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1

UNDULATOR-BASED LASER WAKEFIELD ACCELERATOR ELECTRON BEAM DIAGNOSTIC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

to couple the THUNDER undulator to the LOASIS Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA). Currently the LWFA has achieved quasi-monoenergetic electron beams with energies up to 1 GeV. These ultra-short, high-peak-current, electron beams are ideal for driving a compact XUV free electron laser (FEL). Understanding the electron beam properties such as the energy spread and emittance is critical for achieving high quality light sources with high brightness. By using an insertion device such as an undulator and observing changes in the spontaneous emission spectrum, the electron beam energy spread and emittance can be measured with high precision. The initial experiments will use spontaneous emission from 1.5 m of undulator. Later experiments will use up to 5 m of undulator with a goal of a high gain, XUV FEL.

Bakeman, M.S.; Fawley, W.M.; Leemans, W. P.; Nakamura, K.; Robinson, K.E.; Schroeder, C.B.; Toth, C.

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

2

Electron Beam Alignment Strategy in the LCLS Undulators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The x-ray FEL process puts very tight tolerances on the straightness of the electron beam trajectory (2 {micro}m rms) through the LCLS undulator system. Tight but less stringent tolerances of 80 {micro}m rms vertical and 140 {micro}m rms horizontally are to be met for the placement of the individual undulator segments with respect to the beam axis. The tolerances for electron beam straightness can only be met through beam-based alignment (BBA) based on electron energy variations. Conventional alignment will set the start conditions for BBA. Precision-fiducialization of components mounted on remotely adjustable girders and the use of beam-finder wires (BFW) will satisfy placement tolerances. Girder movement due to ground motion and temperature changes will be monitored continuously by an alignment monitoring system (ADS) and remotely corrected. This stabilization of components as well as the monitoring and correction of the electron beam trajectory based on BPMs and correctors will increase the time between BBA applications. Undulator segments will be periodically removed from the undulator Hall and measured to monitor radiation damage and other effects that might degrade undulator tuning.

Nuhn, H.-D.; Emma, P.J.; Gassner, G.L.; LeCocq, C.M.; Peters, E.; Ruland, R.E.; /SLAC

2007-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

3

The LCLS Undulator Beam Loss Monitor Readout System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The LCLS Undulator Beam Loss Monitor System is required to detect any loss radiation seen by the FEL undulators. The undulator segments consist of permanent magnets which are very sensitive to radiation damage. The operational goal is to keep demagnetization below 0.01% over the life of the LCLS. The BLM system is designed to help achieve this goal by detecting any loss radiation and indicating a fault condition if the radiation level exceeds a certain threshold. Upon reception of this fault signal, the LCLS Machine Protection System takes appropriate action by either halting or rate limiting the beam. The BLM detector consists of a PMT coupled to a Cherenkov radiator located near the upstream end of each undulator segment. There are 33 BLMs in the system, one per segment. The detectors are read out by a dedicated system that is integrated directly into the LCLS MPS. The BLM readout system provides monitoring of radiation levels, computation of integrated doses, detection of radiation excursions beyond set thresholds, fault reporting and control of BLM system functions. This paper describes the design, construction and operational performance of the BLM readout system.

Dusatko, John; Browne, M.; Fisher, A.S.; Kotturi, D.; Norum, S.; Olsen, J.; /SLAC

2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

4

Results of beam-based alignment in undulator section  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(masking incoming dispersion) and correct up to now: step 1 done, step 2 (only vert. plane) #12;Procedure and photons so that the SASE process can take place in the whole undulator section #12;BBA in undulator: steps generated by quads #12;horizontal vertical Technical Note 05-04 #12;red: Soll position of quads black: Ist

5

Undulator-Based Laser Wakefield Accelerator Electron Beam Energy Spread and Emittance Diagnostic  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design and current status of experiments to couple the Tapered Hybrid Undulator (THUNDER) to the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) laser plasma accelerator (LPA) to measure electron beam energy spread and emittance are presented.

Bakeman, M.S.; Van Tilborg, J.; Nakamura, K.; Gonsalves, A.; Osterhoff, J.; Sokollik, T.; Lin, C.; Robinson, K.E.; Schroeder, C.B.; Toth, Cs.; Weingartner, R.; Gruner, F.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Prototype photon position monitors for undulator beams at the Advanced Light Source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Design criteria are described, and test results are presented, for prototype ALS undulator beam position monitors. The design is based on monitors presently in use at NSLS, with modifications to account for the widely varying and large K values of the undulators to be installed at the ALS. In particular, we have modified the design to simplify the thermal engineering and we have explored techniques to suppress the response of the monitors to soft photons, so that the beam position can be determined by measuring the higher energy photons which are better collimated. 4 refs., 8 figs.

Warwick, T.; Shu, D. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Rodricks, B. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Johnson, E.D. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

1990-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

7

Calculating the Loss factor of the LCLS Beam Line Elements for Ultra-Shrot Bunches  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a SASE 1.5-15 {angstrom} x-ray Free-Electron Laser (FEL) facility. Since an ultra-short intense bunch is used in the LCLS operation one might suggest that wake fields, generated in the vacuum chamber, may have an effect on the x-ray production because these fields can change the beam particle energies thereby increasing the energy spread in a bunch. At LCLS a feedback system precisely controls the bunch energy before it enters a beam transport line after the linac. However, in the transport line and later in the undulator section the bunch energy and energy spread are not under feedback control and may change due to wake field radiation, which depends upon the bunch current or on a bunch length. The linear part of the energy spread can be compensated in the upstream linac; the energy loss in the undulator section can be compensated by varying the K-parameter of the undulators, however we need a precise knowledge of the wake fields in this part of the machine. Resistive wake fields are known and well calculated. We discuss an additional part of the wake fields, which comes from the different vacuum elements like bellows, BPMs, transitions, vacuum ports, vacuum valves and others. We use the code 'NOVO' together with analytical estimations for the wake potential calculations.

Novokhatski, A.; /SLAC

2009-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

8

Energy Loss and Energy Spread Growth in a Planar Undulator(LCC-0086)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The change in beam energy spread due to transmission through a long, planar undulator is calculated. This change is shown to be gaussian as expected from the central limit theorem and large number of photons emitted per electron. These results are compared with Saldin et al. [2] expressions. Numerical results for the case of the TESLA beam and for an NLC beam are given.

Sheppard, J

2003-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

9

Resistive Wall Heating of the Undulator in High Repetition Rate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In next generation high repetition rate FELs, beam energy loss due to resistive wall wakefields will produce significant amount of heat. The heat load for a superconducting undulator (operating at low temperature), must be removed and will be expensive to remove. In this paper, we study this effect in an undulator proposed for a Next Generation Light Source (NGLS) at LBNL. We benchmark our calculations with measurements at the LCLS and carry out detailed parameter studies using beam from a start-to-end simulation. Our preliminarym results suggest that the heat load in the undulator is about 2 W/m or lower with an aperture size of 6 mm for nominal NGLS preliminary design parameters.

Qiang, J; Corlett, J; Emma, P; Wu, J

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

10

Micropole undulator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Micropole undulators for use in the generation of x-rays from moving charged particles are disclosed. Two rows of spaced apart poles are arranged so that each pole produces a magnetic field aligned with all other similar fields. The poles are the ends of C''-shaped magnets. In each row, adjacent poles are separated by spacers made of a superconducting material. 11 figs.

Tatchyn, R.O.; Csonka, P.L.; Cremer, J.T.

1990-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

11

Monte Carlo Studies of the Radiation Fields in the Linac Coherent Light Source Undulators and of the Corresponding Signals in the Cerenkov Beam Loss Monitors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2009 the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the SLAC National Accelerator Center started free electron laser (FEL) operation. In order to continue to produce the bright and short-pulsed x-ray laser demanded by FEL scientists, this pioneer hard x-ray FEL requires a perfectly tailored magnetic field at the undulators, so that the photons generated at the electron wiggling path interact at the right phase with the electron beam. In such a precise system, small (>0.01%) radiation-induced alterations of the magnetic field in the permanent magnets could affect FEL performance. This paper describes the simulation studies of radiation fields in permanent magnets and the expected signal in the detectors. The transport of particles from the radiation sources (i.e. diagnostic insert) to the undulator magnets and to the beam loss monitors (BLM) was simulated with the intra nuclear cascade codes FLUKA and MARS15. In order to accurately reproduce the optics of LCLS, lattice capabilities and magnetic fields were enabled in FLUKA and betatron oscillations were validated against reference data. All electron events entering the BLMs were printed in data files. The paper also introduces the Radioactive Ion Beam Optimizer (RIBO) Monte Carlo 3-D code, which was used to read from the event files, to compute Cerenkov production and then to simulate the optical coupling of the BLM detectors, accounting for the transmission of light through the quartz.

Santana Leitner, Mario

2010-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

12

Strong permanent magnet-assisted electromagnetic undulator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention discloses an improved undulator comprising a plurality of electromagnet poles located along opposite sides of a particle beam axis with alternate north and south poles on each side of the beam to cause the beam to wiggle or undulate as it travels generally along the beam axis and permanent magnets spaced adjacent the electromagnetic poles on each side of the axis of said particle beam in an orientation sufficient to reduce the saturation of the electromagnet poles whereby the field strength of the electromagnet poles can be increased beyond the normal saturation levels of the electromagnetic poles.

Halbach, Klaus (Berkeley, CA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Ion beam energy spectrum calculation via dosimetry data deconvolution.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The energy spectrum of a H{sup +} beam generated within the HERMES III accelerator is calculated from dosimetry data to refine future experiments. Multiple layers of radiochromic film are exposed to the beam. A graphic user interface was written in MATLAB to align the film images and calculate the beam's dose depth profile. Singular value regularization is used to stabilize the unfolding and provide the H{sup +} beam's energy spectrum. The beam was found to have major contributions from 1 MeV and 8.5 MeV protons. The HERMES III accelerator is typically used as a pulsed photon source to experimentally obtain photon impulse response of systems due to high energy photons. A series of experiments were performed to explore the use of Hermes III to generate an intense pulsed proton beam. Knowing the beam energy spectrum allows for greater precision in experiment predictions and beam model verification.

Harper-Slaboszewicz, Victor Jozef; Sharp, Andrew Clinton (A& M University, College Station, TX)

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

LCLS Undulator Quadrupole Fiducialization Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This note presents the fiducialization plan for the LCLS undulator quadrupoles. The note begins by summarizing the requirements for the fiducialization. A discussion of the measurement equipment is presented, followed by the methods used to perform the fiducialization and check the results. This is followed by the detailed fiducialization plan in which each step is enumerated. Finally, the measurement results and data storage formats are presented. The LCLS is made up of 33 assemblies consisting of an undulator, quadrupole, beam finder wire, and other components mounted on a girder. The components must be mounted in such a way that the beam passes down the axis of each component. In this note, we describe how the ideal beam axis is related to tooling balls on the quadrupole. This step, called fiducialization, is necessary because the ideal beam axis is determined magnetically, whereas tangible objects must be used to locate the quadrupole. The note begins with the list of fiducialization requirements. The laboratory in which the work will be performed and the relevant equipment is then briefly described. This is followed by a discussion of the methods used to perform the fiducialization and the methods used to check the results. A detailed fiducialization plan is presented in which all the steps of fiducialization are enumerated. A discussion of the resulting data files and directory structure concludes the note.

Wolf, Zachary; Levashov, Michael; Lundahl, Eric; Reese, Ed; LeCocq, Catherine; Ruland, Robert; /SLAC; ,

2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

15

Configurations for short period rf undulators  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

Several configurations for rf undulators energized at millimeter wavelengths and designed to produce coherent nanometer radiation from sub-GeV electron beams are analyzed and compared with one another. These configurations include a traveling-wave resonant ring, a standing wave resonator, and a resonator operating close to cutoff.

Kuzikov, S. V.; Jiang, Y.; Marshall, T. C.; Sotnikov, G. V.; Hirshfield, J. L.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Algorithms to Automate LCLS Undulator Tuning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Automation of the LCLS undulator tuning offers many advantages to the project. Automation can make a substantial reduction in the amount of time the tuning takes. Undulator tuning is fairly complex and automation can make the final tuning less dependent on the skill of the operator. Also, algorithms are fixed and can be scrutinized and reviewed, as opposed to an individual doing the tuning by hand. This note presents algorithms implemented in a computer program written for LCLS undulator tuning. The LCLS undulators must meet the following specifications. The maximum trajectory walkoff must be less than 5 {micro}m over 10 m. The first field integral must be below 40 x 10{sup -6} Tm. The second field integral must be below 50 x 10{sup -6} Tm{sup 2}. The phase error between the electron motion and the radiation field must be less than 10 degrees in an undulator. The K parameter must have the value of 3.5000 {+-} 0.0005. The phase matching from the break regions into the undulator must be accurate to better than 10 degrees. A phase change of 113 x 2{pi} must take place over a distance of 3.656 m centered on the undulator. Achieving these requirements is the goal of the tuning process. Most of the tuning is done with Hall probe measurements. The field integrals are checked using long coil measurements. An analysis program written in Matlab takes the Hall probe measurements and computes the trajectories, phase errors, K value, etc. The analysis program and its calculation techniques were described in a previous note. In this note, a second Matlab program containing tuning algorithms is described. The algorithms to determine the required number and placement of the shims are discussed in detail. This note describes the operation of a computer program which was written to automate LCLS undulator tuning. The algorithms used to compute the shim sizes and locations are discussed.

Wolf, Zachary

2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

17

An Undulator Based Polarized Positron Source for CLIC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A viable positron source scheme is proposed that uses circularly polarized gamma rays generated from the main 250 GeV electron beam. The beam passes through a helical superconducting undulator with a magnetic field of {approx} 1 Tesla and a period of 1.15 cm. The gamma-rays produced in the undulator in the energy range between {approx} 3 MeV - 100 MeV will be directed to a titanium target and produce polarized positrons. The positrons are then captured, accelerated and transported to a Pre-Damping Ring (PDR). Detailed parameter studies of this scheme including positron yield, and undulator parameter dependence are presented. Effects on the 250 GeV CLIC main beam, including emittance growth and energy loss from the beam passing through the undulator are also discussed.

Liu, Wanming; /Argonne; Gai, Wei; /Argonne; Rinolfi, Louis; /CERN; Sheppard, John; /SLAC

2012-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

18

Calculation of collective effects and beam lifetimes for the LBL (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory) 1-2 GeV synchrotron radiation source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In designing a third-generation high brightness synchrotron radiation source, attention must be paid to the various collective effects that can influence beam performance. We report on calculations, performed with the code ZAP, of the bunch length, the transverse emittance and the beam lifetime (from both Touschek and gas scattering) for our 1-2 GeV storage ring. In addition, we estimate the growth times for both longitudinal and transverse coupled bunch instabilities. Bunch lengths of about 20 ps should be obtainable and intrabeam scattering emittance growth is small. For a limiting undulator gap of 1 cm and residual gas pressure of 1n Torr, the beam lifetime is about 5 hours in the single-bunch mode; in the multibunch mode, lifetimes in excess of 6 hours are expected. These results indicate that all performance goals for the facility should be achievable.

Chattopadhyay, S.; Zisman, M.S.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Planar Undulator Considerations(LCC-0085)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This note consists of informal working notes that document an effort to understand the TESLA baseline, unpolarized, undulator based positron source. This is the first step in the design process of an undulator based positron system for the NLC. The expressions and methodologies developed herein are used in subsequent memos that reference this note. In regards to the TESLA design, it is found that a 135 m long (versus 100 m length) undulator is consistent with the performance descriptions in the TDR text. And while operation of the TESLA system with a 250 GeV drive beam energy provides a safety margin of a factor of {approx}2 in e{sup +} yield, operation of the same system at 160 GeV results in a yield of about 0.6.

Sheppard, J

2003-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

20

Coherent Radiation Effects in the LCLS Undulator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For X-ray Free-Electron Lasers such as LCLS and TESLA FEL, a change in the electron energy while amplifying the FEL radiation can shift the resonance condition out of the bandwidth of the FEL. The largest sources of energy loss is the emission of incoherent undulator radiation. Because the loss per electron depends only on the undulator parameters and the beam energy, which are fixed for a given resonant wavelength, the average energy loss can be compensated for by a fixed taper of the undulator. Coherent radiation has a strong enhancement proportional to the number of electrons in the bunch for frequencies comparable to or longer than the bunch dimension. If the emitted coherent energy becomes comparable to that of the incoherent emission, it has to be included in the taper as well. However, the coherent loss depends on the bunch charge and the applied compression scheme and a change of these parameters would require a change of the taper. This imposes a limitation on the practical operation of Free-Electron Lasers, where the taper can only be adjusted manually. In this presentation we analyze the coherent emission of undulator radiation and transition undulator radiation for LCLS, and estimate whether the resulting energy losses are significant for the operation of LCLS.

Reiche, S.; /UCLA; Huang, Z.; /SLAC

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "undulator beam calculated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

A strong permanent magnet-assisted electromagnetic undulator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention discloses an improved undulator comprising a plurality of electromagnet poles located along opposite sides of a particle beam axis with alternate north and south poles on each side of the beam to cause the beam to wiggle or undulate as it travels generally along the beam axis and permanent magnets spaced adjacent the electromagnetic poles on each side of the axis of said particle beam in an orientation sufficient to reduce the saturation of the electromagnet poles whereby the field strength of the electromagnet poles can be increased beyond the normal saturation levels of the electromagnetic poles. 4 figs.

Halbach, K.

1987-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

22

The JLAB UV Undulator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently the JLAB FEL has demonstrated 150 W at 400 nm and 200 W at 700 nm using a 33mm period undulator designed and built by STI Optronics. This paper describes the undulator design and performance. Two key requirements were low phase error, zero steering and offset end fields and small rms trajectory errors. We will describe a new genetic algorithm that allowed phase error minimization to 1.8 degrees while exceeding specifications. The mechanical design, control system and EPICS interface will also be summarized.

Gottschalk, Steven C. [STI, Washington, USA; Benson, Steven V. [JLAB; Moore, Steven Wesley [JLAB

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Performance Evaluation of Undulator Radiation at CEBAF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The performance of undulator radiation (UR) at CEBAF with a 3.5 m helical undulator is evaluated and compared with APS undulator-A radiation in terms of brilliance, peak brilliance, spectral flux, flux density and intensity distribution.

Chuyu Liu, Geoffrey Krafft, Guimei Wang

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Undulator-Based Production of Polarized Photons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

"Project Title: Undulator-Based Production of Polarized Photons" DOE Contract Number: FG02-04ER41355 Principal Investigator: Prof. Kirk McDonald Period of Performance: 09/10/2004 thru 08/31/2006 This award was to fund Princeton's activity on SLAC experiment E166, "Undulator-Based Production of Polarized Positrons" which was performed at SLAC during June and September 2005. Princeton U. fabricated a magnetic spectrometer for this experiment, and participated in the commissioning, operation, and analysis of the experiment, for which Prof. McDonald was a co-spokesperson. The experiment demonstrated that an intense positron beam with 80% longitudinal polarization could be generated by conversion of MeVenergy circularly polarized photons in a thin target, which photons were generated by passage of high-energy electrons through a helical undulator. This technique has since been adopted as the baseline for the polarized positron source of the proposed International Linear Collider. Results of the experiment have been published in Physical Review Letters, vol 100, p 210801 (2008) [see attached .pdf file], and a longer paper is in preparation.

Professor Kirk McDonald

2008-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

25

Publications 1. "Calculation of Beam Loading in Linear Traveling Wave Electron Accelerators," Review of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Publications 1. "Calculation of Beam Loading in Linear Traveling Wave Electron Accelerators). 26 "Stochastic and Adiabatic Behavior of Particles Accelerated by Periodic Forces," (M. A. Lieberman

Kammen, Daniel M.

26

Coherent Radiation in an Undulator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solving the particle-radiation system in a self-consistentto clarify the coherent radiation mechanism. References 1.the Proceedings Coherent Radiation in an Undulator Y,H. Chin

Chin, Y.H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Beam dynamics in accelerators for medical applications: from calculations to machine performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Beam dynamics in accelerators for medical applications: from calculations to machine performance S, z', W, RF-phase) at each time-moment for each particle in the accelerating bunch use cylindrical, Novosibirsk, Russian Federation #12;Main results of calculations 6 ...transverse beam size during acceleration

28

Performance Calculations of APPLE II Undulator  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 TheSteven AshbyDepartment ofGE's Manual3 Short-Period APPLE II

29

CALCULATION OF PULSED KICKER MAGNETIC FIELD ATTENUATION INSIDE BEAM CHAMBERS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation Sites Proposed Route Segments (not drawn30:133PortableCALCULATION OF

30

Calculation of spatial response of 2D beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic on MAST  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The beam emission spectroscopy (BES) turbulence diagnostic on MAST is to be upgraded in June 2010 from a one-dimensional trial system to a two-dimensional imaging system (8 radialx4 poloidal channels) based on a newly developed avalanche photodiode array camera. The spatial resolution of the new system is calculated in terms of the point spread function to account for the effects of field-line curvature, observation geometry, the finite lifetime of the excited state of the beam atoms, and beam attenuation and divergence. It is found that the radial spatial resolution is {approx}2-3 cm and the poloidal spatial resolution {approx}1-5 cm depending on the radial viewing location. The absolute number of detected photons is also calculated, hence the photon noise level can be determined.

Ghim, Young-chul [Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Field, A. R. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Zoletnik, S.; Dunai, D. [KFKI RMKI, Association EURATOM/HAS, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

31

A generalized 2D pencil beam scaling algorithm for proton dose calculation in heterogeneous slab geometries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Pencil beam algorithms are commonly used for proton therapy dose calculations. Szymanowski and Oelfke ['Two-dimensional pencil beam scaling: An improved proton dose algorithm for heterogeneous media,' Phys. Med. Biol. 47, 3313-3330 (2002)] developed a two-dimensional (2D) scaling algorithm which accurately models the radial pencil beam width as a function of depth in heterogeneous slab geometries using a scaled expression for the radial kernel width in water as a function of depth and kinetic energy. However, an assumption made in the derivation of the technique limits its range of validity to cases where the input expression for the radial kernel width in water is derived from a local scattering power model. The goal of this work is to derive a generalized form of 2D pencil beam scaling that is independent of the scattering power model and appropriate for use with any expression for the radial kernel width in water as a function of depth. Methods: Using Fermi-Eyges transport theory, the authors derive an expression for the radial pencil beam width in heterogeneous slab geometries which is independent of the proton scattering power and related quantities. The authors then perform test calculations in homogeneous and heterogeneous slab phantoms using both the original 2D scaling model and the new model with expressions for the radial kernel width in water computed from both local and nonlocal scattering power models, as well as a nonlocal parameterization of Moliere scattering theory. In addition to kernel width calculations, dose calculations are also performed for a narrow Gaussian proton beam. Results: Pencil beam width calculations indicate that both 2D scaling formalisms perform well when the radial kernel width in water is derived from a local scattering power model. Computing the radial kernel width from a nonlocal scattering model results in the local 2D scaling formula under-predicting the pencil beam width by as much as 1.4 mm (21%) at the depth of the Bragg peak for a 220 MeV proton beam in homogeneous water. This translates into a 32% dose discrepancy for a 5 mm Gaussian proton beam. Similar trends were observed for calculations made in heterogeneous slab phantoms where it was also noted that errors tend to increase with greater beam penetration. The generalized 2D scaling model performs well in all situations, with a maximum dose error of 0.3% at the Bragg peak in a heterogeneous phantom containing 3 cm of hard bone. Conclusions: The authors have derived a generalized form of 2D pencil beam scaling which is independent of the proton scattering power model and robust to the functional form of the radial kernel width in water used for the calculations. Sample calculations made with this model show excellent agreement with expected values in both homogeneous water and heterogeneous phantoms.

Westerly, David C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States); Mo Xiaohu; DeLuca, Paul M. Jr. [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Tome, Wolfgang A. [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 and Institute of Onco-Physics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Division of Medical Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York 10461 (United States); Mackie, Thomas R. [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 and Department of Human Oncology, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

32

Evaluation of a new commercial Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm for electron beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: In this report the authors present the validation of a Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm (XiO EMC from Elekta Software) for electron beams. Methods: Calculated and measured dose distributions were compared for homogeneous water phantoms and for a 3D heterogeneous phantom meant to approximate the geometry of a trachea and spine. Comparisons of measurements and calculated data were performed using 2D and 3D gamma index dose comparison metrics. Results: Measured outputs agree with calculated values within estimated uncertainties for standard and extended SSDs for open applicators, and for cutouts, with the exception of the 17 MeV electron beam at extended SSD for cutout sizes smaller than 5 × 5 cm{sup 2}. Good agreement was obtained between calculated and experimental depth dose curves and dose profiles (minimum number of measurements that pass a 2%/2 mm agreement 2D gamma index criteria for any applicator or energy was 97%). Dose calculations in a heterogeneous phantom agree with radiochromic film measurements (>98% of pixels pass a 3 dimensional 3%/2 mm ?-criteria) provided that the steep dose gradient in the depth direction is considered. Conclusions: Clinically acceptable agreement (at the 2%/2 mm level) between the measurements and calculated data for measurements in water are obtained for this dose calculation algorithm. Radiochromic film is a useful tool to evaluate the accuracy of electron MC treatment planning systems in heterogeneous media.

Vandervoort, Eric J., E-mail: evandervoort@toh.on.ca; Cygler, Joanna E. [Department of Medical Physics, The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, The University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1H 8L6 (Canada) [Department of Medical Physics, The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, The University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1H 8L6 (Canada); The Faculty of Medicine, The University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1H 8M5 (Canada); Department of Physics, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada); Tchistiakova, Ekaterina [Department of Medical Physics, The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, The University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1H 8L6 (Canada) [Department of Medical Physics, The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, The University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1H 8L6 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Heart and Stroke Foundation Centre for Stroke Recovery, Sunnybrook Research Institute, University of Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); La Russa, Daniel J. [Department of Medical Physics, The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, The University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1H 8L6 (Canada) and The Faculty of Medicine, The University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1H 8M5 (Canada)] [Department of Medical Physics, The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, The University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1H 8L6 (Canada) and The Faculty of Medicine, The University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1H 8M5 (Canada)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

33

Monte Carlo calculations for reference dosimetry of electron beams with the PTW Roos and NE2571 ion chambers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate recommendations for reference dosimetry of electron beams and gradient effects for the NE2571 chamber and to provide beam quality conversion factors using Monte Carlo simulations of the PTW Roos and NE2571 ion chambers. Methods: The EGSnrc code system is used to calculate the absorbed dose-to-water and the dose to the gas in fully modeled ion chambers as a function of depth in water. Electron beams are modeled using realistic accelerator simulations as well as beams modeled as collimated point sources from realistic electron beam spectra or monoenergetic electrons. Beam quality conversion factors are calculated with ratios of the doses to water and to the air in the ion chamber in electron beams and a cobalt-60 reference field. The overall ion chamber correction factor is studied using calculations of water-to-air stopping power ratios. Results: The use of an effective point of measurement shift of 1.55 mm from the front face of the PTW Roos chamber, which places the point of measurement inside the chamber cavity, minimizes the difference betweenR{sub 50}, the beam quality specifier, calculated from chamber simulations compared to that obtained using depth-dose calculations in water. A similar shift minimizes the variation of the overall ion chamber correction factor with depth to the practical range and reduces the root-mean-square deviation of a fit to calculated beam quality conversion factors at the reference depth as a function of R{sub 50}. Similarly, an upstream shift of 0.34 r{sub cav} allows a more accurate determination of R{sub 50} from NE2571 chamber calculations and reduces the variation of the overall ion chamber correction factor with depth. The determination of the gradient correction using a shift of 0.22 r{sub cav} optimizes the root-mean-square deviation of a fit to calculated beam quality conversion factors if all beams investigated are considered. However, if only clinical beams are considered, a good fit to results for beam quality conversion factors is obtained without explicitly correcting for gradient effects. The inadequacy of R{sub 50} to uniquely specify beam quality for the accurate selection of k{sub Q} factors is discussed. Systematic uncertainties in beam quality conversion factors are analyzed for the NE2571 chamber and amount to between 0.4% and 1.2% depending on assumptions used. Conclusions: The calculated beam quality conversion factors for the PTW Roos chamber obtained here are in good agreement with literature data. These results characterize the use of an NE2571 ion chamber for reference dosimetry of electron beams even in low-energy beams.

Muir, B. R., E-mail: bmuir@physics.carleton.ca; Rogers, D. W. O., E-mail: drogers@physics.carleton.ca [Physics Department, Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada)] [Physics Department, Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

34

LCLS-II Undulator Tolerance Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is building a new FEL user facility, LCLS-II, as a major upgrade to the Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS). The upgrade will include two new Free Electron Lasers (FELs), to generate soft (SXR) and hard x-ray (HXR) SASE FEL radiation, based on planar, variable gap hybrid undulators with two different undulator periods (SXU: 55 mm, HXU: 32 mm). An algebraic FEL tolerance analysis for the undulator lines, including tuning, alignment, and phase correction tolerances has been performed. The methods and results are presented in this paper.

Nuhn, H.-D.; /SLAC; Marks, S.; /LBL, Berkeley; Wu, J.; /SLAC

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

35

Linac Coherent Light Source Undulator RF BPM System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) will be the world's first x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) when it becomes operational in 2009. The LCLS is currently in the construction phase. The beam position monitor (BPM) system planned for the LCLS undulator will incorporate a high-resolution X-band cavity BPM system described in this paper. The BPM system will provide high-resolution measurements of the electron beam trajectory on a pulse-to-pulse basis and over many shots. The X-band cavity BPM size, simple fabrication, and high resolution make it an ideal choice for LCLS beam position detection. We will discuss the system specifications, design, and prototype test results.

Lill, R.M.; Morrison, L.H.; Waldschmidt, G.J.; Walters, D.R.; /Argonne; Johnson, R.; Li, Z.; Smith, S.; Straumann, T.; /SLAC

2007-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

36

On-axis brilliance and power of in-vacuum undulators for the Advanced Photon Source.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A request for studying the spectral performance of in-vacuum undulators (IVUs) for the APS storage ring was recently put forward. In-vacuum undulators are prevalent at other synchrotron radiation facilities such as the ESRF and the Spring-8. However, they never made it into the arsenal of undulators at the APS because the brilliance tuning curves were sufficiently wide due to the fact that the undulator minimum gap could be set as low as 10.5 mm. For sector 3, which in the past used a narrow-gap vacuum chamber, the minimum undulator pole gap was allowed to be set as low as 8.5 mm, providing contiguous tuning curves between the first and third harmonic radiation for a 2.7-cm-period device. (Subsequently, the narrow-gap vacuum chamber was removed and replaced with a standard vacuum chamber, which allows a minimum gap of 10.5 mm.) For sector 4, which currently holds the only narrow-gap vacuum chamber at the APS, the minimum gap is 9.5 mm. In this sector, a permanent magnet hybrid undulator with SmCo magnets is used instead of NdFeB magnets because of their higher radiation resistance and their better protection against radiation-induced demagnetization of the magnets. In the realm of looking to the future, new concepts and technologies are being revisited. Most notable is the superconducting undulator (SCU) technology, which provides the ultimate highest magnetic field of any technology and design. The SCU program has been ongoing at the APS for several years and substantial progress has been made.3,4 However, the in-vacuum undulators may bridge some of the user demands, and it is therefore worthwhile revisiting their potential at the APS. In this work, the following were assumed or required: (1) the smallest in-vacuum beam-stay-clear gap is 5.0 mm, (2) a beam-liner of 2 x 0.060 mm, which increases the pole gap by the same amount, (3) both NdFeB and SmCo magnets shall be studied, even though SmCo magnets are the preferred choice for very small gaps, (4) compare the in-vacuum undulators with superconducting NbTi undulators with a wall thickness/space of 2 x 1.0 mm, and (5) all undulators will have an effective magnetic length of 2.4 m. Three short undulator period lengths were chosen somewhat arbitrary and studied. We will compare the performance of undulators with period lengths of 2.5 cm and 2.0 cm to one with a 1.6-cm period, which is the chosen period length of the first designed and tested short-length SCU for the APS. Additionally, we will make comparisons with the undulator A, which has a period length of 3.3 cm.

Dejus, R.; Jaski, M.; Kim, S. H.; Accelerator Systems Division (APS)

2009-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

37

Numerical Calculation of Beam Coupling Impedances in the Frequency Domain using FIT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The transverse impedance of kicker magnets is considered to be one of the main beam instability sources in the projected SIS-100 at FAIR and also in the SPS at CERN. The longitudinal impedance can contribute to the heat load, which is especially a concern in the cold sections of SIS-100 and LHC. In the high frequency range, commercially available time domain codes like CST Particle Studio serve to calculate the impedance but they are inapplicable at medium and low frequencies which become more important for larger size synchrotrons. We present the ongoing work of developing a Finite Integration Technique (FIT) solver in frequency domain which is based on the Parallel and Extensible Toolkit for Scientific computing (PETSc) framework in C++. Proper beam adapted boundary conditions are important to validate the concept. The code is applied to an inductive insert used to compensate the longitudinal space charge impedance in low energy machines. Another application focuses on the impedance contribution of a ferrit...

Niedermayer, U

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

On the Kinematics of Undulator Girder Motion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The theory of rigid body kinematics is used to derive equations that govern the control and measurement of the position and orientation of undulator girders. The equations form the basis of the girder matlab software on the LCLS control system. The equations are linear for small motion and easily inverted as desired. For reference, some relevant girder geometrical data is also given. Equations 6-8 relate the linear potentiometer readings to the motion of the girder. Equations 9-11 relate the cam shaft angles to the motion of the girder. Both sets are easily inverted to either obtain the girder motion from the angles or readings, or, to find the angles and readings that would give a desired motion. The motion of any point on the girder can be calculated by applying either sets of equations to the two cam-planes and extrapolating in the z coordinate using equation 19. The formulation of the equations is quite general and easily coded via matrix and vector methods. They form the basis of the girder matlab software on the LCLS control system.

Welch, J; /SLAC; ,

2011-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

39

Variable Gap Undulator for 1.5-48 Kev Free Electron Laser at Linac Coherent Light Source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the feasibility of generating femtosecond duration Free-Electron Laser with a variable photon energy from 1.5 to 48 keV, using an electron bunch with the same characteristics of the LINAC Coherent Light Source (LCLS) bunch, and a planar undulator with additional focusing. We assume that the electron bunch energy can be changed, and the undulator has a variable gap, allowing a variable undulator parameter. It is assumed to be operated in an ultra-low charge and ultra-short pulse regime. We study the feasibility of a tunable, short pulse, X-ray FEL with photon energy from 1.5 to 48 keV, using an electron beam like the one in the LCLS and a 2:5 cm period, variable gap, planar undulator. The beam energy changes from 4.6 to 13.8 GeV, the electorn charge is kept at 10 pC, and the undulator parameter varies from 1 to 3. The undulator length needed to saturate the 48 keV FEL is about 55 m, with a peak power around 5 GW. At longer wavelength the saturation length is as short as 15 m, and the peak power around 20 GW. The results from the analytical models and the GENESIS simulations show that the system is feasible. The large wavelength range, full tunability and short, few femtosecond pulses, together with the large peak power, would provide a powerful research tool.

Pellegrini, C.; /UCLA; Wu, J.; /SLAC; ,

2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

40

X-ray intensity interferometer for undulator radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Intensity interferometry is well established with visible light but has never been demonstrated with x-radiation. We propose to measure the transverse coherence of an x-ray beam, for the first time, using the method of Hanbury Brown and Twiss. The x-ray interferometer consists of an array of slits, a grazing incidence reflective beamsplitter, a pair of fast multichannel plate detectors and a broadband, low-noise correlator circuit. The NSLS X1 or X13 soft x-ray undulator will supply the partially coherent x-rays. We are developing this technique to characterize the coherence properties of x-ray beams from high brilliance insertion devices at third-generation synchrotron light facilities such as the Advanced Photon Source and the Advanced Light Source. 17 refs.

Gluskin, E.; McNulty, I.; Viccaro, P.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Howells, M.R. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "undulator beam calculated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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41

X-ray intensity interferometer for undulator radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Intensity interferometry is well established with visible light but has never been demonstrated with x-radiation. We propose to measure the transverse coherence of an x-ray beam, for the first time, using the method of Hanbury Brown and Twiss. The x-ray interferometer consists of an array of slits, a grazing incidence reflective beamsplitter, a pair of fast multichannel plate detectors and a broadband, low-noise correlator circuit. The NSLS X1 or X13 soft x-ray undulator will supply the partially coherent x-rays. We are developing this technique to characterize the coherence properties of x-ray beams from high brilliance insertion devices at third-generation synchrotron light facilities such as the Advanced Photon Source and the Advanced Light Source. 17 refs.

Gluskin, E.; McNulty, I.; Viccaro, P.J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Howells, M.R. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Undulator Hall Air Temperature Fault Scenarios  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent experience indicates that the LCLS undulator segments must not, at any time following tuning, be allowed to change temperature by more than about {+-}2.5 C or the magnetic center will irreversibly shift outside of acceptable tolerances. This vulnerability raises a concern that under fault conditions the ambient temperature in the Undulator Hall might go outside of the safe range and potentially could require removal and retuning of all the segments. In this note we estimate changes that can be expected in the Undulator Hall air temperature for three fault scenarios: (1) System-wide power failure; (2) Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system shutdown; and (3) HVAC system temperature regulation fault. We find that for either a system-wide power failure or an HVAC system shutdown (with the technical equipment left on), the short-term temperature changes of the air would be modest due to the ability of the walls and floor to act as a heat ballast. No action would be needed to protect the undulator system in the event of a system-wide power failure. Some action to adjust the heat balance, in the case of the HVAC power failure with the equipment left on, might be desirable but is not required. On the other hand, a temperature regulation failure of the HVAC system can quickly cause large excursions in air temperature and prompt action would be required to avoid damage to the undulator system.

Sevilla, J.; Welch, J.; /SLAC; ,

2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

43

Variable-Period Undulators For Synchrotron Radiation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new and improved undulator design is provided that enables a variable period length for the production of synchrotron radiation from both medium-energy and high-energy storage rings. The variable period length is achieved using a staggered array of pole pieces made up of high permeability material, permanent magnet material, or an electromagnetic structure. The pole pieces are separated by a variable width space. The sum of the variable width space and the pole width would therefore define the period of the undulator. Features and advantages of the invention include broad photon energy tunability, constant power operation and constant brilliance operation.

Shenoy, Gopal (Naperville, IL); Lewellen, John (Plainfield, IL); Shu, Deming (Darien, IL); Vinokurov, Nikolai (Novosibirsk, RU)

2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

44

Variable-Period Undulators for Synchrotron Radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new and improved undulator design is provided that enables a variable period length for the production of synchrotron radiation from both medium-energy and high energy storage rings. The variable period length is achieved using a staggered array of pole pieces made up of high permeability material, permanent magnet material, or an electromagnetic structure. The pole pieces are separated by a variable width space. The sum of the variable width space and the pole width would therefore define the period of the undulator. Features and advantages of the invention include broad photon energy tunability, constant power operation and constant brilliance operation.

Shenoy, Gopal; Lewellen, John; Shu, Deming; Vinokurov, Nikolai

2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

45

Proposed Laser-driven, Dielectric Microstructure Few-cm Long Undulator for Attosecond Coherent X-rays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article presents the concept of an all-dielectric laser-driven undulator for the generation of coherent X-rays. The proposed laser-driven undulator is expected to produce internal deflection forces equivalent to a several-Tesla magnetic field acting on a speed-of-light particle. The key idea for this laser-driven undulator is its ability to provide phase synchronicity between the deflection force and the electron beam for a distance that is much greater than the laser wavelength. The potential advantage of this undulator is illustrated with a possible design example that assumes a small laser accelerator which delivers a 2 GeV, 1 pC, 1 kHz electron bunch train to a 10 cm long, 1/2 mm period laser-driven undulator. Such an undulator could produce coherent X-ray pulses with {approx}10{sup 9} photons of 64 keV energy. The numerical modeling for the expected X-ray pulse shape was performed with GENESIS, which predicts X-ray pulse durations in the few-attosecond range. Possible applications for nonlinear electromagnetic effects from these X-ray pulses are briefly discussed.

Plettner, T; Byer, R.L.; /Stanford U., Ginzton Lab.

2011-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

46

Experiment on suppression of spontaneous undulator radiation at ATF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We propose undertaking a demonstration experiment on suppressing spontaneous undulator radiation from an electron beam at BNL's Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). We describe the method, the proposed layout, and a possible schedule. There are several advantages in strongly suppressing shot noise in the electron beam, and the corresponding spontaneous radiation. The self-amplified spontaneous (SASE) emission originating from shot noise in the electron beam is the main source of noise in high-gain FEL amplifiers. It may negatively affect several HG FEL applications ranging from single- to multi-stage HGHG FELs. SASE saturation also imposes a fundamental hard limit on the gain of an FEL amplifier in a coherent electron-cooling scheme. A novel active method for suppressing shot noise in relativistic electron beams by many orders-of-magnitude was recently proposed. While theoretically such strong suppression appears feasible, the performance and applicability of this novel method must be evaluated experimentally. Several practical questions about the proposed noise suppressor, such as 3D effects and/or sensitivity to the e-beam parameters also require experimental clarification. To do this, we propose here a proof-of-principle experiment using elements of the VISA FEL at BNL's Accelerator Test Facility.

Litvinenko,V.; Yakimenko, V.

2009-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

47

Calculation of beam paths in optical systems containing inhomogeneous isotropic media with cylindrical distribution of the refractive index  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A system of differential equations convenient for numerical computer integrating is proposed to calculate beam paths, elementary astigmatic beams, and the optical path in isotropic media with cylindrical distribution of the refractive index. A method for selecting the step of this integration is proposed. This technique is implemented in the program package for computers of the VAX series meant for the computer-aided design of optical systems. 4 refs.

Grammatin, A.P.; Degen, A.B.; Katranova, N.A. [Vavilov State Optical Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Air Temperature in the Undulator Hall  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various analyses have been performed recently to estimate the performance of the air conditioning (HVAC) system planned for the Undulator Hall. This reports summarizes the results and provides an upgrade plan to be used if new requirements are needed in the future. The estimates predict that with the planned loads the tunnel air temperature will be well within the allowed tolerance during normal operation.

Not Available

2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

49

Monte Carlo and Analytical Calculation of Lateral Deflection of Proton Beams in Homogeneous Targets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Proton radiation therapy is a precise form of radiation therapy, but the avoidance of damage to critical normal tissues and the prevention of geographical tumor misses require accurate knowledge of the dose delivered to the patient and the verification of his position demand a precise imaging technique. In proton therapy facilities, the X-ray Computed Tomography (xCT) is the preferred technique for the planning treatment of patients. This situation has been changing nowadays with the development of proton accelerators for health care and the increase in the number of treated patients. In fact, protons could be more efficient than xCT for this task. One essential difficulty in pCT image reconstruction systems came from the scattering of the protons inside the target due to the numerous small-angle deflections by nuclear Coulomb fields. The purpose of this study is the comparison of an analytical formulation for the determination of beam lateral deflection, based on Moliere's theory and Rutherford scattering with Monte Carlo calculations by SRIM 2008 and MCNPX codes.

Pazianotto, Mauricio T.; Inocente, Guilherme F.; Silva, Danilo Anacleto A. d; Hormaza, Joel M. [Departamento de Fisica e Biofisica-Instituto de Biociencias, Universidade Estadual Paulista 'Julio de Mesquita Filho'-Botucatu-SP, Brasil and Distrito de Rubiao Junior s/no 18608-000 Botucatu, SP (Brazil)

2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

50

Optimisation of NSLS-II Blade X-ray Beam Position Monitors: from Photoemission type to Diamond Detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Optimisation of blade type x-ray beam position monitors (XBPM) was performed for NSLS-II undulator IVU20. Blade material, con and #64257;guration and operation principle was analysed in order to improve XBPM performance. Optimisation is based on calculation of the XBPM signal spatial distribution. Along with standard photoemission type XBPM a Diamond Detector Blades (DDB) were analysed as blades for XBPMs. DDB XBPMs can help to overcome drawbacks of the photoemission blade XBPMs.

ILINSKI P.

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

51

Fast Beam-Based BPM Calibration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Alignment Diagnostic System (ADS) of the LCLS undulator system indicates that the 33 undulator quadrupoles have extremely high position stability over many weeks. However, beam trajectory straightness and lasing efficiency degrade more quickly than this. A lengthy Beam Based Alignment (BBA) procedure must be executed every two to four weeks to re-optimize the X-ray beam parameters. The undulator system includes RF cavity Beam Position Monitors (RFBPMs), several of which are utilized by an automatic feedback system to align the incoming electron-beam trajectory to the undulator axis. The beam trajectory straightness degradation has been traced to electronic drifts of the gain and offset of the BPMs used in the beam feedback system. To quickly recover the trajectory straightness, we have developed a fast beam-based procedure to recalibrate the BPMs. This procedure takes advantage of the high-precision monitoring capability of the ADS, which allows highly repeatable positioning of undulator quadrupoles. This report describes the ADS, the position stability of the LCLS undulator quadrupoles, and some results of the new recovery procedure.

Bertsche, K.; Loos, H.; Nuhn, H.-D.; Peters, F.; /SLAC

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

52

Tapering studies for Terawatt level X-ray FELs with a superconducting undulator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the tapering optimization scheme for a short period, less than two cm, superconducting undulator, and show that it can generate 4 keV X-ray pulses with peak power in excess of 1 terawatt, using LCLS electron beam parameters. We study the e?ect of undulator module length relative to the FEL gain length for continous and step-wise taper pro?les. For the optimal section length of 1.5m we study the evolution of the FEL process for two di?erent superconducting technologies NbTi and Nb3Sn. We discuss the major factors limiting the maximum output power, particle detrapping around the saturation location and time dependent detrapping due to generation and ampli?cation of sideband modes.

Emma, Claudio; Emma, Paul; Huang, Zhirong; Pellegrini, Claudio

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

An ultrashort pulse ultra-violet radiation undulator source driven by a laser plasma wakefield accelerator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Narrow band undulator radiation tuneable over the wavelength range of 150–260?nm has been produced by short electron bunches from a 2?mm long laser plasma wakefield accelerator based on a 20?TW femtosecond laser system. The number of photons measured is up to 9?×?10{sup 6} per shot for a 100 period undulator, with a mean peak brilliance of 1?×?10{sup 18} photons/s/mrad{sup 2}/mm{sup 2}/0.1% bandwidth. Simulations estimate that the driving electron bunch r.m.s. duration is as short as 3 fs when the electron beam has energy of 120–130?MeV with the radiation pulse duration in the range of 50–100 fs.

Anania, M. P. [SUPA, Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, I-00044 Frascati (Italy); Brunetti, E.; Wiggins, S. M.; Grant, D. W.; Welsh, G. H.; Issac, R. C.; Cipiccia, S.; Shanks, R. P.; Manahan, G. G.; Aniculaesei, C.; Jaroszynski, D. A., E-mail: d.a.jaroszynski@strath.ac.uk [SUPA, Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Geer, S. B. van der; Loos, M. J. de [Pulsar Physics, Burghstraat 47, 5614 BC Eindhoven (Netherlands); Poole, M. W.; Shepherd, B. J. A.; Clarke, J. A. [ASTeC, STFC, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Gillespie, W. A. [SUPA, School of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4HN (United Kingdom); MacLeod, A. M. [School of Computing and Creative Technologies, University of Abertay Dundee, Dundee DD1 1HG (United Kingdom)

2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

54

Undulations from amplified low frequency surface waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the linear scattering of gravity waves in longitudinal inhomogeneous stationary flows. When the flow becomes supercritical, it is known that counterflow propagating shallow waves are blocked and converted into deep waves. Here we show that in the zero-frequency limit, the reflected waves are amplified in such a way that the free surface develops an undulation, i.e., a zero-frequency wave of large amplitude with nodes located at specific places. This amplification involves negative energy waves and implies that flat surfaces are unstable against incoming perturbations of arbitrary small amplitude. The relation between this instability and black hole radiation (the Hawking effect) is established.

Coutant, Antonin, E-mail: antonin.coutant@aei.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics, Albert Einstein Institute, Am Muhlenberg 1, 14476 Golm (Germany)] [Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics, Albert Einstein Institute, Am Muhlenberg 1, 14476 Golm (Germany); Parentani, Renaud, E-mail: renaud.parentani@th.u-psud.fr [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, CNRS UMR 8627, Bâtiment 210, Université Paris-Sud 11, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France)] [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, CNRS UMR 8627, Bâtiment 210, Université Paris-Sud 11, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

55

A Benchmark Construction of Positron Crystal Undulator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimization of a positron crystal undulator (CU) is addressed. The ways to assure both the maximum intensity and minimum spectral width of positron CU radiation are outlined. We claim that the minimum CU spectrum width of 3 -- 4% is reached at the positron energies of a few GeV and that the optimal bending radius of crystals planes in CU ranges from 3 to 5 critical bending radii for channeled particles. Following suggested approach a benchmark positron CU construction is devised and its functioning is illustrated using the simulation method widely tested by experimental data.

Tikhomirov, Victor V

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Calculation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation Sites Proposed Route BTRICGEGR-N GoodsMexico's EnergyCalculation of

57

Three-dimensional calculations of neutron streaming in the beam tubes of the ORNL HFIR (High Flux Isotope Reactor) Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The streaming of neutrons through the beam tubes in High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has resulted in a reduction of the fracture toughness of the reactor vessel. As a result, an evaluation of vessel integrity was undertaken in order to determine if the reactor can be operated again. As a part of this evaluation, three-dimensional neutron transport calculations were performed to obtain fluxes at points of interest in the wall of the vessel. By comparing the calculated and measured activation of dosimetry specimens from the vessel surveillance program, it was determined that the calculated flux shape was satisfactory to transpose the surveillance data to the locations in the vessel. A bias factor was applied to correct for the average C/E ratio of 0.69. 8 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

Childs, R.L.; Rhoades, W.A.; Williams, L.R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

SCIENTIFIC POTENTIAL AND DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS FOK AN UNDULATOR BEAM LINE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 ResourceAwards SAGE Awards ,# , on behalf of Presented

59

The E166 Experiment: Undulator-Based Production of Polarized Positrons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A proof-of-principle experiment has been carried out in the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) at SLAC to demonstrate production of polarized positrons in a manner suitable for implementation at the ILC. A helical undulator of 2.54 mm period and 1-m length produced circularly polarized photons of first harmonic endpoint energy of 8 MeV when traversed by a 46.6 GeV electron beam. The polarized photons were converted to polarized positrons in a 0.2-radiation-length tungsten target. The polarization of these positrons was measured at several energies, with a peak value of {approx} 80% according to a preliminary analysis of the transmission polarimetry of photons obtained on reconversion of the positrons in a second tungsten target.

Schuler, K.Peter; /DESY

2007-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

60

The E166 Experiment: Undulator-Based Production of Polarized Positrons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A proof-of-principle experiment has been carried out in the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) at SLAC to demonstrate production of polarized positrons in a manner suitable for implementation at the ILC. A helical undulator of 2.54 mm period and 1-m length produced circularly polarized photons of first harmonic endpoint energy of 8 MeV when traversed by a 46.6 GeV electron beam. The polarized photons were converted to polarized positrons in a 0.2-radiation-length tungsten target. The polarization of these positrons was measured at several energies, with a peak value in excess of 80%, by transmission polarimetry of photons obtained on reconversion of the positrons in a second tungsten target.

Schueler, K. Peter [DESY, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany)

2008-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "undulator beam calculated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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61

NSLS IN-VACUUM UNDULATORS AND MINI-BETA STRAIGHTS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We review the work carried out in the X13 R&D Straight Section of the NSLS X-Ray Ring on small gap in-vacuum undulators (IVUNs). Then we discuss: (1) plans to replace the pure permanent magnet undulator in X13 by a hybrid design providing stronger magnetic fields, enhancing the tunability of the device; (2) plans to install hybrid IVUNs in the two RF straights of the X-Ray Ring, increasing the number of insertion devices in the XRay Ring to eight; (3) the possibility of reducing the vertical beta function in the X13 straight from 0.33 m down to 0.16 m. This reduction in beta function would allow us to decrease the usable undulator gap from 3mm down to 2mm, further increasing the tuning range.

RAKOWSKY,G.; LYNCH,D.; BLUM,E.B.; KRINSKY,S.

2001-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

62

First results of a superconducting undulator on the ACO storage ring (*) (**)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

L-547 First results of a superconducting undulator on the ACO storage ring (*) (**) C. Bazin (1), M. 2014 A superconducting undulator has been fixed on the ACO storage ring. It has been observed

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

63

Analysis of Shot Noise Suppression for Electron Beams  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

Shot noise can affect the performance of free-electron lasers (FELs) by driving instabilities (e.g., the microbunching instability) or by competing with seeded density modulations. Recent papers have proposed suppressing shot noise to enhance FEL performance. In this paper we use a onedimensional (1D) model to calculate the noise amplification from an energy modulation (e.g., electron interactions from space charge or undulator radiation) followed by a dispersive section. We show that, for a broad class of interactions, selecting the correct dispersive strength suppresses shot noise across a wide range of frequencies. The final noise level depends on the beam’s energy spread and the properties of the interaction potential. We confirm and illustrate our analytical results with 1D simulations.

Ratner, Daniel; Huang, Zhirong; Stupakov, Gennady

2015-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

64

Calculation of the parameters of the X-ray diffraction station with adaptive segmented optics on the side beam from the wiggler of the Sibir'-2 storage ring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mounting of an X-ray diffraction station on the side beam of a 19-pole superconducting wiggler makes it possible not only to use the central synchrotron radiation beam with a wavelength of 0.5 Angstrom-Sign , but also to solve problems requiring softer X rays at a synchrotron radiation (SR) intensity exceeding that for the beams from the bending magnet. A numerical simulation of the formation of photon beams from a source and their transmission through the elements of the station (and through the station as a whole) allows one to calculate the parameters of the station, compare it with the existing analogs, determine its potential and actual efficiency of its elements, and estimate the adjustment quality. A numerical simulation of the SR source on the side beam from the wiggler and the focusing channel (segmented condenser mirror, monochromator with sagittal focusing by the segmented second crystal, and segmented focusing mirror) has been performed. The sizes of the focus and the divergence of rays in it are determined with allowance for the finite sizes of segments. The intensity of radiation with a wavelength {lambda} = 1.0 Angstrom-Sign in the focus is determined taking into account the loss in the SR extraction channel and in the focusing channel. The values of the critical wavelength for the side beam from the wiggler and the wavelength resolution are calculated. The intensities in the X-ray diffraction pattern and its angular resolution are found.

Molodenskii, D. S.; Kheiker, D. M., E-mail: kheiker@ns.crys.ras.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation); Korchuganov, V. N. [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Konoplev, E. E. [NPO Luch (Russian Federation); Dorovatovskii, P. V. [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

65

Triggering for Magnetic Field Measurements of the LCLS Undulators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A triggering system for magnetic field measurements of the LCLS undulators has been built with a National Instruments PXI-1002 and a Xylinx FPGA board. The system generates single triggers at specified positions, regardless of encoder sensor jitter about a linear scale.

Hacker, Kirsten

2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

66

Influence of surface traction on soft robot undulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, assist in human motor tasks, and reduce manufacturing costs. As with natural invertebrates, soft robotsArticle Influence of surface traction on soft robot undulation The International Journal of Robotics Research 32(13) 1577­1584 © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub

Liu, David R.

67

Calculation and Verification of a Planar Pencil Beam Kernel Through the Hankel Transform of Measured OARs for a Radiosurgery System with Cones  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A planar multienergetic pencil beam kernel with rotational symmetry is calculated for a stereotactic radiosurgery system, SRS, BrainLAB with cones, employing the deconvolution method of the off axis ratio profile, OAR, corresponding to the cone of 35 mm in diameter for a 6 MV photon beam produced by a linear accelerator Varian 2100 C/D. Before the deconvolution, the experimental OAR is corrected for beam divergence and variations of the spectral fluence {Phi}, using a boundary function BF. The function BF and the fluence {Phi} are transformed to the conjugate space with the zero order Hankel function, which is the appropriate transform due to the radial symmetry of the circular beams generated by the cones. The kernel in the conjugate space is obtained as the ratio of the transform of BF to the transform of {Phi}, therefore the kernel in the real space is calculated as the inverse transform of the kernel in the conjugate space. To validate the kernel in the real space, it is convolved with the fluence of the cones of 7.5, 12.5, 15, 17.5, 20, 22.5, 25, 30 and 35 mm in diameter. The comparison of the OARs calculated and measured shows a maximum difference of 4.5% in the zones of high gradient of dose, and a difference less than 2% in the regions of low gradient of dose. Finally, the expanded uncertainty of the kernel is estimated and reported.

Vargas Verdesoto, Milton X. [Centro Oncologico de Chihuahua, Hacienda de la Esperanza 6304, Chihuahua, Chihuahua (Mexico); Alvarez Romero, Jose T. [SSDL, Departamento de Metrologia de Radiaciones Ionizantes, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico 52750 (Mexico)

2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

68

The U5. 0 Undulator for the ALS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U5.0 Undulator, an 89 period, 5 cm period length, 4.6 m long insertion device has been designed and is in fabrication. This undulator will be the first high brightness source, in the 50 to 1500 eV range, for the Advanced Light Source (ALS) and is scheduled for completion in 1992. A modular hybrid configuration utilizing Nd-Fe-B permanent magnet material and vanadium permendur is used that achieves 0.837 Tesla effective peak field. Correction of the vertical field integral is with permanent magnet rotors at the ends. Gap adjustment is with an arrangement of roller screws, chains drives, a gear reduction unit and a stepper motor driven by a closed loop control system. The vacuum chamber design is a two-piece, machined and welded 5083-H321 aluminum construction of 5.1 m length. Magnetic design, subsystem design and fabrication progress are presented. 12 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Hoyer, E.; Chin, J.; Halbach, K.; Hassenzahl, W.V.; Humphries, D.; Kincaid, B.; Lancaster, H.; Plate, D.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Quantitative assessment of the accuracy of dose calculation using pencil beam and Monte Carlo algorithms and requirements for clinical quality assurance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To compare the doses calculated using the BrainLAB pencil beam (PB) and Monte Carlo (MC) algorithms for tumors located in various sites including the lung and evaluate quality assurance procedures required for the verification of the accuracy of dose calculation. The dose-calculation accuracy of PB and MC was also assessed quantitatively with measurement using ionization chamber and Gafchromic films placed in solid water and heterogeneous phantoms. The dose was calculated using PB convolution and MC algorithms in the iPlan treatment planning system from BrainLAB. The dose calculation was performed on the patient's computed tomography images with lesions in various treatment sites including 5 lungs, 5 prostates, 4 brains, 2 head and necks, and 2 paraspinal tissues. A combination of conventional, conformal, and intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans was used in dose calculation. The leaf sequence from intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans or beam shapes from conformal plans and monitor units and other planning parameters calculated by the PB were identical for calculating dose with MC. Heterogeneity correction was considered in both PB and MC dose calculations. Dose-volume parameters such as V95 (volume covered by 95% of prescription dose), dose distributions, and gamma analysis were used to evaluate the calculated dose by PB and MC. The measured doses by ionization chamber and EBT GAFCHROMIC film in solid water and heterogeneous phantoms were used to quantitatively asses the accuracy of dose calculated by PB and MC. The dose-volume histograms and dose distributions calculated by PB and MC in the brain, prostate, paraspinal, and head and neck were in good agreement with one another (within 5%) and provided acceptable planning target volume coverage. However, dose distributions of the patients with lung cancer had large discrepancies. For a plan optimized with PB, the dose coverage was shown as clinically acceptable, whereas in reality, the MC showed a systematic lack of dose coverage. The dose calculated by PB for lung tumors was overestimated by up to 40%. An interesting feature that was observed is that despite large discrepancies in dose-volume histogram coverage of the planning target volume between PB and MC, the point doses at the isocenter (center of the lesions) calculated by both algorithms were within 7% even for lung cases. The dose distributions measured with EBT GAFCHROMIC films in heterogeneous phantoms showed large discrepancies of nearly 15% lower than PB at interfaces between heterogeneous media, where these lower doses measured by the film were in agreement with those by MC. The doses (V95) calculated by MC and PB agreed within 5% for treatment sites with small tissue heterogeneities such as the prostate, brain, head and neck, and paraspinal tumors. Considerable discrepancies, up to 40%, were observed in the dose-volume coverage between MC and PB in lung tumors, which may affect clinical outcomes. The discrepancies between MC and PB increased for 15 MV compared with 6 MV indicating the importance of implementation of accurate clinical treatment planning such as MC. The comparison of point doses is not representative of the discrepancies in dose coverage and might be misleading in evaluating the accuracy of dose calculation between PB and MC. Thus, the clinical quality assurance procedures required to verify the accuracy of dose calculation using PB and MC need to consider measurements of 2- and 3-dimensional dose distributions rather than a single point measurement using heterogeneous phantoms instead of homogenous water-equivalent phantoms.

Ali, Imad, E-mail: iali@ouhsc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Ahmad, Salahuddin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

The U5. 0 undulator design for the advanced light source at LBL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U5.0 undulator, currently under design, is the first in a series of insertion devices planned for the Advanced Light Source at LBL. U5.0 parameters include a 5 cm period, 5 m length with a 0.837 T maximum field at a 14 mm gap. A hybrid configuration utilizing Nd-Fe-B permanent magnet material and Vanadium Permendur poles is used for the magnetic structure. Construction is modular with many pole assemblies attached to a pole mount, which in turn is fastened onto one of the backing beams. Vertical field integral correction at the ends is with permanent magnet rotators. The supports structure features a 4-post configuration, a rigid base with 3 kinematic floor supports and 2 rigid 5 m long backing beams that fit within the 2.4 m high accelerator enclosure. The drive system is computer controlled utilizing a stepper motor and shaft encode coupled to a roller-screw/nut and chain drive train. Vacuum chamber design is a rigid configuration with a 10 mm vertical by 218 mm horizontal aperture of 5.5 m length. Chamber fabrication features a two-piece welded chamber of 5083 H321 aluminum. Pumping is with ion and titanium sublimation pumps. 5 figs., 1 tab.

Hoyer, E.; Chin, J.; Halbach, K.; Hassenzahl, W.; Humphries, D.; Kincaid, B.; Lancaster, H.; Plate, D.; Savoy, R.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

HYBRID UNDULATORS AND WIGGLERS LS-18 S.H. Kim  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky9, 2010 The meeting wasEngineering andHQHSIHYBRID UNDULATORS AND

72

Study the sensitivity of dose calculation in prism treatment planning system using Monte Carlo simulation of 6 MeV electron beam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prism is a non-commercial Radiotherapy Treatment Planning System (RTPS) develop by Ira J. Kalet from Washington University. Inhomogeneity factor is included in Prism TPS dose calculation. The aim of this study is to investigate the sensitivity of dose calculation on Prism using Monte Carlo simulation. Phase space source from head linear accelerator (LINAC) for Monte Carlo simulation is implemented. To achieve this aim, Prism dose calculation is compared with EGSnrc Monte Carlo simulation. Percentage depth dose (PDD) and R50 from both calculations are observed. BEAMnrc is simulated electron transport in LINAC head and produced phase space file. This file is used as DOSXYZnrc input to simulated electron transport in phantom. This study is started with commissioning process in water phantom. Commissioning process is adjusted Monte Carlo simulation with Prism RTPS. Commissioning result is used for study of inhomogeneity phantom. Physical parameters of inhomogeneity phantom that varied in this study are: density, location and thickness of tissue. Commissioning result is shown that optimum energy of Monte Carlo simulation for 6 MeV electron beam is 6.8 MeV. This commissioning is used R50 and PDD with Practical length (R{sub p}) as references. From inhomogeneity study, the average deviation for all case on interest region is below 5 %. Based on ICRU recommendations, Prism has good ability to calculate the radiation dose in inhomogeneity tissue.

Hardiansyah, D.; Haryanto, F. [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Laboratory, Physics Department, Institut Teknologi Bandung (ITB) (Indonesia); Male, S. [Radiotherapy Division, Research Hospital of Hassanudin University (Indonesia)

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

73

Verification of TG-61 dose for synchrotron-produced monochromatic x-ray beams using fluence-normalized MCNP5 calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Ion chamber dosimetry is being used to calibrate dose for cell irradiations designed to investigate photoactivated Auger electron therapy at the Louisiana State University Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices (CAMD) synchrotron facility. This study performed a dosimetry intercomparison for synchrotron-produced monochromatic x-ray beams at 25 and 35 keV. Ion chamber depth-dose measurements in a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantom were compared with the product of MCNP5 Monte Carlo calculations of dose per fluence and measured incident fluence. Methods: Monochromatic beams of 25 and 35 keV were generated on the tomography beamline at CAMD. A cylindrical, air-equivalent ion chamber was used to measure the ionization created in a 10 Multiplication-Sign 10 Multiplication-Sign 10-cm{sup 3} PMMA phantom for depths from 0.6 to 7.7 cm. The American Association of Physicists in Medicine TG-61 protocol was applied to convert measured ionization into dose. Photon fluence was determined using a NaI detector to make scattering measurements of the beam from a thin polyethylene target at angles 30 Degree-Sign -60 Degree-Sign . Differential Compton and Rayleigh scattering cross sections obtained from xraylib, an ANSI C library for x-ray-matter interactions, were applied to derive the incident fluence. MCNP5 simulations of the irradiation geometry provided the dose deposition per photon fluence as a function of depth in the phantom. Results: At 25 keV the fluence-normalized MCNP5 dose overestimated the ion-chamber measured dose by an average of 7.2 {+-} 3.0%-2.1 {+-} 3.0% for PMMA depths from 0.6 to 7.7 cm, respectively. At 35 keV the fluence-normalized MCNP5 dose underestimated the ion-chamber measured dose by an average of 1.0 {+-} 3.4%-2.5 {+-} 3.4%, respectively. Conclusions: These results showed that TG-61 ion chamber dosimetry, used to calibrate dose output for cell irradiations, agreed with fluence-normalized MCNP5 calculations to within approximately 7% and 3% at 25 and 35 keV, respectively.

Brown, Thomas A. D.; Hogstrom, Kenneth R.; Alvarez, Diane; Matthews, Kenneth L. II; Ham, Kyungmin [Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70809 and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and A and M College, 202 Nicholson Hall, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and A and M College, 202 Nicholson Hall, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices, Louisiana State University and A and M College, 6980 Jefferson Highway, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70806 (United States)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

74

Start-to-end global imaging as a sunward propagating, SAPS-associated giant undulation event  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present high-time resolution global imaging of a sunward propagating giant undulation event from start to finish. The event occurred on November 24, 2001 during a very disturbed storm interval. The giant undulations began to develop at around 13UT and persisted for approximately 2 hours. The sunward propagation speed was on the order of 0.6 km/s (relative to SM coordinate system). The undulations had a wavelength of {approx} 750 km, amplitudes of {approx} 890 km and produced ULF pulsations on the ground with a period of {approx} 1108s. We show that the undulations were associated with SAPs flows that were caused by the proton plasma sheet penetrating substantially farther Earthward than the electron plasma sheet on the duskside. The observations appear to be consistent with the development of a shear flow and/or ballooning type of instability at the plasmapause driven by intense SAPS-associated shear flows.

Henderson, Michael G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Donovan, Eric F [U OF CALGARY; Foster, John C [MIT; Mann, Ian R [UNIV OF ALBERTA; Immel, Thomas J [UC/BERKELEY; Mende, Stephen B [UN/BERKELEY; Sigwarth, John B [NASA/GSFC

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Photon beam position monitor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A photon beam position monitor is disclosed for use in the front end of a beamline of a high heat flux and high energy photon source such as a synchrotron radiation storage ring detects and measures the position and, when a pair of such monitors are used in tandem, the slope of a photon beam emanating from an insertion device such as a wiggler or an undulator inserted in the straight sections of the ring. The photon beam position monitor includes a plurality of spaced blades for precisely locating the photon beam, with each blade comprised of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond with an outer metal coating of a photon sensitive metal such as tungsten, molybdenum, etc., which combination emits electrons when a high energy photon beam is incident upon the blade. Two such monitors are contemplated for use in the front end of the beamline, with the two monitors having vertically and horizontally offset detector blades to avoid blade ''shadowing''. Provision is made for aligning the detector blades with the photon beam and limiting detector blade temperature during operation. 18 figs.

Kuzay, T.M.; Shu, D.

1995-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

76

LS Note 339 - Calculated Shims' Signatures with the 17.2 mm Period New Undulator  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, NewattractsDamping of PlasmaMethod9

77

Electron Beam Collimation for the Next Generation Light Source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Next Generation Light Source will deliver high (MHz) repetition rate electron beams to an array of free electron lasers. Because of the significant average current in such a facility, effective beam collimation is extremely important to minimize radiation damage to undulators, prevent quenches of superconducting cavities, limit dose rates outside of the accelerator tunnel and prevent equipment damage. This paper describes the early conceptual design of a collimation system, as well as initial results of simulations to test its effectiveness.

Steier, C.; Emma, P.; Nishimura, H.; Papadopoulos, C.; Sannibale, F.

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

78

Design of the commissioning filter/mask/window assembly for undulator beamline front ends at the Advanced Photon Source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A compact filter/mask/window assembly has been designed for undulator beamline commissioning activity at the Advanced Photon Source beamlines. The assembly consists of one 300-{mu}m graphite filter, one 127-{mu}m CVD diamond filter and two 250-{mu}m beryllium windows. A water-cooled Glidcop fixed mask with a 4.5-mm {times} 4.5-mm output optical aperture and a 0.96-mrad {times} 1.6-mrad beam missteering acceptance is a major part in the assembly. The CVD diamond filter which is mounted on the downstream side of the fixed mask is designed to also function as a transmitting x-ray beam position monitor. The sum signal from the latter can be used to monitor the physical condition of the graphite filter and prevent any possible chain reaction damage to the beryllium windows downstream. In this paper, the design concept as well as the detailed structural design of the commissioning window are presented. Further applications of the commissioning window commissioning window components are also discussed.

Shu, D.; Kuzay, T.M.

1995-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

79

A synchrotron X-ray study of competing undulation and electrostatic interlayer interactions in fluid multimembrane lyotropic phases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

arise from attrac- tive electrodynamic van der Waals and, normally repulsive electrostatic forces [2307 A synchrotron X-ray study of competing undulation and electrostatic interlayer interactions of competing electrostatic and undulation forces in two multimembrane systems in the lamellar L03B1 phase

Boyer, Edmond

80

Beam geometry selection using sequential beam addition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The selection of optimal beam geometry has been of interest since the inception of conformal radiotherapy. The authors report on sequential beam addition, a simple beam geometry selection method, for intensity modulated radiation therapy. Methods: The sequential beam addition algorithm (SBA) requires definition of an objective function (score) and a set of candidate beam geometries (pool). In the first iteration, the optimal score is determined for each beam in the pool and the beam with the best score selected. In the next iteration, the optimal score is calculated for each beam remaining in the pool combined with the beam selected in the first iteration, and the best scoring beam is selected. The process is repeated until the desired number of beams is reached. The authors selected three treatment sites, breast, lung, and brain, and determined beam arrangements for up to 11 beams from a pool comprised of 25 equiangular transverse beams. For the brain, arrangements were additionally selected from a pool of 22 noncoplanar beams. Scores were determined for geometries comprised equiangular transverse beams (EQA), as well as two tangential beams for the breast case. Results: In all cases, SBA resulted in scores superior to EQA. The breast case had the strongest dependence on beam geometry, for which only the 7-beam EQA geometry had a score better than the two tangential beams, whereas all SBA geometries with more than two beams were superior. In the lung case, EQA and SBA scores monotonically improved with increasing number of beams; however, SBA required fewer beams to achieve scores equivalent to EQA. For the brain case, SBA with a coplanar pool was equivalent to EQA, while the noncoplanar pool resulted in slightly better scores; however, the dose-volume histograms demonstrated that the differences were not clinically significant. Conclusions: For situations in which beam geometry has a significant effect on the objective function, SBA can identify arrangements equivalent to equiangular geometries but using fewer beams. Furthermore, SBA provides the value of the objective function as the number of beams is increased, allowing the planner to select the minimal beam number that achieves the clinical goals. The method is simple to implement and could readily be incorporated into an existing optimization system.

Popple, Richard A., E-mail: rpopple@uabmc.edu; Brezovich, Ivan A.; Fiveash, John B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1720 2nd Avenue South, Birmingham, Alabama 35294 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1720 2nd Avenue South, Birmingham, Alabama 35294 (United States)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "undulator beam calculated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Calculational analysis of structural activation induced by 20-100 MeV proton beam loss in high-power linear accelerators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the presence of the generated neutrons. The worst contributors were the spallation products created by proton bombardment of iron, and the worst component was the beam pipe, which consists mostly of iron. No definitive conclusions about the feasibility of hands-on...

Lee, Stacey Kirsten

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

82

Beam transport and monitoring for laser plasma accelerators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The controlled transport and imaging of relativistic electron beams from laser plasma accelerators (LPAs) are critical for their diagnostics and applications. Here we present the design and progress in the implementation of the transport and monitoring system for an undulator based electron beam diagnostic. Miniature permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQs) are employed to realize controlled transport of the LPA electron beams, and cavity based electron beam position monitors for non-invasive beam position detection. Also presented is PMQ calibration by using LPA electron beams with broadband energy spectrum. The results show promising performance for both transporting and monitoring. With the proper transport system, XUV-photon spectra from THUNDER will provide the momentum distribution of the electron beam with the resolution above what can be achieved by the magnetic spectrometer currently used in the LOASIS facility.

Nakamura, K.; Sokollik, T.; Tilborg, J. van; Gonsalves, A. J.; Shaw, B.; Shiraishi, S.; Mittal, R.; De Santis, S.; Byrd, J. M.; Leemans, W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States) and University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

83

Measurements of remanent fields in TQG quadrupoles by means of beam position measurements in FLASH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 2 und. 3 Q5UND3 und. 4 Q5UND4 und. 5 Q5UND5 und. 6 Q5UND6 . BPM 21SEED BPM 5UND1 BPM 5UND2 BPM 5UND3 BPM 5UND4 BPM 5UND5 BPM 5UND6 . Figure 1: Schematic layout (not to scale) of the undulator system in FLASH. The electron beam enters from the left side. Quadrupole names begin with 'Q'. BPM stands for beam

84

BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the advent of applied 3D fi elds in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous velocity reduction, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database [1]. Benchmark calculations are presented to validate the collisionless particle orbits, neutral beam injection model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields.

Lazerson, Samuel

2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

85

Periscope pop-in beam monitor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors have built monitors for use as beam diagnostics in the narrow gap of an undulator for an FEL experiment. They utilize an intercepting screen of doped YAG scintillating crystal to make light that is imaged through a periscope by conventional video equipment. The absolute position can be ascertained by comparing the electron beam position with the position of a He:Ne laser that is observed by this pop-in monitor. The optical properties of the periscope and the mechanical arrangement of the system mean that beam can be spatially determined to the resolution of the camera, in this case approximately 10 micrometers. The experience with these monitors suggests improvements for successor designs, which they also describe.

Johnson, E.D.; Graves, W.S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). National Synchrotron Light Source; Robinson, K.E. [STI Optronics, Bellevue, WA (United States)

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Calculator Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MA 16010 -- CALCULATOR POLICY. A ONE-LINE scientific calculator is REQUIRED. No other calculator is allowed. RECOMMENDED: TI-30Xa calculator

charlotb

2014-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

87

Transport and Non-Invasive Position Detection of Electron Beams from Laser-Plasma Accelerators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The controlled imaging and transport of ultra-relativistic electrons from laser-plasma accelerators is of crucial importance to further use of these beams, e.g. in high peak-brightness light sources. We present our plans to realize beam transport with miniature permanent quadrupole magnets from the electron source through our THUNDER undulator. Simulation results demonstrate the importance of beam imaging by investigating the generated XUV-photon flux. In addition, first experimental findings of utilizing cavity-based monitors for non-invasive beam-position measurements in a noisy electromagnetic laser-plasma environment are discussed.

Osterhoff, Jens; Sokollik, Thomas; Nakamura, Kei; Bakeman, Michael; Weingartner, R; Gonsalves, Anthony; Shiraishi, Satomi; Lin, Chen; vanTilborg, Jeroen; Geddes, Cameron; Schroeder, Carl; Esarey, Eric; Toth, Csaba; DeSantis, Stefano; Byrd, John; Gruner, F; Leemans, Wim

2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

88

Cooperative accumulation of coherent undulator radiation emitted from periodic electron bunches  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cavity build-up of coherent undulator synchrotron radiation emitted by periodic electron bunches is investigated. At the optimal off-grazing resonance, the bunch slippage relative to the radiation pulse introduces an initial transient period during which radiation accumulates cooperatively as if it is emitted by a single bunch. The power growth during the period is quadratic to the number of bunches. The number of cooperative bunches is {approx}2 Script-Small-L {sub s}{sup 2}, where Script-Small-L {sub s} denotes the slippage length in units of the resonant wavelength.

Seo, Y. H. [Department of Electrophysics, Kwangwoon University, Seoul 139-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

89

Calculator Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MA 15800 – Calculators – GOOD AND BAD. ONLY ONE-LINE scientific calculators are permitted. *RECOMMENDED CALCULATOR: TI-30XA(See Below).

charlotb

2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

90

NOVEL CHAMBER DESIGN FOR AN IN-VACUUM CRYO-COOLED MINI-GAP UNDULATOR.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A stainless steel, Ultra-High Vacuum (UHV) chamber, featuring a large vertical rectangular port (53''W by 16''H), has been fabricated to house the one-meter magnet assembly of a newly installed undulator insertion device for beamline X-25 at the National Synchrotron Light Source. To achieve UHV, the new chamber is equipped with a differential ion pump, NEG pump, nude ion gauge, residual gas analyzer, and an all metal roughing valve. Temperature of the magnet assembly is maintained below 90 C during vacuum bake. The large rectangular port cover is sealed to the main flange of the chamber using a one-piece flat aluminum gasket and special sealing surfaces developed exclusively by Nor-Cal Products, Inc. The large flange provides easy access to the gap of the installed magnet girders for in situ magnetic measurements and shimming. Special window ports were designed into the cover and chamber for manipulation of optical micrometers external to the chamber to provide precise measurements of the in-vacuum magnet gap. The vacuum chamber assembly features independently vacuum-isolated feedthroughs that can be used for either water-or-cryogenic refrigeration-cooling of the monolithic magnet girders. This would allow for cryogenic-cooled permanent magnet operation and has been successfully tested within temperature range of +100 C to -150 C. Details of the undulator assembly for beamline X-25 is described in the paper.

HU, J.-P.; FOERSTER, C.L.; SKARITKA, J.R.; WATERMAN, D.

2006-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

91

Beam conditioner for free electron lasers and synchrotrons  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A focused optical has been used to introduce an optical pulse, or electromagnetic wave, collinear with the electron beam in a free electron laser or synchrotron thereby adding an axial field component that accelerates the electrons on the radial outside of the distribution of electrons in the electron beam. This invention consists of using the axial electrical component of a TEM{sub 10} mode Gaussian beam in vacuum to condition the electron beam and speed up the outer electrons in the beam. The conditioning beam should possess about the same diameter as the electron beam. The beam waist of the conditioning wave must be located around the entrance of the undulator longitudinally to have a net energy exchange between the electrons in the outer part of the distribution and the conditioning wave owing to the natural divergence of a Gaussian beam. By accelerating the outer electrons, the outer and core electrons are caused to stay in phase. This increases the fraction of the electron beam energy that is converted to light thereby improving the efficiency of conversion of energy to light and therefore boosting the power output of the free electron laser and synchrotron. 4 figs.

Liu, H.; Neil, G.R.

1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

92

Beam conditioner for free electron lasers and synchrotrons  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A focused optical is been used to introduce an optical pulse, or electromagnetic wave, colinearly with the electron beam in a free electron laser or synchrotron thereby adding an axial field component that accelerates the electrons on the radial outside of the distribution of electrons in the electron beam. This invention consists of using the axial electrical component of a TEM.sub.10 mode Gaussian beam in vacuum to condition the electron beam and speed up the outer electrons in the beam. The conditioning beam should possess about the same diameter as the electron beam. The beam waist of the conditioning wave must be located around the entrance of the undulator longitudinally to have a net energy exchange between the electrons in the outer part of the distribution and the conditioning wave owing to the natural divergence of a Gaussian beam. By accelerating the outer electrons, the outer and core electrons are caused to stay in phase. This increases the fraction of the electron beam energy that is converted to light thereby improving the efficiency of conversion of energy to light and therefore boosting the power output of the free electron laser and synchrotron.

Liu, Hongxiu (Williamsburg, VA); Neil, George R. (Williamsburg, VA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Calculator Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MA 15300 Calculator Policy. ONLY a TI-30Xa scientific calculator is allowed on quizzes and exams. If you have questions, please email the course coordinator ...

charlotb

2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

94

Calculator Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MA 15910 Calculator Policy. ONLY a TI-30Xa scientific calculator is allowed on quizzes and exams. If you have questions, please email the course coordinator ...

charlotb

2014-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

95

Statistical properties of the radiation from SASE FEL operating in a post-saturation regime with and without undulator tapering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe statistical and coherence properties of the radiation from x-ray free electron lasers (XFEL) operating in the post-saturation regime. We consider practical case of the SASE3 FEL at the European XFEL. We perform comparison of the main characteristics of the X-ray FEL operating in the post-saturation regime with and without undulator tapering: efficiency, coherence time and degree of transverse coherence.

Schneidmiller, E A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Hard x-ray or gamma ray laser by a dense electron beam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A coherent x-ray or gamma ray can be created from a dense electron beam propagating through an intense laser undulator. It is analyzed by using the Landau damping theory which suits better than the conventional linear analysis for the free electron laser, as the electron beam energy spread is high. The analysis suggests that the currently available physical parameters would enable the generation of the coherent gamma ray of up to 100 keV. The electron quantum diffraction suppresses the FEL action, by which the maximum radiation energy to be generated is limited.

S. Son; S. J. Moon

2012-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

97

Conceptual design report for the UNI-CAT beam line proposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall thrusts of UNI-CAT (University-National Laboratory- Industry Collaborative Access Team) are research at the cutting edge of physics, chemistry, biology, materials science, chemical engineering, polymer science, and geology; and education of a new generation of scientists in the use of synchrotron radiation to probe the structure, chemistry, and dynamic behavior of materials. The UNI-CAT proposal is to develop an APS sector that includes a bending magnet beam line and an insertion device beam line. The APS type-A undulator is the preferred choice for the insertion device. 8 figs, 6 refs. (DLC)

Budai, J.D.; Ice, G.E.; Sparks, C.J.; Zschack, P. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Chen, H.; Chiang, T.C.; Nelson, M.C.; Salamon, M.B.; Simmons, R.O. (Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (United States)); Robota, H. (Allied-Signal, Inc., Des Plaines, IL (United States))

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Recent advances of strong-strong beam-beam simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we report on recent advances in strong-strong beam-beam simulation. Numerical methods used in the calculation of the beam-beam forces are reviewed. A new computational method to solve the Poisson equation on nonuniform grid is presented. This method reduces the computational cost by a half compared with the standard FFT based method on uniform grid. It is also more accurate than the standard method for a colliding beam with low transverse aspect ratio. In applications, we present the study of coherent modes with multi-bunch, multi-collision beam-beam interactions at RHIC. We also present the strong-strong simulation of the luminosity evolution at KEKB with and without finite crossing angle.

Qiang, Ji; Furman, Miguel A.; Ryne, Robert D.; Fischer, Wolfram; Ohmi,Kazuhito

2004-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

99

A pencil beam algorithm for helium ion beam therapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To develop a flexible pencil beam algorithm for helium ion beam therapy. Dose distributions were calculated using the newly developed pencil beam algorithm and validated using Monte Carlo (MC) methods. Methods: The algorithm was based on the established theory of fluence weighted elemental pencil beam (PB) kernels. Using a new real-time splitting approach, a minimization routine selects the optimal shape for each sub-beam. Dose depositions along the beam path were determined using a look-up table (LUT). Data for LUT generation were derived from MC simulations in water using GATE 6.1. For materials other than water, dose depositions were calculated by the algorithm using water-equivalent depth scaling. Lateral beam spreading caused by multiple scattering has been accounted for by implementing a non-local scattering formula developed by Gottschalk. A new nuclear correction was modelled using a Voigt function and implemented by a LUT approach. Validation simulations have been performed using a phantom filled with homogeneous materials or heterogeneous slabs of up to 3 cm. The beams were incident perpendicular to the phantoms surface with initial particle energies ranging from 50 to 250 MeV/A with a total number of 10{sup 7} ions per beam. For comparison a special evaluation software was developed calculating the gamma indices for dose distributions. Results: In homogeneous phantoms, maximum range deviations between PB and MC of less than 1.1% and differences in the width of the distal energy falloff of the Bragg-Peak from 80% to 20% of less than 0.1 mm were found. Heterogeneous phantoms using layered slabs satisfied a {gamma}-index criterion of 2%/2mm of the local value except for some single voxels. For more complex phantoms using laterally arranged bone-air slabs, the {gamma}-index criterion was exceeded in some areas giving a maximum {gamma}-index of 1.75 and 4.9% of the voxels showed {gamma}-index values larger than one. The calculation precision of the presented algorithm was considered to be sufficient for clinical practice. Although only data for helium beams was presented, the performance of the pencil beam algorithm for proton beams was comparable. Conclusions: The pencil beam algorithm developed for helium ions presents a suitable tool for dose calculations. Its calculation speed was evaluated to be similar to other published pencil beam algorithms. The flexible design allows easy customization of measured depth-dose distributions and use of varying beam profiles, thus making it a promising candidate for integration into future treatment planning systems. Current work in progress deals with RBE effects of helium ions to complete the model.

Fuchs, Hermann; Stroebele, Julia; Schreiner, Thomas; Hirtl, Albert; Georg, Dietmar [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/AKH Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria) and Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/AKH Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/AKH Vienna (Austria) and Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/AKH Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); PEG MedAustron, 2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/AKH Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria) and Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/AKH Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

100

Optical remote diagnostics of atmospheric propagating beams of ionizing radiation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Data is obtained for use in diagnosing the characteristics of a beam of ionizing radiation, such as charged particle beams, neutral particle beams, and gamma ray beams. In one embodiment the beam is emitted through the atmosphere and produces nitrogen fluorescence during passage through air. The nitrogen fluorescence is detected along the beam path to provide an intensity from which various beam characteristics can be calculated from known tabulations. Optical detecting equipment is preferably located orthogonal to the beam path at a distance effective to include the entire beam path in the equipment field of view.

Karl, Jr., Robert R. (Los Alamos, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "undulator beam calculated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Formation of compressed flat electron beams with high transverse-emittance ratios  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Flat beams—beams with asymmetric transverse emittances—have important applications in novel light-source concepts and advanced-acceleration schemes and could possibly alleviate the need for damping rings in lepton colliders. Over the last decade, a flat beam generation technique based on the conversion of an angular-momentum-dominated beam was proposed and experimentally tested. In this paper we explore the production of compressed flat beams. We especially investigate and optimize the flat beam transformation for beams with substantial fractional energy spread. We use as a simulation example the photoinjector of Fermilab’s Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator. The optimizations of the flat beam generation and compression at Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator were done via start-to-end numerical simulations for bunch charges of 3.2 nC, 1.0 nC, and 20 pC at ?37??MeV. The optimized emittances of flat beams with different bunch charges were found to be 0.25???m (emittance ratio is ?400), 0.13????m, 15 nm before compression, and 0.41???m, 0.20???m, 16 nm after full compression, respectively, with peak currents as high as 5.5 kA for a 3.2?nC flat beam. These parameters are consistent with requirements needed to excite wakefields in asymmetric dielectric-lined waveguides or produce significant photon flux using small-gap micro-undulators.

Zhu, J. [Fermilab; Institute of Fluid Physics, CAEP, China; Piot, P. [Northern Illinois University; Fermilab; Mihalcea, D. [Northern Illinois University; Prokop, C. R. [Northern Illinois University

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Breaking the Attosecond, Angstrom and TV/M Field Barriers with Ultra-Fast Electron Beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent initiatives at UCLA concerning ultra-short, GeV electron beam generation have been aimed at achieving sub-fs pulses capable of driving X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) in single-spike mode. This use of very low Q beams may allow existing FEL injectors to produce few-100 attosecond pulses, with very high brightness. Towards this end, recent experiments at the LCLS have produced {approx}2 fs, 20 pC electron pulses. We discuss here extensions of this work, in which we seek to exploit the beam brightness in FELs, in tandem with new developments in cryogenic undulator technology, to create compact accelerator-undulator systems that can lase below 0.15 {angstrom}, or be used to permit 1.5 {angstrom} operation at 4.5 GeV. In addition, we are now developing experiments which use the present LCLS fs pulses to excite plasma wakefields exceeding 1 TV/m, permitting a table-top TeV accelerator for frontier high energy physics applications.

Rosenzweig, James; Andonian, Gerard; Fukasawa, Atsushi; Hemsing, Erik; Marcus, Gabriel; Marinelli, Agostino; Musumeci, Pietro; O'Shea, Brendan; O'Shea, Finn; Pellegrini, Claudio; Schiller, David; Travish, Gil; /UCLA; Bucksbaum, Philip; Hogan, Mark; Krejcik, Patrick; /SLAC; Ferrario, Massimo; /INFN, Rome; Full, Steven; /Penn State U.; Muggli, Patric; /Southern California U.

2012-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

103

Simple Low-Frequency Beam Pickup  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detection of the field induced by a beam outside of the beam pipe can be used as a beam diagnostic. Wires placed in longitudinal slots in the outside wall of the beam pipe can be used as a beam pickup. This has a very small beam-coupling impedance and avoids complications of having a feedthrough. The signal can be reasonably high at low frequencies. We present a field waveform at the outer side of a beam pipe, obtained as a result of calculations and measurements. We calculate the beam-coupling impedance due to a long longitudinal slot in the resistive wall and the signal induced in a wire placed in such a slot and shielded by a thin screen from the beam. These results should be relevant for impedance calculations of the slot in an antechamber and for slots in the PEP-II distributed ion pump screens. The design of the low-frequency beam position monitor is very simple. It can be used in storage rings, synchrotron light sources, and free electron lasers, like LINAC coherent light source.

Novokhatski, A.; Heifets, S.; /SLAC; Aleksandrov, A.; /Oak Ridge

2011-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

104

Beam History  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien, I. Ben-Zvi, P. StudyBeam History PrintBeam History

105

Beams 92: Proceedings. Volume 2, Ion beams, electron beams, diagnostics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains papers on the following topics. Ion beam papers; electron beam papers; and these papers have been indexed separately elsewhere.

Mosher, D.; Cooperstein, G. [eds.] [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)] [eds.; Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

106

amp beam currents: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(FBCCM) is an example. It is based on analogue signals from fast beam current transformers (FBCT) used nominally to measure the LHC bunch intensities. The FBCCM calculates...

107

Low energy beam line at the AGOR facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The origin of the low transmission through the low energy beam line between the electron cyclotron resonance source and the AGOR cyclotron has been investigated. Measurements of beam size and emittance, determined with the ''varying quadrupole method,'' are compared with calculations including fringe fields up to third order with the code COSY INFINITY. Calculations and measurements qualitatively agree; the calculations exhibit the large beam losses observed. On the basis of the calculations new settings have been determined, resulting in a significant increase of the transmission. To achieve full transmission a complete redesign of the beam line, in particular of the bending magnets, is needed.

Toprek, Dragan; Formanoy, Iwo; Brandenburg, Sytze [VINCA Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Laboratory for Nuclear and Plasma Physics, B.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut (KVI), Zernikelaan 25, 9747 AA, Groningen (Netherlands)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

MA 22400 -- CALCULATOR POLICY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MA 22400 -- CALCULATOR POLICY. A ONE-LINE scientific calculator is REQUIRED. No other calculator is allowed. RECOMMENDED: TI-30Xa calculator

OwenDavis

2014-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

109

Accelerator beam profile analyzer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A beam profile analyzer employing sector or quadrant plates each servo controlled to outline the edge of a beam.

Godel, Julius B. (Bayport, NY); Guillaume, Marcel (Grivegnee, BE); Lambrecht, Richard M. (East Quogue, NY); Withnell, Ronald (East Setauket, NY)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Design of Control Instrumentation of a 4 meter Variable Polarization Undulator (EPU)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design of a high end, very sophisticated controller, that consists of an Allen Bradley ControlLogix PLC with a Kinetix servo controller for a 4.16 m EPU is presented. Four servo motors control the gap - 2 on the upper girder and 2 on the lower girder, and another 4 servos controls the phase - 2 on the upper girder inner and outer and 2 on the lower girder, inner and outer. This system is designed for The Taiwan Light Source (TLS) a synchrotron radiation machine of the National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center (NSRRC) at the energy of 1.5 GeV with electron beam current of 200 {approx} 400 mA.

Kulesza, Joe; Deyhim, Alex [Advanced Design Consulting USA, 126 Ridge Road, P.O. Box 187, Lansing, NY 14882 (United States); Fan Taiching; Chen, Jenny [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, 101 Hsin-Ann Road, Science-Based Industrial Park, Hsinchu 30077, Taiwan (China)

2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

111

Effect of Diffusion on Bunched Beam Echo  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When a beam receives a dipole kick, its centroid signal decoheres due to the betatron tune spread in the beam. Long after the signal has decohered, however, a followup quadrupole kick to the beam brings a pronounced echo back to the centroid signal. This echo effect has been analyzed for the case of a bunched beam in Ref. [1]. In this work, the perturbation calculation of Ref. [1] is extended to include a diffusion in betatron amplitude. The effect of diffusion on the magnitude of the echo is then parameterized and studied.

Stupakov, G.V.; Chao, A.W.; /SLAC

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Beam History  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien, I. Ben-Zvi, P. StudyBeam History Print Beamline

113

Beam History  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien, I. Ben-Zvi, P. StudyBeam History Print

114

Beam Transport  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien, I. Ben-Zvi, P. StudyBeam History

115

Beam Status  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformationCenterResearch HighlightsToolsBES ReportsExperimentBasicBeam Status Print mA

116

Beam-Bem interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In high energy storage-ring colliders, the nonlinear effect arising from beam-beam interactions is a major source that leads to the emittance growth, the reduction of beam life time, and limits the collider luminosity. In this paper, two models of beam-beam interactions are introduced, which are weak-strong and strong-strong beam-beam interactions. In addition, space-charge model is introduced.

Kim, Hyung Jin; /Fermilab

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Method of automatic measurement and focus of an electron beam and apparatus therefore  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electron beam focusing system, including a plural slit-type Faraday beam trap, for measuring the diameter of an electron beam and automatically focusing the beam for welding is disclosed. Beam size is determined from profiles of the current measured as the beam is swept over at least two narrow slits of the beam trap. An automated procedure changes the focus coil current until the focal point location is just below a workpiece surface. A parabolic equation is fitted to the calculated beam sizes from which optimal focus coil current and optimal beam diameter are determined. 12 figs.

Giedt, W.H.; Campiotti, R.

1996-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

118

How Do Calculators Calculate? Helmut Knaust  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

not convert numbers to base 2. They use a binary-coded decimal (BCD) system instead. Calculators can only

Knaust, Helmut

119

Neutron measurements from beam-target reactions at the ELISE neutral beam test facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements of 2.5 MeV neutron emission from beam-target reactions performed at the ELISE neutral beam test facility are presented in this paper. The measurements are used to study the penetration of a deuterium beam in a copper dump, based on the observation of the time evolution of the neutron counting rate from beam-target reactions with a liquid scintillation detector. A calculation based on a local mixing model of deuterium deposition in the target up to a concentration of 20% at saturation is used to evaluate the expected neutron yield for comparison with data. The results are of relevance to understand neutron emission associated to beam penetration in a solid target, with applications to diagnostic systems for the SPIDER and MITICA Neutral Beam Injection prototypes.

Xufei, X., E-mail: xiexufei@pku.edu.cn; Fan, T. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Nocente, M.; Gorini, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica “G. Occhialini”, Università di Milano-Bicocca, Milano 20216 (Italy); Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “P. Caldirola”, Milano 20216 (Italy); Bonomo, F. [Consorzio RFX, Padova 35100 (Italy); Istituto Gas Ionizzati, CNR, Padova 35100 (Italy); Franzen, P.; Fröschle, M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching 84518 (Germany); Grosso, G.; Tardocchi, M. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “P. Caldirola”, Milano 20216 (Italy); Grünauer, F. [Physics Consulting, Zorneding 85604 (Germany); Pasqualotto, R. [Consorzio RFX, Padova 35100 (Italy)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

120

Using Surface Impedance for Calculating Wakefields in Flat Geometry  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

Beginning with Maxwell's equations and assuming only that the wall interaction can be approximated by a surface impedance, we derive formulas for the generalized longitudinal and transverse impedance in flat geometry, from which the wakefields can also be obtained. From the generalized impedances, by taking the proper limits, we obtain the normal longitudinal, dipole, and quad impedances in flat geometry. These equations can be applied to any surface impedance, such as the known dc, ac, and anomalous skin models of wall resistance, a model of wall roughness, or one for a pipe with small, periodic corrugations. We show that, for the particular case of dc wall resistance, the longitudinal impedance obtained here agrees with a known result in the literature, a result that was derived from a very general formula by Henke and Napoly. As concrete example, we apply our results to representative beam and machine parameters in the undulator region of LCLS-II and estimate the impact of the transverse wakes on the machine performance.

Bane, Karl; Stupakov, Gennady

2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "undulator beam calculated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Study of the Feasibility of an X-Ray Free Electron Laser with a 15 GeV CLIC Beam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This note presents a study of the feasibility of a Free Electron Laser (FEL) using an electron beam from the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). We first show that, with the nominal CLIC layout, the energy spread at 15 GeV would be too large to allow FEL saturation in an undulator of reasonable length. An alternative scheme was studied, with a dedicated source, with a by-pass of the damping rings and with magnetic compression between the various acceleration stages. With this scheme, the energy spread of the CLIC beam can be reduced from 1.5% to 0.1%, but the emittance is much larger and, although the power gain is better than in the nominal case, FEL saturation is still not reached. We show that the energy spread or the transverse emittance would have to be reduced by another order of magnitude in order to obtain FEL saturation.

Brandin, M; Ekelöf, T J C; Ferrari, A

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Original Impact Calculations  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Original Impact Calculations, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

123

Nondestructive evaluation of distributed damage in graphite/epoxy beams using modal parameters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Beam Extensional Stiffness of Composite Beam in Damaged State Bending Stiffness of Composite Beam in Damaged State SENSITIVITY MATRIX CONSTRUCTION FOR LAMINATED COMPOSITE BEAM . Introductory Remarks Governing Equation I' or Transverse Vibration... in Laminated Composite Beam Calculation of Sensitivity Matrix [F] Page rn 1v v11 v111 5 11 14 14 15 17 21 21 23 24 28 28 28 30 V1 TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued) Page PROCEDURE OF EXPERIMENTS AND THEIR RESULTS Introductory Remarks...

Kim, Young Ik

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

LCLS Protype Undulator Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample Environment: Magnet and6 th7525T HE FLCLSLCLS Prep

125

A TALE OF TWO BEAMS: GAUSSIAN BEAMS AND BESSEL BEAMS ROBERT L. NOWACK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A TALE OF TWO BEAMS: GAUSSIAN BEAMS AND BESSEL BEAMS ROBERT L. NOWACK Abstract. An overview is given of two types of focused beams, Gaussian beams and Bessel beams. First I describe some of the basic properties of Gaussian beams in homogeneous media which stay collimated over a certain distance range after

Nowack, Robert L.

126

Beam Dynamics for ARIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Beam dynamics issues are assessed for a new linear induction electron accelerator being designed for flash radiography of large explosively driven hydrodynamic experiments. Special attention is paid to equilibrium beam transport, possible emittance growth, and beam stability. It is concluded that a radiographic quality beam will be produced possible if engineering standards and construction details are equivalent to those on the present radiography accelerators at Los Alamos.

Ekdahl, Carl

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

ATA beam director experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes beam director elements for an experiment at the Advanced Test Accelerator. The elements described include a vernier magnet for beam aiming, an achromat magnet, and an isolation system for the beam interface. These components are built at small scale for concept testing. (JDH)

Lee, E.P.; Younger, F.C.; Cruz, G.E.; Nolting, E.

1986-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

128

Method for measuring and controlling beam current in ion beam processing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for producing film thickness control of ion beam sputter deposition films. Great improvements in film thickness control is accomplished by keeping the total current supplied to both the beam and suppressor grids of a radio frequency (RF) in beam source constant, rather than just the current supplied to the beam grid. By controlling both currents, using this method, deposition rates are more stable, and this allows the deposition of layers with extremely well controlled thicknesses to about 0.1%. The method is carried out by calculating deposition rates based on the total of the suppressor and beam currents and maintaining the total current constant by adjusting RF power which gives more consistent values.

Kearney, Patrick A. (Livermore, CA); Burkhart, Scott C. (Livermore, CA)

2003-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

129

Space Charge Compensation in the Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport Line with Negative Hydrogen Ions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The space charge effect of low energy, unbunched ion beams can be compensated by the trapping of ions or electrons into the beam potential. This has been studied for the 45 keV negative hydrogen ion beam in the CERN Linac4 Low Energy Beam Tranport (LEBT) using the package IBSimu1, which allows the space charge calculation of the particle trajectories. The results of the beam simulations will be compared to emittance measurements of an H- beam at the CERN Linac4 3 MeV test stand, where the injection of hydrogen gas directly into the beam transport region has been used to modify the space charge compensation degree.

Valerio-Lizarraga, C; Leon-Monzon, I; Lettry, J; Midttun, O; Scrivens, R

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Diffusion Simulation and Lifetime Calculation at RHIC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The beam lifetime is an important parameter for any storage ring. For protons in RHIC it is dominated by the non-linear nature of the head-on collisions that causes the particles to diffuse outside the stable area in phase space. In this report we show results from diffusion simulation and lifetime calculation for the 2006 and 2008 polarized proton runs in RHIC.

Abreu,N.P.; Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.; Robert-Demolaize, G.

2009-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

131

Neutral beam monitoring  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method and apparatus for monitoring characteristics of a high energy neutral beam. A neutral beam is generated by passing accelerated ions through a walled cell containing a low energy neutral gas, such that charge exchange neutralizes the high energy ion beam. The neutral beam is monitored by detecting the current flowing through the cell wall produced by low energy ions which drift to the wall after the charge exchange. By segmenting the wall into radial and longitudinal segments various beam conditions are further identified.

Fink, Joel H. (Livermore, CA)

1981-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

132

LBNL-46223, CBP Note 350 BEAM-BEAM SIMULATIONS FOR SEPARATED BEAMS IN THE LHC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-46223, CBP Note 350 BEAM-BEAM SIMULATIONS FOR SEPARATED BEAMS IN THE LHC M. A. Furman, W. C. Turner, Center for Beam Physics, LBNL, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA Abstract We present beam-beam simulation of simulations: (a) to as- sess undesirable effects from LBNL's luminosity monitor- ing scheme for the LHC [2

Furman, Miguel

133

LBNL-45363, CBP Note 333 BEAM-BEAM SIMULATIONS FOR SEPARATED BEAMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-45363, CBP Note 333 BEAM-BEAM SIMULATIONS FOR SEPARATED BEAMS Miguel A. Furman, Center for Beam Physics, LBNL, Berkeley, CA 94720 Abstract We present beam-beam simulation results from a strong undesirable effects from LBNL's sweeping lumi- nosity monitoring scheme for the LHC [1], and (b) to assess

Furman, Miguel

134

A Beam line for Macromolecular Crystallography in ALBA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ALBA is a third generation 3 GeV storage ring being built near Barcelona and foreseen to be operational in 2010. Out of the seven beamlines already funded in ALBA, one will be dedicated to macromolecular crystallography (MX). The beamline, dubbed XALOC, shall cope with a broad range of crystal structures and sizes. To this aim, a flexible optical design involving variable focusing optics has been incorporated into the beamline optics. The photon source will be a 2 m long, in-vacuum undulator with a period of 21.3 mm. The optics will consist in a Si(111), double-crystal monochromator cryogenically cooled, and a pair of mirrors placed in a Kirkpatrick-Baez configuration. The beamline will deliver a high flux beam in the 5-15 keV energy range, with an energy resolution of {delta}E/E {approx}2 x 10-4. In addition to the main beamline, it is being considered the possibility to use a diamond laue monochromator to provide photons at a fixed wavelength to an ancillary branch. This report shows the present status of the beamline design.

Juanhuix, Jordi; Ferrer, Salvador [CELLS -ALBA Synchrotron, Ed. Ciencies, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)

2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

135

Multiphase flow calculation software  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Multiphase flow calculation software and computer-readable media carrying computer executable instructions for calculating liquid and gas phase mass flow rates of high void fraction multiphase flows. The multiphase flow calculation software employs various given, or experimentally determined, parameters in conjunction with a plurality of pressure differentials of a multiphase flow, preferably supplied by a differential pressure flowmeter or the like, to determine liquid and gas phase mass flow rates of the high void fraction multiphase flows. Embodiments of the multiphase flow calculation software are suitable for use in a variety of applications, including real-time management and control of an object system.

Fincke, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

136

Broad beam ion implanter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes.

Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Small beam nonparaxiality arrests selffocusing of optical beams Gadi Fibich  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Small beam nonparaxiality arrests self­focusing of optical beams Gadi Fibich Department­focusing in the presence of small beam nonparaxiality is derived. Analysis of this equation shows that nonparaxiality remains small as the beam propa­ gates. Nevertheless, nonparaxiality arrests self­focusing when the beam

Soatto, Stefano

138

Evaluation and Compensation of Detector Solenoid Effects on Disrupted Beam in the ILC 14 mrad Extraction Line  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents calculations of detector solenoid effects on disrupted primary beam in the ILC 14 mrad extraction line. Particle tracking simulations are performed for evaluation of primary beam loss along the line as well as of beam distribution and polarization at Compton Interaction Point. The calculations are done both without and with solenoid compensation. The results are obtained for the baseline ILC energy of 500 GeV center-of-mass and three options of beam parameters.

Toprek, Dragan; /VINCA Inst. Nucl. Sci., Belgrade; Nosochkov, Yuri; /SLAC

2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

139

Beam Test of a Segmented Foil SEM Grid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A prototype Secondary-electron Emission Monitor (SEM) was installed in the 8 GeV proton transport line for the MiniBooNE experiment at Fermilab. The SEM is a segmented grid made with 5 um Ti foils, intended for use in the 120 GeV NuMI beam at Fermilab. Similar to previous workers, we found that the full collection of the secondary electron signal requires a bias voltage to draw the ejected electrons cleanly off the foils, and this effect is more pronounced at larger beam intensity. The beam centroid and width resolutions of the SEM were measured at beam widths of 3, 7, and 8 mm, and compared to calculations. Extrapolating the data from this beam test, we expect a centroid and width resolutions of 20um and 25 um, respectively, in the NuMI beam which has 1 mm spot size.

S. Kopp; D. Indurthy; Z. Pavlovich; M. Proga; R. Zwaska; S. Childress; R. Ford; C. Kendziora; T. Kobilarcik; C. Moore; G. Tassotto

2005-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

140

Optimal beam pattern to maximize inclusion residence time in an electron beam melting hearth  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Approximate probabilities of inclusion survival through an electron beam melting hearth are computed from nitride dissolution rates, flotation velocities, and residence times. Dissolution rates were determined by measuring shrinkage rates of pure TiN and nitrided sponge in small pools of molten titanium in an electron beam melting hearth. Flotation velocities were calculated using correlations for fluid flow around spheres, and show that particles sink or float unless their densities are extremely close to that of molten titanium. Flow field characteristics which lead to effective inclusion removal are discussed in terms of heat flux pattern required to produce them, based on the electron beam`s unique ability to impart a nearly arbitrary heat flux pattern to the melt surface.

Powell, A.; Pal, U. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States); Avyle, J. van den [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "undulator beam calculated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Measurements and simulations of focused beam for orthovoltage therapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Megavoltage photon beams are typically used for therapy because of their skin-sparing effect. However, a focused low-energy x-ray beam would also be skin sparing, and would have a higher dose concentration at the focal spot. Such a beam can be produced with polycapillary optics. MCNP5 was used to model dose profiles for a scanned focused beam, using measured beam parameters. The potential of low energy focused x-ray beams for radiation therapy was assessed. Methods: A polycapillary optic was used to focus the x-ray beam from a tungsten source. The optic was characterized and measurements were performed at 50 kV. PMMA blocks of varying thicknesses were placed between optic and the focal spot to observe any variation in the focusing of the beam after passing through the tissue-equivalent material. The measured energy spectrum was used to model the focused beam in MCNP5. A source card (SDEF) in MCNP5 was used to simulate the converging x-ray beam. Dose calculations were performed inside a breast tissue phantom. Results: The measured focal spot size for the polycapillary optic was 0.2 mm with a depth of field of 5 mm. The measured focal spot remained unchanged through 40 mm of phantom thickness. The calculated depth dose curve inside the breast tissue showed a dose peak several centimeters below the skin with a sharp dose fall off around the focus. The percent dose falls below 10% within 5 mm of the focus. It was shown that rotating the optic during scanning would preserve the skin-sparing effect of the focused beam. Conclusions: Low energy focused x-ray beams could be used to irradiate tumors inside soft tissue within 5 cm of the surface.

Abbas, Hassan, E-mail: Hassan.Abbas@Yale.Edu [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, Yale-New Haven Hospital, New Haven, 344 Lane Street Hamden, Connecticut 06514 (United States)] [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, Yale-New Haven Hospital, New Haven, 344 Lane Street Hamden, Connecticut 06514 (United States); Mahato, Dip N., E-mail: dip.n.mahato@intel.com [Intel Corporation, Mail-Stop RA3-410, 2501 NW 229th Avenue, Hillsboro, Oregon 97124 (United States); Satti, Jahangir, E-mail: sattij@mail.amc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albany Medical Center, 43 New Scotland Avenue, Albany, New York 12208 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albany Medical Center, 43 New Scotland Avenue, Albany, New York 12208 (United States); MacDonald, C. A., E-mail: c.macdonald@albany.edu [Department of Physics, University at Albany, SUNY, 1400 Washington Avenue, Albany, New York 12222 (United States)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

142

Laser beam generating apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect). 11 figures.

Warner, B.E.; Duncan, D.B.

1993-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

143

Laser beam generating apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus is described. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect). 7 figures.

Warner, B.E.; Duncan, D.B.

1994-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

144

Fracture analysis of HFIR beam tube caused by radiation embrittlement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With an attempt to estimate the neutron beam tube embrittlement condition for the Oak Ridge High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), fracture mechanics calculations are carried out in this paper. The analysis provides some numerical result on how the tube has been structurally weakened. In this calculation, a lateral impact force is assumed. Numerical result is obtained on how much the critical crack size should be reduced if the beam tube has been subjected to an extended period of irradiation. It is also calculated that buckling strength of the tube is increased, not decreased, with irradiation.

Chang, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Research Reactors Div.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

145

Calculating Vessel Volumes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This summarizes a demonstration at the "Metron" conference (April 2002, Yale University), using a computer program to calculate the capacity of pots drawn on the computer screen and then given one dimension (e.g., its ...

Younger, John G.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Beam optics issues for the antiproton decelerator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The deceleration of the beam down to 0.1 GeV/c in the ring previously used as Antiproton Collector (AC) at 3.5 GeV/c, requires a number of modifications to the lattice. The insertion of the electron cooling, needed to cool the antiproton beam at low energy, implies the re-arrange-ment of quadrupoles. The optical functions then need to be readjusted in order to keep the large acceptance and to cope with the electron and stochastic cooling environ-ment. Calculations of the linear optics and of the accep-tance are reported. Tests of beam deceleration in the AC show the need for closed-orbit correction at low momentum in addition to the static correction by the movement of the quadrupoles available in the present configuration. The deceleration tests will be discussed and a correction system, which includes trim supplies on the main bending magnets, will be described.

Belochitskii, P; Eriksson, T; Giannini, R; Maury, S; Möhl, D; Pedersen, F

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

BEAM EMITTANCE MEASUREMENT TOOL FOR CEBAF OPERATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new software tool was created at Jefferson Lab to measure the emittance of the CEBAF electron beams. The tool consists of device control and data analysis applications. The device control application handles the work of wire scanners and writes their measurement results as well as the information about accelerator settings during these measurements into wire scanner data files. The data analysis application reads these files and calculates the beam emittance on the basis of a wire scanner data processing model. Both applications are computer platform independent but are mostly used on LINUX PCs recently installed in the accelerator control room. The new tool significantly simplifies beam emittance measurement procedures for accelerator operations and contributes to a very high availability of the CEBAF machine for the nuclear physics program at Jefferson Lab.

Chevtsov, Pavel; Tiefenback, Michael

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Solar radiation intensity calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SOLAR RADIATION INTENSITY CALCULATIONS A Thesis by RANDOLPH STEVEN LEVINE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partia'l fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1978 Major Subject...: Physics SOLAR RADIATION INTENSITY CALCULATIONS A Thesis by RANDOLPH STEVEN LEVINE Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Member) (Member) ( member) (Head of Department) December 1978 f219 037 ABSTRACT Solar Radiation...

Levine, Randolph Steven

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Neutrino Factories and Beta Beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a Neutrino Factory Based on Muon Beams,” Proc. 2001 ParticleMD. [19] C. Rubbia et al. , “Beam Cooling with Ionisationthe required unstable ion beams has recently been suggested

Zisman, Michael S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Space Charge Correction on Emittance Measurement of Low Energy Electron Beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of any particle accelerator is to optimize the transport of a charged particle beam along a set path by confining the beam to a small region close to the design trajectory and directing it accurately along the beamline. To do so in the simplest fashion, accelerators use a system of magnets that exert approximately linear electromagnetic forces on the charged beam. These electromagnets bend the beam along the desired path, in the case of bending magnets, and constrain the beam to the desired area through alternating focusing and defocusing effects, in the case of quadrupole magnets. We can model the transport of such a beam through transfer matrices representing the actions of the various beamline elements. However, space charge effects, produced from self electric fields within the beam, defocus the beam and must be accounted for in the calculation of beam emittance. We present below the preliminary results of a MATLAB code built to model the transport of a charged particle beam through an accelerator and measure the emittance under the influence of space charge effects. We demonstrate the method of correctly calculating the emittance of a beam under space charge effects using a least square fit to determine the initial properties of the beam given the beam size measured at a specific point after transport.

Treado, Colleen J.; /Massachusetts U., Amherst

2012-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

151

Simulations of beam-beam and beam-wire interactions in RHIC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The beam-beam interaction is one of the dominant sources of emittance growth and luminosity lifetime deterioration. A current carrying wire has been proposed to compensate long-range beam-beam effects in the LHC and strong localized long-range beam-beam effects are experimentally investigated in the RHIC collider. Tune shift, beam transfer function, and beam loss rate are measured in dedicated experiments. In this paper, they report on simulations to study the effect of beam-wire interactions based on diffusive apertures, beam loss rates, and beam transfer function using a parallelized weak-strong beam simulation code (BBSIMC). The simulation results are compared with measurements performed in RHIC during 2007 and 2008.

Kim, Hyung J.; Sen, Tanaji; /Fermilab; Abreu, Natalia P.; Fischer, Wolfram; /Brookhaven

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Beta-beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Beta-beams is a new concept for the production of intense and pure neutrino beams. It is at the basis of a proposed neutrino facility, whose main goal is to explore the possible existence of CP violation in the lepton sector. Here we briefly review the original scenario and the low energy beta-beam. This option would offer a unique opportunity to perform neutrino interaction studies of interest for particle physics, astrophysics and nuclear physics. Other proposed scenarios for the search of CP violation are mentioned.

C. Volpe

2008-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

153

Neutral particle beam intensity controller  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The neutral beam intensity controller is based on selected magnetic defocusing of the ion beam prior to neutralization. The defocused portion of the beam is dumped onto a beam dump disposed perpendicular to the beam axis. Selective defocusing is accomplished by means of a magnetic field generator disposed about the neutralizer so that the field is transverse to the beam axis. The magnetic field intensity is varied to provide the selected partial beam defocusing of the ions prior to neutralization. The desired focused neutral beam portion passes along the beam path through a defining aperture in the beam dump, thereby controlling the desired fraction of neutral particles transmitted to a utilization device without altering the kinetic energy level of the desired neutral particle fraction. By proper selection of the magnetic field intensity, virtually zero through 100% intensity control of the neutral beam is achieved.

Dagenhart, W.K.

1984-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

154

Pulsed ion beam source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved pulsed ion beam source having a new biasing circuit for the fast magnetic field. This circuit provides for an initial negative bias for the field created by the fast coils in the ion beam source which pre-ionize the gas in the source, ionize the gas and deliver the gas to the proper position in the accelerating gap between the anode and cathode assemblies in the ion beam source. The initial negative bias improves the interaction between the location of the nulls in the composite magnetic field in the ion beam source and the position of the gas for pre-ionization and ionization into the plasma as well as final positioning of the plasma in the accelerating gap. Improvements to the construction of the flux excluders in the anode assembly are also accomplished by fabricating them as layered structures with a high melting point, low conductivity material on the outsides with a high conductivity material in the center.

Greenly, John B. (Lansing, NY)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Geothermal Life Cycle Calculator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This calculator is a handy tool for interested parties to estimate two key life cycle metrics, fossil energy consumption (Etot) and greenhouse gas emission (ghgtot) ratios, for geothermal electric power production. It is based solely on data developed by Argonne National Laboratory for DOE’s Geothermal Technologies office. The calculator permits the user to explore the impact of a range of key geothermal power production parameters, including plant capacity, lifetime, capacity factor, geothermal technology, well numbers and depths, field exploration, and others on the two metrics just mentioned. Estimates of variations in the results are also available to the user.

Sullivan, John

2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

156

Geothermal Life Cycle Calculator  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

This calculator is a handy tool for interested parties to estimate two key life cycle metrics, fossil energy consumption (Etot) and greenhouse gas emission (ghgtot) ratios, for geothermal electric power production. It is based solely on data developed by Argonne National Laboratory for DOE’s Geothermal Technologies office. The calculator permits the user to explore the impact of a range of key geothermal power production parameters, including plant capacity, lifetime, capacity factor, geothermal technology, well numbers and depths, field exploration, and others on the two metrics just mentioned. Estimates of variations in the results are also available to the user.

Sullivan, John

157

Wire Scanner Beam Profile Measurements: LANSCE Facility Beam Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is replacing Wire Scanner (WS) beam profile measurement systems. Three beam development tests have taken place to test the new wire scanners under beam conditions. These beam development tests have integrated the WS actuator, cable plant, electronics processors and associated software and have used H{sup -} beams of different beam energy and current conditions. In addition, the WS measurement-system beam tests verified actuator control systems for minimum profile bin repeatability and speed, checked for actuator backlash and positional stability, tested the replacement of simple broadband potentiometers with narrow band resolvers, and tested resolver use with National Instruments Compact Reconfigurable Input and Output (cRIO) Virtual Instrumentation. These beam tests also have verified how trans-impedance amplifiers react with various types of beam line background noise and how noise currents were not generated. This paper will describe these beam development tests and show some resulting data.

Gilpatrick, John D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Batygin, Yuri K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gonzales, Fermin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gruchalla, Michael E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kutac, Vincent G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Derwin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sedillo, James Daniel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pillai, Chandra [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rodriguez Esparza, Sergio [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, Brian G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

158

Fan-beam intensity modulated proton therapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: This paper presents a concept for a proton therapy system capable of delivering intensity modulated proton therapy using a fan beam of protons. This system would allow present and future gantry-based facilities to deliver state-of-the-art proton therapy with the greater normal tissue sparing made possible by intensity modulation techniques.Methods: A method for producing a divergent fan beam of protons using a pair of electromagnetic quadrupoles is described and particle transport through the quadrupole doublet is simulated using a commercially available software package. To manipulate the fan beam of protons, a modulation device is developed. This modulator inserts or retracts acrylic leaves of varying thickness from subsections of the fan beam. Each subsection, or beam channel, creates what effectively becomes a beam spot within the fan area. Each channel is able to provide 0–255 mm of range shift for its associated beam spot, or stop the beam and act as an intensity modulator. Results of particle transport simulations through the quadrupole system are incorporated into the MCNPX Monte Carlo transport code along with a model of the range and intensity modulation device. Several design parameters were investigated and optimized, culminating in the ability to create topotherapy treatment plans using distal-edge tracking on both phantom and patient datasets.Results: Beam transport calculations show that a pair of electromagnetic quadrupoles can be used to create a divergent fan beam of 200 MeV protons over a distance of 2.1 m. The quadrupole lengths were 30 and 48 cm, respectively, with transverse field gradients less than 20 T/m, which is within the range of water-cooled magnets for the quadrupole radii used. MCNPX simulations of topotherapy treatment plans suggest that, when using the distal edge tracking delivery method, many delivery angles are more important than insisting on narrow beam channel widths in order to obtain conformal target coverage. Overall, the sharp distal falloff of a proton depth-dose distribution was found to provide sufficient control over the dose distribution to meet objectives, even with coarse lateral resolution and channel widths as large as 2 cm. Treatment plans on both phantom and patient data show that dose conformity suffers when treatments are delivered from less than approximately ten angles. Treatment time for a sample prostate delivery is estimated to be on the order of 10 min, and neutron production is estimated to be comparable to that found for existing collimated systems.Conclusions: Fan beam proton therapy is a method of delivering intensity modulated proton therapy which may be employed as an alternative to magnetic scanning systems. A fan beam of protons can be created by a set of quadrupole magnets and modified by a dual-purpose range and intensity modulator. This can be used to deliver inversely planned treatments, with spot intensities optimized to meet user defined dose objectives. Additionally, the ability of a fan beam delivery system to effectively treat multiple beam spots simultaneously may provide advantages as compared to spot scanning deliveries.

Hill, Patrick [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Westerly, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States); Mackie, Thomas [Medical Devices, Morgridge Institute for Research, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53715 (United States)] [Medical Devices, Morgridge Institute for Research, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53715 (United States)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

159

Carbon Footprint Calculator  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This calculator estimates the amount of carbon emissions you and members of your household are responsible for. It does not include emissions associated with your work or getting to work if you commute by public transportation. It was developed by IEEE Spectrum magazine.

160

PROPOSED RESIDENTIAL ALTERNATIVE CALCULATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROPOSED RESIDENTIAL ALTERNATIVE CALCULATION MANUAL (ACM) APPROVAL METHOD for the 2013 2012 CEC400201200715DAY #12;201308 Residential ACM Approval Manual 2-2 1. Overview Minimum Modeling Capabilities 1. Overview This Manual explains the requirements for approval of residential Alternative

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "undulator beam calculated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Plutonium 239 Equivalency Calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides the basis for converting actual weapons grade plutonium mass to a plutonium equivalency (PuE) mass of Plutonium 239. The conversion can be accomplished by performing calculations utilizing either: (1) Isotopic conversions factors (CF{sub isotope}), or (2) 30-year-old weapons grade conversion factor (CF{sub 30 yr}) Both of these methods are provided in this document. Material mass and isotopic data are needed to calculate PuE using the isotopic conversion factors, which will provide the actual PuE value at the time of calculation. PuE is the summation of the isotopic masses times their associated isotopic conversion factors for plutonium 239. Isotopic conversion factors are calculated by a normalized equation, relative to Plutonium 239, of specific activity (SA) and cumulated dose inhalation affects based on 50-yr committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE). The isotopic conversion factors for converting weapons grade plutonium to PuE are provided in Table-1. The unit for specific activity (SA) is curies per gram (Ci/g) and the isotopic SA values come from reference [1]. The cumulated dose inhalation effect values in units of rem/Ci are based on 50-yr committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE). A person irradiated by gamma radiation outside the body will receive a dose only during the period of irradiation. However, following an intake by inhalation, some radionuclides persist in the body and irradiate the various tissues for many years. There are three groups CEDE data representing lengths of time of 0.5 (D), 50 (W) and 500 (Y) days, which are in reference [2]. The CEDE values in the (W) group demonstrates the highest dose equivalent value; therefore they are used for the calculation.

Wen, J

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

162

Single element laser beam shaper  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A single lens laser beam shaper for converting laser beams from any spatial profile to a flat-top or uniform spatial profile. The laser beam shaper includes a lens having two aspheric surfaces. The beam shaper significantly simplifies the overall structure in comparison with conventional 2-element systems and therefore provides great ease in alignment and reduction of cost.

Zhang, Shukui (Yorktown, VA); Michelle D. Shinn (Newport News, VA)

2005-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

163

REVIEW ARTICLE Taming molecular beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REVIEW ARTICLE Taming molecular beams The motion of neutral molecules in a beam can be manipulated time-varying fields can be used to decelerate or accelerate beams of molecules to any desired velocity. We review the possibilities that this molecular-beam technology offers, ranging from ultrahigh

Loss, Daniel

164

Beam energy distribution influences on density modulation efficiency in seeded free-electron lasers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The beam energy spread at the entrance of undulator system is of paramount importance for efficient density modulation in high-gain seeded free-electron lasers (FELs). In this paper, the dependences of high harmonic micro-bunching in the high-gain harmonic generation (HGHG), echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) and phase-merging enhanced harmonic generation (PEHG) schemes on the electron energy spread distribution are studied. Theoretical investigations and multi-dimensional numerical simulations are applied to the cases of uniform and saddle beam energy distributions and compared to a traditional Gaussian distribution. It shows that the uniform and saddle electron energy distributions significantly enhance the performance of HGHG-FELs, while they almost have no influence on EEHG and PEHG schemes. A numerical example demonstrates that, with about 84keV RMS uniform and/or saddle slice energy spread, the 30th harmonic radiation can be directly generated by a single-stage seeding scheme for a soft x-ray FEL f...

Wang, Guanglei; Deng, Haixiao; Zhang, Weiqing; Wu, Guorong; Dai, Dongxu; Wang, Dong; Zhao, Zhentang; Yang, Xueming

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Light beam frequency comb generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A light beam frequency comb generator uses an acousto-optic modulator to generate a plurality of light beams with frequencies which are uniformly separated and possess common noise and drift characteristics. A well collimated monochromatic input light beam is passed through this modulator to produce a set of both frequency shifted and unshifted optical beams. An optical system directs one or more frequency shifted beams along a path which is parallel to the path of the input light beam such that the frequency shifted beams are made incident on the modulator proximate to but separated from the point of incidence of the input light beam. After the beam is thus returned to and passed through the modulator repeatedly, a plurality of mutually parallel beams are generated which are frequency-shifted different numbers of times and possess common noise and drift characteristics.

Priatko, Gordon J. (Cupertino, CA); Kaskey, Jeffrey A. (Livermore, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Beam Fields and Energy Dissipation Inside the the BE Beam Pipe of the Super-B Detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the bunch field diffusion and energy dissipation in the beam pipe of the Super-B detector, which consists of two coaxial Be thin pipes (half a millimeter). Cooling water will run between these two pipes. Gold and nickel will be sputtered (several microns) onto the beryllium pipe at different sides. The Maxwell equations for the beam fields in these thin layers are solved numerically for the case of infinite pipes. We also calculate the amplitude of the electromagnetic fields outside the beam pipe, which may be noticeable as the beam current can reach 4 A in each beam. Results of simulations are used for the design of this central part of the Super-B detector.

Novokhatski, Alexander; /SLAC; Sullivan, Michael; /SLAC; ,

2010-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

167

Comparing the accuracy of four-dimensional photon dose calculations with three-dimensional calculations using moving and deforming phantoms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Four-dimensional (4D) dose calculation algorithms, which explicitly incorporate respiratory motion in the calculation of doses, have the potential to improve the accuracy of dose calculations in thoracic treatment planning; however, they generally require greater computing power and resources than currently used for three-dimensional (3D) dose calculations. The purpose of this work was to quantify the increase in accuracy of 4D dose calculations versus 3D dose calculations. Methods: The accuracy of each dose calculation algorithm was assessed using measurements made with two phantoms. Specifically, the authors used a rigid moving anthropomorphic thoracic phantom and an anthropomorphic thoracic phantom with a deformable lung insert. To incorporate a clinically relevant range of scenarios, they programed the phantoms to move and deform with two motion patterns: A sinusoidal motion pattern and an irregular motion pattern that was extracted from an actual patient's breathing profile. For each combination of phantom and motion pattern, three plans were created: A single-beam plan, a multiple-beam plan, and an intensity-modulated radiation therapy plan. Doses were calculated using 4D dose calculation methods as well as conventional 3D dose calculation methods. The rigid moving and deforming phantoms were irradiated according to the three treatment plans and doses were measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and radiochromic film. The accuracy of each dose calculation algorithm was assessed using measured-to-calculated TLD doses and a {gamma} analysis. Results: No significant differences were observed between the measured-to-calculated TLD ratios among 4D and 3D dose calculations. The {gamma} results revealed that 4D dose calculations had significantly greater percentage of pixels passing the 5%/3 mm criteria than 3D dose calculations. Conclusions: These results indicate no significant differences in the accuracy between the 4D and the 3D dose calculation methods inside the gross tumor volume. On the other hand, the film results demonstrated that the 4D dose calculations provided greater accuracy than 3D dose calculations in heterogeneous dose regions. The increase in accuracy of the 4D dose calculations was evident throughout the planning target volume.

Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy Y.; Balter, Peter; Followill, David S.; Alvarez, Paola E.; White, R. Allen; Starkschall, George [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

168

ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Collider-Accelerator Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory is building a high-brightness 500 mA capable Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) as one of its main R&D thrusts towards eRHIC, the polarized electron - hadron collider as an upgrade of the operating RHIC facility. The ERL is in final assembly stages, with injection commisioning starting in October 2012. The objective of this ERL is to serve as a platform for R&D into high current ERL, in particular issues of halo generation and control, Higher-Order Mode (HOM) issues, coherent emissions for the beam and high-brightness, high-power beam generation and preservation. The R&D ERL features a superconducting laser-photocathode RF gun with a high quantum efficiency photoccathode served with a load-lock cathode delivery system, a highly damped 5-cell accelerating cavity, a highly flexible single-pass loop and a comprehensive system of beam instrumentation. In this ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter article we will describe the ERL in a degree of detail that is not usually found in regular publications. We will discuss the various systems of the ERL, following the electrons from the photocathode to the beam dump, cover the control system, machine protection etc and summarize with the status of the ERL systems.

Ben-Zvi I.; Kuczewski A.; Altinbas, Z.; Beavis, D.; Belomestnykh,; Dai, J. et al

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Beam Profile Monitor With Accurate Horizontal And Vertical Beam Profiles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A widely used scanner device that rotates a single helically shaped wire probe in and out of a particle beam at different beamline positions to give a pair of mutually perpendicular beam profiles is modified by the addition of a second wire probe. As a result, a pair of mutually perpendicular beam profiles is obtained at a first beamline position, and a second pair of mutually perpendicular beam profiles is obtained at a second beamline position. The simple modification not only provides more accurate beam profiles, but also provides a measurement of the beam divergence and quality in a single compact device.

Havener, Charles C [Knoxville, TN; Al-Rejoub, Riad [Oak Ridge, TN

2005-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

170

Grazing incidence beam expander  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Grazing Incidence Beam Expander (GIBE) telescope is being designed and fabricated to be used as an equivalent end mirror in a long laser resonator cavity. The design requirements for this GIBE flow down from a generic Free Electron Laser (FEL) resonator. The nature of the FEL gain volume (a thin, pencil-like, on-axis region) dictates that the output beam be very small. Such a thin beam with the high power levels characteristic of FELs would have to travel perhaps hundreds of meters or more before expanding enough to allow reflection from cooled mirrors. A GIBE, on the other hand, would allow placing these optics closer to the gain region and thus reduces the cavity lengths substantially. Results are presented relating to optical and mechanical design, alignment sensitivity analysis, radius of curvature analysis, laser cavity stability analysis of a linear stable concentric laser cavity with a GIBE. Fabrication details of the GIBE are also given.

Akkapeddi, P.R.; Glenn, P.; Fuschetto, A.; Appert, Q.; Viswanathan, V.K.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Colliding neutrino beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From several neutrino oscillation experiments, we understand now that neutrinos have mass. However, we really don't know what mechanism is responsible for producing this neutrino mass. Current or planned neutrino experiments utilize neutrino beams and long-baseline detectors to explore flavor mixing but do not address the question of the origin of neutrino mass. In order to answer that question, neutrino interactions need to be explored at much higher energies. This paper outlines a program to explore neutrinos and their interactions with various particles through a series of experiments involving colliding neutrino beams.

Reinhard Schwienhorst

2007-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

172

Beam Stability Complaint Form  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien, I. Ben-Zvi, P. StudyBeam History PrintBeam

173

PURIFICATION OF IRIDIUM BY ELECTRON BEAM MELTING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purification of iridium metal by electron beam melting has been characterized for 48 impurity elements. Chemical analysis was performed by glow discharge mass spectrographic (GDMS) analysis for all elements except carbon, which was analyzed by combustion. The average levels of individual elemental impurities in the starting powder varied from 37 g/g to 0.02 g/g. The impurity elements Li, Na, Mg, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Pd, Ag, Cd, Sn, Sb, Te, Ba, Ce, Tl, Pb, and Bi were not detectable following the purification. No significant change in concentration of the elements Ti, V, Zr, Nb, Mo, and Re was found. The elements B, C, Al, Si, Cr, Fe, Ru, Rh, and Pt were partially removed by vaporization during electron beam melting. Langmuir's equation for ideal vaporization into a vacuum was used to calculate for each impurity element the expected ratio of impurity content after melting to that before melting. Equilibrium vapor pressures were calculated using Henry's law, with activity coefficients obtained from published data for the elements Fe, Ti, and Pt. Activity coefficients were estimated from enthalpy data for Al, Si, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Zr, Nb, Mo, and Hf and an ideal solution model was used for the remaining elements. The melt temperature was determined from measured iridium weight loss. Excellent agreement was found between measured and calculated impurity ratios for all impurity elements. The results are consistent with some localized heating of the melt pool due to rastering of the electron beam, with an average vaporization temperature of 3100 K as compared to a temperature of 2965 K calculated for uniform heating of the melt pool. The results are also consistent with ideal mixing in the melt pool.

Ohriner, Evan Keith [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Horizontal well IPR calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the calculation of near-wellbore skin and non-Darcy flow coefficient for horizontal wells based on whether the well is drilled in an underbalanced or overbalanced condition, whether the well is completed openhole, with a slotted liner, or cased, and on the number of shots per foot and phasing for cased wells. The inclusion of mechanical skin and the non-Darcy flow coefficient in previously published horizontal well equations is presented and a comparison between these equations is given. In addition, both analytical and numerical solutions for horizontal wells with skin and non-Darcy flow are presented for comparison.

Thomas, L.K.; Todd, B.J.; Evans, C.E.; Pierson, R.G.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

175

ARM - Relative Humidity Calculations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC :ProductsSCM Forcing Data DerivedInstruments Related LinksCalculatorsRelative

176

ARM - Index of Calculators  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcal Documentation(AVIRIS) ProductsAirborneOctober 11, 2011 [FacilityIndiaGVAX NewsCalculators Outreach Home Room

177

Non-Paraxial Accelerating Beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the spatially accelerating solutions of the Maxwell equations. Such non-paraxial beams accelerate in a circular trajectory, thus generalizing the concept of Airy beams. For both TE and TM polarizations, the beams exhibit shape-preserving bending with sub-wavelength features, and the Poynting vector of the main lobe displays a turn of more than 90 degrees. We show that these accelerating beams are self-healing, analyze their properties, and compare to the paraxial Airy beams. Finally, we present the new family of periodic accelerating beams which can be constructed from our solutions.

Ido Kaminer; Rivka Bekenstein; Jonathan Nemirovsky; Mordechai Segev

2012-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

178

Electron beam dynamics for the ISIS bremsstrahlung beam generation system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An electron beam transport system was designed for use in the Bremsstrahlung Beam Generation System of the Integrated Stand-off Inspection System (ISIS). The purpose of this electron transport system was to provide for ...

Block, Robert E. (Robert Edward)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Ion-beam technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This compilation of figures and diagrams reviews processes for depositing diamond/diamond-like carbon films. Processes addressed are chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD, PACVD, etc.), plasma vapor deposition (plasma sputtering, ion beam sputtering, evaporation, etc.), low-energy ion implantation, and hybrid processes (biased sputtering, IBAD, biased HFCVD, etc.). The tribological performance of coatings produced by different means is discussed.

Fenske, G.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Pulsed ion beam source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved pulsed ion beam source is disclosed having a new biasing circuit for the fast magnetic field. This circuit provides for an initial negative bias for the field created by the fast coils in the ion beam source which pre-ionize the gas in the source, ionize the gas and deliver the gas to the proper position in the accelerating gap between the anode and cathode assemblies in the ion beam source. The initial negative bias improves the interaction between the location of the nulls in the composite magnetic field in the ion beam source and the position of the gas for pre-ionization and ionization into the plasma as well as final positioning of the plasma in the accelerating gap. Improvements to the construction of the flux excluders in the anode assembly are also accomplished by fabricating them as layered structures with a high melting point, low conductivity material on the outsides with a high conductivity material in the center. 12 figs.

Greenly, J.B.

1997-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "undulator beam calculated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Colliding beams of light  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The stationary gravitational field of two identical counter-moving beams of pure radiation is found in full generality. The solution depends on an arbitrary function and a parameter which sets the scale of the energy density. Some of its properties are studied. Previous particular solutions are derived as subcases.

B. V. Ivanov

2002-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

182

Beam current sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A current sensor for measuring the dc component of a beam of charged particles employs a superconducting pick-up loop probe, with twisted superconducting leads in combination with a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) detector. The pick-up probe is in the form of a single-turn loop, or a cylindrical toroid, through which the beam is directed and within which a first magnetic flux is excluded by the Meisner effect. The SQUID detector acts as a flux-to-voltage converter in providing a current to the pick-up loop so as to establish a second magnetic flux within the electrode which nulls out the first magnetic flux. A feedback voltage within the SQUID detector represents the beam current of the particles which transit the pick-up loop. Meisner effect currents prevent changes in the magnetic field within the toroidal pick-up loop and produce a current signal independent of the beam's cross-section and its position within the toroid, while the combination of superconducting elements provides current measurement sensitivities in the nano-ampere range.

Kuchnir, M.; Mills, F.E.

1984-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

183

Beam current sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A current sensor for measuring the DC component of a beam of charged particles employs a superconducting pick-up loop probe, with twisted superconducting leads in combination with a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) detector. The pick-up probe is in the form of a single-turn loop, or a cylindrical toroid, through which the beam is directed and within which a first magnetic flux is excluded by the Meisner effect. The SQUID detector acts as a flux-to-voltage converter in providing a current to the pick-up loop so as to establish a second magnetic flux within the electrode which nulls out the first magnetic flux. A feedback voltage within the SQUID detector represents the beam current of the particles which transit the pick-up loop. Meisner effect currents prevent changes in the magnetic field within the toroidal pick-up loop and produce a current signal independent of the beam's cross-section and its position within the toroid, while the combination of superconducting elements provides current measurement sensitivites in the nano-ampere range.

Kuchnir, Moyses (Elmhurst, IL); Mills, Frederick E. (Elburn, IL)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Neutral particle beam intensity controller  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A neutral beam intensity controller is provided for a neutral beam generator in which a neutral beam is established by accelerating ions from an ion source into a gas neutralizer. An amplitude modulated, rotating magnetic field is applied to the accelerated ion beam in the gas neutralizer to defocus the resultant neutral beam in a controlled manner to achieve intensity control of the neutral beam along the beam axis at constant beam energy. The rotating magnetic field alters the orbits of ions in the gas neutralizer before they are neutralized, thereby controlling the fraction of neutral particles transmitted out of the neutralizer along the central beam axis to a fusion device or the like. The altered path or defocused neutral particles are sprayed onto an actively cooled beam dump disposed perpendicular to the neutral beam axis and having a central open for passage of the focused beam at the central axis of the beamline. Virtually zero therough 100% intensity control is achieved by varying the magnetic field strength without altering the ion source beam intensity or its species yield.

Dagenhart, William K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Computer simulation of the processes at electron beam technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The computer software packages developed in Bulgaria are among our important research results concerning EB melting and refining. (i) In the field of the gun and the beam improvement optimisation: A new approach, based on beam phase analysis, has been proposed and applied in a computer software package. The computer simulation of beam formation and transport permit to optimize technology electron guns and predict some features of the processes. A investigation of the ion compensation of the electron space charge in the beam at different technology conditions is in progress. (ii) In the electron beam refining technology. The kinetics of the impurities evaporation and refining of the low density contaminants at the drip or cold hearth melting has been investigated. Computer calculation of the component concentration changes during refinement had been developed. Analysis of main processes of the impurity transport can be studied. (iii) In the field of beam heating of the materials: Computer simulation of the heat transport is done. Deep of the melted pool, thermal distribution in the casted ingot as the temperature loading of the equipment parts are possible to be calculated.

Mladenov, G.M.; Vutova, K.; Sabchevsky, S. [Institute of Electronics, Sofia (Bulgaria)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

186

Goos-H\\"anchen and Imbert-Fedorov shifts for astigmatic Gaussian beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work we investigate the role of the beam astigmatism in the Goos-H\\"anchen and Imbert-Fedorov shift. As a case study, we consider a Gaussian beam focused by an astigmatic lens and we calculate explicitly the corrections to the standard formulas for beam shifts due to the astigmatism induced by the lens. Our results show that astigmatism may enhance the angular part of the shift.

Ornigotti, Marco

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Gaussian Beams Enrique J. Galvez  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gaussian Beams Enrique J. Galvez Department of Physics and Astronomy Colgate University Copyright 2009 #12;ii #12;Contents 1 Fundamental Gaussian Beams 1 1.1 Spherical Wavefront in the Paraxial region . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.2 Formal Solution of the Wave Equation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 1.2.1 Beam Spot w

Galvez, Enrique J. "Kiko"

188

Metallic beam development for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) at Michigan State University (MSU) will accelerate a primary ion beam to energies beyond 200 MeV/u using a superconducting RF linac and will reach a maximum beam power of 400 kW on the fragmentation target. The beam intensity needed from the ECR ion source is expected to be between 0.4 and 0.5 emA for most medium mass to heavy mass elements. Adding to the challenge of reaching the required intensity, an expanded list of primary beams of interest has been established based on the production rate and the number of isotope beams that could be produced with FRIB. We report here on the development done for some of the beam in the list including mercury (natural), molybdenum ({sup 98}Mo), and selenium ({sup 82}Ser)

Machicoane, Guillaume, E-mail: machicoa@nscl.msu.edu; Cole, Dallas; Leitner, Daniela; Neben, Derek; Tobos, Larry [Facility for Rare Isotope Beam, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)] [Facility for Rare Isotope Beam, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

189

Summary of working group g: beam material interaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the first time, the workshop on High-Intensity and High-Brightness Hadron Beams (HB2010), held at Morschach, Switzerland and organized by the Paul Scherrer Institute, included a Working group dealing with the interaction between beam and material. Due to the high power beams of existing and future facilities, this topic is already of great relevance for such machines and is expected to become even more important in the future. While more specialized workshops related to topics of radiation damage, activation or thermo-mechanical calculations, already exist, HB2010 provided the occasion to discuss the interplay of these topics, focusing on components like targets, beam dumps and collimators, whose reliability are crucial for a user facility. In addition, a broader community of people working on a variety of issues related to the operation of accelerators could be informed and their interest sparked.

Kiselev, D.; /PSI, Villigen; Mokhov, N.V.; /Fermilab; Schmidt, R.; /CERN

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Space charge compensation in the Linac4 low energy beam transport line with negative hydrogen ions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The space charge effect of low energy, unbunched ion beams can be compensated by the trapping of ions or electrons into the beam potential. This has been studied for the 45 keV negative hydrogen ion beam in the CERN Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport using the package IBSimu [T. Kalvas et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02B703 (2010)], which allows the space charge calculation of the particle trajectories. The results of the beam simulations will be compared to emittance measurements of an H{sup ?} beam at the CERN Linac4 3 MeV test stand, where the injection of hydrogen gas directly into the beam transport region has been used to modify the space charge compensation degree.

Valerio-Lizarraga, Cristhian A., E-mail: cristhian.alfonso.valerio.lizarraga@cern.ch [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Departamento de Investigación en Física, Universidad de Sonora, Hermosillo (Mexico); Lallement, Jean-Baptiste; Lettry, Jacques; Scrivens, Richard [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)] [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Leon-Monzon, Ildefonso [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico-Matematicas, Universidad Autónoma de Sinaloa, Culiacan (Mexico)] [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico-Matematicas, Universidad Autónoma de Sinaloa, Culiacan (Mexico); Midttun, Øystein [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland) [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

191

Axion beams at HERA?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

If the recently observed anomaly in the PVLAS experiment is due to the axion, then the powerful beams of synchrotron photons, propagating through high magnetic field of the HERA beamline, become strong axion sources. This gives a unique opportunity of detection of the axion-photon interactions by installing a small detector in the HERA tunnel, and to corroborate the axion hypothesis within a few days of running.

K. Piotrzkowski

2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

192

Intense Ion Beam for Warm Dense Matter Physics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is exploring the physical limits of compression and focusing of ion beams for heating material to warm dense matter (WDM) and fusion ignition conditions. The NDCX is a beam transport experiment with several components at a scale comparable to an inertial fusion energy driver. The NDCX is an accelerator which consists of a low-emittance ion source, high-current injector, solenoid matching section, induction bunching module, beam neutralization section, and final focusing system. The principal objectives of the experiment are to control the beam envelope, demonstrate effective neutralization of the beam space-charge, control the velocity tilt on the beam, and understand defocusing effects, field imperfections, and limitations on peak intensity such as emittance and aberrations. Target heating experiments with space-charge dominated ion beams require simultaneous longitudinal bunching and transverse focusing. A four-solenoid lattice is used to tune the beam envelope to the necessary focusing conditions before entering the induction bunching module. The induction bunching module provides a head-to-tail velocity ramp necessary to achieve peak axial compression at the desired focal plane. Downstream of the induction gap a plasma column neutralizes the beam space charge so only emittance limits the focused beam intensity. We present results of beam transport through a solenoid matching section and simultaneous focusing of a singly charged K{sup +} ion bunch at an ion energy of 0.3 MeV. The results include a qualitative comparison of experimental and calculated results after the solenoid matching section, which include time resolved current density, transverse distributions, and phase-space of the beam at different diagnostic planes. Electron cloud and gas measurements in the solenoid lattice and in the vicinity of intercepting diagnostics are also presented. Finally, comparisons of improved experimental and calculated axial focus (> 100 x axial compression, < 2 ns pulses) and higher peak energy deposition on target are also presented. These achievements demonstrate the capabilities for near term target heating experiments to T{sub e} {approx} 0.1 eV and for future ion accelerators to heat targets to T{sub e} > 1 eV.

Coleman, Joshua Eugene

2008-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

193

TRACKING CODE DEVELOPMENT FOR BEAM DYNAMICS OPTIMIZATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dynamic aperture (DA) optimization with direct particle tracking is a straight forward approach when the computing power is permitted. It can have various realistic errors included and is more close than theoretical estimations. In this approach, a fast and parallel tracking code could be very helpful. In this presentation, we describe an implementation of storage ring particle tracking code TESLA for beam dynamics optimization. It supports MPI based parallel computing and is robust as DA calculation engine. This code has been used in the NSLS-II dynamics optimizations and obtained promising performance.

Yang, L.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

194

Performance predictions for a laser intensified thermal beam for use in high resolution Focused Ion Beam instruments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Photo-ionization of a laser-cooled and compressed atomic beam from a high-flux thermal source can be used to create a high-brightness ion beam for use in Focus Ion Beam (FIB) instruments. Here we show using calculations and Doppler cooling simulations that an atomic rubidium beam with a brightness of $2.1 \\times 10^7 A/(m^2\\,sr\\,eV)$ at a current of 1 nA can be created using a compact 5 cm long 2D magneto-optical compressor which is more than an order of magnitude better than the current state of the art Liquid Metal Ion Source.

Wouters, S H W; Notermans, R P M J W; Debernardi, N; Mutsaers, P H A; Luiten, O J; Vredenbregt, E J D

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Understanding the Poor Resolution from Test Beam RunUnderstanding the Poor Resolution from Test Beam Run 2004 Straw Test beam results2004 Straw Test beam results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Understanding the Poor Resolution from Test Beam RunUnderstanding the Poor Resolution from Test Beam Run aah #12;2 2004 Straw Test beam results2004 Straw Test beam results ! Doc # 3308 v#3 by A. Ledovskoy " Using Data from 2004 Test Beam " Used "triplet" method for beam nominally perpendicular to Straw

196

Nondestructive Damage Detection in General Beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is to provide NDE methodologies that simultaneously identify the location, the extent, and the severity of damage in general beams. By general beams, we mean beyond Euler-Bernoulli beams (i.e. slender beams) to deep beams and stubby beams whose response may...

Dincal, Selcuk

2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

197

ENRAF gauge reference level calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the method for calculating reference levels for Enraf Series 854 Level Detectors as installed in the tank farms. The reference level calculation for each installed level gauge is contained herein.

Huber, J.H., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

198

Beam quality conversion factors for parallel-plate ionization chambers in MV photon beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate the behavior of plane-parallel ion chambers in high-energy photon beams through measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: Ten plane-parallel ion chamber types were obtained from the major ion chamber manufacturers. Absorbed dose-to-water calibration coefficients are measured for these chambers and k{sub Q} factors are determined. In the process, the behaviors of the chambers are characterized through measurements of leakage currents, chamber settling in cobalt-60, polarity and ion recombination behavior, and long-term stability. Monte Carlo calculations of the absorbed dose to the air in the ion chamber and absorbed dose to water are obtained to calculate k{sub Q} factors. Systematic uncertainties in Monte Carlo calculated k{sub Q} factors are investigated by varying material properties and chamber dimensions. Results: Chamber behavior was variable in MV photon beams, especially with regard to chamber leakage and ion recombination. The plane-parallel chambers did not perform as well as cylindrical chambers. Significant differences up to 1.5% were observed in calibration coefficients after a period of eight months although k{sub Q} factors were consistent on average within 0.17%. Chamber-to-chamber variations in k{sub Q} factors for chambers of the same type were at the 0.2% level. Systematic uncertainties in Monte Carlo calculated k{sub Q} factors ranged between 0.34% and 0.50% depending on the chamber type. Average percent differences between measured and calculated k{sub Q} factors were - 0.02%, 0.18%, and - 0.16% for 6, 10, and 25 MV beams, respectively. Conclusions: Excellent agreement is observed on average at the 0.2% level between measured and Monte Carlo calculated k{sub Q} factors. Measurements indicate that the behavior of these chambers is not adequate for their use for reference dosimetry of high-energy photon beams without a more extensive QA program than currently used for cylindrical reference-class ion chambers.

Muir, B. R.; McEwen, M. R.; Rogers, D. W. O. [Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Physics Department, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada); Institute for National Measurement Standards, National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Physics Department, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

199

The Properties of Undulator Radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a Dedicated Synchrotron Radiation Facility," IEEE Trans.1983), "Characteristics of Synchrotron Radiation and of itsHandbook on Synchrotron Radiation, E. -E. Koch.1A. 65-172,

Howells, M.R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

LCLS CDR Chapter 8 - Undulator  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "undulator beam calculated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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201

Neutral Beam Excitation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andDataNational Library of1, 2007Transmission toBeam Excitation of Alfv

202

BEAMS: Curiosity | Jefferson Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience Program CumulusA t i o nLiquids Reserve2015 BCPthe24-3BEAMS:

203

Molecular Beam Kinetics | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fundProject8Mistakes to AvoidKinetics Molecular Beam Kinetics

204

CALCULATING INTERIOR DAYLIGHT ILLUMINATION WITH A PROGRAMMABLE HAND CALCULATOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Committee E-3.2, "Daylight: International RecommendationsCalculation of Natural Daylight," CIE PUBLICATION No. 16,Committee E-3.2, "Natural Daylight: Official Recommenda-

Bryan, Harvey J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

CALCULATING INTERIOR DAYLIGHT ILLUMINATION WITH A PROGRAMMABLE HAND CALCULATOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Committee E-3.2, "Daylight: International Recommendationsthe Calculation of Natural Daylight, 11 CIE PUBLICATION No.Committee E-3.2 1 "Natural Daylight: Official Recommenda-

Bryan, Harvey J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Particle Detector / Beam Current Transformer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Particle Detector / Beam Current Transformer Analysis December 8, 2009 Harold G. Kirk #12;ShotSignal,A.U. Proton Bunch Number Beam Current Transformer - 17011 0 2 4 6 8 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 Integrated Transformer Pump 187829 (au) Probe 196504 (au) Ratios: Beam Current 1.046 SF 1.019 2.9% difference #12;Shot

McDonald, Kirk

207

Beam hosing instability in overdense plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transverse stability of the drive beam is critical to plasma wakefield accelerators. A long, relativistic particle beam propagating in an overdense plasma is subject to beam envelope modulation and hosing (centroid displacement) instabilities. Coupled equations for the beam centroid and envelope are derived. The growth rate for beam hosing is examined including return current effects (where the beam radius is of order the plasma skin depth) in the long-beam, strongly-coupled, overdense regime.

Schroeder, C. B.; Benedetti, C.; Esarey, E.; Gruener, F. J.; Leemans, W. P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Universitaet Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

208

Broad-band beam buncher  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A broad-band beam buncher is disclosed, comprising an evacuated housing, an electron gun therein for producing an electron beam, a buncher cavity having entrance and exit openings through which the beam is directed, grids across such openings, a source providing a positive DC voltage between the cavity and the electron gun, a drift tube through which the electron beam travels in passing through such cavity, grids across the ends of such drift tube, gaps being provided between the drift tube grids and the entrance and exit grids, a modulator for supplying an ultrahigh frequency modulating signal to the drift tube for producing velocity modulation of the electrons in the beam, a drift space in the housing through which the velocity modulated electron beam travels and in which the beam is bunched, and a discharge opening from such drift tube and having a grid across such opening through which the bunched electron beam is discharged into an accelerator or the like. The buncher cavity and the drift tube may be arranged to constitute an extension of a coaxial transmission line which is employed to deliver the modulating signal from a signal source. The extended transmission line may be terminated in its characteristic impedance to afford a broad-band response and the device as a whole designed to effect broad-band beam coupling, so as to minimize variations of the output across the response band.

Goldberg, David A. (Walnut Creek, CA); Flood, William S. (Berkeley, CA); Arthur, Allan A. (Martinez, CA); Voelker, Ferdinand (Orinda, CA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Low energy beta-beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The main goal of a beta-beam facility is to determine the possible existence of CP violation in the lepton sector, the value of the third neutrino mixing angle and the mass hierarchy. Here we argue that a much broader physics case can be covered since the beta-beam concept can also be used to establish a low energy beta-beam facility. We discuss that the availability of neutrino beams in the 100 MeV energy range offers a unique opportunity to perform neutrino scattering experiments of interest for nuclear physics, for the study of fundamental interactions and of core-collapse supernova physics.

Cristina Volpe

2009-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

210

Virtual detector of synchrotron radiation (VDSR) - A C++ parallel code for particle tracking and radiation calculation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Virtual Detector for Synchrotron Radiation (VDSR) is a parallel C++ code developed to calculate the incoherent radiation from a single charged particle or a beam moving in given external electro-magnetic fields. In this proceedings the code structure and features are introduced. An example of radiation generation from the betatron motion of a beam in the focusing fields of the wake in a laser-plasma accelerator is presented.

Rykovanov, S. G.; Chen, M.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Rd, Berkeley CA 94720 (United States)

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

211

Accelerators, Beams And Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators And Beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accelerator science and technology have evolved as accelerators became larger and important to a broad range of science. Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators and Beams was established to serve the accelerator community as a timely, widely circulated, international journal covering the full breadth of accelerators and beams. The history of the journal and the innovations associated with it are reviewed.

Siemann, R.H.; /SLAC

2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

212

Beam loading in a laser-plasma accelerator using a near-hollow plasma channel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Beam loading in laser-plasma accelerators using a near-hollow plasma channel is examined in the linear wake regime. It is shown that, by properly shaping and phasing the witness particle beam, high-gradient acceleration can be achieved with high-efficiency, and without induced energy spread or emittance growth. Both electron and positron beams can be accelerated in this plasma channel geometry. Matched propagation of electron beams can be achieved by the focusing force provided by the channel density. For positron beams, matched propagation can be achieved in a hollow plasma channel with external focusing. The efficiency of energy transfer from the wake to a witness beam is calculated for single ultra-short bunches and bunch trains.

Schroeder, C. B.; Benedetti, C.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

213

Comparison of laser-induced surface damage density measurements with small and large beams: toward representativeness  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pulsed laser damage density measurements obtained with diverse facilities are difficult to compare, due to the interplay of numerous parameters, such as beam area and pulse geometry, which, in operational large beam conditions, are very different from laboratory measurements. This discrepancy could have a significant impact; if so, one could not even pretend that laser damage density control is a real measurement process. In this paper, this concern is addressed. Tests with large beams of centimeter size on a high-power laser facility have beam performed according to a parametric study and are compared to small beam laboratory tests. It is shown that laser damage densities obtained with large and small beams are equal, within calculated error bars.

Lamaignere, Laurent; Dupuy, Gabriel; Donval, Thierry; Grua, Pierre; Bercegol, Herve

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Combining tissue-phantom ratios to provide a beam-quality specifier for flattening filter free photon beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: There are currently several commercially available radiotherapy treatment units without a flattening filter in the beam line. Unflattened photon beams have an energy and lateral fluence distribution that is different from conventional beams and, thus, their attenuation properties differ. As a consequence, for flattening filter free (FFF) beams, the relationship between the beam-quality specifier TPR{sub 20,10} and the Spencer–Attix restricted water-to-air mass collision stopping-power ratios, (L{sup -}/?){sub air}{sup water}, may have to be refined in order to be used with equivalent accuracy as for beams with a flattening filter. The purpose of this work was twofold. First, to study the relationship between TPR{sub 20,10} and (L{sup -}/?){sub air}{sup water} for FFF beams, where the flattening filter has been replaced by a metal plate as in most clinical FFF beams. Second, to investigate the potential of increasing the accuracy in determining (L{sup -}/?){sub air}{sup water} by adding another beam-quality metric, TPR{sub 10,5}. The relationship between (L{sup -}/?){sub air}{sup water} and %dd(10){sub x} for beams with and without a flattening filter was also included in this study. Methods: A total of 24 realistic photon beams (10 with and 14 without a flattening filter) from three different treatment units have been used to calculate (L{sup -}/?){sub air}{sup water}, TPR{sub 20,10}, and TPR{sub 10,5} using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo package. The relationship between (L{sup -}/?){sub air}{sup water} and the dual beam-quality specifier TPR{sub 20,10} and TPR{sub 10,5} was described by a simple bilinear equation. The relationship between the photon beam-quality specifier %dd(10){sub x} used in the AAPM’s TG-51 dosimetry protocol and (L{sup -}/?){sub air}{sup water} was also investigated for the beams used in this study, by calculating the photon component of the percentage depth dose at 10 cm depth with SSD 100 cm. Results: The calculated (L{sup -}/?){sub air}{sup water} for beams without a flattening filter was 0.3% lower, on average, than for beams with a flattening filter and comparable TPR{sub 20,10}. Using the relationship in IAEA, TRS-398 resulted in a root mean square deviation (RMSD) of 0.0028 with a maximum deviation of 0.0043 (0.39%) from Monte Carlo calculated values. For all beams in this study, the RMSD between the proposed model and the Monte Carlo calculated values was 0.0006 with a maximum deviation of 0.0013 (0.1%). Using an earlier proposed relationship [Xiong and Rogers, Med. Phys. 35, 2104–2109 (2008)] between %dd(10){sub x} and (L{sup -}/?){sub air}{sup water} gave a RMSD of 0.0018 with a maximum deviation of 0.0029 (0.26%) for all beams in this study (compared to RMSD 0.0015 and a maximum deviation of 0.0048 (0.47%) for the relationship used in AAPM TG-51 published by Almond et al. [Med. Phys. 26, 1847–1870 (1999)]). Conclusions: Using TPR{sub 20,10} as a beam-quality specifier, for the flattening filter free beams used in this study, gave a maximum difference of 0.39% between (L{sup -}/?){sub air}{sup water} predicted using IAEA TRS-398 and Monte Carlo calculations. An additional parameter for determining (L{sup -}/?){sub air}{sup water} has been presented. This parameter is easy to measure; it requires only an additional dose measurement at 5 cm depth with SSD 95 cm, and provides information for accurate determination of the (L{sup -}/?){sub air}{sup water} ratio for beams both with and without a flattening filter at the investigated energies.

Dalaryd, Mårten, E-mail: Marten.Dalaryd@med.lu.se; Knöös, Tommy [Department of Clinical Sciences, Medical Radiation Physics, Lund University, P.O. Box 117, Lund SE-221 00, Sweden and Radiation Physics, Skåne University Hospital, Lund SE-221 85 (Sweden); Ceberg, Crister [Department of Clinical Sciences, Medical Radiation Physics, Lund University, P.O. Box 117, Lund SE-221 00 (Sweden)

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Calculation of the transverse kicks generated by the bends of a hollow electron lens  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electron lenses are pulsed, magnetically confined electron beams whose current-density profile is shaped to obtain the desired effect on the circulating beam in high-energy accelerators. They were used in the Fermilab Tevatron collider for abort-gap clearing, beam-beam compensation, and halo scraping. A beam-beam compensation scheme based upon electron lenses is currently being implemented in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This work is in support of a conceptual design of hollow electron beam scraper for the Large Hadron Collider. It also applies to the implementation of nonlinear integrable optics with electron lenses in the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator at Fermilab. We consider the axial asymmetries of the electron beam caused by the bends that are used to inject electrons into the interaction region and to extract them. A distribution of electron macroparticles is deposited on a discrete grid enclosed in a conducting pipe. The electrostatic potential and electric fields are calculated using numerical Poisson solvers. The kicks experienced by the circulating beam are estimated by integrating the electric fields over straight trajectories. These kicks are also provided in the form of interpolated analytical symplectic maps for numerical tracking simulations, which are needed to estimate the effects of the electron lens imperfections on proton lifetimes, emittance growth, and dynamic aperture. We outline a general procedure to calculate the magnitude of the transverse proton kicks, which can then be generalized, if needed, to include further refinements such as the space-charge evolution of the electron beam, magnetic fields generated by the electron current, and longitudinal proton dynamics.

Stancari, Giulio

2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

216

A high power beam-on-target test of liquid lithium target for RIA.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experiments were conducted to demonstrate the stable operation of a windowless liquid lithium target under extreme thermal loads that are equivalent to uranium beams from the proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) driver linac. The engineering and safety issues accompanying liquid lithium systems are first discussed. The liquid metal technology knowledge base generated primarily for fast reactors, and liquid metal cooled fusion reactors, was applied to the development of these systems in a nuclear physics laboratory setting. The use of a high energy electron beam for simulating a high power uranium beam produced by the RIA driver linac is also described. Calculations were performed to obtain energy deposition profiles produced by electron beams at up to a few MeV to compare with expected uranium beam energy deposition profiles. It was concluded that an experimental simulation using a 1-MeV electron beam would be a valuable tool to assess beam-jet interaction. In the experiments, the cross section of the windowless liquid lithium target was 5 mm x 10 mm, which is a 1/3rd scale prototype target, and the velocity of the liquid lithium was varied up to 6 m/s. Thermal loads up to 20 kW within a beam spot diameter of 1mm were applied on the windowless liquid lithium target by the 1-MeV electron beam. The calculations showed that the maximum power density and total power deposited within the target, from the electron beam, was equivalent to that of a 200-kW, 400-MeV/u uranium beam. It was demonstrated that the windowless liquid lithium target flowing at velocities as low as 1.8 m/s stably operated under beam powers up to 20 kW without disruption or excessive vaporization.

Nolen, J.; Reed, C.; Novick, V.; Specht, J.; Plotkin, P.; Momozaki,Y.; Gomes, I.

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

217

Laser acceleration of ion beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider methods of charged particle acceleration by means of high-intensity lasers. As an application we discuss a laser booster for heavy ion beams provided, e.g. by the Dubna nuclotron. Simple estimates show that a cascade of crossed laser beams would be necessary to provide additional acceleration to gold ions of the order of GeV/nucleon.

I. A. Egorova; A. V. Filatov; A. V. Prozorkevich; S. A. Smolyansky; D. B. Blaschke; M. Chubaryan

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Computational Tools for Supersymmetry Calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I present a brief overview of a variety of computational tools for supersymmetry calculations, including: spectrum generators, cross section and branching fraction calculators, low energy constraints, general purpose event generators, matrix element event generators, SUSY dark matter codes, parameter extraction codes and Les Houches interface tools.

Howard Baer

2009-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

219

Toward automated beam optics control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have begun a program aiming toward automatic control of charged-particle beam optics using artificial intelligence programming techniques. In developing our prototype, we are working with LISP machines and the KEE expert system shell. Our first goal was to develop a ''mouseable'' representation of a typical beam line. This responds actively to changes entered from the mouse or keyboard, giving an updated display of the beam line itself, its optical properties, and the instrumentation and control devices as seen by the operater. We have incorporated TRANSPORT, written in Fortran but running as a callable procedure in the LISP environment, for simulation of the beam-line optics. This paper describes the experience gained in meeting our first goal and discusses plans to extend the work so that it is usable, in realtime, on an operating beam line. 11 refs.

Silbar, R.R.; Schultz, D.E.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Tissue Heterogeneity in IMRT Dose Calculation for Lung Cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of this study was to evaluate the differences in accuracy of dose calculation between 3 commonly used algorithms, the Pencil Beam algorithm (PB), the Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (AAA), and the Collapsed Cone Convolution Superposition (CCCS) for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The 2D dose distributions obtained with the 3 algorithms were compared on each CT slice pixel by pixel, using the MATLAB code (The MathWorks, Natick, MA) and the agreement was assessed with the {gamma} function. The effect of the differences on dose-volume histograms (DVHs), tumor control, and normal tissue complication probability (TCP and NTCP) were also evaluated, and its significance was quantified by using a nonparametric test. In general PB generates regions of over-dosage both in the lung and in the tumor area. These differences are not always in DVH of the lung, although the Wilcoxon test indicated significant differences in 2 of 4 patients. Disagreement in the lung region was also found when the {Gamma} analysis was performed. The effect on TCP is less important than for NTCP because of the slope of the curve at the level of the dose of interest. The effect of dose calculation inaccuracy is patient-dependent and strongly related to beam geometry and to the localization of the tumor. When multiple intensity-modulated beams are used, the effect of the presence of the heterogeneity on dose distribution may not always be easily predictable.

Pasciuti, Katia, E-mail: ka.pasciuti@libero.i [Laboratory of Medical Physics, Istituto Regina Elena, Roma (Italy); Iaccarino, Giuseppe; Strigari, Lidia [Laboratory of Medical Physics, Istituto Regina Elena, Roma (Italy); Malatesta, Tiziana [Medical Physics Department, S. Giovanni Calibita, Fatebenefratelli Hospital, Roma (Italy); Benassi, Marcello; Di Nallo, Anna Maria [Laboratory of Medical Physics, Istituto Regina Elena, Roma (Italy); Mirri, Alessandra; Pinzi, Valentina [Division of Radiotherapy, Istituto Regina Elena, Roma (Italy); Landoni, Valeria [Laboratory of Medical Physics, Istituto Regina Elena, Roma (Italy)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "undulator beam calculated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Study of space charge compensation phenomena in charged particle beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The propagation of a charged particle beam is accompanied by the production of secondary particles created in the interaction of the beam itself with the background gas flowing in the accelerator tube. In the drift region, where the electric field of the electrodes is negligible, secondary particles may accumulate giving a plasma which shields the self-induced potential of the charged beam. This phenomenon, known as space charge compensation is a typical issue in accelerator physics, where it is usually addressed by means of 1D radial transport codes or Monte Carlo codes. The present paper describes some theoretical studies on this phenomenon, presenting a Particle in Cell-Monte Carlo (PIC-MC) Code developed ad hoc where both radial and axial confinements of secondary particles are calculated. The features of the model, offering a new insight on the problem, are described and some results discussed.

Veltri, P.; Serianni, G. [Consorzio RFX, C.so Stati Uniti 4, 35100 Padova (Italy); Cavenago, M. [INFN-LNL, Viale dell'Universita 2, 35020 Legnaro (Italy)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

222

Electrostatic wire stabilizing a charged particle beam  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In combination with a charged particle beam generator and accelerator, apparatus and method are provided for stabilizing a beam of electrically charged particles. A guiding means, disposed within the particle beam, has an electric charge induced upon it by the charged particle beam. Because the sign of the electric charge on the guiding means and the sign of the particle beam are opposite, the particles are attracted toward and cluster around the guiding means to thereby stabilize the particle beam as it travels.

Prono, D.S.; Caporaso, G.J.; Briggs, R.J.

1983-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

223

Conventional wire scanners for TESLA K. Wittenburg  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the undulator section. The heat load of the wires is calculated in the following for the TESLA parameters to the high heat load. At some locations in TESLA both beam diameters are larger than a few microns. The heat load defines the wire scanner parameters, mainly the scanning speed, and other limitations

224

Molecular Beam Epitaxy, Multi-source | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

beam epitaxy, is examined using a combination... Self-corrected Sensors Based On Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy For Atom Flux Measurements In Molecular Beam Epitaxy. A...

225

Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams Print Wednesday, 26 July 2006 00:00 Silicon-based transistors are well-understood,...

226

Orbit and optics improvement by evaluating the nonlinear beam position monitor response in the Cornell Electron Storage Ring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by inverting the nonlinear functions, giving us beam position as a function of the pickup signals, and how signals as nonlinear functions of beam position using Greens reciprocity theorem with a two this is also used to improve our calculation of the betatron phase advance. Measurements are presented

Hoffstaetter, Georg

227

Neutral beam heating of a RFP plasma in MST  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electron temperature is observed to rise due to neutral beam injection (NBI) in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST). Heating is observed to be 100 {+-} 50 eV in the core of 200 kA plasmas. This is the first definitive measurement of auxiliary heating of a reversed-field pinch (RFP). This heating is consistent with a 1D classical model which was developed. This 1D model calculates the evolving thermal conductivity and ohmic power input profiles during enhanced confinement, and can calculate NBI deposition and classical fast ion diffusion and slowing. The predicted temperature change is consistent with measured beam heating both during and after enhanced confinement, which is consistent with previous observations that fast ions are well confined and behave roughly classically in the RFP.

Waksman, J.; Anderson, J. K.; Nornberg, M. D.; Parke, E.; Reusch, J. A. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53706-1390 (United States); Liu, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697-4575 (United States); Fiksel, G. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 E. River Rd, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Davydenko, V. I.; Ivanov, A. A.; Stupishin, N.; Deichuli, P. P. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11, Akademika Lavrentieva Prospect, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Sakakita, H. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

228

Melt and vapor characteristics in an electron beam evaporator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We compare the free surface temperatures T{sub s}, calculated by two methods, in cerium or copper evaporation experiments. The first method considers properties of the melt: by an empirical law we take into account turbulent thermal convection, instabilities and craterization of the free surface. The second method considers the vapor flow expansion and connects T{sub s} to the measured terminal parallel temperature and the terminal mean parallel velocity of the vapor jet, by Direct Simulation Monte Carlo calculations including an atom-atom inelastic collision algorithm. The agreement between the two approaches is better for cerium than for copper in the high craterization case. The analysis, from the point of view of the properties of the melt, of the terminal parameters of the vapor jet for the high beam powers shows that T{sub s} and the Knudsen number at the vapor source reach a threshold when the beam power increases.

Blumenfeld, L.; Fleche, J.L.; Gonella, C. [DCC/DPE/SPEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

229

Electron beam machining using rotating and shaped beam power distribution  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method are disclosed for electron beam (EB) machining (drilling, cutting and welding) that uses conventional EB guns, power supplies, and welding machine technology without the need for fast bias pulsing technology. The invention involves a magnetic lensing (EB optics) system and electronic controls to: (1) concurrently bend, focus, shape, scan, and rotate the beam to protect the EB gun and to create a desired effective power-density distribution, and (2) rotate or scan this shaped beam in a controlled way. The shaped beam power-density distribution can be measured using a tomographic imaging system. For example, the EB apparatus of this invention has the ability to drill holes in metal having a diameter up to 1,000 {micro}m (1 mm or larger), compared to the 250 {micro}m diameter of laser drilling. 5 figs.

Elmer, J.W.; O`Brien, D.W.

1996-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

230

Electron beam machining using rotating and shaped beam power distribution  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for electron beam (EB) machining (drilling, cutting and welding) that uses conventional EB guns, power supplies, and welding machine technology without the need for fast bias pulsing technology. The invention involves a magnetic lensing (EB optics) system and electronic controls to: 1) concurrently bend, focus, shape, scan, and rotate the beam to protect the EB gun and to create a desired effective power-density distribution, and 2) rotate or scan this shaped beam in a controlled way. The shaped beam power-density distribution can be measured using a tomographic imaging system. For example, the EB apparatus of this invention has the ability to drill holes in metal having a diameter up to 1000 .mu.m (1 mm or larger), compared to the 250 .mu.m diameter of laser drilling.

Elmer, John W. (Pleasanton, CA); O'Brien, Dennis W. (Livermore, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Alight a beam and beaming light: A theme with variations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The interaction of light (coherent and incoherent) with charged particle beams is explored in various configurations: incoherent scattering of coherent light (laser) from an incoherent particle beam (high temperature), coherent scattering of coherent light (laser) from a {open_quotes}cold{close_quotes} (bunched) beam, femtosecond generation of particle and light beams via {open_quotes}optical slicing{close_quotes} and Thomson/Compton scattering techniques, etc. The domains of ultrashort temporal duration (femtoseconds) as well as ultrashort wavelengths (x rays and shorter), with varying degrees of coherence, are explored. The relevance to a few critical areas of research in the natural sciences, e.g., ultrafast material, chemical and biological processes, protein folding, particle phase space cooling, etc. are touched upon. All the processes discussed involve proper interpretation and understanding of coherent states of matter and radiation, as well as the quality and quantity of information and energy embedded in them. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

Chattopadhyay, S. [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California94720 (United States)] [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California94720 (United States)

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Course Notes: United States Particle Accelerator School Beam Physics with Intense Space-Charge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this course is to provide a comprehensive introduction to the physics of beams with intense space charge. This course is suitable for graduate students and researchers interested in accelerator systems that require sufficient high intensity where mutual particle interactions in the beam can no longer be neglected. This course is intended to give the student a broad overview of the dynamics of beams with strong space charge. The emphasis is on theoretical and analytical methods of describing the acceleration and transport of beams. Some aspects of numerical and experimental methods will also be covered. Students will become familiar with standard methods employed to understand the transverse and longitudinal evolution of beams with strong space charge. The material covered will provide a foundation to design practical architectures. In this course, we will introduce you to the physics of intense charged particle beams, focusing on the role of space charge. The topics include: particle equations of motion, the paraxial ray equation, and the Vlasov equation; 4-D and 2-D equilibrium distribution functions (such as the Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij, thermal equilibrium, and Neuffer distributions), reduced moment and envelope equation formulations of beam evolution; transport limits and focusing methods; the concept of emittance and the calculation of its growth from mismatches in beam envelope and from space-charge non-uniformities using system conservation constraints; the role of space-charge in producing beam halos; longitudinal space-charge effects including small amplitude and rarefaction waves; stable and unstable oscillation modes of beams (including envelope and kinetic modes); the role of space charge in the injector; and algorithms to calculate space-charge effects in particle codes. Examples of intense beams will be given primarily from the ion and proton accelerator communities with applications from, for example, heavy-ion fusion, spallation neutron sources, nuclear waste transmutation, etc.

Barnard, J.J.; Lund, S.M.

2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

233

H-Mode Accelerating Structures with PMQ Beam Focusing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have developed high-efficiency normal-conducting RF accelerating structures by combining H-mode resonator cavities and a transverse beam focusing by permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQ), for beam velocities in the range of a few percent of the speed of light. The shunt impedance of inter-digital H-mode (IH-PMQ) structures is 10-20 times higher than that of a conventional drift-tube linac, while the transverse size is 4-5 times smaller. Results of the combined 3-D modeling - electromagnetic computations, multi-particle beam-dynamics simulations with high currents, and thermal-stress analysis - for an IH-PMQ accelerator tank are presented. The accelerating field profile in the tank is tuned to provide the best propagation of a 50-mA deuteron beam using coupled iterations of electromagnetic and beam-dynamics modeling. Measurements of a cold model of the IH-PMQ tank show a good agreement with the calculations. H-PMQ accelerating structures following a short RFQ can be used both in the front end of ion linacs or ...

Kurennoy, Sergey S; O'Hara, James F; Olivas, Eric R; Wangler, Thomas P

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Circular, confined distribution for charged particle beams  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A charged particle beam line is formed with magnetic optics that manipulate the charged particle beam to form the beam having a generally rectangular configuration to a circular beam cross-section having a uniform particle distribution at a predetermined location. First magnetic optics form a charged particle beam to a generally uniform particle distribution over a square planar area at a known first location. Second magnetic optics receive the charged particle beam with the generally square configuration and affect the charged particle beam to output the charged particle beam with a phase-space distribution effective to fold corner portions of the beam toward the core region of the beam. The beam forms a circular configuration having a generally uniform spatial particle distribution over a target area at a predetermined second location.

Garnett, Robert W. (Los Alamos, NM); Dobelbower, M. Christian (Toledo, OH)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Circular, confined distribution for charged particle beams  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A charged particle beam line is formed with magnetic optics that manipulate the charged particle beam to form the beam having a generally rectangular configuration to a circular beam cross-section having a uniform particle distribution at a predetermined location. First magnetic optics form a charged particle beam to a generally uniform particle distribution over a square planar area at a known first location. Second magnetic optics receive the charged particle beam with the generally square configuration and affect the charged particle beam to output the charged particle beam with a phase-space distribution effective to fold corner portions of the beam toward the core region of the beam. The beam forms a circular configuration having a generally uniform spatial particle distribution over a target area at a predetermined second location. 26 figs.

Garnett, R.W.; Dobelbower, M.C.

1995-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

236

Confined energy distribution for charged particle beams  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A charged particle beam is formed to a relatively larger area beam which is well-contained and has a beam area which relatively uniformly deposits energy over a beam target. Linear optics receive an accelerator beam and output a first beam with a first waist defined by a relatively small size in a first dimension normal to a second dimension. Nonlinear optics, such as an octupole magnet, are located about the first waist and output a second beam having a phase-space distribution which folds the beam edges along the second dimension toward the beam core to develop a well-contained beam and a relatively uniform particle intensity across the beam core. The beam may then be expanded along the second dimension to form the uniform ribbon beam at a selected distance from the nonlinear optics. Alternately, the beam may be passed through a second set of nonlinear optics to fold the beam edges in the first dimension. The beam may then be uniformly expanded along the first and second dimensions to form a well-contained, two-dimensional beam for illuminating a two-dimensional target with a relatively uniform energy deposition.

Jason, Andrew J. (Los Alamos, NM); Blind, Barbara (Los Alamos, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Center for Beam Physics, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the following information on the center for beam physics: Facilities; Organizational Chart; Roster; Profiles of Staff; Affiliates; Center Publications (1991--1993); and 1992 Summary of Activities.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Neutron beam testing of triblades  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PowerXCell 8i processors and Opterons in four IBM Triblades were tested at LANSCE. The hazard rate when the beam was aimed at the Opterons was higher than when it was aimed at the Cell processors.

Michalak, Sarah E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Du Bois, Andrew J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Storlie, Curtis B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rust, William N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Du Bois, David H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Modl, David G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Quinn, Heather M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Blanchard, Sean P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Manuzzato, Andrea [UNIV DEGLI STUDI DI PADOVA ITALY

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

239

STOCHASTIC COOLING FOR BUNCHED BEAMS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Problems associated with bunched beam stochastic cooling are reviewed. A longitudinal stochastic cooling system for RHIC is under construction and has been partially commissioned. The state of the system and future plans are discussed.

BLASKIEWICZ, M.

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

240

Beam bunch feedback  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When the electromagnetic fields that are excited by the passage of a bundle of charged particles persist to act upon bunches that follow, then the motions of the bunches are coupled. This action between bunches circulating on a closed orbit can generate growing patterns of bunch excursions. Such growth can often be suppressed by feedback systems that detect the excursion and apply corrective forces to the bunches. To be addressed herein is feedback that acts on motions of the bunch body centers. In addition to being useful for suppressing the spontaneous growth of coupled-bunch motions, such feedback can be used to damp transients in bunches injected into an accelerator or storage ring; for hadrons which lack strong radiation damping, feedback is needed to avoid emittance growth through decoherence. Motions excited by noise in magnetic fields or accelerating rf can also be reduced by using this feedback. Whether the action is on motions that are transverse to the closed orbit or longitudinal, the arrangement is the same. Bunch position is detected by a pickup and that signal is processed and directed to a kicker that may act upon the same bunch or some other portion of the collective beam pattern. Transverse motion is an oscillation with angular frequency {nu}{perpendicular}{omega}{sub o} where {omega}{sub o} is the orbital frequency 2{pi}{line_integral}o. Longitudinal synchrotron oscillation occurs at frequency {omega} {sub s} = {nu}{sub s}{omega}{sub o}. The former is much more rapid, {nu}{perpendicular} being on the order of 10 while {nu}{sub s} is typically about 10{sup minus 1} to 10 {sup minus 2}.

Lambertson, G.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "undulator beam calculated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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241

Single lens laser beam shaper  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A single lens bullet-shaped laser beam shaper capable of redistributing an arbitrary beam profile into any desired output profile comprising a unitary lens comprising: a convex front input surface defining a focal point and a flat output portion at the focal point; and b) a cylindrical core portion having a flat input surface coincident with the flat output portion of the first input portion at the focal point and a convex rear output surface remote from the convex front input surface.

Liu, Chuyu (Newport News, VA); Zhang, Shukui (Yorktown, VA)

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

242

Exact kinetic theory for the instability of an electron beam in a hot magnetized plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Efficiency of collective beam-plasma interaction strongly depends on the growth rates of dominant instabilities excited in the system. Nevertheless, exact calculations of the full unstable spectrum in the framework of relativistic kinetic theory for arbitrary magnetic fields and particle distributions were unknown until now. In this paper, we give an example of such a calculation answering the question whether the finite thermal spreads of plasma electrons are able to suppress the fastest growing modes in the beam-plasma system. It is shown that nonrelativistic temperatures of Maxwellian plasmas can stabilize only the oblique instabilities of relativistic beam. On the contrary, non-Maxwellian tails typically found in laboratory beam-plasma experiments are able to substantially reduce the growth rate of the dominant longitudinal modes affecting the efficiency of turbulent plasma heating.

Timofeev, I. V.; Annenkov, V. V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, Novosibirsk, Russia Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)] [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, Novosibirsk, Russia Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

243

Electron beam diagnostic for profiling high power beams  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for characterizing high power electron beams at power levels of 10 kW and above is described. This system is comprised of a slit disk assembly having a multitude of radial slits, a conducting disk with the same number of radial slits located below the slit disk assembly, a Faraday cup assembly located below the conducting disk, and a start-stop target located proximate the slit disk assembly. In order to keep the system from over-heating during use, a heat sink is placed in close proximity to the components discussed above, and an active cooling system, using water, for example, can be integrated into the heat sink. During use, the high power beam is initially directed onto a start-stop target and after reaching its full power is translated around the slit disk assembly, wherein the beam enters the radial slits and the conducting disk radial slits and is detected at the Faraday cup assembly. A trigger probe assembly can also be integrated into the system in order to aid in the determination of the proper orientation of the beam during reconstruction. After passing over each of the slits, the beam is then rapidly translated back to the start-stop target to minimize the amount of time that the high power beam comes in contact with the slit disk assembly. The data obtained by the system is then transferred into a computer system, where a computer tomography algorithm is used to reconstruct the power density distribution of the beam.

Elmer, John W. (Danville, CA); Palmer, Todd A. (Livermore, CA); Teruya, Alan T. (Livermore, CA)

2008-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

244

Proton induced activation in mercury: Comparison of measurements and calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements and simulations of the proton beam interaction with the mercury target were performed to support Spallation Neutron Source design. Due to the abundance of isotopes produced in mercury, the long delay between the irradiation and the measurements, and the self-shielding of the mercury sample, the measurements were difficult to perform and the activities of several isotopes have large uncertainties. Calculations predicted the activities of the most reliably measured isotopes within 20%/40%; however, some large discrepancies were observed for some isotopes for which the measurements were considered less reliable. Predicted dose rates were in very good agreement with the measurements.

Remec, Igor [ORNL; Glasgow, David C [ORNL; Haines, John R [ORNL; Johnson, Jeffrey O [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Proliferation Potential of Accelerator-Drive Systems: Feasibility Calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accelerator-driven systems for fissile materials production have been proposed and studied since the early 1950s. Recent advances in beam power levels for small accelerators have raised the possibility that such use could be feasible for a potential proliferator. The objective of this study is to review the state of technology development for accelerator-driven spallation neutron sources and subcritical reactors. Energy and power requirements were calculated for a proton accelerator-driven neutron spallation source and subcritical reactors to produce a significant amount of fissile material--plutonium.

Riendeau, C.D.; Moses, D.L.; Olson, A.P.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Limiting electron beam current for cyclic induction acceleration in a constant guide field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Theoretical relations are derived for the limiting beam current in a cyclic induction accelerator (CIA) with a constant guide field. The calculations are in agreement with the available experimental data. It is shown that the limiting average beam current in a CIA is of the order of 100 microamperes, i.e., the level attained in microtrons and linear accelerators. The CIA may find industrial applications.

Kanunnikov, V.N.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Measuring of plasma properties induced by non-vacuum electron beam welding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electron beam plasma measurement was realised by means of DIABEAM system invented by ISF RWTH Aachen. The Langmuir probe method is used for measurement. The relative simplicity of the method and the possibility of dispersion of high power on the probe allow its application for the investigation of high-power electron beams. The key element of the method is a rotating thin tungsten wire, which intersects the beam transversely on its axis and collects part of the current by itself. The signals, which are registered in the DIABEAM as a voltage, were taken in the form of amplitude. The conversion of the probe current into the distribution along the beam radius was realised using the Abel's method. A voltage-current characteristic was built for the beam current. The local electron density as well as the electron temperature, the floating potential and the plasma potential were measured and calculated by means of this characteristic.

Reisgen, U.; Schleser, M.; Abdurakhmanov, A. [RWTH Aachen University ISF-Welding and Joining Institute, 52062 Aachen (Germany); Gumenyuk, A. [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, 12205 Berlin (Germany)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

248

Interaction of nonthermal muon beam with electron-positron-photon plasma: A thermal field theory approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Interaction of a muon beam with hot dense QED plasma is investigated. Plasma system contains electrons and positrons with Fermi-Dirac distribution and Bose-Einstein distributed photons while the beam particles have nonthermal distribution. The energy loss of the beam particles during the interaction with plasma is calculated to complete leading order of interaction in terms of the QED coupling constant using thermal field theory approach. The screening effects of the plasma are computed consistently using resummation of perturbation theory with hard thermal loop approximation according to the Braaten-Pisarski method. Time evolution of the plasma characteristics and also plasma identifications during the interaction are investigated. Effects of the nonthermal parameter of the beam distribution on the energy exchange and the evolution of plasma-beam system are also explained.

Noorian, Zainab; Eslami, Parvin; Javidan, Kurosh [Physics Department, School of Science, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Physics Department, School of Science, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

249

Energy deposition in t in films calculated using ellectron transport theory Theodore Biewer and Peter Rez  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy deposition in t in films calculated using ellectron transport theory Theodore Biewer damage which can be related to the energy deposited in the specimen. We derive an expression for the energy deposition using the electron transport equation and give results for beam energies of l-10 k

Biewer, Theodore

250

Nufact 2008 The Beta Beam WP Beta beam R&D status  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nufact 2008 The Beta Beam WP Nufact 08 1 Beta beam R&D status Elena Wildner, CERN on behalf of the Beta Beam Study Group EURISOL/Euronu #12;Nufact 2008 The Beta Beam WP Nufact08Nufact08 Outline Recall, EURISOL Ion Production Loss Management Improvements New Program, EuroNu 2 #12;Nufact 2008 The Beta Beam WP

McDonald, Kirk

251

A Timoshenko beam theory with pressure corrections for layered orthotropic beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Timoshenko beam theory with pressure corrections for layered orthotropic beams Graeme J. Kennedya of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA Abstract A Timoshenko beam theory for layered orthotropic beams and rotation variables that provide the kinematic description of the beam, stress and strain moments used

Papalambros, Panos

252

Commissioning of output factors for uniform scanning proton beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Current commercial treatment planning systems are not able to accurately predict output factors and calculate monitor units for proton fields. Patient-specific field output factors are thus determined by either measurements or empirical modeling based on commissioning data. The objective of this study is to commission output factors for uniform scanning beams utilized at the ProCure proton therapy centers. Methods: Using water phantoms and a plane parallel ionization chamber, the authors first measured output factors with a fixed 10 cm diameter aperture as a function of proton range and modulation width for clinically available proton beams with ranges between 4 and 31.5 cm and modulation widths between 2 and 15 cm. The authors then measured the output factor as a function of collimated field size at various calibration depths for proton beams of various ranges and modulation widths. The authors further examined the dependence of the output factor on the scanning area (i.e., uncollimated proton field), snout position, and phantom material. An empirical model was developed to calculate the output factor for patient-specific fields and the model-predicted output factors were compared to measurements. Results: The output factor increased with proton range and field size, and decreased with modulation width. The scanning area and snout position have a small but non-negligible effect on the output factors. The predicted output factors based on the empirical modeling agreed within 2% of measurements for all prostate treatment fields and within 3% for 98.5% of all treatment fields. Conclusions: Comprehensive measurements at a large subset of available beam conditions are needed to commission output factors for proton therapy beams. The empirical modeling agrees well with the measured output factor data. This investigation indicates that it is possible to accurately predict output factors and thus eliminate or reduce time-consuming patient-specific output measurements for proton treatments.

Zheng Yuanshui; Ramirez, Eric; Mascia, Anthony; Ding Xiaoning; Okoth, Benny; Zeidan, Omar; Hsi Wen; Harris, Ben; Schreuder, Andries N.; Keole, Sameer [ProCure Proton Therapy Center, 5901 West Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States); ProCure Treatment Centers, 420 North Walnut Street, Bloomington, Indiana 47404 (United States); ProCure Proton Therapy Center, 5901 West Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

253

Application of beam emission spectroscopy to NBI plasmas of Heliotron J  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the application of the beam emission spectroscopy (BES) to Heliotron J, having the nonsymmetrical helical-magnetic-axis configuration. The spectral and spatial profile of the beam emission has been estimated by the numerical calculation taking the collisional excitation processes between plasmas (electrons/ions) and beam atoms. Two sets of the sightlines with good spatial resolution are presented. One is the optimized viewing chords which have 20 sightlines and observe the whole plasma region with the spatial resolution {Delta}{rho} less than {+-}0.055 using the newly designed viewing port. The other is 15 sightlines from the present viewing port of Heliotron J for the preliminary measurement to discuss the feasibility of the density fluctuation measurement by BES. The beam emission has been measured by a monochromator with a CCD camera. A good consistency has been obtained between the spectral profiles of the beam emission measured by the monochromator and the beam emission spectrum deduced by the model calculation. An avalanche photodiode with an interference filter system was also used to evaluate the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio of the beam emission in the present experimental setup. The modification of the optical system is being planned to improve the S/N ratio, which will enable us to estimate the density fluctuation in Heliotron J.

Kobayashi, S.; Ohshima, S.; Mizuuchi, T.; Nagasaki, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Okada, H.; Minami, T.; Hanatani, K.; Konoshima, S.; Takeuchi, M.; Toushi, K.; Sano, F. [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Kado, S. [School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Oishi, T. [Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Kagawa, T.; Lee, H. Y.; Minami, T.; Nakamura, Y. [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Murakami, S. [Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

254

Monte Carlo calculations of nuclei  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear many-body calculations have the complication of strong spin- and isospin-dependent potentials. In these lectures the author discusses the variational and Green`s function Monte Carlo techniques that have been developed to address this complication, and presents a few results.

Pieper, S.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Physics Div.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

On the Sensitivity of ?/? Prediction to Dose Calculation Methodology in Prostate Brachytherapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To study the relationship between the accuracy of the dose calculation in brachytherapy and the estimations of the radiosensitivity parameter, ?/?, for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: In this study, Monte Carlo methods and more specifically the code ALGEBRA was used to produce accurate dose calculations in the case of prostate brachytherapy. Equivalent uniform biologically effective dose was calculated for these dose distributions and was used in an iso-effectiveness relationship with external beam radiation therapy. Results: By considering different levels of detail in the calculations, the estimation for the ?/? parameter varied from 1.9 to 6.3 Gy, compared with a value of 3.0 Gy suggested by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 137. Conclusions: Large variations of the ?/? show the sensitivity of this parameter to dose calculation modality. The use of accurate dose calculation engines is critical for better evaluating the biological outcomes of treatments.

Afsharpour, Hossein [Centre de Recherche sur le Cancer, Université Laval and Département de Radio-Oncologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Québec, Québec, QC (Canada); Centre Intégré de Cancérologie de la Montérégie, Hôpital Charles-LeMoyne, Greenfield Park, QC (Canada); Walsh, Sean [Department of Radiation Oncology Maastricht Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands); Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology, The University of Oxford, The United Kingdom (United Kingdom); Collins Fekete, Charles-Antoine; Vigneault, Eric [Centre de Recherche sur le Cancer, Université Laval and Département de Radio-Oncologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Québec, Québec, QC (Canada); Verhaegen, Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology Maastricht Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands); Medical Physics Unit, Department of Oncology, McGill University, Montréal, Québec (Canada); Beaulieu, Luc, E-mail: Luc.Beaulieu@phy.ulaval.ca [Centre de Recherche sur le Cancer, Université Laval and Département de Radio-Oncologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Québec, Québec, QC (Canada)

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Calculation of wakefields in a 17 GHz beam-driven photonic band-gap accelerator structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the theoretical analysis and computer simulation of the wakefields in a 17 GHz photonic band-gap (PBG) structure for accelerator applications. Using the commercial code CST Particle Studio, the fundamental ...

Hu, Min

257

ANL/APS/TB-20 Bremsstrahlung Scattering Calculations for the Beam Stops  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01) (See95TI07)Operations2 Print258Department of31 . Wiggler9 A .0

258

Physics Opportunities with Meson Beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Over the past two decades, meson photo- and electro-production data of unprecedented quality and quantity have been measured at electromagnetic facilities worldwide. By contrast, the meson-beam data for the same hadronic final states are mostly outdated and largely of poor quality, or even nonexistent, and thus provide inadequate input to help interpret, analyze, and exploit the full potential of the new electromagnetic data. To reap the full benefit of the high-precision electromagnetic data, new high-statistics data from measurements with meson beams, with good angle and energy coverage for a wide range of reactions, are critically needed to advance our knowledge in baryon and meson spectroscopy and other related areas of hadron physics. To address this situation, a state of-the-art meson-beam facility needs to be constructed. The present paper summarizes unresolved issues in hadron physics and outlines the vast opportunities and advances that only become possible with such a facility.

Briscoe, William J; Haberzettl, Helmut; Manley, D Mark; Naruki, Megumi; Strakovsky, Igor I; Swanson, Eric S

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Effect of Beam-Beam Interactions on Stability of Coherent Oscillations in a Muon Collider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to achieve peak luminosity of a muon collider in the 10{sup 34}/cm{sup 2}/s range the number of muons per bunch should be of the order of a few units of 10{sup 12} rendering the beam-beam parameter as high as 0.1 per IP. Such strong beam-beam interaction can be a source of instability if the working point is chosen close to a coherent beam-beam resonance. On the other hand, the beam-beam tunespread can provide a mechanism of suppression of the beam-wall driven instabilities. In this report the coherent instabilities driven by beam-beam and beam-wall interactions are studied with the help of BBSS code for the case of 1.5 TeV c.o.m muon collider.

Alexahin, Y.; /Fermilab; Ohmi, K.; /KEK, Tsukuba

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Survey of Collective Instabilities and Beam-Plasma Interactions in Intense Heavy Ion Beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

H. Qin, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 4, 104401 (2001). [30] S.Davidson, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 5, 021001 (2002). [31]Channell, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 2, 074401 (1999); [32

Davidson, Ronald C.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "undulator beam calculated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Nonparaxial Mathieu and Weber accelerating beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We demonstrate both theoretically and experimentally nonparaxial Mathieu and Weber accelerating beams, generalizing the concept of previously found accelerating beams. We show that such beams bend into large angles along circular, elliptical or parabolic trajectories but still retain nondiffracting and self-healing capabilities. The circular nonparaxial accelerating beams can be considered as a special case of the Mathieu accelerating beams, while an Airy beam is only a special case of the Weber beams at the paraxial limit. Not only generalized nonparaxial accelerating beams open up many possibilities of beam engineering for applications, but the fundamental concept developed here can be applied to other linear wave systems in nature, ranging from electromagnetic and elastic waves to matter waves.

Peng Zhang; Yi Hu; Tongcang Li; Drake Cannan; Xiaobo Yin; Roberto Morandotti; Zhigang Chen; Xiang Zhang

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

262

Finding beam focus errors automatically  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An automated method for finding beam focus errors using an optimization program called COMFORT-PLUS. The steps involved in finding the correction factors using COMFORT-PLUS has been used to find the beam focus errors for two damping rings at the SLAC Linear Collider. The program is to be used as an off-line program to analyze actual measured data for any SLC system. A limitation on the application of this procedure is found to be that it depends on the magnitude of the machine errors. Another is that the program is not totally automated since the user must decide a priori where to look for errors. (LEW)

Lee, M.J.; Clearwater, S.H.; Kleban, S.D.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Shimmed electron beam welding process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A modified electron beam welding process effects welding of joints between superalloy materials by inserting a weldable shim in the joint and heating the superalloy materials with an electron beam. The process insures a full penetration of joints with a consistent percentage of filler material and thereby improves fatigue life of the joint by three to four times as compared with the prior art. The process also allows variable shim thickness and joint fit-up gaps to provide increased flexibility for manufacturing when joining complex airfoil structures and the like.

Feng, Ganjiang (Clifton Park, NY); Nowak, Daniel Anthony (Alplaus, NY); Murphy, John Thomas (Niskayuna, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Measurement of the curvature of a surface using parallel light beams  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus for measuring curvature of a surface wherein a beam of collimated light is passed through means for producing a plurality of parallel light beams each separated by a common distance which then reflect off the surface to fall upon a detector that measures the separation of the reflected beams of light. This means can be an etalon and the combination of a diffractive element and a converging lens. The curvature of the surface along the line onto which the multiple beams fall can be calculated from this information. A two-dimensional map of the curvature can be obtained by adding a second etalon (or a second combination of a diffractive element and a converging lens) which is rotated 90.degree. about the optical axis relative to the first etalon and inclined at the same angle. The second etalon creates an individual set of parallel light beams from each of the individual beams created by the first etalon with the sets of parallel light beams from the second etalon rotated 90.degree. relative to the line onto which the single set of parallel beams from the first etalon would have fallen.

Chason, Eric H. (Sandia Park, NM); Floro, Jerrold A. (Edgewood, NM); Seager, Carleton H. (Albuquerque, NM); Sinclair, Michael B. (Albuquerque, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Measurement of the curvature of a surface using parallel light beams  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus is disclosed for measuring curvature of a surface wherein a beam of collimated light is passed through a means for producing a plurality of parallel light beams each separated by a common distance which then reflect off the surface to fall upon a detector that measures the separation of the reflected beams of light. This means can be an etalon and the combination of a diffractive element and a converging lens. The curvature of the surface along the line onto which the multiple beams fall can be calculated from this information. A two-dimensional map of the curvature can be obtained by adding a second etalon (or a second combination of a diffractive element and a converging lens) which is rotated 90[degree] about the optical axis relative to the first etalon and inclined at the same angle. The second etalon creates an individual set of parallel light beams from each of the individual beams created by the first etalon with the sets of parallel light beams from the second etalon rotated 90[degree] relative to the line onto which the single set of parallel beams from the first etalon would have fallen. 5 figs.

Chason, E.H.; Floro, J.A.; Seager, C.H.; Sinclair, M.B.

1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

266

Cryosorption Pumps for a Neutral Beam Injector Test Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the experiences of the manufacturing and the operating of a system of two identical cryosorption pumps used in a neutral beam injector test facility for fusion reactors. Calculated and measured heat loads of the cryogenic liquid helium and liquid nitrogen circuits of the cryosorption pumps are discussed. The design calculations concerning the thermo-hydraulics of the helium circuit are compared with experiences from the operation of the cryosorption pumps. Both cryopumps are integrated in a test facility of a neutral beam injector that will be used to heat the plasma of a nuclear fusion reactor with a beam of deuterium or hydrogen molecules. The huge gas throughput into the vessel of the test facility results in challenging needs on the cryopumping system.The developed cryosorption pumps are foreseen to pump a hydrogen throughput of 20 - 30 mbar{center_dot}l/s. To establish a mean pressure of several 10-5 mbar in the test vessel a pumping speed of about 350 m3/s per pump is needed. The pressure conditions must be maintained over several hours pumping without regeneration of the cryopanels, which necessitates a very high pumping capacity. A possibility to fulfill these requirements is the use of charcoal coated cryopanels to pump the gasloads by adsorption. For the cooling of the cryopanels, liquid helium at saturation pressure is used and therefore a two-phase forced flow in the cryopump system must be controlled.

Dremel, M.; Mack, A.; Day, C.; Jensen, H. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut fuer Technische Physik, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

2006-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

267

Transverse beam shape measurements of intense proton beams using optical transition radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A number of particle physics experiments are being proposed as part of the Department of Energy HEP Intensity Frontier. Many of these experiments will utilize megawatt level proton beams onto targets to form secondary beams of muons, kaons and neutrinos. These experiments require transverse size measurements of the incident proton beam onto target for each beam spill. Because of the high power levels, most beam intercepting profiling techniques will not work at full beam intensity. The possibility of utilizing optical transition radiation (OTR) for high intensity proton beam profiling is discussed. In addition, previous measurements of OTR beam profiles from the NuMI beamline are presented.

Scarpine, Victor E.; /Fermilab

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

NERSC Calculations Provide Independent Confirmation of Global...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Calculations Provide Independent Confirmation of Global Land Warming Since 1901 NERSC Calculations Provide Independent Confirmation of Global Land Warming Since 1901 September 9,...

269

accidental beam loss: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

interaction of fields induced by the beam with their environment. Beam current transformers as well as beam position monitors are based on this principle. The signals induced...

270

On Gaussian Beams Described by Jacobi's Equation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gaussian beams describe the amplitude and phase of rays and are widely used to model acoustic propagation. This paper describes four new results in the theory of Gaussian beams. (1) A new version of the ?ervený equations ...

Smith, Steven T.

271

Electron Beam--21st Century Food Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This publication explains electron beam irradiation technology to consumers, industry professionals and government officials. Electron beam irradiation is a method of treating food and other products for pathogens that might jeopardize food safety....

Vestal, Andy

2003-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

272

Autogenerator of beams of charged particles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An autogenerating apparatus provides secondary intense relativistic current beam pulses in response to an injected beam pulse. One or more electromagnetic energy storage devices are provided in conjunction with gaps along a beam propagation path for the injected beam pulse. For injected beam pulses which are no longer than double the transit time of electromagnetic waves within the storage devices (which may be resonant cavities), distinct secondary beam pulses are generated by each of the energy storage devices. The beam propagation path, together with the one or more gaps provided therein, operates as a pulse forming transmission line cavity, in which the separate cavities associated with the gaps provide delays for electromagnetic waves generated at the gaps. After doubly traversing the cavity, the electromagnetic waves cause the gap to generate the secondary beam pulses, which are thus delayed by a time interval equal to the double transit time for the induced wave within the cavity.

Adler, R.J.; Mazarakis, M.G.; Miller, R.M.; Shope, S.L.; Smith, D.L.

1983-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

273

Transport of elliptic intense charged -particle beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The transport theory of high-intensity elliptic charged-particle beams is presented. In particular, the halo formation and beam loss problem associated with the high space charge and small-aperture structure is addressed, ...

Zhou, J. (Jing), 1978-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Adaptive phase measurements for narrowband squeezed beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have previously [Phys. Rev. A 65, 043803 (2002)] analyzed adaptive measurements for estimating the continuously varying phase of a coherent beam, and a broadband squeezed beam. A real squeezed beam must have finite photon flux N and hence can be significantly squeezed only over a limited frequency range. In this paper we analyze adaptive phase measurements of this type for a realistic model of a squeezed beam. We show that, provided it is possible to suitably choose the parameters of the beam, a mean-square phase uncertainty scaling as (N/kappa)^{-5/8} is possible, where kappa is the linewidth of the beam resulting from the fluctuating phase. This is an improvement over the (N/kappa)^{-1/2} scaling found previously for coherent beams. In the experimentally realistic case where there is a limit on the maximum squeezing possible, the variance will be reduced below that for coherent beams, though the scaling is unchanged.

Dominic W. Berry; Howard M. Wiseman

2006-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

275

Autogenerator of beams of charged particles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An autogenerating apparatus provides secondary intense relativistic current beam pulses in response to an injected beam pulse. One or more electromagnetic energy storage devices are provided in conjunction with gaps along a beam propagation path for the injected beam pulse. For injected beam pulses which are no longer than double the transit time of electromagnetic waves within the storage devices (which may be resonant cavities), distinct secondary beam pulses are generated by each of the energy storage devices. The beam propagation path, together with the one or more gaps provided therein, operates as a pulse forming transmission line cavity, in which the separate cavities associated with the gaps provide delays for electromagnetic waves generated at the gaps. After doubly traversing the cavity, the electromagnetic waves cause the gap to generate the secondary beam pulses, which are thus delayed by a time interval equal to the double transit time for the induced wave within the cavity.

Adler, Richard J. (Albuquerque, NM); Mazarakis, Michael G. (Albuquerque, NM); Miller, Robert B. (Albuquerque, NM); Shope, Steven L. (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, David L. (Albuquerque, NM)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Calculation of shielding door thicknesses for radiation therapy facilities using the ITS Monte Carlo program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shielding calculations for door thicknesses for megavoltage radiotherapy facilities with mazes are generally straightforward. To simplify the calculations, the standard formalism adopts several approximations relating to the average beam path, scattering coefficients, and the mean energy of the spectrum of scattered radiation. To test the accuracy of these calculations, the Monte Carlo program, ITS, was applied to this problem by determining the dose and energy spectrum of the radiation at the door for 4- and 10-MV bremsstrahlung beams incident on a phantom at isocenter. This was performed for mazes, one termed 'standard' and the other a shorter maze where the primary beam is incident on the wall adjacent to the door. The peak of the photon-energy spectrum at the door was found to be the same for both types of maze, independent of primary beam energy, and also, in the case of the conventional maze, of the primary beam orientation. The spectrum was harder for the short maze and for 10 MV vs. 4 MV. The thickness of the lead door for a short maze configuration was 1.5 cm for 10 MV and 1.2 cm for 4 MV vs. approximately less than 1 mm for a conventional maze. For the conventional maze, the Monte Carlo calculation predicts the dose at the door to be lower than given by NCRP 49 and NCRP 51 by about a factor of 2 at 4 MV but to be the same at 10 MV. For the short maze, the Monte Carlo predicts the dose to be a factor of 3 lower for 4 MV and about a factor of 1.5 lower for 10 MV. Experimental results support the Monte Carlo findings for the short maze.

Biggs, P.J. (Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Calculate viscosities for 355 liquids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquid viscosities are important factors in process design and operation. The viscosity of a liquid determines its flow properties, such as velocity and pressure drop. In addition, the heat- and mass-transfer characteristics of a liquid are affected by its viscosity. An equation can be used to calculate liquid viscosities as a function of temperature. In the accompanying table, regression coefficients are included for 355 compounds with five, six or seven carbon atoms--generally the most-widely used in the chemical and petroleum industries. To calculate the viscosity of a liquid at any temperature between its melting and critical points (T[sub min] and T[sub max]), use the following equation: log[sub 10] [eta][sub liq] = A + B/T + CT + DT[sup 2] where [eta][sub liq] = viscosity, cP, A,B,C and D = regression coefficients, and T = liquid temperature, K. Insert the temperature into the equation along with the corresponding regression coefficients from the table. The chemical formulae are listed by the number of carbon atoms.

Yaws, C.L.; Lin, Xiaoyan; Li Bu (Lamar Univ., TX (United States))

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

SU?C?105?05: Reference Dosimetry of High?Energy Electron Beams with a Farmer?Type Ionization Chamber  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate gradient effects and provide Monte Carlo calculated beam quality conversion factors to characterize the Farmer?type NE2571 ion chamber for high?energy reference dosimetry of clinical electron beams. Methods: The EGSnrc code system is used to calculate the absorbed dose to water and to the gas in a fully modeled NE2571 chamber as a function of depth in a water phantom. Electron beams incident on the surface of the phantom are modeled using realistic BEAMnrc accelerator simulations and electron beam spectra. Beam quality conversion factors are determined using calculated doses to water and to air in the chamber in high?energy electron beams and in a cobalt?60 reference field. Calculated water?to?air stopping power ratios are employed for investigation of the overall ion chamber perturbation factor. Results: An upstream shift of 0.3–0.4 multiplied by the chamber radius, r-cav, both minimizes the variation of the overall ion chamber perturbation factor with depth and reduces the difference between the beam quality specifier (R{sub 5} {sub 0}) calculated using ion chamber simulations and that obtained with simulations of dose?to?water in the phantom. Beam quality conversion factors are obtained at the reference depth and gradient effects are optimized using a shift of 0.2r-cav. The photon?electron conversion factor, k-ecal, amounts to 0.906 when gradient effects are minimized using the shift established here and 0.903 if no shift of the data is used. Systematic uncertainties in beam quality conversion factors are investigated and amount to between 0.4 to 1.1% depending on assumptions used. Conclusion: The calculations obtained in this work characterize the use of an NE2571 ion chamber for reference dosimetry of high?energy electron beams. These results will be useful as the AAPM continues to review their reference dosimetry protocols.

Muir, B; Rogers, D [Carleton University, Ottawa, ON (Canada)] [Carleton University, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

279

Bounding Radionuclide Inventory and Accident Consequence Calculation for the 1L Target  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A bounding radionuclide inventory for the tungsten of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) IL Target is calculated. Based on the bounding inventory, the dose resulting from the maximum credible incident (MCI) is calculated for the maximally exposed offsite individual (MEOl). The design basis accident involves tungsten target oxidation following a loss of cooling accident. Also calculated for the bounding radionuclide inventory is the ratio to the LANSCE inventory threshold for purposes of inventory control as described in the target inventory control policy. A bounding radionuclide inventory calculation for the lL Target was completed using the MCNPX and CINDER'90 codes. Continuous beam delivery at 200 {micro}A to 2500 mA{center_dot}h was assumed. The total calculated activity following this irradiation period is 205,000 Ci. The dose to the MEOI from the MCI is 213 mrem for the bounding inventory. The LANSCE inventory control threshold ratio is 132.

Kelsey, Charles T. IV [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Physics with energetic radioactive ion beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Beams of short-lived, unstable nuclei have opened new dimensions in studies of nuclear structure and reactions. Such beams also provide key information on reactions that take place in our sun and other stars. Status and prospects of the physics with energetic radioactive beams are summarized.

Henning, W.F.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "undulator beam calculated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Gaussian beams in inhomogeneous anisotropic layered structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gaussian beams in inhomogeneous anisotropic layered structures Vlastislav Cerven´y 1 ) and Ivan@ig.cas.cz. Summary Gaussian beams concentrated close to rays of high-frequency seismic body waves prop- agating in an inhomogeneous anisotropic layered structure are studied. The amplitude profiles of the Gaussian beam along

Cerveny, Vlastislav

282

A Generalized Vlasov Theory for Composite Beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Generalized Vlasov Theory for Composite Beams Wenbin Yu, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace-0150 Abstract A generalized Vlasov theory for composite beams with arbitrary geometric and material sectional properties is developed based on the variational asymptotic beam sectional analysis. Instead of invoking ad

Yu, Wenbin

283

Stability design of long precast concrete beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stability design of long precast concrete beams T. J. Stratford, BA, MEng, C. J. Burgoyne BA, MSc needed for design engineers to check the stability of precast concrete beams when simply supported loads can be determined and how estimates can be made of the eect of imperfections both in the beam

Burgoyne, Chris

284

Lateral stability of long precast concrete beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lateral stability of long precast concrete beams T. J. Stratford, BA, BEng, and C. J. Burgoyne, BA, MSc, CEng, MICE & Modern precast concrete bridge beams are becoming increasingly long and slender, making them more susceptible to buckling failure. This paper shows that once the beam is positioned

Burgoyne, Chris

285

Laser Telecommunication timeLaser beam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laser Telecommunication Experiment Laser time Laser beam intensity timeLaser beam Laser battery Laser connected to a circuit without a modulator. Bottom graph illustrates what happen when a modulating signal is superimposed to the DC voltage driving the laser Laser beam intensity DC Input voltage DC

La Rosa, Andres H.

286

CALCULATING OPTICAL CONSTANTS OF GLAZING MATERIALS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar Energy CALCULATING OPTICAL CONSTANTS OF GLAZING MATERIALS Michael Rub August 1981 TWO-WEEK LOAN

Rubin, Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

BEAM COUPLING IMPEDANCE STUDIES ON THE LHC FP420 MULTI-POCKET BEAM PIPE PROTOTYPE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BEAM COUPLING IMPEDANCE STUDIES ON THE LHC FP420 MULTI-POCKET BEAM PIPE PROTOTYPE F. Roncarolo , R LHC beam pipe in which two pockets hosting the detectors introduce an abrupt cross-section variation of the pipe. During the FP420 proposed operation, each station is moved towards the beam as close as 5 mm ( 15

288

Techniques for evaluation of e-beam evaporative processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Efforts to evaluate and characterize electron beam evaporative processes at LLNL have produced a number of techniques and capabilities which have proven useful in advancing the process understanding. One of these diagnostic tools, high dynamic range video imaging of the molten pool surface, has provided insight regarding process responses at the melt pool liquid-vapor interface. A water cooled video camera provides continuous high resolution imaging of the pool surface from a low angle position within 20 cm of the liquid-vapor interface. From this vantage point, the e-beam footprint is clearly defined and melt pool free surface shape can be observed. Effects of changes in e-beam footprint, power distribution and sweep frequency on pool surface shape and stability of vaporization are immediately shown. Other electron beam melting and vaporization events have been observed and recorded. These include: formation of the pool and dissipation of {open_quotes}rafts{close_quotes} on the pool surface during startup, behavior of feed material as it enters the pool, effects of feed configuration changes on the mixing of feed entering the pool volume and behaviors of co-evaporated materials of different vapor pressures at the feed/pool boundary. When used in conjunction with laser vapor monitoring capabilities (presented at the 1994 Electron Beam Melting and Refining Conference, Reno, NV), correlation between pool surface phenomena and vaporizer performance has been identified. This video capability was used in verifying the titanium evaporation model results presented at this conference by confirming the calculated melt pool surface deformations caused by vapor pressure of the departing evaporant at the liquid-vapor interface.

Meier, T.C.; Nelson, C.M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

289

Numerical simulation of material and energy flow in an e-beam melt furnace  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A numerical analysis is made of the material and energy flow in an electron-beam furnace. Energy from an electron beam vaporizes metal confined in a water-cooled crucible. At the beam impact site a. recirculating liquid metal pool is surrounded by a shell of its own solid. A Galerkin finite element method is modified to solve for the flow and temperature fields along with interface locations. The deforming mesh is parameterized using spines that pivot and stretch as the interfaces move. Results are given for an aluminum vaporizer in which parametric variations are made in the e-beam power and liquid viscosity. The calculations reveal the importance of the coupling between the free boundaries and the flow and energy fields.

Westerberg, K.W.; McClelland, M.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Finlayson, B.A. [Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

A simple algorithm for beam profile diagnostics using a thermographic camera  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new algorithm for digital image processing apparatuses is developed to evaluate profiles of high-intensity DC beams from temperature images of irradiated thin foils. Numerical analyses are performed to examine the reliability of the algorithm. To simulate the temperature images acquired by a thermographic camera, temperature distributions are numerically calculated for 20 MeV proton beams with different parameters. Noise in the temperature images which is added by the camera sensor is also simulated to account for its effect. Using the algorithm, beam profiles are evaluated from the simulated temperature images and compared with exact solutions. We find that niobium is an appropriate material for the thin foil used in the diagnostic system. We also confirm that the algorithm is adaptable over a wide beam current range of 0.11–214 ?A, even when employing a general-purpose thermographic camera with rather high noise (?T{sub NETD} ? 0.3 K; NETD: noise equivalent temperature difference)

Katagiri, Ken; Hojo, Satoru; Honma, Toshihiro; Suzuki, Kazutoshi; Noda, Akira; Noda, Koji [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)] [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

291

Monte Carlo calculation of helical tomotherapy dose delivery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Helical tomotherapy delivers intensity modulated radiation therapy using a binary multileaf collimator (MLC) to modulate a fan beam of radiation. This delivery occurs while the linac gantry and treatment couch are both in constant motion, so the beam describes, from a patient/phantom perspective, a spiral or helix of dose. The planning system models this continuous delivery as a large number (51) of discrete gantry positions per rotation, and given the small jaw/fan width setting typically used (1 or 2.5 cm) and the number of overlapping rotations used to cover the target (pitch often <0.5), the treatment planning system (TPS) potentially employs a very large number of static beam directions and leaf opening configurations to model the modulated fields. All dose calculations performed by the system employ a convolution/superposition model. In this work the authors perform a full Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation of tomotherapy deliveries to phantom computed tomography (CT) data sets to verify the TPS calculations. All MC calculations are performed with the EGSnrc-based MC simulation codes, BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc. Simulations are performed by taking the sinogram (leaf opening versus time) of the treatment plan and decomposing it into 51 different projections per rotation, as does the TPS, each of which is segmented further into multiple MLC opening configurations, each with different weights that correspond to leaf opening times. Then the projection is simulated by the summing of all of the opening configurations, and the overall rotational treatment is simulated by the summing of all of the projection simulations. Commissioning of the source model was verified by comparing measured and simulated values for the percent depth dose and beam profiles shapes for various jaw settings. The accuracy of the MLC leaf width and tongue and groove spacing were verified by comparing measured and simulated values for the MLC leakage and a picket fence pattern. The validated source and MLC configuration were then used to simulate a complex modulated delivery from fixed gantry angle. Further, a preliminary rotational treatment plan to a delivery quality assurance phantom (the 'cheese' phantom) CT data set was simulated. Simulations were compared with measured results taken with an A1SL ionization chamber or EDR2 film measurements in a water tank or in a solid water phantom, respectively. The source and MLC MC simulations agree with the film measurements, with an acceptable number of pixels passing the 2%/1 mm gamma criterion. 99.8% of voxels of the MC calculation in the planning target volume (PTV) of the preliminary plan passed the 2%/2 mm gamma value test. 87.0% and 66.2% of the voxels in two organs at risk (OARs) passed the 2%/2 mm tests. For a 3%/3 mm criterion, the PTV and OARs show 100%, 93.2%, and 86.6% agreement, respectively. All voxels passed the gamma value test with a criterion of 5%/3 mm. The TomoTherapy TPS showed comparable results.

Zhao Yingli; Mackenzie, M.; Kirkby, C.; Fallone, B. G. [Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, University of Alberta, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada) and Department of Physics, University of Alberta, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, University of Alberta, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2, Canada and Department of Physics, University of Alberta, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada)

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

292

FLAG-SGH Sedov calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We did not run with a 'cylindrically painted region'. However, we did compute two general variants of the original problem. Refinement studies where a single zone at each level of refinement contains the entire internal energy at t=0 or A 'finite' energy source which has the same physical dimensions as that for the 91 x 46 mesh, but consisting of increasing numbers of zones with refinement. Nominal mesh resolution: 91 x 46. Other mesh resolutions: 181 x 92 and 361 x 184. Note, not identical to the original specification. To maintain symmetry for the 'fixed' energy source, the mesh resolution was adjusted slightly. FLAG Lagrange or full (Eulerian) ALE was used with various options for each simulation. Observation - for either Lagrange or ALE, point or 'fixed' source, calculations converge on density and pressure with mesh resolution, but not energy, (not vorticity either).

Fung, Jimmy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schofield, Sam [LLNL; Shashkov, Mikhail J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

293

Commissioning a Vibrating Wire System for Quadrupole Fiducialization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quadrupoles will be placed between the undulator segments in LCLS to keep the electron beam focused as it passes through. The quadrupoles will be assembled with their respective undulator segments prior to being placed into the tunnel. Beam alignment will be used to center the quadrupoles, along with the corresponding undulators, on the beam. If there is any displacement between the undulator and the quadrupole axes in the assemblies, the beam will deviate from the undulator axis. If it deviates by more than 80{micro}m in vertical or 140{micro}m in horizontal directions, the undulator will not perform as required by LCLS. This error is divided between three sources: undulator axis fiducialization, quadrupole magnetic axis fiducialization, and assembly of the two parts. In particular, it was calculated that the quadrupole needs to be fiducialized to within 25{micro}m in both vertical and horizontal directions. A previous study suggested using a vibrating wire system for finding the magnetic axis of the quadrupoles. The study showed that the method has high sensitivity (up to 1{micro}m) and laid out guidelines for constructing such a system. There are 3 steps in fiducializing the quadrupole with the vibrating wire system. They are positioning the wire at the magnet center (step 1), finding the wire with position detectors (step 2), and finding the quadrupole tooling ball positions relative to the position detector tooling balls (step 3). A previous study investigated the error associated with each step by using a permanent quadrupole magnet on an optical mover system. The study reported an error of 11{micro}m for step 1 and a repeatability of 4{micro}m for step 2. However, the set up used a FARO arm to measure tooling balls and didn't allow to accurately check step 2 for errors; an uncertainty of 100{micro}m was reported. Therefore, even though the repeatability was good, there was no way to check that the error in step 2 was small. Following the recommendations of that study, we used a CMM (Coordinate Measuring Machine) instead of the FARO arm for measuring the tooling balls. In addition, a roller cam positioner system replaced the optical movers for moving the quadrupole. With the exception of the quadrupole itself, the system was identical to what will be used in fiducializing the undulator quadrupoles. In this study, we investigate the new vibrating wire set up, including the error associated with each step of fiducialization. A vibrating wire system was constructed to fiducialize the quadrupoles between undulator segments in the LCLS. This note is a continuation of previous work to study the ability of the system to fulfill the fiducialization requirements.

Levashov, Michael Y

2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

294

The Effect of Thermal Load Configurations on Passive Chilled Beam Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dynamics (CFD) model was developed in Star CCM+ v6.06 and used for further analysis of the flow field and to predict additional spatial arrangements of the beam, interior dimensions, and heat source configurations. The CFD model implemented a calculation...

Nelson, Ian 1982-

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

295

VAV Reheat Versus Active Chilled Beams and DOAS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Andrey. Don’t Turn Active Beams Into Expensive Diffusers,added costs of the piping and beams for ACBs are simply too1. Simmonds, Peter. To Beam or not To Beam? , Engineered

Stein, Jeff; Taylor, Steven

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Neutron beam testing of triblades  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Four IBM Triblades were tested in the Irradiation of Chips and Electronics facility at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. Triblades include two dual-core Opteron processors and four PowerXCell 8i (Cell) processors. The Triblades were tested in their field configuration while running different applications, with the beam aimed at the Cell processor or the Opteron running the application. Testing focused on the Cell processors, which were tested while running five different applications and an idle condition. While neither application nor Triblade was statistically important in predicting the hazard rate, the hazard rate when the beam was aimed at the Opterons was significantly higher than when it was aimed at the Cell processors. In addition, four Cell blades (one in each Triblade) suffered voltage shorts, leading to their inoperability. The hardware tested is the same as that in the Roadrunner supercomputer.

Michalak, Sarah E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Du Bois, Andrew J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Storlie, Curtis B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rust, William N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Du Bois, David H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Modl, David G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Quinn, Heather M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Blanchard, Sean P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Manuzzato, Andrea [UNIV DEGLI STUDI DI PADOVA ITALY

2010-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

297

The MICE Muon Beam Line  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) at RAL, muons are produced and transported in a dedicated beam line connecting the production point (target) to the cooling channel. We discuss the main features of the beamline, meant to provide muons with momenta between 140 MeV/c and 240 MeV/c and emittances up to 10 mm rad, which is accomplished by means of a diffuser. Matching procedures to the MICE cooling channel are also described. In summer 2010 we performed an intense data taking campaign to finalize the calibration of the MICE Particle Identification (PID) detectors and the understanding of the beam line, which completes the STEPI phase of MICE. We highlight the main results from these data.

Apollonio, Marco [High Energy Physics Group, Department of Physics, Imperial College London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

298

Oxygen ion-beam microlithography  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of providing and developing a resist on a substrate for constructing integrated circuit (IC) chips includes the following steps: of depositing a thin film of amorphous silicon or hydrogenated amorphous silicon on the substrate and exposing portions of the amorphous silicon to low-energy oxygen ion beams to oxidize the amorphous silicon at those selected portions. The nonoxidized portions are then removed by etching with RF-excited hydrogen plasma. Components of the IC chip can then be constructed through the removed portions of the resist. The entire process can be performed in an in-line vacuum production system having several vacuum chambers. Nitrogen or carbon ion beams can also be used.

Tsuo, Y. Simon (Lakewood, CO)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

X-ray beam finder  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An X-ray beam finder for locating a focal spot of an X-ray tube includes a mass of X-ray opaque material having first and second axially-aligned, parallel-opposed faces connected by a plurality of substantially identical parallel holes perpendicular to the faces and a film holder for holding X-ray sensitive film tightly against one face while the other face is placed in contact with the window of an X-ray head.

Gilbert, H.W.

1983-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

300

Carbon Fiber Damage in Accelerator Beam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon fibers are commonly used as moving targets in Beam Wire Scanners. Because of their thermomechanical properties they are very resistant to particle beams. Their strength deteriorates with time due to radiation damage and low-cycle thermal fatigue. In case of high intensity beams this process can accelerate and in extreme cases the fiber is damaged during a single scan. In this work a model describing the fiber temperature, thermionic emission and sublimation is discussed. Results are compared with fiber damage test performed on SPS beam in November 2008. In conclusions the limits of Wire Scanner operation on high intensity beams are drawn.

Sapinski, M; Guerrero, A; Koopman, J; Métral, E

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "undulator beam calculated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

W-Band Sheet Beam Klystron Design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sheet beam devices provide important advantages for very high power, narrow bandwidth RF sources like accelerator klystrons [1]. Reduced current density and increased surface area result in increased power capabi1ity, reduced magnetic fields for focusing and reduced cathode loading. These advantages are offset by increased complexity, beam formation and transport issues and potential for mode competition in the ovennoded cavities and drift tube. This paper will describe the design issues encountered in developing a 100 kW peak and 2 kW average power sheet beam k1ystron at W-band including beam formation, beam transport, circuit design, circuit fabrication and mode competition.

Scheitrum, G.; Caryotakis, G.; Burke, A.; Jensen, A.; Jongewaard, E.a Krasnykh, A.; Neubauer, M.; Phillips, R.; Rauenbuehler, K.; /SLAC

2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

302

Electron beam generation in Tevatron electron lenses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New type of high perveance electron guns with convex cathode has been developed. Three guns described in this article are built to provide transverse electron current density distributions needed for Electron Lenses for beam-beam compensation in the Tevatron collider. The current distribution can be controlled either by the gun geometry or by voltage on a special control electrode located near cathode. We present the designs of the guns and report results of beam measurements on the test bench. Because of their high current density and low transverse temperature of electrons, electron guns of this type can be used in electron cooling and beam-beam compensation devices.

Kamerdzhiev, V.; Kuznetsov, G.; Shiltsev, V.; Solyak, N.; /Fermilab; Tiunov, M.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Thermal response of photovoltaic cell to laser beam irradiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper firstly presents the concept of using dual laser beam to irradiate the photovoltaic cell, so as to investigate the temperature dependency of the efficiency of long distance energy transmission. Next, the model on the multiple reflection and absorption of any monochromatic light in multilayer structure has been established, and the heat generation in photovoltaic cell has been interpreted in this work. Then, the finite element model has been set up to calculate the temperature of photovoltaic cell subjected to laser irradiation. Finally, the effect of temperature elevation on the efficiency and reliability of photovoltaic cell has been discussed to provide theoretical references for designing the light-electricity conversion system.

Yuan, Yu-Chen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Beamed Energy Propulsion by Means of Target Ablation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes hundreds of pendulum tests examining the beamed energy conversion efficiency of different metal targets coated with multiple liquid enhancers. Preliminary testing used a local laser with photographic paper targets, with no liquid, water, canola oil, or methanol additives. Laboratory experimentation was completed at Wright-Patterson AFB using a high-powered laser, and ballistic pendulums of aluminum, titanium, or copper. Dry targets, and those coated with water, methanol and oil were repeatedly tested in laboratory conditions. Results were recorded on several high-speed digital video cameras, and the conversion efficiency was calculated. Paper airplanes successfully launched using BEP were likewise recorded.

Rosenberg, Benjamin A. [Hilton Head High School, Hilton Head Island, SC 29926 (United States)

2004-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

305

Scattering apodizer for laser beams  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is disclosed for apodizing a laser beam to smooth out the production of diffraction peaks due to optical discontinuities in the path of the laser beam, such method comprising introduction of a pattern of scattering elements for reducing the peak intensity in the region of such optical discontinuities, such pattern having smoothly tapering boundaries in which the distribution density of the scattering elements is tapered gradually to produce small gradients in the distribution density, such pattern of scattering elements being effective to reduce and smooth out the diffraction effects which would otherwise be produced. The apodizer pattern may be produced by selectively blasting a surface of a transparent member with fine abrasive particles to produce a multitude of minute pits. In one embodiment, a scattering apodizer pattern is employed to overcome diffraction patterns in a multiple element crystal array for harmonic conversion of a laser beam. The interstices and the supporting grid between the crystal elements are obscured by the gradually tapered apodizer pattern of scattering elements.

Summers, M.A.; Hagen, W.F.; Boyd, R.D.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Scattering apodizer for laser beams  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is disclosed for apodizing a laser beam to smooth out the production of diffraction peaks due to optical discontinuities in the path of the laser beam, such method comprising introduction of a pattern of scattering elements for reducing the peak intensity in the region of such optical discontinuities, such pattern having smoothly tapering boundaries in which the distribution density of the scattering elements is tapered gradually to produce small gradients in the distribution density, such pattern of scattering elements being effective to reduce and smooth out the diffraction effects which would otherwise be produced. The apodizer pattern may be produced by selectively blasting a surface of a transparent member with fine abrasive particles to produce a multitude of minute pits. In one embodiment, a scattering apodizer pattern is employed to overcome diffraction patterns in a multiple element crystal array for harmonic conversion of a laser beam. The interstices and the supporting grid between the crystal elements are obscured by the gradually tapered apodizer pattern of scattering elements.

Summers, Mark A. (Livermore, CA); Hagen, Wilhelm F. (Livermore, CA); Boyd, Robert D. (Livermore, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Determination of hydrogen cluster velocities and comparison with numerical calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of powerful hydrogen cluster jet targets in storage ring experiments led to the need of precise data on the mean cluster velocity as function of the stagnation temperature and pressure for the determination of the volume density of the target beams. For this purpose a large data set of hydrogen cluster velocity distributions and mean velocities was measured at a high density hydrogen cluster jet target using a trumpet shaped nozzle. The measurements have been performed at pressures above and below the critical pressure and for a broad range of temperatures relevant for target operation, e.g., at storage ring experiments. The used experimental method is described which allows for the velocity measurement of single clusters using a time-of-flight technique. Since this method is rather time-consuming and these measurements are typically interfering negatively with storage ring experiments, a method for a precise calculation of these mean velocities was needed. For this, the determined mean cluster velocities are compared with model calculations based on an isentropic one-dimensional van der Waals gas. Based on the obtained data and the presented numerical calculations, a new method has been developed which allows to predict the mean cluster velocities with an accuracy of about 5%. For this two cut-off parameters defining positions inside the nozzle are introduced, which can be determined for a given nozzle by only two velocity measurements.

Täschner, A.; Köhler, E.; Ortjohann, H.-W.; Khoukaz, A. [Institut für Kernphysik, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, D-48149 Münster (Germany)] [Institut für Kernphysik, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, D-48149 Münster (Germany)

2013-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

308

Pulsed-electron-beam melting of Fe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pulsed (50 nsec) electron beams with deposited energies of 1.1 to 2.3 J/cm/sup 2/ have been used to rapidly melt a surface layer of Fe. Calculations show that this range of energies produces melt depths from 0.4 to 1.2 ..mu..m and melt times of 100 to 500 nsec. Optical microscopy and SEM of pulse treated polycrystalline foils show slip traces, as well as a general smoothing of surface features which shows that melting has occurred. TEM shows that the resolidified material is bcc, and that the material within a grain is epitaxial with the substrate. TEM also shows slip traces along (110) planes, as well as a high density of dislocations, both extended and loop. At the highest energy, subgrain boundaries are observed. Some samples were implanted with 1 x 10/sup 16/ Sn/cm/sup 2/ at 150 keV. After pulse treatment, the Sn depth profile was observed to have broadened, consistent with liquid phase diffusion. The Sn had the unexpected effect of suppressing slip at the sample surface.

Knapp, J.A.; Follstaedt, D.M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Particle beam injector system and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and devices enable coupling of a charged particle beam to a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. Coupling of the charged particle beam is accomplished, at least in-part, by relying on of sensitivity of the input phase space acceptance of the radio frequency quadrupole to the angle of the input charged particle beam. A first electric field across a beam deflector deflects the particle beam at an angle that is beyond the acceptance angle of the radio frequency quadrupole. By momentarily reversing or reducing the established electric field, a narrow portion of the charged particle beam is deflected at an angle within the acceptance angle of the radio frequency quadrupole. In another configuration, beam is directed at an angle within the acceptance angle of the radio frequency quadrupole by the first electric field and is deflected beyond the acceptance angle of the radio frequency quadrupole due to the second electric field.

Guethlein, Gary

2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

310

Paraxial Light Beams with Angular Momentum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fundamental and applied concepts concerning the ability of light beams to carry a certain mechanical angular momentum with respect to the propagation axis are reviewed and discussed. Following issues are included: Historical reference; Angular momentum of a paraxial beam and its constituents; Spin angular momentum and paradoxes associated with it; Orbital angular momentum; Circularly-spiral beams: examples and methods of generation; Orbital angular momentum and the intensity moments; Symmetry breakdown and decomposition of the orbital angular momentum; Mechanical models of the vortex light beams; Mechanical action of the beam angular momentum; Rotational Doppler effect, its manifestation in the image rotation; Spectrum of helical harmonics and associated problems; Non-collinear rotational Doppler effect; Properties of a beam forcedly rotating around its own axis. Research prospects and ways of practical utilization of optical beams with angular momentum.

A. Bekshaev; M. Soskin; M. Vasnetsov

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

311

Dose calculation software for helical tomotherapy, utilizing patient CT data to calculate an independent three-dimensional dose cube  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Treatment plans for the TomoTherapy unit are produced with a planning system that is integral to the unit. The authors have produced an independent dose calculation system, to enable plans to be recalculated in three dimensions, using the patient's CT data. Methods: Software has been written using MATLAB. The DICOM-RT plan object is used to determine the treatment parameters used, including the treatment sinogram. Each projection of the sinogram is segmented and used to calculate dose at multiple calculation points in a three-dimensional grid using tables of measured beam data. A fast ray-trace algorithm is used to determine effective depth for each projection angle at each calculation point. Calculations were performed on a standard desktop personal computer, with a 2.6 GHz Pentium, running Windows XP. Results: The time to perform a calculation, for 3375 points averaged 1 min 23 s for prostate plans and 3 min 40 s for head and neck plans. The mean dose within the 50% isodose was calculated and compared with the predictions of the TomoTherapy planning system. When the modified CT (which includes the TomoTherapy couch) was used, the mean difference for ten prostate patients, was -0.4% (range -0.9% to +0.3%). With the original CT (which included the CT couch), the mean difference was -1.0% (range -1.7% to 0.0%). The number of points agreeing with a gamma 3%/3 mm averaged 99.2% with the modified CT, 96.3% with the original CT. For ten head and neck patients, for the modified and original CT, respectively, the mean difference was +1.1% (range -0.4% to +3.1%) and 1.1% (range -0.4% to +3.0%) with 94.4% and 95.4% passing a gamma 4%/4 mm. The ability of the program to detect a variety of simulated errors has been tested. Conclusions: By using the patient's CT data, the independent dose calculation performs checks that are not performed by a measurement in a cylindrical phantom. This enables it to be used either as an additional check or to replace phantom measurements for some patients. The software has potential to be used in any application where one wishes to model changes to patient conditions.

Thomas, Simon J.; Eyre, Katie R.; Tudor, G. Samuel J.; Fairfoul, Jamie [Medical Physics Department, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge CB2 0QQ (United Kingdom)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

312

RTU Comparison Calculator Enhancement Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the past two years, Department of Energy’s Building Technologies Office (BTO) has been investigating ways to increase the operating efficiency of the packaged rooftop units (RTUs) in the field. First, by issuing a challenge to the RTU manufactures to increase the integrated energy efficiency ratio (IEER) by 60% over the existing ASHRAE 90.1-2010 standard. Second, by evaluating the performance of an advanced RTU controller that reduces the energy consumption by over 40%. BTO has previously also funded development of a RTU comparison calculator (RTUCC). RTUCC is a web-based tool that provides the user a way to compare energy and cost savings for two units with different efficiencies. However, the RTUCC currently cannot compare savings associated with either the RTU Challenge unit or the advanced RTU controls retrofit. Therefore, BTO has asked PNNL to enhance the tool so building owners can compare energy and savings associated with this new class of products. This document provides the details of the enhancements that are required to support estimating energy savings from use of RTU challenge units or advanced controls on existing RTUs.

Miller, James D.; Wang, Weimin; Katipamula, Srinivas

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

313

A novel millimeter-wave beam-steering technique using a dielectric-image-line-fed grating film  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AND TECHNIQUE A. Leaky Waves B. Grating Antenna Theory C. Novel Beam-Steering Technique . . . III DIELECTRIC MAGE LINE ANALYSIS. . . 13 A Background B. Effective Dielectric Constant Calculation . . . C. Ka-Band Image Line Design... . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 14 21 IV SCANNING ANTENNA DESIGN . . . V MEASUREMENT . A Measurement Procedure . B Beam-Steering Performance. . . C. Measured Radiation Patterns. . 31 36 CHAPTER Page D. Summary VI SUGGESTIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR FUTURE 42 STUDIES...

Rodenbeck, Christopher Timothy

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Optics of electron beam in the Recycler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electron cooling of 8.9 GeV/c antiprotons in the Recycler ring (Fermilab) requires high current and good quality of the DC electron beam. Electron trajectories of {approx}0.2 A or higher DC electron beam have to be parallel in the cooling section, within {approx}0.2 mrad, making the beam envelope cylindrical. These requirements yielded a specific scheme of the electron transport from a gun to the cooling section, with electrostatic acceleration and deceleration in the Pelletron. Recuperation of the DC beam limits beam losses at as tiny level as {approx}0.001%, setting strict requirements on the return electron line to the Pelletron and a collector. To smooth the beam envelope in the cooling section, it has to be linear and known at the transport start. Also, strength of the relevant optic elements has to be measured with good accuracy. Beam-based optic measurements are being carried out and analyzed to get this information. They include beam simulations in the Pelletron, differential optic (beam response) measurements and simulation, beam profile measurements with optical transition radiation, envelope measurements and analysis with orifice scrapers. Current results for the first half-year of commissioning are presented. Although electron cooling is already routinely used for pbar stacking, its efficiency is expected to be improved.

Burov, Alexey V.; Kazakevich, G.; Kroc, T.; Lebedev, V.; Nagaitsev, S.; Prost, L.; Pruss, S.; Shemyakin, A.; Sutherland, M.; Tiunov, M.; Warner, A.; /Fermilab

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Simulation of Electron-Beam Irradiation of Skin Tissue Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Monte Carlo simulation of electrons stopping in liquid water was used to model the penetration and dose distribution of electron beams incident on the full-thickness EpiDermTM skin model (MatTek, Ashland, VA). This 3D tissue model has a fully developed basement membrane separating an epidermal layer of keratinocytes in various stages of differentiation from a dermal layer of fibroblast embedded in collagen. The simulations were motivated by a desire to selectively expose the epidermal layer to low linear-energy-transfer (LET) radiation in the presence of a non-irradiated dermal layer. Using the variable energy electron microbeam at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) as a model of device characteristics and irradiation geometry, we find that at the highest beam energy available (90 keV), the estimated 90th percentile of penetration remains in the epidermal layer. To investigate the depth-dose distribution, we calculated lineal energy spectra for 10um thick layers near the 10th, 50th, and 90th percentile of penetration by the 90 keV electron beam. Biphasic spectra showed an increasing component of "stoppers" with increasing depth. Despite changes in the lineal energy spectra, the main effect on dose deposition with increasing depth is the screening effect of tissue above the layer of interest.

Miller, John H.; Suleiman, Atef; Chrisler, William B.; Sowa, Marianne B.

2011-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

316

ICOOL: A SIMULATION CODE FOR IONIZATION COOLING OF MUON BEAMS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current ideas [1,2] for designing a high luminosity muon collider require significant cooling of the phase space of the muon beams. The only known method that can cool the beams in a time comparable to the muon lifetime is ionization cooling [3,4]. This method requires directing the particles in the beam at a large angle through a low Z absorber material in a strong focusing magnetic channel and then restoring the longitudinal momentum with an rf cavity. We have developed a new 3-D tracking code ICOOL for examining possible configurations for muon cooling. A cooling system is described in terms of a series of longitudinal regions with associated material and field properties. The tracking takes place in a coordinate system that follows a reference orbit through the system. The code takes into account decays and interactions of {approx}50-500 MeV/c muons in matter. Material geometry regions include cylinders and wedges. A number of analytic models are provided for describing the field configurations. Simple diagnostics are built into the code, including calculation of emittances and correlations, longitudinal traces, histograms and scatter plots. A number of auxiliary files can be generated for post-processing analysis by the user.

FERNOW,R.C.

1999-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

317

Beam Pipe HOM Absorber for 750 MHz RF Cavity Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This joint project of Muons, Inc., Cornell University and SLAC was supported by a Phase I and Phase II grant monitored by the SBIR Office of Science of the DOE. Beam line HOM absorbers are a critical part of future linear colliders. The use of lossy materials at cryogenic temperatures has been incorporated in several systems. The design in beam pipes requires cylinders of lossy material mechanically confined in such a way as to absorb the microwave energy from the higher-order modes and remove the heat generated in the lossy material. Furthermore, the potential for charge build-up on the surface of the lossy material requires the conductivity of the material to remain consistent from room temperature to cryogenic temperatures. In this program a mechanical design was developed that solved several design constraints: a) fitting into the existing Cornell load vacuum component, b) allowing the use of different material compositions, c) a thermal design that relied upon the compression of the lossy ceramic material without adding stress. Coating experiments were performed that indicated the design constraints needed to fully implement this approach for solving the charge build-up problem inherent in using lossy ceramics. In addition, the ACE3P program, used to calculate the performance of lossy cylinders in beam pipes in general, was supported by this project. Code development and documentation to allow for the more wide spread use of the program was a direct result of this project was well.

Johnson, Rolland; Neubauer, Michael

2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

318

Non-Paraxial Wave Analysis of 3D Airy Beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The 3D Airy beam (AiB) is thoroughly explored from a wave-theory point of view. We utilize the exact spectral integral for the AiB to derive local ray-based solutions that do not suffer from the limitations of the conventional parabolic equation (PE) solution, and are valid far beyond the paraxial zone and for longer ranges. The ray topology near the main lobe of the AiB delineates a hyperbolic umilic diffraction catastrophe, consisting of a cusped double-layered caustic, but this caustic is deformed in the far range where the field loses its beam shape. The field in the vicinity of this caustic is described uniformly by a hyperbolic umilic canonical integral which is structured explicitly on the local geometry of the caustic as obtained from the initial field distribution. In order to accommodate the finite-energy AiB we also modify the canonical integral by adding a complex loss parameter. The canonical integral is calculated using a series expansion and the results are used to identify the validity zone of the conventional PE solution. The analysis is performed within the framework of the non-dispersive AiB where the aperture field is scaled with frequency such that the ray skeleton is frequency-independent. This scaling enables an extension of the theory to the ultra wide band (UWB) regime and ensures that the pulsed field propagates along the curved beam trajectory without dispersion, as will be demonstrated in a subsequent publication.

Y. Kaganovsky; E. Heyman

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

319

Using neutral beams as a light ion beam probe (invited)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

By arranging the particle first banana orbits to pass near a distant detector, the light ion beam probe (LIBP) utilizes orbital deflection to probe internal fields and field fluctuations. The LIBP technique takes advantage of (1) the in situ, known source of fast ions created by beam-injected neutral particles that naturally ionize near the plasma edge and (2) various commonly available diagnostics as its detector. These born trapped particles can traverse the plasma core on their inner banana leg before returning to the plasma edge. Orbital displacements (the forces on fast ions) caused by internal instabilities or edge perturbing fields appear as modulated signal at an edge detector. Adjustments in the q-profile and plasma shape that determine the first orbit, as well as the relative position of the source and detector, enable studies under a wide variety of plasma conditions. This diagnostic technique can be used to probe the impact on fast ions of various instabilities, e.g., Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs) and neoclassical tearing modes, and of externally imposed 3D fields, e.g., magnetic perturbations. To date, displacements by AEs and by externally applied resonant magnetic perturbation fields have been measured using a fast ion loss detector. Comparisons with simulations are shown. In addition, nonlinear interactions between fast ions and independent AE waves are revealed by this technique.

Chen, Xi, E-mail: chenxi@fusion.gat.com [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Heidbrink, W. W. [University of California Irvine, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Van Zeeland, M. A.; Pace, D. C.; Petty, C. C.; Fisher, R. K. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Kramer, G. J.; Nazikian, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Austin, M. E. [University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Hanson, J. M. [Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Zeng, L. [University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

320

Calculator Tips for TI-30XA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TI-30XA Calculator Tips. Calculator Memory. - To use the memory function, hit the STO key to store a number in either memory 1, 2, or 3. o To store the product of ...

Owen Davis

2013-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "undulator beam calculated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Low Emittance Electron Beam Studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have studied the properties of a low emittance electron beam produced by laser pulses incident onto an rf gun photocathode. The experiments were carried out at the A0 photoinjector at Fermilab. Such beam studies are necessary for fixing the design of new Linear Colliders as well as for the development of Free Electron Lasers. An overview of the A0 photoinjector is given in Chapter 1. In Chapter 2 we describe the A0 photoinjector laser system. A stable laser system is imperative for reliable photoinjector operation. After the recent upgrade, we have been able to reach a new level of stability in the pulse-to-pulse fluctuations of the pulse amplitude, and of the temporal and transverse profiles. In Chapter 3 we present a study of transverse emittance versus the shape of the photo-cathode drive-laser pulse. For that purpose a special temporal profile laser shaping device called a pulse-stacker was developed. In Chapter 4 we discuss longitudinal beam dynamics studies using a two macro-particle bunch; this technique is helpful in analyzing pulse compression in the magnetic chicane, as well as velocity bunching effects in the rf-gun and the 9-cell accelerating cavity. In Chapter 5 we introduce a proposal for laser acceleration of electrons. We have developed a laser functioning on the TEM*{sub 01} mode, a mode with a longitudinal electric field component which is suitable for such a process. Using this technique at energies above 40 MeV, one would be able to observe laser-based acceleration.

Tikhoplav, Rodion; /Rochester U.; ,

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

The nonlinear theory of slow-wave electron cyclotron masers with inclusion of the beam velocity spread  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nonlinear theory of slow-wave electron cyclotron masers (ECM) with an initially straight electron beam is developed. The evolution equation of the nonlinear beam electron energy is derived. The numerical studies of the slow-wave ECM efficiency with inclusion of Gaussian beam velocity spread are presented. It is shown that the velocity spread reduces the interaction efficiency. -- Highlights: •The theory of slow-wave electron cyclotron masers is considered. •The calculation of efficiency under the resonance condition is presented. •The efficiency under Gaussian velocity spreads has been obtained.

Kong, Ling-Bao, E-mail: konglingbao@gmail.com [School of Science, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China) [School of Science, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Environmentally Harmful Chemicals Assessment, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Wang, Hong-Yu [School of Physics, Anshan Normal University, Anshan 114005 (China)] [School of Physics, Anshan Normal University, Anshan 114005 (China); Hou, Zhi-Ling, E-mail: houzl@mail.buct.edu.cn [School of Science, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China) [School of Science, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Environmentally Harmful Chemicals Assessment, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Jin, Hai-Bo [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China)] [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Du, Chao-Hai [Institute of Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)] [Institute of Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

323

Effects of R-parity violating supersymmetry in top pair production at linear colliders with polarized beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the minimal supersymmetric standard model with R-parity violation, the lepton number violating top quark interactions can contribute to the top pair production at a linear collider via tree-level u-channel squark exchange diagrams. We calculate such contributions and find that in the allowed range of these R-violating couplings, the top pair production rate as well as the top quark polarization and the forward-backward asymmetry can be significantly altered. By comparing the unpolarized beams with the polarized beams, we find that the polarized beams are more powerful in probing such new physics.

Xuelei Wang; Jitao Li; Suzhen Liu

2006-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

324

Protective laser beam viewing device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A protective laser beam viewing system or device including a camera selectively sensitive to laser light wavelengths and a viewing screen receiving images from the laser sensitive camera. According to a preferred embodiment of the invention, the camera is worn on the head of the user or incorporated into a goggle-type viewing display so that it is always aimed at the area of viewing interest to the user and the viewing screen is incorporated into a video display worn as goggles over the eyes of the user.

Neil, George R.; Jordan, Kevin Carl

2012-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

325

Nuclear astrophysics and electron beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electron beams provide important probes and constraints for nuclear astrophysics. This is especially exciting at energies within the regime of chiral effective field theory (EFT), which provides a systematic expansion for nuclear forces and electroweak operators based on quantum chromodynamics. This talk discusses some recent highlights and future directions based on chiral EFT, including nuclear structure and reactions for astrophysics, the neutron skin and constraints for the properties of neutron-rich matter in neutron stars and core-collapse supernovae, and the dark matter response of nuclei.

Schwenk, A. [Institut für Kernphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, 64289 Darmstadt, Germany and ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

326

Proton beam therapy control system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

Baumann, Michael A; Beloussov, Alexandre V; Bakir, Julide; Armon, Deganit; Olsen, Howard B; Salem, Dana

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

327

Proton beam therapy control system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

Baumann, Michael A; Beloussov, Alexandre V; Bakir, Julide; Armon, Deganit; Olsen, Howard B; Salem, Dana

2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

328

Proton beam therapy control system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

Baumann, Michael A. (Riverside, CA); Beloussov, Alexandre V. (Bernardino, CA); Bakir, Julide (Alta Loma, CA); Armon, Deganit (Redlands, CA); Olsen, Howard B. (Colton, CA); Salem, Dana (Riverside, CA)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

329

Proton beam therapy control system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

Baumann, Michael A. (Riverside, CA); Beloussov, Alexandre V. (San Bernardino, CA); Bakir, Julide (Alta Loma, CA); Armon, Deganit (Longmeadow, MA); Olsen, Howard B. (Irvine, CA); Salem, Dana (Riverside, CA)

2010-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

330

SPEAR3 Beam Line Availability  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 ResourceAwards SAGE Awards ,#2446Smalln n u a l rBeam Line

331

The Beam | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,Ltd Jump Jump to:Information 'Grand Paris' Project:Beam Jump to:

332

Quantum transport calculations using periodic boundaryconditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An efficient new method is presented to calculate the quantum transports using periodic boundary conditions. This method allows the use of conventional ground state ab initio programs without big changes. The computational effort is only a few times of a normal groundstate calculations, thus is makes accurate quantum transport calculations for large systems possible.

Wang, Lin-Wang

2004-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

333

Calculating Evolutionary Dynamics in Structured Populations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Calculating Evolutionary Dynamics in Structured Populations Charles G. Nathanson1. , Corina E. Here we provide a general formula for calculating evolutionary dynamics in a wide class of structured) Calculating Evolutionary Dynamics in Structured Populations. PLoS Comput Biol 5(12): e1000615. doi:10

Nowak, Martin A.

334

Radiation beam calorimetric power measurement system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiation beam calorimetric power measurement system for measuring the average power of a beam such as a laser beam, including a calorimeter configured to operate over a wide range of coolant flow rates and being cooled by continuously flowing coolant for absorbing light from a laser beam to convert the laser beam energy into heat. The system further includes a flow meter for measuring the coolant flow in the calorimeter and a pair of thermistors for measuring the temperature difference between the coolant inputs and outputs to the calorimeter. The system also includes a microprocessor for processing the measured coolant flow rate and the measured temperature difference to determine the average power of the laser beam.

Baker, John (Livermore, CA); Collins, Leland F. (Pleasanton, CA); Kuklo, Thomas C. (Ripon, CA); Micali, James V. (Dublin, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Coherence delay augmented laser beam homogenizer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The geometrical restrictions on a laser beam homogenizer are relaxed by ug a coherence delay line to separate a coherent input beam into several components each having a path length difference equal to a multiple of the coherence length with respect to the other components. The components recombine incoherently at the output of the homogenizer, and the resultant beam has a more uniform spatial intensity suitable for microlithography and laser pantogography. Also disclosed is a variable aperture homogenizer, and a liquid filled homogenizer.

Rasmussen, P.; Bernhardt, A.

1993-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

336

Electroweak Tests at Beta-beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explore the possibility of measuring the Weinberg angle from (anti)neutrino-electron scattering using low energy beta beams, a method that produces single flavour neutrino beams from the beta-decay of boosted radioactive ions. We study how the sensitivity of a possible measurement depends on the intensity of the ion beam and on a combination of different Lorentz boosts of the ions.

A. B. Balantekin; J. H. de Jesus; C. Volpe

2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

337

Halpha with Heating by Particle Beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using 1D NLTE radiative hydrodynamics we model the influence of the particle beams on the Halpha line profile treating the beam propagation and the atmosphere evolution self-consistently. We focus on the influence of the non-thermal collisional rates and the return current. Based on our results, we propose a diagnostic method for determination of the particle beam presence in the formation regions of the Halpha line.

J. Kasparova; M. Varady; M. Karlicky; P. Heinzel; Z. Moravec

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

338

Coherence delay augmented laser beam homogenizer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The geometrical restrictions on a laser beam homogenizer are relaxed by ug a coherence delay line to separate a coherent input beam into several components each having a path length difference equal to a multiple of the coherence length with respect to the other components. The components recombine incoherently at the output of the homogenizer, and the resultant beam has a more uniform spatial intensity suitable for microlithography and laser pantogography. Also disclosed is a variable aperture homogenizer, and a liquid filled homogenizer.

Rasmussen, Paul (Livermore, CA); Bernhardt, Anthony (Berkeley, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

High power, high beam quality regenerative amplifier  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A regenerative laser amplifier system generates high peak power and high energy per pulse output beams enabling generation of X-rays used in X-ray lithography for manufacturing integrated circuits. The laser amplifier includes a ring shaped optical path with a limited number of components including a polarizer, a passive 90 degree phase rotator, a plurality of mirrors, a relay telescope, and a gain medium, the components being placed close to the image plane of the relay telescope to reduce diffraction or phase perturbations in order to limit high peak intensity spiking. In the ring, the beam makes two passes through the gain medium for each transit of the optical path to increase the amplifier gain to loss ratio. A beam input into the ring makes two passes around the ring, is diverted into an SBS phase conjugator and proceeds out of the SBS phase conjugator back through the ring in an equal but opposite direction for two passes, further reducing phase perturbations. A master oscillator inputs the beam through an isolation cell (Faraday or Pockels) which transmits the beam into the ring without polarization rotation. The isolation cell rotates polarization only in beams proceeding out of the ring to direct the beams out of the amplifier. The diffraction limited quality of the input beam is preserved in the amplifier so that a high power output beam having nearly the same diffraction limited quality is produced.

Hackel, L.A.; Dane, C.B.

1993-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

340

High power, high beam quality regenerative amplifier  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A regenerative laser amplifier system generates high peak power and high energy per pulse output beams enabling generation of X-rays used in X-ray lithography for manufacturing integrated circuits. The laser amplifier includes a ring shaped optical path with a limited number of components including a polarizer, a passive 90 degree phase rotator, a plurality of mirrors, a relay telescope, and a gain medium, the components being placed close to the image plane of the relay telescope to reduce diffraction or phase perturbations in order to limit high peak intensity spiking. In the ring, the beam makes two passes through the gain medium for each transit of the optical path to increase the amplifier gain to loss ratio. A beam input into the ring makes two passes around the ring, is diverted into an SBS phase conjugator and proceeds out of the SBS phase conjugator back through the ring in an equal but opposite direction for two passes, further reducing phase perturbations. A master oscillator inputs the beam through an isolation cell (Faraday or Pockels) which transmits the beam into the ring without polarization rotation. The isolation cell rotates polarization only in beams proceeding out of the ring to direct the beams out of the amplifier. The diffraction limited quality of the input beam is preserved in the amplifier so that a high power output beam having nearly the same diffraction limited quality is produced.

Hackel, Lloyd A. (Livermore, CA); Dane, Clifford B. (Livermore, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "undulator beam calculated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Focused ion beam source method and apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A focused ion beam having a cross section of submicron diameter, a high ion current, and a narrow energy range is generated from a target comprised of particle source material by laser ablation. The method involves directing a laser beam having a cross section of critical diameter onto the target, producing a cloud of laser ablated particles having unique characteristics, and extracting and focusing a charged particle beam from the laser ablated cloud. The method is especially suited for producing focused ion beams for semiconductor device analysis and modification.

Pellin, Michael J. (Naperville, IL); Lykke, Keith R. (Gaithersburg, MD); Lill, Thorsten B. (Sunnyvale, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams Print Silicon-based transistors are well-understood, basic components of contemporary electronic technology. In contrast, there is...

343

Ultrasonic imaging with limited-diffraction beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Limited-diffraction beams are a class of waves that may be localized in space and time. Theoretically, these beams are propagation invariant and can propagate to an infinite distance without spreading. In practice, when these beams are produced with wave sources of a finite aperture and energy, they have a very large depth of field, meaning that they can keep a small beam width over a large distance. Because of this property, limited-diffraction beams may have applications in various areas such as medical imaging and tissue characterization. In this paper, fundamentals of limited-diffraction beams are reviewed and the studies of these beams are put into a unified theoretical framework. Theory of limited-diffraction beams is further developed. New limited-diffraction solutions to Klein-Gordon Equation and Schrodinger Equation, as well as limited-diffraction solutions to these equations in confined spaces are obtained. The relationship between the transformation that converts any solutions to an (-1)-dimensional wave equation to limited-diffraction solutions of an -dimensional equation and the Lorentz transformation is clarified and extended. The transformation is also applied to the Klein-Gordon Equation. In addition, applications of limited-diffraction beams are summarized.

Jian-yu Lu

2006-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

344

Low-noise macroscopic twin beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Applying a multiphoton-subtraction technique to two-color macroscopic squeezed vacuum state of light generated via high-gain parametric down conversion we conditionally prepare a new state of light: bright multi-mode low-noise twin beams. The obtained results demonstrate up to 8-fold suppression of noise in each beam while preserving and even moderately improving the nonclassical photon number correlations between the beams. The prepared low-noise macroscopic state, containing up to 2000 photons per mode, is not among the states achievable through nonlinear optical processes. The proposed technique substantially improves the usefulness of twin beams for quantum technologies.

Timur Sh. Iskhakov; Vladyslav C. Usenko; Radim Filip; Maria V. Chekhova; Gerd Leuchs

2014-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

345

Beam Characterization at the Neutron Radiography Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The quality of a neutron imaging beam directly impacts the quality of radiographic images produced using that beam. Fully characterizing a neutron beam, including determination of the beam’s effective length-to-diameter ratio, neutron flux profile, energy spectrum, image quality, and beam divergence, is vital for producing quality radiographic images. This project characterized the east neutron imaging beamline at the Idaho National Laboratory Neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD). The experiments which measured the beam’s effective length-to-diameter ratio and image quality are based on American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards. An analysis of the image produced by a calibrated phantom measured the beam divergence. The energy spectrum measurements consist of a series of foil irradiations using a selection of activation foils, compared to the results produced by a Monte Carlo n-Particle (MCNP) model of the beamline. Improvement of the existing NRAD MCNP beamline model includes validation of the model’s energy spectrum and the development of enhanced image simulation methods. The image simulation methods predict the radiographic image of an object based on the foil reaction rate data obtained by placing a model of the object in front of the image plane in an MCNP beamline model.

Sarah Morgan; Jeffrey King

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Summary of the LARP Mini-Workshop on Beam-Beam Compensation 2007  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The LARP Mini-Workshop on Beam-Beam Compensation 2007 was held at SLAC, 2-4 July 2007. It was attended by 33 participants from 10 institutions in Asia, Europe, and America. 26 presentations were given, while more than one third of the time was allocated to discussions. The workshop web site is Ref. [1]. The workshop's main focus was on long-range and head-on beam-beam compensation, with a view towards application in the LHC. Other topics included the beam-beam performance of previous, existing and future circular colliders; beam-beam simulations; new operating modes, theory, and unexplained phenomena. This summary is also published as Ref. [2].

Fischer, Wolfram; /Brookhaven; Bruning, Oliver S.; Koutchouk, J.P.; Zimmermann, F.; /CERN; Sen, T.; Shiltsev, V.; /Fermilab; Ohmi, K.; /KEK, Tsukuba; Furman, M.; /LBL, Berkeley; Cai, Y.; Chao, A.; /SLAC

2011-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

347

Characterization of Dosimetry of the BMRR Horizontal Thimble Tubes and Broad Beam Facility.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor was a 5 mega-watt, light-water cooled and heavy-graphite moderated research facility. It has two shutter-equipped treatment rooms, three horizontally extended thimble tubes, and an ex-core broad beam facility. The three experimental thimbles, or activation ports, external to the reactor tank were designed for several uses, including the investigations on diagnostic and therapeutic methods using radioactive isotopes of very short half-life, the analysis of radiation exposure on tissue-equivalent materials using a collimated neutron beam, and the evaluation of dose effects on biological cells to improve medical treatment. At the broad beam facility where the distribution of thermal neutrons was essential uniform, a wide variety of mammalian whole-body exposures were studied using animals such as burros or mice. Also studied at the broad beam were whole-body phantom experiments, involving the use of a neutron or photon beam streaming through a screen to obtain the flux spectrum suitable for dose analysis on the sugar-urea-water mixture, a tissue-equivalent material. Calculations of the flux and the dose at beam ports based on Monte Carlo particle-transport code were performed, and measurements conducted at the same tally locations were made using bare or cadmium-covered gold foils. Analytical results, which show good agreement with measurement data, are presented in the paper.

Hu,J.P.; Reciniello, R.N.; Holden, N.E.

2008-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

348

Generation and focusing of electron beams with initial transverse-longitudinal correlation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In charged particle beams, one of the roles played by space charge is to couple the transverse and longitudinal dynamics of the beam. This can lead to very complex phenomena which are generally studied using computer simulations. However, in some cases models based on phenomenological or analytic approximations can provide valuable insight into the system behavior. In this paper, we employ such approximations to investigate the conditions under which all the slices of a space charge dominated electron beam with slowly varying current could be focused to a waist with the same radius and at the same location, independent of slice current, and show that this can be accomplished approximately if the initial transverse-longitudinal correlation introduced onto the beam by the electron gun is chosen to compensate for the transverse-longitudinal correlation introduced onto the beam in the drift section. The validity of our approximations is assessed by use of progressively more realistic calculations. We also consider several design elements of electron guns that affect the initial correlations in the beams they generate.

Harris, J. R., E-mail: john.harris@colostate.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523 (United States); Lewellen, J. W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Poole, B. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

349

H-mode accelerating structures with permanent-magnet quadrupole beam focusing  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

We have developed high-efficiency normal-conducting rf accelerating structures by combining H -mode resonator cavities and a transverse beam focusing by permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQ), for beam velocities in the range of a few percent of the speed of light. The shunt impedance of interdigital H -mode (IH-PMQ) structures is 10–20 times higher than that of a conventional drift-tube linac, while the transverse size is 4–5 times smaller. Results of the combined 3D modeling—electromagnetic computations, multiparticle beam-dynamics simulations with high currents, and thermal-stress analysis—for an IH-PMQ accelerator tank are presented. The accelerating-field profile in the tank is tuned to provide the best propagation of a 50-mA deuteron beam using coupled iterations of electromagnetic and beam-dynamics modeling. Measurements of a cold model of the IH-PMQ tank show a good agreement with the calculations. Examples of cross-bar H -mode structures with PMQ focusing for higher beam velocities are also presented. H -PMQ accelerating structures following a short radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator can be used both in the front end of ion linacs or in stand-alone applications.

Kurennoy, S. S.; Rybarcyk, L. J.; O’Hara, J. F.; Olivas, E. R.; Wangler, T. P.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Silicon-on-insulator structures formed by a line-source electron beam: Experiment and theory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A line-source electron beam has been used to melt and recrystallize isolated Si layers to form Si-on-insulator structures. Heat flow calculations for these layered structures have been developed which correctly predict the observed recrystallization. Using sample sweep speeds of 100--600 cm/s and peak power densities up to 75 kW/cm/sup 2/ in the 1 x 20-mm beam, we have obtained single-crystal areas as large as 50 x 350 ..mu..m. Seed openings to the substrate are used to control the orientation of the regrowth and the heat flow in the recrystallization film.

Knapp, J.A.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Computational and experimental characterization of high-brightness beams for femtosecond electron imaging and spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using a multilevel fast multipole method, coupled with the shadow imaging of femtosecond photoelectron pulses for validation, we quantitatively elucidate the photocathode, space charge, and virtual cathode physics, which fundamentally limit the spatiotemporal and spectroscopic resolution and throughput of ultrafast electron microscope (UEM) systems. We present a simple microscopic description to capture the nonlinear beam dynamics based on a two-fluid picture and elucidate an unexpected dominant role of image potential pinning in accelerating the emittance growth process. These calculations set theoretical limits on the performance of UEM systems and provide useful guides for photocathode design for high-brightness electron beam systems.

Portman, J.; Zhang, H.; Tao, Z.; Makino, K.; Berz, M.; Duxbury, P. M.; Ruan, C.-Y. [Physics and Astronomy Department, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)] [Physics and Astronomy Department, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

352

Method and apparatus for laser-controlled proton beam radiology  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A proton beam radiology system provides cancer treatment and proton radiography. The system includes an accelerator for producing an H.sup.- beam and a laser source for generating a laser beam. A photodetachment module is located proximate the periphery of the accelerator. The photodetachment module combines the H.sup.- beam and laser beam to produce a neutral beam therefrom within a subsection of the H.sup.- beam. The photodetachment module emits the neutral beam along a trajectory defined by the laser beam. The photodetachment module includes a stripping foil which forms a proton beam from the neutral beam. The proton beam is delivered to a conveyance segment which transports the proton beam to a patient treatment station. The photodetachment module further includes a laser scanner which moves the laser beam along a path transverse to the cross-section of the H.sup.- beam in order to form the neutral beam in subsections of the H.sup.- beam. As the scanning laser moves across the H.sup.- beam, it similarly varies the trajectory of the proton beam emitted from the photodetachment module and in turn varies the target location of the proton beam upon the patient. Intensity modulation of the proton beam can also be achieved by controlling the output of the laser.

Johnstone, Carol J. (Warrenville, IL)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Method and apparatus for laser-controlled proton beam radiology  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A proton beam radiology system provides cancer treatment and proton radiography. The system includes an accelerator for producing an H{sup {minus}} beam and a laser source for generating a laser beam. A photodetachment module is located proximate the periphery of the accelerator. The photodetachment module combines the H{sup {minus}} beam and laser beam to produce a neutral beam therefrom within a subsection of the H{sup {minus}} beam. The photodetachment module emits the neutral beam along a trajectory defined by the laser beam. The photodetachment module includes a stripping foil which forms a proton beam from the neutral beam. The proton beam is delivered to a conveyance segment which transports the proton beam to a patient treatment station. The photodetachment module further includes a laser scanner which moves the laser beam along a path transverse to the cross-section of the H{sup {minus}} beam in order to form the neutral beam in subsections of the H{sup {minus}} beam. As the scanning laser moves across the H{sup {minus}} beam, it similarly varies the trajectory of the proton beam emitted from the photodetachment module and in turn varies the target location of the proton beam upon the patient. Intensity modulation of the proton beam can also be achieved by controlling the output of the laser. 9 figs.

Johnstone, C.J.

1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

354

Studies on beam propagation pertaining to beamed microwave power transmission and open resonator quasi-optics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the space shuttle. A near-field program is used to compare the collection efficiencies obtainable with a parabolic dish and a resonant Gaussian beam antenna. The second application of the computer programs is the analysis of a reference system for beaming... characteristics of the maximum tapers in Table 4. . 81 45 Collection efficiency characteristics of the high efficiency tapers. 84 46 Proposed shuttle beamed power demonstration using an 8 ft. parabolic dish as the transmitter antenna. 89 47 Gaussian beam...

McCleary, James Carlton

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Radiation environment simulations at the Tevatron, studies of the beam profile and measurement of the Bc meson mass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The description of a computer simulation of the CDF detector at Fermilab and the adjacent accelerator parts is detailed, with MARS calculations of the radiation background in various elements of the model due to the collision of beams and machine-related losses. Three components of beam halo formation are simulated for the determination of the principal source of radiation background in CDF due to beam losses. The effect of a collimator as a protection for the detector is studied. The simulation results are compared with data taken by a CDF group. Studies of a 150 GeV Tevatron proton beam are performed to investigate the transverse diffusion growth and distribution. A technique of collimator scan is used to scrape the beam under various experimental conditions, and computer programs are written for the beam reconstruction. An average beam halo growth speed is given and the potential of beam tail reconstruction using the collimator scan is evaluated. A particle physics analysis is conducted in order to detect the B{sub c} {yields} J/{psi}{pi} decay signal with the CDF Run II detector in 360 pb{sup -1} of data. The cut variables and an optimization method to determine their values are presented along with a criterion for the detection threshold of the signal. The mass of the B{sub c} meson is measured with an evaluation of the significance of the signal.

Nicolas, Ludovic Y.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced beam dynamics Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

beam-beam interactions with large beam-beam parameter Summary: 1 . The dynamics of the beams could therefore be com- plicated by multimode oscillations of the beam... with...

357

Cascaded injection resonator for coherent beam combining of laser arrays  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides a cascaded injection resonator for coherent beam combining of laser arrays. The resonator comprises a plurality of laser emitters arranged along at least one plane and a beam sampler for reflecting at least a portion of each laser beam that impinges on the beam sampler, the portion of each laser beam from one of the laser emitters being reflected back to another one of the laser emitters to cause a beam to be generated from the other one of the laser emitters to the beam reflector. The beam sampler also transmits a portion of each laser beam to produce a laser output beam such that a plurality of laser output beams of the same frequency are produced. An injection laser beam is directed to a first laser emitter to begin a process of generating and reflecting a laser beam from one laser emitter to another laser emitter in the plurality. A method of practicing the invention is also disclosed.

Kireev, Vassili [Sunnyvale, CA; Liu, Yun; Protopopescu, Vladimir [Knoxville, TN; Braiman, Yehuda [Oak Ridge, TN

2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

358

Beam coupling in hybrid photorefractive inorganic-cholesteric liquid crystal cells: Impact of optical rotation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We develop a theoretical model to describe two-beam energy exchange in a hybrid photorefractive inorganic-cholesteric cell. A cholesteric layer is placed between two inorganic substrates. One of the substrates is photorefractive (Ce:SBN). Weak and strong light beams are incident on the hybrid cell. The interfering light beams induce a periodic space-charge field in the photorefractive window. This penetrates into the cholesteric liquid crystal (LC), inducing a diffraction grating written on the LC director. In the theory, the flexoelectric mechanism for electric field-director coupling is more important than the LC static dielectric anisotropy coupling. The LC optics is described in the Bragg regime. Each beam induces two circular polarized waves propagating in the cholesteric cell with different velocities. The model thus includes optical rotation in the cholesteric LC. The incident light beam wavelength can fall above, below, or inside the cholesteric gap. The theory calculates the energy gain of the weak beam, as a result of its interaction with the pump beam within the diffraction grating. Theoretical results for exponential gain coefficients are compared with experimental results for hybrid cells filled with cholesteric mixture BL038/CB15 at different concentrations of chiral agent CB15. Reconciliation between theory and experiment requires the inclusion of a phenomenological multiplier in the magnitude of the director grating. This multiplier is cubic in the space-charge field, and we provide a justification of the q-dependence of the multiplier. Within this paradigm, we are able to fit theory to experimental data for cholesteric mixtures with different spectral position of cholesteric gap relative to the wavelength of incident beams, subject to the use of some fitting parameters.

Reshetnyak, V. Yu.; Pinkevych, I. P. [Physics Faculty, National Taras Shevchenko University of Kyiv, Volodymyrs’ka Street 64, Kyiv 01601 (Ukraine); Sluckin, T. J. [Division of Mathematical Sciences, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Cook, G.; Evans, D. R. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States)

2014-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

359

Note: A real-time beam current density meter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed a real-time beam current density meter for charged particle beams. It measures the mean current density by collimating a uniform and large diameter primary beam. The suppression of the secondary electrons and the deflection of the beam were simulated, and it was tested with a 105 keV Ar{sup 7+} ion beam.

Liu Junliang; Yu Deyang; Ruan Fangfang; Xue Yingli; Wang Wei [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

360

Polarization of fast particle beams by collisional pumping  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method and apparatus for highly polarizing a fast beam of particles by collisional pumping, including generating a fast beam of particles, and also generating a thick electron-spin-polarized medium positioned as a target for the beam. The target is made sufficiently thick to allow the beam to interact with the medium to produce collisional pumping whereby the beam becomes highly polarized.

Stearns, J. Warren (Castro Valley, CA); Kaplan, Selig N. (El Cerrito, CA); Pyle, Robert V. (Berkeley, CA); Anderson, L. Wilmer (Madison, WI); Ruby, Lawrence (Berkeley, CA); Schlachter, Alfred S. (Oakland, CA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "undulator beam calculated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Non-dissipative boundary feedback for Rayleigh and Timoshenko beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Non-dissipative boundary feedback for Rayleigh and Timoshenko beams Chris Guiver and Mark R. Opmeer-dissipative feedback that has been shown in the literature to exponentially stabilize an Euler-Bernoulli beam makes a Rayleigh beam and a Timoshenko beam unstable. 1 Introduction Feedback control of beams is a much studied

Opmeer, Mark

362

Aerodynamic beam generator for large particles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new type of aerodynamic particle beam generator is disclosed. This generator produces a tightly focused beam of large material particles at velocities ranging from a few feet per second to supersonic speeds, depending on the exact configuration and operating conditions. Such generators are of particular interest for use in additive fabrication techniques.

Brockmann, John E. (Albuquerque, NM); Torczynski, John R. (Albuquerque, NM); Dykhuizen, Ronald C. (Albuquerque, NM); Neiser, Richard A. (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, Mark F. (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Structure of pulsar beams: conal versus patchy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structure of mean pulsar radiation patterns is discussed within the nested-cones and patchy beam models. Observational predictions of both these models are analyzed and compared with available data on pulsar waveforms. It is argued that observational properties of pulsar waveforms are highly consistent with the nested-cone model and, in general, inconsistent with the patchy beam model.

J. Kijak; J. Gil

2002-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

364

RESOLVING BEAM TRANSPORT PROBLEMS IN ELECTROSTATIC ACCELERATORS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESOLVING BEAM TRANSPORT PROBLEMS IN ELECTROSTATIC ACCELERATORS J. D. LARSON (*) Oak Ridge National are frequently encounte- red during the design, operation and upgrading of electrostatic accelerators. Examples are provided of analytic procedures that clarify accelerator ion optics and lead to more effective beam

Boyer, Edmond

365

High-energy electron beam technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A high-energy electron beam (HEEB) technology was developed under the US Department of Defense (DOD) charged-particle-beam (CPB) directed-energy program. The program's objective was advanced military weapon systems. For the past two decades, charged-particle-beam research focused on producing intense beams and the vehicles to deliver large amounts of electrical energy. The charged-particle beams of interest for weapon systems had particle energies up to 100 MeV, beam currents of tens of kiloamperes, and propagation distances in excess of 100 m. However, such high energy levels are not required for industrial uses of the technology. It is anticipated that these less-aggressive beams will provide an electrical heat source suitable for a variety of materials processing applications, including surface treatment, joining, shock hardening, phase-transformation hardening, peening, shock-wave compaction, and melting. Much more R and D is needed to transfer to industry the high-energy electron beam technology developed in the CPB program. For example, its power as a materials processing tool must be convincingly demonstrated. Also required are compact, reliable accelerators that are relatively simple to use and reasonably priced.

Danko, J.C.; Lundin, C.D. (Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)); Nolting, E.E. (Naval Surface Warfare Center, White Oak, MD (United States))

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Emittance growth from electron beam modulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In linac ring colliders like MeRHIC and eRHIC a modulation of the electron bunch can lead to a modulation of the beam beam tune shift and steering errors. These modulations can lead to emittance growth. This note presents simple formulas to estimate these effects which generalize some previous results.

Blaskiewicz, M.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

On the properties of Circular-Beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Circular-Beams were introduced as a very general solution of the paraxial wave equation carrying Orbital Angular Momentum. Here we study their properties, by looking at their normalization and their expansion in terms of Laguerre-Gauss modes. We also study their far-field divergence and, for particular cases of the beam parameters, their possible experimental generation.

Giuseppe Vallone

2015-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

368

Polymer surface treatment with particle beams  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A polymer surface and near surface treatment process produced by irradiation with high energy particle beams. The process is preferably implemented with pulsed ion beams. The process alters the chemical and mechanical properties of the polymer surface in a manner useful for a wide range of commercial applications.

Stinnett, Regan W. (1033 Tramway La. NE., Albuquerque, NM 87122); VanDevender, J. Pace (7604 Lamplighter NE., Albuquerque, NM 87109)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Polymer surface treatment with particle beams  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A polymer surface and near surface treatment process produced by irradiation with high energy particle beams is disclosed. The process is preferably implemented with pulsed ion beams. The process alters the chemical and mechanical properties of the polymer surface in a manner useful for a wide range of commercial applications. 16 figs.

Stinnett, R.W.; VanDevender, J.P.

1999-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

370

Beam characterization at the Neutron Radiography Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The quality of a neutron-imaging beam directly impacts the quality of radiographic images produced using that beam. Fully characterizing a neutron beam, including determination of the beam's effective length-to-diameter ratio, neutron flux profile, energy spectrum, potential image quality, and beam divergence, is vital for producing quality radiographic images. This paper provides a characterization of the east neutron imaging beamline at the Idaho National Laboratory Neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD). The experiments which measured the beam's effective length-to-diameter ratio and potential image quality are based on American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards. An analysis of the image produced by a calibrated phantom measured the beam divergence. The energy spectrum measurements consist of a series of foil irradiations using a selection of activation foils, compared to the results produced by a Monte Carlo n-Particle (MCNP) model of the beamline. The NRAD has an effective collimation ratio greater than 125, a beam divergence of 0.3 +_ 0.1 degrees, and a gold foil cadmium ratio of 2.7. The flux profile has been quantified and the facility is an ASTM Category 1 radiographic facility. Based on bare and cadmium covered foil activation results, the neutron energy spectrum used in the current MCNP model of the radiography beamline over-samples the thermal region of the neutron energy spectrum.

Sarah W. Morgan; Jeffrey C. King; Chad L. Pope

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

LCDETxxxxxxx Improved TESLA Optics and Beam Induced  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LC­DET­xxxx­xxx Improved TESLA Optics and Beam Induced Backgrounds Update Karsten BË?uÃ?er, DESY and Olivier Napoly, CEA/Saclay LCWS 2002, Jeju, Korea Abstract A new tesla optics with l*=5m is under development. An update is given on the simulation of the beam induced backgrounds in the TESLA detector. 1

372

Policy Issues for Retail Beamed Power Transmission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solar electric power using retail delivery of beamed power. Recent advances in power beaming have made to enable widespread adoption of this clean and sustainable contribution to meeting energy needs. It is seen to micro-renewable energy resource exploitation since wired power transmission is only cost effective over

373

Set Up and Test Results for a Vibrating Wire System for Quadrupole Fiducialization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quadrupoles will be placed between the undulator segments in LCLS to keep the electron beam focused as it passes through. The quadrupoles will be assembled with their respective undulator segments prior to being placed into the tunnel. Beam alignment will be used to center the quadrupoles, along with the corresponding undulators, on the beam. If there is any displacement between the undulator and the quadrupole axes in the assemblies, the beam will deviate from the undulator axis. If it deviates by more than 80{micro}m in vertical or 140{micro}m in horizontal directions, the undulator will not perform as required by LCLS. This error is divided between three sources: undulator axis fiducialization, quadrupole magnetic axis fiducialization, and assembly of the two parts. In particular, it was calculated that the quadrupole needs to be fiducialized to within 25{micro}m in both vertical and horizontal directions. A previous study suggested using a vibrating wire system for finding the magnetic axis of a quadrupole. The study showed that the method has high sensitivity (up to 1{micro}m) and laid out guidelines for constructing it. There are 3 steps in fiducializing the quadrupole with the vibrating wire system. They are positioning the wire at the magnet center (step 1), finding the wire with position detectors (step 2), and finding the quadrupole tooling ball positions relative to the position detector tooling balls (step 3). The following break up of error was suggested for the fiducialization steps: 10{micro}m for step 1 (finding the center), 20{micro}m for step 2 (finding the wire), and 10{micro}m for step 3 (tooling ball measurements). The purpose of this study is to investigate whether the vibrating wire system meets the requirements for LCLS. In particular, if it can reliably fiducialize a quadrupole magnetic center to within 25{micro}m in both vertical and horizontal directions. The behavior of individual system components is compared to the expected performance. A vibrating wire system was constructed to fiducialize the quadrupoles between undulator segments in the LCLS. This note studies the ability of the system to fulfill the fiducialization requirements.

Levashov, Michael Y.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Set Up and Test Results for a Vibrating Wire System for Quadrupole Fiducialization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quadrupoles will be placed between the undulator segments in LCLS to keep the electron beam focused as it passes through. The quadrupoles will be assembled with their respective undulator segments prior to being placed into the tunnel. Beam alignment will be used to center the quadrupoles, along with the corresponding undulators, on the beam. If there is any displacement between the undulator and the quadrupole axes in the assemblies, the beam will deviate from the undulator axis. If it deviates by more than 80{micro}m in vertical or 140{micro}m in horizontal directions, the undulator will not perform as required by LCLS. This error is divided between three sources: undulator axis fiducialization, quadrupole magnetic axis fiducialization, and assembly of the two parts. In particular, it was calculated that the quadrupole needs to be fiducialized to within 25{micro}m in both vertical and horizontal directions. A previous study suggested using a vibrating wire system for finding the magnetic axis of a quadrupole. The study showed that the method has high sensitivity (up to 1{micro}m) and laid out guidelines for constructing it. There are 3 steps in fiducializing the quadrupole with the vibrating wire system. They are positioning the wire at the magnet center (step 1), finding the wire with position detectors (step 2), and finding the quadrupole tooling ball positions relative to the position detector tooling balls (step 3). The following break up of error was suggested for the fiducialization steps: 10{micro}m for step 1 (finding the center), 20{micro}m for step 2 (finding the wire), and 10{micro}m for step 3 (tooling ball measurements). The purpose of this study is to investigate whether the vibrating wire system meets the requirements for LCLS. In particular, if it can reliably fiducialize a quadrupole magnetic center to within 25{micro}m in both vertical and horizontal directions. The behavior of individual system components is compared to the expected performance. A vibrating wire system was constructed to fiducialize the quadrupoles between undulator segments in the LCLS. This note studies the ability of the system to fulfill the fiducialization requirements.

Not Available

2010-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

375

Some Calculations for Cold Fusion Superheavy Elements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Q value and optimal exciting energy of the hypothetical superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reaction are calculated with relativistic mean field model and semiemperical shell model mass equation(SSME) and the validity of the two models is tested. The fusion barriers are also calculated with two different models and reasonable results are obtained. The calculations can give useful references for the experiments in the superheavy nuclei synthesized in cold fusion reactions.

Zhong, X H; Ning, P Z

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Some Calculations for Cold Fusion Superheavy Elements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Q value and optimal exciting energy of the hypothetical superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reaction are calculated with relativistic mean field model and semiemperical shell model mass equation(SSME) and the validity of the two models is tested. The fusion barriers are also calculated with two different models and reasonable results are obtained. The calculations can give useful references for the experiments in the superheavy nuclei synthesized in cold fusion reactions.

X. H. Zhong; L. Li; P. Z. Ning

2004-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

377

GPU-optimized Code for Long-term Simulations of Beam-beam Effects in Colliders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on the development of the new code for long-term simulation of beam-beam effects in particle colliders. The underlying physical model relies on a matrix-based arbitrary-order symplectic particle tracking for beam transport and the Bassetti-Erskine approximation for beam-beam interaction. The computations are accelerated through a parallel implementation on a hybrid GPU/CPU platform. With the new code, a previously computationally prohibitive long-term simulations become tractable. We use the new code to model the proposed medium-energy electron-ion collider (MEIC) at Jefferson Lab.

Roblin, Yves [JLAB; Morozov, Vasiliy [JLAB; Terzic, Balsa [JLAB; Aturban, Mohamed A. [Old Dominion University; Ranjan, D. [Old Dominion University; Zubair, Mohammed [Old Dominion University

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Optimization of beam configuration in laser fusion based on the laser beam pattern  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A simple method based on the laser beam pattern is proposed and numerically demonstrated to optimize a beam configuration for direct drive laser fusion. In this method, both the geometrical factor G{sub l} and the single beam factor B{sub l} are considered. By diminishing the product of B{sub l}·G{sub l}, the irradiation nonuniformity can be decreased to the order of 10{sup ?5}. This optimization method can be applied on the design of irradiation systems for an arbitrary number of beams and any axially symmetric beam patterns.

Xu, Teng; Xu, Lixin; Wang, Anting; Gu, Chun; Wang, Shengbo; Liu, Jing; Wei, Ankun [Department of Optics and Optical Engineering, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)] [Department of Optics and Optical Engineering, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

379

Carbon Fiber Damage in Particle Beam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon fibers are commonly used as moving targets in beam wire scanners. The heating of the fiber due to energy loss of the particles travelling through is simulated with Geant4. The heating induced by the beam electromagnetic field is estimated with ANSYS. The heat transfer and sublimation processes are modelled. Due to the model nonlinearity, a numerical approach based on discretization of the wire movement is used to solve it for particular beams. Radiation damage to the fiber is estimated with SRIM. The model is tested with available SPS and LEP data and a dedicated damage test on the SPS beam is performed followed by a post-mortem analysis of the wire remnants. Predictions for the LHC beams are made.

Dehning, B; Kroyer, T; Meyer, M; Sapinski, M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Microwave accelerator E-beam pumped laser  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device and method for pumping gaseous lasers by means of a microwave accelerator. The microwave accelerator produces a relativistic electron beam which is applied along the longitudinal axis of the laser through an electron beam window. The incident points of the electron beam on the electron beam window are varied by deflection coils to enhance the cooling characteristics of the foil. A thyratron is used to reliably modulate the microwave accelerator to produce electron beam pulses which excite the laser medium to produce laser pulse repetition frequencies not previously obtainable. An aerodynamic window is also disclosed which eliminates foil heating problems, as well as a magnetic bottle for reducing laser cavity length and pressures while maintaining efficient energy deposition.

Brau, Charles A. (Los Alamos, NM); Stein, William E. (Los Alamos, NM); Rockwood, Stephen D. (Los Alamos, NM)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "undulator beam calculated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Soft beams: when capillarity induces axial compression  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the interaction of an elastic beam with a liquid drop in the case where bending and extensional effects are both present. We use a variational approach to derive equilibrium equations and constitutive relation for the beam. This relation is shown to include a term due to surface energy in addition of the classical Young's modulus term, leading to a modification of Hooke's law. At the triple point where solid, liquid, and vapor phases meet we find that the external force applied on the beam is parallel to the liquid-vapor interface. Moreover, in the case where solid-vapor and solid-liquid interface energies do not depend on the extension state of the beam, we show that the extension in the beam is continuous at the triple point and that the wetting angle satisfy the classical Young-Dupr\\'e relation.

Sébastien Neukirch; Arnaud Antkowiak; Jean-Jacques Marigo

2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

382

SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE BEAM CURRENT MONITOR ELECTRONICS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) to be constructed at ORNL is a collaboration of six laboratories. Beam current monitors for SNS will be used to monitor H-minus and H-plus beams ranging from the 15 mA (tune-up in the Front End and Linac) to over 60 A fully accumulated in the Ring. The time structure of the beams to be measured range from 645 nsec ''mini'' bunches, at the 1.05 MHz ring revolution rate, to an overall 1 mS long macro pulse. Beam current monitors (BCMs) for SNS have requirements depending upon their location within the system. The development of a general approach to satisfy requirements of various locations with common components is a major design objective. This paper will describe the development of the beam current monitors and electronics.

KESSELMAN, M.

2001-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

383

Filter diagonalization of shell-model calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a method of filter diagonalization for shell-model calculations. This method is based on the Sakurai and Sugiura (SS) method, but extended with the help of the shifted complex orthogonal conjugate gradient (COCG) method. A salient feature of this method is that it can calculate eigenvalues and eigenstates in a given energy interval. We show that this method can be an alternative to the Lanczos method for calculating ground and excited states, as well as spectral strength functions. With an application to the M-scheme shell-model calculations we demonstrate that several inherent problems in the widely used Lanczos method can be removed or reduced.

Mizusaki, Takahiro [Institute of Natural Sciences, Senshu University, Tokyo 101-8425 (Japan); Kaneko, Kazunari [Department of Physics, Kyushu Sangyo University, Fukuoka 813-8503 (Japan); Honma, Michio [Center for Mathematical Sciences, University of Aizu, Aizu-Wakamatsu, 965-8580 (Japan); Sakurai, Tetsuya [Department of Computer Science, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, 305-8573 (Japan)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

384

Calculators and Science and Engineering Calculus Occasionally ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on examinations and quizzes. These courses do spend some class time discussing the use of graphing calculators, and some of the pitfalls into which graphing ...

1910-10-51T23:59:59.000Z

385

Evaluation Of Chemical Geothermometers For Calculating Reservoir...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometers For Calculating Reservoir Temperatures At Nevada Geothermal Power Plants Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper:...

386

Deep Beams and Slabs The purpose of skin reinforcement in a deep beam is to limit the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deep Beams and Slabs Deep Beams The purpose of skin reinforcement in a deep beam is to limit require different amounts of skin reinforcement. The purpose of our experiment is to compare beams designed with the different amounts of skin reinforcement required by these codes. 3 deep beams following

Barthelat, Francois

387

E-Print Network 3.0 - average beam power Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

at target, trajectory (M) Screen positions (M... S. Childress -- Proton BeamsProton Beams 1616 Main Injector Beam Power 2008Main Injector Beam Power 2008 Main... ... Source:...

388

Broadband microwave burst produced by electron beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Theoretical and experimental study of fast electron beams attracts a lot of attention in the astrophysics and laboratory. In the case of solar flares the problem of reliable beam detection and diagnostics is of exceptional importance. This paper explores the fact that the electron beams moving oblique to the magnetic field or along the field with some angular scatter around the beam propagation direction can generate microwave continuum bursts via gyrosynchrotron mechanism. The characteristics of the microwave bursts produced by beams differ from those in case of isotropic or loss-cone distributions, which suggests a new tool for quantitative diagnostics of the beams in the solar corona. To demonstrate the potentiality of this tool, we analyze here a radio burst occurred during an impulsive flare 1B/M6.7 on 10 March 2001 (AR 9368, N27W42). Based on detailed analysis of the spectral, temporal, and spatial relationships, we obtained firm evidence that the microwave continuum burst is produced by electron beams. For the first time we developed and applied a new forward fitting algorithm based on exact gyrosynchrotron formulae and employing both the total power and polarization measurements to solve the inverse problem of the beam diagnostics. We found that the burst is generated by a oblique beam in a region of reasonably strong magnetic field ($\\sim 200-300$ G) and the burst is observed at a quasi-transverse viewing angle. We found that the life time of the emitting electrons in the radio source is relatively short, $\\tau_l \\approx 0.5$ s, consistent with a single reflection of the electrons from a magnetic mirror at the foot point with the stronger magnetic field. We discuss the implications of these findings for the electron acceleration in flares and for beam diagnostics.

A. T. Altyntsev; G. D. Fleishman; G. -L. Huang; V. F. Melnikov

2007-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

389

Prospects for titanium alloy comparison control by electron beam scan frequency manipulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using mathematical modelling, the authors evaluate the prospects for using beam spot size and scan frequency to control titanium-aluminum alloy composition in electron beam melting and refining. Composition control is evaluated in terms of attainable steady-state extremes of composition, and the time scales required to change hearth and mold composition between those extremes. Mathematical models predict spot size-evaporation and frequency-evaporation relationships by simulating heat transfer in the surface of the melt, and predict overall composition change using simplifying assumptions about the fluid flow field in a melting hearth. Corroborating experiments were run on the electron beam furnace at Sandia National Laboratories in order to verify predicted relationships between frequency and evaporation and to calculate activity coefficients of aluminum and vanadium in titanium.

Powell, A.; Pal, U. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Avyle, J.V.D.; Damkroger, B. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

390

Extension of Pierce model to multiple transmission lines interacting with an electron beam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A possible route towards achieving high power microwave devices is through the use of novel slow-wave structures employing multiple coupled transmission lines (MTLs) whose behavior when coupled to electron beams have not been sufficiently explored. We present the extension of the one-dimensional linearized Pierce theory to MTLs coupled to a single electron beam. We develop multiple formalisms to calculate the k-{\\omega} dispersion relation of the system and find that the existence of a growing wave solution is always guaranteed if the electron propagation constant is larger than or equal to the largest propagation constant of the MTL system. We verify our findings with illustrative examples which bring to light unique properties of the system in which growing waves were found to exist within finite bands of the electron propagation constant and discuss possible approach to improve the gain. By treating the beam-MTL interaction as distributed dependent current generators in the MTL, we derive relations charact...

Tamma, Venkata Ananth

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Heavy ion beam loss mechanisms at an electron-ion collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There are currently several proposals to build a high-luminosity electron-ion collider, to study the spin structure of matter and measure parton densities in heavy nuclei, and to search for gluon saturation and new phenomena like the colored glass condensate. These measurements require operation with heavy-nuclei. We calculate the cross-sections for two important processes that will affect accelerator and detector operations: bound-free pair production, and Coulomb excitation of the nuclei. Both of these reactions have large cross-sections, 28-56 mb, which can lead to beam ion losses, produce beams of particles with altered charge:mass ratio, and produce a large flux of neutrons in zero degree calorimeters. The loss of beam particles limits the sustainable electron-ion luminosity to levels of several times $10^{32}/$cm$^2$/s.

Spencer R. Klein

2014-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

392

Laser photons acquire circular polarization by interacting with a Dirac or Majorana neutrino beam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is shown that for the reason of neutrinos being left-handed and their gauge-couplings being parity-violated, linearly polarized photons acquire their circular polarization by interacting with neutrinos. Calculating the ratio of linear and circular polarizations of laser photons interacting with either Dirac or Majorana neutrino beam, we obtain this ratio for the Dirac neutrino case, which is about twice less than the ratio for the Majorana neutrino case. Based on this ratio, we discuss the possibility of using advanced laser facilities and the T2K neutrino experiment to measure the circular polarization of laser beams interacting with neutrino beams in ground laboratories. This could be an additional and useful way to gain some insight into the physics of neutrinos, for instance their Dirac or Majorana nature.

Rohoollah Mohammadi; She-Sheng Xue

2014-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

393

Near beam-gas background for LHCb at 3.5 TeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the machine induced backgrounds for LHCb arising from collisions of the beam with residual gas in the long straight sections of the LHC close to the experiment. We concentrate on the background particle fluxes initiated by inelastic beam-gas interactions with a direct line of sight to the experiment, with the potential impact on the experiment increasing for larger beam currents and changing gas pressures. In this paper we calculate the background rates for parameters foreseen with LHC running in 2011, using realistic residual pressure profiles. We also discuss the effect of using a pressure profile formulated in terms of equivalent hydrogen, through weighting of other residual gases by their cross section, upon the radial fluxes from the machine and the detector response. We present the expected rates and the error introduced through this approximation.

Brett, D R; Corti, G; Alessio, F; Jacobsson, R; Talanov, V; Lieng, M H

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Horizontal Beam Tubes - HFIR Technical Parameters | ORNL Neutron...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Beam Tubes The reactor has four horizontal beam tubes that supply the neutrons to the neutron scattering instruments. Details for each beam tube and instrument can be found on...

395

Interference of a pair of symmetric partially coherent beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

optical effects; (140.3300) Laser beam shaping; (350.5500)of symmetric Collett-Wolf beams,” Opt. Lett. 30, 1605–1607 (of highly directional light beams? ”, Opt. Lett. 2, 27–29 (

Garc?a-Guerrero, E. E.; Mendez, E. R.; Gu, Zu-Han; Leskova, T. A.; Maradudin, A. A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

michael smith ornlradioactive beams: equipment & techniques recoil separators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

michael smith ornlradioactive beams: equipment & techniques recoil separators approach! · directly Smith, Rolfs, Barnes NIMA306 (1991) 233 #12;michael smith ornlradioactive beams: equipment & techniques;michael smith ornlradioactive beams: equipment & techniques recoil separators proof of concept with 12C

397

New Science with the APS Superconducting Undulator  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andDataNational Libraryornl.gov Ron WalliANew ResearchYoung of XSD

398

PVWatts (R) Calculator India (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The PVWatts (R) Calculator for India was released by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in 2013. The online tool estimates electricity production and the monetary value of that production of grid-connected roof- or ground-mounted crystalline silicon photovoltaics systems based on a few simple inputs. This factsheet provides a broad overview of the PVWatts (R) Calculator for India.

Not Available

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Ris-M-2584 RELIABILITY CALCULATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Risø-M-2584 RELIABILITY CALCULATIONS Improvements of methods intended for calculation of reliability of structures and systems Kurt E. Petersen Abstract. Risk and reliability analysis is increasingly being used in evaluations of plant safety and plant reliability. The analysis can be performed either

400

First principles calculations for analysis martensitic transformations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The change in crystal energy is calculated for atomic displacements corresponding to phonons, elastic shears, and lattice transformations. Anomalies in the phonon dispersion curves of NiAl and NiTi are analyzed and recent calculations for TiPd alloys are presented.

Harmon, B.N.; Zhao, G.L.; Ho, K.M.; Chan, C.T.; Ye, Y.Y.; Ding, Y.; Zhang, B.L.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "undulator beam calculated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

URANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

URANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS PIÃ?ON RIDGE PROJECT MONTROSE COUNTY, COLORADO Inc. (Golder) was commissioned by EFRC to evaluate the operations of the uranium mill tailings storage in this report were conducted using the WISE Uranium Mill Tailings Radon Flux Calculator, as updated on November

402

Quark model calculation of the EMC effect  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using a potential model, we calculate quark distributions for a six-quark quasi-deuteron, including the effects of the Pauli Principle and quark tunneling between nuclei. Using a phenomenological sea distribution, the EMC ratio is calculated and found to be in qualitative agreement with experiment.

Benesh, C.J.; Goldman, T.; Stephenson, G.J. Jr. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

AUXILIARY RATE CALCULATION The Budget Office  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AUXILIARY RATE CALCULATION The Budget Office #12;AGENDA Guiding Principles Rate Proposal Building Office supplies for budget manager reconciliationOffice supplies for budget manager reconciliation: Equipment Compensated Leave #12;CALCULATING A RATE Budgeted Expenses Budgeted Usage BaseBudgeted Usage Base

Weston, Ken

404

Unimolecular decomposition of methyltrichlorosilane: RRKM calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Based on reaction thermochemistry and estimates of Arrhenius A-factors, it is expected that Si-C bond cleavage, C-H bond cleavage, and HCl elimination will be the primary channels for the unimolecular decomposition of methyltrichlorosilane. Using RRKM theory, we calculated rate constants for these three reactions. The calculations support the conclusion that these three reactions are the major decomposition pathways. Rate constants for each reaction were calculated in the high-pressure limit (800--1500 K) and in the falloff regime (1300--1500 K) for bath gases of both helium and hydrogen. These calculations thus provide branching fractions as well as decomposition rates. We also calculated bimolecular rate constants for the overall decomposition in the low-pressure limit. Interesting and surprising kinetic behavior of this system and the individual reactions is discussed. The reactivity of this chlorinated organosilane is compared to that of other organosilanes.

Osterheld, T.H.; Allendorf, M.D.; Melius, C.F.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Relativistic QRPA calculation of muon capture rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The relativistic proton-neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation (PN-RQRPA) is applied in the calculation of total muon capture rates on a large set of nuclei from $^{12}$C to $^{244}$Pu, for which experimental values are available. The microscopic theoretical framework is based on the Relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov (RHB) model for the nuclear ground state, and transitions to excited states are calculated using the PN-RQRPA. The calculation is fully consistent, i.e., the same interactions are used both in the RHB equations that determine the quasiparticle basis, and in the matrix equations of the PN-RQRPA. The calculated capture rates are sensitive to the in-medium quenching of the axial-vector coupling constant. By reducing this constant from its free-nucleon value $g_A = 1.262$ by 10% for all multipole transitions, the calculation reproduces the experimental muon capture rates to better than 10% accuracy.

T. Marketin; N. Paar; T. Niksic; D. Vretenar

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

406

Use of proton beams with breast prostheses and tissue expanders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the early 2000s, a small but rapidly increasing number of patients with breast cancer have been treated with proton beams. Some of these patients have had breast prostheses or tissue expanders in place during their courses of treatment. Procedures must be implemented to plan the treatments of these patients. The density, kilovoltage x-ray computed tomography numbers (kVXCTNs), and proton relative linear stopping powers (pRLSPs) were calculated and measured for several test sample devices. The calculated and measured kVXCTNs of saline were 1% and 2.4% higher than the values for distilled water while the calculated RLSP for saline was within 0.2% of the value for distilled water. The measured kVXCTN and pRLSP of the silicone filling material for the test samples were approximately 1120 and 0.935, respectively. The conversion of kVXCTNs to pRLSPs by the treatment planning system standard tissue conversion function is adequate for saline-filled devices but for silicone-filled devices manual reassignment of the pRLSPs is required.

Moyers, Michael F., E-mail: MFMoyers@roadrunner.com [ProCure Proton Therapy Center, Somerset, NJ (United States); Mah, Dennis; Boyer, Sean P.; Chang, Chang [ProCure Proton Therapy Center, Somerset, NJ (United States); Pankuch, Mark [ProCure Proton Therapy Center, Warrenville, IL (United States)

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Long Plasma Source for Heavy Ion Beam Charge Neutralization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

neutralizing plasma column the heavy ion beam can focus to aPlasmas are a source of unbound electrons for charge neutralizing intense heavy ion beams to focus

Efthimion, P.C.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Are Cluster Ion Analysis Beams Good Choices for Hydrogen Depth...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cluster Ion Analysis Beams Good Choices for Hydrogen Depth Profiling Using Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry? Are Cluster Ion Analysis Beams Good Choices for Hydrogen...

409

Lasers, Electron Beams and New Years Resolutions | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lasers, Electron Beams and New Years Resolutions Lasers, Electron Beams and New Years Resolutions March 2, 2011 - 3:43pm Addthis Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Writer,...

410

Ion beam assisted deposition of thermal barrier coatings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and apparatus for depositing thermal barrier coatings on gas turbine blades and vanes using Electron Beam Physical Vapor Deposition (EBPVD) combined with Ion Beam Assisted Deposition (IBAD).

Youchison, Dennis L. (Albuquerque, NM); McDonald, Jimmie M. (Albuquerque, NM); Lutz, Thomas J. (Albuquerque, NM); Gallis, Michail A. (Albuquerque, NM)

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

411

Si-on-Insulator formation using a line-source electron beam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A line-source electron beam has been used to melt and recrystallize isolated Si layers to form Si-on-Insulator structures, and the process is simulated by heat flow calculations. Using sample sweep speeds of 100 to 600 cm/s and peak power densities up to 75 kW/cm/sup 2/ in the 1 x 20 mm beam, we have obtained single-crystal areas as large as 50 x 350 ..mu..m. Seed openings to the substrate are used to control the orientation of the regrowth and the heat flow in the recrystallizing film. A finite-element heat flow code has been developed which correctly simulates the experimental results and which allows the calculation of untried sample configurations.

Knapp, J.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Current Control in ITER Steady State Plasmas With Neutral Beam Steering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Predictions of quasi steady state DT plasmas in ITER are generated using the PTRANSP code. The plasma temperatures, densities, boundary shape, and total current (9 - 10 MA) anticipated for ITER steady state plasmas are specified. Current drive by negative ion neutral beam injection, lower-hybrid, and electron cyclotron resonance are calculated. Four modes of operation with different combinations of current drive are studied. For each mode, scans with the NNBI aimed at differing heights in the plasma are performed to study effects of current control on the q profile. The timeevolution of the currents and q are calculated to evaluate long duration transients. Quasi steady state, strongly reversed q profiles are predicted for some beam injection angles if the current drive and bootstrap currents are sufficiently large.

R.V. Budny

2009-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

413

Physics with Rare Isotope Beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using stable and radioactive beams provided by ATLAS nuclear reactions of special interest in astrophysics have been studied with emphasis on breakout from the hot CNO cycle to the rp-process. The masses of nuclear fragments provided by a strong fission source have been measured in order to help trace the path of the r process. 8Li ions produced by the d(7Li,8Li)n reaction have been trapped and the electrons and alphas emitted in the ensuing beta-decay measured. The neutrino directions were therefore determined, which leads to a measurement of the electron-neutrino correlation. The energies and kinematics are such that a sensitive search for any tensor admixture could be performed and an upper limit of 0.6% was placed on any such admixture. Earlier work on the electromagnetic form factors of the proton was extended. Graduate students were active participants in all of these eperiments, which formed the basis for six PhD theses.

Segel, Ralph E. [Northwestern University] [Northwestern University

2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

414

Beyond ITER: Neutral beams for DEMO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the development of magnetically confined fusion as an economically sustainable power source, ITER is currently under construction. Beyond ITER is the DEMO programme in which the physics and engineering aspects of a future fusion power plant will be demonstrated. DEMO will produce net electrical power. The DEMO programme will be outlined and the role of neutral beams for heating and current drive will be described. In particular, the importance of the efficiency of neutral beam systems in terms of injected neutral beam power compared to wallplug power will be discussed. Options for improving this efficiency including advanced neutralisers and energy recovery are discussed.

McAdams, R

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Injected Beam Dynamics in SPEAR3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the top-off operation it is important to understand the time evolution of charge injected into the storage ring. The large-amplitude horizontal oscillation quickly filaments and decoheres, and in some cases exhibits non-linear x-y coupling before damping to the stored orbit. Similarly, in the longitudinal dimension, any mismatch in beam arrival time, beam energy or phase-space results in damped, non-linear synchrotron oscillations. In this paper we report on measurements of injection beam dynamics in the transverse and longitudinal planes using turn-by-turn BPMs, a fast-gated, image-intensified CCD camera and a Hamamatsu C5680 streak camera.

Corbett, Jeff; /SLAC; Fisher, Alan; /SLAC; Huang, Xiaobiao; /SLAC; Safranek, James; /SLAC; Westerman, Stuart; /SLAC; Cheng, Weixing; /Brookhaven; Mok, Walter; /Unlisted

2012-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

416

Non-Vacuum Electron Beam Welding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Original objectives of CRADA number BNL-01-03 between BNL and Acceleron, Inc., were to further develop the Plasma Window concept (a BNL invention covered by US Patent number 5,578,831), mate the Plasma Window to an existing electron beam welder to perform in-air electron beam welding, and mount the novel nonvacuum electron beam welder on a robot arm. Except for the last objective, all other goals were met or exceeded. Plasma Window design and operation was enhanced during the project, and it was successfully mated to a conventional4 kW electron beam welder. Unprecedented high quality non-vacuum electron beam . welding was demonstrated. Additionally, a new invention the Plasma Shield (US Patent number 7,075,030) that chemically and thermally shields a target object was set forth. Great interest in the new technology was shown by a number of industries and three arcs were sold for experimental use. However, the welding industry requested demonstration of high speed welding, which requires 100 kW electron beam welders. The cost of such a welder involved the need for additional funding. Therefore, some of the effort was directed towards Plasma Shield development. Although relatively a small portion of the R&D effort was spent on the Plasma Shield, some very encouraging results were obtained. Inair Plasma Shield was demonstrated. With only a partial shield, enhanced vacuum separation and cleaner welds were realized. And, electron beam propagation in atmosphere improved by a factor of about 3. Benefits to industry are the introduction of two new technologies. BNL benefited from licensing fee cash, from partial payment for employee salary, and from a new patent In addition to financial benefits, a new technology for physics studies was developed. Recommendations for future work are to develop an under-water plasma shield, perform welding with high-power electron beam:s, carry out other plasma shielded electron beam and laser processes. Potential benefits from further R&D are that various processes involving electron ion and laser beams that have now restrictions can, with the Plasma Shield be performed in practically any environment. For example, electron beam and laser welding can be performed under water, as well as, in situ repair of ship and nuclear reactor components. The plasma shield results in both thermal (since the plasma is hotter than the environment) and chemical shielding. The latter feature brings about in-vacuum process purity out of vacuum, and the thermal shielding aspect results in higher production rates.

Hershcovitch, Ady

2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

417

Discontinuous Buckling of Wide Beams and Metabeams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We uncover how nonlinearities dramatically influence the buckling of elastic beams by means of experiments, simulations and theory. We show that sufficiently wide, ordinary elastic beams exhibit discontinuous buckling, an unstable form of buckling where the post-buckling stiffness is negative. We develop a 1D model that matches our data and identify nonlinearity as the main cause for negative stiffness. Finally, we create nonlinear metamaterials that allow us to rationally design the (negative) post-buckling stiffness of metabeams, independently of beam thickness, and demonstrate discontinuous buckling for metabeams as slender as 1% numerically and 5% experimentally.

Corentin Coulais; Johannes T. B. Overvelde; Luuk A. Lubbers; Katia Bertoldi; Martin van Hecke

2014-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

418

Coating thermal noise for arbitrary shaped beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advanced LIGO's sensitivity will be limited by coating noise. Though this noise depends on beam shape, and though nongaussian beams are being seriously considered for advanced LIGO, no published analysis exists to compare the quantitative thermal noise improvement alternate beams offer. In this paper, we derive and discuss a simple integral which completely characterizes the dependence of coating thermal noise on shape. The derivation used applies equally well, with minor modifications, to all other forms of thermal noise in the low-frequency limit.

Richard O'Shaughnessy

2006-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

419

Fusion Induced by Radioactive Ion Beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The use of radioactive beams opens a new frontier for fusion studies. The coupling to the continuum can be explored with very loosely bound nuclei. Experiments were performed with beams of nuclei at or near the proton and neutron drip-lines to measure fusion and associated reactions in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier. In addition, the fusion yield is predicted to be enhanced in reactions involving very neutron-rich unstable nuclei. Experimental measurements were carried out to investigate if it is feasible to use such beams to produce new heavy elements. The current status of these experimental activities is given in this review.

J. F. Liang; C. Signorini

2005-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

420

Short rise time intense electron beam generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A generator for producing an intense relativisitc electron beam having a subnanosecond current rise time includes a conventional generator of intense relativistic electrons feeding into a short electrically conductive drift tube including a cavity containing a working gas at a low enough pressure to prevent the input beam from significantly ionizing the working gas. Ionizing means such as a laser simultaneously ionize the entire volume of working gas in the cavity to generate an output beam having a rise time less than one nanosecond.

Olson, C.L.

1984-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "undulator beam calculated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Materials Corrosion and Mitigation Strategies for APT: Corrosion of Tungsten in an 800 MeV Proton Beam at the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Materials Corrosion and Mitigation Strategies for APT: Corrosion of Tungsten in an 800 MeV Proton Beam at the Weapons Neutron Research Facility R. Scott Lillard, Darryl P. Butt Materials Corrosion corrosion. Energy deposition and thermal hydraulic calculations predict that the surface temperature

422

Impact of high energy high intensity proton beams on targets: Case studies for Super Proton Synchrotron and Large Hadron Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is designed to collide two proton beams with unprecedented particle energy of 7 TeV. Each beam comprises 2808 bunches and the separation between two neighboring bunches is 25 ns. The energy stored in each beam is 362 MJ, sufficient to melt 500 kg copper. Safety of operation is very important when working with such powerful beams. An accidental release of even a very small fraction of the beam energy can result in severe damage to the equipment. The machine protection system is essential to handle all types of possible accidental hazards; however, it is important to know about possible consequences of failures. One of the critical failure scenarios is when the entire beam is lost at a single point. In this paper we present detailed numerical simulations of the full impact of one LHC beam on a cylindrical solid carbon target. First, the energy deposition by the protons is calculated with the FLUKA code and this energy deposition is used in the BIG2 code to study the corresponding...

Tahir, N A; Shutov, A; Schmidt, R; Piriz, A R

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Infrared measurements and simulations of metal meshes in a focused beam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Infrared transmittance measurements of quasioptical filters are often restricted to a focused beam due to the optical design of the spectrometer. In contrast, numerical simulations assume an incident plane wave, which makes it difficult to compare theory with experimental data. We compare transmittance measurements with numerical simulations of square arrays of circular holes in 3-?m thick Cu sheets at angles of incidence from 0° to 20° for both s and p polarizations. These simple structures allow detailed tests of our electromagnetic simulation methods and show excellent agreement between theory and measurement. Measurements in a focused beam are accurately simulated by combining plane wave calculations over a range of angles that correspond to the focal ratio of the incident beam. Similar screens have been used as components of narrow bandpass filters for far-infrared astronomy, but these results show that the transmittance variations with angle of incidence and polarization limit their use to collimated beams at near normal incidence. The simulations are accurate enough to eliminate a costly trial-and-error approach to the design of more complex and useful quasioptical infrared filters and to predict their in-band performance and out-of-band blocking in focused beams.

Stewart, K. P., E-mail: ken.stewart@nrl.navy.mil [Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Möller, K. D.; Grebel, H. [Electrical Engineering Department, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Electronic Imaging Center, Newark, New Jersey 07102 (United States)

2014-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

424

Transverse Beam Spin Asymmetries in Forward-Angle Elastic Electron-Proton Scattering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have measured the beam-normal single-spin asymmetry in elastic scattering of transversely polarized 3 GeV electrons from unpolarized protons at Q{sup 2}=0.15, 0.25 (GeV/c){sup 2}. The results are inconsistent with calculations solely using the elastic nucleon intermediate state and generally agree with calculations with significant inelastic hadronic intermediate state contributions. A{sub n} provides a direct probe of the imaginary component of the 2{gamma} exchange amplitude, the complete description of which is important in the interpretation of data from precision electron-scattering experiments.

Armstrong, D. S.; Averett, T.; Bailey, S. L.; Finn, J. M.; Griffioen, K. A.; Moffit, B.; Phillips, S. K.; Secrest, J.; Sulkosky, V. [Department of Physics, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia 23187 (United States); Arvieux, J.; Bimbot, L.; Guler, H.; Lenoble, J.; Marchand, D.; Morlet, M.; Ong, S.; Van de Wiele, J. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire d'Orsay, CNRS/IN2P3, Universite Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Asaturyan, R.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Stepanyan, S. [Yerevan Physics Institute, Yerevan 375036 (Armenia)] (and others)

2007-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

425

Instrumentation and Beam Dynamics Study of Advanced Electron-Photon Facility in Indiana University  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced eLectron-PHoton fAcility (ALPHA) is a compact electron accelerator under construction and being commissioned at the Indiana University Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter (CEEM). In this thesis, we have studied the refurbished Cooler Injector Synchrotron (CIS) RF cavity using both the transmission line model and SUPERFISH simulation. Both low power and high power RF measurements have been carried out to characterize the cavity. Considering the performance limit of ferrite, we have designed a new ferrite loaded, co-axial quarter wave like cavity with similar structure but a more suitable ferrite material. We have also designed a traveling wave stripline kicker for fast extraction by POISSON and Microwave Studio. The strips geometry is trimmed to maximize the uniformity of the kicking field and match the impedance of the power cables. The time response simulation shows the kicker is fast enough for machine operation. The pulsed power supply requirement has also been specified. For the beam diagnosis in the longitudinal direction, we use a wideband Wall Gap Monitor (WGM) served in CIS. With proper shielding and amplification to get good WGM signal, we have characterized the injected and extracted beam signal in single pass commissioning, and also verified the debunching effect of the ALPHA storage ring. A modulation-demodulation signal processing method is developed to measure the current and longitudinal profile of injected beam. By scanning the dipole strength in the injection line, we have reconstructed the tomography of the longitudinal phase space of the LINAC beam. In the accumulation mode, ALPHA will be operated under a low energy and high current condition, where intra beam scattering (IBS) becomes a dominant effect on the beam emittance. A self consistent simulation, including IBS effect, gas scattering and linear coupling, has been carried out to calculate the emittance of the stored beam.

Luo, Tianhuan; /Indiana U.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Calculated structures and fluoride affinities for fluorides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is shown that SCF-MO calculations provide good estimates of the energies of the processes MF/sub n/ ..-->.. M/sup n+/ + nF/sup -/ where M/sup n+/ is an ion of a first- or second-row element in a closed-shell or s/sup 2/ configuration. The fluoride ion affinities are then calculated for a number of molecules and ions. Where comparison with experiment is possible, the agreement is generally good when allowance is made for experimental uncertainties. In favorable cases, accurate heats of formation may be calculated from fluoride affinities.

O'Keeffe, M.

1986-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

427

IAEA sodium void reactivity benchmark calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, the IAEA-1 992 ``Benchmark Calculation of Sodium Void Reactivity Effect in Fast Reactor Core`` problem is evaluated. The proposed design is a large axially heterogeneous oxide-fueled fast reactor as described in Section 2; the core utilizes a sodium plenum above the core to enhance leakage effects. The calculation methods used in this benchmark evaluation are described in Section 3. In Section 4, the calculated core performance results for the benchmark reactor model are presented; and in Section 5, the influence of steel and interstitial sodium heterogeneity effects is estimated.

Hill, R.N.; Finck, P.J.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

IAEA sodium void reactivity benchmark calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, the IAEA-1 992 Benchmark Calculation of Sodium Void Reactivity Effect in Fast Reactor Core'' problem is evaluated. The proposed design is a large axially heterogeneous oxide-fueled fast reactor as described in Section 2; the core utilizes a sodium plenum above the core to enhance leakage effects. The calculation methods used in this benchmark evaluation are described in Section 3. In Section 4, the calculated core performance results for the benchmark reactor model are presented; and in Section 5, the influence of steel and interstitial sodium heterogeneity effects is estimated.

Hill, R.N.; Finck, P.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Assessment of seismic margin calculation methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seismic margin review of nuclear power plants requires that the High Confidence of Low Probability of Failure (HCLPF) capacity be calculated for certain components. The candidate methods for calculating the HCLPF capacity as recommended by the Expert Panel on Quantification of Seismic Margins are the Conservative Deterministic Failure Margin (CDFM) method and the Fragility Analysis (FA) method. The present study evaluated these two methods using some representative components in order to provide further guidance in conducting seismic margin reviews. It is concluded that either of the two methods could be used for calculating HCLPF capacities. 21 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

Kennedy, R.P.; Murray, R.C.; Ravindra, M.K.; Reed, J.W.; Stevenson, J.D.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Use of computers for multicomponent distillation calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The corrected values for the b 's are best cal- i culated by multiplying (b. /d ) by (d. ) The compositions for each component in the vapor and liquid streams leaving plate j are calculated by use of the following equations. ('i/ i)ca ( i)co y. ji c Z (v... . . /b. ) (b. ) ji i ca i co i=1 , f a j x N+1 C (47-b) A temperature profile may be calculated by making either bubble or dew point calculations based on the compositions obtained by use of Equations (46) and (47). The specified distillate rate must...

Sullivan, Samuel Lane

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Effects of e-beam parameters on coherent electron cooling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coherent Electron Cooling (CeC) requires detailed control of the phase between the hadron an the FEL-amplified wave packet. This phase depends on local electron beam parameters such as the energy spread and the peak current. In this paper, we examine the effects of local density variations on the cooling rates for CeC. Coherent Electron Cooling (CeC) [1] is a new concept in intense, high energy hadron beamcooling, in which the Debye screened charge perturbation calculated in [2] is used to seed a high-gain free electron laser (FEL). Using delays to give the perturbing hadron an energy-dependent longitudinal displacement relative to its frequencymodulated charge perturbation, the hadron receives an energy-dependent kick which reduces its energy variation from the design energy. The equations of motion in [1] assume that the electron bunch is the same physical size as the hadron bunch, and has a homogeneous charge density across the entire bunch. In practice, the electron bunches will be much shorter than the hadron bunch, and this local spacial inhomogeneity in the charge distribution will alter the gain length of the FEL, resulting in both a change in the amplification of the initial signal and a phase shift. In this paper we consider these inhomogeneity effects, determining cooling equations for bunched beam CeC consistent with these effects and determining thresholds for the cooling parameters.

Webb, S.D.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Wang, G.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

432

Techniques for evaluation of E-beam evaporative processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High dynamic range video imaging of the molten pool surface has provided insight regarding process responses at the melt pool liquid-vapor interface. A water-cooled video camera provides continuous high resolution imaging of the pool surface from a low angle position within 20 cm of the liquid-vapor interface. From the vantage point, the e-beam footprint is clearly defined and melt pool free surface shape can be observed. Effects of changes in a beam footprint, power distribution, and sweep frequency on pool surface shape and stability of vaporization are immediately shown. Other events observed and recorded include: formation of the pool and dissipation of ``rafts`` on the pool surface during startup, behavior of feed material as it enters the pool, effects of feed configuration changes on mixing of feed entering the pool volume and behaviors of co-evaporated materials of different vapor pressures at the feed/pool boundary. When used in conjunction with laser vapor monitoring, correlation between pool surface phenomena and vaporizer performance has been identified. This video capability was used in verifying the titanium evaporation model results presented at this conference by confirming the calculated melt pool surface deformations caused by vapor pressure of the departing evaporant at the liquid-vapor interface.

Meier, T.C.; Nelson, C.M.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Entanglement of two-qubit photon beam by magnetic field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have studied the possibility of affecting the entanglement measure of 2-qubit system consisting of two photons with different fixed frequencies but with two arbitrary linear polarizations, moving in the same direction, by the help of an applied external magnetic field. The interaction between the magnetic field and the photons in our model is achieved through intermediate electrons that interact with both the photons and the magnetic field. The possibility of exact theoretical analysis of this scheme is based on known exact solutions that describe the interaction of an electron subjected to an external magnetic field (or a medium of electrons not interacting with each other) with a quantized field of two photons. We adapt these exact solutions to the case under consideration. Using explicit wave functions for the resulting electromagnetic field, we calculate the entanglement measure of the photon beam as a function of the applied magnetic field and parameters of the electron medium.

A. D. Levin; D. M. Gitman; R. C. Castro

2014-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

434

Vacancies in Al after pulsed electron beam melting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have used transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to study the retention of vacancies in Al after rapid melting and resolidification of a thin (approx. 3 ..mu..m) surface layer using a pulsed (approx.50 ns) electron beam. After pulsing and aging at room temperature, TEM examination showed dislocation loops, which are interpreted to be due to the coalescence of the quenched-in vacancies on )111) planes as is the case for the loops observed in earlier furnace quenching studies. Our results indicate that the rapid melting and resolidification leaves a high vacancy concentration (approx.100 ppm) in the resolidified Al. Heat transport calculations show that cooling rates for the pulse heated samples (approx.10/sup 8/ K/s) are much higher than those achieved by conventional quenching techniques (approx. 10/sup 4/ K/s).

Follstaedt, D.M.; Wampler, W.R.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Solenoidal Fields for Ion Beam Transport and Focusing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report we calculate time-independent fields of solenoidal magnets that are suitable for ion beam transport and focusing. There are many excellent Electricity and Magnetism textbooks that present the formalism for magnetic field calculations and apply it to simple geometries [1-1], but they do not include enough relevant detail to be used for designing a charged particle transport system. This requires accurate estimates of fringe field aberrations, misaligned and tilted fields, peak fields in wire coils and iron, external fields, and more. Specialized books on magnet design, technology, and numerical computations [1-2] provide such information, and some of that is presented here. The AIP Conference Proceedings of the US Particle Accelerator Schools [1-3] contain extensive discussions of design and technology of magnets for ion beams - except for solenoids. This lack may be due to the fact that solenoids have been used primarily to transport and focus particles of relatively low momenta, e.g. electrons of less than 50 MeV and protons or H- of less than 1.0 MeV, although this situation may be changing with the commercial availability of superconducting solenoids with up to 20T bore field [1-4]. Internal reports from federal laboratories and industry treat solenoid design in detail for specific applications. The present report is intended to be a resource for the design of ion beam drivers for Inertial Fusion Energy [1-5] and Warm Dense Matter experiments [1-6], although it should also be useful for a broader range of applications. The field produced by specified currents and material magnetization can always be evaluated by solving Maxwell's equations numerically, but it is also desirable to have reasonably accurate, simple formulas for conceptual system design and fast-running beam dynamics codes, as well as for general understanding. Most of this report is devoted to such formulas, but an introduction to the Tosca{copyright} code [1-7] and some numerical results obtained with it are also presented. Details of design, fabrication, installation, and operation of magnet systems are not included; here we are concerned with calculations that precede or supplement detailed design. Mathematical derivations are presented with only a moderate number of steps. While there is no claim of originality, except for various numerical approximations and a conceptual induction module design in section 20, many of the results and discussions are not readily available elsewhere. Our primary topic is axisymmetric solenoidal systems with no magnetic materials. These simplifying features allow useful analytical calculations, which occupy sections 2-13. Deviations from axisymmetry are considered in sections 14, 15, 21, 22, and 23 and the effects of magnetic materials are treated in sections 16-20. Since magnetic aberrations are mixed with geometric aberrations in computing ion orbits, section 22 on the ion equations of motion in an arbitrary field is included.

Lee, Edward P.; Leitner, Matthaeus

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Energy deposition studies for the LBNE beam absorber  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Results of detailed Monte Carlo energy deposition studies performed for the LBNE absorber core and the surrounding shielding with the MARS15 code are described. The model of the entire facility, that includes a pion-production target, focusing horns, target chase, decay channel, hadron absorber system -- all with corresponding radiation shielding -- was developed using the recently implemented ROOT-based geometry option in the MARS15 code. This option provides substantial flexibility and automation when developing complex geometry models. Both normal operation and accidental conditions were studied. Various design options were considered, in particular the following: (i) filling the decay pipe with air or helium; (ii) the absorber mask material and shape; (iii) the beam spoiler material and size. Results of detailed thermal calculations with the ANSYS code helped to select the most viable absorber design options.

Rakhno, Igor L; Tropin, Igor S

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Optical chirped beam amplification and propagation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A short pulse laser system uses dispersive optics in a chirped-beam amplification architecture to produce high peak power pulses and high peak intensities without the potential for intensity dependent damage to downstream optical components after amplification.

Barty, Christopher P.

2004-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

438

High Brightness Beam Applications: Energy Recovered Linacs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the first part of the paper some general statements are made regarding applications suitable for utilizing energy recovered linacs (ERLs) by contrasting their potential performance to that of single pass linacs and storage rings. As a result of their potential for extremely good beam quality in combination with high average beam current, ERLs have been used and considered as drivers of both free electron laser and partially coherent photon sources, from THz through X-rays; as a suitable technology for high energy electron cooling; and as a continuous or semi-continuous electron beam source for high energy colliders. At present, beam requirements tend to be highly matched to end use requirements. By reviewing some of the many examples which have either been reduced to practice, or are being explored presently, one can develop an appreciation for the wide range of parameters being considered in ERL applications.

Geoffrey A. Krafft

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

The Radioactive Beam Program at Argonne  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this talk I will present selected topics of the ongoing radioactive beam program at Argonne and discuss the capabilities of the CARIBU radioactive ion production facility as well as plans for construction of a novel superconducting solenoid spectrometer.

B. B. Back

2006-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

440

Scrap uranium recycling via electron beam melting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A program is underway at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to recycle scrap uranium metal. Currently, much of the material from forging and machining processes is considered radioactive waste and is disposed of by oxidation and encapsulation at significant cost. In the recycling process, uranium and uranium alloys in various forms will be processed by electron beam melting and continuously cast into ingots meeting applicable specifications for virgin material. Existing vacuum processing facilities at LLNL are in compliance with all current federal and state environmental, safety and health regulations for the electron beam melting and vaporization of uranium metal. One of these facilities has been retrofitted with an auxiliary electron beam gun system, water-cooled hearth, crucible and ingot puller to create an electron beam melt furnace. In this furnace, basic process R&D on uranium recycling will be performed with the goal of eventual transfer of this technology to a production facility.

McKoon, R.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "undulator beam calculated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Shear Behaviour of Concrete Beams Reinforced with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Construction R&D Facility ofthe University ofManitoba to test a total ofnine beams reinforced with GFRP and encouragement went beyond the academic roles. Many special thanks are extended to Dr. Kenneth. R. Hughes. His

442

Solar Power Beaming: From Space to Earth  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Harvesting solar energy in space and power beaming the collected energy to a receiver station on Earth is a very attractive way to help solve mankind's current energy and environmental problems. However, the colossal and expensive 'first step' required in achieving this goal has to-date stifled its initiation. In this paper, we will demonstrate that recent advance advances in laser and optical technology now make it possible to deploy a space-based system capable of delivering 1 MW of energy to a terrestrial receiver station, via a single unmanned commercial launch into Low Earth Orbit (LEO). Figure 1 depicts the overall concept of our solar power beaming system, showing a large solar collector in space, beaming a coherent laser beam to a receiving station on Earth. We will describe all major subsystems and provide technical and economic discussion to support our conclusions.

Rubenchik, A M; Parker, J M; Beach, R J; Yamamoto, R M

2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

443

Flow-through ion beam source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and an apparatus for forming a charge neutral ion beam which is useful in producing thin films of material on electrically conductive or non-conductive substrates are provided. 4 figs.

Springer, R.W.

1997-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

444

The Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Brookhaven National Lab has successfully developed a new pre-injector system, called the Electron Beam Ion Source, for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory science programs. The first of several planned improvemen

Brookhaven Lab

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

445

Electron gun jitter effects on beam bunching  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For routine operation of Beijing Electron Positron Collider II (BEPCII) linac, many factors may affect the beam bunching process directly or indirectly. We present the measurements and analyses of the gun timing jitter, gun high voltage jitter, and beam energy at the exit of the standard acceleration section of the linac quantitatively. Almost 80 mV and more than 200 ps of gun high voltage and time jitters have ever been measured, respectively. It was analyzed that the gun timing jitter produced severe effects on beam energy than the gun high voltage jitter, if the timing jitter exceeded 100 ps which eventually deteriorates both the beam performance and the injection rate to the storage ring.

Liu, M. S. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)] [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Iqbal, M., E-mail: muniqbal.chep@pu.edu.pk [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Centre for High Energy Physics, University of the Punjab, Lahore 45590 (Pakistan)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

446

Doublet III neutral beam power system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Doublet III neutral beam power system supplies pulsed power to the neutral beam injectors for plasma heating experiments on the Doublet III tokamak. The power supply system is connected to an ion source where the power is converted to an 80 kV, 80A, 0.5 sec beam of hydrogen ions at maximum power output. These energetic ions undergo partial neutralization via charge exchange in the beamline. The energetic neutral hydrogen atoms pass through the Doublet III toroidal and poloidal magnet fields and deposit their energy in the confined plasma. The unneutralized ions are deflected into a water-cooled dump. The entire system is interfaced through the neutral beam computer instrumentation and control system.

Nerem, A.; Beal, J.W.; Colleraine, A.P.; LeVine, F.H.; Pipkins, J.F.; Remsen, D.B. Jr.; Tooker, J.F.; Varga, H.J.; Franck, J.V.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

AGS fixed target program with nuclear beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recent approval of the beam transfer line from the Tandem Van de Graaf to the AGS signals the advent of a new era of Nuclear and Particle Physics at BNL. High Energy nuclear beams are expected to be available for experiments in 1986. I will discuss the direct link between the Tandems and the AGS. Two other proposed projects, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and the Synchrotron Booster, are discussed in another presentation to this conference.

Foley, K.J.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Ion beam processing of advanced electronic materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains research programs discussed at the materials research society symposia on ion beam processing of advanced electronic materials. Major topics include: shallow implantation and solid-phase epitaxy; damage effects; focused ion beams; MeV implantation; high-dose implantation; implantation in III-V materials and multilayers; and implantation in electronic materials. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases. (CBS)

Cheung, N.W.; Marwick, A.D.; Roberto, J.B. (eds.) (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA); International Business Machines Corp., Yorktown Heights, NY (USA). Thomas J. Watson Research Center; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

A numerical approach to beam deflections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Beam Deflections. (December 1974) Joel Ernest Lovell, B. S. , Texas ASM University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Prof. E. S. Holdr edge A numerical method for determining deflections of canti- lever and simply supported beams directly from their M/EI... de- flections due to shear is solvable analytically for many types of loadings and cross sectional variations. However, the solution of the equation is cumbersome for any situations where M/EI cannot be described as a continuous function of length...

Lovell, Joel Ernest

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Beam Coupling to Optical Scale Accelerating Structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current research efforts into structure based laser acceleration of electrons utilize beams from standard RF linacs. These beams must be coupled into very small structures with transverse dimensions comparable to the laser wavelength. To obtain decent transmission, a permanent magnet quadrupole (PMQ) triplet with a focusing gradient of 560 T/m is used to focus into the structure. Also of interest is the induced wakefield from the structure, useful for diagnosing potential accelerator structures or as novel radiation sources.

Sears, C.M.; Byer, R.L.; Colby, E.R.; Cowan, B.M.; Ischebeck, R.; Lincoln, M.R.; Siemann, R.H.; Spencer, J.E.; /SLAC; Plettner, T.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

2007-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

451

Beam Coupling to Optical Scale Accelerating Structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current research efforts into structure based laser acceleration of electrons utilize beams from standard RF linacs. These beams must be coupled into very small structures with transverse dimensions comparable to the laser wavelength. To obtain decent transmission, a permanent magnet quadrupole (PMQ) triplet with a focusing gradient of 560 T/m is used to focus into the structure. Also of interest is the induced wakefield from the structure, useful for diagnosing potential accelerator structures or as novel radiation sources.

Sears, Christopher M. S.; Colby, Eric R.; Cowan, Benjamin M.; Ischebeck, Rasmus; Lincoln, Melissa R.; Siemann, Robert H.; Spencer, James E. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Byer, Robert L.; Plettner, Tomas [Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

452

Beam dumping system and abort gap  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The performance of the beam dumping systems and the abort gap cleaning are reviewed in the context of the general machine protection system. Details of the commissioning experience and setting up, encountered equipment problems, the experience with and status of the eXternal Post Operational Checks (XPOC) and the importance of operational procedures are presented for the beam dumping system. The brief experience with the abort gap cleaning is also presented.

Uythoven, J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

High speed x-ray beam chopper  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fast, economical, and compact x-ray beam chopper with a small mass and a small moment of inertia whose rotation can be synchronized and phase locked to an electronic signal from an x-ray source and be monitored by a light beam is disclosed. X-ray bursts shorter than 2.5 microseconds have been produced with a jitter time of less than 3 ns.

McPherson, Armon (Oswego, IL); Mills, Dennis M. (Naperville, IL)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

SIS Calculator User Guide 1 What's Inside  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

..................................................................................................................2 Measurement of Soil Moisture by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to provide general potential water and energy savings estimates, the calculator creates water and energy savings estimates associated with implementing SIS on a particular field

455

Historical river flow rates for dose calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Annual average river flow rates are required input to the LADTAP Computer Code for calculating offsite doses from liquid releases of radioactive materials to the Savannah River. The source of information on annual river flow rates used in dose calculations varies, depending on whether calculations are for retrospective releases or prospective releases. Examples of these types of releases are: Retrospective - releases from routine operations (annual environmental reports) and short term release incidents that have occurred. Prospective - releases that might be expected in the future from routine or abnormal operation of existing or new facilities (EIS`s, EID`S, SAR`S, etc.). This memorandum provides historical flow rates at the downstream gauging station at Highway 301 for use in retrospective dose calculations and derives flow rate data for the Beaufort-Jasper and Port Wentworth water treatment plants.

Carlton, W.H.

1991-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

456

Essential Value, Pmax, and Omax Automated Calculator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Behavioral economic measures of demand are often calculated in sophisticated spreadsheet programs. Unfortunately, no closed form models for exact pmax (point of unit elasticity) and omax (response output at pmax) can be ...

Kaplan, Brent A.; Reed, Derek D.

2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

457

Medical physics calculations with MCNP: a primer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) specific absorbed fraction (SAF) values using the ORNL MIRD phantom, x-ray phototherapy effectiveness, prostate brachytherapy lifetime dose calculations, and a radiograph of the head using the Zubal head phantom. Also...

Lazarine, Alexis D

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

458

Apparatus and method for laser beam diagnosis  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method is disclosed for accurate, real time monitoring of the wavefront curvature of a coherent laser beam. Knowing the curvature, it can be quickly determined whether the laser beam is collimated, or focusing (converging), or de-focusing (diverging). The apparatus includes a lateral interferometer for forming an interference pattern of the laser beam to be diagnosed. The interference pattern is imaged to a spatial light modulator (SLM), whose output is a coherent laser beam having an image of the interference pattern impressed on it. The SLM output is focused to obtain the far-field diffraction pattern. A video camera, such as CCD, monitors the far-field diffraction pattern, and provides an electrical output indicative of the shape of the far-field pattern. Specifically, the far-field pattern comprises a central lobe and side lobes, whose relative positions are indicative of the radius of curvature of the beam. The video camera's electrical output may be provided to a computer which analyzes the data to determine the wavefront curvature of the laser beam.

Salmon, Jr., Joseph T. (Livermore, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Apparatus and method for laser beam diagnosis  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method are disclosed for accurate, real time monitoring of the wavefront curvature of a coherent laser beam. Knowing the curvature, it can be quickly determined whether the laser beam is collimated, or focusing (converging), or de-focusing (diverging). The apparatus includes a lateral interferometer for forming an interference pattern of the laser beam to be diagnosed. The interference pattern is imaged to a spatial light modulator (SLM), whose output is a coherent laser beam having an image of the interference pattern impressed on it. The SLM output is focused to obtain the far-field diffraction pattern. A video camera, such as CCD, monitors the far-field diffraction pattern, and provides an electrical output indicative of the shape of the far-field pattern. Specifically, the far-field pattern comprises a central lobe and side lobes, whose relative positions are indicative of the radius of curvature of the beam. The video camera's electrical output may be provided to a computer which analyzes the data to determine the wavefront curvature of the laser beam. 11 figures.

Salmon, J.T. Jr.

1991-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

460

Electron-beam furnace with magnetic stabilization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes an electron-beam comprising: a. An evacuable chamber having a port for coupling the chamber to vacuum pump means; b. a trough-shaped hearth within the chamber for holding material to be melted, the hearth having a spout for issuing a flow of molten material therefrom; c. a crucible positioned within the chamber for receiving molten material flowing from the hearth; d. one or more electron guns each for producing an energetic beam of electrons, each electron gun being positioned a relatively large distance away from the hearth and the crucible; e. magnetic beam deflection means forming an integral part of each electron gun for scanning and shaping the beam produced thereby across the hearth or the crucible; and f. magnetic means adjacent to the hearth and the crucible for producing a relatively weak magnetic field in the vicinity of the hearth and the crucible for preventing erratic deflections of the scanning electron beams without significantly altering the trajectories of such beams.

Harker, H.R.; Knecht, J.A. II

1986-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "undulator beam calculated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Full Counting Statistics of Stationary Particle Beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a general scheme for treating particle beams as many particle systems. This includes the full counting statistics and the requirements of Bose/Fermi symmetry. In the stationary limit, i.e., for longer and longer beams, the total particle number diverges, and a description in Fock space is no longer possible. We therefore extend the formalism to include stationary beams. These beams exhibit a well-defined "local" counting statistics, by which we mean the full counting statistics of all clicks falling into any given finite interval. We treat in detail a model of a source, creating particles in a fixed state, which then evolve under the free time evolution, and we determine the resulting stationary beam in the far field. In comparison to the one-particle picture we obtain a correction due to Bose/Fermi statistics, which depends on the emission rate. We also consider plane waves as stationary many particle states, and determine the distribution of intervals between successive clicks in such a beam.

J. Kiukas; A. Ruschhaupt; R. F. Werner

2011-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

462

Hartree-Fock calculations of nuclear masses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hartree-Fock calculations pertaining to the determination of nuclear binding energies throughout the whole chart of nuclides are reviewed. Such an approach is compared with other methods. Main techniques in use are shortly presented. Advantages and drawbacks of these calculations are also discussed with a special emphasis on the extrapolation towards nuclei far from the stability valley. Finally, a discussion of some selected results from light to superheavy nuclei, is given.