National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for undp-low emission climate

  1. Trinidad and Tobago-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThin Film SolarTown(LECBP) | Open Energy Information EU-UNDP Low

  2. UNDP-Low Emission Climate Resilient Development Strategies (LECRDS)

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin, New York: EnergyU.S. EPA Region 10 Jump3 -Low Carbon

  3. UNDP-Low Emission Climate Resilient Development Strategies (LECRDS...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    support of the preparation of LECRDS. In a flexible and non-prescriptive manner, they offer detailed step-by-step guidance for the identification of key stakeholders and...

  4. Democratic Republic of Congo-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner...

  5. UNDP-Low Emission Capacity Building Programme | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (Utility Company) Jump to:TucsonLLC Jump to:UDIGEF Fuel Cell

  6. Zambia-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEtGeorgia:Illinois:WizardYates County, NewYorktownZ-AxisZOPF GmbH JumpEnergy

  7. Uganda-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin, New York: EnergyU.S. EPA RegionforUStoNRCSInformationEnergy

  8. Trinidad and Tobago-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind Topics Background analysis, Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, - Energy...

  9. Ghana-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable UrbanKentucky:BoreOpen EnergyGermencik GeothermalGeysir EuropePFAN)

  10. Democratic Republic of Congo-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstruments IncMississippi:Delta Electric PowerSupport | Open

  11. Mexico-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: Energy ResourcesDec 2005 WindPRO is developed byEnergy Information EU-UNDP

  12. Moldova-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: Energy ResourcesDec(Pritchett, 2004) | OpenMohaveEnergy Information

  13. Chile-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLCLtd Jump to:Changing WorldCalifornia: Energy Resources JumpEnergy

  14. China-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLCLtd Jump to:ChangingCNE Jump to:New EnergyPFAN) | OpenDanishEnergy

  15. Indonesia-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA JumpDuimenMaking Energy Efficiencyimplementation of

  16. Tanzania-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeter BatterySolarfinMarketMemberI P RuralTaigaValleyEnergy

  17. Thailand-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJ AutomationTexas/Wind Resources < Texas Jump to:Energy

  18. Vietnam-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThin FilmUnitedVairexVert Investment Group Jump(Majer,ECleanEnergy

  19. Kenya-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View NewGuam:onItronKanosh TownKenetech/Wintech WindPageEnergy

  20. Lebanon-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History ViewInformationWinds Jump to:Laredo RidgeLaymanJersey: EnergyEnergy

  1. Malaysia-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050EnermarGenerationMainsa

  2. Morocco-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII Jump to: navigation, searchsource History ViewMoeOhio:Light Jump to:Energy

  3. Argentina-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: EnergyYork Jump| OpenExploration

  4. Bhutan-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: EnergyYorkColoradoBelcher HomesBeverly, Massachusetts:

  5. Colombia-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower Ventures Jump to: navigation, searchCloverColado(Redirected(CTI PFAN)

  6. Ecuador-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower VenturesInformation9)askDoubleEERESodaEconomicEcowatt Design

  7. Egypt-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePowerEdisto Electric Coop, Inc Jump to: navigation, searchEgegik LightEnergy

  8. Peru-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly Smart GridNorthInformationPersu Mobility was Venture

  9. Philippines-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly Smart GridNorthInformationPersu Mobility|Report,Network

  10. 8, 34053430, 2008 Climate and emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ACPD 8, 3405­3430, 2008 Climate and emission changes over Canada and Mexico E. Tagaris et al. Title Chemistry and Physics Discussions The role of climate and emission changes in future air quality over.russell@ce.gatech.edu) 3405 #12;ACPD 8, 3405­3430, 2008 Climate and emission changes over Canada and Mexico E. Tagaris et al

  11. Uncertainty in emissions projections for climate models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webster, Mort David.; Babiker, Mustafa H.M.; Mayer, Monika.; Reilly, John M.; Harnisch, Jochen.; Hyman, Robert C.; Sarofim, Marcus C.; Wang, Chien.

    Future global climate projections are subject to large uncertainties. Major sources of this uncertainty are projections of anthropogenic emissions. We evaluate the uncertainty in future anthropogenic emissions using a ...

  12. Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: Emission factors Shawn Urbanski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: Emission factors Shawn Urbanski Missoula Fire burning Greenhouse gases Emission factors a b s t r a c t While the vast majority of carbon emitted mixture of gases and aerosols. Primary emissions include sig- nificant amounts of CH4 and aerosol (organic

  13. Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions for Climate Stabilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions for Climate Stabilization: Framing Regional Options L A U R A S C reduction of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by as much as 80% by 2050. Subnational efforts to cut The call to cut global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by up to 80% below 2000 levels, which researchers

  14. CLIMATIC CHANGE, GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS, FUTURE CLIMATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bateman, Ian J.

    trends over India, greenhouse gas emissions due to energy consumption, forest and land-use changes the development of renewable, non- conventional energy sources. In all cases, serious institutional barriers an FOR INDIA by Pitta Govinda Rao, Mick Kelly, Mike Hulme and Govindarajan Srinivasan CSERGE Working Paper GEC

  15. Emissions pathways, climate change, and impacts on California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Emissions pathways, climate change, and impacts on California Katharine Hayhoea,b , Daniel Cayanc emission pathways we choose. Here we explore the implications of the highest and lowest Intergovern- mental Panel on Climate Change emissions pathways for climate change and associated impacts in California

  16. Far-infrared surface emissivity and climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feldman, Daniel R.; Collins, William D.; Pincus, Robert; Huang, Xianglei; Chen, Xiuhong

    2014-11-03

    Presently, there are no global measurement constraints on the surface emissivity at wavelengths longer than 15 ?m, even though this surface property in this far-IR region has a direct impact on the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) and infrared cooling rates where the column precipitable water vapor (PWV) is less than 1 mm. Such dry conditions are common for high-altitude and high-latitude locations, with the potential for modeled climate to be impacted by uncertain surface characteristics. This paper explores the sensitivity of instantaneous OLR and cooling rates to changes in far-IR surface emissivity and how this unconstrained property impacts climate model projections. At high latitudes and altitudes, a 0.05 change in emissivity due to mineralogy and snow grain size can cause a 1.8–2.0 W m?² difference in the instantaneous clear-sky OLR. A variety of radiative transfer techniques have been used to model the far-IR spectral emissivities of surface types defined by the International Geosphere-Biosphere Program. Incorporating these far-IR surface emissivities into the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 8.5 scenario of the Community Earth System Model leads to discernible changes in the spatial patterns of surface temperature, OLR, and frozen surface extent. The model results differ at high latitudes by as much as 2°K, 10 W m?², and 15%, respectively, after only 25 y of integration. The calculated difference in far-IR emissivity between ocean and sea ice of between 0.1 and 0.2, suggests the potential for a far-IR positive feedback for polar climate change.

  17. Far-infrared surface emissivity and climate

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Feldman, Daniel R.; Collins, William D.; Pincus, Robert; Huang, Xianglei; Chen, Xiuhong

    2014-11-03

    Presently, there are no global measurement constraints on the surface emissivity at wavelengths longer than 15 ?m, even though this surface property in this far-IR region has a direct impact on the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) and infrared cooling rates where the column precipitable water vapor (PWV) is less than 1 mm. Such dry conditions are common for high-altitude and high-latitude locations, with the potential for modeled climate to be impacted by uncertain surface characteristics. This paper explores the sensitivity of instantaneous OLR and cooling rates to changes in far-IR surface emissivity and how this unconstrained property impacts climate modelmore »projections. At high latitudes and altitudes, a 0.05 change in emissivity due to mineralogy and snow grain size can cause a 1.8–2.0 W m?² difference in the instantaneous clear-sky OLR. A variety of radiative transfer techniques have been used to model the far-IR spectral emissivities of surface types defined by the International Geosphere-Biosphere Program. Incorporating these far-IR surface emissivities into the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 8.5 scenario of the Community Earth System Model leads to discernible changes in the spatial patterns of surface temperature, OLR, and frozen surface extent. The model results differ at high latitudes by as much as 2°K, 10 W m?², and 15%, respectively, after only 25 y of integration. The calculated difference in far-IR emissivity between ocean and sea ice of between 0.1 and 0.2, suggests the potential for a far-IR positive feedback for polar climate change.« less

  18. Purdue Climate Change Research Center Emissions Trading Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purdue Climate Change Research Center Emissions Trading Workshop Introduction and Overview manner. Workshop rather than conference. #12;What is Emissions Trading? (or "Cap and Trade") · Cap & Enforcement · Measurement, Reporting, and Verification (MRV) mechanisms for reductions #12;Five Emissions

  19. Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: U.S. emissions inventories Narasimhan K. Larkin a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: U.S. emissions inventories Narasimhan K. Larkin a: Fire emissions Emissions inventories Greenhouse gases a b s t r a c t Emissions from wildland fire fire emissions change considerably due to fluctuations from year to year with overall fire season

  20. Impact of Heavy Duty Vehicle Emissions Reductions on Global Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Thomson, Allison M.

    2010-08-01

    The impact of a specified set of emissions reductions from heavy duty vehicles on climate change is calculated using the MAGICC 5.3 climate model. The integrated impact of the following emissions changes are considered: CO2, CH4, N2O, VOC, NOx, and SO2. This brief summarizes the assumptions and methods used for this calculation.

  1. Interactions Among Emissions, Atmospheric Chemistry, and Climate Change: Implications for Future Trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Interactions Among Emissions, Atmospheric Chemistry, and Climate Change: Implications for Future emissions, atmospheric chemistry, and climate, we have conducted a series of simulations on 120-year time emissions and different assumptions for chemistry and climate model parameters. To specifically identify

  2. CALIFORNIA CLIMATE POLICY MODELING (CCPM) DIALOG Greenhouse Gas Emissions Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    H2 CALIFORNIA CLIMATE POLICY MODELING (CCPM) DIALOG Greenhouse Gas Emissions Modeling ­ California goals of criteria pollutant and GHG emission reduction. · Modelers need to work with policy makers more to policy-makers and stakeholders. 5 #12;Greenhouse Gas Emissions Modeling ­ California 2030 #12;

  3. 1Emissions Trading Workshop Summary Report Purdue Climate Change Research Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1Emissions Trading Workshop Summary Report PCCRC Purdue Climate Change Research Center EMISSIONS TRADING WORKSHOP Purdue University West Lafayette, Indiana Friday April 30, 2010 SUMMARY REPORT #12;#12;Purdue Climate Change Research Center EMISSIONS TRADING WORKSHOP Purdue University West

  4. Climate change: Clinton affirms binding emissions reduction policy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fairley, P.

    1996-12-04

    In Australia last month President Clinton called for an international agreement to negotiate {open_quotes}legally binding commitments to fight climate change.{close_quotes} His comments affirmed the line the Administration adopted in July and lent prominence to the effort to bring about a treaty by December 1997. Environmentalists welcomed Clinton`s comments, but industry response is divided. The Global Climate Coalition (Washington), of which CMA is a member, has tried to slow negotiations by questioning the scientific consensus on climate change and suggesting {open_quotes}serious damage to the American economy{close_quotes} could result from emissions reduction.

  5. CEQ Issues Revised Draft NEPA Guidance on GHG Emissions and Climate...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Revised Draft NEPA Guidance on GHG Emissions and Climate Change CEQ Issues Revised Draft NEPA Guidance on GHG Emissions and Climate Change March 3, 2015 - 10:37am Addthis CEQ...

  6. Future CO2 Emissions and Climate Change from Existing Energy Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, SJ; Caldeira, K; Matthews, HD

    2010-01-01

    Future CO 2 Emissions and Climate Change from Existing Energynon-energy emissions could diminish in the future. In viewfuture CO 2 emissions is much greater in China, because China’s energy

  7. Sensitivity of Multi-gas Climate Policy to Emission Metrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Steven J.; Karas, Joseph F.; Edmonds, James A.; Eom, Jiyong; Mizrahi, Andrew H.

    2013-04-01

    Multi-gas greenhouse emission targets require that different emissions be combined into an aggregate total. The Global Warming Potential (GWP) index is currently used for this purpose, despite various criticisms of the underlying concept. It is not possible to uniquely define a single metric that perfectly captures the different impacts of emissions of substances with widely disparate atmospheric lifetimes, which leads to a wide range of possible index values. We examine the sensitivity of emissions and climate outcomes to the value of the index used to aggregate methane emissions using a technologically detailed integrated assessment model. We find that the sensitivity to index value is of order 4-14% in terms of methane emissions and 2% in terms of total radiative forcing, using index values between 4 and 70 for methane, with larger regional differences in some cases. The sensitivity to index value is much higher in economic terms, with total 2-gas mitigation cost decreasing 4-5% for a lower index and increasing 10-13% for a larger index, with even larger changes if the emissions reduction targets are small. The sensitivity to index value also depends on the assumed maximum amount of mitigation available in each sector. Evaluation of the maximum mitigation potential for major sources of non-CO2 greenhouse gases would greatly aid analysis

  8. Impact of emissions, chemistry, and climate on atmospheric carbon monoxide : 100-year predictions from a global chemistry-climate model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chien.; Prinn, Ronald G.

    The possible trends for atmospheric carbon monoxide in the next 100 yr have been illustrated using a coupled atmospheric chemistry and climate model driven by emissions predicted by a global economic development model. ...

  9. How Climate Efficient Is Tourism in Switzerland? An Assessment of Tourism's Carbon Dioxide Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    climate efficiency as the amount of carbon dioxide emissions per generated added value. This conceptHow Climate Efficient Is Tourism in Switzerland? An Assessment of Tourism's Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Relation to Its Added Value Diploma Thesis Department of Environmental Sciences ETH Zurich Ana

  10. Evaluation of air pollutant emission reduction strategies in the context of climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menut, Laurent

    Evaluation of air pollutant emission reduction strategies in the context of climate change Bertrand is a key issue to understand how climate change affects air pollution The global climate fields issued from changes is expected to have a significant impact on air quality. The main meteorological parameters

  11. Sensitivity of China's ozone air quality to 2000-2050 global changes of1 climate and emissions2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shiliang

    1 Sensitivity of China's ozone air quality to 2000-2050 global changes of1 climate and emissions2 3 the effect on China's ozone air quality from 2000-2050 global15 changes in climate and anthropogenic emissions of ozone precursors. The climate and16 emission effect in combination will increase afternoon mean

  12. While future changes in emission are the largest uncertainty on future climate change, another

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan, Richard P.

    While future changes in emission are the largest uncertainty on future climate change, another. Above, the thick lines show different possible future scenarios (Representative Concentration Pathways) ranging from low emission (RCP2.6) up to high emission (RCP 8.5) which explain a large range in future

  13. Climate Change and Emissions Impacts on Atmospheric PAH Transport to the Arctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yanxu

    We investigate effects of 2000–2050 emissions and climate changes on the atmospheric transport of three polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs): phenanthrene (PHE), pyrene (PYR), and benzo[a]pyrene (BaP). We use the GEOS-Chem ...

  14. Assessing ``Dangerous Climate Change'': Required Reduction of Carbon Emissions to Protect Young People,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida, United States of America, 9 Marine Institute, PlymouthC fossil fuel emissions and 100 GtC storage in the biosphere and soil would keep climate close fuel emissions, given current knowledge of the consequences, would be an act of extraordinary witting

  15. Primary aluminum production : climate policy, emissions and costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harnisch, Jochen.; Sue Wing, Ian.; Jacoby, Henry D.; Prinn, Ronald G.

    Climate policy regarding perfluorocarbons (PFCs) may have a significant influence on investment decisions in the production of primary aluminum. This work demonstrates an integrated analysis of the effectiveness and likely ...

  16. Sensitivity of air quality to potential future climate change and emissions in the United1 States and major cities2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nenes, Athanasios

    1 Sensitivity of air quality to potential future climate change and emissions in the United1 States and future air quality is compared for the years 2006-2010 and17 2048-2052 over the contiguous United States affected by changes in climate, land use and pollutant38 emissions [Weaver et al., 2009]. Predictions

  17. Climate-Resilient Low Emission Development in Bangladesh (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, A.; Sandor, D.; Butheau, M.

    2013-11-01

    Bangladesh is widely considered to be one of the nations most threatened by climate change. With two-thirds of the country less than 20 feet above sea level, the intrusion of salt into freshwater wells, frequent flooding, and the displacement of people from their homes is an ongoing threat. At the same time, the country's cities are rapidly growing, and the demand for energy is increasing at a corresponding rate.

  18. Non-Kyoto Radiative Forcing in Long-Run Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Climate Change Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, Steven K.; Richels, Richard G.; Smith, Steven J.; Riahi, Keywan; Stefler, Jessica; Van Vuuren, Detlef

    2014-04-27

    Climate policies designed to achieve climate change objectives must consider radiative forcing from the Kyoto greenhouse gas, as well as other forcing constituents, such as aerosols and tropospheric ozone. Net positive forcing leads to global average temperature increases. Modeling of non-Kyoto forcing is a relatively new component of climate management scenarios. Five of the nineteen models in the EMF-27 Study model both Kyoto and non-Kyoto forcing. This paper describes and assesses current non-Kyoto radiative forcing modeling within these integrated assessment models. The study finds negative forcing from aerosols masking significant positive forcing in reference non-climate policy projections. There are however large differences across models in projected non-Kyoto emissions and forcing, with differences stemming from differences in relationships between Kyoto and non-Kyoto emissions and fundamental differences in modeling structure and assumptions. Air pollution and non-Kyoto forcing decline in the climate policy scenarios. However, non-Kyoto forcing appears to be influencing mitigation results, including allowable carbon dioxide emissions, and further evaluation is merited. Overall, there is substantial uncertainty related to non-Kyoto forcing that must be considered.

  19. Quantifying Climate Feedbacks from Abrupt Changes in High-Latitude Trace-Gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlosser, Courtney Adam; Walter-Anthony, Katey; Zhuang, Qianlai; Melillo, Jerry

    2013-04-26

    Our overall goal was to quantify the potential for threshold changes in natural emission rates of trace gases, particularly methane and carbon dioxide, from pan-arctic terrestrial systems under the spectrum of anthropogenically forced climate warming, and the extent to which these emissions provide a strong feedback mechanism to global climate warming. This goal is motivated under the premise that polar amplification of global climate warming will induce widespread thaw and degradation of the permafrost, and would thus cause substantial changes in the extent of wetlands and lakes, especially thermokarst (thaw) lakes, over the Arctic. Through a coordinated effort of field measurements, model development, and numerical experimentation with an integrated assessment model framework, we have investigated the following hypothesis: There exists a climate-warming threshold beyond which permafrost degradation becomes widespread and thus instigates strong and/or sharp increases in methane emissions (via thermokarst lakes and wetland expansion). These would outweigh any increased uptake of carbon (e.g. from peatlands) and would result in a strong, positive feedback to global climate warming.

  20. UNDP-Low Carbon Portal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin, New York: EnergyU.S. EPA Region 10 Jump3 -Low Carbon Portal

  1. LEDS Global Partnership in Action: Advancing Climate-Resilient Low Emission Development Around the World (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-11-01

    Many countries around the globe are designing and implementing low emission development strategies (LEDS). These LEDS seek to achieve social, economic, and environmental development goals while reducing long-term greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and increasing resiliency to climate change impacts. The LEDS Global Partnership (LEDS GP) harnesses the collective knowledge and resources of more than 120 countries and international donor and technical organizations to strengthen climate-resilient low emission development efforts around the world.

  2. Emission Regulations Reduced Impact of Climate Change in CA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES ScienceInformation Company NamenewEmailEmergencyEmission

  3. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Climate Action Partnership. Contribution of Food Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    similar to the Land and Food Systems (LFS) Orchard Garden, 0.019 tons of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) emissions an external source. This study attempts to quantify the GHG emissions from the transportation of the food Partnership. Contribution of Food Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reductions: Moving UBC Beyond Climate Neutral

  4. Anthropogenic NOx emissions alter the intrinsic water-use efficiency (WUEi) for Quercus cerris stands under Mediterranean climate conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mencuccini, Maurizio

    Anthropogenic NOx emissions alter the intrinsic water-use efficiency (WUEi) for Quercus cerris Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JN, United Kingdom NOx emissions enhance WUEi for a Mediterranean tree species rings for assessing changes in WUEi; while the influence of climate and NOx emission was explored

  5. The Impact of Near-term Climate Policy Choices on Technology and Emissions Transition Pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eom, Jiyong; Edmonds, James A.; Krey, Volker; Johnson, Nils; Longden, Thomas; Luderer, Gunnar; Riahi, Keywan; Van Vuuren, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the implications of delays associated with currently formulated climate policies (compared to optimal policies) for long-term transition pathways to limit climate forcing to 450ppm CO2e on the basis of the AMPERE Work Package 2 model comparison study. The paper highlights the critical importance of the 2030-2050 period for ambitious mitigation strategies. In this period, the most rapid shift to non-greenhouse gas emitting technology occurs. In the delayed response emissions mitigation scenarios, an even faster transition rate in this period is required to compensate for the additional emissions before 2030. Our physical deployment measures indicate that, without CCS, technology deployment rates in the 2030-2050 period would become considerably high. Yet the presence of CCS greatly alleviates the challenges to the transition particularly after the delayed climate policies. The results also highlight the critical role that bioenergy and CO2 capture and storage (BECCS) could play. If this technology is available, transition pathways exceed the emissions budget in the mid-term, removing the excess with BECCS in the long term. Excluding either BE or CCS from the technology portfolio implies that emission reductions need to take place much earlier.

  6. Impacts of Future Climate and Emission Changes on U.S. Air Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penrod, Ashley; Zhang, Yang; Wang, K.; Wu, Shiang Yuh; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2014-06-01

    Changes in climate and emissions will affect future air quality. In this work, simulations of present (2001-2005) and future (2026-2030) regional air quality are conducted with the newly released CMAQ version 5.0 to examine the individual and combined impacts of simulated future climate and anthropogenic emission projections on air quality over the U.S. Current (2001-2005) meteorological and chemical predictions are evaluated against observational data to assess the model’s capability in reproducing the seasonal differences. Overall, WRF and CMAQ perform reasonably well. Increased temperatures (up to 3.18 °C) and decreased ventilation (up to 157 m in planetary boundary layer height) are found in both future winter and summer, with more prominent changes in winter. Increases in future temperatures result in increased isoprene and terpene emissions in winter and summer, driving the increase in maximum 8-h average O3 (up to 5.0 ppb) over the eastern U.S. in winter while decreases in NOx emissions drive the decrease in O3 over most of the U.S. in summer. Future concentrations of PM2.5 in winter and summer and many of its components including organic matter in winter, ammonium and nitrate in summer, and sulfate in winter and summer, decrease due to decreases in primary anthropogenic emissions and the concentrations of secondary anthropogenic pollutants and increased precipitation in winter. Future winter and summer dry and wet deposition fluxes are spatially variable and increase with increasing surface resistance and precipitation (e.g., NH4+ and NO3- dry and wet deposition fluxes increase in winter over much of the U.S.), respectively, and decrease with a decrease in ambient particulate concentrations (e.g., SO42- dry and wet deposition fluxes decrease over the eastern U.S. in summer and winter). Sensitivity simulations show that anthropogenic emission projections dominate over changes in climate in their impacts on the U.S. air quality in the near future. Changes in some regions/species, however, are dominated by climate and/or both climate and anthropogenic emissions, especially in future years that are marked by meteorological conditions conducive to poor air quality.

  7. Predicted change in global secondary organic aerosol concentrations in response to future climate, emissions, and land use change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heald, C. L.; Henze, D. K.; Horowitz, L. W.; Feddema, Johannes J.; Lamarque, J. F.; Guenther, A.; Hess, P. G.; Vitt, F.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Goldstein, A. H.; Fung, I.

    2008-03-01

    The sensitivity of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) concentration to changes in climate and emissions is investigated using a coupled global atmosphere-land model driven by the year 2100 IPCC A1B scenario predictions. The Community Atmosphere Model...

  8. 20th-Century Industrial Black Carbon Emissions Altered Arctic Climate Forcing Joseph R. McConnell,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saltzman, Eric

    20th-Century Industrial Black Carbon Emissions Altered Arctic Climate Forcing Joseph R. Mc since 1788 as a result of boreal forest fires and industrial activities. Beginning about 1850, industrial emissions resulted in a seven-fold increase in ice core BC concentrations with most change

  9. International potential of IGCC technology for use in reducing global warming and climate change emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lau, F.S.

    1996-12-31

    High efficiency advanced coal-based technologies such as Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) that can assist in reducing CO{sub 2} emissions which contribute to Global Warming and Climate Change are becoming commercially available. U-GAS is an advanced gasification technology that can be used in many applications to convert coal in a high efficiency manner that will reduce the total amount of CO{sub 2} produced by requiring less coal-based fuel per unit of energy output. This paper will focus on the status of the installation and performance of the IGT U-GAS gasifiers which were installed at the Shanghai Cooking and Chemical Plant General located in Shanghai, China. Its use in future IGCC project for the production of power and the benefits of IGCC in reducing CO{sub 2} emissions through its high efficiency operation will be discussed.

  10. CO2 emissions mitigation and fossil fuel markets: Dynamic and international aspects of climate policies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, Nico; Bosetti, Valentina; Hamdi-Cherif, Meriem; Kitous, Alban; McCollum, David; Mejean, Aurelie; Rao, Shilpa; Turton, Hal; Paroussos, Leonidas; Ashina, Shuichi; Calvin, Katherine V.; Wada, Kenichi; Van Vuuren, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores a multi-model scenario ensemble to assess the impacts of idealized and non-idealized climate change stabilization policies on fossil fuel markets. Under idealized conditions climate policies significantly reduce coal use in the short- and long-term. Reductions in oil and gas use are much smaller, particularly until 2030, but revenues decrease much more because oil and gas prices are higher and decrease with mitigation. A first deviation from the optimal transition pathway relaxes global emission targets until 2030, in accordance with the Copenhagen pledges and regionally-specific low-carbon technology targets. Fossil fuel markets revert back to the no-policy case: though coal use increases strongest, revenue gains are higher for oil and gas. To balance the carbon budget over the 21st century, the long-term reallocation of fossil fuels is significantly larger - twice and more - than the short-term distortion. This amplifying effect results from coal lock-in and inter-fuel substitution effects. The second deviation from the optimal transition pathway relaxes the global participation assumption. The result here is less clear cut across models, as we find carbon leakage effects ranging from positive to negative because leakage and substitution patterns of coal, oil, and gas differ. In summary, distortions of fossil fuel markets resulting from relaxed short-term global emission targets are more important and less uncertain than the issue of carbon leakage from early mover action.

  11. CO? emission mitigation and fossil fuel markets: Dynamic and international aspects of climate policies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, Nico; Bosetti, Valentina; Hamdi-Cherif, Meriem; Kitous, Alban; McCollum, David; Méjean, Aurélie; Rao, Shilpa; Turton, Hal; Paroussos, Leonidas; Ashina, Shuichi; Calvin, Katherine; Wada, Kenichi; van Vuuren, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores a multi-model scenario ensemble to assess the impacts of idealized and non-idealized climate change stabilization policies on fossil fuel markets. Under idealized conditions climate policies significantly reduce coal use in the short- and long-term. Reductions in oil and gas use are much smaller, particularly until 2030, but revenues decrease much more because oil and gas prices are higher than coal prices. A first deviation from optimal transition pathways is delayed action that relaxes global emission targets until 2030 in accordance with the Copenhagen pledges. Fossil fuel markets revert back to the no-policy case: though coal use increases strongest, revenue gains are higher for oil and gas. To balance the carbon budget over the 21st century, the long-term reallocation of fossil fuels is significantly larger—twice and more—than the short-term distortion. This amplifying effect results from coal lock-in and inter-fuel substitution effects to balance the full-century carbon budget. The second deviation from the optimal transition pathway relaxes the global participation assumption. The result here is less clear-cut across models, as we find carbon leakage effects ranging from positive to negative because trade and substitution patterns of coal, oil, and gas differ across models. In summary, distortions of fossil fuel markets resulting from relaxed short-term global emission targets are more important and less uncertain than the issue of carbon leakage from early mover action.

  12. CO? emission mitigation and fossil fuel markets: Dynamic and international aspects of climate policies

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bauer, Nico; Bosetti, Valentina; Hamdi-Cherif, Meriem; Kitous, Alban; McCollum, David; Méjean, Aurélie; Rao, Shilpa; Turton, Hal; Paroussos, Leonidas; Ashina, Shuichi; et al

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores a multi-model scenario ensemble to assess the impacts of idealized and non-idealized climate change stabilization policies on fossil fuel markets. Under idealized conditions climate policies significantly reduce coal use in the short- and long-term. Reductions in oil and gas use are much smaller, particularly until 2030, but revenues decrease much more because oil and gas prices are higher than coal prices. A first deviation from optimal transition pathways is delayed action that relaxes global emission targets until 2030 in accordance with the Copenhagen pledges. Fossil fuel markets revert back to the no-policy case: though coal use increasesmore »strongest, revenue gains are higher for oil and gas. To balance the carbon budget over the 21st century, the long-term reallocation of fossil fuels is significantly larger—twice and more—than the short-term distortion. This amplifying effect results from coal lock-in and inter-fuel substitution effects to balance the full-century carbon budget. The second deviation from the optimal transition pathway relaxes the global participation assumption. The result here is less clear-cut across models, as we find carbon leakage effects ranging from positive to negative because trade and substitution patterns of coal, oil, and gas differ across models. In summary, distortions of fossil fuel markets resulting from relaxed short-term global emission targets are more important and less uncertain than the issue of carbon leakage from early mover action.« less

  13. CO2 emission mitigation and fossil fuel markets: Dynamic and international aspects of climate policies

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bauer, Nico; Bosetti, Valentina; Hamdi-Cherif, Meriem; Kitous, Alban; McCollum, David; Méjean, Aurélie; Rao, Shilpa; Turton, Hal; Paroussos, Leonidas; Ashina, Shuichi; et al

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores a multi-model scenario ensemble to assess the impacts of idealized and non-idealized climate change stabilization policies on fossil fuel markets. Under idealized conditions climate policies significantly reduce coal use in the short- and long-term. Reductions in oil and gas use are much smaller, particularly until 2030, but revenues decrease much more because oil and gas prices are higher than coal prices. A first deviation from optimal transition pathways is delayed action that relaxes global emission targets until 2030 in accordance with the Copenhagen pledges. Fossil fuel markets revert back to the no-policy case: though coal use increasesmore »strongest, revenue gains are higher for oil and gas. To balance the carbon budget over the 21st century, the long-term reallocation of fossil fuels is significantly larger—twice and more—than the short-term distortion. This amplifying effect results from coal lock-in and inter-fuel substitution effects to balance the full-century carbon budget. The second deviation from the optimal transition pathway relaxes the global participation assumption. The result here is less clear-cut across models, as we find carbon leakage effects ranging from positive to negative because trade and substitution patterns of coal, oil, and gas differ across models. In summary, distortions of fossil fuel markets resulting from relaxed short-term global emission targets are more important and less uncertain than the issue of carbon leakage from early mover action.« less

  14. Isoprene emissions over Asia 1979-2012 : impact of climate and land use changes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stavrakou, T.; Muller, J. F.; Bauwens, M.; De Smedt, I.; Roozendael, Van M.; Guenther, Alex B.; Wild, M.; Xia, X.

    2014-05-12

    Due to the scarcity of observational constraints and the rapidly changing environment in East and Southeast Asia, isoprene emissions predicted by models are expected to bear substantial uncertainties. The aim of this study is to improve upon the existing bottom-up estimates, and investigate the temporal evolution of the fluxes in Asia over 1979-2012. To this purpose, we calculate the hourly emissions at 0.5% ×0.5% resolution using the MEGAN-MOHYCAN model driven by ECMWF ERA-Interim climatology. This study incorporates (i) changes in land use, including the rapid expansion of oil palms, (ii) meteorological variability according to ERA-Interim, (iii) long-term changes in solar radiation (dimming/brightening) constrained by surface network radiation measurements,and (iv) recent experimental evidence that South Asian tropical forests are much weaker isoprene emitters than previously assumed, and on the other hand, that oil palms hold a strong isoprene emission capacity. These effects lead to a significant lowering (factor of two) in the total isoprene fluxes over the studied domain, and to emission reductions reaching a factor of 3.5 in Southeast Asia. The bottom-up annual isoprene emissions for 2005 are estimated at 7.0, 4.8, 8.3, 2.9 Tg in China, India, Indonesia and Malaysia, respectively. Changes in temperature and solar radiation are the major drivers of the interannual variability and trend in the emissions. An annual positive flux trend of 0.2% and 0.52% is found in Asia and China, respectively, through the entire period, related to positive trend in temperature and solar radiation. The impact of oil palm expansion in Indonesia and Malaysia is to enhance the trends over that region, e.g. from 1.17% to 1.5% in 1979-2005 in Malaysia. A negative emission trend is derived in India (?0.4 %), owing to the negative trend in solar radiation data associated to the strong dimming effect likely due to increasing aerosol loadings. The bottom-up emissions are evaluated using top-down isoprene emission estimates derived from inverse modelling constrained by GOME-2/MetOp-A formaldehyde columns through 2007-2012. The satellite-based estimates appear to support our assumptions, and confirm the lower emission rate in tropical forests of Indonesia and Malaysia. Additional flux measurements are clearly needed to better characterize the spatial variability of emission factors. Finally, a decreasing trend in the top-down Chinese emissions inferred after 2007, is in line with the cooling episode recorded in China after that year, thus suggesting that the satellite HCHO columns are able to capture climate-induced changes in emissions.

  15. Assessing "Dangerous Climate Change": Required Reduction of Carbon Emissions to Protect Young People, Future Generations and Nature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    Assessing "Dangerous Climate Change": Required Reduction of Carbon Emissions to Protect Young high and would subject young people, future generations and nature to irreparable harm. Carbon dioxide. Of course carbon dioxide from deforestation also causes warming and policies must address that carbon source

  16. A fair compromise to break the climate impasse. A major economies forum approach to emissions reductions budgeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grasso, Marco; J. Roberts, Timmons

    2013-04-15

    Key messages of the study are: Given the stalemate in U.N. climate negotiations, the best arena to strike a workable deal is among the members the Major Economies Forum on Energy and Climate (MEF); The 13 MEF members—including the EU-27 (but not double-counting the four EU countries that are also individual members of the MEF)—account for 81.3 percent of all global emissions; This proposal devises a fair compromise to break the impasse to develop a science-based approach for fairly sharing the carbon budget in order to have a 75 percent chance of avoiding dangerous climate change; To increase the likelihood of a future climate agreement, carbon accounting must shift from production-based inventories to consumption-based ones; The shares of a carbon budget to stay below 2 deg C through 2050 are calculated by cumulative emissions since 1990, i.e. according to a short-horizon polluter pays principle, and national capability (income), and allocated to MEF members through emission rights. This proposed fair compromise addresses key concerns of major emitters; According to this accounting, no countries have negative carbon budgets, there is substantial time for greening major developing economies, and some developed countries need to institute very rapid reductions in emissions; and, To provide a 'green ladder' to developing countries and to ensure a fair global deal, it will be crucial to agree how to extend sufficient and predictable financial support and the rapid transfer of technology.

  17. Effects of 20002050 changes in climate and emissions on global tropospheric ozone and the policy-relevant background surface ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shiliang

    Effects of 2000­2050 changes in climate and emissions on global tropospheric ozone and the policy-relevant background surface ozone in the United States Shiliang Wu,1 Loretta J. Mickley,1 Daniel J. Jacob,1 David Rind) on the global tropospheric ozone budget and on the policy-relevant background (PRB) ozone in the United States

  18. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Climate Action Partnership Contribution of Food GHG Emissions Reduction: Moving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    target: Ensure that 90% of UBC's food system waste can be composted or recycled by 2015. We reviewed Waste Management, UBC Food Services and the AMS Food and Beverage Partnership Contribution of Food GHG Emissions Reduction: Moving UBC Beyond Climate Neutral Jennifer Baum

  19. Offshore wind energy climate projection using UPSCALE climate data under the RCP8.5 emission scenario

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Recently it was demonstrated how climate data can be utilized to estimate regional wind power densities. In particular it was shown that the quality of the global scale estimate compared well with regional high resolution studies and a link between surface temperature and moist density in the estimate was presented. In the present paper the methodology is tested further, to ensure that the results using one climate data set are reliable. This is achieved by extending the study to include four ensemble members. With the confidence that one instantiation is sufficient a climate change data set, which was also a result of the UPSCALE experiment, is analyzed. This, for the first time, provides a projection of future changes in wind power resources using this data set. This climate change data set is based on the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCP) 8.5 climate change scenario. This provides guidance for developers and policy makers to mitigate and adapt.

  20. On the Road to Climate Stability: The Parable of the Secretary A-Team Report on Prospects for Halting the Growth of CO2 Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    for Halting the Growth of CO2 Emissions James Hansen1,2, Darnell Cain3, Robert Schmunk3 After President Bush) reducing non-CO2 climate forcings, and (2) getting CO2 emissions to level out in the near-term and decline for a path in which the United States achieves an energy and CO2 emissions pathway consistent

  1. A sensitivity study of climate and energy balance simulations with use of satellite-derived emissivity data over Northern Africa and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Liming

    -derived emissivity data over Northern Africa and the Arabian Peninsula L. Zhou,1 R. E. Dickinson,1 Y. Tian,1 M. Jin,2 and energy balance to changes in soil emissivity over Northern Africa and the Arabian Peninsula and considers how this information may be used to improve emissivity parameterizations in climate models. Analysis

  2. Probabilistic Forecast for 21st Century Climate Based on Uncertainties in Emissions (without Policy) and Climate Parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sokolov, Andrei P.

    The MIT Integrated Global System Model is used to make probabilistic projections of climate change from 1861 to 2100. Since the model's first projections were published in 2003 substantial improvements have been made to ...

  3. Impact of Emissions, Chemistry, and Climate on Atmospheric Carbon Monoxide: 100-year Predictions from a Global Chemistry-Climate Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of methane and the production of CO2, ozone, and sulfate aerosols and thus affects climate, while, producing formaldehyde (CH2O) and then carbon monoxide. This methane reaction, in combination with R1

  4. Probabilistic Forecast for Twenty-First-Century Climate Based on Uncertainties in Emissions (Without Policy) and Climate Parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacoby, Henry D.

    The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Integrated Global System Model is used to make probabilistic projections of climate change from 1861 to 2100. Since the model’s first projections were published in 2003, ...

  5. Future climate change under RCP emission scenarios with GISS ModelE2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nazarenko, L.; NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York, NY; Schmidt, G. A.; Miller, R. L.; Tausnev, N.; Trinnovim LLC, New York, NY; Kelley, M.; Trinnovim LLC, New York, NY; Ruedy, R.; Trinnovim LLC, New York, NY; et al

    2015-02-24

    We examine the anthropogenically forced climate response for the 21st century representative concentration pathway (RCP) emission scenarios and their extensions for the period 2101–2500. The experiments were performed with ModelE2, a new version of the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Sciences (GISS) coupled general circulation model that includes three different versions for the atmospheric composition components: a noninteractive version (NINT) with prescribed composition and a tuned aerosol indirect effect (AIE), the TCAD version with fully interactive aerosols, whole-atmosphere chemistry, and the tuned AIE, and the TCADI version which further includes a parameterized first indirect aerosol effect on clouds. Each atmosphericmore »version is coupled to two different ocean general circulation models: the Russell ocean model (GISS-E2-R) and HYCOM (GISS-E2-H). By 2100, global mean warming in the RCP scenarios ranges from 1.0 to 4.5°#2;C relative to 1850–1860 mean temperature in the historical simulations. In the RCP2.6 scenario, the surface warming in all simulations stays below a 2#2;°C threshold at the end of the 21st century. For RCP8.5, the range is 3.5–4.5°#2;C at 2100. Decadally averaged sea ice area changes are highly correlated to global mean surface air temperature anomalies and show steep declines in both hemispheres, with a larger sensitivity during winter months. By the year 2500, there are complete recoveries of the globally averaged surface air temperature for all versions of the GISS climate model in the low-forcing scenario RCP2.6. TCADI simulations show enhanced warming due to greater sensitivity to CO?, aerosol effects, and greater methane feedbacks, and recovery is much slower in RCP2.6 than with the NINT and TCAD versions. All coupled models have decreases in the Atlantic overturning stream function by 2100. In RCP2.6, there is a complete recovery of the Atlantic overturning stream function by the year 2500 while with scenario RCP8.5, the E2-R climate model produces a complete shutdown of deep water formation in the North Atlantic.« less

  6. Future climate change under RCP emission scenarios with GISS ModelE2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nazarenko, L.; Schmidt, G. A.; Miller, R. L.; Tausnev, N.; Kelley, M.; Ruedy, R.; Russell, G. L.; Aleinov, I.; Bauer, M.; Bauer, S.; Bleck, R.; Canuto, V.; Cheng, Y.; Clune, T. L.; Del Genio, A. D.; Faluvegi, G.; Hansen, J. E.; Healy, R. J.; Kiang, N. Y.; Koch, D.; Lacis, A. A.; LeGrande, A. N.; Lerner, J.; Lo, K. K.; Menon, S.; Oinas, V.; Perlwitz, J.; Puma, M. J.; Rind, D.; Romanou, A.; Sato, M.; Shindell, D. T.; Sun, S.; Tsigaridis, K.; Unger, N.; Voulgarakis, A.; Yao, M. -S.; Zhang, Jinlun

    2015-02-24

    We examine the anthropogenically forced climate response for the 21st century representative concentration pathway (RCP) emission scenarios and their extensions for the period 2101–2500. The experiments were performed with ModelE2, a new version of the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Sciences (GISS) coupled general circulation model that includes three different versions for the atmospheric composition components: a noninteractive version (NINT) with prescribed composition and a tuned aerosol indirect effect (AIE), the TCAD version with fully interactive aerosols, whole-atmosphere chemistry, and the tuned AIE, and the TCADI version which further includes a parameterized first indirect aerosol effect on clouds. Each atmospheric version is coupled to two different ocean general circulation models: the Russell ocean model (GISS-E2-R) and HYCOM (GISS-E2-H). By 2100, global mean warming in the RCP scenarios ranges from 1.0 to 4.5°#2;C relative to 1850–1860 mean temperature in the historical simulations. In the RCP2.6 scenario, the surface warming in all simulations stays below a 2#2;°C threshold at the end of the 21st century. For RCP8.5, the range is 3.5–4.5°#2;C at 2100. Decadally averaged sea ice area changes are highly correlated to global mean surface air temperature anomalies and show steep declines in both hemispheres, with a larger sensitivity during winter months. By the year 2500, there are complete recoveries of the globally averaged surface air temperature for all versions of the GISS climate model in the low-forcing scenario RCP2.6. TCADI simulations show enhanced warming due to greater sensitivity to CO?, aerosol effects, and greater methane feedbacks, and recovery is much slower in RCP2.6 than with the NINT and TCAD versions. All coupled models have decreases in the Atlantic overturning stream function by 2100. In RCP2.6, there is a complete recovery of the Atlantic overturning stream function by the year 2500 while with scenario RCP8.5, the E2-R climate model produces a complete shutdown of deep water formation in the North Atlantic.

  7. Combined Effects of Anthropogenic Emissions and Resultant Climatic Changes on Atmospheric OH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    issue in atmospheric chemistry and global climate studies. We have developed a coupled global atmospheric chemistry and climate model to better assess science and policy issues related to global change.5 indicate the potential for substantial future changes affecting both atmospheric chemistry and climate

  8. How emissions, climate, and land use change will impact mid-century air quality over the United States: a focus on effects at national parks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Val Martin, M.

    We use a global coupled chemistry–climate–land model (CESM) to assess the integrated effect of climate, emissions and land use changes on annual surface O[subscript 3] and PM[subscript 2.5] in the United States with a focus ...

  9. Climate impact of aviation NOx? emissions : radiative forcing, temperature, and temporal heterogeneity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Lawrence Man Kit

    2014-01-01

    Aviation NOx emissions are byproducts of combustion in the presence of molecular nitrogen. In the upper troposphere, NOx emissions result in the formation of O? but also reduce the lifetime of CH4 , causing an indirect ...

  10. SUPPORTING ONLINE MATERIAL Combustion emissions per unit of energy: The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    1 SUPPORTING ONLINE MATERIAL SOM Text Combustion emissions per unit of energy from stationary installations using different forms of energy. Emissions rates from some biomass). Many do so in practice by assuming that there are no emissions from the combustion of the biofuels

  11. Does the location of aircraft nitrogen oxide emissions affect their climate impact?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, David

    integrations: a base case, then variants with extra aircraft nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions added to specific NOx emissions. NOx promotes tropospheric ozone (O3) production, but also stimulates methane (CH4 how important the emission location is in influencing the impact of aviation NOx on O3 and CH4. 2

  12. The Impact of Emission and Climate Change on Ozone in the United States under Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Yang; Fu, Joshua S.; Drake, John B.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Liu, Yang

    2013-09-27

    Dynamical downscaling was applied in this study to link the global climate-chemistry model Community Atmosphere Model (CAM-Chem) with the regional models: Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model and Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ). Two Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios (RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5) were used to evaluate the climate impact on ozone concentrations in 2050s. Ozone concentrations in the lower-mid troposphere (surface to ~300 hPa), from mid- to high latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere (NH), show decreasing trends in RCP 4.5 between 2000s and 2050s, with the largest decrease of 4-10 ppbv occurring in the summer and the fall; and increasing trends (2-12 ppbv) in RCP 8.5 resulting from the increased methane emissions. In RCP 8.5, methane emissions increase by ~60% by the end of 2050s, accounting for more than 90% of ozone increases in summer and fall, and 60-80% in spring and winter. Under the RCP 4.5 scenario, in the summer when photochemical reactions are the most active, the large ozone precursor emissions reduction leads to the greatest decrease of downscaled surface ozone concentrations, ranging from 6 to 10 ppbv. However, a few major cities show ozone increases of 3 to 7 ppbv due to weakened NO titration. Under the RCP 8.5 scenario, in winter, downscaled ozone concentrations increase across nearly the entire continental US in winter, ranging from 3 to 10 ppbv due to increased methane emissions and enhanced stratosphere-troposphere exchange (STE). More intense heat waves are projected to occur by the end of 2050s in RCP 8.5, leading to more than 8 ppbv of the maximum daily 8-hour daily average (MDA8) ozone during the heat wave days than other days; this indicates the dramatic impact heat waves exert on high frequency ozone events.

  13. Leveraging Existing Data Streams Toward Climate-Driven Emissions Inventorying and Reporting 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reith, C. C.; Shanin, D.

    2008-01-01

    for value. Even though the forthcoming legislation (e.g., the Lieberman-Warner American Climate Security Act) hasn?t yet passed, there are many reasons for a company or facility to be proactive in understanding and managing its carbon footprint... analytics tool and its integration with an energy management system, as used to guide climate-related strategic planning for a multinational mining and metallurgy company. Introduction Carbon regulation will soon join rising energy...

  14. 20th-Century Industrial Black Carbon Emissions Altered Arctic Climate Forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    emissions, not boreal forest fires. (B) Annual averagea result of boreal forest fires and industrial activities.as indi- cators of forest fires and industrial pollution,

  15. 20th-Century Industrial Black Carbon Emissions Altered Arctic Climate Forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    biomass and fossil fuel combustion alters chemical and physical properties of the atmosphere and snow albedo, yet little is known about its emission

  16. Future CO2 Emissions and Climate Change from Existing Energy Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, SJ; Caldeira, K; Matthews, HD

    2010-01-01

    2 from combustion of fossil fuels by existing infrastructureas well as estimates of fossil fuel emissions produced di-the combustion of fossil fuels by existing infrastructure

  17. Future methane, hydroxyl, and their uncertainties: key climate and emission parameters for future predictions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holmes, C. D; Prather, M. J; Sovde, O. A; Myhre, G.

    2013-01-01

    of present-day and future OH and methane lifetime, Atmos.Chemistry and Physics Future methane, hydroxyl, and theirand emission parameters for future predictions C. D. Holmes

  18. The Politics of Carbon Dioxide Emissions Reduction: The Role of Pluralism in Shaping the Climate Change Technology Initiative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Dylan

    1999-01-01

    in Shaping the Climate Change Technology Initiative Dylaninvolved in the Climate Change Technology Initiative priorare listed below: 8 CLIMATE CHANGE TECHNOLOGY INITIATIVE (

  19. Optical and Physical Properties from Primary On-Road Vehicle ParticleEmissions And Their Implications for Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strawa, A.W.; Kirchstetter, T.W.; Hallar, A.G.; Ban-Weiss, G.A.; McLaughlin, J.P.; Harley, R.A.; Lunden, M.M.

    2009-01-23

    During the summers of 2004 and 2006, extinction and scattering coefficients of particle emissions inside a San Francisco Bay Area roadway tunnel were measured using a combined cavity ring-down and nephelometer instrument. Particle size distributions and humidification were also measured, as well as several gas phase species. Vehicles in the tunnel traveled up a 4% grade at a speed of approximately 60 km h{sup -1}. The traffic situation in the tunnel allows the apportionment of emission factors between light duty gasoline vehicles and diesel trucks. Cross-section emission factors for optical properties were determined for the apportioned vehicles to be consistent with gas phase and particulate matter emission factors. The absorption emission factor (the absorption cross-section per mass of fuel burned) for diesel trucks (4.4 {+-} 0.79 m{sup 2} kg{sup -1}) was 22 times larger than for light-duty gasoline vehicles (0.20 {+-} 0.05 m{sup 2} kg{sup -1}). The single scattering albedo of particles - which represents the fraction of incident light that is scattered as opposed to absorbed - was 0.2 for diesel trucks and 0.3 for light duty gasoline vehicles. These facts indicate that particulate matter from motor vehicles exerts a positive (i.e., warming) radiative climate forcing. Average particulate mass absorption efficiencies for diesel trucks and light duty gasoline vehicles were 3.14 {+-} 0.88 m{sup 2} g{sub PM}{sup -1} and 2.9 {+-} 1.07 m{sup 2} g{sub PM}{sup -1}, respectively. Particle size distributions and optical properties were insensitive to increases in relative humidity to values in excess of 90%, reinforcing previous findings that freshly emitted motor vehicle particulate matter is hydrophobic.

  20. Future methane, hydroxyl, and their uncertainties: key climate and emission parameters for future predictions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holmes, C. D; Prather, M. J; Sovde, O. A; Myhre, G.

    2013-01-01

    in tropospheric ozone and methane; global 3-D model studies,hydroxyl radical and methane life- time from the Atmosphericof meteorology and emissions on methane trends, 1990–2004,

  1. Climate policy and the airline industry : emissions trading and renewable jet fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McConnachie, D. (Dominic Alistair)

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis, I assess the impact of the current EU Emissions Trading Scheme and a hypothetical renewable jet fuel mandate on US airlines. I find that both the EU Scheme up until 2020 and a renewable jet fuel mandate of ...

  2. Fiddling while carbon burns: why climate policy needs pervasive emission pricing as well as technology promotion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pezzey, Jack

    supply technologies with lower emissions, greater energy use efficiency, and substitution in demand, innovation, Asia­Pacific Partnership, AP6 John (Jack) Pezzey (email: jack.pezzey@anu.edu.au) is a Senior to facilitate the development, diffusion, deployment, and transfer of existing, emerging and longer term cost

  3. The Politics of Carbon Dioxide Emissions Reduction: The Role of Pluralism in Shaping the Climate Change Technology Initiative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Dylan

    1999-01-01

    sources of carbon dioxide emissions are the destruction ofat 570. 1998/99] CARBON DIOXIDE EMISSIONS REDUCTION causedat 438. 1998/99] CARBON DIOXIDE EMISSIONS REDUCTION trucks.

  4. CEQ Issues Revised Draft NEPA Guidance on GHG Emissions and Climate Change

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment|Marketing, LLCEfficiency |CBA.PDF&#0; MoreJune 28,Emissions and the|

  5. Quantifying Climate Feedbacks from Abrupt Changes in High-Latitude Trace-Gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qianlai Zhuang

    2012-11-16

    During the three-year project period, Purdue University has specifically accomplished the following: revised the existing Methane Dynamics Model (MDM) to consider the effects of changes of atmospheric pressure; applied the methane dynamics model (MDM) to Siberian region to demonstrate that ebullition estimates could increase previous estimates of regional terrestrial CH{sub 4} emissions 3- to 7-fold in Siberia; Conducted an analysis of the carbon balance of the Arctic Basin from 1997 to 2006 to show that terrestrial areas of the Arctic were a net source of 41.5 Tg CH{sub 4} yr{sup â??1} that increased by 0.6 Tg CH{sub 4} yr{sup â??1} during the decade of analysis, a magnitude that is comparable with an atmospheric inversion of CH{sub 4}; improved the quantification of CH{sub 4} fluxes in the Arctic with inversion methods; evaluated AIRS CH4 retrieval data with a transport and inversion model and surface flux and aircraft data; to better quantify methane emissions from wetlands, we extended the MDM within a biogeochemistry model, the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM), to include a large-scale hydrology model, the variable infiltration capacity (VIC) model; more recently, we developed a single box atmospheric chemistry model involving atmospheric methane (CH{sub 4}), carbon monoxide (CO) and radical hydroxyl (OH) to analyze atmospheric CH{sub 4} concentrations from 1984 to 2008.

  6. Climate Change Mitigation: Climate, Health, and Equity Implications of the Visible and the Hidden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shonkoff, Seth Berrin

    2012-01-01

    2004). "Emissions pathways, climate change, and impacts onfor human health and climate change." J Toxicol Environet al. (2001). Climate change 2001: impacts, adaptation, and

  7. Consumption, Not CO2 emissions: Reframing Perspectives on Climate Change and Sustainability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harriss, Robert; Shui, Bin

    2010-12-01

    A stunning documentary film titled “Mardi Gras: Made in China” provides an insightful and engaging perspective on the globalization of desire for material consumption. Tracing the life cycle of Mardi Gras beads from a small factory in Fuzhou, China to the streets of the Mardi Gras celebration in New Orleans the viewer grasps the near universal human desire to strive for an affluent lifestyle. David Redmon, an independent film maker, follows the beads' genealogy back to the industrial town of Fuzhou, China, to the factory that is the world's largest producer of Mardi Gras beads and related party trinkets. He explores how these frivolous and toxic products affect the people who make them and those who consume them. Redmon captures the daily reality of a Chinese manufacturing facility. It’s workforce of approximately 500 teenage girls, and a handful of boys, live like prisoners in a fenced-in compound. These young people, often working 16-hour days, are constantly exposed to styrene, a chemical known to cause cancer — all for about 10 cents an hour. In addition to indoor pollution, the decrepit coal-fired manufacturing facilities are symbolic of China’s fast rise to the world’s top producer of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions.1 The process of industrialization and modernization in China is happening at an unprecedented rate and scale.

  8. Emission

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas NuclearElectronic StructureEly M.Emilio Segrè About the LabEmission

  9. Massachusetts Takes On Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimmell, Ken; Laurie, Burt

    2009-01-01

    to promote new technologies to fight climate change as theON CLIMATE CHANGE dard is a market-based, technology-neutraland technologies. 9. Facilities will calculate emissions using The Climate

  10. Climate Change Effects on California Precipitation and Soil Moisture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berg, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Extremes Over California Under Climate Change 432004: Emissions pathways, climate change, and impacts onbelow 2 C. Nature Climate Change, 3, 4-6. Seager, R. , N.

  11. This study explores how the EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) actually works on the ground affecting corporate climate strategies.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    This study explores how the EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) actually works on the ground@bookpoint.co.uk May 2013 322 pages Hardback 978-1-4094-6078-7 £60.00 Corporate Responses to EU Emissions Trading at The Fridtjof Nansen Institute, Norway `With greenhouse gas emissions trading schemes emerging worldwide

  12. Effects of mineral aerosols on the summertime climate of southwest Asia: Incorporating subgrid variability in a dust emission scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcella, Marc Pace

    [1] Improvements in modeling mineral aerosols over southwest Asia are made to the dust scheme in a regional climate model by representing subgrid variability of both wind speed and surface roughness length. The new module ...

  13. Methane emissions from rice fields: The effects of climatic and agricultural factors. Final report, March 1, 1994--April 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khalil, M.A.K.; Rasmussen, R.A.

    1997-10-01

    The work reported was performed for the purpose of refining estimates of methane emissions from rice fields. Research performed included methane flux measurements, evaluation of variables affecting emissions, compilation of a data base, and continental background measurements in China. The key findings are briefly described in this report. Total methane emissions, seasonal patterns, and spatial variability were measured for a 7-year periods. Temperature was found to be the most important variable studies affecting methane emissions. The data archives for the research are included in the report. 5 refs., 6 figs.

  14. Optical and Physical Properties from Primary On-Road Vehicle Particle Emissions And Their Implications for Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Optical and Physical Properties from Primary On-Road Vehicle Particle Emissions between light duty gasoline vehicles and diesel trucks. Cross-section emission factors for optical size distributions and optical properties were insensitive to increases in relative humidity to values

  15. 8th i-CIPEC8th International Conference/Exhibition on Combustion, Incineration/Pyrolysis, Emission and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    8th i-CIPEC8th International Conference/Exhibition on Combustion, Incineration/Pyrolysis, Emission Pyrolysis and Gasification / New Materials / New Processes ·Waste-to-Energy Conversion Traditional as well

  16. Climate Research in Society 1 CLIMATE SCIENCE IN SOCIETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    von Storch, Hans

    Climate Research in Society 1 CLIMATE SCIENCE IN SOCIETY The situation is post-normal The situation is as follows: Man-made climate change is real, but we are still arguing what it really consists in and how temperature. Restricting emissions will reduce or slow down future climate change. Although everybody agrees

  17. Locked into Copenhagen pledges - Implications of short-term emission targets for the cost and feasibility of long-term climate goals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riahi, Keywan; Kriegler, Elmar; Johnson, Nils; Bertram, Christoph; den Elzen, Michel; Eom, Jiyong; Schaeffer, Michiel; Edmonds, James A.; Isaac, Morna; Krey, Volker; Longden, Thomas; Luderer, Gunnar; Mejean, Aurelie; McCollum, David; Mima, Silvana; Turton, Hal; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Wada, Kenichi; Bosetti, Valentina; Capros, Pantelis; Criqui, Patrick; Hamdi-Cherif, Meriem; Kainuma, M.; Edenhofer, Ottmar

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the AMPERE intermodeling comparison with focus on the implications of near-term policies for the costs and attainability of long-term climate objectives. Ten modeling teams participated in the project to explore the consequences of global emissions following the proposed policy stringency of the national pledges from the Copenhagen Accord and Cancún Agreements to 2030. Specific features compared to earlier assessments are the explicit consideration of near-term 2030 emissions targets as well as the systematic sensitivity analysis for the availability and potential of mitigation technologies. Our estimates show that a 2030 mitigation effort comparable to the pledges would result in a further "lock-in" of the energy system into fossil fuels and thus impede the required energy transformation to reach low greenhouse-gas stabilization levels (450ppm CO2e). Major implications include significant increases in mitigation costs, increased risk that low stabilization targets become unattainable, and reduced chances of staying below the proposed temperature change target of 2C. With respect to technologies, we find that following the pledge pathways to 2030 would narrow policy choices, and increases the risks that some currently optional technologies, such as nuclear or carbon capture and storage (CCS), will become "a must" by 2030.

  18. Risk Analysis for Water Resources Under Climate Change, Population Growth, and Land Use Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiparsky, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Vulnerability from climate change acid population growth."2004). "Emissions pathways, climate change, and impacts onthe Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). J. J.

  19. Climate sensitivity of marine energy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Gareth P; Wallace, Robin

    2005-01-01

    Marine energy has a significant role to play in lowering carbon emissions within the energy sector. Paradoxically, it may be susceptible to changes in climate that will result from rising carbon emissions. Wind patterns ...

  20. DRAFT NEPA Guidance on Consideration of the Effects of Climate...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DRAFT NEPA Guidance on Consideration of the Effects of Climate Change and Greenhouse Gas Emissions DRAFT NEPA Guidance on Consideration of the Effects of Climate Change and...

  1. Global Climate Autumn 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    conservation concern: mitigation - reduce emissions of green house gases Climate Change and Wildlife · Pattern house gases · Secondary concern: adaptation - how do we lessen ongoing impacts of climate change - protect these areas - facilitate animal movement to these areas (corridors) #12;11/30/14 4 Fordham et al

  2. Climate Change Proposed Scoping Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change Proposed Scoping Plan a amework for change Prepared by the California Air Resources #12;CLIMATE CHANGE SCOPING PLAN State of California Air Resources Board Resolution 08-47 December 11 greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that cause global warming; WHEREAS, the adverse impacts of climate change

  3. CLIMATE RESEARCH Vol. 61: 7591, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sample of climate projections, including 1 regional climate model (RCM) following 3 emission scenarios (A. KEY WORDS: Heat waves · Regional climate models · Reference historical time series · Sources) with the ECHAM3 model and Meehl & Tebaldi (2004) with the Parallel Climate Model. More recently, Chauvin & Denvil

  4. Climate impact metrics for energy technology evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Morgan Rae

    2013-01-01

    The climate change mitigation potential of energy technologies depends on how their lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions compare to global climate stabilization goals. Current methods for comparing technologies, which assess ...

  5. Analysis of Climate Policy Targets under Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacoby, Henry D.

    Although policymaking in response to the climate change is essentially a challenge of risk management, most studies of the relation of emissions targets to desired climate outcomes are either deterministic or subject to a ...

  6. Tillage and seasonal emissions of CO2, N2O and NO across a seed bed and at the field scale in a Mediterranean climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Kessel, Chris

    Tillage and seasonal emissions of CO2, N2O and NO across a seed bed and at the field scale tillage may increase N2O emissions under certain circumstances, thereby offsetting C sequestration manage- ment accounted for almost 94% of total US N2O emissions from 1990 to 2004 (USEPA, 2006). In 2004

  7. Verifying Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Methods to Support International...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Verifying Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Methods to Support International Climate Agreements Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Verifying Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Methods...

  8. Climate Science and Climate Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    the World Bank by the Potsdam Institute for Climate ImpactResearch and Climate Analytics.of carbon under non-linear climate response. ESRI working

  9. Climate Change, the Clean Air Act, and Industrial Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaswan, Alice

    2012-01-01

    trading program, the Emissions Trading System (ETS), and inCLIMATE CHANGE: THE EU EMISSIONs TRADING Sci HlME (ETS) GEsRegulatory Agency in Emissions Trading, 59 ADMIN. L. Riv.

  10. Campus Sustainability Goals Energy & Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobs, Lucia

    Campus Sustainability Goals Energy & Climate By 2014, reduce greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 and water consumption and wastewater production; incorporate sustainable design principles into capital levels. Food & Dining By 2020, increase sustainable food purchases by campus foodservice providers

  11. UNDP-Catalysing Climate Finance: A Guidebook on Policy and Financing...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    UNDP-Catalysing Climate Finance: A Guidebook on Policy and Financing Options to Support Green, Low-Emission and Climate-Resilient Development Jump to: navigation, search Tool...

  12. Abrupt Climate Change R. B. Alley,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - tained Earth-surface conditions within the narrow liquid-water window conducive to life for about 4 change has focused on the climatic consequences of greenhouse-gas emissions and their impacts- sibility that large climate changes could occur quickly. Such abrupt climate changes could have natural

  13. CLIMATE RISK AND CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smerdon, Jason E.

    CLIMATE RISK AND CLIMATE CHANGE Scenarios of what the climate will be like 50 to 100 years from now associated with climate change demand these efforts continue. However, the long time horizons have led many decision makers to regard climate change as a problem of the distant future. But is it? I n many regions

  14. Climate Stewardship Act of 2004 (released in AEO2005)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01

    The Climate Stewardship Act of 2004 would establish a system of tradable allowances to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The bill includes requirements for mandatory emissions reporting by covered entities and for voluntary reporting of emissions reduction activities by noncovered entities; a national greenhouse gas database and registry of reductions; and a research program on climate change and related activities.

  15. Commonality Among Unique Indigenous Communities: An Introduction to Climate Change and Its Impacts on Indigenous Peoples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abate, Randall S.; Kronk, Elizabeth Ann

    2013-01-01

    This book (Climate Change and Indigenous Peoples: The Search for Legal Remedies) explores how climate change affects the rights of indigenous peoples. Climate change is a global environmental problem caused by greenhouse gas emissions. Although...

  16. Climate Change, Bromus tectorum (Cheatgrass) Invasion, and Wildfire Risk Management in the Eastern Sierra Nevada, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wade, Catherine Eva

    2015-01-01

    2004. Emissions pathways, climate change, and impacts onTyree, and K. Hayhoe. 2008. Climate change scenarios for theB. M. Wotton. 2001. Climate change and forest disturbances.

  17. Comparative Climate Change Law A flexible international legal framework is emerging to deal with climate change. Within this framework each

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Judd, Martin

    2 Comparative Climate Change Law A flexible international legal framework is emerging to deal with climate change. Within this framework each country is free to choose its own climate policy with climate change, including emission standards, while a growing number of countries have decided to rely

  18. UCC UNIVERSITIES CLIMATE UNIVERSITY CLIMATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kidston, Joseph

    CONSORTIUM UCC UNIVERSITIES CLIMATE UNIVERSITY CLIMATE World-class excellence Internationally recognised Australia based www.monash.edu.au/climate-consortium CONSORTIUM An International Collaborative of the institutional leads within the UCC: The University Climate Consortium (UCC) comprises four research intensive

  19. Improving understanding of climate change dynamics using interactive simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin Aguirre, Juan Francisco

    2008-01-01

    Global climate change is one of the most complex problems that human kind will face during the 21st century. Long delays in changing greenhouse gas emissions and in the response of the climate to anthropogenic forcing mean ...

  20. Integrated Economic and Climate Projections for Impact Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paltsev, Sergey

    We designed scenarios for impact assessment that explicitly address policy choices and uncertainty in climate response. Economic projections and the resulting greenhouse gas emissions for the “no climate policy” scenario ...

  1. TSINGHUA -MIT China Energy & Climate Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TSINGHUA - MIT China Energy & Climate Project *Reprinted from Emissions trading in China: Progress: globalchange@mit.edu Website: http://globalchange.mit.edu/ #12;Emissions trading in China: Progress to establish pilot emissions trading systems (ETS). In this paper, we provide a comprehensive overview

  2. Life cycle inventory analysis of regenerative thermal oxidation of air emissions from oriented strand board facilities in Minnesota - a perspective of global climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicholson, W.J.

    1997-12-31

    Life cycle inventory analysis has been applied to the prospective operation of regenerative thermal oxidation (RTO) technology at oriented strand board plants at Bemidji (Line 1) and Cook, Minnesota. The net system destruction of VOC`s and carbon monoxide, and at Cook a small quantity of particulate, has a very high environmental price in terms of energy and water use, global warming potential, sulfur and nitrogen oxide emissions, solids discharged to water, and solid waste deposited in landfills. The benefit of VOC destruction is identified as minor in terms of ground level ozone at best and possibly slightly detrimental. Recognition of environmental tradeoffs associated with proposed system changes is critical to sound decision-making. There are more conventional ways to address carbon monoxide emissions than combustion in RTO`s. In an environment in which global warming is a concern, fuel supplemental combustion for environmental control does not appear warranted. Consideration of non-combustion approaches to address air emission issues at the two operations is recommended. 1 ref., 5 tabs.

  3. DOE Releases Climate VISION Progress Report 2007 | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Outlines Industry Progress in Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions Intensity through Climate VISION Partnership WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today released the...

  4. Future land use and land cover influences on regional biogenic emissions and air quality in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    cover change in simulating future climates. Science 310 (Folberth, G.A. , 2005. Future tropospheric ozone simulatedconcentrations in response to future climate, emissions, and

  5. Emissions Trading: What Makes It Work? Julien Chevallier1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Emissions Trading: What Makes It Work? Julien Chevallier1 04 July 2009 Abstract: At the stage permits markets. Keywords: climate change policy; emissions trading; banking borrowing; initial allocation-4Jul2009 #12;2 Review of current climate policies The European Union Emissions Trading Scheme (EU ETS

  6. Expert assessment of vulnerability of permafrost carbon to climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    emissions and climate forcing. Abbreviations Pg Petagrams C Carbon Carbon dioxidecarbon dioxide (CO 2 ) or methane (CH 4 ) will determine the ultimate radiative-forcing potential of these emissions.

  7. Climate Models and Climate Change Guillaume Mauger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Models and Climate Change Guillaume Mauger gmauger@uw.edu Climate Impacts Group University of Washington Outline: · Climate Change 101 · Why do we care? · Climate models: · About, UncertainDes, Performance, and Projec

  8. CO? emissions limits: economic adjustments and the distribution of burdens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacoby, Henry D.; Eckaus, Richard S.; Ellerman, A. Denny.; Prinn, Ronald G.; Reiner, David M.; Yang, Zili.

    Policies under consideration within the Climate Convention would impose CO? controls on only a subset of nations. A model of economic growth and emissions, coupled to an analysis of the climate system, is used to explore ...

  9. Future climate trends from a first-difference atmospheric carbon dioxide regression model involving emissions scenarios for business as usual and for peak fossil fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leggett, L M W

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the implications of the future continuation of the demonstrated past (1960-2012) strong correlation between first-difference atmospheric CO2 and global surface temperature. It does this, for the period from the present to 2050, for a comprehensive range of future global fossil fuel energy use scenarios. The results show that even for a business-as-usual (the mid-level IPCC) fossil fuel use estimate, global surface temperature will rise at a slower rate than for the recent period 1960-2000. Concerning peak fossil fuel, for the most common scenario the currently observed (1998-2013)temperature plateau will turn into a decrease. The observed trend to date for temperature is compared with that for global climate disasters: these peaked in 2005 and are notably decreasing. The temperature and disaster results taken together are consistent with either a reduced business-as-usual fossil fuel use scenario into the future, or a peak fossil fuel scenario, but not with the standard business-as-usu...

  10. Effects of Air Pollution Control on Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prinn, Ronald G.

    Urban air pollution and climate are closely connected due to shared generating processes (e.g., combustion) for emissions of the driving gases and aerosols. They are also connected because the atmospheric lifecycles of ...

  11. ATNI Tribal Leaders Summit on Climate Change

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians (ATNI) is hosting the Tribal Leaders Summit on Climate Change conference. The conference will share tribal strategies, plans, and regional, national, and international policies on climate change, energy and carbon emissions as well as discuss tribal needs and funding opportunities.

  12. Revised Draft Guidance on Consideration of Greenhouse Gas Emissions...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    departments and agencies should consider the effects of greenhouse gas emissions and climate change in their National Environmental Policy Act reviews. The revised draft...

  13. European Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trading: A System in Transition*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    European Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trading: A System in Transition* John M. Reilly and Sergey, and environmental effects. In turn, the greenhouse gas and atmospheric aerosol assumptions underlying climate

  14. Photon Enhanced Thermionic Emission for Solar Energy Harvesting...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Enhanced Thermionic Emission for Solar Energy Harvesting Final Report to the Global Climate and Energy Project Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Photon Enhanced...

  15. Promoting Low Emission Urban Development Strategies in Emerging...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ICLEI - Local Governments for Sustainability Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Energy Efficiency Topics Low emission development planning Resource Type...

  16. Climate Change 2007: Mitigation of Climate Change.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiavon, Stefano; Zecchin, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    2007: Mitigation of Climate Change. Full report. WorkingIntergovernmental Panel on Climate Change www.webcda.it LaIntergovernmental Panel on Climate Change”. Il Rapporto

  17. The Energy and Economic Impacts of Expanding International Emissions Trading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qi, Tianyu

    2013-08-21

    Emissions trading systems are recognized as a cost-effective way to facilitate emissions abatement and are expected to play an important role in international cooperation for global climate mitigation. Starting from the ...

  18. An Analysis of the European Emission Trading Scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reilly, John M.

    An international emissions trading system is a featured instrument in the Kyoto Protocol to the Framework Convention on Climate Change, designed to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases among major industrial countries. The ...

  19. Impact of Climate Changes on Pollution Levels in Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimov, Ivan

    Impact of Climate Changes on Pollution Levels in Europe Final Report NATO Project CLG 980505 Petra scientific project: "Impact of Climatic Changes on Pollution Levels in Europe" is partly supported by a NATO ..................................................................................................... 8 3. Constant meteorology versus constant anthropogenic emissions .................. 9 4. Climatic

  20. Modeling Climate Change Adaptation: Challenges, Recent Developments and Future Directions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wing, Ian Sue

    Modeling Climate Change Adaptation: Challenges, Recent Developments and Future Directions Karen of modeling practice in the field of integrated assessment of climate change and ways forward. Past efforts assessments of climate change have concentrated on developing baseline emissions scenarios and analyzing

  1. Climate change mitigation through forestry measures: potentials, options, practice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate change mitigation through forestry measures: potentials, options, practice Robert Matthews KINGDOM #12;18 May 2010 Climate change mitigation and forestry measures What I will cover · Inherent;18 May 2010 Climate change mitigation and forestry measures GHG dynamics in forest systems · Emissions

  2. NATURE CLIMATE CHANGE | ADVANCE ONLINE PUBLICATION | www.nature.com/natureclimatechange 1 ecent downward revisions in the climate response to rising

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stocker, Thomas

    is the forcing following an injection of C1 = 1 TtC of cumulative car- bon emissions, 1 is the cumulative that the case for reducing CO2 emissions to limit climate change is less urgent than previously thought5 as cumulative CO2 emissions themselves, independent of the climate system response. This is the rate at which

  3. NATURE CLIMATE CHANGE | VOL 4 | JANUARY 2014 | www.nature.com/natureclimatechange 23 ecent downward revisions in the climate response to rising

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stocker, Thomas

    is the forcing following an injection of C1 = 1 TtC of cumulative car- bon emissions, 1 is the cumulative that the case for reducing CO2 emissions to limit climate change is less urgent than previously thought5 as cumulative CO2 emissions themselves, independent of the climate system response. This is the rate at which

  4. Application of an online-coupled regional climate model, WRF-CAM5, over East Asia for examination of ice nucleation schemes. Part II. Sensitivity to heterogeneous ice nucleation parameterizations and dust emissions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Yang; Chen, Ying; Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai -Yung

    2015-09-14

    Aerosol particles can affect cloud microphysical properties by serving as ice nuclei (IN). Large uncertainties exist in the ice nucleation parameterizations (INPs) used in current climate models. In this Part II paper, to examine the sensitivity of the model predictions to different heterogeneous INPs, WRF-CAM5 simulation using the INP of Niemand et al. (N12) [1] is conducted over East Asia for two full years, 2006 and 2011, and compared with simulation using the INP of Meyers et al. (M92) [2], which is the original INP used in CAM5. M92 calculates the nucleated ice particle concentration as a function of icemore »supersaturation, while N12 represents the nucleated ice particle concentration as a function of temperature and the number concentrations and surface areas of dust particles. Compared to M92, the WRF-CAM5 simulation with N12 produces significantly higher nucleated ice crystal number concentrations (ICNCs) in the northern domain where dust sources are located, leading to significantly higher cloud ice number and mass concentrations and ice water path, but the opposite is true in the southern domain where temperatures and moistures play a more important role in ice formation. Overall, the simulation with N12 gives lower downward shortwave radiation but higher downward longwave radiation, cloud liquid water path, cloud droplet number concentrations, and cloud optical depth. The increase in cloud optical depth and the decrease in downward solar flux result in a stronger shortwave and longwave cloud forcing, and decreases temperature at 2-m and precipitation. Changes in temperature and radiation lower surface concentrations of OH, O?, SO?²?, and PM2.5, but increase surface concentrations of CO, NO?, and SO? over most of the domain. By acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and IN, dust particles have different impacts on cloud water and ice number concentrations, radiation, and temperature at 2-m and precipitation depending on whether the dominant role of dust is CCN or IN. These results indicate the importance of the heterogeneous ice nucleation treatments and dust emissions in accurately simulating regional climate and air quality.« less

  5. Climate Research Ocean Climate Sta1ons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Research Ocean Climate Sta1ons PI: Meghan Cronin Co Lab Review 2 hClimate Sta-ons are moored buoys #12;Ocean Climate Sta1ons 2014 PMEL Lab Review 5 Contribu-ng to NOAA's Goals

  6. Analysis of the Climate Change Technology Initiative

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1999-01-01

    Analysis of the impact of specific policies on the reduction of carbon emissions and their impact on U.S. energy use and prices in the 2008-2012 time frame. Also, analyzes the impact of the President's Climate Change Technology Initiative, as defined for the 2000 budget, on reducing carbon emissions from the levels forecast in the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 reference case.

  7. TSINGHUA -MIT China Energy & Climate Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TSINGHUA - MIT China Energy & Climate Project The energy and CO2 emissions impact of renewable and CO2 emissions impact of renewable energy development in China Tianyu Qi a , Xiliang Zhang a energy development in China* Tianyu Qi, Xiliang Zhang and Valerie Karplus *Reprinted from Energy Policy

  8. A Right to Enjoy Culture in Face of Climate Change: Implications for “Climate Migrants”

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wewerinke, Margaretha

    sustainability while allowing for global economic development. This includes strategies for carbon emissions reduction, sequestration of carbon in vegetation and improved resilience of the built environment, economies and social institutions to climate impacts...

  9. Climate Systems and Climate Change Is Climate Change Real?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Feifei

    Chapter 10 Climate Systems and Climate Change #12;Is Climate Change Real? 1980 1898 2005 2003 #12;Arctic Sea Ice Changes #12;Observed Global Surface Air Temperature #12;! Current climate: weather station data, remote sensing data, numerical modeling using General Circulation Models (GCM) ! Past climate

  10. The Contribution of Biomass to Emissions Mitigation under a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    interactions among natural and human climate system components; objectively assess uncertainty in economic, monitor and verify greenhouse gas emissions and climatic impacts. This reprint is one of a series intended price, applied to all anthropogenic emissions except those from land-use change, that rises from $15 per

  11. Economics, ethics, and climate policy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howarth, R.B.; Monahan, P.A.

    1992-11-01

    Are the costs of greenhouse gas emissions abatement justified by the perceived benefits of sustained climate stability Do people of the present generation have a moral right to impose climate risks on their descendants in generations to come This report examines these questions in light of the emergent facts of climate science and their socioeconomic implications. We consider alternative normative criteria for social decision-making with particular emphasis on cost-benefit analysis and the principle of sustainable development. While each framework yields important insights, we argue that the gross uncertainties associated with climate change and the distribution of impacts between present and future generations constrain the usefulness of cost-benefit criteria in evaluating climate policy. If one accepts the ethical proposition that it is morally wrong to impose catastrophic risks on unborn generations when reducing those risks would not noticeably diminish the quality of life of existing persons, a case can be made for concerted policy action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

  12. Economics, ethics, and climate policy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howarth, R.B.; Monahan, P.A.

    1992-11-01

    Are the costs of greenhouse gas emissions abatement justified by the perceived benefits of sustained climate stability? Do people of the present generation have a moral right to impose climate risks on their descendants in generations to come? This report examines these questions in light of the emergent facts of climate science and their socioeconomic implications. We consider alternative normative criteria for social decision-making with particular emphasis on cost-benefit analysis and the principle of sustainable development. While each framework yields important insights, we argue that the gross uncertainties associated with climate change and the distribution of impacts between present and future generations constrain the usefulness of cost-benefit criteria in evaluating climate policy. If one accepts the ethical proposition that it is morally wrong to impose catastrophic risks on unborn generations when reducing those risks would not noticeably diminish the quality of life of existing persons, a case can be made for concerted policy action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

  13. Commonality Among Unique Indigenous Communities: An Introduction to Climate Change and Its Impacts on Indigenous Peoples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abate, Randall S.; Kronk, Elizabeth Ann

    2013-01-01

    This article is part of a special issue of the Tulane Environmental Law Journal exploring how climate change affects the rights of indigenous peoples. Climate change is a global environmental problem caused by greenhouse gas emissions. Indigenous...

  14. Permafrost degradation and methane: low risk of biogeochemical climate-warming feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Xiang

    Climate change and permafrost thaw have been suggested to increase high latitude methane emissions that could potentially represent a strong feedback to the climate system. Using an integrated earth-system model framework, ...

  15. Sandia Energy - Arctic Climate Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Arctic Climate Measurements Home Climate & Earth Systems Climate Measurement & Modeling Arctic Climate Measurements Arctic Climate Measurementscwdd2015-05-08T01:51:20+00:00 A...

  16. Global climate change and international security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, M.

    1991-01-01

    On May 8--10, 1991, the Midwest Consortium of International Security Studies (MCISS) and Argonne National Laboratory cosponsored a conference on Global Climate Change and International Security. The aim was to bring together natural and social scientists to examine the economic, sociopolitical, and security implications of the climate changes predicted by the general circulation models developed by natural scientists. Five themes emerged from the papers and discussions: (1) general circulation models and predicted climate change; (2) the effects of climate change on agriculture, especially in the Third World; (3) economic implications of policies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions; (4) the sociopolitical consequences of climate change; and (5) the effect of climate change on global security.

  17. Climate Contracts: A Game of Emissions, Investments,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Løw, Erik

    less fossil fuel today, while a more long-term solution might be to invest in renewable energy sources duration may reflect the difficulties or costs of committing to the distant future. With this motivation, I quotas, I abstract from the difficulties of motivating participation and compliance. Review of Economic

  18. Implications of simultaneously mitigating and adapting to climate change: Initial experiments using GCAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Wise, Marshall A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.; Kyle, G. Page; Luckow, Patrick W.; Thomson, Allison M.

    2013-04-01

    Historically climate impacts research and climate mitigation research have been two separate and independent domains of inquiry. Climate mitigation research has investigated greenhouse gas emissions assuming that climate is unchanging. At the same time climate mitigation research has investigated the implications of climate change on the assumption that climate mitigation will proceed without affecting the degree of climate impacts or the ability of human and natural systems to adapt. The Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM) has largely been employed to study climate mitigation. Here we explore the development of capabilities to assess climate change impacts and adaptation within the GCAM model. These capabilities are being developed so as to be able to simultaneously reconcile the joint implications of climate change mitigation, impacts and adaptive potential. This is an important step forward in that it enables direct comparison between climate mitigation activities and climate impacts and the opportunity to understand interactions between the two.

  19. Review: Global Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    introduction to global climate change, the greenhouseReview: Global Climate Change: A Primer By Orrin H PilkeyPilkey, Keith C. Global Climate Change: a primer. Durham,

  20. Apportioning Climate Change Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farber, Daniel A.

    2008-01-01

    Apportioning Climate Change Costs Daniel A. Farber* I. II.ON CLIMATE CHANGE FOUR QUESTIONS ABOUTof how to respond to climate change. Most public attention

  1. Climate Engineering Responses to Climate Emergencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Battisti, David

    Novim Climate Engineering Responses to Climate Emergencies Jason J. Blackstock David S. Battisti Santa Barbara, California #12;Climate Engineering Responses to Climate Emergencies This report should, A. A. N. Patrinos, D. P. Schrag, R. H. Socolow and S. E. Koonin, Climate Engineering Responses

  2. CLIMATE AND CLIMATE CHANGE CERTAINTIES AND UNCERTAINTIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    CLIMATE AND CLIMATE CHANGE CERTAINTIES AND UNCERTAINTIES Stephen E. Schwartz http://www.ecd.bnl.gov/steve/schwartz.html December 4, 2001 Updated, March 4, 2002 #12;OUTLINE · Overview of the Earth climate system · Increased concentrations of "greenhouse gases" · Radiative forcing of climate change · Climate system response

  3. Gas Emissions FLOODING THE LAND,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Batiste, Oriol

    . Scientists have done field studies of emissions of one or both gases at some 30 reservoirs, mostly in Canada, the climate change impact of hydropower in Canada and the northern US appears to be well under half coal plants generating the same amounts of power. Dams and their associated reservoirs are globally

  4. Microsoft PowerPoint - FNC NEPA GHG Climate Slides -- 16Jan2015...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    REVISED DRAFT GUIDANCE ON CONSIDERATION OF GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS AND THE EFFECTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE IN NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT REVIEWS HORST G GRECZMIEL ASSOCIATE...

  5. "Managing Department Climate Change"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    "Managing Department Climate Change" #12;Presenters · Ronda Callister Professor, Department Department Climate? · Assesment is essential for determining strategies for initiating change · In a research climate · Each panelist will describe an intervention designed to improve department climate ­ Ronda

  6. Climate Change and Extinctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinervo, Barry

    2013-01-01

    Lectures presents: Climate Change and Extinctions Happening2013. He will present a climate change extinction model that

  7. Climate-Energy Nexus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Sayler; Randall Gentry; Jie Zhuang

    2010-07-01

    The 140-page published proceedings of the workshop include individual articles and PowerPoint slides for all workshop presentations. The proceedings also contain pertinent background information on the China-US Joint Research Center, partnering organizations, and workshop goals and objectives. Overall, the workshop increased the understanding of the impacts of climate change on energy use and renewable energy production as well as the complex relationships among land use, energy production, and ecological restoration. The workshop served as an international platform for scientists and students of different research backgrounds to develop a unified perspective on energy and climate relationships. Such understanding will benefit future cooperation between China and the US in mitigating global climate change. The workshop’s agenda, which is highly interdisciplinary, explored many potential opportunities for international collaboration in ecosystem management, climate modeling, greenhouse gas emissions, and bioenergy sustainability. International research groups have been suggested in the areas of genomes and biotechnology of energy plants, sustainable management of soil and water resources, carbon sequestration, and microbial processes for ecological cycles. The project has attracted considerable attention from institutes beyond the China-US Joint Research Center partners, and several of them (such as Institute of Qing-Tibet Plateau Research, Institute of Soil and Water Conservation, Institute of Applied Ecology, CAS) have expressed interest in joining the partnership. In addition, the workshop played a significant role in facilitating establishment of private-public partnerships between government and private bioenergy companies (such as L.R. Shugarts and Associates, Inc.), including seed providers (Blade Energy Crops, Thousand Oaks, CA), pilot demonstration projects at coal-producing cities (e.g., Huaibei, Anhui province, China), and the development of methodology for assessment of the sustainable production of biofuels (such as life-cycle analysis, sustainability metrics, and land-use policy). Establishment of two US-China scientific research networks in the area of bioenergy and environmental science is a significant result of the workshop.

  8. UPDATE ON NUCLEAR PLANS AND CARBON LEGISLATION 1 Misc points re climate policies --Energy Security,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emissions Trading Workshop Purdue Climate Change Research Center April 30, 2010 #12;UPDATE ON NUCLEAR PLANS side must compromise ·Emissions trading aligns the incentives for both in same direction ·Nuclear

  9. Background: Global Warming, 2009 1. Unequivocally, the climate is warming. Natural systems are affected.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    ." #12;Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Transportation Sources in Minnesota A Study gas (GHG) emissions from Minnesota's transportation sector. #12;Research Study Team UniversityBackground: Global Warming, 2009 1. Unequivocally, the climate is warming. Natural systems

  10. Uncertainty in climate science and climate policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uncertainty in climate science and climate policy Jonathan Rougier University of Bristol, UK Michel1.tex. 1 Introduction This essay, written by a statistician and a climate scientist, describes our view of the gap that exists between current practice in mainstream climate science, and the practical

  11. Use of Climate Data in Climate Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    von Storch, Hans

    Use of Climate Data in Climate Research A Random Walk Through the MPI Hans von Storch Max and Technical Committee of the Global Climate Observing System in Hamburg, Germany September 19 - 22, 1994 #12;For which- Purposes do we Use 0bserved Data · Climate modelling - Design of parameterisations

  12. RELATING CLIMATE FORCINGS AND CLIMATE RESPONSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    RELATING CLIMATE FORCINGS AND CLIMATE RESPONSE Stephen E. Schwartz Upton NY USA Bern, Switzerland change are tightly correlated. Forcing by GHGs only leads to extremely low climate sensitivity, well to rapid changes in forcings by stratospheric volcanic aerosols. Climate sensitivity is quite low, probably

  13. Climate Summary Working toward Climate Resilience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    1 Climate Summary Working toward Climate Resilience A Summary Prepared for the Town of Germantown and decision-making as requested by the Town of Germantown. It identifies historic climate trends and introduces future projections and strategies to address the climate hazards most likely to affect Hudson

  14. CLIMATE VARIABILITY, CLIMATE CHANGE, AND WESTERN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keeton, William S.

    CHAPTER 13 CLIMATE VARIABILITY, CLIMATE CHANGE, AND WESTERN WILDFIRE WITH IMPLICATIONS FOR THE URBAN­WILDLAND INTERFACE William S. Keeton, Philip W. Mote and Jerry F. Franklin ABSTRACT Climate change hazards by the warmer, drier summers projected for much of the western U.S. by climate models would

  15. CLIMATE AND CLIMATE CHANGE SCIENTIFIC BACKGROUND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    CLIMATE AND CLIMATE CHANGE SCIENTIFIC BACKGROUND FOR INFORMED DECISION-MAKING Stephen E. Schwartz Climate Research Unit, East Anglia UK #12;INDICATIONS OF SYSTEMATIC WARMING IN RECENT YEARS The 1990s were call the anthropocene climate regime. Over the 20th century, human population quadrupled and energy

  16. Climate Change Action Pack Climate & Habitats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunawardena, Arunika

    Climate Change Action Pack Climate & Habitats B A C K G R O U DN C H E C K ! Habitat, Food, Water. Disease,predation,pollution, accidents and climatic conditions are among other limiting factors which can affect an animal's ability to meet its needs. This section will look further into the impact of Climate

  17. Biofuels, Climate Policy and the European Vehicle Fleet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rausch, Sebastian

    We examine the effect of biofuels mandates and climate policy on the European vehicle fleet, considering the prospects for diesel and gasoline vehicles. We use the MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model, ...

  18. Climate change impacts on financial risk in hydropower projects 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Gareth P; Whittington, Bert; Wallace, Robin

    Limiting the emissions of greenhouse gases from power generation will depend, among other things, on the continuing and increased use of hydroelectric power. However, climate change itself may alter rainfall patterns, ...

  19. Climate Change Taxes and Energy Efficiency in Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasahara, Satoru.

    In 2003 Japan proposed a Climate Change Tax to reduce its CO2 emissions to the level required by the Kyoto Protocol. If implemented, the tax would be levied on fossil fuel use and the revenue distributed to several sectors ...

  20. Stringency and distribution in the EU ETS: first evidence 41 CLIMATE POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steininger, Karl W.

    Stringency and distribution in the EU Emissions Trading Scheme: first evidence CLAUDIA KETTNER1,2 , ANGELA covered by the EU Emissions Trading Scheme (EU ETS) were compared. Based on data available for 24 Member: climate policy; emissions trading; EU Emissions Trading Scheme A partir des émissions vérifiées pour les

  1. Greenhouse gas emissions of biofuels, Improving Life Cycle Assessments by taking into

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Greenhouse gas emissions of biofuels, Improving Life Cycle Assessments by taking into account local.......................................................................................................................................................14 Chapter 1 Biofuels, greenhouse gases and climate change 1 Introduction

  2. Climate Change, Adaptation, and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cole, Daniel H.

    2008-01-01

    Climate Change, Adaptation, and Development Daniel H. Cole*THE COSTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE . ADAPTATIONCONVENTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE . IV. A.

  3. Climate Action Plan 2013 Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    UC Irvine Climate Action Plan 2013 Update #12;CLIMATE ACTION PLAN - 2013 UPDATE 1 TABLE OF CONTENTS CLIMATE PROTECTION GOALS...............................................................18 OPPORTUNITIES-2050 CLIMATE NEUTRALITY.........................................................29 MEDICALCENTER IMPLEMENTATION

  4. Valuing climate impacts in integrated assessment models: the MIT IGSM*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    interactions among natural and human climate system components; objectively assess uncertainty in economic, monitor and verify greenhouse gas emissions and climatic impacts. This reprint is one of a series intended to their daily lives--crop yield, food prices, premature death, flooding or drought events, land use change

  5. Human Perceptions of Climate Change Varun Dutt and Cleotilde Gonzalez*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spirtes, Peter

    's warming (Sterman and Sweeney, 2002). Anthropogenic CO2 and other green house gases #12;2 (GHG) emissions that in the past 50 years Earth's climate has started to undergo a change where warming is predicted for the future 2002). Although many people believe that global warming is real (Climate Change Fact Sheet 2006) many

  6. An update on human-induced climate change Testimony of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trenberth, Kevin Edward

    for Atmospheric Research** before The U. S. Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works The United States Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), known as AR4, clearly stated and animals. Increasing rates of carbon dioxide emissions raise the specter that future climate changes could

  7. Climate Update Nolan Doesken

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Update Nolan Doesken Colorado Climate Center Presented to Water Availability Task Force precip #12;Mtd ppt #12;Mtd ppt PRISM Climate Group, Oregon State University #12;Climate divisions defined by Dr. Klaus Wolter of NOAA's Climate Diagnostic Center in Boulder, CO #12;#12;Division 1 ­ Grand Lake 1

  8. Climate Change Scoping Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change Scoping Plan a amework for change as approved Prepared by the California AirBackgroundBackgroundBackground ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 4444 1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California

  9. Climate change action plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delivery Climate change action plan 2009-2011 #12;2 | Climate change action plan ©istockphoto.com #12;Climate Change Action Plan Climate change action plan | 3 Contents Overview 4 Preface and Introduction 5 Climate change predictions for Scotland 6 The role of forestry 7 Protecting and managing

  10. Climate Change Scoping Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change Scoping Plan a amework for change Prepared by the California Air Resources BoardBackgroundBackgroundBackground ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 4444 1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California

  11. Remarks in the National Assembly of France The European Climate Foundation kindly helped arrange a discussion about global climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    polluted air and water, avoid climate catastrophe, and economics (a leg up on clean technology). #12;A. Implications of climate re exploitation of geophysical reservoirs of carbon: (1) coal emissions must be phased on their internal consumption of fossil fuels. Why would China agree: to avoid fossil fuel addiction, clean up its

  12. A Regional Climate Change Assessment Program for North America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mearns, L. O.; Gutowski, William; Jones, Richard; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; McGinnis, Seth; Nunes, A.; Qian, Yun

    2009-09-08

    There are two main uncertainties in determining future climate: the trajectories of future emissions of greenhouse gases and aerosols, and the response of the global climate system to any given set of future emissions [Meehl et al., 2007]. These uncertainties normally are elucidated via application of global climate models, which provide information at relatively coarse spatial resolutions. Greater interest in, and concern about, the details of climate change at regional scales has provided the motivation for the application of regional climate models, which introduces additional uncertainty [Christensen et al., 2007a]. These uncertainties in fi ne- scale regional climate responses, in contrast to uncertainties of coarser spatial resolution global models in which regional models are nested, now have been documented in numerous contexts [Christensen et al., 2007a] and have been found to extend to uncertainties in climate impacts [Wood et al., 2004; Oleson et al., 2007]. While European research in future climate projections has moved forward systematically to examine combined uncertainties from global and regional models [Christensen et al., 2007b], North American climate programs have lagged behind. To fi ll this research gap, scientists developed the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (-NARCCAP). The fundamental scientifi c motivation of this international program is to explore separate and combined uncertainties in regional projections of future climate change resulting from the use of multiple atmosphere- ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs) to drive multiple regional climate models (RCMs). An equally important, and related, motivation for this program is to provide the climate impacts and adaptation community with high- resolution regional climate change scenarios that can be used for studies of the societal impacts of climate change and possible adaptation strategies.

  13. Transport impacts on atmosphere and climate: Shipping Veronika Eyring a,*, Ivar S.A. Isaksen b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, David

    by these emissions. Regulating ship emissions requires comprehensive knowledge of current fuel consumption and emisTransport impacts on atmosphere and climate: Shipping Veronika Eyring a,*, Ivar S.A. Isaksen b Accepted 6 April 2009 Keywords: Transport Oceangoing shipping Ozone Climate change Radiative forcing Air

  14. On the magnitude of positive feedback between future climate change and the carbon cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dufresne, Jean-Louis

    - pogenic emissions are expected to continue in the com- ing decades. The corresponding atmospheric CO 2 con by [Cox et al., 2000] using the Hadley Center HadCM3 climate model coupled to a car- bon cycle model emissions and the land and ocean sinks. Starting from an initial state where the coupled climate carbon

  15. Protecting climate with forests.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    Changing feedbacks in the climate–biosphere system Front.313–32 Bonan G B 2008 Forests and climate change: forcings,feedbacks, and the climate benefits of forests Science

  16. Climate Code Foundation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnes, Nick; Jones, David

    2011-07-05

    Climate Code Foundation - who are we? A non-profit organisation founded in August 2010; our goal is to promote the public understanding of climate science, by increasing the visibility and clarity of the software used in climate science...

  17. Climate Data Operators (CDO)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Data Operators (CDO) Climate Data Operators (CDO) Description and Overview CDO is a large tool set for working on climate data. NetCDF 34, GRIB including SZIP compression,...

  18. Financing Innovation to Address Global Climate Change

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Loan Programs Office (LPO) is helping address the global challenge of climate change by providing critical financing needed to deploy some of the world’s largest and most innovative clean energy and advanced technology vehicles manufacturing projects, preventing more than 25 million metric tons of CO2 emissions to date.

  19. University of Vermont 2010 Climate Action Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bierman, Paul

    : Reach net zero electricity 2020: Reach net zero heating, cooling and fleet 2025: Address all remaining alternative · Climate commitment requires finding ways to reduce to net zero emissions 8 0 10,000 20,000 30 and switching to primarily renewable energy · Also means buying carbon credits or other ways to compensate

  20. SEMINAR SERIES Towards a climate sensitive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in an Earth System Model presented by Peter Hess Associate Professor, Biological and Environmental Engineering are crudely represented in Earth System Models and do not respond changes in climate. Here I present a first interactive parameterization of ammonia emissions in an Earth System Model based on model physics and discuss

  1. Extremes in climate science Andreas Sterl (KNMI)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    (non-deterministic) influences: sun, volcanoes, anthropogenic effects (GHG emissions) => deterministic Sterl, PhysMathClim Climate change GHG concentrations increase => Temperature increases => other weather;31.01.2012, Utrecht Andreas Sterl, PhysMathClim EVT - 1 Extremes: tail of a distribution => few observations => tail

  2. FY08 LDRD Final Report Regional Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bader, D C; Chin, H; Caldwell, P M

    2009-05-19

    An integrated, multi-model capability for regional climate change simulation is needed to perform original analyses to understand and prepare for the impacts of climate change on the time and space scales that are critical to California's future environmental quality and economic prosperity. Our intent was to develop a very high resolution regional simulation capability to address consequences of climate change in California to complement the global modeling capability that is supported by DOE at LLNL and other institutions to inform national and international energy policies. The California state government, through the California Energy Commission (CEC), institutionalized the State's climate change assessment process through its biennial climate change reports. The bases for these reports, however, are global climate change simulations for future scenarios designed to inform international policy negotiations, and are primarily focused on the global to continental scale impacts of increasing emissions of greenhouse gases. These simulations do not meet the needs of California public and private officials who will make major decisions in the next decade that require an understanding of climate change in California for the next thirty to fifty years and its effects on energy use, water utilization, air quality, agriculture and natural ecosystems. With the additional development of regional dynamical climate modeling capability, LLNL will be able to design and execute global simulations specifically for scenarios important to the state, then use those results to drive regional simulations of the impacts of the simulated climate change for regions as small as individual cities or watersheds. Through this project, we systematically studied the strengths and weaknesses of downscaling global model results with a regional mesoscale model to guide others, particularly university researchers, who are using the technique based on models with less complete parameterizations or coarser spatial resolution. Further, LLNL has now built a capability in state-of-the-science mesoscale climate modeling that complements that which it has in global climate simulation, providing potential sponsors with an end-to-end simulation and analysis program.

  3. The Role of Asia in Mitigating Climate Change: Results from the Asia Modeling Exercise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Clarke, Leon E.; Krey, Volker; Blanford, Geoffrey J.; Jiang, Kejun; Kainuma, M.; Kriegler, Elmar; Luderer, Gunnar; Shukla, Priyadarshi R.

    2012-12-01

    In 2010, Asia accounted for 60% of global population, 39% of Gross World Product, 44% of global energy consumption and nearly half of the world’s energy system CO2 emissions. Thus, Asia is an important region to consider in any discussion of climate change or climate change mitigation. This paper explores the role of Asia in mitigating climate change, by comparing the results of 23 energy-economy and integrated assessment models. We focus our analysis on seven key areas: base year data, future energy use and emissions absent climate policy, the effect of urban and rural development on future energy use and emissions, the role of technology in emissions mitigation, regional emissions mitigation, and national climate policies

  4. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change Cripples Forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality...

  5. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate change cripples forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality...

  6. Chapter 20 Climate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in bold and acronyms are defined in Chapter 32, Glossary and Acronyms. Chapter 20 Climate This chapter describes existing climate conditions in the project area, and how the...

  7. Climatic Data Center Climatic Data Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA's ational Climatic Data Center NOAA's ational Climatic Data Center 2008 Annual Report 2008NerS 12-16 DAtA ceNter iNFrAStrUctUre 16-20 USer eNGAGemeNt 21-24 eDUcAtioN/oUtreAch/WorKShoPS 26-31 em) National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) served the Nation as an authoritative resource for climate information

  8. Global Climate Change Impacts:Global Climate Change Impacts: Implications for Climate EngineeringImplications for Climate Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polz, Martin

    Global Climate Change Impacts:Global Climate Change Impacts: Implications for Climate EngineeringImplications for Climate Engineering Thomas R. Karl Lead, NOAA climate services Director, NOAA National Climatic Data Center Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States October 29, 2009 #12;2Global Climate Change

  9. ISWA commitments on waste and climate ISWA General Secretariat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    in case studies and targeted action to mitigate GHG emissions through waste management systems the potential for waste related GHG emissions reductions. The International Solid Waste Association (ISWAISWA commitments on waste and climate ISWA General Secretariat 123 Mariahilfer Strasse, 3rd floor

  10. Climatic change special issue: geoengineering research and its limitations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Robert

    in the field of geoengineering science, climate modeling, environmental ethics, governance, policy, and law. Under such emission scenarios, it is likely that the global average temperature will come to exceed. Given continuing political inertia surrounding global emissions reduc- tions, such an outcome

  11. Minimizing Irreversible Impacts of Human-Made Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    ; purple are emissions through 2012. 1 GtC (gigaton carbon) = 1 billion tons of carbon or ~3.7 GtCO2; 1 ppm CO2 ~2.12 GtC #12;Assessing "Dangerous Climate Change": Required Reduction of Carbon Emissions. Colorado #12;Melt descending into a moulin, a vertical shaft carrying water to ice sheet base. Source

  12. World energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions : 1950-2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmalensee, Richard

    1995-01-01

    Emissions of carbon dioxide form combustion of fossil fuels, which may contribute to long-term climate change, are projected through 2050 using reduced form models estimated with national-level panel data for the period ...

  13. World energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions : 1950-2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmalensee, Richard.; Stoker, Thomas M.; Judson, Ruth A.

    Emissions of carbon dioxide from combustion of fossil fuels, which may contribute to long-term climate change, are projected through 2050 using reduced form models estimated with national-level panel data for the period ...

  14. Promoting lower-carbon lifestyles: the role of personal values, climate change communications and carbon allowances in processes of change 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howell, Rachel Angharad

    2013-07-01

    Climate change is a pressing problem and substantial reductions in the greenhouse gas emissions that cause it are necessary to avert the worst impacts predicted. The UK has targeted an 80% reduction from 1990 emissions ...

  15. International Finance and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Junshan

    International Finance and Climate Change Thursday, October 17, 2013 Breakfast ­ 8:30 a Principal Climate Change Specialist, Climate Business Group at International Finance Corporation, World Bank Group Vladimir Stenek Senior Climate Change Specialist, Climate Business Department of the International

  16. Coordinating Low Emission Development in Columbia (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, A.; Butheau, M.; Sandor, D.

    2013-11-01

    Colombia's economy has grown more than 4 percent per year for a decade, but climate change is posing new risks to sustaining that development. With the nation's coastal areas, mountain ranges, rain forests, plains, and river basins vulnerable to changing weather patterns and growing seasons, Colombia is building resilience to climate change while working to curb emissions and pursue new options for low emission development.

  17. Selected Translated Abstracts of Chinese-Language Climate Change Publications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushman, R.M.; Burtis, M.D.

    1999-05-01

    This report contains English-translated abstracts of important Chinese-language literature concerning global climate change for the years 1995-1998. This body of literature includes the topics of adaptation, ancient climate change, climate variation, the East Asia monsoon, historical climate change, impacts, modeling, and radiation and trace-gas emissions. In addition to the biological citations and abstracts translated into English, this report presents the original citations and abstracts in Chinese. Author and title indexes are included to assist the reader in locating abstracts of particular interest.

  18. Can reducing black carbon emissions counteract global warming?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tami C. Bond; Haolin Sun

    2005-08-15

    Field measurements and model results have recently shown that aerosols may have important climatic impacts. One line of inquiry has investigated whether reducing climate-warming soot or black carbon aerosol emissions can form a viable component of mitigating global warming. Black carbon is produced by poor combustion, from our example hard coal cooking fires for and industrial pulverized coal boilers. The authors review and acknowledge scientific arguments against considering aerosols and greenhouse gases in a common framework, including the differences in the physical mechanisms of climate change and relevant time scales. It is argued that such a joint consideration is consistent with the language of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Results from published climate-modeling studies are synthesized to obtain a global warming potential for black carbon relative to that of CO{sub 2} (680 on a 100 year basis). This calculation enables a discussion of cost-effectiveness for mitigating the largest sources of black carbon. It is found that many emission reductions are either expensive or difficult to enact when compared with greenhouse gases, particularly in Annex I countries. Finally, a role for black carbon in climate mitigation strategies is proposed that is consistent with the apparently conflicting arguments raised during the discussion. Addressing these emissions is a promising way to reduce climatic interference primarily for nations that have not yet agreed to address greenhouse gas emissions and provides the potential for a parallel climate agreement. 31 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Climatic Change An Interdisciplinary,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reale, Marco

    1 23 Climatic Change An Interdisciplinary, International Journal Devoted to the Description, Causes and Implications of Climatic Change ISSN 0165-0009 Volume 107 Combined 3-4 Climatic Change (2011) 107:247-265 DOI available until 12 months after publication. #12;Climatic Change (2011) 107:247­265 DOI 10.1007/s10584

  20. CLIMATE PRODUCTS Basic Climatology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLIMATE PRODUCTS Basic Climatology Colorado Climate Center Funding provided by NOAA Sectoral the computer or a telephone system Data are collected by the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC), where) The original observations relate to WEATHER, not CLIMATE. But if we look at this information over a much longer

  1. Climate Science Andreas Schmittner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmittner, Andreas

    Climate Science Andreas Schmittner Associate Professor College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences Oregon State University Climate Change: A Workshop for Oregon Educators, Aug. 11, 2015 #12;Outline Past Present Future #12;Past Paleoclimate · How can we reconstruct past climate? · How did climate

  2. Climate Change and Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    1 Climate Change and Transportation Addressing Climate Change in the Absence of Federal Guidelines;6 WSDOT Efforts · Climate Change Team · Project Level GHG Approach · Planning Level GHG Approach · Alternative Fuels Corridor · Recent legislation and research #12;7 WSDOT Efforts: Climate Change Team

  3. Using market-based dispatching with environmental price signals to reduce emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Using market-based dispatching with environmental price signals to reduce emissions and water use to: discover new interactions among natural and human climate system components; objectively assess future; and improve methods to model, monitor and verify greenhouse gas emissions and climatic impacts

  4. Emissions trading - time to get serious

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitelli, A.

    2007-11-15

    The Kyoto Protocol's five year compliance period begins in 2008. Industrialized nations around the world have pledged to cut carbon emissions, but the job seems to get harder, not easier, as 2008 approaches. Can market mechanisms make the crucial difference? The article discloses recent initiatives and developments worldwide. It concludes that it is clear that the market is maintaining its central role in fighting climate change and that bringing emissions trading to developing countries and to the US can only reinforce that role.

  5. Emissions of greenhouse gases in the United States 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-10-01

    This is the sixth annual report on aggregate US national emissions of greenhouse gases. It covers emissions over the period 1990--1996, with preliminary estimates of emissions for 1997. Chapter one summarizes some background information about global climate change and the greenhouse effect. Important recent developments in global climate change activities are discussed, especially the third Conference of the Parties to the Framework Convention on Climate Change, which was held in December of 1997 in Kyoto, Japan. Chapters two through five cover emissions of carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, halocarbons and related gases, respectively. Chapter six describes potential sequestration and emissions of greenhouse gases as a result of land use changes. Six appendices are included in the report. 96 refs., 38 tabs.

  6. The physical science behind climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, William; Collins, William; Colman, Robert; Haywood, James; Manning, Martin R.; Mote, Philip

    2007-07-01

    For a scientist studying climate change, 'eureka' moments are unusually rare. Instead progress is generally made by a painstaking piecing together of evidence from every new temperature measurement, satellite sounding or climate-model experiment. Data get checked and rechecked, ideas tested over and over again. Do the observations fit the predicted changes? Could there be some alternative explanation? Good climate scientists, like all good scientists, want to ensure that the highest standards of proof apply to everything they discover. And the evidence of change has mounted as climate records have grown longer, as our understanding of the climate system has improved and as climate models have become ever more reliable. Over the past 20 years, evidence that humans are affecting the climate has accumulated inexorably, and with it has come ever greater certainty across the scientific community in the reality of recent climate change and the potential for much greater change in the future. This increased certainty is starkly reflected in the latest report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the fourth in a series of assessments of the state of knowledge on the topic, written and reviewed by hundreds of scientists worldwide. The panel released a condensed version of the first part of the report, on the physical science basis of climate change, in February. Called the 'Summary for Policymakers,' it delivered to policymakers and ordinary people alike an unambiguous message: scientists are more confident than ever that humans have interfered with the climate and that further human-induced climate change is on the way. Although the report finds that some of these further changes are now inevitable, its analysis also confirms that the future, particularly in the longer term, remains largely in our hands--the magnitude of expected change depends on what humans choose to do about greenhouse gas emissions. The physical science assessment focuses on four topics: drivers of climate change, changes observed in the climate system, understanding cause-and-effect relationships, and projection of future changes. Important advances in research into all these areas have occurred since the IPCC assessment in 2001. In the pages that follow, we lay out the key findings that document the extent of change and that point to the unavoidable conclusion that human activity is driving it.

  7. fter 8 days of fractious negotiating, delegates at the 1997 climate conference in Kyoto, Japan, were running out of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    Global emissions: 22.7billion tonnes of CO2 1997Global emissions: 24.4billion tonnes of CO2 2011Global emissions: 33.9billion tonnes of CO2 Kyoto Protocol agreed Commitments made under the Kyoto climate treaty their emissions, something that they had objected to doing before the developed world acted. By the time the Kyoto

  8. Tribal Climate Change Webinars: BIA's Climate Change Competitive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    climate adaptation, ocean and coastal planning, and youth internships. SpeakersSean Hart, BIA Climate Change Coordinator, andRachael Novak, BIA Climate Science Coordinator,...

  9. Formulating Climate Change Scenarios to Inform Climate - Resilient...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Formulating Climate Change Scenarios to Inform Climate - Resilient Development Strategies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Formulating Climate Change...

  10. Climate Action Champions: Sonoma County Regional Climate Protection...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Sonoma County Regional Climate Protection Authority, CA Climate Action Champions: Sonoma County Regional Climate Protection Authority, CA In 2005, nine cities and the County of...

  11. Biosphere-atmosphere interactions over semi-arid regions : modeling the role of mineral aerosols and irrigation in the regional climate system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcella, Marc Pace

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation describes the role of land surface processes in shaping semi-arid climates, namely those of Southwest Asia and Northwest Africa. The interactions between dust emissions, irrigation, and climate processes ...

  12. Illegal logging threatens Congo's forests, global climate Illegal logging threatens Congo's forests, global climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .4 billion tonnes of CO2, roughly equivalent to the UK's CO2 emissions over the last sixty years. The DRC, global climate Rhett A. Butler, mongabay.com April 11, 2007 Despite government and World Bank assurances. ©Greenpeace/Reynaers Greenpeace says the World Bank, which is the largest donor to DRC, has failed to control

  13. Near-Term Climate Mitigation by Short-Lived Forcers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Steven J.; Mizrahi, Andrew H.

    2013-08-12

    Emissions reductions focused on anthropogenic climate forcing agents with relatively short atmospheric lifetimes such as methane (CH4) and black carbon (BC) have been suggested as a strategy to reduce the rate of climate change over the next several decades. We find that reductions of methane and BC would likely have only a modest impact on near-term climate warming. Even with maximally feasible reductions phased in from 2015 to 2035, global mean temperatures in 2050 are reduced by 0.16 °C, with an uncertainty range of 0.04-0.36°C, with the high end of this range only possible if total historical aerosol forcing is small. More realistic mitigation scenarios would likely provide a smaller climate benefit. The climate benefits from targeted reductions in short-lived forcing agents are smaller than previously estimated and are not substantially different in magnitude from the benefits due to a comprehensive climate policy.

  14. Climate change risk and response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahrl, Fredrich; Roland-Holst, David

    2008-01-01

    the Potential Consequences of Climate Variability and Changeand Kate Scow. 2006. “Climate Change: Page 117 ChallengesLandscapes. ” California Climate Change Center White Paper.

  15. Climate & Environment | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate & Environment SHARE Climate and Environment Climate and environmental scientists at ORNL conduct research, develop technology and perform analyses to understand and predict...

  16. Climate change risk and response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahrl, Fredrich; Roland-Holst, David

    2008-01-01

    and Kate Scow. 2006. “Climate Change: Page 117 ChallengesLandscapes. ” California Climate Change Center White Paper.Sea Level. ” California Climate Change Center White Paper.

  17. Climate Change and National Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alyson, Fleming; Summer, Kelly; Summer, Martin; Lauren, Franck; Jonathan, Mark

    2015-01-01

    CLIMATE CHANGE Multiplying Threats to National Securityfor the impacts of climate change on national security. Pagea warming world. Page 11 “Climate change acts as a threat

  18. Climate change risk and response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahrl, Fredrich; Roland-Holst, David

    2008-01-01

    The Potential Impacts of Climate Change on Inshore Squid:Fifth Annual California Climate Change Research Conference,Potential Impacts of Climate Change on U.S. Transportation.

  19. Review: Preparing for Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunnas, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Review: Preparing for Climate Change By Michael D.Stephen, Preparing for Climate Change. A Boston Review Book.alkaline paper. “Climate change is inevitable, but disaster

  20. Urban Growth and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahn, Matthew E.

    2008-01-01

    2007a The Economic Impacts of Climate Change: Evidence fromGreenstone. 2007b. Climate Change, Mortality and Adaptation:and Ariel Dinar, 1999, Climate Change, Agriculture, and

  1. The supply chain of CO2 emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, S. J; Peters, G. P; Caldeira, K.

    2011-01-01

    impose a price on the carbon in their own fossil fuels forprice A nthropogenic climate change is driven by CO 2 emissions from the burning of fossil fuels (fossil fuel resources are suf?ciently concentrated such that, if the relatively few countries that extract the most fuels imposed a price

  2. Energy and GHG Emissions in British Columbia 1990 -2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    Energy and GHG Emissions in British Columbia 1990 - 2010 Report Highlights John Nyboer and Maximilian Kniewasser Canadian Industrial Energy End-use Data and Analysis Centre (CIEEDAC) Simon Fraser for Climate Solutions 1 HIGHLIGHTS The Energy and GHG Emissions in British

  3. The Energy and CO2 Emissions Impact of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Energy and CO2 Emissions Impact of Renewable Energy Development in China Xiliang Zhang, Tianyu://globalchange.mit.edu/ Printed on recycled paper #12;1 The Energy and CO2 Emissions Impact of Renewable Energy Development Qi, and Valerie J. Karplus Report No. 242 April 2013 China Energy & Climate Project TSINGHUA - MIT

  4. Climate and Climate Change COURSE: .............................................................................. EAS B8800

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolberg, George

    Climate and Climate Change COURSE with a focus on energy transport. Finally, we tackle natural and anthropogenic climate change. This course. Synthesize and apply theory of the various natural and anthropogenic climate change mechanisms to explain

  5. Emissions trading to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the United States : the McCain-Lieberman Proposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paltsev, Sergey.

    The Climate Stewardship Act of 2003 (S. 139) is the most detailed effort to date to design an economy-wide cap-and-trade system for US greenhouse gas emissions reductions. The Act caps sectors at their 2000 emissions in ...

  6. Climate Impacts of Ice Nucleation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gettelman, A.; Liu, Xiaohong; Barahona, Donifan; Lohmann, U.; Chen, Chih-Chieh

    2012-10-27

    Several different ice nucleation parameterizations in two different General Circulation Models are used to understand the effects of ice nucleation on the mean climate state, and the climate effect of aerosol perturbations to ice clouds. The simulations have different ice microphysical states that are consistent with the spread of observations. These different states occur from different parameterizations of the ice cloud nucleation processes, and feature different balances of homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation. At reasonable efficiencies, consistent with laboratory measurements and constrained by the global radiative balance, black carbon has a small (-0.06 Wm?2) and not statistically significant climate effect. Indirect effects of anthropogenic aerosols on cirrus clouds occur mostly due to increases in homogeneous nucleation fraction as a consequence of anthropogenic sulfur emissions. The resulting ice indirect effects do not seem strongly dependent on the ice micro-physical balance, but are slightly larger for those states with less homogeneous nucleation in the base state. The total ice AIE is estimated at 0.26±0.09 Wm?2 (1? uncertainty). This represents an offset of 20-30% of the simulated total Aerosol Indirect Effect for ice and liquid clouds.

  7. FUTURE CLIMATE ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.M. Forester

    2000-03-14

    This Analysis/Model Report (AMR) documents an analysis that was performed to estimate climatic variables for the next 10,000 years by forecasting the timing and nature of climate change at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada (Figure l), the site of a potential repository for high-level radioactive waste. The future-climate estimates are based on an analysis of past-climate data from analog meteorological stations, and this AMR provides the rationale for the selection of these analog stations. The stations selected provide an upper and a lower climate bound for each future climate, and the data from those sites will provide input to the infiltration model (USGS 2000) and for the total system performance assessment for the Site Recommendation (TSPA-SR) at YM. Forecasting long-term future climates, especially for the next 10,000 years, is highly speculative and rarely attempted. A very limited literature exists concerning the subject, largely from the British radioactive waste disposal effort. The discussion presented here is one method, among many, of establishing upper and lower bounds for future climate estimates. The method used here involves selecting a particular past climate from many past climates, as an analog for future climate. Other studies might develop a different rationale or select other past climates resulting in a different future climate analog.

  8. Variation in Estimated Ozone-Related Health Impacts of Climate Change due to Modeling Choices and Assumptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Post, Ellen S.; Grambsch, A.; Weaver, C. P.; Morefield, Philip; Huang, Jin; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Nolte, Christopher G.; Adams, P. J.; Liang, Xin-Zhong; Zhu, J.; Mahoney, Hardee

    2012-11-01

    Future climate change may cause air quality degradation via climate-induced changes in meteorology, atmospheric chemistry, and emissions into the air. Few studies have explicitly modeled the potential relationships between climate change, air quality, and human health, and fewer still have investigated the sensitivity of estimates to the underlying modeling choices.

  9. Post-2020 climate agreements in the major economies assessed in the light of global models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tavoni, Massimo; Kriegler, Elmar; Riahi, Keywan; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Aboumahboub, Tino; Bowen, Alex; Calvin, Katherine V.; Campiglio, Emanuele; Kober, Tom; Jewell, Jessica; Luderer, Gunnar; Marangoni, Giacomo; McCollum, David; van Sluisveld, Mariesse; Zimmer, Anne; van der Zwaan, Bob

    2014-12-15

    Integrated assessment models can help in quantifying the implications of international climate agreements and regional climate action. This paper reviews scenario results from model intercomparison projects to explore different possible outcomes of post-2020 climate negotiations, recently announced pledges and their relation to the 2°C target. We provide key information for all the major economies, such as the year of emission peaking, regional carbon budgets and emissions allowances. We highlight the distributional consequences of climate policies, and discuss the role of carbon markets for financing clean energy investments, and achieving efficiency and equity.

  10. Climate WorkshopsClimate Workshops for Department Chairsp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tilbury, Dawn

    Climate WorkshopsClimate Workshops for Department Chairsp University of Wisconsin ADVANCE-IT Slides) #12;Why focus on departmental climate? Individuals experience climate in their immediate workplace negative climate than male faculty Improving department climate is critical for retention and advancement

  11. Climate in China ! Climate is weather over time.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Feifei

    Climate in China #12;! Climate is weather over time. ! Climatology is the study of climate. ! Climatic regions are areas with similar weather statistics. ! Climate influences ecosystems. ! On land, the location of climatic regions determines the location of ecosystems (e.g., forest, grassland, savanna

  12. ETHICAL DILEMMAS IN CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chauve, Cedric

    ETHICAL DILEMMAS IN CLIMATE CHANGE RECOMMENDATIONS FOR CANADIAN CLIMATE POLICY Roundtable Dialogue AND SELECTED THE FOLLOWING CLIMATE CHANGE POLICY AREAS FOR DETAILED DISCUSSION. PARTICIPANTS THEN WORKED Dilemmas in Climate Change roundtable dialogue, convened by Simon Fraser University's Centre for Dialogue

  13. The Climate Policy Dilemma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pindyck, Robert S.

    Climate policy poses a dilemma for environmental economists. The economic argument for stringent greenhouse gas (GHG) abatement is far from clear. There is disagreement among both climate scientists and economists concerning ...

  14. The Climate Policy Dilemma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pindyck, Robert S.

    Climate policy poses a dilemma for environmental economists. The economic argument for stringent GHG abatement is far from clear. There is disagreement among both climate scientists and economists over the likelihood of ...

  15. Indigenous Climate Justice Symposium

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Indigenous Climate Justice Symposium brings together Native speakers who are working to keep fossil fuels in the ground, by stopping coals terminals, oil trains and fracking, and protecting treaty resources from the threat of climate change.

  16. Climate Change Adaptation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE is adapting to climate change by applying a risk-based resiliency approach to identify and minimize climate-related vulnerabilities across all DOE policies, programs and activities.

  17. Climate Leadership Conference

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Climate Leadership Conference is your annual exchange for addressing global climate change through policy, innovation, and business solutions. Forward-thinking lead­ers from busi­ness, gov­ern...

  18. Climate Change and National Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alyson, Fleming; Summer, Kelly; Summer, Martin; Lauren, Franck; Jonathan, Mark

    2015-01-01

    data needed to construct effective climate change models and forecasts. Academic “Centers of Excellence” that focus on climate change

  19. METEOROLOGICAL Journal of Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Ming

    AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY Journal of Climate EARLY ONLINE RELEASE This is a preliminary PDF it is available. © 201 American Meteorological Society1 #12;Sun et al. climate downscaling of the Australian currents 1 Marine downscaling of a future climate scenario for Australian boundary currents Chaojiao Sun

  20. CLIMATE CHANGE AND BIODIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLIMATE CHANGE AND BIODIVERSITY THE CONTRIBUTION OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY #12;At, the origin of which is mainly related to human activities. For the first time climate change sends a strong of climate change and that will fully find material expression in the debates. What will the world we shape

  1. CLIMATE CHANGE & THE GREENHOUSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobar, Michael

    CLIMATE CHANGE & THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT #12;This development of these materials was supported under.nasa.gov/Features/BlueMarble/BlueMarble_history.php © 2014 University of Western Australia ISBN 978-0-646-93241-5 Title: Climate change and the greenhouse OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction to climate change resources 5 Alternative conceptions 6 References

  2. Forest Research: Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Research: Climate Change projects Forest Research is part of the Forestry Commission of climate change-related research is wide-ranging, covering impact assessment and monitoring, adaptation around a quarter of its research budget with Forest Research on climate change and related programmes

  3. Climate change vulnerability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hilderbrand, Robert H.

    Climate change vulnerability assessment of the Verde Island Passage, Philippines #12;ii This document should be cited as: R. Boquiren, G. Di Carlo, and M.C. Quibilan (Eds). 2010. Climate Change, Marine Climate Change Program Conservation International­Global Marine Division epidgeon

  4. Environment and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galles, David

    Migration, Environment and Climate Change: ASSESSING THE EVIDENCE #12;The opinions expressed;Migration, Environment and Climate Change: ASSESSING THE EVIDENCE Edited by Frank Laczko and Christine with with the financial support of #12;3 Migration, Environment and Climate Change: Assessing the Evidence Contents

  5. Campus Climate Camden Campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanson, Stephen José

    Campus Climate Report Camden Campus New Brunswick/Piscataway Campus Newark Campus Student Survey #12;I. INTRODUCTION Executive Summary The Rutgers Campus Climate Survey was designed to determine how University, the campus climate surveys revealed strong areas of satisfaction with the Rutgers University

  6. Climate Change Workshop 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    1 Climate Change Workshop 2007 Adaptive Management and Resilience Relevant for the Platte River, UNL Climate Change Workshop 2007 · Resilience ·Why it matters · Adaptive Management ·How it helps ·Adaptive Capacity · What it is Overview Climate Change Workshop 2007 "A public Domain, once a velvet carpet

  7. Climate2012 State of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    Climate2012 State of the #12;2 State of the Climate 2012 Climate2012 State of the The previous State of the Climate, released in March 2010 (www.csiro.au/Outcomes/Climate/Understanding/State-of-the- Climate.aspx) highlighted a multi-decadal warming trend over Australia's land and oceans, an increase

  8. Climate Change Economics and Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romano, Daniela

    AFRICA COLLEGE Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy Adapting to Climate Change 3 CLIMATE...Furthermore, there is strong scientific evidence that climate change will disrupt the global economy, environment and society a growing population in a changing climate is, therefore, a major global challenge. Changes in climate

  9. Clouds and climate: Unraveling a key piece of global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seinfeld, J.H.

    2000-02-01

    Federal policy decisions relating to mitigation of greenhouse gas and other emissions have the potential to exert an enormous impact on industries in which chemical engineers play a prominent role. Many in these industries keep close watch on the development of scientific understanding associated with predictions of global climate change. The authors review one of the most critical, and most uncertain, pieces of the climate puzzle, the role of aerosols and clouds in the global energy balance.

  10. Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

    2009-01-01

    lower greenhouse gas emissions from electricity productionAssessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Plug-in Hybridof national greenhouse gas emissions. Both motor vehicle

  11. The hedge value of international emissions trading under uncertainty Mort Webster n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The hedge value of international emissions trading under uncertainty Mort Webster n , Sergey Keywords: Climate change Emissions trading Uncertainty a b s t r a c t This paper estimates the value of international emissions trading, focusing on a here-to-fore neglected component; its value as a hedge against

  12. The European Union Emissions Trading System: should we throw the flagship out

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    No 48-2013 The European Union Emissions Trading System: should we throw the flagship out European Union Emissions Trading System: should we throw the flagship out with the bathwater? Abstract The European Union Emissions Trading System (EU-ETS), presented as the ``flagship'' of European climate policy

  13. Short term effects of moderate carbon prices on land use in the New Zealand emissions trading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Whendee

    Short term effects of moderate carbon prices on land use in the New Zealand emissions trading Zealand Emissions Trading Scheme (NZ ETS) was introduced through the Climate Change Response Act............................................................................ 14 #12;1 1 Introduction The New Zealand Emissions Trading Scheme (NZ ETS) was legislated through

  14. Carbon emissions in China: How far can new efforts bend the curve?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbon emissions in China: How far can new efforts bend the curve? Xiliang Zhang, Valerie J future; and improve methods to model, monitor and verify greenhouse gas emissions and climatic impacts emissions in China: How far can new efforts bend the curve? Xiliang Zhang§* , Valerie J. Karplus , Tianyu Qi

  15. Future Climate Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Houseworth

    2001-10-12

    This Analysis/Model Report (AMR) documents an analysis that was performed to estimate climatic variables for the next 10,000 years by forecasting the timing and nature of climate change at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada (Figure 1), the site of a potential repository for high-level radioactive waste. The future-climate estimates are based on an analysis of past-climate data from analog meteorological stations, and this AMR provides the rationale for the selection of these analog stations. The stations selected provide an upper and a lower climate bound for each future climate, and the data from those sites will provide input to the infiltration model (USGS 2000) and for the total system performance assessment for the Site Recommendation (TSPA-SR) at YM. Forecasting long-term future climates, especially for the next 10,000 years, is highly speculative and rarely attempted. A very limited literature exists concerning the subject, largely from the British radioactive waste disposal effort. The discussion presented here is one method, among many, of establishing upper and lower bounds for future climate estimates. The method used here involves selecting a particular past climate from many past climates, as an analog for future climate. Other studies might develop a different rationale or select other past climates resulting in a different future climate analog. Revision 00 of this AMR was prepared in accordance with the ''Work Direction and Planning Document for Future Climate Analysis'' (Peterman 1999) under Interagency Agreement DE-AI08-97NV12033 with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The planning document for the technical scope, content, and management of ICN 01 of this AMR is the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' (BSC 2001a). The scope for the TBV resolution actions in this ICN is described in the ''Technical Work Plan for: Integrated Management of Technical Product Input Department''. (BSC 2001b, Addendum B, Section 4.1).

  16. Uncertainty in Simulating Wheat Yields Under Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asseng, S.; Ewert, F.; Rosenzweig, C.; Jones, J.W.; Hatfield, Jerry; Ruane, Alex; Boote, K. J.; Thorburn, Peter; Rotter, R.P.; Cammarano, D.; Brisson, N.; Basso, B.; Martre, P.; Aggarwal, P.K.; Angulo, C.; Bertuzzi, P.; Biernath, C.; Challinor, AJ; Doltra, J.; Gayler, S.; Goldberg, R.; Grant, Robert; Heng, L.; Hooker, J.; Hunt, L.A.; Ingwersen, J.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Kersebaum, K.C.; Mueller, C.; Naresh Kumar, S.; Nendel, C.; O'Leary, G.O.; Olesen, JE; Osborne, T.; Palosuo, T.; Priesack, E.; Ripoche, D.; Semenov, M.A.; Shcherbak, I.; Steduto, P.; Stockle, Claudio O.; Stratonovitch, P.; Streck, T.; Supit, I.; Tao, F.; Travasso, M.; Waha, K.; Wallach, D.; White, J.W.; Williams, J.R.; Wolf, J.

    2013-09-01

    Anticipating the impacts of climate change on crop yields is critical for assessing future food security. Process-based crop simulation models are the most commonly used tools in such assessments1,2. Analysis of uncertainties in future greenhouse gas emissions and their impacts on future climate change has been increasingly described in the literature3,4 while assessments of the uncertainty in crop responses to climate change are very rare. Systematic and objective comparisons across impact studies is difficult, and thus has not been fully realized5. Here we present the largest coordinated and standardized crop model intercomparison for climate change impacts on wheat production to date. We found that several individual crop models are able to reproduce measured grain yields under current diverse environments, particularly if sufficient details are provided to execute them. However, simulated climate change impacts can vary across models due to differences in model structures and algorithms. The crop-model component of uncertainty in climate change impact assessments was considerably larger than the climate-model component from Global Climate Models (GCMs). Model responses to high temperatures and temperature-by-CO2 interactions are identified as major sources of simulated impact uncertainties. Significant reductions in impact uncertainties through model improvements in these areas and improved quantification of uncertainty through multi-model ensembles are urgently needed for a more reliable translation of climate change scenarios into agricultural impacts in order to develop adaptation strategies and aid policymaking.

  17. Quantifying the climate impacts of albedo changes due to biofuel production: a comparison with biogeochemical effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caiazzo, Fabio

    Lifecycle analysis is a tool widely used to evaluate the climate impact of greenhouse gas emissions attributable to the production and use of biofuels. In this paper we employ an augmented lifecycle framework that includes ...

  18. Potential Climatic Impacts and Reliability of Very Large-Scale Wind Farms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chien

    Meeting future world energy needs while addressing climate change requires large-scale deployment of low or zero greenhouse gas (GHG) emission technologies such as wind energy. The widespread availability of wind power has ...

  19. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Moving UBC Beyond Climate Neutral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    between Climate Change, Food Systems and UBC Campus..........5 Global Warming and Livestock Production products and there exist very few suggestions to reduce green house gas emissions (GHGE) other than

  20. Environmental Externalities in Electric Power Markets: Acid Rain, Urban Ozone, and Climate Change

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1995-01-01

    This article discusses the emissions resulting from the generation of electricity by utilities and their role in contributing to the environmental problems of acid rain, urban ozone, and climate change.

  1. Linking mitigation and adaptation in local climate change planning : the opportunity facing Somerville, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldwasser, Mia R. (Mia Rebecca)

    2015-01-01

    As climate change impacts are beginning to be felt and scientists project unavoidable levels of future change-cities are beginning to adapt. Simultaneously, they are expanding their commitment to mitigate carbon emissions, ...

  2. The potential for a nuclear renaissance : the development of nuclear power under climate change mitigation policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osouf, Nicolas

    2007-01-01

    Anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases are very likely to have already changed the Earth's climate, and will continue to change it for centuries if no action is taken. Nuclear power, a nearly carbon-free source of ...

  3. SUNOCO's Experience with the Climate Wise Environmental Database and Tracking Software 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verdiani, D.; James, K.

    2000-01-01

    In 1998, Sunoco joined the U.S. EPA's Climate Wise Program, an industry-government partnership through which companies make voluntary commitments to reduce their emissions of greenhouse gases and improve their environmental performance. In an effort...

  4. Climate change adaptation in the U.S. electric utility sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Higbee, Melissa (Melissa Aura)

    2013-01-01

    The electric utility sector has been a focus of policy efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, but even if these efforts are successful, the sector will need to adapt to the impacts of climate change. These are likely ...

  5. An investigation of carbon flows from forest soils, in relation to climatic warming 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cross, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Rises in anthropogenic CO2 emissions are now widely acknowledged to be responsible for changes in the global climate, with potentially disastrous consequences if these rises continue unchecked. Although knowledge of ecosystem ...

  6. The economic impact of global climate and tropospheric oxone on world agricultural production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiaodu

    2005-01-01

    The objective of my thesis is to analyze the economic impact on agriculture production from changes in climate and tropospheric ozone, and related policy interventions. The analysis makes use of the Emissions Prediction ...

  7. Expert assessment of vulnerability of permafrost carbon to climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turetsky, Merritt

    to be the main source of C emissions and climate forcing. Abbreviations Pg Petagrams C Carbon CO2 Carbon dioxide be 19­45 Pg C by 2040, 162­288 Pg C by 2100, and 381­616 Pg C by 2300 in CO2 equivalent using 100-year of emissions proposed here are unlikely to overshadow the impact of fossil fuel burning, which will continue

  8. Climate Change Review of Muller's chapter on Climate Change from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Browder, Tom

    Climate Change · Review of Muller's chapter on Climate Change from Physics for Future Society) controversy on climate change (e.g. resignation of Hal Lewis, Ivar Giaever and other notable. #12;Some climate changes basics · IPCC = Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change · The IPCC

  9. Climate Sensitivity of the Community Climate System Model Version 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bitz, Cecilia

    Climate Sensitivity of the Community Climate System Model Version 4 C. M. Bitz 1 , K.M. Shell 2 , P. Equilibrium climate sensitivity of the Community Climate System Model Version 4 (CCSM4) is 3.20 C for 1 version (CCSM3). The transient climate sensitivity of CCSM4 at 1 resolution is 1.72 C, which is about 0

  10. Climate Change: One, or Many? Professor of Climate and Culture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hulme, Mike

    Climate Change: One, or Many? Mike Hulme Professor of Climate and Culture Department of Geography Presidential Session: `Geographies of Climate Change' AAG Annual Conference, Tampa, Florida, 7-11 April 2014 climate system' 2 `The Plan' #12;One Climate? "... a complex, interactive system consisting

  11. Climate closure: Game over for climate skep4cs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovejoy, Shaun

    Climate closure: Game over for climate skep4cs S. Lovejoy, McGill, Physics McGill, Macdonald College Campus 4 November, 2014 #12;What is the climate climate is what you expect... "Climate is what you expect, weather is what you get." -Lazarus Long

  12. Climate history and paleoclimate -HS 2011 Future climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Climate history and paleoclimate - HS 2011 Future climate Climate History & Paleoclimate - December 9, 2011 1 #12;Climate history and paleoclimate - HS 2011 IPCC 2007 4th Assessment report (AR4) More information can be found: http://www.ipcc.ch/ Remark: 5th assessment report is due in 2013/2014 2 #12;Climate

  13. Climate history and paleoclimate -HS 2011 Climate proxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Climate history and paleoclimate - HS 2011 Climate proxies 18O Climate History & Paleoclimate ­ September 30, 2011 #12;How do we know about the past? Instrumental Historical Through proxies Climate proxies Climate history and paleoclimate - HS 2011 #12;What is a `proxy'? "Proxy, as used here

  14. Climate change policy and its effect on market power in the gas market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newbery, David

    2006-03-14

    Climate change policy and its effect on market power in the gas market David Newbery Faculty of Economics, Cambridge 10 November 2005 Abstract The European Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS) limits CO2 emissions from covered sectors... the market power of gas suppliers, and also amplifying the impact of gas price increases on the price of electricity. A rough estimate using just British data suggests that this could increase gas market power by 50%. Key words Climate change...

  15. Misrepresentation of the IPCC CO2 emission scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manning, Martin; Edmonds, James A.; Emori, S.; Grubler, Arnulf; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Joos, Fortunat; Kainuma, M.; Keeling, Ralph; Kram, Tom; Manning, Andrew; Meinhausen, Malte; Moss, Richard H.; Nakicenovic, Nebojsa; Riahi, Keywan; Rose, Steven K.; Smith, Steven J.; Swart, Robert; Van Vuuren, Detlef

    2010-06-01

    Estimates of recent fossil fuel CO2 emissions have been compared with the IPCC SRES (Special Report on Emission Scenarios) emission scenarios that had been developed for analysis of future climate change, impacts and mitigation. In some cases this comparison uses averages across subgroups of SRES scenarios and for one category of greenhouse gases (industrial sources of CO2). That approach can be misleading and cause confusion as it is inconsistent with many of the papers on future climate change projections that are based on a specific subset of closely scrutinized SRES scenarios, known as illustrative marker scenarios. Here, we show that comparison between recent estimates of fossil fuel emissions trends and the SRES illustrative marker scenarios leads to the conclusion that recent trends are not outside the SRES range. Furthermore, the recent economic downturn appears to have brought actual emission back toward the middle of the SRES illustrative marker scenarios. We also note that SRES emission scenarios are designed to reflect potential alternative long-term trends in a world without climate policy intervention and the trend in the resulting climate change is not sensitive to short-term fluctuations.

  16. Book Review: Rapid Climate Change: Causes, Consequences, and Solutions, by Scott G. McNall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ternes, Brock

    2013-01-01

    the most recent Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Control (IPCC) report is only four years old, it already offers insufficient calculations for just how Social Thought & Research 126 serious the damage is likely to be. These models are conservative... because emissions are exceeding the amount the IPCC climate models foresaw, and the climate is changing even more rapidly than the IPCC reports predicted. Therefore, we should expect changes even more extreme than what the IPCC’s “worst-case scenario...

  17. Using Land to Mitigate Climate Change: Hitting the Target, Recognizing the Trade-offs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    model, the Program seeks to: discover new interactions among natural and human climate system components that will shape our future; and improve methods to model, monitor and verify greenhouse gas emissions and climatic environmental conditions there may be implications for food prices. Using an integrated global system model, we

  18. Assessing climate change impacts on the near-term stability of the wind energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pryor, Sara C.

    Assessing climate change impacts on the near-term stability of the wind energy resource over- ble emissions of carbon dioxide. The wind energy resource is natu- rally a function of the climate, leading some to question the continued viability of the wind energy industry. Here we briefly articulate

  19. U.S. Greenhouse Gas Intensity and the Global Climate Change Initiative (released in AEO2005)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01

    On February 14, 2002, President Bush announced the Administrations Global Climate Change Initiative. A key goal of the Climate Change Initiative is to reduce U.S. greenhouse gas intensity by 18% over the 2002 to 2012 time frame. For the purposes of the initiative, greenhouse gas intensity is defined as the ratio of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions to economic output.

  20. U.S. Greenhouse Gas Intensity and the Global Climate Change Initiative (released in AEO2006)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01

    On February 14, 2002, President Bush announced the Administrations Global Climate Change Initiative. A key goal of the Climate Change Initiative is to reduce U.S. greenhouse gas (GHG) intensity-defined as the ratio of total U.S. GHG emissions to economic output-by 18% over the 2002 to 2012 time frame.

  1. Conservation and Global Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landweber, Laura

    V.6 Conservation and Global Climate Change Diane M. Debinski and Molly S. Cross OUTLINE 1. Introduction 2. How climate is changing 3. Environmental responses to climate change 4. Consequences of climate the coming decades will be preserving biodiversity in the face of climate change. It has become increasingly

  2. Abrupt Climate Change Inevitable Surprises

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abrupt Climate Change Inevitable Surprises Committee on Abrupt Climate Change Ocean Studies Board of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Abrupt climate change : inevitable surprises / Committee on Abrupt Climate Change, Ocean Studies Board, Polar Research Board, Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate

  3. Climate Change Proposed Scoping Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change Proposed Scoping Plan a amework for change Prepared by the California Air ResourcesBackgroundBackgroundBackground ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 4444 1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California

  4. Climate Change and Runoff Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Climate Change and Runoff Management in Wisconsin Fox-Wolf Watershed Alliance May 10, 2011 David S of Engineering #12;Overview · Understanding climate change · Wisconsin's changing climate · Expected impacts · Adaptation strategies #12;What is climate? "Climate is properly the long average of weather in a single place

  5. The Climate Impacts LINK Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feigon, Brooke

    The Climate Impacts LINK Project The Climatic Research Unit, University of East Anglia Funded by the UK Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions, Contract Ref EPG 1/1/68 The Climate Impacts LINK Project: Applying Results from the Hadley Centre's Climate Change Experiments for Climate

  6. Future Climate Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. G. Cambell

    2004-09-03

    This report documents an analysis that was performed to estimate climatic variables for the next 10,000 years by forecasting the timing and nature of climate change at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, the site of a repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The future-climate estimates are based on an analysis of past-climate data from analog meteorological stations, and this report provides the rationale for the selection of these analog stations. The stations selected provide an upper and a lower climate bound for each future climate, and the data from those sites will provide input to the following reports: ''Simulation of Net Infiltration for Present-Day and Potential Future Climates'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170007]), ''Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Model/Analysis for the License Application'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168504]), ''Features, Events, and Processes in UZ Flow and Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170012]), and ''Features, Events, and Processes in SZ Flow and Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170013]). Forecasting long-term future climates, especially for the next 10,000 years, is highly speculative and rarely attempted. A very limited literature exists concerning the subject, largely from the British radioactive waste disposal effort. The discussion presented here is one available forecasting method for establishing upper and lower bounds for future climate estimates. The selection of different methods is directly dependent on the available evidence used to build a forecasting argument. The method used here involves selecting a particular past climate from many past climates, as an analog for future climate. While alternative analyses are possible for the case presented for Yucca Mountain, the evidence (data) used would be the same and the conclusions would not be expected to drastically change. Other studies might develop a different rationale or select other past climates resulting in a different future climate analog. Other alternative approaches could include simulation of climate over the 10,000-year period; however, this modeling extrapolation is well beyond the bounds of current scientific practice and would not provide results with better confidence. A corroborative alternative approach may be found in ''Future Climate Analysis-10,000 Years to 1,000,000 Years After Present'' (Sharpe 2003 [DIRS 161591]). The current revision of this report is prepared in accordance with ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654]).

  7. Climate Change, Drought & Environment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Afternoon Plenary Session: Current Trends in the Advanced Bioindustry Climate Change, Drought, and Environment—Michael Champ, Executive Director, The Sustainable Water Challenge

  8. Climate Change Webinar Series

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Experts will provide findings from the Quadrennial Energy Review (QER) and outline federal energy policy objectives, proposals, and actions as they relate to climate change and resilience for...

  9. Protecting climate with forests.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    much more than carbon sequestration does, and often in abiophysics, carbon sequestration, climate change, climatethe accompanying carbon sequestration does—and sometimes in

  10. 1DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE IN BRAZIL Dangerous Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE IN BRAZIL Dangerous Climate A BrAzil-UK AnAlysis of ClimAte ChAnge And deforestAtion impACts in the AmAzon Change in Brazil #12;3DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE IN BRAZIL April 2011Alysis of ClimAte ChAnge And deforestAtion impACts in the AmAzon Change in Brazil #12;4 DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE

  11. ClimateChangeLIVE Webcast: Join the Climate Conversation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Join ClimateChangeLIVE's webcast, bringing together students and climate experts for a discussion about climate change and what students and classes around the country are doing to be part of the climate solution. Students will be able to interact with climate scientists and experts online through Facebook and Twitter. A GreenWorks! grant will be offered to help schools with climate action projects.

  12. Climate policy implications for agricultural water demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.

    2013-03-28

    Energy, water and land are scarce resources, critical to humans. Developments in each affect the availability and cost of the others, and consequently human prosperity. Measures to limit greenhouse gas concentrations will inevitably exact dramatic changes on energy and land systems and in turn alter the character, magnitude and geographic distribution of human claims on water resources. We employ the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), an integrated assessment model to explore the interactions of energy, land and water systems in the context of alternative policies to limit climate change to three alternative levels: 2.5 Wm-2 (445 ppm CO2-e), 3.5 Wm-2 (535 ppm CO2-e) and 4.5 Wm-2 (645 ppm CO2-e). We explore the effects of two alternative land-use emissions mitigation policy options—one which taxes terrestrial carbon emissions equally with fossil fuel and industrial emissions, and an alternative which only taxes fossil fuel and industrial emissions but places no penalty on land-use change emissions. We find that increasing populations and economic growth could be anticipated to almost triple demand for water for agricultural systems across the century even in the absence of climate policy. In general policies to mitigate climate change increase agricultural demands for water still further, though the largest changes occur in the second half of the century, under both policy regimes. The two policies examined profoundly affected both the sources and magnitudes of the increase in irrigation water demands. The largest increases in agricultural irrigation water demand occurred in scenarios where only fossil fuel emissions were priced (but not land-use change emission) and were primarily driven by rapid expansion in bioenergy production. In these scenarios water demands were large relative to present-day total available water, calling into question whether it would be physically possible to produce the associated biomass energy. We explored the potential of improved water delivery and irrigation system efficiencies. These could potentially reduce demands substantially. However, overall demands remained high under our fossil-fuel-only tax policy. In contrast, when all carbon was priced, increases in agricultural water demands were smaller than under the fossil-fuel-only policy and were driven primarily by increased demands for water by non-biomass crops such as rice. Finally we estimate the geospatial pattern of water demands and find that regions such as China, India and other countries in south and east Asia might be expected to experience greatest increases in water demands.?

  13. Global air quality and climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    Evaluation of Chemistry- Climate Models 5, 2010. 320 S. Wu,and R. Van Dorland, in Climate Change 2007: The PhysicalInter- governmental Panel on Climate Change, ed. D. Qin, M.

  14. Climate Change at Annual Timescales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stine, Alexander Robin

    2010-01-01

    1900–93, Journal of Climate, 10 (5), 1004–1020, 1997. Zhou,University of East Anglia’s Climate Research Unit (Jones etand those from WCRP “Climate of the Twentieth Century”

  15. Climate Change and Conceptual Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, David Joseph

    2013-01-01

    1.1.2 The Stark Reality of Climate Change . . . . . . . .1.2 Climate Change as a BehavioralEducation for Climate Change . . . . 1.4.1 The Numerically

  16. Climate Change and National Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alyson, Fleming; Summer, Kelly; Summer, Martin; Lauren, Franck; Jonathan, Mark

    2015-01-01

    for the impacts of climate change on national security. Pagea warming world. Page 11 “Climate change acts as a threatand the Threat of Climate Change,” The CNA Corporation, 2007

  17. Climate Action Plan 2009 Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capogna, Luca

    Climate Action Plan September 2009 Sustainability Council This plan outlines methods by which. This document is publicly available at http://sustainability.uark.edu. #12;2 University of Arkansas Climate....................................................................................................................................7 Climate Action Plan Committee

  18. book review: Climate change mapped

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shanahan, Mike

    2012-01-01

    of millions 2 .   Climate change is a moving target and introductions  to  climate change’, the Atlas stands out media reporting on climate change.   Cambridge University 

  19. Climate Change at Annual Timescales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stine, Alexander Robin

    2010-01-01

    carbon cycling to global climate change, Nature, 393 (6682),2005. Meehl, G. , et al. , Climate Change 2007: The PhysicalIntergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, chap. 10. Global

  20. MAPPING CLIMATE CHANGE EXPOSURES, VULNERABILITIES,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MAPPING CLIMATE CHANGE EXPOSURES, VULNERABILITIES, AND ADAPTATION TO PUBLIC HEALTH RISKS's California Climate Change Center JULY 2012 CEC5002012041 Prepared for: California Energy Commission of California. #12; ii ABSTRACT This study reviewed first available frameworks for climate change adaptation

  1. Truths we must tell ourselves to manage climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truths we must tell ourselves to manage climate change Robert Socolow socolow@princeton.edu CLAIRE hydrological cycle major changes in forest cover major emissions of greenhouse gases from the tundra. Today's science cannot predict how much atmospheric change would let these monsters in, nor how quickly

  2. Regionalized Global Energy Scenarios Meeting Stringent Climate Targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Regionalized Global Energy Scenarios Meeting Stringent Climate Targets ­ cost effective fuel in the energy system it is less costly to reduce CO2-emissions #12;Global energy system model #12;Global energy system model Optimisation #12;Global energy system model Optimisation Minimises the total cost under

  3. www.corporate-env-strategy.com Climate Change Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Andrew J.

    and losers« Suncor Energy, Pechiney and Ontario Power Generation) joined in a voluntary reduction partnership that all companies can benefit from greenhouse gas reductions. Climate change controls represent a market shift; the formation of new markets in pollution, pollution credits, money and emission abatement

  4. Multi-century Changes to Global Climate and Carbon Cycle: Results from a Coupled Climate and Carbon Cycle Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bala, G; Caldeira, K; Mirin, A; Wickett, M; Delire, C

    2005-02-17

    In this paper, we use a coupled climate and carbon cycle model to investigate the global climate and carbon cycle changes out to year 2300 that would occur if CO{sub 2} emissions from all the currently estimated fossil fuel resources were released to the atmosphere. By year 2300, the global climate warms by about 8 K and atmospheric CO{sub 2} reaches 1423 ppmv. The warming is higher than anticipated because the sensitivity to radiative forcing increases as the simulation progresses. In our simulation, the rate of emissions peak at over 30 PgC yr{sup -1} early in the 22nd century. Even at year 2300, nearly 50% of cumulative emissions remain in the atmosphere. In our simulations both soils and living biomass are net carbon sinks throughout the simulation. Despite having relatively low climate sensitivity and strong carbon uptake by the land biosphere, our model projections suggest severe long-term consequences for global climate if all the fossil-fuel carbon is ultimately released to the atmosphere.

  5. Climate Change Policies for the XXIst Century: Mechanisms, Predictions and Recommendations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khmelinskii, Igor

    2011-01-01

    Recent experimental works demonstrated that the Anthropogenic Global Warming (AGW) hypothesis, embodied in a series of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) global climate models, is erroneous. These works prove that atmospheric carbon dioxide contributes only very moderately to the observed warming, and that there is no climatic catastrophe in the making, independent on whether or not carbon dioxide emissions will be reduced. In view of these developments, we discuss climate predictions for the XXIst century. Based on the solar activity tendencies, a new Little Ice Age is predicted by the middle of this century, with significantly lower global temperatures. We also show that IPCC climate models can't produce any information regarding future climate, due to essential physical phenomena lacking in those, and that the current budget deficit in many EU countries is mainly caused by the policies promoting renewable energies and other AGW-motivated measures. In absence of any predictable adverse climate...

  6. Electricity Generation and Emissions Reduction Decisions under Policy Uncertainty: A General Equilibrium Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, J.

    The electric power sector, which accounts for approximately 40% of U.S. carbon dioxide emissions, will be a critical component of any policy the U.S. government pursues to confront climate change. In the context of uncertainty ...

  7. Forecasting and Capturing Emission Reductions Using Industrial Energy Management and Reporting Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, J.

    2010-01-01

    The Mandatory 2010 Green House Gas (GHG) Reporting Regulations and pending climate change legislation has increased interest in Energy Management and Reporting Systems (EMRS) as a means of both reducing and reporting GHG emissions. This paper...

  8. Synergy between Pollution and Carbon Emissions Control: Comparing China and the U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nam, Kyung-Min

    We estimate the potential synergy between pollution and climate control in the U.S. and China, summarizing the results as emissions cross-elasticities of control. We set a range of NOx and SO2 targets, and record the ...

  9. A Strategy for a Global Observing System for Verification of National Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prinn, Ronald G.

    With the risks of climate change becoming increasingly evident, there is growing discussion regarding international treaties and national regulations to lower greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Enforcement of such agreements ...

  10. Life-cycle assessment of Greenhouse Gas emissions from alternative jet fuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Hsin Min

    2008-01-01

    The key motivation for this work was the potential impact of alternative jet fuel use on emissions that contribute to global climate change. This work focused on one specific aspect in examining the feasibility of using ...

  11. Electricity generation and emissions reduction decisions under uncertainty : a general equilibrium analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, Jennifer F. (Jennifer Faye)

    2013-01-01

    The electric power sector, which accounts for approximately 40% of U.S. carbon dioxide emissions, will be a critical component of any policy the U.S. government pursues to confront climate change. In the context of uncertainty ...

  12. Climate change risk and response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahrl, Fredrich; Roland-Holst, David

    2008-01-01

    Climate Change and Electricity Demand: Applying the NewClimate Change and Electricity Demand in California. ”Extreme Heat, and Electricity Demand in California. ”

  13. Climate Change/Paleoclimate & Geochronology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate ChangePaleoclimate & Geochronology "The instrumental record is generally considered not to be long enough to give a complete picture of climate variability... It is...

  14. Climate Change and California Water where do we go from here?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maurer,. Edwin P.

    equity - Lowest estimate for 21st century Scenarios of CO2 emissions CO2 concentrations Lag Impacts, climate sensitive industries (agriculture, tourism), 5th largest economy in world · Water supply in CA Hold? How society changes in the future: "Scenarios" of greenhouse gas emissions: A1fi: Rapid economic

  15. Limiting net greenhouse gas emissions in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, R A; Watts, E C; Williams, E R

    1991-09-01

    In 1988, Congress requested that DOE produce a study on carbon dioxide inventory and policy to provide an inventory of emissions sources and to analyze policies to achieve a 20% reduction in carbon dioxide emissions in 5 to 10 years and a 50% reduction in 15 to 20 years. Energy and environmental technology data were analyzed using computational analysis models. This information was then evaluated, drawing on current scientific understanding of global climate change, the possible consequences of anthropogenic climate change (change caused by human activity) and the relationship between energy production and use and the emission of radiatively important gases. Topics discussed include: state of the science in estimating atmosphere/climate change relationships, the potential consequences of atmosphere/climate change, us greenhouse emissions past and present, an approach to analyzing the technical potential and cost of reducing US energy-related greenhouse gas emissions, current policy base and National Energy Strategy actions, fiscal instruments, regulatory instruments, combined strategies and instruments, macroeconomic impacts, carbon taxation and international trade, a comparison to other studies.

  16. Iterative Federalism and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlson, Ann E.

    2008-01-01

    INST. , GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS TRADING IN U.S. STATES:greenhouse-gas-emissions-trading-us-lessons-from-otc-nox.increase). 19 The emissions trading program also achieved

  17. CLIMATE CHANGE WHAT IS CLIMATE CHANGE?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, Frederick M.

    is the global power sector ¡ Generates around 40% of all global electricity from coal ¡ The power sector of Tons of Carbon Dioxide *an estimate from the World Resources Institute STEPS TAKEN TO COMBAT CLIMATE Kullen v. Wild by Nature ¡ WBN is an organic market also owned by King Kullen ¡ Prices nearly doubled

  18. EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Methane Emissions

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    of U.S. methane emissions are energy production, distribution, and use; agriculture; and waste management (Figure 17). U.S. methane emissions in 2009 totaled 731 MMTCO2e, 0.9...

  19. Limiting net greenhouse gas emissions in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, R A; Watts, E C; Williams, E R

    1991-09-01

    In 2988 the Congress requested DOE produce a study on carbon dioxide inventory and policy to provide an inventory of emissions sources and to analyze policies to achieve a 20% reduction in carbon dioxide emissions in 5 to 10 years and a 50% reduction in 15 to 20 years. This report presents the results of that study. Energy and environmental technology data were analyzed using computational analysis models. This information was then evaluated, drawing on current scientific understanding of global climate change, the possible consequences of anthropogenic climate change (change caused by human activity), and the relationship between energy production and use and the emission of radiactively important gases. Topics discussed include: energy and environmental technology to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, fossil energy production and electricity generation technologies, nuclear energy technology, renewable energy technologies, energy storage, transmission, and distribution technology, transportation, technology, industrial technology, residential and commercial building technology, greenhouse gas removal technology, approaches to restructuring the demand for energy.

  20. Climate policy gets down to business

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powicki, C.R.; Douglas, J.

    2006-07-01

    As Europe negotiates caps and allocations for Phase 2 emissions trading (for 2008-2012) the United States' first mandatory cap and trade initiative is gathering steam in the northeast. The Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) is designed to stabilise CO{sub 2} emissions from regulated power plants in seven states at approximately 1990 levels from 2009 to 2014 and then reduce them by a total of 10% during a second five-year period. The states included are: Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York and Vermont. Meanwhile, a variety of other regional and state-level initiatives are taking shape over a total of 30 states, targeting the electric power, automotive, oil and gas, real estate and financial services sectors. Emissions targets have been set by several utilities such as American Electric Power, Cinergy and DTE Energy. Several have joined the Chicago Climate Exchange (CCX) to trade emissions allowances. Decentralised initiatives are seen by David Victor, director of the Program in Energy and Sustainable Development at Stamford University, as a necessary development, coined a Madisonian approach. Several legislation proposals aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions have been introduced. Regardless of what Congress eventually turns into law, successful development of advanced technology will, in the authors' opinion, be the requisite for making them work. 5 figs.

  1. Climate Impact of Transportation A Model Comparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Girod, Bastien; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Grahn, Maria; Kitous, Alban; Kim, Son H.; Kyle, G. Page

    2013-06-01

    Transportation contributes to a significant and rising share of global energy use and GHG emissions. Therefore modeling future travel demand, its fuel use, and resulting CO2 emission is highly relevant for climate change mitigation. In this study we compare the baseline projections for global service demand (passenger-kilometers, ton-kilometers), fuel use, and CO2 emissions of five different global transport models using harmonized input assumptions on income and population. For four models we also evaluate the impact of a carbon tax. All models project a steep increase in service demand over the century. Technology is important for limiting energy consumption and CO2 emissions, but quite radical changes in the technology mix are required to stabilize or reverse the trend. While all models project liquid fossil fuels dominating up to 2050, they differ regarding the use of alternative fuels (natural gas, hydrogen, biofuels, and electricity), because of different fuel price projections. The carbon tax of US$200/tCO2 in 2050 stabilizes or reverses global emission growth in all models. Besides common findings many differences in the model assumptions and projections indicate room for improvement in modeling and empirical description of the transport system.

  2. Executive Summary An emissions inventory that identifies and quantifies a country's primary anthropogenic1 sources and sinks of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Little, John B.

    Executive Summary An emissions inventory that identifies and quantifies a country's primary emission sources and greenhouse gases to climate change. In 1992, the United States signed and ratified and make available...national inventories of anthropogenic emissions by sources and removals by sinks

  3. An Insurance-Led Response to Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webster, Anthony J

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is widely expected to increase weather related damage and the insurance claims that result from it. This has the undesirable consequence of increasing insurance costs, in a way that is independent of a customer's contribution to the causes of climate change. This is unfortunate because insurance provides a financial mechanism that mitigates some of the consequences of climate change, allowing damage from increasingly frequent events to be repaired. We observe that the insurance industry could reclaim any increase in claims due to climate change, by increasing the insurance premiums on energy producers for example, without needing government intervention or a new tax. We argue that this insurance-led levy must acknowledge both present carbon emissions and a modern industry's carbon inheritance, that is, to recognise that fossil-fuel driven industrial growth has provided the innovations and conditions needed for modern civilisation to exist and develop. The increases in premiums would initially b...

  4. Climate ChangeClimate Change and Runoff Managementand Runoff Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Climate ChangeClimate Change and Runoff Managementand Runoff Management in Wisconsinin Wisconsin NASECA February 3, 2011 David S. Liebl #12;Overview · Understanding climate change · Wisconsin's changing Vegetation indicators #12;Indicators of a changing climate J. Magnuson Source: IPCC 2007 Potter, et al

  5. The role of solar absorption in climate and climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 The role of solar absorption in climate and climate change William Collins UC Berkeley · Changes to surface and atmosphere by aerosols · Climate sensitivity to changes in aerosols and CO2 Research Boulder, Colorado, USA #12;2 Prior Research on Absorption and Climate Field Experiments: · Central

  6. Climate and Sockeye Salmon Climate effects on growth, phenology, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinch, Scott G.

    Climate and Sockeye Salmon Climate effects on growth, phenology, and survival of sockeye salmon in peer-reviewed studies that link sockeye salmon growth, phenology, and survival to climate variables 2. State the known knowledge in regards to effects of climate variables on growth, phenology, and survival

  7. Climate simulators and climate projections Jonathan Rougier1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dixon, Peter

    Climate simulators and climate projections Jonathan Rougier1 Department of Mathematics University;Abstract We provide a statistical interpretation of current practice in climate mod- elling. This includes: definitions for weather and climate; clarifying the relationship between simulator output and simulator

  8. Climate Change: Conflict, Security and Vulnerability Professor of Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hulme, Mike

    Climate Change: Conflict, Security and Vulnerability Mike Hulme Professor of Climate Change Science, Society and Sustainability Group School of Environmental Sciences Rethinking Climate Change, Conflict and Security University of Sussex, 18-19 October 2012 1 #12;Weather and climate ... vulnerability and security

  9. Bioenergy in Energy Transformation and Climate Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, Steven K.; Kriegler, Elmar; Bibas, Ruben; Calvin, Katherine V.; Popp, Alexander; van Vuuren, Detlef; Weyant, John

    2014-04-01

    Unlike fossil fuels, biomass is a renewable resource that can sequester carbon during growth, be converted to energy, and then re-grown. Biomass is also a flexible fuel that can service many end-uses. This paper explores the importance of bioenergy to potential future energy transformation and climate change management. Using a model comparison of fifteen models, we characterize and analyze future dependence on, and the value of, bioenergy in achieving potential long-run climate objectives—reducing radiative forcing to 3.7 and 2.8 W/m2 in 2100 (approximately 550 and 450 ppm carbon dioxide equivalent atmospheric concentrations). Model scenarios project, by 2050, bioenergy growth of 2 to 10% per annum reaching 5 to 35 percent of global primary energy, and by 2100, bioenergy becoming 15 to 50 percent of global primary energy. Non-OECD regions are projected to be the dominant suppliers of biomass, as well as consumers, with up to 35 percent of regional electricity from biopower by 2050, and up to 70 percent of regional liquid fuels from biofuels by 2050. Bioenergy is found to be valuable to many models with significant implications for mitigation costs and world consumption. The availability of bioenergy, in particular biomass with carbon dioxide capture and storage (BECCS), notably affects the cost-effective global emissions trajectory for climate management by accommodating prolonged near-term use of fossil fuels. We also find that models cost-effectively trade-off land carbon and nitrous oxide emissions for the long-run climate change management benefits of bioenergy. Overall, further evaluation of the viability of global large-scale bioenergy is merited.

  10. 1DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE IN BRAZIL Dangerous Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE IN BRAZIL Dangerous Climate A BrAzil-UK AnAlysis of ClimAte ChAnge And deforestAtion impACts in the AmAzon Change in Brazil #12;3DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE IN BRAZIL April 2011 Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Brazil, and the Met Office Hadley Centre, UK Dangerous Climate A BrAzil-UK An

  11. Campus Climate Survey Binghamton University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Zhongfei "Mark"

    1 Campus Climate Survey Binghamton University 2014-15 Office of Diversity, Equity a campus climate that values diversity, equity and inclusion. One of the early tasks of ODEI was to conduct a campus-wide "Campus Climate Survey" to gather a variety of data related to institutional climate

  12. IMPROVING FUTURE CLIMATE PREDICTION USING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    IMPROVING FUTURE CLIMATE PREDICTION USING PALAEOCLIMATE DATA A community White Paper for consideration by the Natural Environment Research Council, UK #12;#12;IMPROVING FUTURE CLIMATE PREDICTION USING Climate Symposium 2008 - Earth's Climate: Past, Present and Future", convened by H. Elderfield, M. Bickle

  13. Climate and the Tropical Atlantic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate and the Tropical Atlantic Presenter: Rick Lumpkin AOML Program Review 4-6 March 2014 What drives Tropical Atlantic climate changes and what are their impacts? #12;AOML Program Review2 Climate and the Tropical Atlantic Why this matters to NOAA and to society: Climate variability in the Tropical Atlantic

  14. Climate risk Learning from practice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smerdon, Jason E.

    Climate risk management in Africa: Learning from practice ClimateandSocietyNo.1 #12;The Climate and Society series is devoted to providing authoritative and accessible information on climate risk management of the International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI). IRI aims to contribute to sustainable living

  15. Climate change: Flawed science, or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate change: Fraud, Flawed science, or Fundamental dilemma? Prof Roy Thompson, FRSE #12;Fraud innovation Dilemma... Vicious Circle #12;1. Climate Change - Weather vs. climate - The greenhouse effect - Past climates 2. Impacts - Plants & animals - The seasons 3. Fundamental dilemma - Overpopulation

  16. Information Visualization in Climate Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tominski, Christian

    relevant association between time series at vertices · Successes: El-Nino Southern Oscillation, "Climate

  17. Understanding and Attributing Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Box, Jason E.

    9 Understanding and Attributing Climate Change Coordinating Lead Authors: Gabriele C. Hegerl (USA. Nicholls, J.E. Penner and P.A. Stott, 2007: Under- standing and Attributing Climate Change. In: Climate of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change [Solomon, S., D. Qin, M. Manning, Z. Chen, M. Marquis, K.B. Averyt, M

  18. Biological Impacts of Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarty, John P.

    Biological Impacts of Climate Change John P McCarty, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, NE and reproduction depend on how well adapted individuals are to local climate patterns. Climate change can disrupt subsequent impacts on populations or species' distributions across geographic regions. Climate change may

  19. Potential Impacts of CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Potential Impacts of CLIMATE CHANGE on U.S. Transportation Potential Impacts of CLIMATE CHANGE on U.S. Transportation TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH BOARD SPECIAL REPORT 290 #12;#12;Committee on Climate Change and U Washington, D.C. 2008 www.TRB.org Potential Impacts of CLIMATE CHANGE on U.S. Transportation TRANSPORTATION

  20. Urban Growth and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahn, Matthew E.

    2008-01-01

    2007. The European Union Emissions Trading Scheme: Origins,Decentralization in the EU Emissions Trading Scheme and

  1. Energy, Climate & Infrastructure Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy, Climate & Infrastructure Security EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE IN THE NATIONAL INTEREST Sandia, and reactorsystemoverviews. Training in Action: Gulf Nuclear Energy InfrastructureInstitute In2011,SandiateamedwiththeNuclearSecurity energy safety, security,safeguards,andnonproliferation. Training Sandia National Laboratories experts

  2. PALEOCLIMATOLOGY Reconstructing Climates of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Briffa, Keith

    recognized as an important source of chronological and climatic information. In Europe, stud- ies of tree growth were facilitated by the availability of wood from archeological sites, as well as from mod- ern

  3. Refining climate models

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Warren, Jeff; Iversen, Colleen; Brooks, Jonathan; Ricciuto, Daniel

    2014-06-26

    Using dogwood trees, Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers are gaining a better understanding of the role photosynthesis and respiration play in the atmospheric carbon dioxide cycle. Their findings will aid computer modelers in improving the accuracy of climate simulations.

  4. Climate Change Adaptation Planning

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This course provides an introduction to planning for climate change impacts, with examples of tribes that have been going through the adaptation planning process. The course is intended for tribal...

  5. Refining climate models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Jeff; Iversen, Colleen; Brooks, Jonathan; Ricciuto, Daniel

    2012-10-31

    Using dogwood trees, Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers are gaining a better understanding of the role photosynthesis and respiration play in the atmospheric carbon dioxide cycle. Their findings will aid computer modelers in improving the accuracy of climate simulations.

  6. Climate and energy policy for U.S. passenger vehicles : a technology-rich economic modeling and policy analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karplus, Valerie J

    2011-01-01

    Climate and energy security concerns have prompted policy action in the United States and abroad to reduce petroleum use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from passenger vehicles. Policy affects the decisions of firms and ...

  7. The economics of long-term global climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    This report is intended to provide an overview of economic issues and research relevant to possible, long-term global climate change. It is primarily a critical survey, not a statement of Administration or Department policy. This report should serve to indicate that economic analysis of global change is in its infancy few assertions about costs or benefits can be made with confidence. The state of the literature precludes any attempt to produce anything like a comprehensive benefit-cost analysis. Moreover, almost all the quantitative estimates regarding physical and economic effects in this report, as well as many of the qualitative assertions, are controversial. Section I provides background on greenhouse gas emissions and their likely climatic effects and on available policy instruments. Section II considers the costs of living with global change, assuming no substantial efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Section III considers costs of reducing these emissions, though the available literature does not contain estimates of the costs of policies that would, on the assumptions of current climate models, prevent climate change altogether. The individual sections are not entirely compartmentalized, but can be read independently if necessary.

  8. Vehicle Emissions Review- 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reviews vehicle emission control highlighting representative studies that illustrate the state-of-the-art

  9. Multiwavelength Thermal Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Multiwavelength Astronomy NASA #12;Thermal Emission #12;Thermal Emission Non-thermal p-p collisions Optical IR Radio/ Microwave sources of emission massive stars, WHIM, Ly many dust, cool objects-ray ~GeV Gamma-ray ~TeV sources of emission AGN, clusters, SNR, binaries, stars AGN (obscured), shocks

  10. Diesel Emission Control Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reviews regulatory requirements and technology approaches for diesel emission control for heavy and light duty applications

  11. Preparing Low-emission and Climate-Resilient Development Strategies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    development strategies (LECRDS). Working within relevant national, local, and regional planning and coordination frameworks, LECRDS are designed to build upon existing...

  12. Climate impacts of energy technologies depend on emissions timing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Morgan Rae

    Energy technologies emit greenhouse gases with differing radiative efficiencies and atmospheric lifetimes. Standard practice for evaluating technologies, which uses the global warming potential (GWP) to compare the integrated ...

  13. Climate regulation of fire emissions and deforestation in equatorial Asia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    on the anomaly optimization (see Materials and Methods) andabsolute optimization approach described in Materials and

  14. Reversing Climate Change: Using Carbon Technology to Offset Carbon Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with a walk-away safe, less expensive, more proliferation-resistant form of nuclear power, with acceptable solutions for the problems of high-level and low-level nuclear waste. Taken together, STRs and MSBRs allow and Technology Advisory Group and as an Advisor on Energy to the Premier of Taiwan. He also Chairs the Advisory

  15. Emission Regulations Reduced Impact of Climate Change in CA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    black carbon on California. In conducting the study, scientists used computer models and air pollution data collected by aircraft, satellite and ground monitors. The study's...

  16. EPA Climate Leaders Simplified GHG Emissions Calculator (SGEC) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:of the NationalDynetek Europe GmbHEDENERGYEOL EnergyEnergy

  17. Preparing Low-emission and Climate-Resilient Development Strategies

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg,Energy LLC JumpPhonoSolar and WindPrayagMonitoring,

  18. Emissions pathways, climate change, and impacts on California (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article) | SciTech(Journal Article)at theReport)Connect Conference:Article)

  19. Incomplete Environmental Regulation, Imperfect Competition, and Emissions Leakage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fowlie, Meredith

    in response to gridlock and policy inaction at higher levels of governance.4 The global nature of the climateIncomplete Environmental Regulation, Imperfect Competition, and Emissions Leakage January 2009 Meredith Fowliey Abstract For political, jurisdictional and technical reasons, environmental regulation

  20. The Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP): Overview and Description of Models, Simulations and Climate Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamarque, J.-F.; Shindell, Drew; Josse, B.; Young, P. J.; Cionni, I.; Eyring, Veronika; Bergmann, D.; Cameron-Smith, Philip; Collins, W. J.; Doherty, R.; Dalsoren, S.; Faluvegi, G.; Folberth, G.; Ghan, Steven J.; Horowitz, L.; Lee, Y. H.; MacKenzie, I. A.; Nagashima, T.; Naik, Vaishali; Plummer, David; Righi, M.; Rumbold, S.; Schulz, M.; Skeie, R. B.; Stevenson, D. S.; Strode, S.; Sudo, K.; Szopa, S.; Voulgarakis, A.; Zeng, G.

    2013-02-07

    The Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP) consists of a series of timeslice experiments targeting the long-term changes in atmospheric composition between 1850 and 2100, with the goal of documenting radiative forcing and the associated composition changes. Here we introduce the various simulations performed under ACCMIP and the associated model output. The ACCMIP models have a wide range of horizontal and vertical resolutions, vertical extent, chemistry schemes and interaction with radiation and clouds. While anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions were specified for all time slices in the ACCMIP protocol, it is found that the natural emissions lead to a significant range in emissions, mostly for ozone precursors. The analysis of selected present-day climate diagnostics (precipitation, temperature, specific humidity and zonal wind) reveals biases consistent with state-of-the-art climate models. The model-to-model comparison of changes in temperature, specific humidity and zonal wind between 1850 and 2000 and between 2000 and 2100 indicates mostly consistent results, but with outliers different enough to possibly affect their representation of climate impact on chemistry.

  1. Decomposing the Impact of Alternative Technology Sets on Future Carbon Emissions Growth1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wing, Ian Sue

    of carbon capture and storage, nuclear, and hydroelectric generation all lead to upward shifts in the long are the drivers of future global carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions growth and how would the availability of key Classification: D58, Q4, Q54, O1, Keywords: Asia, energy use, carbon emissions, global climate change, computable

  2. Temporal controls on global dust emissions: The role of surface S. Engelstaedter1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington, Richard

    in the atmosphere will not be realistic either. While climatically important atmospheric gases such as CO2 are well with constraining dust emissions spatially came with the `preferred source' concept following analysis of the firstTemporal controls on global dust emissions: The role of surface gustiness S. Engelstaedter1 and R

  3. EIC Climate Change Technology Conference 2013 Electric Trolleybus System Proposed for Downtown St. John's for Private Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coles, Cynthia

    , specifically an electric trolleybus system for controlling both on-road vehicle volumes and emissions fuel, air pollution, climate change, global warming, external costs, vehicle population, electricEIC Climate Change Technology Conference 2013 1 Electric Trolleybus System Proposed for Downtown St

  4. The effect of climate change, population distribution, and climate mitigation on building energy use in the U.S. and China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Yuyu; Eom, Jiyong; Clarke, Leon E.

    2013-08-01

    A changing climate will affect the energy system in a number of ways, one of which is through changes in demands for heating and cooling in buildings. Understanding the potential effect of climate on heating and cooling demands must take into account not only the manner in which the building sector might evolve over time - including, for example, movements from rural to urban environments in developing countries - but also important uncertainty about the nature of climate change itself and the growth and movements of populations over time. In this study, we explored the uncertainty in climate change impacts on heating and cooling by constructing estimates of heating and cooling degree days for both a reference (no-policy) scenario and a climate mitigation scenario built from 0.5 degree latitude by 0.5 degree longitude resolution output from three different Global Climate Models (GCMs) and three gridded scenarios of population distribution. The implications that changing climate and population distribution might have for building energy consumption in the U.S. and China were then explored by using the heating and cooling degree days results as inputs to a detailed, building energy model, nested in the long-term global integrated assessment framework, Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM). Across the climate models and population distribution scenarios, the results indicate that unabated climate change would cause total final energy consumption to decrease modestly in both U.S. and China buildings by the end of the century, as decreased heating consumption is more than balanced by increased cooling using primarily electricity. However, the results also indicate that when indirect emissions from the power sector are also taken into account, climate change may have negligible effect on building sector CO2 emissions in the two countries. The variation in results due to variation of population distribution is noticeably smaller than variation due to the use of different climate models.

  5. Geoengineering the Earth's Climate

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Google Tech Talks

    2009-09-01

    Emergency preparedness is generally considered to be a good thing, yet there is no plan regarding what we might do should we be faced with a climate emergency. Such an emergency could take the form of a rapid shift in precipitation patterns, a collapse of the great ice sheets, the imminent triggering of strong climate system feedbacks, or perhaps the loss of valuable ecosystems. Over the past decade, we have used climate models to investigate the potential to reverse some of the effects of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere by deflecting some incoming sunlight back to space. This would probably be most cost-effectively achieved with the placement of small particles in or above the stratosphere. Our model simulations indicate that such geoengineering approaches could potentially bring our climate closer to the state is was in prior to the introduction of greenhouse gases. This talk will present much of what is known about such geoengineering approaches, and raise a range of issues likely to stimulate lively discussion. Speaker: Ken Caldeira Ken Caldeira is a scientist at the Carnegie Institution Department of Global Ecology and a Professor (by courtesy) at the Stanford University Department of Environmental and Earth System Sciences. Previously, he worked for 12 years in the Energy and Environment Directorate at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Department of Energy). His research interests include the numerical simulation of Earth's climate, carbon, and biogeochemistry; ocean acidification; climate emergency response systems; evaluating approaches to supplying environmentally-friendly energy services; ocean carbon sequestration; long-term evolution of climate and geochemical cycles; and marine biogeochemical cycles. Caldeira has a B.A. in Philosophy from Rutgers College and an M.S. and Ph.D. in Atmospheric Sciences from New York University.

  6. Methane emissions from MBT landfills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heyer, K.-U. Hupe, K.; Stegmann, R.

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • Compilation of methane generation potential of mechanical biological treated (MBT) municipal solid waste. • Impacts and kinetics of landfill gas production of MBT landfills, approach with differentiated half-lives. • Methane oxidation in the waste itself and in soil covers. • Estimation of methane emissions from MBT landfills in Germany. - Abstract: Within the scope of an investigation for the German Federal Environment Agency (“Umweltbundesamt”), the basics for the estimation of the methane emissions from the landfilling of mechanically and biologically treated waste (MBT) were developed. For this purpose, topical research including monitoring results regarding the gas balance at MBT landfills was evaluated. For waste treated to the required German standards, a methane formation potential of approximately 18–24 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/t of total dry solids may be expected. Monitoring results from MBT landfills show that a three-phase model with differentiated half-lives describes the degradation kinetics in the best way. This is due to the fact that during the first years of disposal, the anaerobic degradation processes still proceed relatively intensively. In addition in the long term (decades), a residual gas production at a low level is still to be expected. Most of the soils used in recultivation layer systems at German landfills show a relatively high methane oxidation capacity up to 5 l CH{sub 4}/(m{sup 2} h). However, measurements at MBT disposal sites indicate that the majority of the landfill gas (in particular at non-covered areas), leaves the landfill body via preferred gas emission zones (hot spots) without significant methane oxidation. Therefore, rather low methane oxidation factors are recommended for open and temporarily covered MBT landfills. Higher methane oxidation rates can be achieved when the soil/recultivation layer is adequately designed and operated. Based on the elaborated default values, the First Order Decay (FOD) model of the IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories, 2006, was used to estimate the methane emissions from MBT landfills. Due to the calculation made by the authors emissions in the range of 60,000–135,000 t CO{sub 2-eq.}/a for all German MBT landfills can be expected. This wide range shows the uncertainties when the here used procedure and the limited available data are applied. It is therefore necessary to generate more data in the future in order to calculate more precise methane emission rates from MBT landfills. This is important for the overall calculation of the climate gas production in Germany which is required once a year by the German Government.

  7. Climate & Environmental Sciences | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate & Environment SHARE Climate and Environmental Sciences Climate and environmental scientists at ORNL conduct research, develop technology and perform analyses to understand...

  8. Climate & Environmental Sciences | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate and Environment SHARE Climate and Environmental Sciences Climate and environmental scientists at ORNL conduct research, develop technology and perform analyses to...

  9. Climate Change Science Institute | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change Science Institute SHARE Climate Change Science Institute To advance understanding of the Earth system, describe the consequences of climate change, and evaluate and...

  10. EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Nitrous Oxide Emissions

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    U.S. nitrous oxide emissions include agriculture, energy use, industrial processes, and waste management (Figure 22). The largest source is agriculture (73 percent), and the...

  11. Climate Change Policies for the XXIst Century: Mechanisms, Predictions and Recommendations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Igor Khmelinskii; Peter Stallinga

    2014-05-15

    Recent experimental works demonstrated that the Anthropogenic Global Warming (AGW) hypothesis, embodied in a series of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) global climate models, is erroneous. These works prove that atmospheric carbon dioxide contributes only very moderately to the observed warming, and that there is no climatic catastrophe in the making, independent on whether or not carbon dioxide emissions will be reduced. In view of these developments, we discuss climate predictions for the XXIst century. Based on the solar activity tendencies, a new Little Ice Age is predicted by the middle of this century, with significantly lower global temperatures. We also show that IPCC climate models can't produce any information regarding future climate, due to essential physical phenomena lacking in those, and that the current budget deficit in many EU countries is mainly caused by the policies promoting renewable energies and other AGW-motivated measures. In absence of any predictable adverse climate consequences of carbon dioxide emissions, and with no predictable shortage of fossil fuels, we argue for recalling of all policies aimed at reducing carbon dioxide emissions and usage of expensive renewable energy sources. The concepts of carbon credits, green energy and green fuels should be abandoned in favor of productive, economically viable and morally acceptable solutions.

  12. A Struggle for Reconciliation of Development and Climate Protection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Costa, Luís; Kropp, Jürgen P

    2010-01-01

    Although developing countries are called to participate on the efforts of reducing CO2 emissions in order to avoid dangerous climate change, the implications of CO2 reduction targets in human development standards of developing countries remain a matter of debate. We show the existence of a positive and - time dependent correlation between the Human Development Index (HDI) and per capita CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion. Based on this empirical relation and three population scenarios extracted from the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment report, we calculate for the first time the cumulative CO2 emissions necessary for developing countries to achieve particular HDI thresholds. If current demographic and development trends are maintained, we estimate that by 2050 around 85% of the world's population will live in countries with high HDI (above 0.8) as defined in the United Nations Human Development Report. In particular, we estimate that at least 300Gt of cumulative CO2 emissions between 2000 and 2050 are ...

  13. Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment for Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopher P. Ischay; Ernest L. Fossum; Polly C. Buotte; Jeffrey A. Hicke; Alexander Peterson

    2014-10-01

    The University of Idaho (UI) was asked to participate in the development of a climate change vulnerability assessment for Idaho National Laboratory (INL). This report describes the outcome of that assessment. The climate change happening now, due in large part to human activities, is expected to continue in the future. UI and INL used a common framework for assessing vulnerability that considers exposure (future climate change), sensitivity (system or component responses to climate), impact (exposure combined with sensitivity), and adaptive capacity (capability of INL to modify operations to minimize climate change impacts) to assess vulnerability. Analyses of climate change (exposure) revealed that warming that is ongoing at INL will continue in the coming decades, with increased warming in later decades and under scenarios of greater greenhouse gas emissions. Projections of precipitation are more uncertain, with multi model means exhibiting somewhat wetter conditions and more wet days per year. Additional impacts relevant to INL include estimates of more burned area and increased evaporation and transpiration, leading to reduced soil moisture and plant growth.

  14. What is the importance of climate model bias when projecting the impacts of climate change on land surface processes?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, M. L.; Rajagopalan, K.; Chung, S. H.; Jiang, X.; Harrison, J. H.; Nergui, T.; Guenther, Alex B.; Miller, C.; Reyes, J.; Tague, C. L.; Choate, J. S.; Salathe, E.; Stockle, Claudio O.; Adam, J. C.

    2014-05-16

    Regional climate change impact (CCI) studies have widely involved downscaling and bias-correcting (BC) Global Climate Model (GCM)-projected climate for driving land surface models. However, BC may cause uncertainties in projecting hydrologic and biogeochemical responses to future climate due to the impaired spatiotemporal covariance of climate variables and a breakdown of physical conservation principles. Here we quantify the impact of BC on simulated climate-driven changes in water variables(evapotranspiration, ET; runoff; snow water equivalent, SWE; and water demand for irrigation), crop yield, biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC), nitric oxide (NO) emissions, and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) export over the Pacific Northwest (PNW) Region. We also quantify the impacts on net primary production (NPP) over a small watershed in the region (HJ Andrews). Simulation results from the coupled ECHAM5/MPI-OM model with A1B emission scenario were firstly dynamically downscaled to 12 km resolutions with WRF model. Then a quantile mapping based statistical downscaling model was used to downscale them into 1/16th degree resolution daily climate data over historical and future periods. Two series climate data were generated according to the option of bias-correction (i.e. with bias-correction (BC) and without bias-correction, NBC). Impact models were then applied to estimate hydrologic and biogeochemical responses to both BC and NBC meteorological datasets. These im20 pact models include a macro-scale hydrologic model (VIC), a coupled cropping system model (VIC-CropSyst), an ecohydrologic model (RHESSys), a biogenic emissions model (MEGAN), and a nutrient export model (Global-NEWS). Results demonstrate that the BC and NBC climate data provide consistent estimates of the climate-driven changes in water fluxes (ET, runoff, and water demand), VOCs (isoprene and monoterpenes) and NO emissions, mean crop yield, and river DIN export over the PNW domain. However, significant differences rise from projected SWE, crop yield from dry lands, and HJ Andrews’s ET between BC and NBC data. Even though BC post-processing has no significant impacts on most of the studied variables when taking PNW as a whole, their effects have large spatial variations and some local areas are substantially influenced. In addition, there are months during which BC and NBC post-processing produces significant differences in projected changes, such as summer runoff. Factor-controlled simulations indicate that BC post-processing of precipitation and temperature both substantially contribute to these differences at region scales. We conclude that there are trade-offs between using BC climate data for offline CCI studies vs. direct modeled climate data. These trade-offs should be considered when designing integrated modeling frameworks for specific applications; e.g., BC may be more important when considering impacts on reservoir operations in mountainous watersheds than when investigating impacts on biogenic emissions and air quality (where VOCs are a primary indicator).

  15. Online measurements of the emissions of intermediate-volatility and semi-volatile organic compounds from aircraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herndon, S. C.

    A detailed understanding of the climate and air quality impacts of aviation requires measurements of the emissions of intermediate-volatility and semi-volatile organic compounds (I/SVOCs) from aircraft. Currently both the ...

  16. Reducing the negative human-health impacts of bioenergy crop emissions through region-specific crop selection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guenther, Alex

    An expected global increase in bioenergy-crop cultivation as an alternative to fossil fuels will have consequences on both global climate and local air quality through changes in biogenic emissions of volatile organic ...

  17. BP's Perspective on Emissions Purdue Emissions Trading Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BP's Perspective on Emissions Trading Purdue Emissions Trading Workshop April 30, 2010 Mark - Government policies can create a carbon price via three primary mechanisms: - Emissions trading (BP's strong

  18. Status of Climate Change 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North, G.

    2013-01-01

    stream_source_info ESL-KT-13-12-56.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 3413 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name ESL-KT-13-12-56.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 Status of Climate Change 2013... CaTee Conference San Antonio 2013 ESL-KT-13-12-56 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 Menu for Today • IPCC 2013: Assessment Report #5 • Facts about Climate Change • Who will Win, Who will Lose...

  19. Climate Time-Machine

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D BGene NetworkNuclearDNP 20082 P r o j e c t D eClimateClimate

  20. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits &BradburyMayARM-0501Classroom-presentations SignClimateClimate

  1. www.noaa.gov/climate Proposed Climate Service in NOAA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    domestic product depends on accurate weather and climate information. Concerns from business, industry and information about climate that helps people make informed decisions in their lives, businesses, September 2010 Climate Service Example: Construction NOAA provides air-freezing data to the home building

  2. Ensemble climate predictions using climate models and observational constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    REVIEW Ensemble climate predictions using climate models and observational constraints BY PETER A. STOTT 1,* AND CHRIS E. FOREST 2 1 Hadley Centre for Climate Change (Reading Unit), Meteorology Building, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA Two different approaches are described

  3. Trading permanent and temporary carbon emissions credits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marland, Gregg; Marland, Eric

    2009-08-01

    In this issue of Climatic Change, Van Kooten (2009) addresses an issue that has bedeviled negotiators since the drafting stage of the Kyoto Protocol. If we accept that increasing withdrawals of carbon dioxide from the atmpshere has the same net impact on the climate system as reducing emissions of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere, how do we design a system that allows trading of one for the other? As van Kooten expresses the challenge: 'The problem is that emissions reduction and carbon sequestration, while opposite sides of the same coin in some sense, are not directly comparable, thereby inhibiting their trade in carbon markets.' He explains: 'The difficulty centers on the length of time that mitigation strategies without CO{sub 2} from entering the atmosphere - the duration problem.' While reducing emissions of CO{sub 2} represents an essentially permanent benefit for the atmosphere, capturing CO{sub 2} that has been produced (whether capture is from the atmosphere or directly from, for example, the exhaust from power plants) there is the challenge of storing the carbon adn the risk that it will yet escape to the atmosphere. Permanent benefit to the atmosphere is often not assured for carbon sequestration activities. This is especially true if the carbon is taken up and stored in the biosphere - e.g. in forest trees or agricultural soils.

  4. Global Climate Change and Demand for Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    1 Global Climate Change and Demand for Energy Tyson Research Center and International Center et al. Climate Variability and Climate Change: The New Climate Dice http://data, 2012 Tyson Research Center International Center for Advanced Research and Sustainability (I

  5. UK Climate Change Risk Assessment and National

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    UK Climate Change Risk Assessment and National Adaptation Programme Meg Patel Defra #12;Legislative Framework Climate Change Act 2008 Adaptation Reporting Power 2011 Climate Change Risk Assessment: Climate Change Risk Assessment Elevensectors(forinitial analysis) Health Energy Transport Built

  6. Climate Change and National Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alyson, Fleming; Summer, Kelly; Summer, Martin; Lauren, Franck; Jonathan, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Pew Project on National Security, Energy and Climate http://of climate change, energy security and economic stability.DoD is improving U.S. energy security and national security.

  7. Farming: A Climate Change Culprit

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Farming: A Climate Change Culprit Farming: A Climate Change Culprit Simulations run at NERSC show impact of land-use change on African monsoon precipitation June 7, 2014 | Tags:...

  8. Climate Change and Urban Trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    Climate Change and Urban Trees: effects on disease and insect pests Drew C. Zwart, Ph.D. Bartlett · Other climate related impacts on plant health: Elevated atmospheric CO2 (no real question about

  9. Climate Extremes, Uncertainty and Impacts Climate Change Challenge: The Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Extremes, Uncertainty and Impacts Climate Change Challenge: The Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC, AR4) has resulted in a wider acceptance of global climate change climate extremes and change impacts. Uncertainties in process studies, climate models, and associated

  10. Information theory and climate prediction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leung, Lai-yung

    1988-01-01

    obtained from more sophisticated model. It is amazing that the complicated climate system can be described by such simple energy balance concept. The assumption of homogeneous noise over the sphere is for convenient of calculation and interpretation... in climate prediction study will be demonstrated by using a simple stochastic climate model. Its interpretations and usefulness especially when generalized to other climate models will be discussed and suggestions for using these concepts of information...

  11. 1, 231253, 2005 Synoptic climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    CPD 1, 231­253, 2005 Synoptic climate change as driver of New Zealand glaciation H. Rother and J / Esc Print Version Interactive Discussion EGU Climate of the Past Discussions, 1, 231­253, 2005 www.climate-of-the-past.net/cpd/1/231/ SRef-ID: 1814-9359/cpd/2005-1-231 European Geosciences Union Climate of the Past Discussions

  12. Climate Change Action in Arizona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owens, Steve

    2009-01-01

    that increasing emissions of car- bon dioxide (C02), methaneCalifornia "Clean Car" GHG vehicle emissions standards; 28.gas exhaust emission limits for passenger car, light-duty

  13. Emissions Trading and Social Justice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farber, Daniel A

    2011-01-01

    David  M.  Driesen,  Does  Emissions  Trading  Encourage  Jason  Coburn,  Emissions  Trading   and   Environmental  Szambelan,  U.S.  Emissions  Trading  Markets  for  SO 2  

  14. Business Responses to Climate Change. Identifying Emergent Strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolk, A.; Pinkse, J.

    2005-07-01

    Companies face much uncertainty about the competitive effects of the recently adopted Kyoto Protocol on global climate change and the current and future regulations that may emerge from it. Companies have considerable discretion to explore different market strategies to address global warming and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. This article examines these strategic options by reviewing the market-oriented actions that are currently being taken by 136 large companies that are part of the Global 500. There are six different market strategies that companies use to address climate change and that consist of different combinations of the market components available to managers. Managers can choose between more emphasis on improvements in their business activities through innovation or employ compensatory approaches such as emissions trading. They can either act by themselves or work with other companies, NGOs, or (local) governments.

  15. Changes in Dimethyl Sulfide Oceanic Distribution due to Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cameron-Smith, P; Elliott, S; Maltrud, M; Erickson, D; Wingenter, O

    2011-02-16

    Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) is one of the major precursors for aerosols and cloud condensation nuclei in the marine boundary layer over much of the remote ocean. Here they report on coupled climate simulations with a state-of-the-art global ocean biogeochemical model for DMS distribution and fluxes using present-day and future atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations. They find changes in zonal averaged DMS flux to the atmosphere of over 150% in the Southern Ocean. This is due to concurrent sea ice changes and ocean ecosystem composition shifts caused by changes in temperature, mixing, nutrient, and light regimes. The largest changes occur in a region already sensitive to climate change, so any resultant local CLAW/Gaia feedback of DMS on clouds, and thus radiative forcing, will be particularly important. A comparison of these results to prior studies shows that increasing model complexity is associted with reduced DMS emissions at the equator and increased emissions at high latitudes.

  16. Changing the intellectual climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castree, Noel; Adams, William M.; Barry, John; Brockington, Daniel; Büscher, Bram; Corbera, Esteve; Demeritt, David; Duffy, Rosaleen; Neves, Katja; Newell, Peter; Pellizzoni, Luigi; Rigby, Kate; Robbins, Paul; Robin, Libby; Rose, Deborah Bird; Ross, Andrew; Schlosberg, David; Sörlin, Sverker; West, Paige; Whitehead, Mark; Wynne, Brian

    2014-08-27

    environmental management (such as international carbon emissions trading). Determining the range of possible values, means and ends that together might inform deliberations and decisions about future societal trajectories is something that GEC scientists...

  17. Simple Tests of Simple Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Withers, Paul

    Simple Tests of Simple Climate Models on More Than One Planet Paul Withers and Ralph Lorenz Spring simple climate models? * Focus on variation with latitude of annually averaged temperatures * Surface * Seasonal effects on Earth * Conclusions #12;Complicated Climate Models * General Circulation Models (GCMs

  18. CLIMATE NETWORKS The Azimuth Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baez, John

    CLIMATE NETWORKS The Azimuth Project John Baez, Jan Galkowski, Graham Jones, Nadja Kutz, Daniel: The network of global corporate control #12;In Complex Networks in Climate Dynamics, Donges et al took daily Networks in Climate Dynamics, Donges et al took daily surface air temperatures on a grid and computed

  19. Climate Models and Their Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Box, Jason E.

    8 Climate Models and Their Evaluation Coordinating Lead Authors: David A. Randall (USA), Richard A and Their Evaluation. In: Climate Change 2007: The Physical Science Basis. Contribution of Working Group I to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change [Solomon, S., D. Qin, M

  20. Climate Modeling and Function Fitting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blais, Brian

    Climate Modeling and Function Fitting Brown Bag Research Wednesday, October 26, 11 #12;Abstract In this seminar I hope to explore an approach to climate modeling to which I was just introduced, which focusses are those who are interested in any of the topics of time-series analysis, climate modeling , spectrum

  1. Climate Change in Chris Brierley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Peter JS

    Climate Change in HadCM3 Chris Brierley Chapa Club - 21/06/06 #12;Increase in CO2 A climate forcing References Climate Change SRES Scenarios - T. C. Johns, J. M. Gregory,W. J. Ingram, C. E. Johnson, A. Jones

  2. CLIMATE CHANGE A RISK ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    CLIMATE CHANGE A RISK ASSESSMENT David King, Daniel Schrag, Zhou Dadi, Qi Ye and Arunabha Ghosh/JAROS, and U.S./JapanASTER Science Team. China National Expert Committee on Climate Change Hosts of the project for Climate Change, and was formerly the UK Government's Chief Scientific Adviser. He has authored over 500

  3. Climate Modeling: A Brief Exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blais, Brian

    Climate Modeling: A Brief Exploration Dr Hong Yang Dr Qin Leng Collin Gagnon April 9, 2014 Dr Brian;Exponential Model Gaussian Model #12;Oscillation Model Ecological Modelling 171 (2004) 433­450 Climate change; accepted 13 August 2003 Abstract Two questions about climate change remain open: detection and attribution

  4. 4, 28752899, 2007 Climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    HESSD 4, 2875­2899, 2007 Climate change impact and model inaccuracy P. Droogers et al. Title Page are under open-access review for the journal Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Climate change impact­2899, 2007 Climate change impact and model inaccuracy P. Droogers et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction

  5. Climate Change Action Plan Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Andrew J.

    Climate Change Action Plan Report Intermountain Region 2013 National Park Service Resource Stewardship and Science Landscape Conservation and Climate Change Division #12;About this Report Each National Park Service is responding to the challenge of climate change; and (2) raise awareness among NPS

  6. CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS, VULNERABILITIES, AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS, VULNERABILITIES, AND ADAPTATION IN THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA Commission's California Climate Change Center JULY 2012 CEC5002012071 Prepared for: California Energy, as well as projections of future changes in climate based on modeling studies using various plausible

  7. Climate Analysis, Monitoring, and Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Analysis, Monitoring, and Modeling Environmental Research Area PIER Environmental Research www.energy.ca.gov/research/ environmental August 2012 The Issue Climate change is a daunting challenge health. The energy sector will not be spared. The potential repercussions of climate change include

  8. The Climate Change Action Plan: Technical supplement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    This Technical Annex documents the assumptions and parameters used in developing the supporting analysis for the Climate Change Action Plan (the Plan) issued by President Clinton on October 19, 1993. The Annex is intended to meet the needs of independent energy and environmental analysts who wish to better understand the Plan, its analytical underpinnings, and the events that need to transpire for the emissions reductions called for in the Plan to be realized. The Plan documented in this Annex reflects the outcome of a wide-ranging effort by Government agencies and interested members of the public to develop and implement actions that can reduce net greenhouse gas emissions in the year 2000 to their aggregate 1990 level. Based on agency and public input, the Climate Change Mitigation Group, chaired by the White House Office on Environmental Policy, developed the Plan`s content. Many of the actions called for in the Plan are now underway, while others are in advanced planning pending congressional action on the fiscal year 1995 budget. The analysis supporting the Plan represents the results of an interagency effort. The US Department of Energy (DOE) was responsible for the integrated analysis of energy-related options, based on the analysis of individual energy-related options by DOE, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the US Department of Transportation (DOT). EPA led in providing analysis for actions related to methane, hydrofluorocarbons, and perfluorocarbons. The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) led the analysis of carbon sequestration actions and cooperated with EPA in the analysis of actions to reduce nitrous oxide emissions.

  9. Energy, Climate & Infrastructure Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy, Climate & Infrastructure Security EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE IN THE NATIONAL INTEREST Sandia owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND 2012-1670P Ensuring the Safe Containment

  10. Energy, Climate & Infrastructure Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy, Climate & Infrastructure Security EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE IN THE NATIONAL INTEREST Sandia Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear

  11. Energy, Climate, & Infrastructure Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siefert, Chris

    Infrastructure Demonstration for Energy reliability and Security) (web link) program to demonstrate: · Cyber-securityEnergy, Climate, & Infrastructure Security ExCEptIonal SErvICE In thE natIonal IntErESt Sandia Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND2013-7809W to enhance the nation's security

  12. METEOROLOGICAL Journal of Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woollings, Tim

    eddy-driven jet stream. In previous studies it has been argued that a slow decay of the autocorrelation trend of the jet stream which cannot be explained as aris- ing from climate noise. These findings have through north-south shifts of the atmospheric eddy-driven jet stream. The jet stream steers weather

  13. Energy, Climate, & Infrastructure Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siefert, Chris

    Energy, Climate, & Infrastructure Security ExCEptIonal SErvICE In thE natIonal IntErESt Sandia owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND2013-7809W the computational, physics

  14. Energy, Climate, & Infrastructure Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siefert, Chris

    Energy, Climate, & Infrastructure Security ExCEptIonal SErvICE In thE natIonal IntErESt Sandia owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND2013-7809W to enhance the nation's security

  15. ENERGY FLOWS CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    ENERGY FLOWS FORCINGS CLIMATE CHANGE A REALLY TOUGH PROBLEM Stephen E. Schwartz, BNL, 7-20-11 www average temperature 15°C or 59°F #12;ATMOSPHERIC RADIATION Power per area Energy per time per area Unit" temperature to radiative flux. #12;GLOBAL ENERGY BALANCE Global and annual average energy fluxes in watts per

  16. Two Hundred Fifty Years of Aerosols and Climate: The End of the Age of Aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Steven J.; Bond, Tami C.

    2014-01-20

    Carbonaceous and sulfur aerosols have a substantial global and regional influence on climate in addition to their impact on health and ecosystems. The magnitude of this influence has changed substantially over the past and is expected to continue to change into the future. An integrated picture of the changing climatic influence of black carbon, organic carbon and sulfate over the period 1850 through 2100, focusing on uncertainty, is presented using updated historical inventories and a coordinated set of emission projections. While aerosols have had a substantial impact on climate over the past century, by the end of the 21st century aerosols will likely be only a minor contributor to radiative forcing due to increases in greenhouse gas forcing and a global decrease in pollutant emissions. This outcome is even more certain under a successful implementation of a policy to limit greenhouse gas emissions as low-carbon energy technologies that do not emit appreciable aerosol or SO2 are deployed.

  17. Oregon Climate Assessment Report December 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Stephen

    Oregon Climate Assessment Report December 2010 Oregon Climate Change Research Institute #12;Oregon Climate Assessment Report December 2010 Oregon Climate Change Research Institute Recommended citation: Oregon Climate Change Research Institute (2010), Oregon Climate Assessment Report, K.D. Dello and P

  18. Climate Entrepreneurship ...turning an idea into business

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    Climate Entrepreneurship ...turning an idea into business Dr. Anaïs Sägesser, Director Climate-KIC Switzerland Dr. Regina Vogel, Education Lead Climate-KIC Switzerland Akitaka Fujii, Executive Assistant Climate-KIC Switzerland 20 October 2014 #12;Climate-KIC 2 #12;Climate-KIC 3 «... 1968 you went

  19. Regulation of GHG emissions from transportation fuels: Emission quota versus emission intensity standard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajagopal, Deepak

    2010-01-01

    Derivation of average cost of emission reduction by blending?) and ? respectively. GHG emissions per unit of blend is, ?+ ?? i Reduction in GHG emissions with respect to unblended

  20. Technology Opportunities to Reduce U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    National Lab Directors, . .

    2001-04-05

    The rise in greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel combustion and industrial and agricultural activities has aroused international concern about the possible impacts of these emissions on climate. Greenhouse gases--mostly carbon dioxide, some methane, nitrous oxide and other trace gases--are emitted to the atmosphere, enhancing an effect in which heat reflected from the earth's surface is kept from escaping into space, as in a greenhouse. Thus, there is concern that the earth's surface temperature may rise enough to cause global climate change. Approximately 90% of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions from anthropogenic sources come from energy production and use, most of which are a byproduct of the combustion of fossil fuels. On a per capita basis, the United States is one of the world's largest sources of greenhouse gas emissions, comprising 4% of the world's population, yet emitting 23% of the world's greenhouse gases. Emissions in the United States are increasing at around 1.2% annually, and the Energy Information Administration forecasts that emissions levels will continue to increase at this rate in the years ahead if we proceed down the business-as-usual path. President Clinton has presented a two-part challenge for the United States: reduce greenhouse gas emissions and grow the economy. Meeting the challenge will mean that in doing tomorrow's work, we must use energy more efficiently and emit less carbon for the energy expended than we do today. To accomplish these goals, President Clinton proposed on June 26, 1997, that the United States ''invest more in the technologies of the future''. In this report to Secretary of Energy Pena, 47 technology pathways are described that have significant potential to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. The present study was completed before the December 1997 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and is intended to provide a basis to evaluate technology feasibility and options to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. These technology pathways (which are described in greater detail in Appendix B, Technology Pathways) address three areas: energy efficiency, clean energy, and carbon sequestration (removing carbon from emissions and enhancing carbon storage). Based on an assessment of each of these technology pathways over a 30-year planning horizon, the directors of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) national laboratories conclude that success will require pursuit of multiple technology pathways to provide choices and flexibility for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Advances in science and technology are necessary to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the United States while sustaining economic growth and providing collateral benefits to the nation.

  1. Emissions of greenhouse gases in the United States 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-10-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is required by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 to prepare a report on aggregate US national emissions of greenhouse gases for the period 1987--1990, with annual updates thereafter. This report is the fifth annual update, covering national emissions over the period 1989--1995, with preliminary estimates of emissions for 1996. The estimates contained in this report have been revised from those in last year`s report. Emissions estimates for carbon dioxide are reported in metric tons of carbon; estimates for other gases are reported in metric tons of gas. Chapter 1 of this report briefly recapitulates some background information about global climate change and the greenhouse effect and discusses important recent developments in global climate change activities. Chapter 2 through 6 cover emissions of carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, halocarbons, and criteria pollutants, respectively. Chapter 7 describes potential sequestration and emissions of greenhouse gases as a result of land use changes. Five appendixes are included with this report. 216 refs., 11 figs., 38 tabs.

  2. Global climate change crosses state boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Changnon, S.A.

    1996-12-31

    The hot, dry summer of 1988 brought the specter of global warming a bit too close for comfort. {open_quotes}Scorching heat, not scientific models, attracted media attention,{close_quotes} says Stanley A. Changnon, senior scientist with the Illinois State Water Survey in Champaign, Illinois. Rising temperatures in the late 1980`s prompted individual states to begin to take action to curb greenhouse-gas emissions. A 1990 report by the National Governors Association identified two guiding principles for addressing climate change issues. {open_quotes}First, that energy policy must be at the center of any efforts to control greenhouse-gas emissions. Second, that state can...restrict emissions through state policies related to public utilities, land use, transportation, and even taxation,{close_quotes} Changnon says. Even if concerns for global warming prove to be overblown, states decided to act for broader economic and environmental reasons. Such initiatives not only save money, but they improve air quality and leave the nation more energy independent,{close_quotes} Changnon says.

  3. EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Carbon Dioxide Emissions

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    carbon-intensive fossil fuel, increased by 4.8 percent. 2.8. Carbon dioxide emissions and carbon sequestration from nonfuel uses of energy inputs Nonfuel uses of fossil fuels (for...

  4. Climate Mitigation Policy Implications for Global Irrigation Water Demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Wise, Marshall A.

    2013-08-22

    Energy, water and land are scarce resources, critical to humans. Developments in each affect the availability and cost of the others, and consequently human prosperity. Measures to limit greenhouse gas concentrations will inevitably exact dramatic changes on energy and land systems and in turn alter the character, magnitude and geographic distribution of human claims on water resources. We employ the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), an integrated assessment model to explore the interactions of energy, land and water systems in the context of alternative policies to limit climate change to three alternative levels: 2.5 Wm-2 (445 ppm CO2-e), 3.5 Wm-2 (535 ppm CO2-e) and 4.5 Wm-2 (645 ppm CO2-e). We explore the effects of alternative land-use emissions mitigation policy options—one which values terrestrial carbon emissions equally with fossil fuel and industrial emissions, and an alternative which places no penalty on land-use change emissions. We find that increasing populations and economic growth could be anticipated to lead to increased demand for water for agricultural systems (+200%), even in the absence of climate change. In general policies to mitigate climate change will increase agricultural demands for water, regardless of whether or not terrestrial carbon is valued or not. Burgeoning demands for water are driven by the demand for bioenergy in response to emissions mitigation policies. We also find that the policy matters. Increases in the demand for water when terrestrial carbon emissions go un-prices are vastly larger than when terrestrial system carbon emissions are prices at the same rate as fossil fuel and industrial emissions. Our estimates for increased water demands when terrestrial carbon systems go un-priced are larger than earlier studies. We find that the deployment of improved irrigation delivery systems could mitigate some of the increase in water demands, but cannot reverse the increases in water demands when terrestrial carbon emissions go un-priced. Finally we estimates that the geospatial pattern of water demands could stress some parts of the world, e.g. China, India and other countries in south and east Asia, earlier and more intensely than in other parts of the world, e.g. North America.

  5. China: Emissions pattern of the world leader in CO2 emissions from fossil fuel consumption and cement production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregg, J; Andres, Robert Joseph; Marland, Gregg

    2008-01-01

    Release of carbon dioxide (CO2) from fossil fuel combustion and cement manufacture is the primary anthropogenic driver of climate change. Our best estimate is that China became the largest national source of CO2 emissions during 2006. Previously, the United States (US) had occupied that position. However, the annual emission rate in the US has remained relatively stable between 2001-2006 while the emission rate in China has more than doubled, apparently eclipsing that of the US in late 2006. Here we present the seasonal and spatial pattern of CO2 emissions in China, as well as the sectoral breakdown of emissions. Though our best point estimate places China in the lead position in terms of CO2 emissions, we qualify this statement in a discussion of the uncertainty in the underlying data (3-5% for the US; 15-20% for China). Finally, we comment briefly on the implications of China's new position with respect to international agreements to mitigate climate change.

  6. U.S. Government Supports Low Emission Economic Growth (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, A.; Sandor, D.; Butheau, M.

    2013-11-01

    Countries around the world face the challenge of maintaining long-term sustainable economic growth and development under the threat of climate change. By identifying and pursuing a sustainable development pathway now, they are better positioned to reach their economic growth goals while addressing climate change impacts and lowering greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Low emission development strategies - development plans that promote sustainable social and economic development while reducing long-term GHG emissions - provide a pathway to preparing for a global low emission future. Partner country governments are working with the U.S. government through the Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies (EC-LEDS) program to further their national development objectives.

  7. Low Emissions Aftertreatment and Diesel Emissions Reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2005-05-27

    Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) has successfully completed a five-year Low Emissions Aftertreatment and Diesel Emissions Reduction (LEADER) program under a DOE project entitled: ''Research and Development for Compression-Ignition Direct-Injection Engines (CIDI) and Aftertreatment Sub-Systems''. The objectives of the LEADER Program were to: Demonstrate technologies that will achieve future federal Tier 2 emissions targets; and Demonstrate production-viable technical targets for engine out emissions, efficiency, power density, noise, durability, production cost, aftertreatment volume and weight. These objectives were successfully met during the course of the LEADER program The most noteworthy achievements in this program are listed below: (1) Demonstrated Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions target over the FTP75 cycle on a PNGV-mule Neon passenger car, utilizing a CSF + SCR system These aggressive emissions were obtained with no ammonia (NH{sub 3}) slip and a combined fuel economy of 63 miles per gallon, integrating FTP75 and highway fuel economy transient cycle test results. Demonstrated feasibility to achieve Tier 2 Bin 8 emissions levels without active NOx aftertreatment. (2) Demonstrated Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions target over the FTP75 cycle on a light-duty truck utilizing a CSF + SCR system, synergizing efforts with the DOE-DDC DELTA program. This aggressive reduction in tailpipe out emissions was achieved with no ammonia slip and a 41% fuel economy improvement, compared to the equivalent gasoline engine-equipped vehicle. (3) Demonstrated Tier 2 near-Bin 9 emissions compliance on a light-duty truck, without active NOx aftertreatment devices, in synergy with the DOE-DDC DELTA program. (4) Developed and applied advanced combustion technologies such as ''CLEAN Combustion{copyright}'', which yields simultaneous reduction in engine out NOx and PM emissions while also improving engine and aftertreatment integration by providing favorable exhaust species and temperature characteristics. These favorable emissions characteristics were obtained while maintaining performance and fuel economy. These aggressive emissions and performance results were achieved by applying a robust systems technology development methodology. This systems approach benefits substantially from an integrated experimental and analytical approach to technology development, which is one of DDCs core competencies Also, DDC is uniquely positioned to undertake such a systems technology development approach, given its vertically integrated commercial structure within the DaimlerChrysler organization. State-of-the-art analytical tools were developed targeting specific LEADER program objectives and were applied to guide system enhancements and to provide testing directions, resulting in a shortened and efficient development cycle. Application examples include ammonia/NO{sub x} distribution improvement and urea injection controls development, and were key contributors to significantly reduce engine out as well as tailpipe out emissions. Successful cooperation between DDC and Engelhard Corporation, the major subcontractor for the LEADER program and provider of state-of-the-art technologies on various catalysts, was another contributing factor to ensure that both passenger car and LD truck applications achieved Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions levels. Significant technical challenges, which highlight barriers of commercialization of diesel technology for passenger cars and LD truck applications, are presented at the end of this report.

  8. Bringing climate change down to earth : science and participation in Canadian and Australian climate change campaigns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Padolsky, Miriam Elana

    2006-01-01

    Scientific Uncertainty about Global Climate Change. PublicConservation Foundation. 2005a. Climate Change: A Matter ofFoundation. 2005b. Climate Change > Actions 2005 [cited 10

  9. Climate Change Mitigation: Climate, Health, and Equity Implications of the Visible and the Hidden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shonkoff, Seth Berrin

    2012-01-01

    2008). "Accountability of networked climate governance: Therise of transnational climate partnerships." GlobalBoard. CARB (2008d). Climate change proposed scoping plan: a

  10. Climate Change in the South American Monsoon System: Present Climate and CMIP5 Projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Charles; Carvalho, Leila M. V

    2013-01-01

    Lau, 1998: Does a monsoon climate exist over South America?J. Climate, 11, 1020–1040.America monsoon system. Climate Dyn. , 36, 1865–1880, doi:

  11. Bringing climate change down to earth : science and participation in Canadian and Australian climate change campaigns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Padolsky, Miriam Elana

    2006-01-01

    about Global Climate Change. Public Understanding of ScienceFoundation. 2005a. Climate Change: A Matter of SurvivalFoundation. 2005b. Climate Change > Actions 2005 [cited 10

  12. Climate Change Mitigation: Climate, Health, and Equity Implications of the Visible and the Hidden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shonkoff, Seth Berrin

    2012-01-01

    for human health and climate change." J Toxicol Environet al. (2001). Climate change 2001: impacts, adaptation, andin France: dangerous climate change here and now." Risk Anal

  13. Climate Change in the South American Monsoon System: Present Climate and CMIP5 Projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Charles; Carvalho, Leila M. V

    2013-01-01

    Disasters to Advance Climate Change Adaptation. Cambridgeof scenarios for climate change research and assessment.Jr. , Eds. , 2007: Climate Change 2007: The Physical Science

  14. Climate Change Mitigation: Climate, Health, and Equity Implications of the Visible and the Hidden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shonkoff, Seth Berrin

    2012-01-01

    Board. CARB (2008d). Climate change proposed scoping plan: aJ. (2009). "Cities, Climate Change and Urban Heat Islandet al. (2006). Climate change in California: health,

  15. Assessing climate impacts of planning policies-An estimation for the urban region of Leipzig (Germany)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwarz, Nina Bauer, Annette Haase, Dagmar

    2011-03-15

    Local climate regulation by urban green areas is an important urban ecosystem service, as it reduces the extent of the urban heat island and therefore enhances quality of life. Local and regional planning policies can control land use changes in an urban region, which in turn alter local climate regulation. Thus, this paper describes a method for estimating the impacts of current land uses as well as local and regional planning policies on local climate regulation, using evapotranspiration and land surface emissivity as indicators. This method can be used by practitioners to evaluate their policies. An application of this method is demonstrated for the case study Leipzig (Germany). Results for six selected planning policies in Leipzig indicate their distinct impacts on climate regulation and especially the role of their spatial extent. The proposed method was found to easily produce a qualitative assessment of impacts of planning policies on climate regulation.

  16. 150 G. Marland et al. / Climate Policy 3 (2003) 149157 Strategies to mitigate anthropogenic climate change recognize that carbon sequestration in the terrestrial biosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niyogi, Dev

    2003-01-01

    anthropogenic climate change recognize that carbon sequestration in the terrestrial biosphere can reduce to create a system of credits and debits wherein emission or sequestration of carbon in the biosphere; Carbon sequestration; Land use change; Land surface change; Surface energy balance 1. Introduction Human

  17. Contributions of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the ARM Climate Research Facility to the U.S. Climate Change Science Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SA Edgerton; LR Roeder

    2008-09-30

    The Earth’s surface temperature is determined by the balance between incoming solar radiation and thermal (or infrared) radiation emitted by the Earth back to space. Changes in atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols can alter this balance and produce significant climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for quantifying future climate change; however, there remain significant uncertainties in the GCM treatment of clouds, aerosol, and their effects on the Earth’s energy balance. The 2007 assessment (AR4) by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reports a substantial range among GCMs in climate sensitivity to greenhouse gas emissions. The largest contributor to this range lies in how different models handle changes in the way clouds absorb or reflect radiative energy in a changing climate (Solomon et al. 2007). In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program within the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. To address this problem, BER has adopted a unique two-pronged approach: * The ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF), a scientific user facility for obtaining long-term measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes. * The ARM Science Program, focused on the analysis of ACRF data to address climate science issues associated with clouds, aerosols, and radiation, and to improve GCMs. This report describes accomplishments of the BER ARM Program toward addressing the primary uncertainties related to climate change prediction as identified by the IPCC.

  18. Carbon dioxide and climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-10-01

    Scientific and public interest in greenhouse gases, climate warming, and global change virtually exploded in 1988. The Department's focused research on atmospheric CO{sub 2} contributed sound and timely scientific information to the many questions produced by the groundswell of interest and concern. Research projects summarized in this document provided the data base that made timely responses possible, and the contributions from participating scientists are genuinely appreciated. In the past year, the core CO{sub 2} research has continued to improve the scientific knowledge needed to project future atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations, to estimate climate sensitivity, and to assess the responses of vegetation to rising concentrations of CO{sub 2} and to climate change. The Carbon Dioxide Research Program's goal is to develop sound scientific information for policy formulation and governmental action in response to changes of atmospheric CO{sub 2}. The Program Summary describes projects funded by the Carbon Dioxide Research Program during FY 1990 and gives a brief overview of objectives, organization, and accomplishments.

  19. On mitigating emissions leakage under biofuel policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajagopal, D; Rajagopal, D

    2015-01-01

    gtap-bio framework. Climate Change Economics, 3( 03), 2012.Mustafa H. Babiker. Climate change policy, market structure,cost implications. Climate Change Economics, 3(03), 2012.

  20. Climate Extremes, Uncertainty and Impacts Climate Change Challenge: The Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Extremes, Uncertainty and Impacts Climate Change Challenge: The Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC, AR4) has resulted in a wider acceptance of global climate change, hurricanes and tropical storms) or extreme stresses (e.g., tropical climate in temperate regions or shifting

  1. Sandia Energy - Sandia Co-Hosts "Climate Risk Forum: Bridging...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Co-Hosts "Climate Risk Forum: Bridging Climate Science and Actuarial Practice" Home Climate Water Security Facilities News Global Climate & Energy NISAC News & Events Analysis...

  2. Climate change will exacerbate California’s insect pest problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trumble, John; Butler, Casey

    2009-01-01

    Hadley Centre. 2007. Climate Change. www. metoffice.gov.uk/on parasitoids in a climate change perspective. Ann RevIntergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. 2007. Climate

  3. Climate Change and San Francisco Bay-Delta Tidal Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, V. Thomas; Callaway, John C.; Schile, Lisa M.; Vasey, Michael C.; Herbert, Ellen R.

    2011-01-01

    National Institute for Climate Change Research, Coastalcontext of predicted climate change. Madroño 54(3):234–248.MD. 2005. From climate-change spaghetti to climate-change

  4. Vehicle Emissions Review- 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reviews regulatory requirements and general technology approaches for heavy- and light-duty vehicle emissions control - filter technology, new catalysts, NOx control, diesel oxidation catalysts, gasoline particulate filters

  5. Field emission chemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Panitz, J.A.

    1983-11-22

    A field emission chemical sensor for specific detection of a chemical entity in a sample includes a closed chamber enclosing two field emission electrode sets, each field emission electrode set comprising (a) an electron emitter electrode from which field emission electrons can be emitted when an effective voltage is connected to the electrode set; and (b) a collector electrode which will capture said electrons emitted from said emitter electrode. One of the electrode sets is passive to the chemical entity and the other is active thereto and has an active emitter electrode which will bind the chemical entity when contacted therewith.

  6. Modeling Traffic Flow Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappiello, Alessandra

    2002-09-17

    The main topic of this thesis is the development of light-duty vehicle dynamic emission models and their integration with dynamic traffic models. Combined, these models

  7. Biological Air Emissions Control

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Air quality standards are becoming more stringent for the U.S. wood products industry. Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) (including methanol,...

  8. Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

    2009-01-01

    would in turn lower PHEV fuel costs and make them morestretches from fossil-fuel- powered conventional vehiclesbraking, as do Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions Making Plug-

  9. Climate implications of carbonaceous aerosols: An aerosol microphysical study using the GISS/MATRIX climate model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, Susanne E.; Menon, Surabi; Koch, Dorothy; Bond, Tami; Tsigaridis, Kostas

    2010-04-09

    Recently, attention has been drawn towards black carbon aerosols as a likely short-term climate warming mitigation candidate. However the global and regional impacts of the direct, cloud-indirect and semi-direct forcing effects are highly uncertain, due to the complex nature of aerosol evolution and its climate interactions. Black carbon is directly released as particle into the atmosphere, but then interacts with other gases and particles through condensation and coagulation processes leading to further aerosol growth, aging and internal mixing. A detailed aerosol microphysical scheme, MATRIX, embedded within the global GISS modelE includes the above processes that determine the lifecycle and climate impact of aerosols. This study presents a quantitative assessment of the impact of microphysical processes involving black carbon, such as emission size distributions and optical properties on aerosol cloud activation and radiative forcing. Our best estimate for net direct and indirect aerosol radiative forcing change is -0.56 W/m{sup 2} between 1750 and 2000. However, the direct and indirect aerosol effects are very sensitive to the black and organic carbon size distribution and consequential mixing state. The net radiative forcing change can vary between -0.32 to -0.75 W/m{sup 2} depending on these carbonaceous particle properties. Assuming that sulfates, nitrates and secondary organics form a coating shell around a black carbon core, rather than forming a uniformly mixed particles, changes the overall net radiative forcing from a negative to a positive number. Black carbon mitigation scenarios showed generally a benefit when mainly black carbon sources such as diesel emissions are reduced, reducing organic and black carbon sources such as bio-fuels, does not lead to reduced warming.

  10. 2014 Urban Forest Symposium: Climate Change and the Urban Forest Matt Kuharic, King County Department of Natural Resources and Parks (DNRP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    Report · 2013: 660 new acres added to open space taxation programs (Public Benefit Rating System (PBRS Climate Action Plan Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions · Transportation and Land Use · Energy · Forests, promote public health, and are resilient to changing climate conditions. County Operations Goal: King

  11. ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' Team : 1995/1996 Scientific Report February 1997 CERFACS ACTIVITY REPORT 1 #12; Contents 1 Climate Modelling) : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 6 2.2 Anthropogenic climate change studies: scenario experiments (96) : : : : : : : : : 7 2

  12. ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report 1 ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report 1 ``Climate Modelling & Global Change of the tropical climate : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 6 2.2 Short­term variability studies : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 8 2.3 Climate drift sensitivity studies

  13. Global climate change and international security. Report on a conference held at Argonne National Laboratory, May 8--10, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, M.

    1991-12-31

    On May 8--10, 1991, the Midwest Consortium of International Security Studies (MCISS) and Argonne National Laboratory cosponsored a conference on Global Climate Change and International Security. The aim was to bring together natural and social scientists to examine the economic, sociopolitical, and security implications of the climate changes predicted by the general circulation models developed by natural scientists. Five themes emerged from the papers and discussions: (1) general circulation models and predicted climate change; (2) the effects of climate change on agriculture, especially in the Third World; (3) economic implications of policies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions; (4) the sociopolitical consequences of climate change; and (5) the effect of climate change on global security.

  14. Attributing land-use change carbon emissions to exported biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saikku, Laura, E-mail: laura.saikku@helsinki.fi [University of Helsinki, P.O Box 65, 00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Soimakallio, Sampo, E-mail: sampo.soimakallio@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, 02044 VTT (Finland); Pingoud, Kim, E-mail: kim.pingoud@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, 02044 VTT (Finland)

    2012-11-15

    In this study, a simple, transparent and robust method is developed in which land-use change (LUC) emissions are retrospectively attributed to exported biomass products based on the agricultural area occupied for the production. LUC emissions account for approximately one-fifth of current greenhouse gas emissions. Increasing agricultural exports are becoming an important driver of deforestation. Brazil and Indonesia are used as case studies due to their significant deforestation in recent years. According to our study, in 2007, approximately 32% and 15% of the total agricultural land harvested and LUC emissions in Brazil and Indonesia respectively were due to exports. The most important exported single items with regard to deforestation were palm oil for Indonesia and bovine meat for Brazil. To reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions effectively worldwide, leakage of emissions should be avoided. This can be done, for example, by attributing embodied LUC emissions to exported biomass products. With the approach developed in this study, controversial attribution between direct and indirect LUC and amortization of emissions over the product life cycle can be overcome, as the method operates on an average basis and annual level. The approach could be considered in the context of the UNFCCC climate policy instead of, or alongside with, other instruments aimed at reducing deforestation. However, the quality of the data should be improved and some methodological issues, such as the allocation procedure in multiproduct systems and the possible dilution effect through third parties not committed to emission reduction targets, should be considered. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CO{sub 2} emissions from land use changes are highly important. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Attribution of land use changes for products is difficult. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simple and robust method is developed to attribute land use change emissions.

  15. Global Climate Dialogue Prepared by Kershney Naidoo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global Climate Dialogue Prepared by Kershney Naidoo In a historic moment of Justice for the Climate) backgrounds. It aimed to establish a set of guiding global principles for a just response to climate change. The intention of the Climate Justice Dialogue was to lend new impetus to an awareness of climate change

  16. CLIMATE CHANGE AND INTERNATIONAL PEACE AND SECURITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLIMATE CHANGE AND INTERNATIONAL PEACE AND SECURITY: Possible Roles for the U.N. Security Council in Addressing Climate Change By Dane Warren July 2015 #12;© 2015 Sabin Center for Climate Change Law, Columbia Law School The Sabin Center for Climate Change Law develops legal techniques to fight climate change

  17. CLIMATE CHANGE: Past, Present and Future: Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan, Richard P.

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