 IPP & CHP 4,231 22 Net generation (megawatthours) 77,137,438 21 Electric utilities 62,966,914 16 IPP & CHP 14,170,524 23 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 68,550 20 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 40,656 26 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 33,295 25 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 23 Nitrogen

  2. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    West Virginia Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (West Virginia) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 16,276 25 Electric utilities 11,981 21 IPP & CHP 4,295 21 Net generation (megawatthours) 81,059,577 19 Electric utilities 63,331,833 15 IPP & CHP 17,727,743 17 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 102,406 12 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 72,995 11 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 73,606 9 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.5 14

  3. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Wisconsin) Item Value Rank Primary Energy Source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 17,166 23 Electric utilities 14,377 18 IPP & CHP 2,788 32 Net generation (megawatthours) 61,064,796 25 Electric utilities 47,301,782 20 IPP & CHP 13,763,014 26 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 81,239 17 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 39,597 27 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 43,750 19 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 12 Nitrogen

  4. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Wyoming Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Wyoming) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 8,458 37 Electric utilities 7,233 32 IPP & CHP 1,225 43 Net generation (megawatthours) 49,696,183 32 Electric utilities 45,068,982 23 IPP & CHP 4,627,201 41 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 45,704 24 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 49,638 18 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 47,337 17 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 22 Nitrogen Oxide

  5. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alaska Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Alaska) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 2,464 48 Electric utilities 2,313 39 IPP & CHP 151 50 Net generation (megawatthours) 6,042,830 50 Electric utilities 5,509,991 40 IPP & CHP 532,839 50 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 4,129 43 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 19,281 38 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 3,558 44 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.4 28 Nitrogen oxide

  6. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arizona Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Arizona) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 28,249 13 Electric utilities 21,311 11 IPP & CHP 6,938 17 Net generation (megawatthours) 112,257,187 13 Electric utilities 94,847,135 8 IPP & CHP 17,410,053 19 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 22,597 32 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 56,726 17 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 53,684 16 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 41 Nitrogen oxide

  7. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (California) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 74,646 2 Electric utilities 28,201 4 IPP & CHP 46,446 2 Net generation (megawatthours) 198,807,622 5 Electric utilities 71,037,135 14 IPP & CHP 127,770,487 4 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 3,102 46 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 98,348 5 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 57,223 14 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.0 49

  8. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Colorado Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Colorado) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 14,933 29 Electric utilities 10,204 28 IPP & CHP 4,729 18 Net generation (megawatthours) 53,847,386 30 Electric utilities 43,239,615 26 IPP & CHP 10,607,771 30 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 28,453 30 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 44,349 24 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 38,474 22 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 32 Nitrogen

  9. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Connecticut) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 8,832 35 Electric utilities 161 45 IPP & CHP 8,671 12 Net generation (megawatthours) 33,676,980 38 Electric utilities 54,693 45 IPP & CHP 33,622,288 11 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 1,897 47 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 8,910 45 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 7,959 41 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.1 46 Nitrogen oxide

  10. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Delaware Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Delaware) Item Value U.S. rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 3,086 46 Electric utilities 102 46 IPP & CHP 2,984 31 Net generation (megawatthours) 7,703,584 47 Electric utilities 49,050 46 IPP & CHP 7,654,534 35 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 824 48 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 2,836 48 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 4,276 43 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.2 45 Nitrogen oxide

  11. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    District of Columbia Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (District of Columbia) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 9 51 Electric utilities IPP & CHP 9 51 Net generation (megawatthours) 67,612 51 Electric utilities IPP & CHP 67,612 51 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 0 51 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 147 51 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 48 50 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.0 51 Nitrogen oxide (lbs/MWh) 4.3 3

  12. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Florida) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 59,440 3 Electric utilities 51,775 1 IPP & CHP 7,665 15 Net generation (megawatthours) 230,015,937 2 Electric utilities 211,970,587 1 IPP & CHP 18,045,350 15 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 126,600 10 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 91,356 6 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 111,549 2 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 30 Nitrogen

  13. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Georgia Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Georgia) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 38,250 7 Electric utilities 28,873 3 IPP & CHP 9,377 10 Net generation (megawatthours) 125,837,224 10 Electric utilities 109,523,336 4 IPP & CHP 16,313,888 20 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 105,998 11 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 58,144 14 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 62,516 12 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.7 24 Nitrogen oxide

  14. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hawaii Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Hawaii) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Petroleum Net summer capacity (megawatts) 2,672 47 Electric utilities 1,732 40 IPP & CHP 939 45 Net generation (megawatthours) 10,204,158 46 Electric utilities 5,517,389 39 IPP & CHP 4,686,769 40 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 21,670 33 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 26,928 31 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 7,313 42 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 4.2 4 Nitrogen oxide

  15. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Idaho Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Idaho) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Hydroelectric Net summer capacity (megawatts) 4,944 42 Electric utilities 3,413 37 IPP & CHP 1,531 39 Net generation (megawatthours) 15,184,417 43 Electric utilities 9,628,016 37 IPP & CHP 5,556,400 39 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 5,777 42 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 20,301 37 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 1,492 49 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.8 36 Nitrogen oxide

  16. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Illinois) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 44,727 4 Electric utilities 5,263 35 IPP & CHP 39,464 4 Net generation (megawatthours) 202,143,878 4 Electric utilities 10,457,398 36 IPP & CHP 191,686,480 3 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 187,536 6 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 58,076 15 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 96,624 6 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 20 Nitrogen

  17. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Indiana Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Indiana) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 27,499 14 Electric utilities 23,319 7 IPP & CHP 4,180 23 Net generation (megawatthours) 115,395,392 12 Electric utilities 100,983,285 6 IPP & CHP 14,412,107 22 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 332,396 3 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 133,412 3 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 103,391 3 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.8 1 Nitrogen oxide

  18. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Iowa Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Iowa) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 16,507 24 Electric utilities 12,655 20 IPP & CHP 3,852 25 Net generation (megawatthours) 56,853,282 28 Electric utilities 43,021,954 27 IPP & CHP 13,831,328 25 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 74,422 19 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 41,793 25 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 39,312 21 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 13 Nitrogen oxide

  19. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kansas Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Kansas) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 14,227 31 Electric utilities 11,468 24 IPP & CHP 2,759 33 Net generation (megawatthours) 49,728,363 31 Electric utilities 39,669,629 29 IPP & CHP 10,058,734 31 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 31,550 29 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 29,014 29 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 31,794 29 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 29 Nitrogen oxide

  20. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kentucky Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Kentucky) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 20,878 21 Electric utilities 19,473 15 IPP & CHP 1,405 40 Net generation (megawatthours) 90,896,435 17 Electric utilities 90,133,403 10 IPP & CHP 763,032 49 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 204,873 5 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 89,253 7 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 85,795 7 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 4.5 3 Nitrogen oxide