National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for undulator beam calculated

  1. A possibility for using an APPLE undulator to generate a photon beam with transverse optical modes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sasaki, S.; McNulty, I.; Shimada, T.; JAEA

    2008-01-01

    We investigate use of an APPLE-type undulator for generating Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) and Hermite-Gaussian (HG) mode beams. We find that the second harmonic radiation in the circular mode corresponds to an LG beam with l=1, and the second harmonic in the linear mode corresponds to an HG beam with l=1. The combination of an APPLE undulator and conventional monochromator optics may provide an opportunity for a new type of experimental research in the synchrotron radiation community.

  2. Simulation and measurement of the electrostatic beam kicker in the low-energy undulator test line.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waldschmidt, G. J.

    1998-10-27

    An electrostatic kicker has been constructed for use in the Low-Energy Undulator Test Line (LEUTL) at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The function of the kicker is to limit the amount of beam current to be accelerated by the APS linac. Two electrodes within the kicker create an electric field that adjusts the trajectory of the beam. This paper will explore the static fields that are set up between the offset electrode plates and determine the reaction of the beam to this field. The kicker was numerically simulated using the electromagnetic solver package MAFIA [1].

  3. Calculated Performance Of The Variable-Polarization Undulator Upgrade To The Daresbury SRS Soft X-Ray Undulator Beamline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roper, Mark D.; Bird, Daniel T.

    2004-05-12

    The soft x-ray beamline 5U1 on the Daresbury Laboratory SRS currently uses a planar undulator, producing linearly polarized radiation in the range 100 to 1000 eV. The undulator is soon to be replaced by a variable-polarization device of the Apple II design. The aim is to produce circularly polarized light in the energy range 265 to 1000 eV, covering the K-edges of C, N and O, and the first row transition element L-edges. This will greatly enhance the provision of circularly polarized soft-x-rays on the SRS and open up new opportunities for experimenters. The device will also produce linear polarization with a selectable angle of polarization with respect to the orbit plane, which is currently unavailable on the SRS. In order to provide the coverage over this energy range, we are exploiting the relatively large emittance of the SRS to allow us to use the second and third harmonics even in circular polarization mode. This paper presents the expected beamline output in various polarization modes and the predicted degree of polarization.

  4. Undulator-Based Production of Polarized Positrons, A Proposal for the 50-GeV Beam in the FFTB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Alexander; P. Anthony; V. Bharadwaj; Yu.K. Batygin; T. Behnke; S. Berridge; G.R. Bower; W. Bugg; R. Carr; E. Chudakov; J.E. Clendenin; F.J. Decker; Yu. Efremenko; T. Fieguth; K. Flottmann; M. Fukuda; V. Gharibyan; T. Handler; T. Hirose; R.H. Iverson; Yu. Kamyshkov; H. Kolanoski; T. Lohse; Chang-guo Lu; K.T. McDonald; N. Meyners; R. Michaels; A.A. Mikhailichenko; K. Monig; G. Moortgat-Pick; M. Olson; T. Omori; D. Onoprienko; N. Pavel; R. Pitthan; M. Purohit; L. Rinolfi; K.P. Schuler; J.C. Sheppard; S. Spanier; A. Stahl; Z.M. Szalata; J. Turner; D. Walz; A. Weidemann; J. Weisend

    2003-06-01

    The full exploitation of the physics potential of future linear colliders such as the JLC, NLC, and TESLA will require the development of polarized positron beams. In the proposed scheme of Balakin and Mikhailichenko [1] a helical undulator is employed to generate photons of several MeV with circular polarization which are then converted in a relatively thin target to generate longitudinally polarized positrons. This experiment, E-166, proposes to test this scheme to determine whether such a technique can produce polarized positron beams of sufficient quality for use in future linear colliders. The experiment will install a meter-long, short-period, pulsed helical undulator in the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) at SLAC. A low-emittance 50-GeV electron beam passing through this undulator will generate circularly polarized photons with energies up to 10 MeV. These polarized photons are then converted to polarized positrons via pair production in thin targets. Titanium and tungsten targets, which are both candidates for use in linear colliders, will be tested. The experiment will measure the flux and polarization of the undulator photons, and the spectrum and polarization of the positrons produced in the conversion target, and compare the measurement results to simulations. Thus the proposed experiment directly tests for the first time the validity of the simulation programs used for the physics of polarized pair production in finite matter, in particular the effects of multiple scattering on polarization. Successful comparison of the experimental results to the simulations will lead to greater confidence in the proposed designs of polarized positrons sources for the next generation of linear colliders. This experiment requests six-weeks of time in the FFTB beam line: three weeks for installation and setup and three weeks of beam for data taking. A 50-GeV beam with about twice the SLC emittance at a repetition rate of 30 Hz is required.

  5. Micropole undulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Csonka, P.L.; Tatchyn, R.O.

    1989-01-24

    Micropole undulators for use in the generation of x-rays from moving charged particles and methods for manufacturing such undulators are disclosed. One type of micropole undulator has two jaws containing rows of spaced apart poles arranged so that each pole produces a magnetic field aligned with all other similar fields. An external biasing field extends through the jaws so that an overall undulator field of substantially sinusoidal shape and substantially zero average value extends along the undulator axis. Preferably, the poles are bars formed of a magnetizable, but unmagnetized, material so that, after the jaws are assembled, all of the bars can be magnetized simultaneously in a uniform magnetic field of suitable strength. Another type of micropole undulator incorporates two parallel layers which have been magnetized to provide rows of alternating magnetic fields extending in opposite directions, the layers being positioned between the pole faces of a highly magnetically permeable material with the south poles of one layer opposite the north poles of the other. Poles in the layers are formed by subjecting successive regions of each layer to oppositely directed and suitably varied magnetizing forces. 16 figs.

  6. Micropole undulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Csonka, Paul L.; Tatchyn, Roman O.

    1989-01-24

    Micropole undulators for use in the generation of x-rays from moving charged particles and methods for manufacturing such undulators are disclosed. One type of micropole undulator has two jaws containing rows of spaced apart poles arranged so that each pole produces a magnetic field aligned with all other similar fields. An external biasing field extends through the jaws so that an overall undulator field of substantially sinusoidal shape and substantially zero average value extends along the undulator axis. Preferably, the poles are bars formed of a magnetizable, but unmagnetized, material so that, after the jaws are assembled, all of the bars can be magnetized simultaneously in a uniform magnetic field of suitable strength. Another type of micropole undulator incorporates two parallel layers which have been magnetized to provide rows of alternating magnetic fields extending in opposite directions, the layers being positioned between the pole faces of a highly magnetically permeable material with the south poles of one layer opposite the north poles of the other. Poles in the layers are formed by subjecting successive regions of each layer to oppositely directed and suitably varied magnetizing forces.

  7. Energy Loss and Energy Spread Growth in a Planar Undulator(LCC-0086)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheppard, J

    2003-10-07

    The change in beam energy spread due to transmission through a long, planar undulator is calculated. This change is shown to be gaussian as expected from the central limit theorem and large number of photons emitted per electron. These results are compared with Saldin et al. [2] expressions. Numerical results for the case of the TESLA beam and for an NLC beam are given.

  8. Micropole undulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tatchyn, Roman O.; Csonka, Paul L.; Cremer, Jay T.

    1990-12-11

    Micropole undulators for use in the generation of x-rays from moving charged particles are disclosed. Two rows of spaced apart poles are arranged so that each pole produces a magnetic field aligned with all other similar fields. The poles are the ends of "C"-shaped magnets. In each row, adjacent poles are separated by spacers made of a superconducting material.

  9. Micropole undulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tatchyn, R.O.; Csonka, P.L.; Cremer, J.T.

    1990-12-11

    Micropole undulators for use in the generation of x-rays from moving charged particles are disclosed. Two rows of spaced apart poles are arranged so that each pole produces a magnetic field aligned with all other similar fields. The poles are the ends of C''-shaped magnets. In each row, adjacent poles are separated by spacers made of a superconducting material. 11 figs.

  10. Monte Carlo Studies of the Radiation Fields in the Linac Coherent Light Source Undulators and of the Corresponding Signals in the Cerenkov Beam Loss Monitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santana Leitner, Mario; Fasso, Alberto; Fisher, Alan S.; Nuhn, Heinz D.; Dooling, Jeffrey C.; Berg, William; Yang, Bin X.; /Argonne

    2010-09-14

    In 2009 the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the SLAC National Accelerator Center started free electron laser (FEL) operation. In order to continue to produce the bright and short-pulsed x-ray laser demanded by FEL scientists, this pioneer hard x-ray FEL requires a perfectly tailored magnetic field at the undulators, so that the photons generated at the electron wiggling path interact at the right phase with the electron beam. In such a precise system, small (>0.01%) radiation-induced alterations of the magnetic field in the permanent magnets could affect FEL performance. This paper describes the simulation studies of radiation fields in permanent magnets and the expected signal in the detectors. The transport of particles from the radiation sources (i.e. diagnostic insert) to the undulator magnets and to the beam loss monitors (BLM) was simulated with the intra nuclear cascade codes FLUKA and MARS15. In order to accurately reproduce the optics of LCLS, lattice capabilities and magnetic fields were enabled in FLUKA and betatron oscillations were validated against reference data. All electron events entering the BLMs were printed in data files. The paper also introduces the Radioactive Ion Beam Optimizer (RIBO) Monte Carlo 3-D code, which was used to read from the event files, to compute Cerenkov production and then to simulate the optical coupling of the BLM detectors, accounting for the transmission of light through the quartz.

  11. MaRIE Undulator & XFEL Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Dinh Cong; Marksteiner, Quinn R.; Anisimov, Petr Mikhaylovich; Buechler, Cynthia Eileen

    2015-03-23

    The 22 slides in this presentation treat the subject under the following headings: MaRIE XFEL Performance Parameters, Input Electron Beam Parameters, Undulator Design, Genesis Simulations, Risks, and Summary It is concluded that time-dependent Genesis simulations show the MaRIE XFEL can deliver the number of photons within the required bandwidth, provided a number of assumptions are met; the highest risks are associated with the electron beam driving the XFEL undulator; and risks associated with the undulator and/or distributed seeding technique may be evaluated or retired by performing early validation experiments.

  12. Strong permanent magnet-assisted electromagnetic undulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Halbach, Klaus

    1988-01-01

    This invention discloses an improved undulator comprising a plurality of electromagnet poles located along opposite sides of a particle beam axis with alternate north and south poles on each side of the beam to cause the beam to wiggle or undulate as it travels generally along the beam axis and permanent magnets spaced adjacent the electromagnetic poles on each side of the axis of said particle beam in an orientation sufficient to reduce the saturation of the electromagnet poles whereby the field strength of the electromagnet poles can be increased beyond the normal saturation levels of the electromagnetic poles.

  13. Concept of quasi-periodic undulator - control of radiation spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sasaki, Shigemi

    1995-02-01

    A new type of undulator, the quasi-periodic undulator (QPU) is considered which generates the irrational harmonics in the radiation spectrum. This undulator consists of the arrays of magnet blocks aligned in a quasi-periodic order, and consequentially lead to a quasi-periodic motion of electron. A combination of the QPU and a conventional crystal/grating monochromator provides pure monochromatic photon beam for synchrotron radiation users because the irrational harmonics do not be diffracted in the same direction by a monochromator. The radiation power and width of each radiation peak emitted from this undulator are expected to be comparable with those of the conventional periodic undulator.

  14. Errors in response calculations for beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wada, H.; Wurburton, G.B.

    1985-05-01

    When the finite element method is used to idealize a structure, its dynamic response can be determined from the governing matrix equation by the normal mode method or by one of the many approximate direct integration methods. In either method the approximate data of the finite element idealization are used, but further assumptions are introduced by the direct integration scheme. It is the purpose of this paper to study these errors for a simple structure. The transient flexural vibrations of a uniform cantilever beam, which is subjected to a transverse force at the free end, are determined by the Laplace transform method. Comparable responses are obtained for a finite element idealization of the beam, using the normal mode and Newmark average acceleration methods; the errors associated with the approximate methods are studied. If accuracy has priority and the quantity of data is small, the normal mode method is recommended; however, if the quantity of data is large, the Newmark method is useful.

  15. Linear beam-beam tune shift calculations for the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, D.

    1989-01-12

    A realistic estimate of the linear beam-beam tune shift is necessary for the selection of an optimum working point in the tune diagram. Estimates of the beam-beam tune shift using the ''Round Beam Approximation'' (RBA) have over estimated the tune shift for the Tevatron. For a hadron machine with unequal lattice functions and beam sizes, an explicit calculation using the beam size at the crossings is required. Calculations for various Tevatron lattices used in Collider operation are presented. Comparisons between the RBA and the explicit calculation, for elliptical beams, are presented. This paper discusses the calculation of the linear tune shift using the program SYNCH. Selection of a working point is discussed. The magnitude of the tune shift is influenced by the choice of crossing points in the lattice as determined by the pbar ''cogging effects''. Also discussed is current cogging procedures and presents results of calculations for tune shifts at various crossing points in the lattice. Finally, a comparison of early pbar tune measurements with the present linear tune shift calculations is presented. 17 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. An Undulator Based Polarized Positron Source for CLIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Wanming; Gai, Wei; Rinolfi, Louis; Sheppard, John; /SLAC

    2012-07-02

    A viable positron source scheme is proposed that uses circularly polarized gamma rays generated from the main 250 GeV electron beam. The beam passes through a helical superconducting undulator with a magnetic field of {approx} 1 Tesla and a period of 1.15 cm. The gamma-rays produced in the undulator in the energy range between {approx} 3 MeV - 100 MeV will be directed to a titanium target and produce polarized positrons. The positrons are then captured, accelerated and transported to a Pre-Damping Ring (PDR). Detailed parameter studies of this scheme including positron yield, and undulator parameter dependence are presented. Effects on the 250 GeV CLIC main beam, including emittance growth and energy loss from the beam passing through the undulator are also discussed.

  17. Planar Undulator Considerations(LCC-0085)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheppard, J

    2003-10-07

    This note consists of informal working notes that document an effort to understand the TESLA baseline, unpolarized, undulator based positron source. This is the first step in the design process of an undulator based positron system for the NLC. The expressions and methodologies developed herein are used in subsequent memos that reference this note. In regards to the TESLA design, it is found that a 135 m long (versus 100 m length) undulator is consistent with the performance descriptions in the TDR text. And while operation of the TESLA system with a 250 GeV drive beam energy provides a safety margin of a factor of {approx}2 in e{sup +} yield, operation of the same system at 160 GeV results in a yield of about 0.6.

  18. Coherent Radiation Effects in the LCLS Undulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reiche, S.; /UCLA; Huang, Z.; /SLAC

    2010-12-14

    For X-ray Free-Electron Lasers such as LCLS and TESLA FEL, a change in the electron energy while amplifying the FEL radiation can shift the resonance condition out of the bandwidth of the FEL. The largest sources of energy loss is the emission of incoherent undulator radiation. Because the loss per electron depends only on the undulator parameters and the beam energy, which are fixed for a given resonant wavelength, the average energy loss can be compensated for by a fixed taper of the undulator. Coherent radiation has a strong enhancement proportional to the number of electrons in the bunch for frequencies comparable to or longer than the bunch dimension. If the emitted coherent energy becomes comparable to that of the incoherent emission, it has to be included in the taper as well. However, the coherent loss depends on the bunch charge and the applied compression scheme and a change of these parameters would require a change of the taper. This imposes a limitation on the practical operation of Free-Electron Lasers, where the taper can only be adjusted manually. In this presentation we analyze the coherent emission of undulator radiation and transition undulator radiation for LCLS, and estimate whether the resulting energy losses are significant for the operation of LCLS.

  19. A strong permanent magnet-assisted electromagnetic undulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Halbach, K.

    1987-01-30

    This invention discloses an improved undulator comprising a plurality of electromagnet poles located along opposite sides of a particle beam axis with alternate north and south poles on each side of the beam to cause the beam to wiggle or undulate as it travels generally along the beam axis and permanent magnets spaced adjacent the electromagnetic poles on each side of the axis of said particle beam in an orientation sufficient to reduce the saturation of the electromagnet poles whereby the field strength of the electromagnet poles can be increased beyond the normal saturation levels of the electromagnetic poles. 4 figs.

  20. Compensation of Beam Line Polarizing Effects at UE112 of BESSY II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahrdt, J.; Follath, R.; Frentrup, W.; Gaupp, A.; Scheer, M.

    2010-06-23

    Reflections in synchrotron radiation beam lines tend to change the state of polarization of the radiation. This effect is more pronounced for steep angle of incidence, i.e. at low photon energy (say below 100 eV) beam lines. The APPLE II undulator UE112 at BESSY has all four magnetic rows shiftable and thus generates any state of polarization. To provide any intended polarization state at the sample we perform polarization measurements based on simple and fast linear polarization analysis that together with calculations of the undulator radiation predicts undulator settings that cancel beam line polarization effects.

  1. The JLAB UV Undulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gottschalk, Steven C.; Benson, Steven V.; Moore, Steven Wesley

    2013-05-01

    Recently the JLAB FEL has demonstrated 150 W at 400 nm and 200 W at 700 nm using a 33mm period undulator designed and built by STI Optronics. This paper describes the undulator design and performance. Two key requirements were low phase error, zero steering and offset end fields and small rms trajectory errors. We will describe a new genetic algorithm that allowed phase error minimization to 1.8 degrees while exceeding specifications. The mechanical design, control system and EPICS interface will also be summarized.

  2. Undulator Radiation Damage Experience at LCLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nuhn, H. D.; Field, C.; Mao, S.; Levashov, Y.; Santana, M.; Welch, J. N.; Wolf, Z.

    2015-01-06

    The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has been running the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the first x-ray Free Electron Laser since 2009. Undulator magnet damage from radiation, produced by the electron beam traveling through the 133-m long straight vacuum tube, has been and is a concern. A damage measurement experiment has been performed in 2007 in order to obtain dose versus damage calibrations. Radiation reduction and detection devices have been integrated into the LCLS undulator system. The accumulated radiation dose rate was continuously monitored and recorded. In addition, undulator segments have been routinely removed from the beamline to be checked for magnetic (50 ppm, rms) and mechanic (about 0.25 µm, rms) changes. A reduction in strength of the undulator segments is being observed, at a level, which is now clearly above the noise. Recently, potential sources for the observed integrated radiation levels have been investigated. The paper discusses the results of these investigation as well as comparison between observed damage and measured dose accumulations and discusses, briefly, strategies for the new LCLS-II upgrade, which will be operating at more than 300 times larger beam rate.

  3. LCLS CDR Chapter 8 - Undulator

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 Undulator TECHNICAL SYNOPSIS The LCLS Undulator is made up of 33 individual undulator segments. Each undulator segment will be a permanent-magnet planar hybrid device with a period length of 30 mm and a fixed gap of nominally 6 mm. The actual gap will be adjusted as necessary to yield an effective K of 3.71. Each undulator segment is 3.42 m long, with 226 poles per jaw. The poles will be made of vanadium permendur and the magnets of a grade of NdFeB with a high intrinsic coercivity for better

  4. Fast optimization and dose calculation in scanned ion beam therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hild, S.; Graeff, C.; Trautmann, J.; Kraemer, M.; Zink, K.; Durante, M.; Bert, C.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Particle therapy (PT) has advantages over photon irradiation on static tumors. An increased biological effectiveness and active target conformal dose shaping are strong arguments for PT. However, the sensitivity to changes of internal geometry complicates the use of PT for moving organs. In case of interfractionally moving objects adaptive radiotherapy (ART) concepts known from intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can be adopted for PT treatments. One ART strategy is to optimize a new treatment plan based on daily image data directly before a radiation fraction is delivered [treatment replanning (TRP)]. Optimizing treatment plans for PT using a scanned beam is a time consuming problem especially for particles other than protons where the biological effective dose has to be calculated. For the purpose of TRP, fast optimization and fast dose calculation have been implemented into the GSI in-house treatment planning system (TPS) TRiP98. Methods: This work reports about the outcome of a code analysis that resulted in optimization of the calculation processes as well as implementation of routines supporting parallel execution of the code. To benchmark the new features, the calculation time for therapy treatment planning has been studied. Results: Compared to the original version of the TPS, calculation times for treatment planning (optimization and dose calculation) have been improved by a factor of 10 with code optimization. The parallelization of the TPS resulted in a speedup factor of 12 and 5.5 for the original version and the code optimized version, respectively. Hence the total speedup of the new implementation of the authors' TPS yielded speedup factors up to 55. Conclusions: The improved TPS is capable of completing treatment planning for ion beam therapy of a prostate irradiation considering organs at risk in this has been overseen in the review process. Also see below 6 min.

  5. ORBIT : BEAM DYNAMICS CALCULATIONS FOR HIGH - INTENSITY RINGS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HOLMES,J.A.; DANILOV,V.; GALAMBOS,J.; SHISHLO,A.; COUSINEAU,S.; CHOU,W.; MICHELOTTI,L.; OSTIGUY,F.; WEI,J.

    2002-06-03

    We are developing a computer code, ORBIT, specifically for beam dynamics calculations in high-intensity rings. Our approach allows detailed simulation of realistic accelerator problems. ORBIT is a particle-in-cell tracking code that transports bunches of interacting particles through a series of nodes representing elements, effects, or diagnostics that occur in the accelerator lattice. At present, ORBIT contains detailed models for strip-foil injection including painting and foil scattering; rf focusing and acceleration; transport through various magnetic elements; longitudinal and transverse impedances; longitudinal, transverse, and three-dimensional space charge forces; collimation and limiting apertures; and the calculation of many useful diagnostic quantities. ORBIT is an object-oriented code, written in C++ and utilizing a scripting interface for the convenience of the user. Ongoing improvements include the addition of a library of accelerator maps, BEAMLINE/MXYZPTLK the introduction of a treatment magnet errors and fringe fields; the conversion of the scripting interface to the standard scripting language, Python; and the parallelization of the computations using MPI. The ORBIT code is an open source, powerful, and convenient tool for studying beam dynamics in high-intensity rings.

  6. Performance Evaluation of Undulator Radiation at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chuyu Liu, Geoffrey Krafft, Guimei Wang

    2010-05-01

    The performance of undulator radiation (UR) at CEBAF with a 3.5 m helical undulator is evaluated and compared with APS undulator-A radiation in terms of brilliance, peak brilliance, spectral flux, flux density and intensity distribution.

  7. Calculations Of Damage To Rotating Targets Under Intense Beams...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    modest melting point andor high sputtering yield material will eventually melt or destroy the target. Defocused or 'wobbled' beams enhance target survival only to a modest degree. ...

  8. Undulators for the BESSY SASE-FEL Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahrdt, J.; Frentrup, W.; Gaupp, A.; Kuske, B.; Meseck, A.; Scheer, M.

    2004-05-12

    BESSY plans to build a SASE-FEL facility for the energy range from 20 eV to 1000 eV. The energy range will be covered by three APPLE II type undulators with a magnetic length of about 60 m each. This paper summarizes the basic parameters of the FEL-undulators. The magnetic design will be presented. A modified APPLE II design will be discussed which provides higher fields at the expense of reduced horizontal access. GENESIS simulations give an estimate on the tolerances for the beam wander and for gap errors.

  9. Commissioning of the Delta Polarizing Undulator at LCLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter

    2015-09-25

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) generates linearly polarized, intense, high-brightness x-ray pulses from planar fixed-gap undulators. While the fixed-gap design supports a very successful and tightly controlled alignment concept, it provides only limited taper capability (up to 1% through canted pole and horizontal position adjustability) and lacks polarization control. The latter is of great importance for soft x-ray experiments. A new 3.2-m-long compact undulator (based on the Cornell University Delta design) has been developed and installed in place of the last LCLS undulator segment (U33) in October 2014. This undulator provides full control of the polarization degree and K value. Used on its own, it produces fully polarized radiation in the selected state (linear, circular or elliptical) but at low intensity. To increase the output power by orders of magnitude, the electron beam is micro-bunched by several (~10) of the upstream LCLS undulator segments operated in the linear FEL regime. As unavoidable by-product, this microbunching process produces moderate amounts of horizontally linear polarized radiation which mixes with the radiation produced by the Delta undulator. This unwanted radiation component has been greatly reduced by the reverse taper configuration, as suggested by E. Schneidmiller and M. Yurkov. Full elimination of the linear polarized component was achieved through spatial separation combined with transverse collimation. The paper describes these and other methods tested during commissioning. It also presents results of polarization measurements showing high degrees of circular polarization in the soft x-ray wavelength range (500 eV - 1500 eV).

  10. Transition undulator radiation as bright infrared sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, K.J.

    1995-02-01

    Undulator radiation contains, in addition to the usual component with narrow spectral features, a broad-band component in the low frequency region emitted in the near forward direction, peaked at an angle 1/{gamma}, where {gamma} is the relativistic factor. This component is referred to as the transition undulator radiation, as it is caused by the sudden change in the electron`s longitudinal velocity as it enters and leaves the undulator. The characteristic of the transition undulator radiation are analyzed and compared with the infrared radiation from the usual undulator harmonics and from bending magnets.

  11. 20 keV undulators for a 6-GeV storage ring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, S.H.; Cho, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The main goal of the future 6-GeV electron storage ring is to provide 20-keV fundamental harmonic radiations from insertion devices. Parameter restrictions of REC-vanadium permendur hybrid undulators have been examined. The critical factor is the achievable minimum gap of the undulator. Variations of the spectral brilliance for different beam parameters are also shown. 6 refs., 5 figs.

  12. SU-E-T-386: A Monte Carlo Dose Calculation Framework for Electron Beams On Varian TrueBeam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodrigues, A; Yin, F; Wu, Q; Sawkey, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The design of the linac head is different for TrueBeam than Clinac, and there are differences in measured dose distributions in water phantoms between TrueBeam and Clinac for electron beams. Therefore, MC models for Clinac may not be applied directly to the Truebeam linac. The purpose of this study is to validate a Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation framework for electron beams on Varian TrueBeam with phase space files provided by Varian. Methods: The particle histories from the phase space file were used as input for the down-stream simulation including jaws, applicators, and water phantom. MC packages BEAMnrc/DOSYXZnrc were used. The down-stream beam components were modeled according to manufacturer specifications and the dose distributions were compared with the measured data of standard cones. The measurements were performed in a water phantom with a p-type electron field diode (diameter 0.2cm) and ion chamber (CC13). Depth dose and orthogonal profiles at depths defined by R{sub 1} {sub 0} {sub 0}, R{sub 5} {sub 0}, Rp were compared. Results: Preliminary results for a 16 MeV phase space and 10x10, 15x15, and 20x20 cm{sup 2} applicator are presented. Simulations were run for a statistical uncertainty of <2% at depth of maximum dose for a voxel resolution of 0.5x0.5x0.2cm{sup 2}. Dose and range differences for the PDD profiles were within 2% and 1 mm, respectively. Dose differences within the central 80% of the beam width for the orthogonal profiles at depth of maximum dose were less than 2% for the 10x10, 15x15, and 20x20 cm{sup 2} applicator, respectively. Conclusion: Varian electron phase space files simulations are in agreement with measured commissioning data. These phase space files can be used in the simulation of TrueBeam linacs, and will provide reproducibility across publications. Analyses for all electron energies and standard applicators are under way and results will be included in the presentation.

  13. Evaluation of a new commercial Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm for electron beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vandervoort, Eric J. Cygler, Joanna E.; The Faculty of Medicine, The University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1H 8M5; Department of Physics, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 ; Tchistiakova, Ekaterina; Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9; Heart and Stroke Foundation Centre for Stroke Recovery, Sunnybrook Research Institute, University of Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 ; La Russa, Daniel J.; The Faculty of Medicine, The University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1H 8M5

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: In this report the authors present the validation of a Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm (XiO EMC from Elekta Software) for electron beams. Methods: Calculated and measured dose distributions were compared for homogeneous water phantoms and for a 3D heterogeneous phantom meant to approximate the geometry of a trachea and spine. Comparisons of measurements and calculated data were performed using 2D and 3D gamma index dose comparison metrics. Results: Measured outputs agree with calculated values within estimated uncertainties for standard and extended SSDs for open applicators, and for cutouts, with the exception of the 17 MeV electron beam at extended SSD for cutout sizes smaller than 5 5 cm{sup 2}. Good agreement was obtained between calculated and experimental depth dose curves and dose profiles (minimum number of measurements that pass a 2%/2 mm agreement 2D gamma index criteria for any applicator or energy was 97%). Dose calculations in a heterogeneous phantom agree with radiochromic film measurements (>98% of pixels pass a 3 dimensional 3%/2 mm ?-criteria) provided that the steep dose gradient in the depth direction is considered. Conclusions: Clinically acceptable agreement (at the 2%/2 mm level) between the measurements and calculated data for measurements in water are obtained for this dose calculation algorithm. Radiochromic film is a useful tool to evaluate the accuracy of electron MC treatment planning systems in heterogeneous media.

  14. A Monte Carlo simulation framework for electron beam dose calculations using Varian phase space files for TrueBeam Linacs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodrigues, Anna; Yin, Fang-Fang; Wu, Qiuwen; Sawkey, Daren

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: To develop a framework for accurate electron Monte Carlo dose calculation. In this study, comprehensive validations of vendor provided electron beam phase space files for Varian TrueBeam Linacs against measurement data are presented. Methods: In this framework, the Monte Carlo generated phase space files were provided by the vendor and used as input to the downstream plan-specific simulations including jaws, electron applicators, and water phantom computed in the EGSnrc environment. The phase space files were generated based on open field commissioning data. A subset of electron energies of 6, 9, 12, 16, and 20 MeV and open and collimated field sizes 3 × 3, 4 × 4, 5 × 5, 6 × 6, 10 × 10, 15 × 15, 20 × 20, and 25 × 25 cm{sup 2} were evaluated. Measurements acquired with a CC13 cylindrical ionization chamber and electron diode detector and simulations from this framework were compared for a water phantom geometry. The evaluation metrics include percent depth dose, orthogonal and diagonal profiles at depths R{sub 100}, R{sub 50}, R{sub p}, and R{sub p+} for standard and extended source-to-surface distances (SSD), as well as cone and cut-out output factors. Results: Agreement for the percent depth dose and orthogonal profiles between measurement and Monte Carlo was generally within 2% or 1 mm. The largest discrepancies were observed within depths of 5 mm from phantom surface. Differences in field size, penumbra, and flatness for the orthogonal profiles at depths R{sub 100}, R{sub 50}, and R{sub p} were within 1 mm, 1 mm, and 2%, respectively. Orthogonal profiles at SSDs of 100 and 120 cm showed the same level of agreement. Cone and cut-out output factors agreed well with maximum differences within 2.5% for 6 MeV and 1% for all other energies. Cone output factors at extended SSDs of 105, 110, 115, and 120 cm exhibited similar levels of agreement. Conclusions: We have presented a Monte Carlo simulation framework for electron beam dose calculations for

  15. Monte Carlo calculations of electron beam quality conversion factors for several ion chamber types

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muir, B. R.; Rogers, D. W. O.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To provide a comprehensive investigation of electron beam reference dosimetry using Monte Carlo simulations of the response of 10 plane-parallel and 18 cylindrical ion chamber types. Specific emphasis is placed on the determination of the optimal shift of the chambers effective point of measurement (EPOM) and beam quality conversion factors. Methods: The EGSnrc system is used for calculations of the absorbed dose to gas in ion chamber models and the absorbed dose to water as a function of depth in a water phantom on which cobalt-60 and several electron beam source models are incident. The optimal EPOM shifts of the ion chambers are determined by comparing calculations of R{sub 50} converted from I{sub 50} (calculated using ion chamber simulations in phantom) to R{sub 50} calculated using simulations of the absorbed dose to water vs depth in water. Beam quality conversion factors are determined as the calculated ratio of the absorbed dose to water to the absorbed dose to air in the ion chamber at the reference depth in a cobalt-60 beam to that in electron beams. Results: For most plane-parallel chambers, the optimal EPOM shift is inside of the active cavity but different from the shift determined with water-equivalent scaling of the front window of the chamber. These optimal shifts for plane-parallel chambers also reduce the scatter of beam quality conversion factors, k{sub Q}, as a function of R{sub 50}. The optimal shift of cylindrical chambers is found to be less than the 0.5 r{sub cav} recommended by current dosimetry protocols. In most cases, the values of the optimal shift are close to 0.3 r{sub cav}. Values of k{sub ecal} are calculated and compared to those from the TG-51 protocol and differences are explained using accurate individual correction factors for a subset of ion chambers investigated. High-precision fits to beam quality conversion factors normalized to unity in a beam with R{sub 50} = 7.5 cm (k{sub Q}{sup ?}) are provided. These factors

  16. Operation of a small-gap undulator on the NSLS X-ray Ring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefan, P.M.; Krinsky, S.; Rakowsky, G.; Solomon, L.

    1995-02-01

    The authors report results of an on-going experiment being carried out in the X13 straight section of the NSLS X-ray Ring which explores the limits of the operation of small-gap undulators. In particular, they discuss the operation of a 16 mm period small-gap undulator. At an electron beam current of 300 mA the variable gap vacuum chamber has been closed to an inner aperture of 3.8 mm with no effect on the electron beam lifetime. Measurements of the output radiation spectrum at a magnet gap of 7.5 mm are described.

  17. Waveguide Structures for RF Undulators with Applications to FELs and Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yeddulla, M.; Geng, H.G.; Huang, Z.; Ma, Z.; Tantawi, S.G.; /SLAC

    2011-11-02

    RF undulators, suggested a long time ago, have the advantage of fast dynamic control of polarization, undulator strength and wavelength. However, RF undulators require very strong RF fields in order to produce radiation of the same order as conventional static devices. Very high power RF energy confined inside a waveguide or a cavity can provide the necessary RF fields to undulate the electron beam. However, the wall losses in the waveguide should be low enough to make it practically feasible as a CW or quasi CW undulator and, hence, competitive with static devices for applications to storage rings and FELs. Here we present various waveguide structures such as smooth walled and corrugated walled waveguides and various RF modes. We will show that there are some advantages in operating with higher order modes and also with hybrid modes in the corrugated guide. We will show that the RF power requirement for some of these modes will permit a quasi CW operation of the undulator, thus permitting its operation in a storage ring.

  18. Calculation of synchrotron radiation from high intensity electron beam at eRHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jing Y.; Chubar, O.; Litvinenko, V.

    2012-05-20

    The Electron-Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (eRHIC) at Brookhaven National Lab is an upgrade project for the existing RHIC. A 30 GeV energy recovery linac (ERL) will provide a high charge and high quality electron beam to collide with proton and ion beams. This will improve the luminosity by at least 2 orders of magnitude. The synchrotron radiation (SR) from the bending magnets and strong quadrupoles for such an intense beam could be penetrating the vacuum chamber and producing hazards to electronic devices and undesired background for detectors. In this paper, we calculate the SR spectral intensity, power density distributions and heat load on the chamber wall. We suggest the wall thickness required to stop the SR and estimate spectral characteristics of the residual and scattered background radiation outside the chamber.

  19. Calculating survival curves in spread-peaks of heavy ion beams and comparison with experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, S.B.; Chu, W.T.; Llacer, J.; Renner, T.R.; Rodriguez, A.; Yang, T.C.H.

    1995-08-01

    In preparing for treating patients with high-energy ion beams, it is important first to determine the composition of the beam, that is, the relative mixes of the various primary and secondary particles and their LET spectra, and secondly to estimate the cell killing expected during a treatment schedule. This requires measurements of the beam composition at various depths through the spread-peak region, and a calculation of cell survival using a cell-killing model designed to accommodate the mixed LET nature of the beam in the spread-peak region. This talk presents results of an experiment in which a particle identification telescope, the BEPKLET, was used to measure the LET spectra of the primary and secondary particles at two positions in a 12-cm-spread-peak of a 585 MeV/amu neon ion beam at the Bevalac. Cell survival measurements were made at the same positions at which the LET-spectra were measured. The survival curves obtained were compared with calculations using the LPL (Lethal, Potentially Lethal) model of cell-killing. Results agree quite well at doses up to about 4 Gy. A quantity proportional to the RBE at 10% survival, when plotted against dose-averaged LET for a number of different beams and energies, appears to be a fairly good predictor of biological effect. This would not be expected if the difference in biological effect due to differences in track structure between various ions at the same LET played a significant role in modifying cell-killing in the range of LETs covered by this experiment.

  20. Monte Carlo calculations for reference dosimetry of electron beams with the PTW Roos and NE2571 ion chambers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muir, B. R. Rogers, D. W. O.

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To investigate recommendations for reference dosimetry of electron beams and gradient effects for the NE2571 chamber and to provide beam quality conversion factors using Monte Carlo simulations of the PTW Roos and NE2571 ion chambers. Methods: The EGSnrc code system is used to calculate the absorbed dose-to-water and the dose to the gas in fully modeled ion chambers as a function of depth in water. Electron beams are modeled using realistic accelerator simulations as well as beams modeled as collimated point sources from realistic electron beam spectra or monoenergetic electrons. Beam quality conversion factors are calculated with ratios of the doses to water and to the air in the ion chamber in electron beams and a cobalt-60 reference field. The overall ion chamber correction factor is studied using calculations of water-to-air stopping power ratios. Results: The use of an effective point of measurement shift of 1.55 mm from the front face of the PTW Roos chamber, which places the point of measurement inside the chamber cavity, minimizes the difference betweenR{sub 50}, the beam quality specifier, calculated from chamber simulations compared to that obtained using depth-dose calculations in water. A similar shift minimizes the variation of the overall ion chamber correction factor with depth to the practical range and reduces the root-mean-square deviation of a fit to calculated beam quality conversion factors at the reference depth as a function of R{sub 50}. Similarly, an upstream shift of 0.34 r{sub cav} allows a more accurate determination of R{sub 50} from NE2571 chamber calculations and reduces the variation of the overall ion chamber correction factor with depth. The determination of the gradient correction using a shift of 0.22 r{sub cav} optimizes the root-mean-square deviation of a fit to calculated beam quality conversion factors if all beams investigated are considered. However, if only clinical beams are considered, a good fit to results for

  1. Dose calculations using MARS for Bremsstrahlung beam stops and collimators in APS beamline stations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dooling, J.; Accelerator Systems Division

    2010-11-01

    The Monte Carlo radiation transport code MARS is used to model the generation of gas bremsstrahlung (GB) radiation from 7-GeV electrons which scatter from residual gas atoms in undulator straight sections within the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring. Additionally, MARS is employed to model the interactions of the GB radiation with components along the x-ray beamlines and then determine the expected radiation dose-rates that result. In this manner, MARS can be used to assess the adequacy of existing shielding or the specifications for new shielding when required. The GB radiation generated in the 'thin-target' of an ID straight section will consist only of photons in a 1/E-distribution up to the full energy of the stored electron beam. Using this analytical model, the predicted GB power for a typical APS 15.38-m insertion device (ID) straight section is 4.59 x 10{sup -7} W/nTorr/mA, assuming a background gas composed of air (Z{sub eff} = 7.31) at room temperature (293K). The total GB power provides a useful benchmark for comparisons between analytical and numerical approaches. We find good agreement between MARS and analytical estimates for total GB power. The extended straight section 'target' creates a radial profile of GB, which is highly peaked centered on the electron beam. The GB distribution reflects the size of the electron beam that creates the radiation. Optimizing the performance of MARS in terms of CPU time per incident trajectory requires the use of a relatively short, high-density gas target (air); in this report, the target density is {rho}L = 2.89 x 10{sup -2} g/cm{sup 2} over a length of 24 cm. MARS results are compared with the contact dose levels reported in TB-20, which used EGS4 for radiation transport simulations. Maximum dose-rates in 1 cc of tissue phantom form the initial basis for comparison. MARS and EGS4 results are approximately the same for maximum 1-cc dose-rates and attenuation in the photon-dominated regions; for thicker

  2. Fast pulsed excitation wiggler or undulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    van Steenbergen, Arie (Shoreham, NY)

    1990-01-01

    A fast pulsed excitation, electromagnetic undulator or wiggler, employing geometrically alternating substacks of thin laminations of ferromagnetic material, together with a single turn current loop excitation of the composite assembly, of such shape and configuration that intense, spatially alternating, magnetic fields are generated; for use as a pulsed mode undulator or wiggler radiator, for use in a Free Electron Laser (FEL) type radiation source or, for use in an Inverse Free Electron Laser (IFEL) charged particle accelerator.

  3. Ion beam measurement of deuterium in palladium and calculation of hydrogen isotope separation factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gullinger, T.R.; Kelly, M.J.; Knapp, J.A.; Walsh, D.S.; Doyle, B.L. )

    1991-08-01

    In this paper, the authors demonstrate a new technique for measuring hydrogen isotope separation factors in hydrogen-absorbing metals. Using external ion beam nuclear reaction analysis of metal electrodes in an operating electrochemical cell, the authors monitor in situ the deuterium content of the electrode. changing the deuterium/hydrogen ratio in the electrolyte changes the observed deuterium content of the metal electrode, and, assuming identical ultimate total metal loading for deuterium, hydrogen, and any mixture of deuterium and hydrogen, a simple calculation yields the separation factor.

  4. Progress on the superconducting undulator for ANKA and on the instrumentation for R and D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casalbuoni, Sara; Baumbach, Tilo; Grau, Andreas; Hagelstein, Michael; Saez de Jauregui, David; Boffo, Cristian; Borlein, Markus; Walter, Wolfgang; Magerl, Andreas; Mashkina, Elena; Vassiljev, Nikita

    2010-06-23

    Superconducting undulators show a larger magnetic field strength for the same gap and period length, as compared to permanent magnet devices, which allows to generate X-ray beams of higher brilliance and with harder spectrum. The worldwide first short period length superconducting undulator is in operation since 2005 at the synchrotron light source ANKA in Karlsruhe [1]. To further drive the development in this field a research and development program is being carried out. In this contribution we report on the last progress of the construction of a 1.5 m long superconducting undulator with a period length of 15 mm, planned to be installed in ANKA beginning 2010 to be the light source of the new beamline NANO for high resolution X-ray scattering. The key specifications of the system are an undulator parameter K higher than 2 (with a magnetic gap of 5 mm) and a phase error smaller than 3.5 degrees. Cryocoolers will keep the coils at 4.2 K for a beam heat load of 4 W. The ongoing R and D includes improvements in understanding of the magnetic field properties and of the beam heat load mechanisms. The tools and instruments under development to fulfill these tasks are also discussed.

  5. Cryogenic performance of a cryocooler-cooled superconducting undulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuerst, J. D.; Doose, C.; Hasse, Q.; Ivanyushenkov, Y.; Kasa, M.; Shiroyanagi, Y.

    2014-01-29

    A cryocooler-cooled superconducting undulator has been installed and operated with beam at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The device consists of a dual-core 42-pole magnet structure that is cooled to 4.2 K with a system of four cryocoolers operating in a zero-boil-off configuration. This effort represents the culmination of a development program to establish concept feasibility and evaluate cryostat design and cryocooler-based refrigeration. Cryostat performance is described including cool-down/warm-up, steady-state operation, cooling margin, and the impact of beam during operation in the APS storage ring. Plans for future devices with longer magnets, which will incorporate lessons learned from the development program, are also discussed.

  6. Undulator Hall Air Temperature Fault Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sevilla, J.; Welch, J.; ,

    2010-11-17

    Recent experience indicates that the LCLS undulator segments must not, at any time following tuning, be allowed to change temperature by more than about {+-}2.5 C or the magnetic center will irreversibly shift outside of acceptable tolerances. This vulnerability raises a concern that under fault conditions the ambient temperature in the Undulator Hall might go outside of the safe range and potentially could require removal and retuning of all the segments. In this note we estimate changes that can be expected in the Undulator Hall air temperature for three fault scenarios: (1) System-wide power failure; (2) Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system shutdown; and (3) HVAC system temperature regulation fault. We find that for either a system-wide power failure or an HVAC system shutdown (with the technical equipment left on), the short-term temperature changes of the air would be modest due to the ability of the walls and floor to act as a heat ballast. No action would be needed to protect the undulator system in the event of a system-wide power failure. Some action to adjust the heat balance, in the case of the HVAC power failure with the equipment left on, might be desirable but is not required. On the other hand, a temperature regulation failure of the HVAC system can quickly cause large excursions in air temperature and prompt action would be required to avoid damage to the undulator system.

  7. Variable-Period Undulators For Synchrotron Radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shenoy, Gopal; Lewellen, John; Shu, Deming; Vinokurov, Nikolai

    2005-02-22

    A new and improved undulator design is provided that enables a variable period length for the production of synchrotron radiation from both medium-energy and high-energy storage rings. The variable period length is achieved using a staggered array of pole pieces made up of high permeability material, permanent magnet material, or an electromagnetic structure. The pole pieces are separated by a variable width space. The sum of the variable width space and the pole width would therefore define the period of the undulator. Features and advantages of the invention include broad photon energy tunability, constant power operation and constant brilliance operation.

  8. Calculating tumor trajectory and dose-of-the-day using cone-beam CT projections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Bernard L. Westerly, David; Miften, Moyed

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Cone-beam CT (CBCT) projection images provide anatomical data in real-time over several respiratory cycles, forming a comprehensive picture of tumor movement. The authors developed and validated a method which uses these projections to determine the trajectory of and dose to highly mobile tumors during each fraction of treatment. Methods: CBCT images of a respiration phantom were acquired, the trajectory of which mimicked a lung tumor with high amplitude (up to 2.5 cm) and hysteresis. A template-matching algorithm was used to identify the location of a steel BB in each CBCT projection, and a Gaussian probability density function for the absolute BB position was calculated which best fit the observed trajectory of the BB in the imager geometry. Two modifications of the trajectory reconstruction were investigated: first, using respiratory phase information to refine the trajectory estimation (Phase), and second, using the Monte Carlo (MC) method to sample the estimated Gaussian tumor position distribution. The accuracies of the proposed methods were evaluated by comparing the known and calculated BB trajectories in phantom-simulated clinical scenarios using abdominal tumor volumes. Results: With all methods, the mean position of the BB was determined with accuracy better than 0.1 mm, and root-mean-square trajectory errors averaged 3.8% ± 1.1% of the marker amplitude. Dosimetric calculations using Phase methods were more accurate, with mean absolute error less than 0.5%, and with error less than 1% in the highest-noise trajectory. MC-based trajectories prevent the overestimation of dose, but when viewed in an absolute sense, add a small amount of dosimetric error (<0.1%). Conclusions: Marker trajectory and target dose-of-the-day were accurately calculated using CBCT projections. This technique provides a method to evaluate highly mobile tumors using ordinary CBCT data, and could facilitate better strategies to mitigate or compensate for motion during

  9. Proposed Laser-driven, Dielectric Microstructure Few-cm Long Undulator for Attosecond Coherent X-rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plettner, T; Byer, R.L.; /Stanford U., Ginzton Lab.

    2011-09-16

    This article presents the concept of an all-dielectric laser-driven undulator for the generation of coherent X-rays. The proposed laser-driven undulator is expected to produce internal deflection forces equivalent to a several-Tesla magnetic field acting on a speed-of-light particle. The key idea for this laser-driven undulator is its ability to provide phase synchronicity between the deflection force and the electron beam for a distance that is much greater than the laser wavelength. The potential advantage of this undulator is illustrated with a possible design example that assumes a small laser accelerator which delivers a 2 GeV, 1 pC, 1 kHz electron bunch train to a 10 cm long, 1/2 mm period laser-driven undulator. Such an undulator could produce coherent X-ray pulses with {approx}10{sup 9} photons of 64 keV energy. The numerical modeling for the expected X-ray pulse shape was performed with GENESIS, which predicts X-ray pulse durations in the few-attosecond range. Possible applications for nonlinear electromagnetic effects from these X-ray pulses are briefly discussed.

  10. SU-E-T-209: Independent Dose Calculation in FFF Modulated Fields with Pencil Beam Kernels Obtained by Deconvolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azcona, J; Burguete, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To obtain the pencil beam kernels that characterize a megavoltage photon beam generated in a FFF linac by experimental measurements, and to apply them for dose calculation in modulated fields. Methods: Several Kodak EDR2 radiographic films were irradiated with a 10 MV FFF photon beam from a Varian True Beam (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) linac, at the depths of 5, 10, 15, and 20cm in polystyrene (RW3 water equivalent phantom, PTW Freiburg, Germany). The irradiation field was a 50 mm diameter circular field, collimated with a lead block. Measured dose leads to the kernel characterization, assuming that the energy fluence exiting the linac head and further collimated is originated on a point source. The three-dimensional kernel was obtained by deconvolution at each depth using the Hankel transform. A correction on the low dose part of the kernel was performed to reproduce accurately the experimental output factors. The kernels were used to calculate modulated dose distributions in six modulated fields and compared through the gamma index to their absolute dose measured by film in the RW3 phantom. Results: The resulting kernels properly characterize the global beam penumbra. The output factor-based correction was carried out adding the amount of signal necessary to reproduce the experimental output factor in steps of 2mm, starting at a radius of 4mm. There the kernel signal was in all cases below 10% of its maximum value. With this correction, the number of points that pass the gamma index criteria (3%, 3mm) in the modulated fields for all cases are at least 99.6% of the total number of points. Conclusion: A system for independent dose calculations in modulated fields from FFF beams has been developed. Pencil beam kernels were obtained and their ability to accurately calculate dose in homogeneous media was demonstrated.

  11. A table-top x-ray FEL based on a laser wakefield accelerator-undulator system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakajima, K.; Kawakubo, T.; Nakanishi, H.

    1995-12-31

    Ultrahigh-gradient electron acceleration has been confirmed owing to the laser wakefield acceleration mechanism driven by an intense short laser wakefield acceleration mechanism driven by an intense short laser pulse in an underdense plasma. The laser wakefield acceleration makes it possible to build a compact electron linac capable of producing an ultra-short bunched electron beam. While the accelerator is attributed to longitudinal wakefields, transverse wakefields simultaneously generated by a short laser pulse can serve as a plasma undulator with a very short wavelength equal to a half of the plasma wavelength. We propose a new FEL concept for X-rays based on a laser wakefield accelerator-undulator system driven by intense short laser pulses delivered from table-top terawatt lasers. The system is composed of the accelerator stage and the undulator stage in a table-top size. A low energy electron beam is accelerated an bunched into microbunches due to laser wakefields in the accelerator stage. A micro-bunched beam travelling to the opposite direction of driving laser pulses produces coherent X-ray radiation in the undulator stage. A practical configuration and its analyses are presented.

  12. Optimisation of NSLS-II Blade X-ray Beam Position Monitors: from Photoemission type to Diamond Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ILINSKI P.

    2012-07-10

    Optimisation of blade type x-ray beam position monitors (XBPM) was performed for NSLS-II undulator IVU20. Blade material, con and #64257;guration and operation principle was analysed in order to improve XBPM performance. Optimisation is based on calculation of the XBPM signal spatial distribution. Along with standard photoemission type XBPM a Diamond Detector Blades (DDB) were analysed as blades for XBPMs. DDB XBPMs can help to overcome drawbacks of the photoemission blade XBPMs.

  13. Conceptual Design for Superconducting Planar Helical Undulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sasaki, Shigemi

    2004-05-12

    A preliminary consideration was made on a short-period superconducting planar helical undulator (SCHU) for circularly polarized radiation. The SCHU consists of coils and iron poles/yokes. There is no magnetic structure in the horizontal plane of the electron orbit. The SCHU would provide the large horizontal aperture needed to allow injection into the storage ring. The expected field strength is at least 30% larger than that by an APPLE-type permanent-magnet device with the same gap and the same period.

  14. Calculation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Calculation of resistive magnetohydrodynamics and two-fluid tearing modes by example of reversed-field-pinch-like plasma V. A. Svidzinski and H. Li Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545, USA ͑Received 26 November 2007; accepted 7 April 2008; published online 15 May 2008͒ An algorithm suitable for numerical solution of linear eigenmode problems in resistive magnetohydrodynamics ͑MHD͒ and two-fluid MHD models without prior approximations is presented. For these plasma

  15. Development of a golden beam data set for the commissioning of a proton double-scattering system in a pencil-beam dose calculation algorithm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slopsema, R. L. Flampouri, S.; Yeung, D.; Li, Z.; Lin, L.; McDonough, J. E.; Palta, J.

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this investigation is to determine if a single set of beam data, described by a minimal set of equations and fitting variables, can be used to commission different installations of a proton double-scattering system in a commercial pencil-beam dose calculation algorithm. Methods: The beam model parameters required to commission the pencil-beam dose calculation algorithm (virtual and effective SAD, effective source size, and pristine-peak energy spread) are determined for a commercial double-scattering system. These parameters are measured in a first room and parameterized as function of proton energy and nozzle settings by fitting four analytical equations to the measured data. The combination of these equations and fitting values constitutes the golden beam data (GBD). To determine the variation in dose delivery between installations, the same dosimetric properties are measured in two additional rooms at the same facility, as well as in a single room at another facility. The difference between the room-specific measurements and the GBD is evaluated against tolerances that guarantee the 3D dose distribution in each of the rooms matches the GBD-based dose distribution within clinically reasonable limits. The pencil-beam treatment-planning algorithm is commissioned with the GBD. The three-dimensional dose distribution in water is evaluated in the four treatment rooms and compared to the treatment-planning calculated dose distribution. Results: The virtual and effective SAD measurements fall between 226 and 257 cm. The effective source size varies between 2.4 and 6.2 cm for the large-field options, and 1.0 and 2.0 cm for the small-field options. The pristine-peak energy spread decreases from 1.05% at the lowest range to 0.6% at the highest. The virtual SAD as well as the effective source size can be accurately described by a linear relationship as function of the inverse of the residual energy. An additional linear correction term as function of

  16. First Beam Measurements with the LHC Synchrotron Light Monitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lefevre, Thibaut; Bravin, Enrico; Burtin, Gerard; Guerrero, Ana; Jeff, Adam; Rabiller, Aurelie; Roncarolo, Federico; Fisher, Alan; /SLAC

    2012-07-13

    The continuous monitoring of the transverse sizes of the beams in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) relies on the use of synchrotron radiation and intensified video cameras. Depending on the beam energy, different synchrotron light sources must be used. A dedicated superconducting undulator has been built for low beam energies (450 GeV to 1.5 TeV), while edge and centre radiation from a beam-separation dipole magnet are used respectively for intermediate and high energies (up to 7 TeV). The emitted visible photons are collected using a retractable mirror, which sends the light into an optical system adapted for acquisition using intensified CCD cameras. This paper presents the design of the imaging system, and compares the expected light intensity with measurements and the calculated spatial resolution with a cross calibration performed with the wire scanners. Upgrades and future plans are also discussed.

  17. Design Features of a Planar Hybrid/Permanent Magnet Strong Focusing Undulator for Free Electron Laser (FEL) And Synchrotron Radiation (SR) Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tatchyn, Roman; /SLAC

    2011-09-09

    Insertion devices for Angstrom-wavelength Free Electron Laser (FEL) amplifiers driven by multi-GeV electron beams generally require distributed focusing substantially stronger than their own natural focusing fields. Over the last several years a wide variety of focusing schemes and configurations have been proposed for undulators of this class, ranging from conventional current-driven quadrupoles external to the undulator magnets to permanent magnet (PM) lattices inserted into the insertion device gap. In this paper we present design studies of a flexible high-field hybrid/PM undulator with strong superimposed planar PM focusing proposed for a 1.5 Angstrom Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) driven by an electron beam with a 1 mm-mr normalized emittance. Attainable field parameters, tuning modes, and potential applications of the proposed structure are discussed.

  18. Transverse Gradient Undulator Huang, Zhirong; Ding, Yuantao;...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    B.; LBL, Berkeley 43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; ACCELERATORS; ELECTRON BEAMS; ELECTRONS; FREE ELECTRON LASERS; LASERS; PERFORMANCE; PLASMA GUNS; RADIATIONS; WIGGLER MAGNETS...

  19. Single shot polarization characterization of XUV FEL pulses from crossed polarized undulators

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ferrari, E.; Allaria, E.; Buck, J.; De Ninno, G.; Diviacco, B.; Gauthier, D.; Giannessi, L.; Glaser, L.; Huang, Z.; Ilchen, M.; et al

    2015-08-28

    Polarization control is a key feature of light generated by short-wavelength free-electron lasers. In this work, we report the first experimental characterization of the polarization properties of an extreme ultraviolet high gain free-electron laser operated with crossed polarized undulators. We research the average degree of polarization and the shot-to-shot stability and we analyze aspects such as existing possibilities for controlling and switching the polarization state of the emitted light. The results are in agreement with predictions based on Gaussian beams propagation.

  20. A Fixed Gap APPLE II Undulator for SLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, T.; Imhof, A.; Ingold, G.; Jakob, B.; Vollenweider, C.

    2007-01-19

    To vary the polarization vector of an APPLE II undulator continuously from 0 - 180 deg., all four magnet arrays need to be movable. Following the adjustable-phase undulator approach by R. Carr, a 3.4 m long fixed gap undulator for SLS with a gap of 11.6 mm has been constructed. It will be installed in fall 2006. The gap drive is replaced by a pair-wise shift of the magnet arrays to change the energy, while the polarization is changed by shifts of diagonal arrays. The high injection efficiency and standard operation top-up mode at the SLS allows this simplified undulator design. The design as well as the operational aspects will be discussed.

  1. Soft x-ray undulator for the Siam Photon Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rugmai, S.; Dasri, T.; Prawanta, S.; Siriwattanapaitoon, S.; Kwankasem, A.; Sooksrimuang, V.; Chachai, W.; Suradet, N.; Juthong, N.; Tancharakorn, S.

    2007-01-19

    An undulator for production of intense soft x-rays has been designed for the Siam Photon Source. The construction of the undulator has been completed. It is now being characterized and prepared for installation. The device, named U60, is a pure permanent magnet planar undulator, consisting of 41 magnetic periods, with 60 mm period length. Utilization of the undulator radiation in the photon energy range of 30 - 900 eV is expected. The design studies of the magnetic structure, including investigation of perturbations arising from the magnetic field of the device, their effects on the SPS storage ring and compensation schemes are described. A magnetic measurement system has been constructed for magnetic characterization of the device. Partial results of magnetic measurements are presented.

  2. Canted Undulator Upgrade for GeoSoilEnviroCARS Sector 13 at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutton, Stephen

    2013-02-02

    Support for the beamline component of the canted undulator upgrade of Sector 13 (GeoSoilEnviroCARS; managed and operated by the University of Chicago) at the Advanced Photon Source (APS; Argonne National Laboratory) was received from three agencies (equally divided): NASA-SRLIDAP (now LARS), NSF-EAR-IF (ARRA) and DOE-Single Investigator Small Group (SISGR). The associated accelerator components (undulators, canted front end) were provided by the APS using DOE-ARRA funding. The intellectual merit of the research enabled by the upgrade lies in advancing our knowledge of the composition, structure and properties of earth materials; the processes they control; and the processes that produce them. The upgrade will facilitate scientific advances in the following areas: high pressure mineral physics and chemistry, non-crystalline and nano-crystalline materials at high pressure, chemistry of hydrothermal fluids, reactions at mineral-water interfaces, biogeochemistry, oxidation states of magmas, flow dynamics of fluids and solids, and cosmochemistry. The upgrade, allowing the microprobe to operate 100% of the time and the high pressure and surface scattering and spectroscopy instruments to receive beam time increases, will facilitate much more efficient use of the substantial investment in these instruments. The broad scientific community will benefit by the increase in the number of scientists who conduct cutting-edge research at GSECARS. The user program in stations 13ID-C (interface scattering) and 13ID-D (laser heated diamond anvil cell and large volume press) recommenced in June 2012. The operation of the 13ID-E microprobe station began in the Fall 2012 cycle (Oct.-Dec 2012). The upgraded canted beamlines double the amount of undulator beam time at Sector 13 and provide new capabilities including extended operations of the X-ray microprobe down to the sulfur K edge and enhanced brightness at high energy. The availability of the upgraded beamlines will advance the

  3. Calculation of the Beam Field in the LCLS Bunch Length Monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stupakov, G.; Ding, Y.; Huang, Z.; /SLAC

    2006-06-07

    Maintaining a stable bunch length and peak current is a critical step for the reliable operation of a SASE based x-ray source. In the LCLS, relative bunch length monitors (BLM) right after both bunch compressors are proposed based on the coherent radiation generated by the short electron bunch. Due to its diagnostic setup, the standard far field synchrotron radiation formula and well-developed numerical codes do not apply for the analysis of the BLM performance. In this paper, we develop a calculation procedure to take into account the near field effect, the effect of a short bending magnet, and the diffraction effect of the radiation transport optics. We find the frequency response of the BLM after the first LCLS bunch compressor and discuss its expected performance.

  4. Insertion device calculations with mathematica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carr, R.; Lidia, S.

    1995-02-01

    The design of accelerator insertion devices such as wigglers and undulators has usually been aided by numerical modeling on digital computers, using code in high level languages like Fortran. In the present era, there are higher level programming environments like IDL{reg_sign}, MatLab{reg_sign}, and Mathematica{reg_sign} in which these calculations may be performed by writing much less code, and in which standard mathematical techniques are very easily used. The authors present a suite of standard insertion device modeling routines in Mathematica to illustrate the new techniques. These routines include a simple way to generate magnetic fields using blocks of CSEM materials, trajectory solutions from the Lorentz force equations for given magnetic fields, Bessel function calculations of radiation for wigglers and undulators and general radiation calculations for undulators.

  5. Exact and variational calculations of eigenmodes for three-dimensional free electron laser interaction with a warm electron beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, M.

    1995-12-31

    I present an exact calculation of free-electron-laser (FEL) eigenmodes (fundamental as well as higher order modes) in the exponential-gain regime. These eigenmodes specify transverse profiles and exponential growth rates of the laser field, and they are self-consistent solutions of the coupled Maxwell-Vlasov equations describing the FEL interaction taking into account the effects due to energy spread, emittance and betatron oscillations of the electron beam, and diffraction and guiding of the laser field. The unperturbed electron distribution is assumed to be of Gaussian shape in four dimensional transverse phase space and in the energy variable, but uniform in longitudinal coordinate. The focusing of the electron beam is assumed to be matched to the natural wiggler focusing in both transverse planes. With these assumptions the eigenvalue problem can be reduced to a numerically manageable integral equation and solved exactly with a kernel iteration method. An approximate, but more efficient solution of the integral equation is also obtained for the fundamental mode by a variational technique, which is shown to agree well with the exact results. Furthermore, I present a handy formula, obtained from interpolating the numerical results, for a quick calculation of FEL exponential growth rate. Comparisons with simulation code TDA will also be presented. Application of these solutions to the design and multi-dimensional parameter space optimization for an X-ray free electron laser driven by SLAC linac will be demonstrated. In addition, a rigorous analysis of transverse mode degeneracy and hence the transverse coherence of the X-ray FEL will be presented based on the exact solutions of the higher order guided modes.

  6. SU-E-T-586: Field Size Dependence of Output Factor for Uniform Scanning Proton Beams: A Comparison of TPS Calculation, Measurement and Monte Carlo Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Y; Singh, H; Islam, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Output dependence on field size for uniform scanning beams, and the accuracy of treatment planning system (TPS) calculation are not well studied. The purpose of this work is to investigate the dependence of output on field size for uniform scanning beams and compare it among TPS calculation, measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: Field size dependence was studied using various field sizes between 2.5 cm diameter to 10 cm diameter. The field size factor was studied for a number of proton range and modulation combinations based on output at the center of spread out Bragg peak normalized to a 10 cm diameter field. Three methods were used and compared in this study: 1) TPS calculation, 2) ionization chamber measurement, and 3) Monte Carlos simulation. The XiO TPS (Electa, St. Louis) was used to calculate the output factor using a pencil beam algorithm; a pinpoint ionization chamber was used for measurements; and the Fluka code was used for Monte Carlo simulations. Results: The field size factor varied with proton beam parameters, such as range, modulation, and calibration depth, and could decrease over 10% from a 10 cm to 3 cm diameter field for a large range proton beam. The XiO TPS predicted the field size factor relatively well at large field size, but could differ from measurements by 5% or more for small field and large range beams. Monte Carlo simulations predicted the field size factor within 1.5% of measurements. Conclusion: Output factor can vary largely with field size, and needs to be accounted for accurate proton beam delivery. This is especially important for small field beams such as in stereotactic proton therapy, where the field size dependence is large and TPS calculation is inaccurate. Measurements or Monte Carlo simulations are recommended for output determination for such cases.

  7. U10.0 Undulator conceptual design report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoyer, E.

    1994-06-01

    The U10.0 Undulator described here is a 43 period, 10 cm period, 4.5 meter long insertion device. Designed for the Advanced Light Source (ALS) storage ring at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. This insertion device will provide high brightness, quasi-monochromatic radiation in the 5-950 eV energy range. This conceptual design report includes sections on: parameter development, spectral performance, and accelerator requirements, physics specifications and the detailed conceptual design of the magnetic structure, the support/drive systems, the insertion device control system, the vacuum system, and installation for the U10.0 Undulator.

  8. SU-E-T-71: Commissioning and Acceptance Testing of a Commercial Monte Carlo Electron Dose Calculation Model (eMC) for TrueBeam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheu, R; Tseng, T; Powers, A; Lo, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To provide commissioning and acceptance test data of the Varian Eclipse electron Monte Carlo model (eMC v.11) for TrueBeam linac. We also investigated the uncertainties in beam model parameters and dose calculation results for different geometric configurations. Methods: For beam commissioning, PTW CC13 thimble chamber and IBA Blue Phantom2 were used to collect PDD and dose profiles in air. Cone factors were measured with a parallel plate chamber (PTW N23342) in solid water. GafChromic EBT3 films were used for dose calculation verifications to compare with parallel plate chamber results in the following test geometries: oblique incident, extended distance, small cutouts, elongated cutouts, irregular surface, and heterogeneous layers. Results: Four electron energies (6e, 9e, 12e, and 15e) and five cones (66, 1010, 1515, 2020, and 2525) with standard cutouts were calculated for different grid sizes (1, 1.5,2, and 2.5 mm) and compared with chamber measurements. The results showed calculations performed with a coarse grid size underestimated the absolute dose. The underestimation decreased as energy increased. For 6e, the underestimation (max 3.3 %) was greater than the statistical uncertainty level (3%) and was systematically observed for all cone sizes. By using a 1mm grid size, all the calculation results agreed with measurements within 5% for all test configurations. The calculations took 21s and 46s for 6e and 15e (2.5mm grid size) respectively distributed on 4 calculation servants. Conclusion: In general, commissioning the eMC dose calculation model on TrueBeam is straightforward and thedose calculation is in good agreement with measurements for all test cases. Monte Carlo dose calculation provides more accurate results which improves treatment planning quality. However, the normal acceptable grid size (2.5mm) would cause systematic underestimation in absolute dose calculation for lower energies, such as 6e. Users need to be cautious in this

  9. Field calculations, single-particle tracking, and beam dynamics with space charge in the electron lens for the Fermilab Integrable Optics Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noll, Daniel; Stancari, Giulio

    2015-11-17

    An electron lens is planned for the Fermilab Integrable Optics Test Accelerator as a nonlinear element for integrable dynamics, as an electron cooler, and as an electron trap to study space-charge compensation in rings. We present the main design principles and constraints for nonlinear integrable optics. A magnetic configuration of the solenoids and of the toroidal section is laid out. Singleparticle tracking is used to optimize the electron path. Electron beam dynamics at high intensity is calculated with a particle-in-cell code to estimate current limits, profile distortions, and the effects on the circulating beam. In the conclusions, we summarize the main findings and list directions for further work.

  10. Quantitative assessment of the accuracy of dose calculation using pencil beam and Monte Carlo algorithms and requirements for clinical quality assurance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali, Imad; Ahmad, Salahuddin

    2013-10-01

    To compare the doses calculated using the BrainLAB pencil beam (PB) and Monte Carlo (MC) algorithms for tumors located in various sites including the lung and evaluate quality assurance procedures required for the verification of the accuracy of dose calculation. The dose-calculation accuracy of PB and MC was also assessed quantitatively with measurement using ionization chamber and Gafchromic films placed in solid water and heterogeneous phantoms. The dose was calculated using PB convolution and MC algorithms in the iPlan treatment planning system from BrainLAB. The dose calculation was performed on the patient's computed tomography images with lesions in various treatment sites including 5 lungs, 5 prostates, 4 brains, 2 head and necks, and 2 paraspinal tissues. A combination of conventional, conformal, and intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans was used in dose calculation. The leaf sequence from intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans or beam shapes from conformal plans and monitor units and other planning parameters calculated by the PB were identical for calculating dose with MC. Heterogeneity correction was considered in both PB and MC dose calculations. Dose-volume parameters such as V95 (volume covered by 95% of prescription dose), dose distributions, and gamma analysis were used to evaluate the calculated dose by PB and MC. The measured doses by ionization chamber and EBT GAFCHROMIC film in solid water and heterogeneous phantoms were used to quantitatively asses the accuracy of dose calculated by PB and MC. The dose-volume histograms and dose distributions calculated by PB and MC in the brain, prostate, paraspinal, and head and neck were in good agreement with one another (within 5%) and provided acceptable planning target volume coverage. However, dose distributions of the patients with lung cancer had large discrepancies. For a plan optimized with PB, the dose coverage was shown as clinically acceptable, whereas in reality, the MC showed a

  11. Preparing the BESSY APPLE Undulators for Top-Up Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahrdt, J.; Frentrup, W.; Gaupp, A.; Scheer, M.

    2007-01-19

    BESSY plans to go to topping up operation in the near future. A high injection efficiency is essential to avoid particle losses inside the undulator magnets and to ensure a low radiation background in the beamlines. Dynamic and static multipoles of the insertion devices have to be minimized to accomplish this requirement. APPLE II devices show strong dynamic multipoles in the elliptical and vertical polarization mode. Measurements before and after shimming of these multipoles are presented. The static multipoles of the BESSY UE56-2 which are due to systematic block inhomgeneities have successfully been shimmed recovering the full dynamic aperture.

  12. Study the sensitivity of dose calculation in prism treatment planning system using Monte Carlo simulation of 6 MeV electron beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardiansyah, D.; Haryanto, F.; Male, S.

    2014-09-30

    Prism is a non-commercial Radiotherapy Treatment Planning System (RTPS) develop by Ira J. Kalet from Washington University. Inhomogeneity factor is included in Prism TPS dose calculation. The aim of this study is to investigate the sensitivity of dose calculation on Prism using Monte Carlo simulation. Phase space source from head linear accelerator (LINAC) for Monte Carlo simulation is implemented. To achieve this aim, Prism dose calculation is compared with EGSnrc Monte Carlo simulation. Percentage depth dose (PDD) and R50 from both calculations are observed. BEAMnrc is simulated electron transport in LINAC head and produced phase space file. This file is used as DOSXYZnrc input to simulated electron transport in phantom. This study is started with commissioning process in water phantom. Commissioning process is adjusted Monte Carlo simulation with Prism RTPS. Commissioning result is used for study of inhomogeneity phantom. Physical parameters of inhomogeneity phantom that varied in this study are: density, location and thickness of tissue. Commissioning result is shown that optimum energy of Monte Carlo simulation for 6 MeV electron beam is 6.8 MeV. This commissioning is used R50 and PDD with Practical length (R{sub p}) as references. From inhomogeneity study, the average deviation for all case on interest region is below 5 %. Based on ICRU recommendations, Prism has good ability to calculate the radiation dose in inhomogeneity tissue.

  13. Relative efficiency calculations of biological and physical systems exposed to charged particle beams through Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avila, Olga; Brandan, Maria-Ester

    1998-08-28

    A theoretical investigation of thermoluminescence response of Lithium Fluoride after heavy ion irradiation has been performed through Monte Carlo simulation of the energy deposition process. Efficiencies for the total TL signal of LiF irradiated with 0.7, 1.5 and 3 MeV protons and 3, 5.3 and 7.5 MeV helium ions have been calculated using the radial dose distribution profiles obtained from the MC procedure and applying Track Structure Theory and Modified Track Structure Theory. Results were compared with recent experimental data. The models correctly describe the observed decrease in efficiency as a function of the ion LET.

  14. SU-E-I-05: A Correction Algorithm for Kilovoltage Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Dose Calculations in Cervical Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, J; Zhang, W; Lu, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the accuracy and feasibility of dose calculations using kilovoltage cone beam computed tomography in cervical cancer radiotherapy using a correction algorithm. Methods: The Hounsfield units (HU) and electron density (HU-density) curve was obtained for both planning CT (pCT) and kilovoltage cone beam CT (CBCT) using a CIRS-062 calibration phantom. The pCT and kV-CBCT images have different HU values, and if the HU-density curve of CBCT was directly used to calculate dose in CBCT images may have a deviation on dose distribution. It is necessary to normalize the different HU values between pCT and CBCT. A HU correction algorithm was used for CBCT images (cCBCT). Fifteen intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans of cervical cancer were chosen, and the plans were transferred to the pCT and cCBCT data sets without any changes for dose calculations. Phantom and patient studies were carried out. The dose differences and dose distributions were compared between cCBCT plan and pCT plan. Results: The HU number of CBCT was measured by several times, and the maximum change was less than 2%. To compare with pCT, the CBCT and cCBCT has a discrepancy, the dose differences in CBCT and cCBCT images were 2.48%±0.65% (range: 1.3%∼3.8%) and 0.48%±0.21% (range: 0.1%∼0.82%) for phantom study, respectively. For dose calculation in patient images, the dose differences were 2.25%±0.43% (range: 1.4%∼3.4%) and 0.63%±0.35% (range: 0.13%∼0.97%), respectively. And for the dose distributions, the passing rate of cCBCT was higher than the CBCTs. Conclusion: The CBCT image for dose calculation is feasible in cervical cancer radiotherapy, and the correction algorithm offers acceptable accuracy. It will become a useful tool for adaptive radiation therapy.

  15. Code System to Calculate Neutron and Gamma-Ray Skyshine Doses Using the Integral Line-Beam Method.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2000-11-16

    Version 03 This package includes the SKYNEUT 1.1, SKYDOSE 2.3, MCSKY 2.3 and SKYCONES 1.1 codes plus the DLC-188/SKYDATA library to form a comprehensive system for calculating skyshine doses. See the author's web site for related information: http://athena.mne.ksu.edu/~jks/ SKYNEUT evaluates the neutron and neutron-induced secondary gamma-ray skyshine doses from an isotropic, point, neutron source collimated by three simple geometries: an open silo, a vertical black (perfectly absorbing) wall, and a rectangular building. The source maymore » emit monoenergetic neutrons or neutrons with an arbitrary multigroup spectrum of energies. SKYDOSE evaluates the gamma-ray skyshine dose from an isotropic, monoenergetic, point gamma-photon source collimated by three simple geometries: (1) a source in a silo, (2) a source behind an infinitely long, vertical, black wall, and (3) a source in a rectangular building. In all three geometries an optional overhead slab shield may be specified. MCSKY evaluates the gamma-ray skyshine dose from an isotropic, monoenergetic, point gamma-photon source collimated into either a vertical cone (i.e., silo geometry) or into a vertically oriented structure with an N-sided polygon cross section. An overhead laminate shield composed of two different materials is assumed, although shield thicknesses of zero may be specified to model an unshielded SKYSHINE source. SKYCONES evaluates the skyshine doses produced by a point neutron or gamma-photon source emitting, into the atmosphere, radiation that is collimated into an upward conical annulus between two arbitrary polar angles. The source is assumed to be axially (azimuthally) symmetric about a vertical axis through the source and can have an arbitrary polyenergetic spectrum. Nested contiguous annular cones can thus be used to represent the energy and polar-angle dependence of a skyshine source emitting radiation into the atmosphere.« less

  16. Indentation and overall compression behavior of multilayered thin-film composites. Effect of undulating layer geometry

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jamison, Ryan D.; Shen, Y. -L.

    2015-03-19

    Two finite element models are used to investigate the behavior of aluminum/silicon carbide thin-film layered composites with imperfect internal geometry when subjected to various loadings. In both models, undulating layers are represented by regular waveforms with various amplitudes, wavelengths, and phase offsets. First, uniaxial compressive loading of the composite is considered. The modulus and stress/strain response of the composite is sensitive to both loading direction and frequency of the undulation. Second, the nanoindentation response of the composite is investigated. The derived hardness and modulus are shown to be sensitive to the presence of undulating layers and the relative size ofmore » the indenter to the undulation. Undulating layers create bands of tensile and compressive stress in the indentation direction that are significantly different from the flat layers. The amount of equivalent plastic strain in the Al layers is increased by the presence of undulating layers. The correlations between the two forms of loading, and the implications to composite property measurement are carefully examined in this study.« less

  17. Long wavelength undulations dominate dynamics in large surfactant membrane patches

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lipfert, Frederik; Holderer, Olaf; Frielinghaus, Henrich; Appavou, Marie-Sousai; Do, Changwoo; Ohl, Michael E.; Richter, Dieter

    2014-12-03

    In this study, by exposing microemulsions to small (80 nm diameter) and large (500 nm) disk shaped clay particles we were able to show the presence of long wavelength undulations that only occur for large membrane patches. A combination of small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and neutron spin echo (NSE) experiments have been applied to study microemulsions. These, consisting of D2O, d-decane and the surfactant C10E4, were used in connection with Laponite (small) and Nanofil (large) clay. To our knowledge our experiments show for the first time that the clay platelets induce lamellar ordering adjacent to the clay discs inmore » the otherwise bicontinuous microemulsion. This is due to the fact that in purely structural investigations, radial averaging smears out the signature of the lamellar phase. For thermodynamically fluctuating membranes near interfaces the theory of Seifert predicts a cross-over of the dispersion relationship from k2 to a k3-dependence. Lastly, with the correlation length of the membrane patches being confined by the dimension of the clay platelets we were able to show that this in fact takes place but is only present for the larger Nanofil particles.« less

  18. Reduction of Beam Emittance of Pep-X Using Quadruple Bend Achromat Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Min-Huey; Cai, Yunhai; Hettel, Robert; Nosochkov, Yuri; /SLAC

    2009-05-26

    SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is studying an option of building a high brightness synchrotron light source machine, PEP-X, in the existing PEP-II tunnel [1, 2]. By replacing 6 arcs of FODO cells of PEPII High Energy Ring (HER) with two arcs of DBA and four arcs of TME and installation of 89.3 m long damping wiggler an ultra low beam emittance of 0.14 nm-rad (including intra-beam scattering) at 4.5 GeV is achieved. In this paper we study the possibility to further reduce the beam emittance by releasing the constraint of the dispersion free in the DBA straight. The QBA (Quadruple Bend Achromat) cell is used to replace the DBA. The ratio of outer and inner bending angle is optimized. The dispersion function in the non-dispersion straight is controlled to compromise with lower emittance and beam size at the dispersion straight. An undulator of period length 23 mm, maximum magnetic field of 1.053 T, and total periods of 150 is used to put in the 30 straights to simulate the effects of these IDs on the beam emittance and energy spread. The brightness including all the ID effects is calculated and compared to the original PEP-X design.

  19. Photon beam position monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuzay, T.M.; Shu, D.

    1995-02-07

    A photon beam position monitor is disclosed for use in the front end of a beamline of a high heat flux and high energy photon source such as a synchrotron radiation storage ring detects and measures the position and, when a pair of such monitors are used in tandem, the slope of a photon beam emanating from an insertion device such as a wiggler or an undulator inserted in the straight sections of the ring. The photon beam position monitor includes a plurality of spaced blades for precisely locating the photon beam, with each blade comprised of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond with an outer metal coating of a photon sensitive metal such as tungsten, molybdenum, etc., which combination emits electrons when a high energy photon beam is incident upon the blade. Two such monitors are contemplated for use in the front end of the beamline, with the two monitors having vertically and horizontally offset detector blades to avoid blade ''shadowing''. Provision is made for aligning the detector blades with the photon beam and limiting detector blade temperature during operation. 18 figs.

  20. Photon beam position monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuzay, Tuncer M.; Shu, Deming

    1995-01-01

    A photon beam position monitor for use in the front end of a beamline of a high heat flux and high energy photon source such as a synchrotron radiation storage ring detects and measures the position and, when a pair of such monitors are used in tandem, the slope of a photon beam emanating from an insertion device such as a wiggler or an undulator inserted in the straight sections of the ring. The photon beam position monitor includes a plurality of spaced blades for precisely locating the photon beam, with each blade comprised of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond with an outer metal coating of a photon sensitive metal such as tungsten, molybdenum, etc., which combination emits electrons when a high energy photon beam is incident upon the blade. Two such monitors are contemplated for use in the front end of the beamline, with the two monitors having vertically and horizontally offset detector blades to avoid blade "shadowing". Provision is made for aligning the detector blades with the photon beam and limiting detector blade temperature during operation.

  1. Beam Status

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beam Status Beam Status Print Loading... You can also view the Operations Group's Beam History archives.

  2. TURTLE with MAD input (Trace Unlimited Rays Through Lumped Elements) -- A computer program for simulating charged particle beam transport systems and DECAY TURTLE including decay calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carey, D.C.

    1999-12-09

    TURTLE is a computer program useful for determining many characteristics of a particle beam once an initial design has been achieved, Charged particle beams are usually designed by adjusting various beam line parameters to obtain desired values of certain elements of a transfer or beam matrix. Such beam line parameters may describe certain magnetic fields and their gradients, lengths and shapes of magnets, spacings between magnetic elements, or the initial beam accepted into the system. For such purposes one typically employs a matrix multiplication and fitting program such as TRANSPORT. TURTLE is designed to be used after TRANSPORT. For convenience of the user, the input formats of the two programs have been made compatible. The use of TURTLE should be restricted to beams with small phase space. The lumped element approximation, described below, precludes the inclusion of the effect of conventional local geometric aberrations (due to large phase space) or fourth and higher order. A reading of the discussion below will indicate clearly the exact uses and limitations of the approach taken in TURTLE.

  3. Beam geometry selection using sequential beam addition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Popple, Richard A. Brezovich, Ivan A.; Fiveash, John B.

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: The selection of optimal beam geometry has been of interest since the inception of conformal radiotherapy. The authors report on sequential beam addition, a simple beam geometry selection method, for intensity modulated radiation therapy. Methods: The sequential beam addition algorithm (SBA) requires definition of an objective function (score) and a set of candidate beam geometries (pool). In the first iteration, the optimal score is determined for each beam in the pool and the beam with the best score selected. In the next iteration, the optimal score is calculated for each beam remaining in the pool combined with the beam selected in the first iteration, and the best scoring beam is selected. The process is repeated until the desired number of beams is reached. The authors selected three treatment sites, breast, lung, and brain, and determined beam arrangements for up to 11 beams from a pool comprised of 25 equiangular transverse beams. For the brain, arrangements were additionally selected from a pool of 22 noncoplanar beams. Scores were determined for geometries comprised equiangular transverse beams (EQA), as well as two tangential beams for the breast case. Results: In all cases, SBA resulted in scores superior to EQA. The breast case had the strongest dependence on beam geometry, for which only the 7-beam EQA geometry had a score better than the two tangential beams, whereas all SBA geometries with more than two beams were superior. In the lung case, EQA and SBA scores monotonically improved with increasing number of beams; however, SBA required fewer beams to achieve scores equivalent to EQA. For the brain case, SBA with a coplanar pool was equivalent to EQA, while the noncoplanar pool resulted in slightly better scores; however, the dose-volume histograms demonstrated that the differences were not clinically significant. Conclusions: For situations in which beam geometry has a significant effect on the objective function, SBA can identify

  4. Wakefield computations for a corrugated pipe as a beam dechirper for FEL applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ng, C. K.; Bane, K. L.F.

    2015-06-09

    A beam “dechirper” based on a corrugated, metallic vacuum chamber has been proposed recently to cancel residual energy chirp in a beam before it enters the undulator in a linac-based X-ray FEL. Rather than the round geometry that was originally proposed, we consider a pipe composed of two parallel plates with corrugations. The advantage is that the strength of the wake effect can be tuned by adjusting the separation of the plates. The separation of the plates is on the order of millimeters, and the corrugations are fractions of a millimeter in size. The dechirper needs to be meters long in order to provide sufficient longitudinal wakefield to cancel the beam chirp. Considerable computation resources are required to determine accurately the wakefield for such a long structure with small corrugation gaps. Combining the moving window technique and parallel computing using multiple processors, the time domain module in the parallel finite-element electromagnetic suite ACE3P allows efficient determination of the wakefield through convergence studies. In this paper, we will calculate the longitudinal, dipole and quadrupole wakefields for the dechirper and compare the results with those of analytical and field matching approaches.

  5. Beam Status

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beam Status Print Loading... You can also view the Operations Group's Beam History archives

  6. Negative-mass mitigation of Coulomb repulsion for terahertz undulator radiation of electron bunches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balal, N.; Magory, E.; Bandurkin, I. V.; Bratman, V. L.; Savilov, A. V.

    2015-10-19

    It is proposed to utilize the effect of negative mass for stabilization of the effective axial size of very dense and short electron bunches produced by photo-injector guns by using combined undulator and strong uniform magnetic fields. It has been shown that in the “abnormal” regime, an increase in the electron energy leads to a decrease in the axial velocity of the electron; due to the negative-mass effect, the Coulomb repulsion of electrons leads to their attraction and formation of a fairly stable and compact bunch “nucleus.” An undulator with a strong uniform magnetic field providing the negative-mass effect is designed for an experimental source of terahertz radiation. The use of the negative-mass regime in this experiment should result in a long-pulse coherent spontaneous undulator emission from a short dense moderately relativistic (5.5 MeV) photo-injector electron bunch with a high (up to 20%) efficiency and a narrow frequency spectrum.

  7. Initial studies of Bremsstrahlung energy deposition in small-bore superconducting undulator structures in linac environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cremer, T.; Tatchyn, R.

    1995-12-31

    One of the more promising technologies for developing minimal-length insertion devices for linac-driven, single-pass Free Electron Lasers (FELs) operating in the x-ray range is based on the use of superconducting (SC) materials. In recent FEL simulations, for example, a bifilar helical SC device with a 2 cm period and 1.8 T field was found to require a 30 m saturation length for operation at 1.5{Angstrom} on a 15 GeV linac, more than 40% shorter than an alternative hybrid/permanent magnet (hybrid/PM) undulator. AT the same time, however, SC technology is known to present characteristic difficulties for insertion device design, both in engineering detail and in operation. Perhaps the most critical problem, as observed, e.g., by Madey and co-workers in their initial FEL experiments, was the frequent quenching induced by scattered electrons upstream of their (bifilar) device. Postulating that this quenching was precipitated by directly-scattered or bremsstrahlung-induced particle energy deposited into the SC material or into material contiguous with it, the importance of numerical and experimental characterizations of this phenomenon for linac-based, user-facility SC undulator design becomes evident. In this paper we discuss selected prior experimental results and report on initial EGS4 code studies of scattered and bremsstrahlung induced particle energy deposition into SC structures with geometries comparable to a small-bore bifilar helical undulator.

  8. Beam/seam alignment control for electron beam welding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burkhardt, Jr., James H.; Henry, J. James; Davenport, Clyde M.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to a dynamic beam/seam alignment control system for electron beam welds utilizing video apparatus. The system includes automatic control of workpiece illumination, near infrared illumination of the workpiece to limit the range of illumination and camera sensitivity adjustment, curve fitting of seam position data to obtain an accurate measure of beam/seam alignment, and automatic beam detection and calculation of the threshold beam level from the peak beam level of the preceding video line to locate the beam or seam edges.

  9. Characterization of the Support and Drive System of the PETRA III APPLE Undulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahrdt, J.; Baecker, H.-J.; Frentrup, W.; Gaupp, A.; Gottschlich, S.; Kuhn, C.; Scheer, M.; Schulz, B.; Gast, M.; Englisch, U.; Schoeps, A.; Tischer, M.

    2010-06-23

    Helmholtzzentrum Berlin has built an APPLE II undulator for the storage ring PETRA III. The device has a total length of 5m and a minimum gap of 11mm. The high magnetic forces in particular in the inclined mode have been analyzed by means of finite element methods (FEM). Specific mechanic components such as flexible joints have been optimized to cope with the gap- and shift-dependent 3D-forces and a sophisticated control and drive system has been implemented. After completion of the device, detailed laser interferometer measurements for all operation modes have been performed. The data are compared to the FEM simulations.

  10. Beam-beam simulations for separated beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furman, Miguel A.

    2000-04-10

    We present beam-beam simulation results from a strong-strong gaussian code for separated beams for the LHC and RHIC. The frequency spectrum produced by the beam-beam collisions is readily obtained and offers a good opportunity for experimental comparisons. Although our results for the emittance blowup are preliminary, we conclude that, for nominal parameter values, there is no significant difference between separated beams and center-on-center collisions.

  11. SU-E-J-100: The Combination of Deformable Image Registration and Regions-Of-Interest Mapping Technique to Accomplish Accurate Dose Calculation On Cone Beam Computed Tomography for Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, B-T; Lu, J-Y

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We introduce a new method combined with the deformable image registration (DIR) and regions-of-interest mapping (ROIM) technique to accurately calculate dose on daily CBCT for esophageal cancer. Methods: Patients suffered from esophageal cancer were enrolled in the study. Prescription was set to 66 Gy/30 F and 54 Gy/30 F to the primary tumor (PTV66) and subclinical disease (PTV54) . Planning CT (pCT) were segmented into 8 substructures in terms of their differences in physical density, such as gross target volume (GTV), venae cava superior (SVC), aorta, heart, spinal cord, lung, muscle and bones. The pCT and its substructures were transferred to the MIM software to readout their mean HU values. Afterwards, a deformable planning CT to daily KV-CBCT image registration method was then utilized to acquire a new structure set on CBCT. The newly generated structures on CBCT were then transferred back to the treatment planning system (TPS) and its HU information were overridden manually with mean HU values obtained from pCT. Finally, the treatment plan was projected onto the CBCT images with the same beam arrangements and monitor units (MUs) to accomplish dose calculation. Planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs) from both of the pCT and CBCT were compared to evaluate the dose calculation accuracy. Results: It was found that the dose distribution in the CBCT showed little differences compared to the pCT, regardless of whether PTV or OARs were concerned. Specifically, dose variation in GTV, PTV54, PTV66, SVC, lung and heart were within 0.1%. The maximum dose variation was presented in the spinal cord, which was up to 2.7% dose difference. Conclusion: The proposed method combined with DIR and ROIM technique to accurately calculate dose distribution on CBCT for esophageal cancer is feasible.

  12. Co: clqrt. Beam

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Co: clqrt. Beam*/:

  13. A tapered undulator experiment at the ELBE far infrared hybrid-resonator oscillator free electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asgekar, V.; Lehnert, U.; Michel, P.

    2012-01-15

    A tapered undulator experiment was carried out at the ELBE far-infrared free electron laser (FEL). The oscillator FEL makes use of a hybrid optical resonator. The main motivation was to see whether the presence of a dispersive medium in the form of a waveguide in the resonator has any effect on the outcome. The FEL saturated power and the wavelength shifts have been measured as a function of both positive as well as negative undulator field amplitude tapering. In contrast to the typical high-gain FELs where positive tapering proves beneficial for the output power we observed an improvement of performance at negative taper. During the same experiments we studied the characteristics of the detuning curves. The width of the curves indicates a maximum small signal gain for zero taper while the output peak power increases with negative taper. The saturated power output, the detuning curve characteristics, and the wavelength shifts agrees with the theoretical predictions. Details of the experiment are presented.

  14. 43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; ELECTRON GUNS; BEAM EMITTANCE; CHARGE

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SPACE 430200* -- Particle Accelerators-- Beam Dynamics, Field Calculations, & Ion Optics The evolution of the electron-beam phase space distribution in laser-driven rf guns is...

  15. Beam conditioner for free electron lasers and synchrotrons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, H.; Neil, G.R.

    1998-09-08

    A focused optical has been used to introduce an optical pulse, or electromagnetic wave, collinear with the electron beam in a free electron laser or synchrotron thereby adding an axial field component that accelerates the electrons on the radial outside of the distribution of electrons in the electron beam. This invention consists of using the axial electrical component of a TEM{sub 10} mode Gaussian beam in vacuum to condition the electron beam and speed up the outer electrons in the beam. The conditioning beam should possess about the same diameter as the electron beam. The beam waist of the conditioning wave must be located around the entrance of the undulator longitudinally to have a net energy exchange between the electrons in the outer part of the distribution and the conditioning wave owing to the natural divergence of a Gaussian beam. By accelerating the outer electrons, the outer and core electrons are caused to stay in phase. This increases the fraction of the electron beam energy that is converted to light thereby improving the efficiency of conversion of energy to light and therefore boosting the power output of the free electron laser and synchrotron. 4 figs.

  16. Beam conditioner for free electron lasers and synchrotrons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Hongxiu; Neil, George R.

    1998-01-01

    A focused optical is been used to introduce an optical pulse, or electromagnetic wave, colinearly with the electron beam in a free electron laser or synchrotron thereby adding an axial field component that accelerates the electrons on the radial outside of the distribution of electrons in the electron beam. This invention consists of using the axial electrical component of a TEM.sub.10 mode Gaussian beam in vacuum to condition the electron beam and speed up the outer electrons in the beam. The conditioning beam should possess about the same diameter as the electron beam. The beam waist of the conditioning wave must be located around the entrance of the undulator longitudinally to have a net energy exchange between the electrons in the outer part of the distribution and the conditioning wave owing to the natural divergence of a Gaussian beam. By accelerating the outer electrons, the outer and core electrons are caused to stay in phase. This increases the fraction of the electron beam energy that is converted to light thereby improving the efficiency of conversion of energy to light and therefore boosting the power output of the free electron laser and synchrotron.

  17. Ion Beam Simulator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-11-08

    IBSimu(Ion Beam Simulator) is a computer program for making two and three dimensional ion optical simulations. The program can solve electrostatic field in a rectangular mesh using Poisson equation using Finite Difference method (FDM). The mesh can consist of a coarse and a fine part so that the calculation accuracy can be increased in critical areas of the geometry, while most of the calculation is done quickly using the coarse mesh. IBSimu can launch ionmore » beam trajectories into the simulation from an injection surface or fomo plasma. Ion beam space charge of time independent simulations can be taken in account using Viasov iteration. Plasma is calculated by compensating space charge with electrons having Boltzmann energy distribution. The simulation software can also be used to calculate time dependent cases if the space charge is not calculated. Software includes diagnostic tools for plotting the geometry, electric field, space charge map, ion beam trajectories, emittance data and beam profiles.« less

  18. Quantitative analysis of the x-ray diffraction intensities of undulated smectic phases in bent-core liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Folcia, C. L.; Etxebarria, J.; Ortega, J.

    2007-07-15

    X-ray diffraction diagrams of undulated smectic phases in bent-core liquid crystals have been theoretically studied. The intensities of the reflections have been obtained for different layer modulations, and a general expression has been deduced for orthogonal cells in terms of the different harmonics of the distortion. The case of sinusoidal modulation is especially simple and has been studied also in oblique cells. High-quality x-ray measurements of three compounds reported in the literature have been analyzed as examples. In all cases it has been deduced that the modulation is sinusoidal and its amplitude has been easily obtained by fitting the experimental intensities. Equatorial (h0) reflections have been also considered to obtain information about the structure of defects at the maxima and minima of the undulation.

  19. Beam Transport

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beam Transport A simplified drawing of the beam transport system from the linac to Target-1 (Lujan Center), Target-2 (Blue Room) and Target-4 is shown below. In usual operation ...

  20. 6-D weak-strong beam-beam simulation study of proton lifetime in presence of head-on beam-beam compensation in the RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Y.; Fischer, W.

    2010-08-01

    In this note we summarize the calculated particle loss of a proton bunch in the presence of head-on beam-beam compensation in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). To compensate the head-on beam-beam effect in the RHIC 250 GeV polarized proton run, we are introducing a DC electron beam with the same transverse profile as the proton beam to collide with the proton beam. Such a device is called an electron lens (e-lens). In this note we first present the optics and beam parameters and the tracking setup. Then we calculate and compare the particle loss of a proton bunch with head-on beam-beam compensation, phase advance of k{pi} between IP8 and the center of the e-lens and second order chromaticity correction. We scanned the proton beam's linear chromaticity, working point and bunch intensity. We also scanned the electron beam's intensity, transverse beam size. The effect of the electron-proton transverse offset in the e-lens was studied. In the study 6-D weak-strong beam-beam interaction model a la Hirata is used for proton collisions at IP6 and IP8. The e-lens is modeled as 8 slices. Each slice is modeled with as drift - (4D beam-beam kick) - drift.

  1. Gap solitons in rocking optical lattices and waveguides with undulating gratings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayteevarunyoo, Thawatchai; Malomed, Boris A.

    2009-07-15

    We report results of a systematic analysis of the stability of one-dimensional solitons in a model including the self-repulsive or attractive cubic nonlinearity and a linear potential represented by a periodically shaking lattice, which was recently implemented in experiments with Bose-Einstein condensates. In optics, the same model applies to undulated waveguiding arrays, which are also available to the experiment. In the case of the repulsive nonlinearity, stability regions are presented, in relevant parameter planes, for fundamental gap solitons and their two-peak and three-peak bound complexes, in the first and second finite band gaps. In the model with the attractive nonlinearity, stability regions are produced for fundamental solitons and their bound states populating the semi-infinite gap. In the first finite and semi-infinite gaps, unstable solitons gradually decay into radiation, while, in the second finite band gap, they are transformed into more complex states, which may represent new species of solitons. For a large amplitude of the rocking-lattice drive, the model is tantamount to that with a 'flashing' lattice potential, which is controlled by periodic sequences of instantaneous kicks. Using this correspondence, we explain generic features of the stability diagrams for the solitons. We also derive a limit case of the latter system, in the form of coupled-mode equations with a 'flashing' linear coupling.

  2. SRU Calculator

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Calculator SRU Calculator About SRUs You can use this form to estimate your mass storage charges (in SRUs). SRUs are calculated on a daily basis. Enter your estimated daily average number of files and data storage and your yearly estimate of data transferred to and from the HPSS system. Click on Calculate and your SRU charge will appear in the light blue boxes. Enter average daily values for the allocation year Number of files*: Amount of data stored*: GB Enter total HPSS I/O for the allocation

  3. Beam characterization by wavefront sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neal, D.R.; Alford, W.J.; Gruetzner, J.K.

    1999-08-10

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for characterizing an energy beam (such as a laser) with a two-dimensional wavefront sensor, such as a Shack-Hartmann lenslet array. The sensor measures wavefront slope and irradiance of the beam at a single point on the beam and calculates a space-beamwidth product. A detector array such as a charge coupled device camera is preferably employed. 21 figs.

  4. Beam characterization by wavefront sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neal, Daniel R.; Alford, W. J.; Gruetzner, James K.

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus and method for characterizing an energy beam (such as a laser) with a two-dimensional wavefront sensor, such as a Shack-Hartmann lenslet array. The sensor measures wavefront slope and irradiance of the beam at a single point on the beam and calculates a space-beamwidth product. A detector array such as a charge coupled device camera is preferably employed.

  5. BEAM PROPAGATOR

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    003691MLTPL00 Beam Propagator for Weather Radars, Modules 1 and 2 http://www.exelisvis.com/ProductsServices/IDL.aspx

  6. Beam History

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beam Status Beam History Print Beamline History Request Form To request a beam current histograph from the ALS storage ring beam histograph database, select the year, month, and day, then click on "Submit Request". Histographs are available as far back as February 2, 1994. Year 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Day 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13

  7. Optical remote diagnostics of atmospheric propagating beams of ionizing radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karl, Jr., Robert R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1990-01-01

    Data is obtained for use in diagnosing the characteristics of a beam of ionizing radiation, such as charged particle beams, neutral particle beams, and gamma ray beams. In one embodiment the beam is emitted through the atmosphere and produces nitrogen fluorescence during passage through air. The nitrogen fluorescence is detected along the beam path to provide an intensity from which various beam characteristics can be calculated from known tabulations. Optical detecting equipment is preferably located orthogonal to the beam path at a distance effective to include the entire beam path in the equipment field of view.

  8. Beam tuning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pardo, R.C.; Zinkann, G.P.

    1995-08-01

    A program for configuring the linac, based on previously run configurations for any desired beam was used during the past year. This program uses only a small number of empirical tunes to scale resonator fields to properly accelerate a beam with a different charge-to-mass (q/A) ratio from the original tune configuration. The program worked very well for the PII linac section where we can easily match a new beam`s arrival phase and velocity to the tuned value. It was also fairly successful for the Booster and ATLAS sections of the linac, but not as successful as for the PII linac. Most of the problems are associated with setting the beam arrival time correctly for each major linac section. This problem is being addressed with the development of the capacitive pickup beam phase monitor discussed above. During the next year we expect to improve our ability to quickly configure the linac for new beams and reduce the time required for linac tuning. Already the time required for linac tuning as a percentage of research hours has decreased from 22% in FY 1993 to 15% in the first quarter of FY 1995.

  9. Beam History

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beam History Print Beamline History Request Form To request a beam current histograph from the ALS storage ring beam histograph database, select the year, month, and day, then click on "Submit Request". Histographs are available as far back as February 2, 1994. Year 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Day 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

  10. Beam History

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beam History Print Beamline History Request Form To request a beam current histograph from the ALS storage ring beam histograph database, select the year, month, and day, then click on "Submit Request". Histographs are available as far back as February 2, 1994. Year 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Day 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

  11. WBGT Calculator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2000-05-22

    This software calculates a Wet Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGT) using standard measurements from a meteorological station. WBGT is used by Industrial Hygenists (IH) to determine heat stress potential to outdoor workers. Through the mid 1990''s, SRS technicians were dispatched several times daily to measure WBGT with a custom hand held instrument and results were dessiminated via telephone. Due to workforce reductions, the WSRC IH Department asked for the development of an automated method to simulatemore » the WBGT measurement using existing real time data from the Atmospheric Technologies Group''s meteorological monitoring network.« less

  12. Formation of compressed flat electron beams with high transverse-emittance ratios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, J.; Piot, P.; Mihalcea, D.; Prokop, C. R.

    2014-08-01

    Flat beamsbeams with asymmetric transverse emittanceshave important applications in novel light-source concepts and advanced-acceleration schemes and could possibly alleviate the need for damping rings in lepton colliders. Over the last decade, a flat beam generation technique based on the conversion of an angular-momentum-dominated beam was proposed and experimentally tested. In this paper we explore the production of compressed flat beams. We especially investigate and optimize the flat beam transformation for beams with substantial fractional energy spread. We use as a simulation example the photoinjector of Fermilabs Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator. The optimizations of the flat beam generation and compression at Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator were done via start-to-end numerical simulations for bunch charges of 3.2 nC, 1.0 nC, and 20 pC at ?37??MeV. The optimized emittances of flat beams with different bunch charges were found to be 0.25???m (emittance ratio is ?400), 0.13????m, 15 nm before compression, and 0.41???m, 0.20???m, 16 nm after full compression, respectively, with peak currents as high as 5.5 kA for a 3.2?nC flat beam. These parameters are consistent with requirements needed to excite wakefields in asymmetric dielectric-lined waveguides or produce significant photon flux using small-gap micro-undulators.

  13. Beam Test Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beam Test Facility Beam Test Facility Print Tuesday, 20 October 2009 09:36 Coming Soon

  14. Stability of Single Particle Motion with Head-On Beam-Beam Compensation in the RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo,Y.; Fischer, W.; Abreu, N.

    2008-05-01

    To compensate the large tune shift and tune spread generated by the head-on beam-beam interactions in the polarized proton run in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), we proposed a low energy electron beam with a Gaussian transverse profiles to collide head-on with the proton beam. In this article, with a weak-strong beam-beam interaction model, we investigate the stability of single particle motion in the presence of head-on beam-beam compensation. Tune footprints, tune diffusion, Lyapunov exponents, and 10{sup 6} turn dynamic apertures are calculated and compared between the cases without and with beam-beam compensation. A tune scan is performed and the possibility of increasing the bunch intensity is studied. The cause of tune footprint foldings is discussed, and the tune diffusion and Lyapunov exponent analysis are compared.

  15. Simulation study of dynamic aperture with head-on beam-beam compensation in the RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Y.; Fischer, W.

    2010-08-01

    In this note we summarize the calculated 10{sup 6} turn dynamic apertures with the proposed head-on beam-beam compensation in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). To compensate the head-on beam-beam effect in the RHIC 250 GeV polarized proton run, we are planning to introduce a DC electron beam with the same transverse profile as the proton beam to collide with the proton beam. Such a device to provide the electron beam is called an electron lens (e-lens). In this note we first present the optics and beam parameters and the tracking setup. Then we compare the calculated dynamic apertures without and with head-on beam-beam compensation. The effects of adjusted phase advances between IP8 and the center of e-lens and second order chromaticity correction are checked. In the end we will scan the proton and electron beam parameters with head-on beam-beam compensation.

  16. A new luminescence beam profile monitor for intense proton and heavy ion beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsang,T.; Bellavia, S.; Connolly, R.; Gassner, D.; Makdisi, Y.; Russo, T.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Zelenski, A.

    2008-10-01

    A new luminescence beam profile monitor is realized in the polarized hydrogen gas jet target at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) facility. In addition to the spin polarization of the proton beam being routinely measured by the hydrogen gas jet, the luminescence produced by beam-hydrogen excitation leads to a strong Balmer series lines emission. A selected hydrogen Balmer line is spectrally filtered and imaged to produce the transverse RHIC proton beam shape with unprecedented details on the RHIC beam profile. Alternatively, when the passage of the high energy RHIC gold ion beam excited only the residual gas molecules in the beam path, sufficient ion beam induced luminescence is produced and the transverse gold ion beam profile is obtained. The measured transverse beam sizes and the calculated emittances provide an independent confirmation of the RHIC beam characteristics and to verify the emittance conservation along the RHIC accelerator. This optical beam diagnostic technique by making use of the beam induced fluorescence from injected or residual gas offers a truly noninvasive particle beam characterization, and provides a visual observation of proton and heavy ion beams. Combined with a longitudinal bunch measurement system, a 3-dimensional spatial particle beam profile can be reconstructed tomographically.

  17. Longitudinal Diagnostics for Short Electron Beam Bunches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loos, H.; ,

    2010-06-11

    Single-pass free electron lasers require high peak currents from ultra-short electron bunches to reach saturation and an accurate measurement of bunch length and longitudinal bunch profile is necessary to control the bunch compression process from low to high beam energy. The various state-of-the-art diagnostics methods from ps to fs time scales using coherent radiation detection, RF deflection, and other techniques are presented. The use of linear accelerators as drivers for free electron lasers (FEL) and the advent of single-pass (SASE) FELs has driven the development of a wide range of diagnostic techniques for measuring the length and longitudinal distribution of short and ultra-short electron bunches. For SASE FELs the radiation power and the length of the undulator needed to achieve saturation depend strongly on the charge density of the electron beam. In the case of X-ray FELs, this requires the accelerator to produce ultra-high brightness beams with micron size transverse normalized emittances and peak currents of several kA through several stages of magnetic bunch compression. Different longitudinal diagnostics are employed to measure the peak current and bunch profile along these stages. The measurement techniques can be distinguished into different classes. Coherent methods detect the light emitted from the beam by some coherent radiation process (spectroscopic measurement), or directly measure the Coulomb field traveling with the beam (electro-optic). Phase space manipulation techniques map the time coordinate onto a transverse dimension and then use conventional transverse beam diagnostics (transverse deflector, rf zero-phasing). Further methods measure the profile or duration of an incoherent light pulse emitted by the bunch at wavelengths much shorted than the bunch length (streak camera, fluctuation technique) or modulate the electron beam at an optical wavelength and then generate a narrow bandwidth radiation pulse with the longitudinal profile of

  18. CEBAF beam loss accounting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ursic, R.; Mahoney, K.; Hovater, C.; Hutton, A.; Sinclair, C.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a beam loss accounting system for the CEBAF electron accelerator. This system samples the beam curent throughout the beam path and measures the beam current accurately. Personnel Safety and Machine Protection systems use this system to turn off the beam when hazardous beam losses occur.

  19. Method for finding the beam waist through ABCD matrix element adjustment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, J.D.

    1988-12-15

    Laser beam parameters includingbeam waist are calculated for laser cavities using an equivalent lens waveguide approach.(AIP)

  20. Girder Alignment Plan (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Thus, the undulator, undulator beam pipe, quadrupole, beam finder wire, and beam position monitor axes must all be aligned to a common line. All relative alignments are equally ...

  1. Mode selectivity in multiple-beam klystrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nusinovich, Gregory S.; Abe, David K.

    2006-09-15

    A general method is developed for calculating the coupling coefficients of multiple beamlets of an arbitrary geometry to resonator fields having an arbitrary transverse distribution. A number of examples illustrate the effectiveness of this method for calculating coupling coefficients and show the effect of device parameters on the coupling of a given multiple electron beam to competing modes of multiple-beam klystrons (MBKs) operating in high-order modes. The method can be used for evaluating the mode selectivity and the 'monotron instability' in MBKs. It can also be used for determining the Pierce gain parameter in multiple-beam traveling-wave tubes.

  2. Optics of ion beams for the neutral beam injection system on HL-2A Tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zou, G. Q.; Lei, G. J.; Cao, J. Y.; Duan, X. R.

    2012-07-15

    The ion beam optics for the neutral beam injection system on HL-2A Tokomak is studied by two- dimensional numerical simulation program firstly, where the emitting surface is taken at 100 Debye lengths from the plasma electrode. The mathematical formulation, computation techniques are described. Typical ion orbits, equipotential contours, and emittance diagram are shown. For a fixed geometry electrode, the effect of plasma density, plasma potential and plasma electron temperature on ion beam optics is examined, and the calculation reliability is confirmed by experimental results. In order to improve ion beam optics, the application of a small pre-acceleration voltage ({approx}100 V) between the plasma electrode and the arc discharge anode is reasonable, and a lower plasma electron temperature is desired. The results allow optimization of the ion beam optics in the neutral beam injection system on HL-2A Tokomak and provide guidelines for designing future neutral beam injection system on HL-2M Tokomak.

  3. Method of automatic measurement and focus of an electron beam and apparatus therefor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Giedt, Warren H.; Campiotti, Richard

    1996-01-01

    An electron beam focusing system, including a plural slit-type Faraday beam trap, for measuring the diameter of an electron beam and automatically focusing the beam for welding. Beam size is determined from profiles of the current measured as the beam is swept over at least two narrow slits of the beam trap. An automated procedure changes the focus coil current until the focal point location is just below a workpiece surface. A parabolic equation is fitted to the calculated beam sizes from which optimal focus coil current and optimal beam diameter are determined.

  4. Method of automatic measurement and focus of an electron beam and apparatus therefore

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Giedt, W.H.; Campiotti, R.

    1996-01-09

    An electron beam focusing system, including a plural slit-type Faraday beam trap, for measuring the diameter of an electron beam and automatically focusing the beam for welding is disclosed. Beam size is determined from profiles of the current measured as the beam is swept over at least two narrow slits of the beam trap. An automated procedure changes the focus coil current until the focal point location is just below a workpiece surface. A parabolic equation is fitted to the calculated beam sizes from which optimal focus coil current and optimal beam diameter are determined. 12 figs.

  5. BEAMS: Curiosity | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BEAMS: Curiosity BEAMS: Curiosity January 9, 2013 BEAMS, Becoming Excited About Math and Science, is one of our education programs. In particular, it is the only one in which I ...

  6. Relativistic electron beam generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mooney, L.J.; Hyatt, H.M.

    1975-11-11

    A relativistic electron beam generator for laser media excitation is described. The device employs a diode type relativistic electron beam source having a cathode shape which provides a rectangular output beam with uniform current density.

  7. Laser beam monitoring system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weil, Bradley S.; Wetherington, Jr., Grady R.

    1985-01-01

    Laser beam monitoring systems include laser-transparent plates set at an angle to the laser beam passing therethrough and light sensor for detecting light reflected from an object on which the laser beam impinges.

  8. Laser beam monitoring system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weil, B.S.; Wetherington, G.R. Jr.

    Laser beam monitoring systems include laser-transparent plates set at an angle to the laser beam passing therethrough and light sensor for detecting light reflected from an object on which the laser beam impinges.

  9. Beam imaging sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McAninch, Michael D; Root, Jeffrey J

    2015-03-31

    The present invention relates generally to the field of sensors for beam imaging and, in particular, to a new and useful beam imaging sensor for use in determining, for example, the power density distribution of a beam including, but not limited to, an electron beam or an ion beam. In one embodiment, the beam imaging sensor of the present invention comprises, among other items, a circumferential slit that is either circular, elliptical or polygonal in nature.

  10. Beam imaging sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McAninch, Michael D.; Root, Jeffrey J.

    2016-07-05

    The present invention relates generally to the field of sensors for beam imaging and, in particular, to a new and useful beam imaging sensor for use in determining, for example, the power density distribution of a beam including, but not limited to, an electron beam or an ion beam. In one embodiment, the beam imaging sensor of the present invention comprises, among other items, a circumferential slit that is either circular, elliptical or polygonal in nature.

  11. Interactive Beam-Dynamics Program

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2001-01-08

    TRACE3D is an interactive program that calculates the envelopes of a bunched beam, including linear space-charge forces, through a user-defined system. The transport system may consist of the following elements: drift, thin lens, quadrupole, permanent magnet quadrupole, solenoid, doublet, triplet, bending magnet, edge angle (for bend), RF gap, radio-frequency-quadrupole cell, RF cavity, coupled-cavity tank, user-desired element, coordinate rotation, and identical element. The beam is represented by a 6X6 matrix defining a hyper-ellipsoid in six-dimensional phasemore » space. The projection of this hyperellipsoid on any two-dimensional plane is an ellipse that defines the boundary of the beam in that plane.« less

  12. Beam quality and wavelength limitation in visible and UV FEL oscillations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomimasu, T.

    1995-12-31

    The FELI linac beam has succeeded in visible-FEL oscillation on the third harmonics at 0.64 {mu}m using a 3-m undulator and a 6.72-m optical cavity with two Au-coated mirrors in Feb. 28, 1995. The beam is a 68-MeV, 40-A electron beam with a normalized emittance of 26 {pi}mm{center_dot}mrad and a relative energy spread of 1%. In 1993, an ultraviolet (UV) FEL oscillation was already achieved on the third harmonics at 0.37{mu} m using a 46-MeV, 130-A electron beam with a normalized emittance of 3{pi}mm{center_dot}mrad and a relative energy spread of 0.24% from the APEX L-band linac with an rf photocathode electron gun. However, we are now trying to achieve an FEL oscillation in the UV range using the FELI linac with the thermionic gun because of long-life, easy-operation, and low-cost of the thermionic gun, as the FELI ring with 9.8-m long straight sections capable of storing a long lived 1-A beam is in the design stage. Recent experimental and theoretical results on relations between beam quality and short wavelength FEL oscillations have been also reviewed and wavelength limitations due to normalized emittance and relative energy spread are discussed.

  13. BEAM INSTRUMENTATION FOR HIGH POWER HADRON BEAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aleksandrov, Alexander V

    2013-01-01

    This presentation will describe developments in the beam diagnostics which support the understanding and operation of high power hadron accelerators. These include the measurement of large dynamic range transverse and longitudinal beam profiles, beam loss detection, and non-interceptive diagnostics.

  14. Beam halo in mismatched proton beams.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wangler, Thomas P.,; Allen, C. K.; Chan, D.; Colestock, P. L. ,; Crandall, K. R.; Qiang, J.; Garnett, R. W.; Lysenko, W. P.; Gilpatrick, J. D.; Schneider, J. D.; Schulze, M. E.; Sheffield, R. L.; Smith, H. V.

    2002-01-01

    Progress was made during the past decade towards a better understanding of halo formation caused by beam mismatch in high-intensity beams. To test these ideas an experiment was carried out at Los Alamos with proton beams in a 52-quadrupole focusing channel. Rms emittances and beam widths were obtained from measured beam profiles for comparison with the maximum emittance growth predictions of a free-energy model and the maximum haloamplitude predictions of a particle-core model. The experimental results are also compared with multiparticle simulations. In this paper we will present the experimental results and discuss the implications with respect to the validity of both the models and the simulations. Keywords: beam halo, emittance growth, beam profiles, simulations, space charge, mismatch

  15. Optimum focusing of Gaussian laser beams: Beam waist shift in spot size minimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Y.; Katz, J. )

    1994-04-01

    Optimum focusing of Gaussian laser beams is first discussed by Dickson, who described the change in beam radius under the effect of focusing system parameters. The purpose of this study is to present a formulation for calculating the waist shift under various optimum conditions. Because the variations of beam waist can be measured directly, the waist shift in a focused Gaussian beam is a more practical parameter than the movement of the intensity maximum that is the subject for investigators of the well-known focal shift problem.

  16. Telecommunication using muon beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arnold, Richard C.

    1976-01-01

    Telecommunication is effected by generating a beam of mu mesons or muons, varying a property of the beam at a modulating rate to generate a modulated beam of muons, and detecting the information in the modulated beam at a remote location.

  17. Ion Beam Materials Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ion Beam Materials Lab Ion Beam Materials Lab A new research frontier awaits! Our door is open and we thrive on mutually beneficial partnerships, collaborations that drive innovations and new technologies. April 12, 2012 Ion Beam Danfysik Implanter High Voltage Terminal. Contact Yongqiang Wang (505) 665-1596 Email Devoted to the characterization and modification of surfaces through the use of ion beams The Ion Beam Materials Laboratory (IBML) is a Los Alamos National Laboratory resource devoted

  18. Neutron measurements from beam-target reactions at the ELISE neutral beam test facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xufei, X. Fan, T.; Nocente, M.; Gorini, G.; Bonomo, F.; Franzen, P.; Fröschle, M.; Grosso, G.; Tardocchi, M.; Grünauer, F.; Pasqualotto, R.

    2014-11-15

    Measurements of 2.5 MeV neutron emission from beam-target reactions performed at the ELISE neutral beam test facility are presented in this paper. The measurements are used to study the penetration of a deuterium beam in a copper dump, based on the observation of the time evolution of the neutron counting rate from beam-target reactions with a liquid scintillation detector. A calculation based on a local mixing model of deuterium deposition in the target up to a concentration of 20% at saturation is used to evaluate the expected neutron yield for comparison with data. The results are of relevance to understand neutron emission associated to beam penetration in a solid target, with applications to diagnostic systems for the SPIDER and MITICA Neutral Beam Injection prototypes.

  19. BEAM HALO IN PROTON LINAC BEAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. WANGLER; K. CRANDALL

    2000-08-01

    In this paper we review the present picture of km halo in proton linacs. Space-charge forces acting in mismatched beams have been identified as a major cause of beam-halo. We present a definition of halo based on a ratio of moments of the distribution of the beam coordinates. We find from our initial studies that for halo detined in this way, a beam can have rms emittance growth without halo growth, but halo growth is always accompanied by rms emittance growth. We describe the beam-halo experiment that is in preparation at Los Alamos, which will address questions about the beam profiles, maximum particle amplitudes, and rms emittance growth associated with the halo.

  20. Original Impact Calculations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Original Impact Calculations, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

  1. ION BEAM COLLIMATOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Langsdorf, A.S. Jr.

    1957-11-26

    A device is described for defining a beam of high energy particles wherein the means for defining the beam in the horizontal and vertical dimension are separately adjustable and the defining members are internally cooled. In general, the device comprises a mounting block having a central opening through which the beam is projected, means for rotatably supporting two pairs of beam- forming members, passages in each member for the flow of coolant; the beam- forming members being insulated from each other and the block, and each having an end projecting into the opening. The beam-forming members are adjustable and may be cooperatively positioned to define the beam passing between the end of the members. To assist in projecting and defining the beam, the member ends have individual means connected thereto for indicating the amount of charge collected thereon due to beam interception.

  2. Pyramid beam splitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McKeown, Mark H.; Beason, Steven C.; Fairer, George

    1992-01-01

    The apparatus of the present invention provides means for obtaining accurate, dependable, measurement of bearings and directions for geologic mapping in subterranean shafts, such as, for example, nuclear waste storage investigations. In operation, a laser beam is projected along a reference bearing. A pyramid is mounted such that the laser beam is parallel to the pyramid axis and can impinge on the apex of the pyramid thus splitting the beam several ways into several beams at right angles to each other and at right angles to the reference beam. The pyramid is also translatable and rotatable in a plane perpendicular to the reference beam.

  3. Beam position monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alkire, Randy W.; Rosenbaum, Gerold; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2003-07-22

    An apparatus for determining the position of an x-ray beam relative to a desired beam axis. Where the apparatus is positioned along the beam path so that a thin metal foil target intersects the x-ray beam generating fluorescent radiation. A PIN diode array is positioned so that a portion of the fluorescent radiation is intercepted by the array resulting in an a series of electrical signals from the PIN diodes making up the array. The signals are then analyzed and the position of the x-ray beam is determined relative to the desired beam path.

  4. W-Band Sheet Beam Klystron Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colby, E.R.; Caryotakis, G.; Fowkes, W.R.; /SLAC; Smithe, D.N.; /Mission Res., Newington

    2005-09-12

    With the development of ever higher energy particle accelerators comes the need for compactness and high gradient, which in turn require very high frequency high power rf sources. Recent development work in W-band accelerating techniques has spurred the development of a high-power W-band source. Axisymmetric sources suffer from fundamental power output limitations (P{sub sat} {approx} {lambda}{sup 2}) brought on by the conflicting requirements of small beam sizes and high beam current. The sheet beam klystron allows for an increase in beam current without substantial increase in the beam current density, allowing for reduced cathode current densities and focusing field strengths. Initial simulations of a 20:1 aspect ratio sheet beam/cavity interaction using the 3 dimensional particle-in-cell code Magic3D have demonstrated a 35% beam-power to RF power extraction efficiency. Calculational work and numerical simulations leading to a prototype W-band sheet beam klystron will be presented, together with preliminary cold test structure studies of a proposed RF cavity geometry.

  5. W-band sheet beam klystron simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colby, E.R.; Caryotakis, G.; Fowkes, W.R. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, 2575 Sand Hill Rd., Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Smithe, D.N. [Mission Research Corporation, 8560 Cinderbed Road, Ste. 700, Newington, Virginia 22122 (United States)

    1999-05-01

    With the development of ever higher energy particle accelerators comes the need for compactness and high gradient, which in turn require very high frequency high power rf sources. Recent development work in W-band accelerating techniques has spurred the development of a high-power W-band source. Axisymmetric sources suffer from fundamental power output limitations (P{sub sat}{approximately}{lambda}{sup 2}) brought on by the conflicting requirements of small beam sizes and high beam current. The sheet beam klystron allows for an increase in beam current without substantial increase in the beam current density, allowing for reduced cathode current densities and focussing field strengths. Initial simulations of a 20:1 aspect ratio sheet beam/cavity interaction using the 3 dimensional particle-in-cell code Magic3D have demonstrated a 35{percent} beam-power to RF power extraction efficiency. Calculational work and numerical simulations leading to a prototype W-band sheet beam klystron will be presented, together with preliminary cold test structure studies of a proposed RF cavity geometry. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Molecular-beam scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vernon, M.F.

    1983-07-01

    The molecular-beam technique has been used in three different experimental arrangements to study a wide range of inter-atomic and molecular forces. Chapter 1 reports results of a low-energy (0.2 kcal/mole) elastic-scattering study of the He-Ar pair potential. The purpose of the study was to accurately characterize the shape of the potential in the well region, by scattering slow He atoms produced by expanding a mixture of He in N/sub 2/ from a cooled nozzle. Chapter 2 contains measurements of the vibrational predissociation spectra and product translational energy for clusters of water, benzene, and ammonia. The experiments show that most of the product energy remains in the internal molecular motions. Chapter 3 presents measurements of the reaction Na + HCl ..-->.. NaCl + H at collision energies of 5.38 and 19.4 kcal/mole. This is the first study to resolve both scattering angle and velocity for the reaction of a short lived (16 nsec) electronic excited state. Descriptions are given of computer programs written to analyze molecular-beam expansions to extract information characterizing their velocity distributions, and to calculate accurate laboratory elastic-scattering differential cross sections accounting for the finite apparatus resolution. Experimental results which attempted to determine the efficiency of optically pumping the Li(2/sup 2/P/sub 3/2/) and Na(3/sup 2/P/sub 3/2/) excited states are given. A simple three-level model for predicting the steady-state fraction of atoms in the excited state is included.

  7. Neutral Beam Excitation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... the presence of a small fast ion population are one area ... This research is highly relevant to fusion reactors as beam ... 100 A beam of < 200 keV sodium or potassium ions which ...

  8. PARTICLE BEAM TRACKING CIRCUIT

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, O.A.

    1959-05-01

    >A particle-beam tracking and correcting circuit is described. Beam induction electrodes are placed on either side of the beam, and potentials induced by the beam are compared in a voltage comparator or discriminator. This comparison produces an error signal which modifies the fm curve at the voltage applied to the drift tube, thereby returning the orbit to the preferred position. The arrangement serves also to synchronize accelerating frequency and magnetic field growth. (T.R.H.)

  9. Beam Dynamics for ARIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ekdahl, Carl August Jr.

    2014-10-14

    Beam dynamics issues are assessed for a new linear induction electron accelerator being designed for flash radiography of large explosively driven hydrodynamic experiments. Special attention is paid to equilibrium beam transport, possible emittance growth, and beam stability. It is concluded that a radiographic quality beam will be produced possible if engineering standards and construction details are equivalent to those on the present radiography accelerators at Los Alamos.

  10. Utility Potential Calculator

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Potential Studies in the Northwest V1.0 Utility Potential Calculator V1.0 for Excel 2007 Utility Potential Calculator V1.0 for Excel 2003 Note: BPA developed the Utility...

  11. ARM - Wind Chill Calculations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CalculatorsWind Chill Calculations Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Wind Chill Calculations Wind Chill is the apparent temperature felt on the exposed human body owing to the combination of temperature and wind speed. From 1945 to 2001, Wind Chill was calculated by the Siple

  12. Numerical calculation of the ion polarization in MEIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derbenev, Yaroslav; Lin, Fanglei; Morozov, Vasiliy; Zhang, Yuhong; Kondratenko, Anatoliy; Kondratenko, M A; Filatov, Yury

    2015-09-01

    Ion polarization in the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) is controlled by means of universal 3D spin rotators designed on the basis of "weak" solenoids. We use numerical calculations to demonstrate that the 3D rotators have negligible effect on the orbital properties of the ring. We present calculations of the polarization dynamics along the collider's orbit for both longitudinal and transverse polarization directions at a beam interaction point. We calculate the degree of depolarization due to the longitudinal and transverse beam emittances in case when the zero-integer spin resonance is compensated.

  13. Toward design of the Collider Beam Collimation System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drozhdin, A.; Mokhov, N.; Soundranayagam, R.; Tompkins, J.

    1994-02-01

    A multi-component beam collimation system for the Superconducting Super Collider is described. System choice justification and design requirements are presented. System consists of targets, scrapers, and collimators with appropriate cooling and radiation shielding. Each component has an independent control for positioning and aligning with respect to the beam. Results of beam loss distribution, energy deposition calculations, and thermal analyses, as well as cost estimate, are presented.

  14. Neutral beam monitoring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fink, Joel H.

    1981-08-18

    Method and apparatus for monitoring characteristics of a high energy neutral beam. A neutral beam is generated by passing accelerated ions through a walled cell containing a low energy neutral gas, such that charge exchange neutralizes the high energy ion beam. The neutral beam is monitored by detecting the current flowing through the cell wall produced by low energy ions which drift to the wall after the charge exchange. By segmenting the wall into radial and longitudinal segments various beam conditions are further identified.

  15. BEAM CONTROL PROBE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chesterman, A.W.

    1959-03-17

    A probe is described for intercepting a desired portion of a beam of charged particles and for indicating the spatial disposition of the beam. The disclosed probe assembly includes a pair of pivotally mounted vanes moveable into a single plane with adjacent edges joining and a calibrated mechanical arrangement for pivoting the vancs apart. When the probe is disposed in the path of a charged particle beam, the vanes may be adjusted according to the beam current received in each vane to ascertain the dimension of the beam.

  16. Method for measuring and controlling beam current in ion beam processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kearney, Patrick A.; Burkhart, Scott C.

    2003-04-29

    A method for producing film thickness control of ion beam sputter deposition films. Great improvements in film thickness control is accomplished by keeping the total current supplied to both the beam and suppressor grids of a radio frequency (RF) in beam source constant, rather than just the current supplied to the beam grid. By controlling both currents, using this method, deposition rates are more stable, and this allows the deposition of layers with extremely well controlled thicknesses to about 0.1%. The method is carried out by calculating deposition rates based on the total of the suppressor and beam currents and maintaining the total current constant by adjusting RF power which gives more consistent values.

  17. Gated beam imager for heavy ion beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahle, Larry; Hopkins, Harvey S.

    1998-12-10

    As part of the work building a small heavy-ion induction accelerator ring, or recirculator, at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, a diagnostic device measuring the four-dimensional transverse phase space of the beam in just a single pulse has been developed. This device, the Gated Beam Imager (GBI), consists of a thin plate filled with an array of 100-micron diameter holes and uses a Micro Channel Plate (MCP), a phosphor screen, and a CCD camera to image the beam particles that pass through the holes after they have drifted for a short distance. By time gating the MCP, the time evolution of the beam can also be measured, with each time step requiring a new pulse.

  18. Gated beam imager for heavy ion beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahle, L.; Hopkins, H.S.

    1998-12-01

    As part of the work building a small heavy-ion induction accelerator ring, or recirculator, at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, a diagnostic device measuring the four-dimensional transverse phase space of the beam in just a single pulse has been developed. This device, the Gated Beam Imager (GBI), consists of a thin plate filled with an array of 100-micron diameter holes and uses a Micro Channel Plate (MCP), a phosphor screen, and a CCD camera to image the beam particles that pass through the holes after they have drifted for a short distance. By time gating the MCP, the time evolution of the beam can also be measured, with each time step requiring a new pulse. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Laser diagnostic for high current H{sup {minus}} beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shafer, R.E.

    1998-12-01

    In the last 5 years, significant technology advances have been made in the performance, size, and cost of solid-state diode-pumped lasers. These developments enable the use of compact Q-switched Nd:YAG lasers as a beam diagnostic for high current H{sup {minus}} beams. Because the threshold for photodetachment is only 0.75 eV, and the maximum detachment cross section is 4{times}10{sup {minus}17}cm{sup 2} at 1.5 eV, A 50 mJ/pulse Q-switched Nd:YAG laser can neutralize a significant fraction of the beam in a single 10 ns wide pulse. The neutral beam maintains nearly identical parameters as the parent H{sup {minus}} beam, including size, divergence, energy, energy spread, and phase spread. A dipole magnet can separate the neutral beam from the H{sup {minus}} beam to allow diagnostics on the neutral beam without intercepting the high-current H{sup {minus}} beam. Such a laser system can also be used to extract a low current proton beam, or to induce fluorescence in partially stripped heavy ion beams. Possible beamline diagnostic systems will be reviewed, and the neutral beam yields will be calculated. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Laser diagnostic for high current H{sup {minus}} beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shafer, R.E.

    1998-05-05

    In the last 5 years, significant technology advances have been made in the performance, size, and cost of solid-state diode-pumped lasers. These developments enable the use of compact Q-switched Nd:YAG lasers as a beam diagnostic for high current H{sup {minus}} beams. Because the threshold for photodetachment is only 0.75 eV, and the maximum detachment cross section is 4 {times} 10{sup {minus}17} cm{sup 2} at 1.5 eV, a 50 mJ/pulse Q-switched Nd:YAG laser can neutralize a significant fraction of the beam in a single 10-ns wide pulse. The neutral beam maintains nearly identical parameters as the parent H{sup {minus}} beam, including size, divergence, energy, energy spread, and phase spread. A dipole magnet can separate the neutral beam from the H{sup {minus}} beam to allow diagnostics on the neutral beam without intercepting the high-current H{sup {minus}} beam. Such a laser system can also be used to extract a low current proton beam, or to induce fluorescence in partially stripped heavy ion beams. Possible beamline diagnostic systems will be reviewed, and the neutral beam yields will be calculated.

  1. Laser diagnostic for high current H{sup -} beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shafer, Robert E.

    1998-12-10

    In the last 5 years, significant technology advances have been made in the performance, size, and cost of solid-state diode-pumped lasers. These developments enable the use of compact Q-switched Nd:YAG lasers as a beam diagnostic for high current H{sup -} beams. Because the threshold for photodetachment is only 0.75 eV, and the maximum detachment cross section is 4x10{sup -17} cm{sup 2} at 1.5 eV, A 50 mJ/pulse Q-switched Nd:YAG laser can neutralize a significant fraction of the beam in a single 10 ns wide pulse. The neutral beam maintains nearly identical parameters as the parent H{sup -} beam, including size, divergence, energy, energy spread, and phase spread. A dipole magnet can separate the neutral beam from the H{sup -} beam to allow diagnostics on the neutral beam without intercepting the high-current H{sup -} beam. Such a laser system can also be used to extract a low current proton beam, or to induce fluorescence in partially stripped heavy ion beams. Possible beamline diagnostic systems will be reviewed, and the neutral beam yields will be calculated.

  2. ARM - Relative Humidity Calculations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CalculatorsRelative Humidity Calculations Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Relative Humidity Calculations Heat Index is an index that combines air temperature and relative humidity to estimate how hot it actually feels. The human body cools off through perspiration, which

  3. Stochastic Boundary, Diffusion, Emittance Growth and Lifetime calculation for the RHIC e-lens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu,N.P.; Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.; Robert-Demolaize, G.

    2009-01-20

    To compensate the large tune shift and tune spread generated by the head-on beam-beam interactions in polarized proton operation in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), a low energy electron beam with proper Gaussian transverse profiles was proposed to collide head-on with the proton beam. In this article, using a modified version of SixTrack [1], we investigate stability of the single particle in the presence of head-on beam-beam compensation. The Lyapunov exponent and action diffusion are calculated and compared between the cases without and with beam-beam compensation for two different working points and various bunch intensities. Using the action diffusion results the emittance growth rate and lifetime of the proton beam is also estimated for the different scenarios.

  4. Multiphase flow calculation software

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fincke, James R.

    2003-04-15

    Multiphase flow calculation software and computer-readable media carrying computer executable instructions for calculating liquid and gas phase mass flow rates of high void fraction multiphase flows. The multiphase flow calculation software employs various given, or experimentally determined, parameters in conjunction with a plurality of pressure differentials of a multiphase flow, preferably supplied by a differential pressure flowmeter or the like, to determine liquid and gas phase mass flow rates of the high void fraction multiphase flows. Embodiments of the multiphase flow calculation software are suitable for use in a variety of applications, including real-time management and control of an object system.

  5. Waste Package Lifting Calculation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. Marr

    2000-05-11

    The objective of this calculation is to evaluate the structural response of the waste package during the horizontal and vertical lifting operations in order to support the waste package lifting feature design. The scope of this calculation includes the evaluation of the 21 PWR UCF (pressurized water reactor uncanistered fuel) waste package, naval waste package, 5 DHLW/DOE SNF (defense high-level waste/Department of Energy spent nuclear fuel)--short waste package, and 44 BWR (boiling water reactor) UCF waste package. Procedure AP-3.12Q, Revision 0, ICN 0, calculations, is used to develop and document this calculation.

  6. Calculation note review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramble, A.L.

    1996-09-30

    This document contains a review of the calculation notes which were prepared for the Tank Waste Remediation System Basis for Interim Operation.

  7. Transmutation calculations for the accelerator transmutation of waste (ATW) program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, W.B.; Arthur, E.D.; Bowman, C.D.; Engel, L.N.; England, T.R.; Hughes, H.G.; Lisowski, P.W.; Perry, R.T.

    1991-01-01

    The disposal of radioactive waste by the transmutation of long-lived radionuclides is being considered; now using neutrons produced with an intense beam of 1.6-GeV protons on a Pb-Bi target. Study teams have been active in the areas of accelerator design, beam transport, radiation transport, transmutation, fluid flow and heat transfer, process chemistry and system analyses. Work is of a preliminary and developmental nature. Here we describe these preliminary efforts in transmutation calculations; the tools developed, status of basic nuclear data, and some early results. These calculations require the description of the intensity and spectrum of neutrons produced by the beam, the distribution of nuclides produced in the medium-energy reactions, the transport of particles produced by the beam, the transmutation of the target materials and transmutation products, and the decay properties of the inventory of radionuclides produced.

  8. Particle beam injection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jassby, Daniel L.; Kulsrud, Russell M.

    1977-01-01

    This invention provides a poloidal divertor for stacking counterstreaming ion beams to provide high intensity colliding beams. To this end, method and apparatus are provided that inject high energy, high velocity, ordered, atomic deuterium and tritium beams into a lower energy, toroidal, thermal equilibrium, neutral, target plasma column that is magnetically confined along an endless magnetic axis in a strong restoring force magnetic field having helical field lines to produce counterstreaming deuteron and triton beams that are received bent, stacked and transported along the endless axis, while a poloidal divertor removes thermal ions and electrons all along the axis to increase the density of the counterstreaming ion beams and the reaction products resulting therefrom. By balancing the stacking and removal, colliding, strong focused particle beams, reaction products and reactions are produced that convert one form of energy into another form of energy.

  9. Beam Instrumentation Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shafer, R.E. )

    1994-01-01

    The fifth annual Beam Instrumentation Workshop was hosted by Los Alamos National Laboratory in Santa Fe, New Mexico. These proceedings represent the papers presented at the Workshop. A variety of topics were covered including beam emittance diagnostics, fluorescent screens, control systems for many accelerators and photon sources. Beam monitoring was discussed in great detail. There were thirty seven papers presented at the Workshop and all have been abstracted for the Energy and Science Technology database. (AIP)

  10. Draft PEI Calculator

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Excel spreadsheet is designed to perform the calculations necessary to determine PEI -- a pump's energy index -- as proposed in DOE's Notices of Proposed Rulemaking (Dockets EERE-2011-BT-STD-0031 and EERE-2013-BT-TP-0055). DOE is providing this calculator as a convenience at the request of interested parties.

  11. Beam Stability Complaint Form

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    For New Users For Current Users For Administrators MX Users APS User Portal APS Data Management Practices Find a Beamline Apply for Beam Time ESAF Contacts Calendars User...

  12. Broad beam ion implanter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, K.N.

    1996-10-08

    An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes. 6 figs.

  13. Broad beam ion implanter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    1996-01-01

    An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes.

  14. Accelerators AND Beams

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... to energies far higher than usually found on earth. ... Implanting them very precisely in metal surfaces means ... of a Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), an ...

  15. Pulsed ion beam source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenly, John B.

    1996-01-01

    An improved magnetically-confined anode plasma pulsed ion beam source. Beam rotation effects and power efficiency are improved by a magnetic design which places the separatrix between the fast field flux structure and the slow field structure near the anode of the ion beam source, by a gas port design which localizes the gas delivery into the gap between the fast coil and the anode, by a pre-ionizer ringing circuit connected to the fast coil, and by a bias field means which optimally adjusts the plasma formation position in the ion beam source.

  16. Multiple Electron Stripping of Heavy Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Mueller; L. Grisham; I. Kaganovich; R. L. Watson; V. Horvat; K. E. Zaharakis; Y. Peng

    2002-06-25

    One approach being explored as a route to practical fusion energy uses heavy ion beams focused on an indirect drive target. Such beams will lose electrons while passing through background gas in the target chamber, and therefore it is necessary to assess the rate at which the charge state of the incident beam evolves on the way to the target. Accelerators designed primarily for nuclear physics or high energy physics experiments utilize ion sources that generate highly stripped ions in order to achieve high energies economically. As a result, accelerators capable of producing heavy ion beams of 10 to 40 Mev/amu with charge state 1 currently do not exist. Hence, the stripping cross-sections used to model the performance of heavy ion fusion driver beams have, up to now, been based upon theoretical calculations. We have investigated experimentally the stripping of 3.4 Mev/amu Kr 7+ and Xe +11 in N2; 10.2 MeV/amu Ar +6 in He, N2, Ar and Xe; 19 MeV/amu Ar +8 in He, N2, Ar and Xe; 30 MeV He 1 + in He, N2, Ar and Xe; and 38 MeV/amu N +6 in He, N2, Ar and Xe. The results of these measurements are compared with the theoretical calculations to assess their applicability over a wide range of parameters.

  17. MONO: A program to calculate synchrotron beamline monochromator throughputs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, D.

    1989-01-01

    A set of Fortran programs have been developed to calculate the expected throughput of x-ray monochromators with a filtered synchrotron source and is applicable to bending magnet and wiggler beamlines. These programs calculate the normalized throughput and filtered synchrotron spectrum passed by multiple element, flat un- focussed monochromator crystals of the Bragg or Laue type as a function of incident beam divergence, energy and polarization. The reflected and transmitted beam of each crystal is calculated using the dynamical theory of diffraction. Multiple crystal arrangements in the dispersive and non-dispersive mode are allowed as well as crystal asymmetry and energy or angle offsets. Filters or windows of arbitrary elemental composition may be used to filter the incident synchrotron beam. This program should be useful to predict the intensities available from many beamline configurations as well as assist in the design of new monochromator and analyzer systems. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Dose Calculation Spreadsheet

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1997-06-10

    VENTSAR XL is an EXCEL Spreadsheet that can be used to calculate downwind doses as a result of a hypothetical atmospheric release. Both building effects and plume rise may be considered. VENTSAR XL will run using any version of Microsoft EXCEL version 4.0 or later. Macros (the programming language of EXCEL) was used to automate the calculations. The user enters a minimal amount of input and the code calculates the resulting concentrations and doses atmore » various downwind distances as specified by the user.« less

  19. Laser beam generating apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, Bruce E. (Livermore, CA); Duncan, David B. (Auburn, CA)

    1994-01-01

    Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect).

  20. Laser beam generating apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, Bruce E. (Livermore, CA); Duncan, David B. (Auburn, CA)

    1993-01-01

    Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect).

  1. Picosecond beam monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schutt, D.W.; Beck, G.O.

    1974-01-01

    The current in the beam of a particle accelerator is monitored with picosecond resolution by causing the beam to impinge upon the center conductor of a coaxial line, generating a pulse of electromagnetic energy in response thereto. This pulse is detected by means such as a sampling oscilloscope. (Official Gazette)

  2. Laser beam generating apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, B.E.; Duncan, D.B.

    1994-02-15

    Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus is described. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect). 7 figures.

  3. Laser beam generating apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, B.E.; Duncan, D.B.

    1993-12-28

    Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect). 11 figures.

  4. Appliance Energy Calculator

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Our appliance and electronic energy use calculator allows you to estimate your annual energy use and cost to operate specific products. The wattage values provided are samples only; actual wattage...

  5. Vehicle Cost Calculator

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Annual Fuel Cost gal Annual GHG Emissions (lbs of CO2) Vehicle Cost Calculator See Assumptions and Methodology Back Next U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and ...

  6. ARM - Heat Index Calculations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Heat Index Calculations Heat Index is an index that ...

  7. Beam director design report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Younger, F.C.

    1986-08-01

    A design and fabrication effort for a beam director is documented. The conceptual design provides for the beam to pass first through a bending and focusing system (or ''achromat''), through a second achromat, through an air-to-vacuum interface (the ''beam window''), and finally through the vernier steering system. Following an initial concept study for a beam director, a prototype permanent magnet 30/sup 0/ beam-bending achromat and prototype vernier steering magnet were designed and built. In volume II, copies are included of the funding instruments, requests for quotations, purchase orders, a complete set of as-built drawings, magnetic measurement reports, the concept design report, and the final report on the design and fabrication project. (LEW)

  8. Laser beam alignment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kasner, William H.; Racki, Daniel J.; Swenson, Clark E.

    1984-01-01

    A plurality of pivotal reflectors direct a high-power laser beam onto a workpiece, and a rotatable reflector is movable to a position wherein it intercepts the beam and deflects a major portion thereof away from its normal path, the remainder of the beam passing to the pivotal reflectors through an aperture in the rotating reflector. A plurality of targets are movable to positions intercepting the path of light traveling to the pivotal reflectors, and a preliminary adjustment of the latter is made by use of a low-power laser beam reflected from the rotating reflector, after which the same targets are used to make a final adjustment of the pivotal reflectors with the portion of the high-power laser beam passed through the rotating reflector.

  9. High resolution monochromator for inelastic scattering studies of high energy phonons using undulator radiation at the advanced photon source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macrander, A.T.; Schwoerer-Boehning, M.; Abbamonte, P.M.; Hu, M.

    1997-08-01

    A monochromator for use at 13.84 keV with a calculated bandpass of 5.2 meV was designed built, and tested. Tuning was performed by rotating the inner crystal of a pair of nested silicon channel-cut crystals. The inner crystal employs the (884) reflection, and the outer crystal employs a collimating asymmetric (422) reflection (dynamical asymmetry factor, b, equal to {minus}17.5). Tests were done with a double-crystal Si(111) pre-monochromator situated upstream of the high resolution monochromator and a Si(777) backscattering crystal situated downstream. For this optical arrangement an ideal value of 6.3 meV as calculated by x-ray dynamical diffraction theory applies for the FWHM of the convolution of the net monochromator reflectivity function with that of the Si(777) reflection. This calculated value is to be compared to the value of 7.1 meV measured by tuning the high resolution monochromator. Measured efficiencies were less than ideal by a factor of 3.2 to 4.9, where the larger flux reduction factors were found with higher positron storage ring currents.

  10. Electron Lens for Beam-Beam Compensation at LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valishev, A.; Shiltsev, V.; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    Head-on beam-beam effect may become a major performance limitation for the LHC in some of the upgrade scenarios. Given the vast experience gained from the operation of Tevatron electron lenses, a similar device provides significant potential for mitigation of beam-beam effects at the LHC. In this report we present the results of simulation studies of beam-beam compensation and analyze potential application of electron lense at LHC and RHIC.

  11. STUDY OF ELECTRON -PROTON BEAM-BEAM INTERACTION IN ERHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HAO,Y.; LITVINENKO, V.N.; MONTAG, C.; POZDEYEV, E.; PTITSYN, V.

    2007-06-25

    Beam-beam effects present one of major factors limiting the luminosity of colliders. In the linac-ring option of eRHIC design, an electron beam accelerated in a superconducting energy recovery linac collides with a proton beam circulating in the RHIC ring. There are some features of beam-beam effects, which require careful examination in linac-ring configuration. First, the beam-beam interaction can induce specific head-tail type instability of the proton beam referred to as a ''kink'' instability. Thus, beam stability conditions should be established to avoid proton beam loss. Also, the electron beam transverse disruption by collisions has to be evaluated to ensure beam quality is good enough for the energy recovery pass. In addition, fluctuations of electron beam current and/or electron beam size, as well as transverse offset, can cause proton beam emittance growth. The tolerances for those factors should be determined and possible countermeasures should be developed to mitigate the emittance growth. In this paper, a soft Gaussian strong-strong simulation is used to study all of mentioned beam-beam interaction features and possible techniques to reduce the emittance growth.

  12. Measurements and simulations of focused beam for orthovoltage therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbas, Hassan; Mahato, Dip N.; Satti, Jahangir; MacDonald, C. A.

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Megavoltage photon beams are typically used for therapy because of their skin-sparing effect. However, a focused low-energy x-ray beam would also be skin sparing, and would have a higher dose concentration at the focal spot. Such a beam can be produced with polycapillary optics. MCNP5 was used to model dose profiles for a scanned focused beam, using measured beam parameters. The potential of low energy focused x-ray beams for radiation therapy was assessed. Methods: A polycapillary optic was used to focus the x-ray beam from a tungsten source. The optic was characterized and measurements were performed at 50 kV. PMMA blocks of varying thicknesses were placed between optic and the focal spot to observe any variation in the focusing of the beam after passing through the tissue-equivalent material. The measured energy spectrum was used to model the focused beam in MCNP5. A source card (SDEF) in MCNP5 was used to simulate the converging x-ray beam. Dose calculations were performed inside a breast tissue phantom. Results: The measured focal spot size for the polycapillary optic was 0.2 mm with a depth of field of 5 mm. The measured focal spot remained unchanged through 40 mm of phantom thickness. The calculated depth dose curve inside the breast tissue showed a dose peak several centimeters below the skin with a sharp dose fall off around the focus. The percent dose falls below 10% within 5 mm of the focus. It was shown that rotating the optic during scanning would preserve the skin-sparing effect of the focused beam. Conclusions: Low energy focused x-ray beams could be used to irradiate tumors inside soft tissue within 5 cm of the surface.

  13. Influence of transverse diffusion within the proton beam fast-ignitor scenario

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barriga-Carrasco, Manuel D.; Maynard, Gilles; Kurilenkov, Yuri K.

    2004-12-01

    Fast ignition of an inertial confinement fusion target by an energetic proton beam is here re-examined. We put special emphasis on the role of the transverse dispersion of the beam induced during its travel between the proton source and the compressed deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel. The theoretical model and the computer code used in our calculations are presented. Different beam initial energy distributions are analyzed. We found that the beam exhibits small collective effects while multiple scattering collisions provide a substantial transverse dispersion of the beam. Therefore, the nuclear dispersion imposes severe restrictions on the schemes for fast ignitor even considering an ideal monoenergetic and noncorrelated proton beam.

  14. High bandwidth beam current monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baltrusaitis, R.M.; Ekdahl, C.A. ); Cooper, R.G. . Santa Barbara Operations); Peterson, E.; Warn, C.E. . Las Vegas Operations)

    1993-01-01

    A stripline directional coupler beam current monitor capable of measuring the time structure of a 30-ps electron beam bunch has been developed. The time response performance of the monitor compares very well with Cherenkov light produced in quartz by the electron beam. The four-pickup monitor is now used on a routine basis for measuring the beam duration, tuning for optimized beam bunching, and centering the bunch in the beam pipe.

  15. High bandwidth beam current monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baltrusaitis, R.M.; Ekdahl, C.A.; Cooper, R.G.; Peterson, E.; Warn, C.E.

    1993-06-01

    A stripline directional coupler beam current monitor capable of measuring the time structure of a 30-ps electron beam bunch has been developed. The time response performance of the monitor compares very well with Cherenkov light produced in quartz by the electron beam. The four-pickup monitor is now used on a routine basis for measuring the beam duration, tuning for optimized beam bunching, and centering the bunch in the beam pipe.

  16. Jobs Calculator | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Jobs Calculator Jobs Calculator owip_jobs_calculator_v11-0.xls (1.46 MB) More Documents & Publications WPN 10-14: Calculation of Job Creation through DOE Recovery Act Funding Progress Report Template Job Counting Guidelines

  17. Ion beam lithography system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2005-08-02

    A maskless plasma-formed ion beam lithography tool provides for patterning of sub-50 nm features on large area flat or curved substrate surfaces. The system is very compact and does not require an accelerator column and electrostatic beam scanning components. The patterns are formed by switching beamlets on or off from a two electrode blanking system with the substrate being scanned mechanically in one dimension. This arrangement can provide a maskless nano-beam lithography tool for economic and high throughput processing.

  18. Simulations of beam-beam and beam-wire interactions in RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Hyung J.; Sen, Tanaji; Abreu, Natalia P.; Fischer, Wolfram; /Brookhaven

    2009-02-01

    The beam-beam interaction is one of the dominant sources of emittance growth and luminosity lifetime deterioration. A current carrying wire has been proposed to compensate long-range beam-beam effects in the LHC and strong localized long-range beam-beam effects are experimentally investigated in the RHIC collider. Tune shift, beam transfer function, and beam loss rate are measured in dedicated experiments. In this paper, they report on simulations to study the effect of beam-wire interactions based on diffusive apertures, beam loss rates, and beam transfer function using a parallelized weak-strong beam simulation code (BBSIMC). The simulation results are compared with measurements performed in RHIC during 2007 and 2008.

  19. LEDA BEAM DIAGNOSTICS INSTRUMENTATION: BEAM POSITION MONITORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. BARR; ET AL

    2000-05-01

    The Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) facility located at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) accelerates protons to an energy of 6.7-MeV and current of 100-mA operating in either a pulsed or cw mode. Of key importance to the commissioning and operations effort is the Beam Position Monitor system (BPM). The LEDA BPM system uses five micro-stripline beam position monitors processed by log ratio processing electronics with data acquisition via a series of custom TMS32OC40 Digital Signal Processing (DSP) boards. Of special interest to this paper is the operation of the system, the log ratio processing, and the system calibration technique. This paper will also cover the DSP system operations and their interaction with the main accelerator control system.

  20. Three recent TDHF calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, M.S.

    1981-05-01

    Three applications of TDHF are discussed. First, vibrational spectra of a post grazing collision /sup 40/Ca nucleus is examined and found to contain many high energy components, qualitatively consistent with recent Orsay experiments. Second, the fusion cross section in energy and angular momentum are calculated for /sup 16/O + /sup 24/Mg to exhibit the parameters of the low l window for this system. A sensitivity of the fusion cross section to the effective two body potential is discussed. Last, a preliminary analysis of /sup 86/Kr + /sup 139/La at E/sub lab/ = 505 MeV calculated in the frozen approximation is displayed, compared to experiment and discussed.

  1. Geothermal Life Cycle Calculator

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sullivan, John

    2014-03-11

    This calculator is a handy tool for interested parties to estimate two key life cycle metrics, fossil energy consumption (Etot) and greenhouse gas emission (ghgtot) ratios, for geothermal electric power production. It is based solely on data developed by Argonne National Laboratory for DOEs Geothermal Technologies office. The calculator permits the user to explore the impact of a range of key geothermal power production parameters, including plant capacity, lifetime, capacity factor, geothermal technology, well numbers and depths, field exploration, and others on the two metrics just mentioned. Estimates of variations in the results are also available to the user.

  2. Geothermal Life Cycle Calculator

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sullivan, John

    This calculator is a handy tool for interested parties to estimate two key life cycle metrics, fossil energy consumption (Etot) and greenhouse gas emission (ghgtot) ratios, for geothermal electric power production. It is based solely on data developed by Argonne National Laboratory for DOEs Geothermal Technologies office. The calculator permits the user to explore the impact of a range of key geothermal power production parameters, including plant capacity, lifetime, capacity factor, geothermal technology, well numbers and depths, field exploration, and others on the two metrics just mentioned. Estimates of variations in the results are also available to the user.

  3. Geothermal Life Cycle Calculator

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sullivan, John

    2014-03-11

    This calculator is a handy tool for interested parties to estimate two key life cycle metrics, fossil energy consumption (Etot) and greenhouse gas emission (ghgtot) ratios, for geothermal electric power production. It is based solely on data developed by Argonne National Laboratory for DOE’s Geothermal Technologies office. The calculator permits the user to explore the impact of a range of key geothermal power production parameters, including plant capacity, lifetime, capacity factor, geothermal technology, well numbers and depths, field exploration, and others on the two metrics just mentioned. Estimates of variations in the results are also available to the user.

  4. Neutral particle beam intensity controller

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dagenhart, W.K.

    1984-05-29

    The neutral beam intensity controller is based on selected magnetic defocusing of the ion beam prior to neutralization. The defocused portion of the beam is dumped onto a beam dump disposed perpendicular to the beam axis. Selective defocusing is accomplished by means of a magnetic field generator disposed about the neutralizer so that the field is transverse to the beam axis. The magnetic field intensity is varied to provide the selected partial beam defocusing of the ions prior to neutralization. The desired focused neutral beam portion passes along the beam path through a defining aperture in the beam dump, thereby controlling the desired fraction of neutral particles transmitted to a utilization device without altering the kinetic energy level of the desired neutral particle fraction. By proper selection of the magnetic field intensity, virtually zero through 100% intensity control of the neutral beam is achieved.

  5. Beam! Magic! | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with all the changes, the accelerator can be made to work. Beam Since my first serious introduction to nuclear and particle physics - when I worked for a few weeks one summer at...

  6. Focused ion beam system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, K.; Gough, R.A.; Ji, Q.; Lee, Y.Y.

    1999-08-31

    A focused ion beam (FIB) system produces a final beam spot size down to 0.1 {mu}m or less and an ion beam output current on the order of microamps. The FIB system increases ion source brightness by properly configuring the first (plasma) and second (extraction) electrodes. The first electrode is configured to have a high aperture diameter to electrode thickness aspect ratio. Additional accelerator and focusing electrodes are used to produce the final beam. As few as five electrodes can be used, providing a very compact FIB system with a length down to only 20 mm. Multibeamlet arrangements with a single ion source can be produced to increase throughput. The FIB system can be used for nanolithography and doping applications for fabrication of semiconductor devices with minimum feature sizes of 0.1 m or less. 13 figs.

  7. Focused ion beam system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Gough, Richard A.; Ji, Qing; Lee, Yung-Hee Yvette

    1999-01-01

    A focused ion beam (FIB) system produces a final beam spot size down to 0.1 .mu.m or less and an ion beam output current on the order of microamps. The FIB system increases ion source brightness by properly configuring the first (plasma) and second (extraction) electrodes. The first electrode is configured to have a high aperture diameter to electrode thickness aspect ratio. Additional accelerator and focusing electrodes are used to produce the final beam. As few as five electrodes can be used, providing a very compact FIB system with a length down to only 20 mm. Multibeamlet arrangements with a single ion source can be produced to increase throughput. The FIB system can be used for nanolithography and doping applications for fabrication of semiconductor devices with minimum feature sizes of 0.1 .mu.m or less.

  8. Tunnel closure calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moran, B.; Attia, A.

    1995-07-01

    When a deeply penetrating munition explodes above the roof of a tunnel, the amount of rubble that falls inside the tunnel is primarily a function of three parameters: first the cube-root scaled distance from the center of the explosive to the roof of the tunnel. Second the material properties of the rock around the tunnel, and in particular the shear strength of that rock, its RQD (Rock Quality Designator), and the extent and orientation of joints. And third the ratio of the tunnel diameter to the standoff distance (distance between the center of explosive and the tunnel roof). The authors have used CALE, a well-established 2-D hydrodynamic computer code, to calculate the amount of rubble that falls inside a tunnel as a function of standoff distance for two different tunnel diameters. In particular they calculated three of the tunnel collapse experiments conducted in an iron ore mine near Kirkeness, Norway in the summer of 1994. The failure model that they used in their calculations combines an equivalent plastic strain criterion with a maximum tensile strength criterion and can be calibrated for different rocks using cratering data as well as laboratory experiments. These calculations are intended to test and improve the understanding of both the Norway Experiments and the ACE (Array of conventional Explosive) phenomenology.

  9. Carbon Footprint Calculator

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This calculator estimates the amount of carbon emissions you and members of your household are responsible for. It does not include emissions associated with your work or getting to work if you commute by public transportation. It was developed by IEEE Spectrum magazine.

  10. Plutonium 239 Equivalency Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wen, J

    2011-05-31

    This document provides the basis for converting actual weapons grade plutonium mass to a plutonium equivalency (PuE) mass of Plutonium 239. The conversion can be accomplished by performing calculations utilizing either: (1) Isotopic conversions factors (CF{sub isotope}), or (2) 30-year-old weapons grade conversion factor (CF{sub 30 yr}) Both of these methods are provided in this document. Material mass and isotopic data are needed to calculate PuE using the isotopic conversion factors, which will provide the actual PuE value at the time of calculation. PuE is the summation of the isotopic masses times their associated isotopic conversion factors for plutonium 239. Isotopic conversion factors are calculated by a normalized equation, relative to Plutonium 239, of specific activity (SA) and cumulated dose inhalation affects based on 50-yr committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE). The isotopic conversion factors for converting weapons grade plutonium to PuE are provided in Table-1. The unit for specific activity (SA) is curies per gram (Ci/g) and the isotopic SA values come from reference [1]. The cumulated dose inhalation effect values in units of rem/Ci are based on 50-yr committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE). A person irradiated by gamma radiation outside the body will receive a dose only during the period of irradiation. However, following an intake by inhalation, some radionuclides persist in the body and irradiate the various tissues for many years. There are three groups CEDE data representing lengths of time of 0.5 (D), 50 (W) and 500 (Y) days, which are in reference [2]. The CEDE values in the (W) group demonstrates the highest dose equivalent value; therefore they are used for the calculation.

  11. Detector dose response in megavoltage small photon beams. II. Pencil beam perturbation effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bouchard, Hugo Duane, Simon; Kamio, Yuji; Palmans, Hugo; Seuntjens, Jan

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: To quantify detector perturbation effects in megavoltage small photon fields and support the theoretical explanation on the nature of quality correction factors in these conditions. Methods: In this second paper, a modern approach to radiation dosimetry is defined for any detector and applied to small photon fields. Fano’s theorem is adapted in the form of a cavity theory and applied in the context of nonstandard beams to express four main effects in the form of perturbation factors. The pencil-beam decomposition method is detailed and adapted to the calculation of perturbation factors and quality correction factors. The approach defines a perturbation function which, for a given field size or beam modulation, entirely determines these dosimetric factors. Monte Carlo calculations are performed in different cavity sizes for different detection materials, electron densities, and extracameral components. Results: Perturbation effects are detailed with calculated perturbation functions, showing the relative magnitude of the effects as well as the geometrical extent to which collimating or modulating the beam impacts the dosimetric factors. The existence of a perturbation zone around the detector cavity is demonstrated and the approach is discussed and linked to previous approaches in the literature to determine critical field sizes. Conclusions: Monte Carlo simulations are valuable to describe pencil beam perturbation effects and detail the nature of dosimetric factors in megavoltage small photon fields. In practice, it is shown that dosimetric factors could be avoided if the field size remains larger than the detector perturbation zone. However, given a detector and beam quality, a full account for the detector geometry is necessary to determine critical field sizes.

  12. Photodetachment process for beam neutralization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fink, J.H.; Frank, A.M.

    1979-02-20

    A process for neutralization of accelerated ions employing photo-induced charge detachment is disclosed. The process involves directing a laser beam across the path of a negative ion beam such as to effect photodetachment of electrons from the beam ions. The frequency of the laser beam employed is selected to provide the maximum cross-section for the photodetachment process. 2 figs.

  13. Single element laser beam shaper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Shukui; Michelle D. Shinn

    2005-09-13

    A single lens laser beam shaper for converting laser beams from any spatial profile to a flat-top or uniform spatial profile. The laser beam shaper includes a lens having two aspheric surfaces. The beam shaper significantly simplifies the overall structure in comparison with conventional 2-element systems and therefore provides great ease in alignment and reduction of cost.

  14. Beam Trail Tracking at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicklaus, Dennis J.; Carmichael, Linden Ralph; Neswold, Richard; Yuan, Zongwei

    2015-01-01

    We present a system for acquiring and sorting data from select devices depending on the destination of each particular beam pulse in the Fermilab accelerator chain. The 15 Hz beam that begins in the Fermilab ion source can be directed to a variety of additional accelerators, beam lines, beam dumps, and experiments. We have implemented a data acquisition system that senses the destination of each pulse and reads the appropriate beam intensity devices so that profiles of the beam can be stored and analysed for each type of beam trail. We envision utilizing this data long term to identify trends in the performance of the accelerators

  15. Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program Record (Offices of Fuel Cell Technologies) Record #: 11007 Date: March 25, 2011 Title: Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation Originator: Mark Ruth & Fred Joseck Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: March 24, 2011 Description: The hydrogen threshold cost is defined as the hydrogen cost in the range of $2.00-$4.00/gge (2007$) which represents the cost at which hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) are projected to become competitive on a cost per mile basis with the competing

  16. Vehicle Cost Calculator

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Choose a vehicle to compare fuel cost and emissions with a conventional vehicle. Select Fuel/Technology Electric Hybrid Electric Plug-in Hybrid Electric Natural Gas (CNG) Flex Fuel (E85) Biodiesel (B20) Next Vehicle Cost Calculator Update Your Widget Code This widget version will stop working on March 31. Update your widget code. × Widget Code Select All Close U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  17. Nuclear Material Variance Calculation

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-01-01

    MAVARIC (Materials Accounting VARIance Calculations) is a custom spreadsheet that significantly reduces the effort required to make the variance and covariance calculations needed to determine the detection sensitivity of a materials accounting system and loss of special nuclear material (SNM). The user is required to enter information into one of four data tables depending on the type of term in the materials balance (MB) equation. The four data tables correspond to input transfers, output transfers,more » and two types of inventory terms, one for nondestructive assay (NDA) measurements and one for measurements made by chemical analysis. Each data entry must contain an identification number and a short description, as well as values for the SNM concentration, the bulk mass (or solution volume), the measurement error standard deviations, and the number of measurements during an accounting period. The user must also specify the type of error model (additive or multiplicative) associated with each measurement, and possible correlations between transfer terms. Predefined spreadsheet macros are used to perform the variance and covariance calculations for each term based on the corresponding set of entries. MAVARIC has been used for sensitivity studies of chemical separation facilities, fuel processing and fabrication facilities, and gas centrifuge and laser isotope enrichment facilities.« less

  18. Light beam frequency comb generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Priatko, G.J.; Kaskey, J.A.

    1992-11-24

    A light beam frequency comb generator uses an acousto-optic modulator to generate a plurality of light beams with frequencies which are uniformly separated and possess common noise and drift characteristics. A well collimated monochromatic input light beam is passed through this modulator to produce a set of both frequency shifted and unshifted optical beams. An optical system directs one or more frequency shifted beams along a path which is parallel to the path of the input light beam such that the frequency shifted beams are made incident on the modulator proximate to but separated from the point of incidence of the input light beam. After the beam is thus returned to and passed through the modulator repeatedly, a plurality of mutually parallel beams are generated which are frequency-shifted different numbers of times and possess common noise and drift characteristics. 2 figs.

  19. Light beam frequency comb generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Priatko, Gordon J.; Kaskey, Jeffrey A.

    1992-01-01

    A light beam frequency comb generator uses an acousto-optic modulator to generate a plurality of light beams with frequencies which are uniformly separated and possess common noise and drift characteristics. A well collimated monochromatic input light beam is passed through this modulator to produce a set of both frequency shifted and unshifted optical beams. An optical system directs one or more frequency shifted beams along a path which is parallel to the path of the input light beam such that the frequency shifted beams are made incident on the modulator proximate to but separated from the point of incidence of the input light beam. After the beam is thus returned to and passed through the modulator repeatedly, a plurality of mutually parallel beams are generated which are frequency-shifted different numbers of times and possess common noise and drift characteristics.

  20. Beam Characterizations at Femtosecond Electron Beam Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rimjaem, S.; Jinamoon, V.; Kangrang, M.; Kusoljariyakul, K.; Saisut, J.; Thongbai, C.; Vilaithong, T.; Rhodes, M.W.; Wichaisirimongkol, P.; Wiedemann, H.; /SLAC

    2006-03-17

    The SURIYA project at the Fast Neutron Research Facility (FNRF) has been established and is being commissioning to generate femtosecond (fs) electron bunches. Theses short bunches are produced by a system consisting of an S-band thermionic cathode RF-gun, an alpha magnet (a-magnet) serving as a magnetic bunch compressor, and a SLAC-type linear accelerator (linac). The characteristics of its major components and the beam characterizations as well as the preliminary experimental results will be presented and discussed in this paper.

  1. ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ben-Zvi I.; Kuczewski A.; Altinbas, Z.; Beavis, D.; Belomestnykh,; Dai, J. et al

    2012-07-01

    The Collider-Accelerator Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory is building a high-brightness 500 mA capable Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) as one of its main R&D thrusts towards eRHIC, the polarized electron - hadron collider as an upgrade of the operating RHIC facility. The ERL is in final assembly stages, with injection commisioning starting in October 2012. The objective of this ERL is to serve as a platform for R&D into high current ERL, in particular issues of halo generation and control, Higher-Order Mode (HOM) issues, coherent emissions for the beam and high-brightness, high-power beam generation and preservation. The R&D ERL features a superconducting laser-photocathode RF gun with a high quantum efficiency photoccathode served with a load-lock cathode delivery system, a highly damped 5-cell accelerating cavity, a highly flexible single-pass loop and a comprehensive system of beam instrumentation. In this ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter article we will describe the ERL in a degree of detail that is not usually found in regular publications. We will discuss the various systems of the ERL, following the electrons from the photocathode to the beam dump, cover the control system, machine protection etc and summarize with the status of the ERL systems.

  2. LHC beam-beam compensation studies at RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer,W.; Abreu, N.; Calaga, R.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Luo, Y.; Montag, C.

    2009-05-04

    Long-range and head-on beam-beam effects are expected to limit the LHC performance with design parameters. To mitigate long-range effects current carrying wires parallel to the beam were proposed. Two such wires are installed in RHIC where they allow studying the effect of strong long-range beam-beam effects, as well as the compensation of a single long-range interaction. The tests provide benchmark data for simulations and analytical treatments. To reduce the head-on beam-beam effect electron lenses were proposed for both the LHC and RHIC. We present the experimental long-range beam-beam program and report on head-on compensations studies at RHIC, which are based on simulations.

  3. Beam-beam observations in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Y.; Fischer, W.; White, S.

    2015-06-24

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory has been operating since 2000. Over the past decade, thanks to the continuously increased bunch intensity and reduced β*s at the interaction points, the maximum peak luminosity in the polarized proton operation has been increased by more than two orders of magnitude. In this article, we first present the beam-beam observations in the previous RHIC polarized proton runs. Then we analyze the mechanisms for the beam loss and emittance growth in the presence of beam-beam interaction. The operational challenges and limitations imposed by beam-beam interaction and their remedies are also presented. In the end, we briefly introduce head-on beam-beam compensation with electron lenses in RHIC.

  4. Laser beam characterization results for a high power CW Nd:YAG laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keicher, D.M.

    1994-12-31

    In an effort to understand multimode laser beam propagation characteristics for better development of laser material processing applications, beam diagnostic experiments were performed on a 1800 watt CW Nd:YAG laser. Beam diameter data were acquired at approximately 12 positions along the beam optical axis about the minimum waist created by a long focal length single element lens at several power levels. These data were then used to evaluate the laser output beam characteristics using two differing techniques. For the ISO technique, two data points from the beam diameter data were used in determining the output laser beam characteristics. These points were the beam minimum waist diameter and the diameter at a point along the beam optical axis where the beam diameter had increased to approximately 0.7 times that of the beam minimum waist diameter. The second analysis technique involved fitting the entire data set to theoretical equations used to describe the multimode laser beam propagation and points from the fitted curve fit were then used to determine the output beam characteristics from the laser. For all power levels evaluated, calculated results predicting the laser beam minimum waist location were in agreement with measured values and more consistent using the curve-fit technique than the two-point evaluation technique.

  5. The effect of head-on beam-beam compensation on the stochastic boundaries and particle diffusion in RHIC.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu,N.; Beebe-Wang, J.; FischW; Luo, Y.; Robert-Demolaize, G.

    2008-06-23

    To compensate the effects from the head-on beam-beam interactions in the polarized proton operation in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), an electron lens (elens) is proposed to collide head-on with the proton beam. We used an extended version of SixTrack for multiparticle beam-beam simulation in order to study the effect of the e-lens on the stochastic boundary and also on diffusion. The stochastic boundary was analyzed using Lyapunov exponents and the diffusion was characterized as the increase in the rms spread of the action. For both studies the simulations were performed with and without the e-lens and with full and partial compensation. Using the simulated values of the diffusion an attempt to calculate the emittance growth rate is presented.

  6. Calculation of Electron Trajectories

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1982-06-01

    EGUN, the SLAC Electron Trajectory Program, computes trajectories of charged particles in electrostatic and magnetostatic focusing systems including the effects of space charge and self-magnetic fields. Starting options include Child''s Law conditions on cathodes of various shapes, user-specified initial conditions for each ray, and a combination of Child''s Law conditions and user specifications. Either rectangular or cylindrically symmetric geometry may be used. Magnetic fields may be specified using arbitrary configuration of coils, or the outputmore » of a magnet program, such as Poisson, or by an externally calculated array of the axial fields.« less

  7. Zero Temperature Hope Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rozsnyai, B F

    2002-07-26

    The primary purpose of the HOPE code is to calculate opacities over a wide temperature and density range. It can also produce equation of state (EOS) data. Since the experimental data at the high temperature region are scarce, comparisons of predictions with the ample zero temperature data provide a valuable physics check of the code. In this report we show a selected few examples across the periodic table. Below we give a brief general information about the physics of the HOPE code. The HOPE code is an ''average atom'' (AA) Dirac-Slater self-consistent code. The AA label in the case of finite temperature means that the one-electron levels are populated according to the Fermi statistics, at zero temperature it means that the ''aufbau'' principle works, i.e. no a priory electronic configuration is set, although it can be done. As such, it is a one-particle model (any Hartree-Fock model is a one particle model). The code is an ''ion-sphere'' model, meaning that the atom under investigation is neutral within the ion-sphere radius. Furthermore, the boundary conditions for the bound states are also set at the ion-sphere radius, which distinguishes the code from the INFERNO, OPAL and STA codes. Once the self-consistent AA state is obtained, the code proceeds to generate many-electron configurations and proceeds to calculate photoabsorption in the ''detailed configuration accounting'' (DCA) scheme. However, this last feature is meaningless at zero temperature. There is one important feature in the HOPE code which should be noted; any self-consistent model is self-consistent in the space of the occupied orbitals. The unoccupied orbitals, where electrons are lifted via photoexcitation, are unphysical. The rigorous way to deal with that problem is to carry out complete self-consistent calculations both in the initial and final states connecting photoexcitations, an enormous computational task. The Amaldi correction is an attempt to address this problem by distorting the

  8. Beam Profile Monitor With Accurate Horizontal And Vertical Beam Profiles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Havener, Charles C [Knoxville, TN; Al-Rejoub, Riad [Oak Ridge, TN

    2005-12-26

    A widely used scanner device that rotates a single helically shaped wire probe in and out of a particle beam at different beamline positions to give a pair of mutually perpendicular beam profiles is modified by the addition of a second wire probe. As a result, a pair of mutually perpendicular beam profiles is obtained at a first beamline position, and a second pair of mutually perpendicular beam profiles is obtained at a second beamline position. The simple modification not only provides more accurate beam profiles, but also provides a measurement of the beam divergence and quality in a single compact device.

  9. Brachytherapy structural shielding calculations using Monte Carlo generated, monoenergetic data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zourari, K.; Peppa, V.; Papagiannis, P.; Ballester, Facundo; Siebert, Frank-Andr

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To provide a method for calculating the transmission of any broad photon beam with a known energy spectrum in the range of 201090 keV, through concrete and lead, based on the superposition of corresponding monoenergetic data obtained from Monte Carlo simulation. Methods: MCNP5 was used to calculate broad photon beam transmission data through varying thickness of lead and concrete, for monoenergetic point sources of energy in the range pertinent to brachytherapy (201090 keV, in 10 keV intervals). The three parameter empirical model introduced byArcher et al. [Diagnostic x-ray shielding design based on an empirical model of photon attenuation, Health Phys. 44, 507517 (1983)] was used to describe the transmission curve for each of the 216 energy-material combinations. These three parameters, and hence the transmission curve, for any polyenergetic spectrum can then be obtained by superposition along the lines of Kharrati et al. [Monte Carlo simulation of x-ray buildup factors of lead and its applications in shielding of diagnostic x-ray facilities, Med. Phys. 34, 13981404 (2007)]. A simple program, incorporating a graphical user interface, was developed to facilitate the superposition of monoenergetic data, the graphical and tabular display of broad photon beam transmission curves, and the calculation of material thickness required for a given transmission from these curves. Results: Polyenergetic broad photon beam transmission curves of this work, calculated from the superposition of monoenergetic data, are compared to corresponding results in the literature. A good agreement is observed with results in the literature obtained from Monte Carlo simulations for the photon spectra emitted from bare point sources of various radionuclides. Differences are observed with corresponding results in the literature for x-ray spectra at various tube potentials, mainly due to the different broad beam conditions or x-ray spectra assumed. Conclusions: The data of

  10. SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5-1 Nov. 28, 2005 Nov. 29, 2005 Nov. 30, 2005 Dec. 01, 2005 Dec. 02, 2005 Dec. 03, 2005 Dec. 04, 2005 MA FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI BEAM LINE 5-2 Nov. 28, 2005 Nov. 29, 2005 Nov. 30, 2005 Dec. 01, 2005 Dec. 02, 2005 Dec. 03, 2005 Dec. 04, 2005 MA FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI BEAM LINE 5-4 Nov. 28, 2005 Nov. 29, 2005 Nov. 30, 2005 Dec. 01, 2005 Dec. 02,

  11. SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7-1 Nov. 09, 2015 Nov. 10, 2015 Nov. 11, 2015 Nov. 12, 2015 Nov. 13, 2015 Nov. 14, 2015 Nov. 15, 2015 DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN STUP STUP DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN STUP STUP STUP DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN STUP STUP STUP BEAM LINE 9-2 Nov. 09, 2015 Nov. 10, 2015 Nov. 11, 2015 Nov. 12, 2015 Nov. 13, 2015 Nov. 14, 2015 Nov. 15, 2015 DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN STUP STUP DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN STUP STUP STUP DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN STUP STUP STUP BEAM LINE 11-1 Nov. 09, 2015 Nov. 10, 2015 Nov. 11, 2015 Nov. 12, 2015 Nov.

  12. SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5-4 Nov. 09, 2015 Nov. 10, 2015 Nov. 11, 2015 Nov. 12, 2015 Nov. 13, 2015 Nov. 14, 2015 Nov. 15, 2015 DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN STUP STUP DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN STUP STUP STUP DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN STUP STUP STUP BEAM LINE 8-1 Nov. 09, 2015 Nov. 10, 2015 Nov. 11, 2015 Nov. 12, 2015 Nov. 13, 2015 Nov. 14, 2015 Nov. 15, 2015 DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN Unscheduled Unscheduled DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled BEAM LINE 8-2 Nov.

  13. Beam characteristics of energy-matched flattening filter free beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paynter, D.; Weston, S. J.; Cosgrove, V. P.; Evans, J. A.; Thwaites, D. I.

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Flattening filter free (FFF) linear accelerators can increase treatment efficiency and plan quality. There are multiple methods of defining a FFF beam. The Elekta control system supports tuning of the delivered FFF beam energy to enable matching of the percentage depth-dose (PDD) of the flattened beam at 10 cm depth. This is compared to FFF beams where the linac control parameters are identical to those for the flattened beam. All beams were delivered on an Elekta Synergy accelerator with an Agility multi-leaf collimator installed and compared to the standard, flattened beam. The aim of this study is to compare “matched” FFF beams to both “unmatched” FFF beams and flattened beams to determine the benefits of matching beams. Methods: For the three modes of operation 6 MV flattened, 6 MV matched FFF, 6 MV unmatched FFF, 10 MV flattened, 10 MV matched FFF, and 10 MV unmatched FFF beam profiles were obtained using a plotting tank and were measured in steps of 0.1 mm in the penumbral region. Beam penumbra was defined as the distance between the 80% and 20% of the normalized dose when the inflection points of the unflattened and flattened profiles were normalized with the central axis dose of the flattened field set as 100%. PDD data was obtained at field sizes ranging from 3 cm × 3 cm to 40 cm × 40 cm. Radiation protection measurements were additionally performed to determine the head leakage and environmental monitoring through the maze and primary barriers. Results: No significant change is made to the beam penumbra for FFF beams with and without PDD matching, the maximum change in penumbra for a 10 cm × 10 cm field was within the experimental error of the study. The changes in the profile shape with increasing field size are most significant for the matched FFF beam, and both FFF beams showed less profile shape variation with increasing depth when compared to flattened beams, due to consistency in beam energy spectra across the radiation field

  14. Beam position monitor sensitivity for low-{beta} beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shafer, R.E.

    1993-11-01

    At low velocities, the EM field of a particle in a conducting beam tube is no longer a TEM wave, but has a finite longitudinal extent. The net effect of this is to reduce the coupling of the high-frequency Fourier components of the beam current to BPM (beam position monitor) electrodes, which modifies the BPM sensitivity to beam displacement. This effect is especially pronounced for high-frequency, large-aperture pickups used for low-{beta} beams. Non-interceptive beam position monitors used in conjunction with high frequency RFQ (radio-frequency-quadrupole) and DTL (drift-tube-linac) accelerators fall into this category. When testing a BPM with a thin wire excited with either pulses or high-frequency sinusoidal currents, the EM wave represents the principal (TEM) mode in a coaxial transmission line, which is equivalent to a highly relativistic ({beta} = 1) beam. Thus wire measurements are not suitable for simulating slow particle beams in high bandwidth diagnostic devices that couple to the image currents in the beam tube wall. Attempts to load the tin wire either capacitively or inductively to slow the EM wave down have met with limited success. In general, the equations used to represent the 2-D response of cylindrical-geometry BPMs to charged-particle beams make several assumptions: (1) the BPM electrodes are flush with and grounded to the surface of the conducting beam tube; (2) the beam is a line source (pencil beam); (3) the longitudinal extent of the EM field of a beam particle at the beam tube wall is zero, corresponding to a highly relativistic beam. The purpose of this paper is to make some quantitative estimates of the corrections to the conventional approximations when a BPM is used to measure the position of low velocity (low-{beta}) beams.

  15. Sheet beam model for intense space-charge: with application to Debye screening and the distribution of particle oscillation frequencies in a thermal equilibrium beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lund, Steven M.; Friedman, Alex; Bazouin, Guillaume

    2011-01-10

    A one-dimensional Vlasov-Poisson model for sheet beams is reviewed and extended to provide a simple framework for analysis of space-charge effects. Centroid and rms envelope equations including image charge effects are derived and reasonable parameter equivalences with commonly employed 2D transverse models of unbunched beams are established. This sheet beam model is then applied to analyze several problems of fundamental interest. A sheet beam thermal equilibrium distribution in a continuous focusing channel is constructed and shown to have analogous properties to two- d three-dimensional thermal equilibrium models in terms of the equilibrium structure and Deybe screening properties. The simpler formulation for sheet beams is exploited to explicitly calculate the distribution of particle oscillation frequencies within a thermal equilibrium beam. It is shown that as space-charge intensity increases, the frequency distribution becomes broad, suggesting that beams with strong space-charge can have improved stability.

  16. Beam imaging diagnostics for heavy ion beam fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Prost, L.; Ghiorso, W.

    2003-05-01

    We are developing techniques for imaging beams in heavy-ion beam fusion experiments in the HIF-VNL in 2 to 4 transverse dimensions. The beams in current experiments range in energy from 50 keV to 2 MeV, with beam current densities from <10 to 200 mA/cm{sup 2}, and pulse lengths of 4 to 20 {micro}s. The beam energy will range up to 10 MeV in near-future beam experiments. The imaging techniques, based on kapton films and optical scintillators, complement and, in some cases, may replace mechanical slit scanners. The kapton film images represent a time-integrated image on the film exposed to the beam. The optical scintillator utilizes glass and ceramic scintillator material imaged by a fast, image-intensified CCD-based camera. We will discuss the techniques, results, and plans for implementation of the diagnostics on the beam experiments.

  17. Roof Savings Calculator Suite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    New, Joshua R; Garrett, Aaron; Erdem, Ender; Huang, Yu

    2013-11-22

    The software options currently supported by the simulation engine can be seen/experienced at www.roofcalc.com. It defaults all values to national averages with options to test a base-case (residential or commercial) building versus a comparison building with inputs for building type, location, building vintage, conditioned area, number of floors, and window-to-wall ratio, cooling system efficiency, type of heating, heating system efficiency, duct location, roof/ceiling insulation level, above-sheathing ventilation, radiant barrier, roof thermal mass, roof solar reflectance, roof thermal emittance, utility costs, roof pitch. The Roof Savings Caculator Suite adds utilities and website/web service and the integration of AtticSim with DOE-2.1E, with the end-result being Roof Savings Calculator.

  18. Roof Savings Calculator Suite

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-11-22

    The software options currently supported by the simulation engine can be seen/experienced at www.roofcalc.com. It defaults all values to national averages with options to test a base-case (residential or commercial) building versus a comparison building with inputs for building type, location, building vintage, conditioned area, number of floors, and window-to-wall ratio, cooling system efficiency, type of heating, heating system efficiency, duct location, roof/ceiling insulation level, above-sheathing ventilation, radiant barrier, roof thermal mass, roof solar reflectance,more » roof thermal emittance, utility costs, roof pitch. The Roof Savings Caculator Suite adds utilities and website/web service and the integration of AtticSim with DOE-2.1E, with the end-result being Roof Savings Calculator.« less

  19. SSRL Beam Lines Map | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SSRL Beam Lines Map Beam Line by Number | Beam Line by Techniques | Photon Source Parameters

  20. Ion-beam technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fenske, G.R.

    1993-01-01

    This compilation of figures and diagrams reviews processes for depositing diamond/diamond-like carbon films. Processes addressed are chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD, PACVD, etc.), plasma vapor deposition (plasma sputtering, ion beam sputtering, evaporation, etc.), low-energy ion implantation, and hybrid processes (biased sputtering, IBAD, biased HFCVD, etc.). The tribological performance of coatings produced by different means is discussed.

  1. Pulsed ion beam source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenly, J.B.

    1997-08-12

    An improved pulsed ion beam source is disclosed having a new biasing circuit for the fast magnetic field. This circuit provides for an initial negative bias for the field created by the fast coils in the ion beam source which pre-ionize the gas in the source, ionize the gas and deliver the gas to the proper position in the accelerating gap between the anode and cathode assemblies in the ion beam source. The initial negative bias improves the interaction between the location of the nulls in the composite magnetic field in the ion beam source and the position of the gas for pre-ionization and ionization into the plasma as well as final positioning of the plasma in the accelerating gap. Improvements to the construction of the flux excluders in the anode assembly are also accomplished by fabricating them as layered structures with a high melting point, low conductivity material on the outsides with a high conductivity material in the center. 12 figs.

  2. SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... BEAM LINE 6-2 May 24, 2004 May 25, 2004 May 26, 2004 May 27, 2004 May 28, 2004 May 29, 2004 May 30, 2004 2664 D.STRAWN 2730 A.BELL 2699 R.SHAFER 2699 R.SHAFER 2648 F.BRIDGES 2648 ...

  3. Beam current sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuchnir, M.; Mills, F.E.

    1984-09-28

    A current sensor for measuring the dc component of a beam of charged particles employs a superconducting pick-up loop probe, with twisted superconducting leads in combination with a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) detector. The pick-up probe is in the form of a single-turn loop, or a cylindrical toroid, through which the beam is directed and within which a first magnetic flux is excluded by the Meisner effect. The SQUID detector acts as a flux-to-voltage converter in providing a current to the pick-up loop so as to establish a second magnetic flux within the electrode which nulls out the first magnetic flux. A feedback voltage within the SQUID detector represents the beam current of the particles which transit the pick-up loop. Meisner effect currents prevent changes in the magnetic field within the toroidal pick-up loop and produce a current signal independent of the beam's cross-section and its position within the toroid, while the combination of superconducting elements provides current measurement sensitivities in the nano-ampere range.

  4. Beam current sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuchnir, Moyses; Mills, Frederick E.

    1987-01-01

    A current sensor for measuring the DC component of a beam of charged particles employs a superconducting pick-up loop probe, with twisted superconducting leads in combination with a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) detector. The pick-up probe is in the form of a single-turn loop, or a cylindrical toroid, through which the beam is directed and within which a first magnetic flux is excluded by the Meisner effect. The SQUID detector acts as a flux-to-voltage converter in providing a current to the pick-up loop so as to establish a second magnetic flux within the electrode which nulls out the first magnetic flux. A feedback voltage within the SQUID detector represents the beam current of the particles which transit the pick-up loop. Meisner effect currents prevent changes in the magnetic field within the toroidal pick-up loop and produce a current signal independent of the beam's cross-section and its position within the toroid, while the combination of superconducting elements provides current measurement sensitivites in the nano-ampere range.

  5. SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... BEAM LINE 8-2 Mar. 18, 2013 Mar. 19, 2013 Mar. 20, 2013 Mar. 21, 2013 Mar. 22, 2013 Mar. 23, 2013 Mar. 24, 2013 8053 D.NORDLUND 3769 S.Dupont 3769 S.Dupont 3769 S.Dupont 3731 ...

  6. SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BEAM LINE 9-1 Feb. 14, 2005 Feb. 15, 2005 Feb. 16, 2005 Feb. 17, 2005 Feb. 18, 2005 Feb. 19, 2005 Feb. 20, 2005 8803 C.SMITH 8803 C.SMITHDOWN 9B01 A.DEACON 9B01 A.DEACON 1B00 ...

  7. SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BEAM LINE 7-1 Nov. 06, 2006 Nov. 07, 2006 Nov. 08, 2006 Nov. 09, 2006 Nov. 10, 2006 Nov. 11, 2006 Nov. 12, 2006 8803 C.SMITH 8803 C.SMITH 8803 C.SMITH 8803 C.SMITH 8803 C.SMITH ...

  8. SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BEAM LINE 7-1 Nov. 11, 2013 Nov. 12, 2013 Nov. 13, 2013 Nov. 14, 2013 Nov. 15, 2013 Nov. 16, 2013 Nov. 17, 2013 8803 C.Smith 8803 C.Smith 8803 C.Smith 8803 C.Smith 8803 C.Smith ...

  9. SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BEAM LINE 9-1 Nov. 07, 2011 Nov. 08, 2011 Nov. 09, 2011 Nov. 10, 2011 Nov. 11, 2011 Nov. 12, 2011 Nov. 13, 2011 DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN 8803 C.SMITH 8803 C.SMITH 8803 C.SMITH DOWN DOWN ...

  10. Optimizing the electron beam parameters for head-on beam-beam compensation in RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Y.; Fischer, W.; Pikin, A.; Gu, X.

    2011-03-28

    Head-on beam-beam compensation is adopted to compensate the large beam-beam tune spread from the protonproton interactions at IP6 and IP8 in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Two e-lenses are being built and to be in stalled near IP10 in the end of 2011. In this article we perform numeric simulation to investigate the effect of the electron beam parameters on the proton dynamics. The electron beam parameters include its transverse profile, size, current, offset and random errors in them. In this article we studied the effect of the electron beam parameters on the proton dynamics. The electron beam parameters include its transverse shape, size, current, offset and their random errors. From the study, we require that the electron beam size can not be smaller than the proton beam's. And the random noise in the electron current should be better than 0.1%. The offset of electron beam w.r.t. the proton beam center is crucial to head-on beam-beam compensation. Its random errors should be below {+-}8{micro}m.