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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "undeveloped undeveloped undeveloped" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Identification of undeveloped hydropower resources in the United States based on environmental, legal, and institutional attributes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is used to model the undeveloped hydropower potential in the US. It was developed for the US Department of Energy (DOE) by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) in response to National Energy Strategy requirements. The HES models the environmental, legal, and institutional attributes present at potential hydropower sites, and calculates a regional or state total of the undeveloped hydropower potential. The site attributes and characteristics can be entered into the menu-driven model on a site-by-site basis, as well as downloaded from existing information sources such as the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission`s (FERC) Hydroelectric Power Resources Assessment Inventory and the Department of Interior`s National Rivers Inventory.

Francfort, J.E.; Conner, A.M.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Idaho National Laboratory - Hydropower Program: Hydrofacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Undeveloped Hydropower Potential by State The Department of Energy is performing a resource assessment of the undeveloped conventional hydropower potential in the U.S. (Undeveloped...

3

Mosquito populations in the Powder River basin, Wyoming.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Coal bed natural gas development in northeastern Wyoming has increased surface water in ranching and agricultural areas over undeveloped land. This increase of water increases… (more)

Doherty, Melissa Kuckler.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

NREL SEA-II Chapter 3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Entrance; otherwise, this zone is undeveloped. The zone is designated for general research and development with dry laboratories and minimal use of hazardous materials 3.1.1.2...

5

Study and prediction of the energy interactions between buildings and the urban climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Urbanization produces higher air temperatures in cities than in the undeveloped rural surroundings. This phenomenon is known as the Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect and has been measured in different cities around the world. ...

Bueno Unzeta, Bruno

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

An urban weather generator coupling a building simulation program with an urban canopy model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The increase in air temperature observed in urban environments compared to the undeveloped rural surroundings, known as the Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect, is being intensely studied, due to its adverse environmental and ...

Bueno Unzeta, Bruno

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

EA-1184: Transfer of the DP Road Tract to the County of Los Alamos, New Mexico  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to transfer ownership of the undeveloped DP Road Property from the U.S. Department of Energy to Los Alamos County, New Mexico.

8

Towards a theory of service innovation : an inductive case study approach to evaluating the uniqueness of services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Much of the innovation literature focuses exclusively on product-oriented companies. While scholars have begun researching innovation in service companies, the field of service innovation remains undeveloped and relatively ...

Mansharamani, Vikram, 1974-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

U.S. hydropower resource assessment for Virginia  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In June 1989, the US Department of Energy initiated the development of a National Energy Strategy to identify the energy resources available to support the expanding demand for energy in the US. Public hearings conducted as part of the strategy development process indicated that undeveloped hydropower resources were not well defined. As a result, the Department of Energy established an interagency Hydropower Resource Assessment Team to ascertain the undeveloped hydropower potential. In connection with these efforts by the Department of Energy, the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory designed the Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES), which has been used to perform a resource assessment of the undeveloped conventional hydropower potential in over 30 states. This report presents the results of the hydropower resource assessment for the State of Virginia. Undeveloped pumped storage hydropower potential is not included.

Conner, A.M.; Francfort, J.E.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Resource Limits and Conversion Efficiency with Implications for Climate Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

has large, undeveloped oil reserves is offshore California.of the known offshore oil reserves of the state. These wereVenezuela has huge heavy oil reserves. It is not currently a

Croft, Gregory Donald

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

3rd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3rd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report 3rd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report 3rd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: October 31, 2013 Next Release Date: February 2014 Capacity (short tons of ore per day) 2012 1st Quarter 2013 2nd Quarter 2013 3rd Quarter 2013 EFR White Mesa LLC White Mesa Mill San Juan, Utah 2,000 Operating Operating Operating Operating-Processing Alternate Feed Energy Fuels Resources Corporation Piñon Ridge Mill Montrose, Colorado 500 Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Permitted And Licensed Energy Fuels Wyoming Inc Sheep Mountain Fremont, Wyoming 725 - Undeveloped Undeveloped Undeveloped Kennecott Uranium Company/Wyoming Coal Resource Company Sweetwater Uranium Project Sweetwater, Wyoming 3,000

12

Total production of uranium concentrate in the United States  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3. U.S. uranium mills and heap leach facilities by owner, location, capacity, and operating status 3. U.S. uranium mills and heap leach facilities by owner, location, capacity, and operating status Operating Status at the End of Owner Mill and Heap Leach1 Facility Name County, State (existing and planned locations) Capacity (short tons of ore per day) 2012 1st Quarter 2013 2nd Quarter 2013 3rd Quarter 2013 EFR White Mesa LLC White Mesa Mill San Juan, Utah 2,000 Operating Operating Operating Operating-Processing Alternate Feed Energy Fuels Resources Corporation Piñon Ridge Mill Montrose, Colorado 500 Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Permitted and Licensed Energy Fuels Wyoming Inc Sheep Mountain Fremont, Wyoming 725 - Undeveloped Undeveloped Undeveloped

13

U.S. Hydropower Resource Assessment Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To provide a more accurate assessment of the domestic undeveloped hydropower capacity, the US Department of Energy's Hydropower Program developed a computer model, Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES). HES allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental, legal, and institutional attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report describes the development of HES, its data requirements, and its application to each state assessment; in addition, it summarizes the data derivation process and data for the states. Modeling of the undeveloped hydropower resources in the US, based on environmental, legal, and institutional constraints, has identified 5,677 sites that have a total undeveloped capacity of about 30,000 megawatts.

A. M. Conner; J. E. Francfort; B. N. Rinehart

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

US hydropower resource assessment for Hawaii  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

US DOE is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydropower potential in US. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model developed by INEL for this purpose. HES measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in US, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was tested using hydropower information and data provided by Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven program that allows the PC user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes, and generate reports. This report describes the resource assessment results for the State of Hawaii.

Francfort, J.E.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Simulating the effect of access road route slection on wind farm construction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind energy as a power source is attractive alternative to fossil fuels. Wind farms are typically constructed in undeveloped rural areas with challenging topography. The lack of a paved road network leading to the site and within the site itself pose ...

Khaled Nassar; Mohamed El Masry; Hesham Osman

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

ABC NEWS/TIME/STANFORD POLL: GLOBAL WARMING 3/14/06 EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE AFTER 9 a.m. Sunday, March 26, 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or electricity taxes to discourage consumption. 85% 49% 58% 64% 80% 31% 44% 67% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80 deal Future generations 88% 60% Plant and animal species 86 56 Poor people in undeveloped countries 84 51 World's environment 83 51 People in other industrialized countries 78 34 Other Americans 77 32 You

Nur, Amos

17

Modeling and Measurement Constraints in Fault Diagnostics for HVAC Systems Massieh Najafi1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling and Measurement Constraints in Fault Diagnostics for HVAC Systems Massieh Najafi1 , David for determining HVAC diagnostics, methods to detect faults in HVAC systems are still generally undeveloped. Most in a substantial increase in energy use. For example, failure of an HVAC fan may prevent cool air from one

18

Geophysical and geochemical characterization of the groundwater system and the role of Chatham Fault in groundwater movement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

legislature initiated a moratorium on uranium mining in Virginia (Legislative bill number §45.1-283). Marline Fault in groundwater movement at the Coles Hill uranium deposit, Virginia, USA John P. Gannon & Thomas J. Burbey & Robert J. Bodnar & Joseph Aylor Abstract The largest undeveloped uranium deposit in the United

Houser, Paul R.

19

College of Natural Resources Fall 2005 VOLUME 11, NUMBER 2 BREAKTHROUGHS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wildlife Refuge. Should ANWR continue in its undeveloped state, or should it be opened for oil drilling, pollution. Through their research and calculations, the students found that ANWR could eventually produce the overall oil output from ANWR would be a very small portion of the world- wide market, the new supply curve

Wildermuth, Mary C

20

U.S. hydropower resource assessment for Alaska  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydropower potential in the US. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. HES measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the US, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report describes the resource assessment results for the State of Alaska.

Conner, A.M.; Francfort, J.E.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "undeveloped undeveloped undeveloped" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

U.S. hydropower resource assessment for Minnesota  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydropower potential in the United States. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. HES measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the United States, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report describes the resource assessment results for the State of Minnesota.

Francfort, J.E.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

U.S. hydropower resource assessment for Michigan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydropower potential in the US. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory for this purpose. HES measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the US, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report describes the resource assessment results for the State of Michigan.

Conner, A.M.; Francfort, J.E.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

US hydropower resource assessment for New Jersey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydropower potential in this country. The Hydropower Evaluation Software is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. The software measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the United States, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven software program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report details the resource assessment results for the State of New Jersey.

Connor, A.M.; Francfort, J.E.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

U.S. hydropower resource assessment for Alabama  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydropower potential in the US. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. HES measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the US, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report describes the resource assessment results for the State of Alabama.

Conner, A.M.; Francfort, J.E.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

U.S. hydropower resource assessment for Oregon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydropower potential in the United States. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory for this purpose. HES measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the US, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report describes the resource assessment results for the State of Oregon.

Conner, A.M.; Francfort, J.E.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

US Hydropower Resource Assessment for Massachusetts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydropower potential in the United States. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. The software measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the United States, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven software program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report details the resource assessment results for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

Francfort, J.E.; Rinehart, B.N.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

U.S. hydropower resource assessment for Mississippi  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydropower potential in the US. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. HES measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the US, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report describes the resource assessment results for the State of Mississippi.

Conner, A.M.; Francfort, J.E.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

U.S. hydropower resource assessment for Connecticut  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydro-power potential in the United States. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. The software measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the United States, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven software program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report details the resource assessment results for the State of Connecticut.

Francfort, J.E.; Rinehart, B.N.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

U.S. hydropower resource assessment for New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydropower potential in the US. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. HES measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the US, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report describes the resource assessment results for the State of New Mexico.

Conner, A.M.; Francfort, J.E.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

US hydropower resource assessment for New Hampshire  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydropower potential in this country. The Hydropower Evaluation Software is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. The software measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the United States, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven software program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report details the resource assessment results for the State of New Hampshire.

Francfort, J.E.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

U.S. hydropower resource assessment for Florida  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydropower potential in the US. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. HES measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the US, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report describes the resource assessment results for the State of Florida.

Conner, A.M.; Francfort, J.E.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

US hydropower resource assessment for Rhode Island  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydropower potential in the United States. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. The software measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the United States, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven software program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report details the resource assessment results for the State of Rhode Island.

Francfort, J.E.; Rinehart, B.N.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

U.S. hydropower resource assessment for Kentucky  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydropower potential in the United States. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory for this purpose. HES measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the United States, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report describes the resource assessment results for the State of Kentucky.

Conner, A.M.; Francfort, J.E.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

U.S. hydropower resource assessment for Maine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydro-power potential in the United States. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. The software measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the United States, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven software program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report details the resource assessment results for the State of Maine.

Francfort, J.E.; Rinehart, B.N.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

US hydropower resource assessment for Vermont  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydropower potential in this country. The Hydropower Evaluation Software is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. The software measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the United States, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven software program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report details the resource assessment results for the State of Vermont.

Conner, A.M.; Francfort, J.E.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

U.S. hydropower resource assessment for North Carolina  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydropower potential in the US. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. HES measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the US, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report describes the resource assessment results for the State of North Carolina.

Conner, A.M.; Francfort, J.E.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

U.S. hydropower resource assessment for Tennessee  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydropower potential in the US. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. HES measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the US, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report describes the resource assessment results for the State of Tennessee.

Conner, A.M.; Francfort, J.E.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

U.S. hydropower resource assessment for Pennsylvania  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydropower potential in the US. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. HES measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the US, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report describes the resource assessment results for the State of Pennsylvania.

Conner, A.M.; Francfort, J.E.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

US hydropower resource assessment for Indiana  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydropower potential in this country. The Hydropower Evaluation Software is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. The software measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the United States, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven software program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report details the resource assessment results for the State of Indiana.

Francfort, J.E.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

US hydropower resource assessment for Iowa  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydropower potential in this country. The Hydropower Evaluation Software is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. The software measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the United States, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven software program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report details the resource assessment results for the State of Iowa.

Francfort, J.E.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "undeveloped undeveloped undeveloped" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

U.S. hydropower resource assessment for Maryland  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydropower potential in the US. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. HES measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the US, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report describes the resource assessment results for the State of Maryland.

Conner, A.M.; Francfort, J.E.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

U.S. hydropower resource assessment for West Virginia  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydropower potential in the US. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. HES measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the US, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report describes the resource assessment results for the State of West Virginia.

Conner, A.M.; Francfort, J.E.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

U.S. hydropower resource assessment for Arizona  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydropower potential in the US. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. HES measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the US, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report describes the resource assessment results for the State of Arizona.

Conner, A.M.; Francfort, J.E.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

U.S. hydropower resource assessment for Nebraska  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydropower potential in the US. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. HES measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the US, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report describes the resource assessment results for the State of Nebraska.

Conner, A.M.; Francfort, J.E.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

U.S. hydropower resource assessment for Ohio  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydropower potential in the US. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. HES measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the US, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report describes the resource assessment results for the State of Ohio.

Conner, A.M.; Francfort, J.E.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

U.S. hydropower resource assessment for Illinois  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydropower potential in the US. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. HES measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the US, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report describes the resource assessment results for the State of Illinois.

Conner, A.M.; Francfort, J.E.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

U.S. hydropower resource assessment for Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydropower potential in the US. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory for this purpose. HES measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the US, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report describes the resource assessment results for the State of Idaho.

Conner, A.M.; Francfort, J.E.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

US hydropower resource assessment for Wisconsin  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydropower potential in this country. The Hydropower Evaluation Software is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. The software measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the United States, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven software program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report details the resource assessment results for the State of Wisconsin.

Conner, A.M.; Francfort, J.E.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

U.S. hydropower resource assessment for South Carolina  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydropower potential in the US. To assist in providing this estimate, the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory developed the Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) computer model. HES measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the US, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report describes the resource assessment results for the State of South Carolina.

Conner, A.M.; Francfort, J.E.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Hydropower Resource Assessment Modeling Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hydropower Evaluation Software uses the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission?s Hydroelectric Power Resource Assessment database to identify sites with undeveloped hydropower capacity and the estimated megawatts of undeveloped capacity at each site. The software integrates this information with environmental values from the National Park Service?s National Rivers Inventory database. Other constraints to development that are modeled include Federal and state legislative protection for river segments that have been identified as being wild and scenic river segments. River segments containing threatened and/or endangered wildlife and fish are also modeled for their influence on hydropower development. The amount that each attribute affects the likelihood of development is dependent on the prior development of a site.

A. M. Conner; J. E. Francfort

1999-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

51

US hydropower resource assessment for Washington  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydropower potential in the United States. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. HES measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the United States, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report describes the resource assessment results for the State of Washington.

Conner, A.M.; Francfort, J.E.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

U.S. hydropower resource assessment for Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydropower potential in the US. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. HES measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the US, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report describes the resource assessment results for the State of Nevada.

Conner, A.M.; Francfort, J.E.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

U.S. Hydropower Resource Assessment - Georgia  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydropower potential in the United States. For this purpose, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory developed a computer model called Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES). HES measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the United States, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report describes the resource assessment results for the State of Georgia.

A. M. Conner; B. N. Rinehart; J. E. Francfort

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

U.S. hydropower resource assessment for New York  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydropower potential in the United States. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory for this purpose. HES measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the United States, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report describes the resource assessment results for the State of New York.

Conner, A.M.; Francfort, J.E.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Ecological characteristics of the Boardman site and environs, Morrow County, Oregon. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The report provides data concerning biota, other than man, and its relationship to the existing climatic regime and land use history at the Boardman Site, a large undeveloped tract of steppe land in northern Morrow County, Oregon. Baseline information is provided to permit evaluation of anticipated changes in plant and animal population related to the construction and operation of one or more electrical power generating stations and construction of a large water storage reservoir. (GRA)

Rogers, L.E.; Gurtisen, J.M.; Rickard, W.H.; Fitzner, R.E.

1975-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Avian Monitoring and Risk Assessment at the San Gorgonio Wind Resource Area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of this study at the San Gorgonio Wind Resource Area was to estimate and compare bird utilization, fatality rates, and the risk index among factors including bird taxonomic groups, wind turbine and reference areas, wind turbine sizes and types, and geographic locations. The key questions addressed to meet this objective include: (1) Are there any differences in the level of bird activity, called ''utilization rate'' or ''use'', with the operating wind plant and within the surrounding undeveloped areas (reference area)?; (2) Are there any differences in the rate of bird fatalities (or avian fatality) within the operating wind plant or the surrounding undeveloped areas (reference area)?; (3) Does bird use, fatality rates, or bird risk index vary according to the geographic location, type and size of wind turbine, and/or type of bird within the operating wind plant and surrounding undeveloped areas (reference area)?; and (4) How do raptor fatality rates at San Gorgonio compare to other wind projects with comparable data?

Anderson, R.; Tom, J.; Neumann, N.; Erickson, W. P.; Strickland, M. D.; Bourassa, M.; Bay, K. J.; Sernka, K. J.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

The Relationship between Land Use and Temperature Change in Dallas County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study examines the relationship between land use and temperature change in Dallas County, TX. The purpose of this research is to analyze the relationship between temperature and land use and to identify the primary factors contributing to the formation of urban heat islands based on different categories of land use. Specifically, this research analyzes the elements that contribute to the urban heat island effect in Dallas County using temperature data provided by remote sensing imagery and parcel-based land use data using Geographic Information System (GIS) technique and a correlation analysis method, which was employed to analyze the relationship between temperature and land use. The results of this study showed that every land use category has different temperature averages and those patterns were observed similarly in both 2000 and 2005. Parking, airport, commercial, industrial, and residential areas have relatively high temperatures. In contrast, water, undeveloped area and parks showed relatively low temperatures. Another major finding was ratio of land use composition affected the temperature of census tracts. Correlation analyses of land use and temperature in 2000 and 2005 indicate that various types of land use categories have significant relationships with temperature. Among them commercial, industrial, residential, parking, and infrastructure, are positively associated with temperature, while undeveloped, parks, water, and dedicated areas are negatively associated with temperature. Areas with a high ratio of commercial use showed the highest and undeveloped areas showed the lowest relationship. Furthermore, through the analysis of the relationship between land use and temperature change for five years (2000-2005), this study finds that temperature change depends on the ratio of each land use category change. The results of this study can help local planning and policy decisions which are related to urban land use planning concerning temperature change such as zoning, environmental regulations and open space preservation.

Kim, Hee Ju

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

EIS-0349: Draft Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft Environmental Impact Statement Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0349: Draft Environmental Impact Statement BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project BP West Coast Products, LLC proposes to construct and operate a 720-megawatt, natural-gas-fired, combined-cycle cogeneration facility on land adjacent to its BP Cherry Point Refinery. Approximately 195 acres of undeveloped land would be converted for the cogeneration facility; gas, water, wastewater, and steam pipelines; construction laydown areas; access roads; and wetland mitigation areas.This Draft EIS assesses the existing natural and built environment, evaluates the potential environmental impacts and economic benefits of the proposed action, and identifies mitigation measures to compensate for the unavoidable impacts. Alternative

59

One Year Experience with Portable Back-Pressure Turbines in Los Azufres  

SciTech Connect

This paper contains the experience gained after one year operating five 5 MW portable, back-pressure, geothermal power plants at Los Azufres. A brief description of the field and te equipment is given. Cost figures of the whole installation and a list of what they believe are the advantages and disadvantages is also presented. The main conclusion is that the use of this type of turbogenerators is quite attractive in new undeveloped fields and also in countries with financial problems where initial capital cost investments must be kept as low as possible at the expenses of long term steam consumption.

Hiriart, Gerardo L.

1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

60

EA-1631: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Final Environmental Assessment 1: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1631: Final Environmental Assessment Loan Guarantee for Beacon Power Corporation Frequency Regulation Facility in Stephentown, New York The environmental assessment examines the potential environmental impacts associated with issuing a Federal loan guarantee to Beacon Power Corporation for construction and operation of a flywheel-based frequency regulation facility at an undeveloped seven acre site in Stephentown, New York. Environmental Assessment for Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for Beacon Power Corporation Frequency Regulation Facility in Stephentown, New York, DOE/EA-1631, February 2009 More Documents & Publications EA-1631: Finding of No Significant Impact Fact Sheet: Grid-Scale Flywheel Energy Storage Plant

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "undeveloped undeveloped undeveloped" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Tucson Solar Village: Project management  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Tucson Solar Village is a Design/Build Project In Sustainable Community Development which responds to a broad spectrum of energy, environmental, and economic challenges. This project is designed for 820 acres of undeveloped State Trust Land within the Tucson city limits; residential population will be five to six thousand persons with internal employment provided for 1200. This is a 15 year project (for complete buildout and sales) with an estimated cost of $500 million. Details of the project are addressed with emphasis on the process and comments on its transferability.

Not Available

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Geothermal energy and the land resource: conflicts and constraints in The Geysers-Calistoga KGRA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study of potential land-related impacts of geothermal power development in The Geysers region focuses on Lake County because it has most of the undeveloped resource and the least regulatory capability. First, the land resource is characterized in terms of its ecological, hydrological, agricultural, and recreational value; intrinsic natural hazards; and the adequacy of roads and utility systems. Based on those factors, the potential land-use conflicts and constraints that geothermal development may encounter in the region are identified and the availability and relative suitability of land for such development is determined. A brief review of laws and powers germane to geothermal land-use regulation is included.

O'Banion, K.; Hall, C.

1980-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

63

Land-use conflicts in The Geysers-Calistoga KGRA: a preliminary study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This preliminary study of potential land use conflicts of geothermal development in The Geysers region, one component of the LLL/LBL socioeconomic program, focuses on Lake County because it has most of the undeveloped resource and the least regulatory capability. The land resource is characterized in terms of its ecological, hydrological, agricultural, and recreational value; intrinsic natural hazards; and the adequacy of roads and utility systems and each factor is depicted on a map. Then those factors are analyzed for potential conflicts with both geothermal and urban development and the conflicts displayed on respective maps. A brief review of laws and methods germane to geothermal land-use regulation is included.

O'Banion, K.; Hall, C.; Haven, K.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Western Area Power Administration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

v*Zy- i , . v*Zy- i , . r ,v * -i S # Af [, (e- . - o -A tl }r- 0 v-" l^~4~S J l ^-)^ I^U^ck iM clti ^ Undeveloped Transmission Right-of-Way Western has very little undeveloped transmission right-of-way. There is a 7-mile right- of-way between Folsom, CA and Roseville, CA where Western acquired a 250' wide right-of-way but is only using half of it. Another line could be built parallel to Western's line to relieve congestion in the Sacramento area. In addition, Western has rights-of- way for many transmission lines that could be rebuilt to increase transmission capacity. For example, Western's Tracy-Livermore 230-kV line is a single circuit line but the existing towers could support a double circuit line. These rights-of-way would have to

65

Uniform criteria for U.S. hydropower resource assessment: Hydropower Evaluation Software status report -- 2  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy is estimating the undeveloped hydropower potential in the US. The Hydropower Evaluation software is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. The Hydropower Evaluation Software estimates the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the US, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven software application. Hydropower Evaluation Software allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This status report describes Hydropower Evaluation Software`s development, its data requirements, and its application to the 20 states assessed to date. This report does not discuss or present the various user-friendly menus of the Hydropower Evaluation Software. The reader is referred to the User`s Manual for specifics. This report focuses on data derivation, summarization of the 20 states (Arkansas, Missouri, Montana, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, Vermont, and Wyoming) assessed to date, and plans for future assessments.

Conner, A.M.; Francfort, J.E.; Rinehart, B.N.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Recovery Act-Funded Study Assesses Contamination at Former Test Site in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Act-Funded Study Assesses Contamination at Former Test Act-Funded Study Assesses Contamination at Former Test Site in California Recovery Act-Funded Study Assesses Contamination at Former Test Site in California Workers in a study funded by $38 million from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to assess radiological contamination have collected more than 600 soil samples and surveyed 120 acres of land for gamma radiation. Under an interagency agreement with DOE, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is conducting the study at Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL) Area IV and the Northern Undeveloped Land. Recovery Act-Funded Study Assesses Contamination at Former Test Site in California More Documents & Publications EA-1345: Final Environmental Assessment EIS-0402: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement

67

EA-1441: Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1441: Environmental Assessment EA-1441: Environmental Assessment EA-1441: Environmental Assessment Construction and Operation of the Molecular Foundry at Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) proposes to build a six-story, approximately 86,500 gross square foot (gsf) Molecular Foundry building; and an adjacent 8,000 gsf, partly below-grade Central Utility Plant building (for a combined 94,500 gsf), to be funded and operated by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences. The buildings would be located on an approximately 21⁄2-acre site in the southeastern portion of the LBNL facility in the Oakland-Berkeley hills (see Figures 1 and 2). The site is on mostly undeveloped slopes between Building 72, which

68

CX-006160: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0: Categorical Exclusion Determination 0: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006160: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pumpernickel Valley: Sub-soil Gas and Fluid Inclusion Exploration and Slim Well Drilling CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B3.6 Date: 06/28/2011 Location(s): Pumpernickel Valley, Nevada Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office Nevada Geothermal Power Company would apply highly detailed, precise, low cost subsoil and down-hole gas geochemistry methods from the oil and gas industry to identify two upflow zone slim hole drilling targets in an undeveloped geothermal prospect at Pumpernickel Valley, Nevada. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-006160.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-000677: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002750: Categorical Exclusion Determination

69

An Alfirmotive Action/Equal Opportunity Employer STATUS AND PLANS  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

I&s ' c I&s ' c c scilenti ? alamos c laboratoiy of ihe University of California Lsr i'"""', i'" MEXICO 8,545 An Alfirmotive Action/Equal Opportunity Employer STATUS AND PLANS REPORT FOR FORMER TECHNICAL AREA ONE AT LOS ALAMOS SCIENTIFIC LABORATORY HEALTH RESEARCH DIVISION JANUARY i976 I I I I I I I if n II 9 I I I I. I I I I STATUS AND PLANS REPORT FOR FORMER TECHNICAL AREA ONE AT LOS ALAMOS SCIENTIFIC LABORATORY INTRODUCTION Because of increased official and public concern over low-level radioactive contamination of private lands or former ERDA (AEC) lands released to the public, the undeveloped part of the former main tech- nical area of LASL (TA-1) was surveyed in 1974 at the request of ERDA @EC)*. This effort was to determine whether any of the land (%40

70

Evaluation of the Potential for Agricultural Development at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

By 2050, when cleanup of the Hanford Site is expected to be completed, large worldwide demands to increase the global production of animal and fish protein, food, and fiber are anticipated, despite advancements in crop breeding, genetic engineering, and other technologies. The most likely large areas for expanded irrigation in the Pacific Northwest are the undeveloped East High areas of the Columbia Basin Project and non-restricted areas within the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State. The area known as the Hanford Site has all the components that favor successful irrigated farming. Constraints to agricultural development of the Hanford Site are political and social, not economic or technical. Obtaining adequate water rights for any irrigated development will be a major issue. Numerous anticipated future advances in irrigation and resource conservation techniques such as precision agriculture techniques, improved irrigation systems, and irrigation system controls will greatly minimize the negative environmental impacts of agricultural activities.

Evans, Robert G.; Hattendorf, Mary J.; Kincaid, Charles T.

2000-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

71

Construction feasibility of OTEC platforms. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study provides an evaluation of the feasibility of constructing either steel or concrete OTEC platforms of both spar and ship shape configurations for a range of platform sizes with respect to existing, developed shipyard or fabrication yard facilities that are currently active in marine vessel construction within the US. This brief study is quite broad in scope. Many parameters, including plant size; vessel type, size, configuration, and dimensions; position of heat exchangers; existing construction facility size, geographic location, and potential for modification; and, availability of undeveloped deep water construction sites affect the conclusions drawn. Nevertheless, the conclusions should remain valid and not change significantly, unless there are major changes in either vessel size or US construction capabilities. The various concepts are ranked in order of their feasibility and practicality of construction in existing or modified existing facilities and new facilities.

Brewer, J H; Harwood, P; Solberg, K; Fjeld, S

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

The Current and Historical Distribution of Special Status Amphibians at the Livermore Site and Site 300  

SciTech Connect

65 surveys were completed in 2002 to assess the current distribution of special status amphibians at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Livermore Site and Site 300. Combined with historical information from previous years, the information presented herein illustrates the dynamic and probable risk that amphibian populations face at both sites. The Livermore Site is developed and in stark contrast to the mostly undeveloped Site 300. Yet both sites have significant issues threatening the long-term sustainability of their respective amphibian populations. Livermore Site amphibians are presented with a suite of challenges inherent of urban interfaces, most predictably the bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana), while Site 300's erosion issues and periodic feral pig (Sus scrofa) infestations reduce and threaten populations. The long-term sustainability of LLNL's special status amphibians will require active management and resource commitment to maintain and restore amphibian habitat at both sites.

Hattem, M V; Paterson, L; Woollett, J

2008-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

73

Geothermal Exploration And Reservoir Monitoring Using Earthquakes And The  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Exploration And Reservoir Monitoring Using Earthquakes And The Geothermal Exploration And Reservoir Monitoring Using Earthquakes And The Passive Seismic Method Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Geothermal Exploration And Reservoir Monitoring Using Earthquakes And The Passive Seismic Method Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This paper reviews the use of earthquake studies in the field of geothermal exploration. Local, regional and teleseismic events can all provide useful information about a geothermal area on various scales. It is imperative that data collection is conducted in properly designed, realistic experiments. Ground noise is still of limited usefulness as a prospecting tool. The utility of the method cannot yet be assessed because of its undeveloped methodology and the paucity of case histories.

74

MHK Technologies/LUKAS | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LUKAS LUKAS < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage LUKAS.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Kneider Innovations Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The device according to the invention aims at supplying a means of Navigation appropriate clean easy to use it can be an additional means of navigation This invention allows navigation by converting the kinetic energy of movements the oscillations right left an or front back or high down to a uni directional one way horizontal push These energies are free renewable but still undeveloped yet in navigations Mooring Configuration Does not indicate

75

Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report for Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laborat... Laborat... file:///I|/Data%20Migration%20Task/EIS-0157-FEIS-03-1992/05eis0157_f.html[6/27/2011 9:57:50 AM] APPENDIX F ECOLOGY AND BIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT This appendix contains two major sections. Section F.1 is a discussion of the ecological characteristics at the LLNL Livermore site, LLNL Site 300, and SNL, Livermore (referred to collectively as the study sites); and presents information and data on the flora and fauna in the upland areas (see Appendix G for a detailed analysis of wetlands at the study sites). This section focuses on the biological features of LLNL Site 300 because this 7000-acre site is largely undeveloped and represents the most biologically diverse area under study. In contrast, the LLNL Livermore site and SNL, Livermore are developed areas that provide only marginal wildlife habitat because of the high degree of human activity and the few

76

EA-1631: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31: Finding of No Significant Impact 31: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1631: Finding of No Significant Impact Loan Guarantee for Beacon Power Corporation Frequency Regulation Facility in Stephentown, N.Y. The environmental assessment examines the potential environmental impacts associated with issuing a Federal loan guarantee to Beacon Power Corporation for construction and operation of a flywheel-based frequency regulation facility at an undeveloped seven acre site in Stephentown, New York. Environmental Assessment for Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for Beacon Power Corporation Frequency Regulation Facility in Stephentown, New York, DOE/EA-1631, February 2009, Finding of No Significant Impact More Documents & Publications EA-1631: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1753: Finding of No Significant Impact

77

Definition: Stepout-Deepening Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stepout-Deepening Wells Stepout-Deepening Wells Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Stepout-Deepening Wells A well drilled at a later time over remote, undeveloped portions of a partially developed continuous reservoir rock. A deepening well is reentering a well and drilling to a deeper reservoir. Often referred to as an "infield exploration well" in the oil and gas industry.[1] Also Known As delayed development well References ↑ http://www.answers.com/topic/step-out-well Ste LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. p-out-well: a well drilled in the expected extent of a reservoir that is being developed but at a significant distance, usually two or more drilling and spacing units, from the nearest producer in that reservoir. A step-out

78

maxey.cdr  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Maxey Maxey Flats, Kentucky, Disposal Site. Site Description and History The Maxey Flats Site is an inactive, low-level radioactive waste disposal site located in eastern Kentucky about 10 miles northwest of Morehead, Kentucky. The property encompasses approximately 770 acres, including a buffer zone of approximately 440 acres. The site is located in the Knobs physio- graphic region, which is characterized by hills and relatively flat-topped ridges. The disposal cell is located on a spur of Maxey Flats, one of the larger flat-topped ridges in the region. The site is bounded by steep slopes on the west, east, and south and is approximately 350 feet above the adjacent valleys. The Commonwealth of Kentucky owns the disposal site and surrounding buffer zone. The land surrounding the site is primarily mixed woodlands and open farmland. The area is sparsely populated and mostly undeveloped.

79

Recovery Act-Funded Study Assesses Contamination at Former Test Site in California  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CANOGA PARK, Calif. - Workers in a study funded by $38 million from the American Recovery CANOGA PARK, Calif. - Workers in a study funded by $38 million from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to assess radiological contamination have collected more than 600 soil samples and surveyed 120 acres of land for gamma radiation. Under an interagency agreement with DOE, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is conduct- ing the study at Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL) Area IV and the Northern Undeveloped Land. DOE's Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC) is located in Area IV. Results of the study will guide cleanup decisions for this portion of SSFL, which was once used for a broad range of energy related research and development. The EPA is collecting soil samples to determine the nature and extent of radiological contamina-

80

Geothermal Permeability Enhancement - Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective is to apply known permeability enhancement techniques to reduce the number of wells needed and demonstrate the applicability of the techniques to other undeveloped or under-developed fields. The Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) concept presented in this project enhances energy extraction from reduced permeability zones in the super-heated, vapor-dominated Aidlin Field of the The Geysers geothermal reservoir. Numerous geothermal reservoirs worldwide, over a wide temperature range, contain zones of low permeability which limit the development potential and the efficient recovery of heat from these reservoirs. Low permeability results from poorly connected fractures or the lack of fractures. The Enhanced Geothermal System concept presented here expands these technologies by applying and evaluating them in a systematic, integrated program.

Joe Beall; Mark Walters

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "undeveloped undeveloped undeveloped" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

U.S. Hydropower Resource Assessment - California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the underdeveloped hydropower potential in the United States. For this purpose, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory developed a computer model called Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES). HES measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the United States, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report describes the resource assessment results for the State of California.

A. M. Conner; B. N. Rinehart; J. E. Francfort

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Gray scale x-ray mask  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention describes a method for fabricating an embossing tool or an x-ray mask tool, providing microstructures that smoothly vary in height from point-to-point in etched substrates, i.e., structure which can vary in all three dimensions. The process uses a lithographic technique to transfer an image pattern in the surface of a silicon wafer by exposing and developing the resist and then etching the silicon substrate. Importantly, the photoresist is variably exposed so that when developed some of the resist layer remains. The remaining undeveloped resist acts as an etchant barrier to the reactive plasma used to etch the silicon substrate and therefore provides the ability etch structures of variable depths.

Morales, Alfredo M. (Livermore, CA); Gonzales, Marcela (Seattle, WA)

2006-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

83

Field development will cost $1 billion  

SciTech Connect

The development of the Belridge property 40 miles west of Bakersfield in the San Joaquin Valley is not only one of the biggest production developments of this decade in California but also is one of the msot challenging. It will call on advanced expertise and, ultimately, on techniques that are still in the research stage. The program calls for drilling at least 3000 wells and reworking another 2200 wells. In excess of $100 million is being committed in 1980 alone. Since acquiring the property, Shell has increased the estimate of proved developed and undeveloped reserves to approximately 598 million bbl of hydrocarbon liquids and 364 billion cu ft of natural gas. The higher estimates mirror the company's confidence in its capability to recover a larger amount of the in-place oil and gas than previously expected.

Rintoul, B.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

South Belridge Tulare simulation study: Steamflood in a heterogeneous stratified reservoir  

SciTech Connect

Thermal reservoir simulation is used to develop an operational strategy for the Tulare sand of the South Belridge field. History matching of an ongoing steamflood that has been in operation since 1981 is used to test the validity of the model. The primary purpose of the simulation study is to evaluate and design the optimum steamflood for an expansion project in the undeveloped, southern portion of the field. The simulation model also is used to study operating policy options for current operations as well as for new development. This study results in the recommendation that a 5-acre, nine-spot pattern be developed for the Southern Expansion Project. Study of operating policy shows that steamflood performance can be improved by shutting in marginal producing layers and optionally cutting back the steam-injection rate

Chiou, R.C.S.; Weinstein, H.G.; Smith, R.C.; Barrett, R.A.; DuBois, D.P. [Mobil E and P U.S. Inc., Bakersfield, CA (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Wind Powering America: Goals, Approach, Perspectives, and Prospects; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

While wind development activity in the United States has dramatically increased over the last 3 years, it has been mainly driven by policy mandates in the investor owned utility community. Also, while significant wind development has and is now occurring in the Northwest, the Great Plains, the Rocky Mountains, Texas, and several eastern states, there remain a number of states that have excellent resources that are essentially undeveloped. Additionally, the U.S. federal agencies represent the largest institutional load in the world, and thus are a potential large market for green (wind) energy. Rural America is economically stressed and traditional agricultural incomes are seriously threatened; wind development in these windy regions offers one of the most promising''crops'' of the 21st century. Public power serves these communities, and local development of wind with low-cost financing appears to be competitive with new conventional fossil energy sources.

Flowers, L. T.; Dougherty, P. J.

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

File:BOEMRE lease.platforms.santa.barb.map.5.2010.pdf | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

lease.platforms.santa.barb.map.5.2010.pdf lease.platforms.santa.barb.map.5.2010.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Federal Leases in Pacific Ocean, near Santa Maria Basin Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,650 × 1,275 pixels, file size: 1.41 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Federal Leases in Pacific Ocean, near Santa Maria Basin Sources Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (BOEMRE) Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2010-05-18 Extent Santa Maria Basin Countries United States UN Region Northern America States California Developed federal leases, platforms and undeveloped federal leases in the santa maria basin (Pacific Ocean). File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time.

87

Microsoft Word - 4L_Traffic_DEIR.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

L-1 ESA / 201074 L-1 ESA / 201074 Public Circulation Draft January 22, 2007 IV.L. Transportation/Traffic IV.L.1 Introduction This chapter evaluates project impacts on transportation facilities and existing transportation operating conditions in the vicinity of the project area, including neighborhood traffic, vehicular circulation, parking, transit and shuttle services, and pedestrian and bicycle circulation. IV.L.2 Setting LBNL is located close to three major highways: Interstate 80/580 1 approximately three miles to the west, and State Routes (SR) 24 and 13, two miles to the south. Access from the Lab to I-80/580 is through the city of Berkeley via arterial roads. Access to SR 24 and SR 13 is via Tunnel Road. Grizzly Peak Boulevard, which runs through a largely undeveloped area, provides a

88

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): ISSM: Mountain Lion Sightings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Safeguards & Security Management Integrated Safeguards & Security Management Home ISSM Plan Security at LBNL Clearance Holders Export Control International Visitors Security Updates Contact Us CI Awareness Security and Emergency Operations Website Mountain Lion Sightings Mountain Lion Adult Mountain Lion Cub Mountain Lion Adult Mountain Lion Cub Updated 11/19/2012: Mountain lions generally exist where deer are found. Warning signs have been placed at walkways and gate entrances. As a precaution, the use of isolated stairs/walkways at dusk, night, or dawn is discouraged. To limit an interaction with a mountain lion, avoid hiking or jogging in the undeveloped areas of the lab alone or at dawn, dusk or night. If you see a mountain lion, immediately call 7-911 from any Lab phone or 911 from any cell phone. Go to http://www.dfg.ca.gov/keepmewild/lion.html

89

Coastal Barrier Resources Act | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Barrier Resources Act Barrier Resources Act Jump to: navigation, search Statute Name Coastal Barrier Resources Act Year 1982 Url [[File:|160px|link=]] Description References Wikipedia[1] FWS Coastal Barrier Resources Act Webpage[2] The Coastal Barrier Resources Act of the United States was enacted October 18, 1982. The United States Congress passed this Act in order to address the many problems associated with coastal barrier development. CBRA designated various undeveloped coastal barriers, which were illustrated by a set of maps adopted by law, to be included in the John H. Chafee Coastal Barrier Resources System (CBRS). These designated areas were made ineligible for both direct and indirect Federal expenditures and financial assistance, which are believed to encourage development of fragile,

90

EA-1212: Lease of Land for the Development of a Research Park at Los Alamos  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1212: Lease of Land for the Development of a Research Park at 1212: Lease of Land for the Development of a Research Park at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico EA-1212: Lease of Land for the Development of a Research Park at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to lease undeveloped land that is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory in Los Alamos, New Mexico, to the County for private sector use as a research park. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD October 15, 1997 EA-1212: Mitigation Action Plan Lease of Land for the Development of a Research Park at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM October 8, 1997 EA-1212: Finding of No Significant Impact

91

Presentation title: This can be up to 2 lines  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Michael Schaal, Director Michael Schaal, Director Office of Petroleum, Gas, and Biofuels Analysis April 26, 2011 | Washington, DC The future of the OCS after Macondo Historical crude oil production by source 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 Other Lower 48 onshore CO2 EOR Alaska 2 million barrels per day Lower 48 offshore Michael Schaal, Washington, DC, April 26, 2011 History 2 Crude oil production by source, 1990-2035 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Other Lower 48 onshore CO2 EOR Alaska 3 million barrels per day Lower 48 offshore Michael Schaal, Washington, DC, April 26, 2011 History Projections 3 * Impact of new regulatory and safety requirements * Timing of lease sales in the Pacific, Atlantic, and Eastern GOM OCS * Cost of exploration and development in undeveloped areas * Resource level uncertainty

92

Caldwell Ranch Exploration and Confirmation Project, Northwest Geysers, CA  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Caldwell Ranch Exploration and Confirmation Project was to drill, test, and confirm the present economic viability of the undeveloped geothermal reservoir in the 870 acre Caldwell Ranch area of the Northwest Geysers that included the CCPA No.1 steam field. All of the drilling, logging, and sampling challenges were met. ? Three abandoned wells, Prati 5, Prati 14 and Prati 38 were re-opened and recompleted to nominal depths of 10,000 feet in 2010. Two of the wells required sidetracking. ? The flow tests indicated Prati 5 Sidetrack 1 (P-5 St1), Prati 14 (P-14) and Prati 38 Sidetrack 2 (P-38 St2) were collectively capable of initially producing an equivalent of 12 megawatts (MWe) of steam using a conversion rate of 19,000 pounds of steam/hour

Walters, Mark A.

2013-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

93

BP-Statoil to study Caspian oil project; S. Korea eyes Yakut gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports that a combine of British Petroleum Co. plc and Den norske stats oljeselskap AS has agreed to pay $40 million for exclusive rights to study development of a Caspian Sea oil field off Azerbaijan and explore a nearby prospect. Meanwhile, the South Korean press said South Korea and Russia have agreed to form a joint venture to develop undisclosed gas fields in the Yakut Autonomous Republic of eastern Siberia and lay gas pipelines from Yakut to the Korean peninsula. In a 50-50 joint venture with the former Soviet republic of Azerbaijan, BP-Statoil will evaluate undeveloped Dostlug field, previously known as Kaverochkin, 75 km southeast of Baku. It also will study the adjacent Shak Deniz prospect, formerly known as Shakhovo More.

Not Available

1992-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

94

Dickinson geothermal study. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Inyan Kara Formation provides an abundant source of warm (54 to 71/sup 0/C) but salty (7400 mg/l combined Na and Cl ions) water for much of southwestern North Dakota. The city of Dickinson, ND, overlies this aquifer at 1676 to 1768 meters. This study investigates the potential of usng this hydrothermal resource as an energy source for a district heating system in a new undeveloped addition to Dickinson. In addition, the use of a reverse osmosis system to desalinate the water is considered along with other water treatment processes necessary to allow use of this water in the existing city water supply. The results of the study indicate the economic requirements to make this concept feasible and outline the consideration to carry the project into the design phase.

Fossum, G.O.; Harris, K.L.; Hassett, D.J.; Mathsen, D.V.; Owens, T.C.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

US hydropower resource assessment for South Dakota  

SciTech Connect

A total of 33 sites have been identified and assessed for their hydropower potential. Information as to the potential megawatts of capacity for 4 of the sites was not available; however, these sites have been identified as having hydropower potential and are included in the group of 33. The Hydropower Evaluation Software results for site capacities range from 35 kilowatts to 234 megawatts. Most of the sites have potential capacities of under 1 megawatts. The unadjusted hydropower potential for South Dakota was identified as being 1,124 megawatts. The Hydropower Evaluation Software results lower this estimate 38% to 695 megawatts. The greatest reduction in undeveloped potential occurs at developed sites with current power production. These sites have a Hydropower Evaluation Software estimated capacity of 285 megawatts, a 50% reduction in capacity. The number of sites does not change, only the identified capacity is reassessed.

Francfort, J.E.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Economics of Alaska North Slope gas utilization options  

SciTech Connect

The recoverable natural gas available for sale in the developed and known undeveloped fields on the Alaskan North Slope (ANS) total about 26 trillion cubic feet (TCF), including 22 TCF in the Prudhoe Bay Unit (PBU) and 3 TCF in the undeveloped Point Thomson Unit (PTU). No significant commercial use has been made of this large natural gas resource because there are no facilities in place to transport this gas to current markets. To date the economics have not been favorable to support development of a gas transportation system. However, with the declining trend in ANS oil production, interest in development of this huge gas resource is rising, making it important for the U.S. Department of Energy, industry, and the State of Alaska to evaluate and assess the options for development of this vast gas resource. The purpose of this study was to assess whether gas-to-liquids (GTL) conversion technology would be an economic alternative for the development and sale of the large, remote, and currently unmarketable ANS natural gas resource, and to compare the long term economic impact of a GTL conversion option to that of the more frequently discussed natural gas pipeline/liquefied natural gas (LNG) option. The major components of the study are: an assessment of the ANS oil and gas resources; an analysis of conversion and transportation options; a review of natural gas, LNG, and selected oil product markets; and an economic analysis of the LNG and GTL gas sales options based on publicly available input needed for assumptions of the economic variables. Uncertainties in assumptions are evaluated by determining the sensitivity of project economics to changes in baseline economic variables.

Thomas, C.P.; Doughty, T.C.; Hackworth, J.H.; North, W.B.; Robertson, E.P.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Assist in the recovery of bypassed oil from reservoirs in the Gulf of Mexico. Quarterly status report (final), July 1--September 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research is to assist the recovery of non contacted oil from known reservoirs on the Outer Continental Shelf in the Gulf of Mexico. Mature offshore reservoirs, declining oil reserves, declining production, and other natural forces are accelerating the abandonment of offshore oil resources and production platforms. As these offshore wells are plugged and the platforms are abandoned, an enormous volume of remaining oil will be permanently abandoned. Significant quantities of this oil could be recovered using advanced technologies now available if the resource can be identified. This project will proceed under three broad phases: (1) Analysis -- TORIS level data will be collected on the major fields located in the piercement salt dome province of the Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf. Representative reservoirs will be studied in detail in order to evaluate undeveloped and attic oil reserve potential. These detailed investigations will be used to calibrate the TORIS level predictive models. The recovery potential of advanced secondary and enhanced oil recovery processes and the exploitation of undeveloped and attic oil zones for salt dome reservoirs in the Gulf of Mexico will be assessed. (2) Supporting Research -- Supporting research will focus on the modification of public domain reservoir simulation models to accurately simulate the conditions encountered in the piercement salt dome province of the Gulf of Mexico. Laboratory research will focus on the development of fluid relationships that will be used in the simulation of miscible and immiscible processes in the project area. (3) Technology Transfer -- A significant effort is planned to transfer the results of this project to potential users of the technology. Technology transfer activities will also provide feedback channels that will help keep the analysis and supporting research focused on the most important problems associated with this project.

Schenewerk, P.A.

1994-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

98

A geologic assessment of natural gas from tight gas sandstones in the San Juan Basin. Final report, June 1989--June 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors conducted a detailed geologic appraisal, estimated gas in place and recoverable volumes, and evaluated the impact of technology improvements on potential Cretaceous (Pictured Cliffs, Chacra, Cliff House, Point Lookout and Dakota intervals) tight gas reserves of the San Juan Basin. This report summarizes the results of a disaggregated appraisal of the undeveloped San Juan tight gas resource in the context of current and near-term technology, project economics and market potential. A geologic data base was constructed based on location reservoir properties, and typical well recoveries were modeled on a township-specific basis. Project costing and cash flow economics were analyzed to derive potential reserves for various technology specifications and wellhead prices. These data provide a foundation for operators and pipelines to more closely examine these tight formations for development in the near future. Gas in place for the undeveloped tight portion of the five intervals studied was estimated at 17.2 Tcf, with the Dakota Formation accounting for two thirds of this volume. Using current technology, potential ultimate recovery for all intervals is 7.2 Tcf. Potential reserve additions are 1.1 Tcf at $1.50/Mcf, 2.3 Tcf at $2.00/Mcf, and 5.9 Tcf at $5.00/Mcf. The availability of the Nonconventional Fuels Tax Credit for eligible wells drilled in 1991 and 1992 could improve project economics by an after tax equivalent of $0.66/Mcf at the wellhead. Over 300 geophysical logs were evaluated to construct depth, overburden and isopach maps and a location-specific resource database. The database was analyzed using TGAS-PC{reg_sign}, an integrated engineering and economics model for tight sands that has the capability to do rapid sensitivity analysis of geological, technology and economic assumptions.

Haas, M.R.; Lombardi, T.E.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Population Status and Evaluation of Landscape Change for the Lower Keys Marsh Rabbit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wildlife biologists and land managers tasked with the recovery of the endangered Lower Keys marsh rabbit (LKMR; Sylvilagus palustris hefneri) were in need of a current population estimate as well as a method to estimate the LKMR population annually. Habitat loss and fragmentation from population growth and development have threatened the existence of the LKMR. Establishing and understanding long-term habitat availability for the LKMR is important for determining causes of historical population declines as well as designing and implementing successful recovery plans. I conducted a range-wide pellet survey and a mark-recapture study to estimate the LKMR population. I evaluated the fit of 5 models and considered the variation in behavioral response model the best model. I correlated (r2 = 0.913) this model's rabbit abundance estimates to pellet density in 11 patches and generated a range-wide population estimate of 317, a western clade population of 257, an eastern clade population of 25, and translocated LKMR populations of 35 and 0 on Little Pine and Water keys, respectively. This prediction equation provides managers a quick, efficient, and non-invasive method to estimate LKMR abundance from pellet counts. To quantify the amount of habitat loss and fragmentation that occurred over the last 50 years, I systematically delineated and compared potential LKMR habitat using 1959 and 2006 aerial photographs. Additionally, I investigated if other factors could have reduced the amount of suitable habitat available for the LKMR with a comparison of habitat loss and fragmentation on a developed island and an undeveloped island. Range-wide, I found that number of habitat patches increased by 38, total class area decreased by 49.0%, and mean patch size decreased by 44.3%. Mean shape index increased by 4.2% and mean proximity index decreased by 13%. Both the 1959 and 2006 connectance indices were low while the 2006 set decreased 12.1%. I observed the same patterns of habitat loss and fragmentation on both the developed and undeveloped islands as I did in the range-wide landscape analysis. I found that LKMR habitat has declined in area and become more fragmented over the last 50 years. Habitat loss and fragmentation by development have directly endangered the LKMR; however, sea level rise and woody encroachment also could have historically caused habitat loss and fragmentation. Although development in LKMR habitat was halted, sea-level rise and woody encroachment could continue to alter LKMR habitat.

Schmidt, Jason Alan

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Analysis for the Design of a Sustainable Housing Complex in Haiti  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents sustainable strategies for the design of a prototype sustainable housing complex in tropical climate that applies specifically to Haiti. The tropical climate zone is hot and humid with abundant rainfall and luxuriant vegetation growth. Despite its beautiful environment most of the countries in this zone are undeveloped and poverty manifests itself in different faces especially in poor housing condition. In this study, the history, geography, and culture of Haiti are analyzed in the context of family unit, community, and economic aspects. The climate conditions are also investigated in the context of residents’ comfort and energy savings. The construction materials appropriate for Haiti climate are explored. Rainwater harvesting and gray water reuses are discussed. Finally, sustainable design principles are proposed. Sustainable housing design refers to a strategy to plan and build a housing complex that uses efficient energy and water management while minimizing the overall adverse health and environmental problems. This means keeping the conventional comfort and environment conditions in housing by using natural sources of energy, like sun and wind, to provide natural heating, cooling, ventilation, lighting, and water management while contributing to a responsible natural resources use. The proposed guiding principles target to be utilized for the design of sustainable housing complex in Haiti located in a tropical climate.

Dinka, M.; Cho, S.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "undeveloped undeveloped undeveloped" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Geology and geochemistry of the Geyser Bight Geothermal Area, Umnak Island, Aleutian Islands, Alaska  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geyser Bight geothermal area is located on Umnak Island in the central Aleutian Islands. It contains one of the hottest and most extensive areas of thermal springs and fumaroles in Alaska, and is only documented site in Alaska with geysers. The zone of hot springs and fumaroles lies at the head of Geyser Creek, 5 km up a broad, flat, alluvial valley from Geyser Bight. At present central Umnak is remote and undeveloped. This report describes results of a combined program of geologic mapping, K-Ar dating, detailed description of hot springs, petrology and geochemistry of volcanic and plutonic rock units, and chemistry of geothermal fluids. Our mapping documents the presence of plutonic rock much closer to the area of hotsprings and fumaroles than previously known, thus increasing the probability that plutonic rock may host the geothermal system. K-Ar dating of 23 samples provides a time framework for the eruptive history of volcanic rocks as well as a plutonic cooling age.

Nye, C.J. (Alaska Univ., Fairbanks, AK (USA). Geophysical Inst. Alaska Dept. of Natural Resources, Fairbanks, AK (USA). Div. of Geological and Geophysical Surveys); Motyka, R.J. (Alaska Dept. of Natural Resources, Juneau, AK (USA). Div. of Geological and Geophysical Surveys); Turner, D.L. (Alaska Univ., Fairbanks, AK (USA). Geophysical Inst.); Liss, S.A. (Alaska Dept. of Natural Resources, Fairba

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Reservoir description breathes new life into an old fireflood  

SciTech Connect

The MOCO T reservoir is a Miocene-age (''Stevens equivalent,'' Monterey Formation) unconsolidated sand reservoir in the Midway-Sunset field, Kern County, California. This reservoir was discovered in 1957 as a deeper pay beneath the Monarch and Webster reservoirs. Due to low prices for heavy oil (14/sup 0/ API), the MOCO T was only partially developed and remained essentially shut-in until initiation of in-situ combustion in 1960. Exploitation of the MOCO T by the combustion process continues today, with cumulative production to date of approximately 14 million bbl of oil. The MOCO T reservoir is approximately 500 ft thick and lies at an average drill depth of 2,100-2,700 ft. Based on modern core data and sand distribution maps, these sands were probably deposited by channelized turbidity currents that flowed southwest to northwest in this area. Detailed recorrelation of wireline logs, stratigraphic zonation, and description of individual zones of the MOCO T reservoir in the context of a channelized turbidite system have led to: (1) determination of probable flow paths, vertically and laterally, between injectors and producers by zone, (2) control for workovers to optimize conformance between injection and production intervals, and (3) identification of previously unrecognized and undeveloped reserves. Integration of this geologic model with an understanding of how the combustion front has advanced through the MOCO T reservoir has led to successful placement of infill wells to produce the reservoir more efficiently and completely.

Hall, B.R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Data:635d59d8-dc5b-424c-a1e8-a3b708b9b87e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d59d8-dc5b-424c-a1e8-a3b708b9b87e d59d8-dc5b-424c-a1e8-a3b708b9b87e No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Blue Ridge Elec Member Corp Effective date: 2010/03/03 End date if known: Rate name: Growth Zone Pricing Sector: Industrial Description: Availability: Available to commercial or industrial members for full time permanent three-phase electric service with a maximum load requirement of 75 kilowatts (kW) or greater to new facilities located in a Cooperative designated growth zone. A growth zone is a designated commercial/industrial area that creates economic growth in the cooperative's service area in an area that is undeveloped or under development where electric utility infrastructure exists or is planned to be installed.

104

Report of the State Geothermal Resources Task Force, State of California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The State Geothermal Resources Task Force has investigated the status of geothermal resources and development in California and in this report offers recommendations for overcoming obstacles facing increased utilization of this significant natural resource. For the most part, these recommendations are short-term solutions to immediate problems and would not radically change the roles of governmental agencies currently regulating geothermal development. The Task Force concludes that geothermal operations have been hindered by the lack of a statewide policy on geothermal development. This has resulted in instances where industry has been forced to comply with conflicting governmental policies toward geothermal energy development and environmental protection. The Task Force therefore recommends legislation establishing a statewide policy to encourage geothermal development consistent with environmental quality standards. In addition to geothermal resources suitable for the production of electrical power, California has extensive undeveloped hot water reservoirs suitable for direct thermal applications. The Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission and the US Geological Survey have concluded that these resources, if developed, could make a significant contribution to satisfying California's energy needs. The Task Force therefore recommends establishing a statewide policy to encourage the use of non-electric hot water geothermal resources for commercial and non-commercial uses where the development is consistent with environmental quality concerns.

Warburg, Judith; Kirkham, Bill; Hannon, Theodore

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

International Conference on Engineering Education August 6 -- 10, 2001 Oslo, Norway  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction of modern CAD-CAP-CAM technologies shortened the product development cycle and lowered production costs. To deliver new product faster and cheaper, engineers are forced to learn faster and more efficiently. Rapid development of information and communication technologies (ICT) enabled new tools for education and boosted distance learning tools. The goal of this paper is to give some ideas and results on how can ICT are used efficiently in engineering education, based on the experiences and international cooperation from Italy, Norway, Germany and Spain, as well as from Bosnia and Herzegovina, a country with undeveloped industry. On one side, we have industry on the level of fifties and on the opposite side we have ICT technologies, which can not be as slow as local industry development. The paper is based on experiences gathered through international project "Establishment of Phare Open and Distance Learning Centers in Bosnia and Herzegovina" and treats the development activities in the ODL Center at the Faculty of Mechanical Engineering in Zenica.

Is It Possible; Darko Petkovic; Samir Lemes; Mladen Jecmenica; Joan Vivancos Calvet

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Oil shale up-date  

SciTech Connect

The development of large domestic oil shale resources in an environmentally acceptable manner is technically feasible. Such development is approaching economic attractiveness. It is an essential step in attacking the major national problem: increasing oil imports. Several things have been impeding oil shale development. First, until recently there has been a lack of viable technology. Second, environmental regulations are becoming increasingly restrictive. These have become so unrealistic that the bare undeveloped ground in oil shale country fails to comply. Most of this area is now classified as a nonattainment area. The third reason is economic uncertainty. This relates to price and other governmental controls which make it impossible to predict future conditions with enough confidence to justify private investments. In an effort to overcome this uncertainty, while retaining the impeding controls, all types of governmental incentives and supports are being proposed by the Administration, the Congress, and the industry. This study highlights the current status of the more prominent technologies. It suggest that the next logical step in their advancement is the construction and operation of single full-size retorts or modules.

Pforzheimer, H.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Perestroika, Soviet oil, and joint ventures  

SciTech Connect

Glaznost, the freedom of expression in both the public and private sectors of the Soviet Union, has rapidly transformed the country form a largely isolated and closed society to one that is rapidly becoming more cosmopolitan and open to the West. Now that the Soviet Union is moving toward a free-market economy, a number of new laws are being generated to create a favorable environment for Western investment, especially joint ventures. First, crude oil sales have provided over 75% of much-needed hard currency, and oil has been the principal barter for manufactured goods produced in eastern Europe. Second, joint oil ventures with Western companies can reverse declining production levels and provide sufficient stimulus to turn around the economic recession. The Soviet Union has a very large inventory of discovered but undeveloped oil and gas fields. Most of these fields are difficult for the Soviets to produce technically, financially, and environmentally safely, and they are actively seeking appropriate Western partners. From an exploration point of view, the Soviet Union has probably the largest number of undrilled and highly prospective oil basins, which may replenish declining reserves in the West. Finally, the Soviet Union represents in the long term a large unsaturated market eager to absorb the surplus of goods and services in the Western world. Again, joint oil ventures could provide the convertible currency to increase East-West trade.

Churkin, M. Jr.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Hydrothermal opportunities and challenges in the basin and range  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal development in the Basin and Range is a viable alternative for a portion of the new power. The existing fields in operation, short development lead times, ability to add incremental power generation, and the favorable environmental aspects all bode well for the industry. The Basin and Range province has a large inventory of both developed and undeveloped prospects. Currently, there are 434 MW{sub e} (gross) of installed generating capacity, which has been added at an average rate 67 MW{sub e} per year. Additional areas can be considered as maturing exploration prospects. An improved exploration and development approach would rely on a multi-disciplinary team of geologists, geochemists, geophysicists, and reservoir engineers. An exploration model would be developed by the team and continually reevaluated as exploration and development progressed. The role of the reservoir engineer would be the ongoing incorporation of geologic and engineering data into a reservoir model, providing a reality check on the exploration team. At each stage, the model is available to management for the latest estimates of reservoir deliverability, project economics, a reservoir management plan, and be used for well site selection. 15 refs., 3 figs.

Faulder, D.D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Office of Oil and Natural Gas Prepared by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The domestic oil resource recovery potential outlined in this report is based on six basin-oriented assessments released by the Department of Energy (DOE) in April 2005. These estimates do not include the additional oil resource potential outlined in the ten basin-oriented assessments or recoverable resources from residual oil zones, as discussed in related reports issued by DOE in February 2006. Accounting for these, the future recovery potential from domestic undeveloped oil resources by applying EOR technology is 240 billion barrels, boosting potentially recoverable resources to 430 billion barrels. Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States nor the United States Department of Energy, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility of the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the Department of Energy.

Prepared For; Vello A. Kuuskraa; George J. Koperna

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Office of Oil and Natural Gas Prepared by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Much of the analysis in this report was performed in late 2005. The domestic oil resource recovery potential outlined in the report is based on six basin-oriented assessments released by the United States Department of Energy in April 2005. These estimates do not include the additional oil resource potential outlined in the ten basin-oriented assessments or recoverable resources from residual oil zones, as discussed in related reports issued by Department of Energy in February 2006. Accounting for these, the future recovery potential from domestic undeveloped oil resources by applying EOR technology is 240 billion barrels, boosting potentially recoverable resources to 430 billion barrels. Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States nor the United States Department of Energy, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility of the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily

L. Stephen Melzer; Prepared For; L. Stephen Melzer; Melzer Consulting

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Natural CO2 Analogs for Carbon Sequestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report summarizes research conducted at three naturally occurring geologic CO{sub 2} fields in the US. The fields are natural analogs useful for the design of engineered long-term storage of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} in geologic formations. Geologic, engineering, and operational databases were developed for McElmo Dome in Colorado; St. Johns Dome in Arizona and New Mexico; and Jackson Dome in Mississippi. The three study sites stored a total of 2.4 billion t (46 Tcf) of CO{sub 2} equivalent to 1.5 years of power plant emissions in the US and comparable in size with the largest proposed sequestration projects. The three CO{sub 2} fields offer a scientifically useful range of contrasting geologic settings (carbonate vs. sandstone reservoir; supercritical vs. free gas state; normally pressured vs. overpressured), as well as different stages of commercial development (mostly undeveloped to mature). The current study relied mainly on existing data provided by the CO{sub 2} field operator partners, augmented with new geochemical data. Additional study at these unique natural CO{sub 2} accumulations could further help guide the development of safe and cost-effective design and operation methods for engineered CO{sub 2} storage sites.

Scott H. Stevens; B. Scott Tye

2005-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

112

1999 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect

Throughout the scientific community, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is renowned for its leading-edge research in physics, medicine, chemistry, biology, materials, and the environment. BNL is committed to supporting its world-class scientific research with an internationally recognized environmental protection program. The 1999 Site Environmental Report (SER) summarizes the status of the Laboratory's environmental programs and performance, including the steady progress towards cleaning up the site and fully integrating environmental stewardship into all facets of the Laboratory's mission. BNL is located on 5,265 acres of pine barrens in Suffolk County in the center of Long Island, New York. The Laboratory is situated above a sole source aquifer at the headwaters of the Peconic River; therefore, protecting ground and surface water quality is a special concern. Approximately 3,600 acres of the site are undeveloped and serve as habitat for a wide variety of animals and plants, including one New York State endangered species, the tiger salamander, and two New York State threatened species, the banded sunfish and the stiff goldenrod. Monitoring, preserving, and restoring these ecological resources is a high priority for the Laboratory.

ENGEL-COX,J.; ZIMMERMAN,E.; LEE,R.; WILLIAMS,J.; GREEN,T.; PAQUETTE,D.; HOODA,B.; SCARPITTA,S.; GENZER,P.; ET AL

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Environ Monit Assess DOI 10.1007/s10661-013-3256-6 Evaluation of stream chemistry trends in US Geological Survey reference watersheds, 1970–2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is a long-term monitoring program established by the US Geological Survey in the 1960s to track changes in the streamflow and stream chemistry in undeveloped watersheds across the USA. Trends in stream chemistry were tested at 15 HBN stations over two periods (1970– 2010 and 1990–2010) using the parametric Load Estimator (LOADEST) model and the nonparametric seasonal Kendall test. Trends in annual streamflow and precipitation chemistry also were tested to help identify likely drivers of changes in stream chemistry. At stations in the northeastern USA, there were significant declines in stream sulfate, which were consistent with declines in sulfate deposition resulting from the reductions in SO2 emissions mandated under the Clean Air Act Amendments. Sulfate declines in stream water were smaller than declines in deposition suggesting sulfate may be accumulating in watershed soils and thereby delaying the stream response to improvements in deposition. Trends in stream chemistry at stations in other part of the country generally were attributed to climate variability or land disturbance. Despite declines in sulfate deposition, increasing stream sulfate was observed at several stations and appeared to be linked to periods of drought or declining streamflow. Falling water tables might have

M. Alisa Mast; M. A. Mast

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

THE REMEDIATION OF ABANDONED IRON ORE MINE SUBSIDENCE IN ROCKAWAY TOWNSHIP, NEW JERSEY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report represents the thirteenth Technical Progress Report issued in connection with the subsidence remediation projects undertaken by Rockaway Township in Morris County, New Jersey. This report provides a summary of the major project work accomplished during this semi annual reporting period and contemplated for the subsequent reporting period. This report is issued as part of the project reporting provisions set forth in the Cooperators Agreement between the United States Government--Department of Energy, and Rockaway Township. The purpose of the Cooperators Agreement is for the Department of Energy to provide technical and financial assistance in a coordinated effort with Rockaway Township to develop and implement a multi-phased plan to remediate ground stability problems associated with abandoned mining activity. Primarily during the 1800's, extensive iron ore mining and prospecting was undertaken in Rockaway Township, part of the Dover District Mining region in Morris County. The abandoned mining activity has resulted in public safety hazards associated with ground collapse and surface subsidence features evolving in both developed and undeveloped areas within Rockaway Township. At the Green Pond Mine site at the Township's Jacobs Road Compost Storage Facility, construction was completed during this reporting period and surface monitoring began. Surface monitoring was conducted periodically at the Mt. Hope Road subsidence work area and adjacent areas after the January 2000 construction effort.

Gary Gartenberg

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

THE REMEDIATION OF ABANDONED IRON ORE MINE SUBSIDENCE IN ROCKAWAY TONWSHIP, NEW JERSEY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report represents the tenth Semi-Annual Technical Progress Report issued in connection with the subsidence remediation projects undertaken by Rockaway Township in Morris County, New Jersey. This report provides a summary of the major project work accomplished during this reporting period and contemplated for the subsequent reporting period. This report is issued as part of the project reporting provisions set forth in the Cooperators Agreement between the United States Government-Department of Energy, and Rockaway Township. The purpose of the Cooperators Agreement is for the Department of Energy to provide technical and financial assistance in a coordinated effort with Rockaway Township to develop and implement a multi-phased plan to remediate ground stability problems associated with abandoned mining activity. Primarily during the 1800's, extensive iron ore mining and prospecting was undertaken in Rockaway Township, part of the Dover District Mining region in Morris County. The abandoned mining activity has resulted in public safety hazards associated with ground collapse and surface subsidence features evolving in both developed and undeveloped areas within Rockaway Township. At the Green Pond Mine site at the Township Compost Storage Facility, engineering continued during this reporting period toward development of the Construction Plans and Technical Specifications for the remediation work. At the Mt. Hope Road subsidence, surface monitoring was conducted periodically at the work area and adjacent areas after the January 2000 construction effort.

Gary Gartenberg

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Environmental Assessment of remedial action at the Ambrosia Lake uranium mill tailings site, Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This document assesses and compares the environmental impacts of various alternatives for remedial action at the Ambrosia Lake uranium mill tailings site located near Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico. The designated site covers 196 acres and contains 111 acres of tailings and some of the original mill structures. The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA), Public Law 95-604, authorizes the US Department of Energy to clean up the site to reduce the potential health impacts associated with the residual radioactive materials remaining at the site and at associated properties off the site. The US Environmental Protection Agency promulgated standards for th remedial action (40 CFR Part 192). Remedial action must be performed in accordance with these standards and with the concurrence of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The proposed action is to stabilize the tailings at their present location by consolidating the tailings and associated contaminated materials into a recontoured pile. A radon barrier would be constructed over the pile and various erosion protection measures would be taken to assure the long-term stability of the pile. Another alternative which would involve moving the tailings to a new location is also assessed in this document. This alternative would generally involve greater short-term impacts and costs but would result in stabilization of the tailings at an undeveloped location. The no action alternative is also assessed in this document.

Not Available

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Co-Firing Oil Shale with Coal and Other Fuels for Improved Efficiency and Multi-Pollutant Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oil shale is an abundant, undeveloped natural resource which has natural sorbent properties, and its ash has natural cementitious properties. Oil shale may be blended with coal, biomass, municipal wastes, waste tires, or other waste feedstock materials to provide the joint benefit of adding energy content while adsorbing and removing sulfur, halides, and volatile metal pollutants, and while also reducing nitrogen oxide pollutants. Oil shale depolymerization-pyrolysis-devolatilization and sorption scoping studies indicate oil shale particle sorption rates and sorption capacity can be comparable to limestone sorbents for capture of SO2 and SO3. Additionally, kerogen released from the shale was shown to have the potential to reduce NOx emissions through the well established “reburning” chemistry similar to natural gas, fuel oil, and micronized coal. Productive mercury adsorption is also possible by the oil shale particles as a result of residual fixed-carbon and other observed mercury capture sorbent properties. Sorption properties were found to be a function particle heating rate, peak particle temperature, residence time, and gas-phase stoichmetry. High surface area sorbents with high calcium reactivity and with some adsorbent fixed/activated carbon can be produced in the corresponding reaction zones that exist in a standard pulverized-coal or in a fluidized-bed combustor.

Robert A. Carrington; William C. Hecker; Reed Clayson

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

RADIATION: A TOOL FOR INDUSTRY. A Survey of Current Technology  

SciTech Connect

This one-year survey of industrial applications of ionizing radiation is based on interviews with workers in the field and on analysis of selected literature. ionizing radiation at kilowatt power levels from electron accelerators and from radionuclides is finding a few special applications, notably sterilization and be in various stages of process development and tcsting. These are concentrated heavily in the plastics field, though examples are found in petrochemical synthesis, product sterilization, and portable energy sources such as batteries. Ionizing radiation is not yet a processing tool of major importance to industry generally, however, because it has not yet demonstrated sufficient advantages over established methods of achieving a similar result. Thus, though ionizing radiation produces free radicals under a wide variety of conditions, it has, with few exceptions, not proved superior to other agents, such as heat and chemicals, that also produce free radicals. Insufficient specificity of action, low yields, and costs higher than those of competitive processes are among the chief difficulties found. Possible unique features of radiation have not been fully explored. Optimization of enviromental variables has not been thoroughly studied. Indirect advantages associated with radiation, such as greater processing or packaging flexibility, have already proved significantly important but have not yet been thoroughly evaluated in most potential applications. Even radiation engineering is relatively undeveloped and radiation economics uncertain. Skillfully oriented research and development on such problems will improve the likelihood of radiation becoming a tool of major importance for U.S. industry. (auth)

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Active Space Debris Removal using Capture and Ejection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low Earth Orbit is over-cluttered with rogue objects that threaten existing technological assets and interfere with allocating new ones. Traditional satellite missions are not efficient enough to collect an appreciable amount of debris due to the high cost of orbit transfers. Many alternate proposals are politically controversial, costly, or dependent on undeveloped technology. This dissertation attempts to solve the problem by introducing a new mission architecture, Space Sweeper, and bespoke hardware, Sling-Sat, that sequentially captures and ejects debris plastically. Resulting momentum exchanges are exploited to aid in subsequent orbit transfers, thus saving fuel. Sling-Sat is a spinning satellite that captures debris at the ends of adjustable-length arms. Arm length controls the angular rate to achieve a desired tangential ejection speed. Timing the release exacts the ejection angle. This process redirects debris to burn up in the atmosphere, or reduce its lifetime, by lowering its perigee. This dissertation establishes feasibility of principles fundamental to the proposed concept. Hardware is conceptualized to accommodate Space Sweeper ’s specialized needs. Mathematical models are built for the purpose of analysis and simulation. A kinematic analysis investigates system demands and long-term behavior resulting from repeated debris interaction. A successful approach to enforce debris capture is established through optimal control techniques. A study of orbital parameters and their response to debris interactions builds an intuition for missions of this nature. Finally, a J2-compliant technique for path optimization is demonstrated. The results strongly support feasibility of the proposed mission.

Missel, Jonathan William

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Robinson Rancheria Strategic Energy Plan; Middletown Rancheria Strategic Energy Plan, Scotts Valley Rancheria Strategic Energy Plan, Elem Indian Colony Strategic Energy Plan, Upperlake Rancheria Strategic Energy Plan, Big Valley Rancheria Strategic Energy Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Scotts Valley Band of Pomo Indians is located in Lake County in Northern California. Similar to the other five federally recognized Indian Tribes in Lake County participating in this project, Scotts Valley Band of Pomo Indians members are challenged by generally increasing energy costs and undeveloped local energy resources. Currently, Tribal decision makers lack sufficient information to make informed decisions about potential renewable energy resources. To meet this challenge efficiently, the Tribes have committed to the Lake County Tribal Energy Program, a multi Tribal program to be based at the Robinson Rancheria and including The Elem Indian Colony, Big Valley Rancheria, Middletown Rancheria, Habematolel Pomo of Upper Lake and the Scotts Valley Pomo Tribe. The mission of this program is to promote Tribal energy efficiency and create employment opportunities and economic opportunities on Tribal Lands through energy resource and energy efficiency development. This program will establish a comprehensive energy strategic plan for the Tribes based on Tribal specific plans that capture economic and environmental benefits while continuing to respect Tribal cultural practices and traditions. The goal is to understand current and future energy consumption and develop both regional and Tribe specific strategic energy plans, including action plans, to clearly identify the energy options for each Tribe.

McGinnis and Associates LLC

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

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121

Improved recovery from Gulf of Mexico reservoirs. Quarterly status report, January 1--March 31, 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On February 18, 1992, Louisiana State University with two technical subcontractors, BDM, Inc. and ICF, Inc., began a research program to estimate the potential oil and gas reserve additions that could result from the application of advanced secondary and enhanced oil recovery technologies and the exploitation of undeveloped and attic oil zones in the Gulf of Mexico oil fields that are related to piercement salt domes. This project is a one year continuation of this research and will continue work in reservoir description, extraction processes, and technology transfer. Detailed data will be collected for two previously studies reservoirs: a South Marsh Island reservoir operated by Taylor Energy and one additional Gulf of Mexico reservoir operated by Mobil. Additional reservoirs identified during the project will also be studied if possible. Data collected will include reprocessed 2-D seismic data, newly acquired 3-D data, fluid data, fluid samples, pressure data, well test data, well logs, and core data/samples. The new data will be used to refine reservoir and geologic characterization of these reservoirs. Further laboratory investigation will provide additional simulation input data in the form of PVT properties, relative permeabilities, capillary pressure, and water compatibility. Geological investigations will be conducted to refine the models of mud-rich submarine fan architectures used by seismic analysts and reservoir engineers. Research on advanced reservoir simulation will also be conducted. This report describes a review of fine-grained submarine fans and turbidite systems.

Kimbrell, W.C.; Bassiouni, Z.A.; Bourgoyne, A.T.

1996-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

122

Kerr-McGee launches talent at House Creek flood  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Kerr-McGee Corp. gets tertiary status on potassium hydroxide treatment augmenting the polymer flood of House Creek Sussex Unit. Kerr-McGee took over the House Creek flood project when it bought some $65.6 million in Powder River Basin properties from Sonat Exploration Co. of Birmingham, Alabama. Those Campbell and Converse county properties included some 75,000 net acres of leases and approximately 11 MMboe in developed and undeveloped reserves. At first, Kerr-McGee planned to go ahead with Sonat's 3-to-1 line drive pattern for its flood, but further study persuaded the company to go to a 1-to-1 pattern. The original 3-to-1 pattern had three rows of producers for one row of injectors. The 1-to-1 pattern has one row of producers for one row of injectors. Even though it's technically a polymer flood, the project qualifies for tertiary recovery status because of the potassium hydroxide (KOH) treatment used to stabilize clays in the touchy Sussex Formation.

Lyle, D.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Technology assessment of external heat systems for Stirling heat pumps. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A technology assessment and design improvement effort was undertaken for the Stirling engine heat pump external heat system (EHS) in order to reduce costs. It was found that only two applicable EHS design approaches have been developed to any extent: a relatively undeveloped design featuring a premixed fuel and air transpiration burner, and a turbulent diffusion type burner system developed by Mechanical Technology, Inc. To evaluate and optimize the design concepts, an analytical model was developed that examined design and performance variables. The model calculated key temperatures, allowing the specification of materials requirements. Adherence to American National Standards Institute appliance furnace code material specifications was assumed. Concepts for EHS control systems were evaluated, and a cost-effective control system design was developed for the turbulent diffusion burner EHS. The study reveals that optimizing the diffusion burner EHS design can result in significant cost savings. No clear choice between the diffusion burner and transpiration burner systems could be determined from this study, but the designs of both were further developed and improved. Estimates show the EHS based on a transpiration burner to have a manufactured cost that is roughly 70% of the turbulent diffusion burner EHS cost, but fuel efficiency is lower by about 18%.

Vasilakis, A.D. [Advanced Mechanical Technology, Inc., Newton, MA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

The Need for Open Lands  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Need for Open Lands Need for Open Lands Nature Bulletin No. 742 February 8, 1964 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour .Simon, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor THE NEED FOR OPEN LANDS There is an old saying: The proof of the pudding is the eating . In other words, if it's good, people enjoy it and beg for more. The proof of the need for open lands -- publicly owned areas for recreational uses and open spaces undisturbed -- is the tremendous and ever-increasing use of those we have. We need more now. Year after year we will need more and more. It is imperative that areas desirable for future use be acquired now or as soon as possible, regardless of cost and even though they may stand idle ' -- vacant and undeveloped -- until more funds become available. Otherwise they may be gone, or the asking price may be a hundred times greater. Open spaces such as farm lands and prairies may have been occupied by residential, commercial or industrial developments. Woodlands may have been cut, stream channels dredged and wetlands drained, destroying all but a memory of their beauty and recreational values. There are compelling reasons for our need of open lands and why we should waste no time in providing more. Those reasons have been confirmed and emphasized by exhaustive studies and statistical analyses nationwide in scope.

125

Diffracted light from latent images in photoresist for exposure control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In microelectronics manufacturing, an arrangement for monitoring and control of exposure of an undeveloped photosensitive layer on a structure susceptible to variations in optical properties in order to attain the desired critical dimension for the pattern to be developed in the photosensitive layer. This is done by ascertaining the intensities for one or more respective orders of diffracted power for an incident beam of radiation corresponding to the desired critical dimension for the photosensitive layer as a function of exposure time and optical properties of the structure, illuminating the photosensitive layer with a beam of radiation of one or more frequencies to which the photosensitive layer is not exposure-sensitive, and monitoring the intensities of the orders of diffracted radiation due to said illumination including at least the first order of diffracted radiation thereof, such that when said predetermined intensities for the diffracted orders are reached during said illumination of photosensitive layer, it is known that a pattern having at least approximately the desired critical dimension can be developed on the photosensitive layer.

Bishop, Kenneth P. (Rio Rancho, NM); Brueck, Steven R. J. (Albuquerque, NM); Gaspar, Susan M. (Albuquerque, NM); Hickman, Kirt C. (Albuquerque, NM); McNeil, John R. (Albuquerque, NM); Naqvi, S. Sohail H. (Albuquerque, NM); Stallard, Brian R. (Albuquerque, NM); Tipton, Gary D. (Albuquerque, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Evaluation of the potential for agricultural development at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

By 2050, when cleanup of the Hanford Site is expected to be completed, large worldwide demands to increase the global production of animalhlish protein, food, and fiber are anticipated, despite advancements in crop breeding, genetic engineering, and other technologies. World population is projected to double to more than 12 billion people, straining already stressed worldwide agricultural resources. The current world surpluses in many commodities will not last when faced with increasing population, decreasing ocean fisheries, and rapid loss of productive lands from soil salivation and erosion. The production of pharmaceuticals from bioengineered plants and animals will undoubtedly add more pressure on the already limited (and declining) arable land base. In addition there will be pressure to produce crops that can help reduce the world's dependence on petroleum and be used for chemical plant feedstock. These external, formidable pressures will necessitate increasing investments in irrigation infi-a-structures in many areas of the world to increase productivity. Intensive greenhouse culture and aqua-culture also will be greatly expanded. There will be large economic and social pressures to expand production in areas such as the Pacific Northwest. Agricultural exports will continue to be important The most likely large areas for expanded irrigation in the Pacific Northwest are the undeveloped East High areas of the Columbia Basin Project and non-restricted areas within the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State. Both of these are potentially highly productive area: for producing food and export capital. The environmental concerns will be large however, the favorable growing conditions, high-quality (low-salinity) abundant water supplies and minimal problems with salivation of soils make the Pacific Northwest a very desirable region for economically sustainable expansion from a world perspective.

RG Evans; MJ Hattendorf; CT Kincaid

2000-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

127

Powder River Basin Coalbed Methane Development and Produced Water Management Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Coalbed methane resources throughout the entire Powder River Basin were reviewed in this analysis. The study was conducted at the township level, and as with all assessments conducted at such a broad level, readers must recognize and understand the limitations and appropriate use of the results. Raw and derived data provided in this report will not generally apply to any specific location. The coal geology in the basin is complex, which makes correlation with individual seams difficult at times. Although more than 12,000 wells have been drilled to date, large areas of the Powder River Basin remain relatively undeveloped. The lack of data obviously introduces uncertainty and increases variability. Proxies and analogs were used in the analysis out of necessity, though these were always based on sound reasoning. Future development in the basin will make new data and interpretations available, which will lead to a more complete description of the coals and their fluid flow properties, and refined estimates of natural gas and water production rates and cumulative recoveries. Throughout the course of the study, critical data assumptions and relationships regarding gas content, methane adsorption isotherms, and reservoir pressure were the topics of much discussion with reviewers. A summary of these discussion topics is provided as an appendix. Water influx was not modeled although it is acknowledged that this phenomenon may occur in some settings. As with any resource assessment, technical and economic results are the product of the assumptions and methodology used. In this study, key assumptions as well as cost and price data, and economic parameters are presented to fully inform readers. Note that many quantities shown in various tables have been subject to rounding; therefore, aggregation of basic and intermediate quantities may differ from the values shown.

Advanced Resources International

2002-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

128

Reducing Onshore Natural Gas and Oil Exploration and Production Impacts Using a Broad-Based Stakeholder Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Never before has the reduction of oil and gas exploration and production impacts been as important as it is today for operators, regulators, non-governmental organizations and individual landowners. Collectively, these stakeholders are keenly interested in the potential benefits from implementing effective environmental impact reducing technologies and practices. This research project strived to gain input and insight from such a broad array of stakeholders in order to identify approaches with the potential to satisfy their diverse objectives. The research team examined three of the most vital issue categories facing onshore domestic production today: (1) surface damages including development in urbanized areas, (2) impacts to wildlife (specifically greater sage grouse), and (3) air pollution, including its potential contribution to global climate change. The result of the research project is a LINGO (Low Impact Natural Gas and Oil) handbook outlining approaches aimed at avoiding, minimizing, or mitigating environmental impacts. The handbook identifies technical solutions and approaches which can be implemented in a practical and feasible manner to simultaneously achieve a legitimate balance between environmental protection and fluid mineral development. It is anticipated that the results of this research will facilitate informed planning and decision making by management agencies as well as producers of oil and natural gas. In 2008, a supplemental task was added for the researchers to undertake a 'Basin Initiative Study' that examines undeveloped and/or underdeveloped oil and natural gas resources on a regional or geologic basin scope to stimulate more widespread awareness and development of domestic resources. Researchers assessed multi-state basins (or plays), exploring state initiatives, state-industry partnerships and developing strategies to increase U.S. oil and gas supplies while accomplishing regional economic and environmental goals.

Amy Childers

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

129

2010 Ecological Survey of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) oversees and manages the DOE contract for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), a DOE Office of Science multi-program laboratory located in Richland, Washington. PNSO is responsible for ensuring that all activities conducted on the PNNL Site comply with applicable laws, policies, and DOE orders. The DOE Pacific Northwest Site Office Cultural and Biological Resources Management Plan (DOE/PNSO 2008) addresses the requirement for annual surveys and monitoring for species of concern and to identify and map invasive species. In addition to the requirement for an annual survey, proposed project activities must be reviewed to assess any potential environmental consequences of conducting the project. The assessment process requires a thorough understanding of the resources present, the potential impacts of a proposed action to those resources, and the ultimate consequences of those actions. The PNNL Site is situated on the southeastern corner of the DOE Hanford Site, located at the north end of the city of Richland in south-central Washington. The site is bordered on the east by the Columbia River, on the west by Stevens Drive, and on the north by the Hanford Site 300 Area (Figure 1). The environmental setting of the PNNL Site is described in Larson and Downs (2009). There are currently two facilities on the PNNL Site: the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), and the recently completed Physical Sciences Facility (PSF). This report describes the results of the annual survey of the biological resources found on the undeveloped portions of the PNNL Site in 2010. A brief description of the methods PNNL ecologists used to conduct the surveys and the results of the surveys are presented. Actions taken to fully delineate noxious weed populations discovered in 2009 and efforts in 2010 to control those weeds also are described. Appendix A provides a list of plant and animal species identified on the PNNL Site.

Chamness, Michele A.; Perry, Christopher; Downs, Janelle L.; Powell, Sylvia D.

2011-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

130

Public key infrastructure for DOE security research  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes the Department of Energy`s Second Joint Energy Research/Defence Programs Security Research Workshop. The workshop, built on the results of the first Joint Workshop which reviewed security requirements represented in a range of mission-critical ER and DP applications, discussed commonalties and differences in ER/DP requirements and approaches, and identified an integrated common set of security research priorities. One significant conclusion of the first workshop was that progress in a broad spectrum of DOE-relevant security problems and applications could best be addressed through public-key cryptography based systems, and therefore depended upon the existence of a robust, broadly deployed public-key infrastructure. Hence, public-key infrastructure ({open_quotes}PKI{close_quotes}) was adopted as a primary focus for the second workshop. The Second Joint Workshop covered a range of DOE security research and deployment efforts, as well as summaries of the state of the art in various areas relating to public-key technologies. Key findings were that a broad range of DOE applications can benefit from security architectures and technologies built on a robust, flexible, widely deployed public-key infrastructure; that there exists a collection of specific requirements for missing or undeveloped PKI functionality, together with a preliminary assessment of how these requirements can be met; that, while commercial developments can be expected to provide many relevant security technologies, there are important capabilities that commercial developments will not address, due to the unique scale, performance, diversity, distributed nature, and sensitivity of DOE applications; that DOE should encourage and support research activities intended to increase understanding of security technology requirements, and to develop critical components not forthcoming from other sources in a timely manner.

Aiken, R.; Foster, I.; Johnston, W.E. [and others

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Proposed Tenaska Washington II Generation Project : Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1: Environmental Analysis and Technical Appendices.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BPA is considering whether to purchase electrical power from a proposed privately-owned combustion-turbine electrical generation plant in Washington. The plant would be fired by natural gas and would use combined-cycle technology to generate 240 average megawatts (aMW) of energy. The plant would be developed, owned, and operated by Tenaska Washington Partners II, L.P. The project would be located about 19 kilometers (12 miles) southeast of downtown Tacoma in the Frederickson Industrial Area, Pierce County. The proposed plant would occupy about half of a 6.4-hectare (16-acre) parcel and would be consistent with the industrial character of its surroundings. The proposed site is currently undeveloped and zoned for industrial use by the county. Main environmental concerns identified in the scoping process and in comments on the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) include: (1) potential air quality impacts, such as emissions and their contribution to the {open_quotes}greenhouse{close_quotes} effect; (2) potential health and safety impacts, such as nuisance odors, plant safety, visibility and heat-emission systems which may affect low-flying planes and potential health effects of electric and magnetic fields; and (3) potential water quality and quantity impacts, such as the amount of wastewater to be discharged, the source and amount of water required for plant operation. These and other issues are discussed in detail in the EIS. The proposed project already includes many features designed to reduce environmental impacts. Based on investigations performed for the EIS, no significant unavoidable adverse environmental impacts associated with the proposed project were identified, and no evidence emerged to suggest that the proposed action is controversial. The EIS is being mailed to numerous agencies, groups, and individuals (see Section 8.0). There will be a 30-day no-action period before any decisions are made and the Record of Decision is signed.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Proposed Tenaska Washington II Generation Project : Final Environmental Impact Statement: Summary.  

SciTech Connect

BPA is considering whether to purchase electrical power from a proposed privately-owned combustion-turbine electrical generation plant in Washington. The plant would be fired by natural gas and would use combined-cycle technology to generate 240 average megawatts (aMW) of energy. The plant would be developed, owned, and operated by Tenaska Washington Partners II, L.P. The project would be located about 19 kilometers (12 miles) southeast of downtown Tacoma in the Frederickson Industrial Area, Pierce County. The proposed plant would occupy about half of a 6.4-hectare (16-acre) parcel and would be consistent with the industrial character of its surroundings. The proposed site is currently undeveloped and zoned for industrial use by the county. Main environmental concerns identified in the scoping process and in comments on the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) include: (1) potential air quality impacts, such as emissions and their contribution to the {open_quotes}greenhouse{close_quotes} effect; (2) potential health and safety impacts, such as nuisance odors, plant safety, visibility and heat-emission systems which may affect low-flying planes and potential health effects of electric and magnetic fields; and (3) potential water quality and quantity impacts, such as the amount of wastewater to be discharged, the source and amount of water required for plant operation. These and other issues are discussed in detail in the EIS. The proposed project already includes many features designed to reduce environmental impacts. Based on investigations performed for the EIS, no significant unavoidable adverse environmental impacts associated with the proposed project were identified, and no evidence emerged to suggest that the proposed action is controversial. The EIS is being mailed to numerous agencies, groups, and individuals (see Section 8.0). There will be a 30-day no-action period before any decisions are made and the Record of Decision is signed.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Predicting the Appraised Unit Value of Unimproved Parcels in San Francisco, CA Using LEED Sustainable Site Credit Criteria, Parcel area, Zoning, and Population Density  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nowadays many people recognize the need for sustainable development more than ever because of improper urban sprawl, rapid exhaustion of natural resources, and serious environmental problems. Emission of carbon dioxide from transportation sources causes severe air contamination, and this will increase due to the continued use of private vehicles. Thus, local governments are trying to keep public transit on a satisfactory level due to rising commuting time for cities. The U.S. Census shows that the majority of people would prefer to use their private automobile rather than utilize existing mass transit systems. Therefore, it is up to local governments to consider setting up more efficient alternative mass transit systems to deal with the increasing pollution caused by automobiles. Organizations adopt certain environmental standards for many different reasons, such as commitment to environmental issues affecting their industry. Other organizations could also benefit, both economically and environmentally, by utilizing such standards. The LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) rating system is one of the more commonly-used environmental standards which presents guidelines for making decisions regarding land development while preserving the environment. However, only a few studies have attempted to evaluate this voluntary rating system which makes it difficult to justify the motivation of organizations that have adopted such voluntary standards. In this respect, this research primarily aims to explore the economic influence on the market value of undeveloped land through an analysis of public transportation in San Francisco, CA. Population density and area of each parcel are the factors considered to make the predictive model more powerful. Findings in this study show that LEED PTA (Public Transportation Accessibility) criteria, and population density significantly affect the appraised land unit value in specific purposed zones. Particularly, the economic impact of public transportation accessibility tended to be positive. With these findings, the statistical model for predicting land value was created. The result of this research can assist developers to make better site selections to accelerate the growth of sustainable construction.

Cho, Hyun Jeong

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Assessment of costs and benefits of flexible and alternative fuel use in the US transportation sector. Technical report twelve: Economic analysis of alternative uses for Alaskan North Slope natural gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the Altemative Fuels Assessment, the Department of Energy (DOE) is studying the use of derivatives of natural gas, including compressed natural gas and methanol, as altemative transportation fuels. A critical part of this effort is determining potential sources of natural gas and the economics of those sources. Previous studies in this series characterized the economics of unutilized gas within the lower 48 United States, comparing its value for methanol production against its value as a pipelined fuel (US Department of Energy 1991), and analyzed the costs of developing undeveloped nonassociated gas reserves in several countries (US Department of Energy 1992c). This report extends those analyses to include Alaskan North Slope natural gas that either is not being produced or is being reinjected. The report includes the following: A description of discovered and potential (undiscovered) quantities of natural gas on the Alaskan North Slope. A discussion of proposed altemative uses for Alaskan North Slope natural gas. A comparison of the economics of the proposed alternative uses for Alaskan North Slope natural gas. The purpose of this report is to illustrate the costs of transporting Alaskan North Slope gas to markets in the lower 48 States as pipeline gas, liquefied natural gas (LNG), or methanol. It is not intended to recommend one alternative over another or to evaluate the relative economics or timing of using North Slope gas in new tertiary oil recovery projects. The information is supplied in sufficient detail to allow incorporation of relevant economic relationships (for example, wellhead gas prices and transportation costs) into the Altemative Fuels Trade Model, the analytical framework DOE is using to evaluate various policy options.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Spatial Analysis of Residential Development and Urban-Rural Zoning in Baltimore County, Maryland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the past half-century, Baltimore County, Maryland has experienced various policy measures that have shaped development patterns. This thesis analyzes three spatially explicit parcel-level models of residential development in Baltimore County to examine the effects of land-use regulations on multiple density classes from 1996 to 2008. The first model analyzes the entire county, while the second analyzes areas outside the county urban growth boundary, while the third model studied areas inside the boundary. While this region has been previously analyzed, prior studies have generally ignored policy affects upon the density of new residential subdivisions. The use of a binary dependent variable, i.e. develop or not develop, represents a critical oversight as this assumes policy measures exert a uniform impact across all development types. This study addressed this issue with the literature by using a multinomial logit model to differentiate the effects of various development policies to better understand residential growth. The objective of this research is to determine what factors influence individual landowner's decision to convert an undeveloped property to residential use. The impacts of rural conservation (RC) zoning and urban growth boundaries (UGB) comprise the prominent land-use regulations analyzed in this study. The empirical estimates provided significant evidence that maximum density zoning effectively limits the density of new residential development in almost every model. Other policy measures, mainly rural legacy areas and critical areas, were generally found to be ineffective at limiting growth. This research concludes that maximum density zoning comprises the strongest tool for limiting development to a density mandated by the county government. Finally, maps depicting the predicted probability of development at two densities are included and discussed to indicate the areas most likely to be subdivided for residential land use.

Griffin, Alexander C.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Improved recovery from Gulf of Mexico reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Gulf of Mexico Basin offers the greatest near-term potential for reducing the future decline in domestic oil and gas production. The Basin is less mature than productive on-shore areas, large unexplored areas remain, and there is great potential for reducing bypassed oil in known fields. Much of the remaining oil in the offshore is trapped in formations that are extremely complex due to intrusions Of salt domes. Recently, however, significant innovations have been made in seismic processing and reservoir simulation. In addition, significant advances have been made in deviated and horizontal drilling technologies. Effective application of these technologies along with improved integrated resource management methods offer opportunities to significantly increase Gulf of Mexico production, delay platform abandonments, and preserve access to a substantial remaining oil target for both exploratory drilling and advanced recovery processes. On February 18, 1992, Louisiana State University (the Prime Contractor) with two technical subcontractors, BDNL Inc. and ICF, Inc., began a research program to estimate the potential oil and gas reserve additions that could result from the application of advanced secondary and enhanced oil recovery technologies and the exploitation of undeveloped and attic oil zones in the Gulf of Mexico oil fields that are related to piercement salt dornes. This project is a one year continuation of this research and will continue work in reservoir description, extraction processes, and technology transfer. Detailed data will be collected for two previously studied reservoirs: a South Marsh Island reservoir operated by Taylor Energy and a South Pelto reservoir operated by Mobil. This data will include reprocessed 2-D seismic data, newly acquired 3-D data, fluid data, fluid samples, pressure data, well test data, well logs, and core data/samples. Geologic data is being compiled; extraction research has not begun.

Schenewerk, P.

1995-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

137

The Remediation of Abandoned Iron Ore Mine Subsidence in Rockaway Township, New Jersey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report represents the twenty-seventh and Final Technical Progress Report issued in connection with the subsidence remediation projects undertaken by Rockaway Township in Morris County, New Jersey. This report provides a summary of the major project work accomplished during this last reporting period ending June 30, 2010 and a summary of the work accomplished since the agreement inception in 1997. This report is issued as part of the project reporting provisions set forth in the Cooperatorâ??s Agreement between the United States Government - Department of Energy, and Rockaway Township. The purpose of the Cooperatorâ??s Agreement is for the Department of Energy to provide technical and financial assistance in a coordinated effort with Rockaway Township to develop and implement a multi-phased plan to remediate ground stability problems associated with abandoned mining activity. Primarily during the 1800â??s, extensive iron ore mining and prospecting was undertaken in Rockaway Township, part of the Dover District Mining region in Morris County. The abandoned mining activity has resulted in public safety hazards associated with ground collapse and surface subsidence features evolving in both developed and undeveloped areas within Rockaway Township. At the Green Pond Mine site at the Townshipâ??s Jacobs Road Compost Storage Facility, surface monitoring continued after completion of construction in September 2003. Surface monitoring was conducted periodically at the Mt. Hope Road subsidence work area and adjacent areas after the January 2000 construction effort. In March 2007, a seventh collapse occurred over a portion of the White Meadow Mine in a public roadway at the intersection of Iowa and Erie Avenues in Rockaway Township. After test drilling, this portion of the mine was remediated by drilling and grouting the stopes.

Gartenberg, Gary; Poff, Gregory

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

138

Petroleum geology of heavy oil in the Oriente basin of Ecuador: Exploration and exploitation challenge for the 1990s  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Published Ecuadorian government forecasts suggest that Oriente basin light oil (21-32{degree} API) production may start to decline in the early to mid-1990s. To maintain stabilized production into the next century, heavy oil reserves (10-20{degree} API) will have to be aggressively exploited. The Oriente's undeveloped proven plus probable heavy reserves are substantial and are expected to exceed 0.5 billion bbl. A recent discovery made by Conoc Ecuador Ltd., operator of Block 16 for a group which consists of O.P.I.C., Maxus, Nomeco, Murphy and Canam, is a good model for future exploration and exploitation of heavy oil in the remote eastern regions of the basin. Amo-1 tested a low-relief anticline (less than 100 ft vertical closure) and encountered 10-20{degree} API oil in five Cretaceous sandstone reservoirs (8,000-10,000 ft depth). Cumulative test production was 1,062 BOPD. Subsequent drilling along the trend resulted in three additional discoveries. The Cretaceous sands were transported from the Brazilian shield by the westward flowing proto-Amazon River and were deposited in fluviodeltaic, tidal, and high-energy marginal marine environments. Air permeabilities are high and geometric mean values approaching several darcies. Porosities average 18-22% in generally well-consolidated sands. The heavy oils are the result of mild biodegradation and/or expulsion from a thermally immature source. Oil-to-oil correlations suggest that all of the basin oils have the same or similar origin, probably marine calcareous shales of the Cretaceous Napo formation. The Block 16 project will provide a major step toward the strategic exploitation of the Oriente basin's heavy oil reserves, when it comes on stream in the early 1990s.

Leadholm, R.H. (Conoco Ecuador Ltd., Houston, TX (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

New geothermal site identification and qualification. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study identifies remaining undeveloped geothermal resources in California and western Nevada, and it estimates the development costs of each. It has relied on public-domain information and such additional data as geothermal developers have chosen to make available. Reserve estimation has been performed by volumetric analysis with a probabilistic approach to uncertain input parameters. Incremental geothermal reserves in the California/Nevada study area have a minimum value of 2,800 grosss MW and a most-likely value of 4,300 gross MW. For the state of California alone, these values are 2,000 and 3,000 gross MW, respectively. These estimates may be conservative to the extent that they do not take into account resources about which little or no public-domain information is available. The average capital cost of incremental generation capacity is estimated to average $3,100/kW for the California/Nevada study area, and $2,950/kW for the state of California alone. These cost estimates include exploration, confirmation drilling, development drilling, plant construction, and transmission-line costs. For the purposes of this study, a capital cost of $2,400/kW is considered competitive with other renewable resources. The amount of incremental geothermal capacity available at or below $2,400/kW is about 1,700 gross MW for the California/Nevada study area, and the same amount (within 50-MW rounding) for the state of California alone. The capital cost estimates are only approximate, because each developer would bring its own experience, bias, and opportunities to the development process. Nonetheless, the overall costs per project estimated in this study are believed to be reasonable.

Not Available

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Hydrocarbon evaluation proposed southeastern New Mexico radioactive material storage site Eddy County, New Mexico. Volume I. Discussion  

SciTech Connect

The proposed radioactive waste material storage site is located in the northern portion of the Delaware Basin. No hydrocarbon production exists within the current boundaries of the ''site area'', but oil and gas are being produced from 60 wells in a 368 square-mile area around the site. These wells produce from the Delaware, Bone Springs, Wolfcamp, Strawn, Atoka and Morrow zones at a total rate of about 22,682 MCF of gas and 429 barrels of oil per day. This area is considered to be potentially rich in hydrocarbon reserves and the lack of fuller development and exploration drilling is due primarily to low gas prices, lack of sales outlets and/or pipelines and moratoriums on drilling in the potash areas. Proved producing and proved nonproducing reserves are present in two wells in the Los Medanos Field area immediately adjacent to the southwest corner of the ''site area''. In addition, proved undeveloped, probable and possible reserves exist at six potential drilling locations in the Los Medanos Field. Further, probable and possible reserves were assigned to fifteen other potential drilling locations in the northwest and south-central portions of the ''site area''. Total future economically recoverable reserves projected for these wells are 62,253,244 MCF of gas and 409,628 barrels of oil. The future net undiscounted revenue to the oil operators was determined to be $48,410,821. The discounted future net revenue is $21,216,899, discounted at 10 percent per annum. The fair market value for these projected reserves is $12,730,139, assuming a fair market factor of 0.60.

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "undeveloped undeveloped undeveloped" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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141

Application of turbidite facies of the Stevens Oil Zone for reservoir management, Elk Hills Field, California  

SciTech Connect

A detailed depositional model for the uppermost sand reservoirs of the Stevens Oil Zone, Elk Hills Field, California, contains three facies: turbidite channel-fill sand bodies, overbank Sandstone and mudstone, and pelagic and hemipelagic siliceous shale. Sand bodies are the primary producing facies and consist of layered, graded sandstone with good permeability. The presence of incipient anticlines with subsea relief in the late Miocene resulted in deposition of lenticular and sinuous sand Was within structurally created channels. Relief of these structural channels was low when the earliest sand bodies were deposited, leading to a wide channel complex bounded by broad overbank deposits of moderate to low permeability. As deposition proceeded, increased structural relief constrained the channels, resulting in narrower sand body width and relatively abrupt channel terminations against very low permeability siliceous shale. With post-Miocene uplift and differential compaction, stratigraphic mounding of sand bodies helped create structural domes such as the 24Z reservoir. Stratigraphic traps including the 26R reservoir were also created. Such traps vary in seal quality from very effective to leaky, depending on the lateral transition from sand bodies to siliceous shale. Application of the Elk Hills turbidity model (1) provides a framework for monitoring production performance in the 24Z and Northwest Stevens waterflood projects; and for tracking gas migration into and out of the 26R reservoir, (2) helps b identify undeveloped locations in the 26R reservoir ideally suited for horizontal wells, (3) has led to the identification of two new production trends in the 29R area, and (4) makes possible the development of exploration plays in western Elk Hills.

Reid, S.A.; Thompson, T.W. (Bechtel Petroleum Operations, Inc., Tupman, CA (United States)); McJannet, G.S. (Dept. of Energy, Tupman, CA (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

PLUTONIUM/HIGH-LEVEL VITRIFIED WASTE BDBE DOSE CALCULATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In accordance with the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987, Yucca Mountain was designated as the site to be investigated as a potential repository for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The Yucca Mountain site is an undeveloped area located on the southwestern edge of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), about 100 miles northwest of Las Vegas. The site currently lacks rail service or an existing right-of-way. If the Yucca Mountain site is found suitable for the repository, rail service is desirable to the Office of Civilian Waste Management (OCRWM) Program because of the potential of rail transportation to reduce costs and to reduce the number of shipments relative to highway transportation. A Preliminary Rail Access Study evaluated 13 potential rail spur options. Alternative routes within the major options were also developed. Each of these options was then evaluated for potential land use conflicts and access to regional rail carriers. Three potential routes having few land use conflicts and having access to regional carriers were recommended for further investigation. Figure 1-1 shows these three routes. The Jean route is estimated to be about 120 miles long, the Carlin route to be about 365 miles long, and Caliente route to be about 365 miles long. The remaining ten routes continue to be monitored and should any of the present conflicts change, a re-evaluation of that route will be made. Complete details of the evaluation of the 13 routes can be found in the previous study. The DOE has not identified any preferred route and recognizes that the transportation issues need a full and open treatment under the National Environmental Policy Act. The issue of transportation will be included in public hearings to support development of the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) proceedings for either the Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility or the Yucca Mountain Project or both.

D.C. Richardson

2003-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

143

Cherokee Nation Enterprises Wind Energy Feasibility Study Final Report to U.S. DOE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

CNE has conducted a feasibility study on the Chilocco property in north-central Oklahoma since the grant award on July 20, 2003. This study has concluded that there is sufficient wind for a wind farm and that with the Production Tax Credits and Green Tags, there will be sufficient energy to, not only cover the costs of the Nation’s energy needs, but to provide a profit. CNE has developed a wind energy team and is working independently and with industry partners to bring its renewable energy resources to the marketplace. We are continuing with the next phase in conducting avian, cultural and transmission studies, as well as continuing to measure the wind with the SoDAR unit. Cherokee Nation Enterprises, Inc. is a wholly-owned corporation under Cherokee Nation and has managed the Department of Energy grant award since July 20, 2003. In summary, we have determined there is sufficient wind for a wind farm at the Chilocco property where Cherokee Nation owns approximately 4,275 acres. The primary goal would be more of a savings in light of the electricity used by Cherokee Nation and its entities which totals an estimated eight million dollars per year. Cherokee Nation Enterprises (CNE), working independently and with industry partners, plans to bring its renewable energy resources into the marketplace through a well-documented understanding of our undeveloped resource. Our plan is to cultivate this resource in a way that will ensure the development and use for our energy will be in an environmentally and culturally acceptable form.

Carol E. Wyatt

2006-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

144

The impacts of technology on global unconventional gas supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As energy supplies from known resources are declining, the development of new energy sources is mandatory. One reasonable source is natural gas from unconventional resources. This study focus on three types of unconventional gas resources: coalbeds, tight sands, and shales. Whereas these resources are abundant, they have largely been overlooked and understudied, especially outside of North America. New technologies, including those needed to unlock unconventional gas (UCG) resources, have been acknowledged to be the most significant factor in increasing natural gas supply in the United States. This study evaluates advances in critical technology that will most likely increase supply the most. Advanced technology is one of the main drivers in increasing unconventional natural gas production, as observed in the United States, Canada, and Australia. 3D seismic, horizontal drilling, multilateral completion, water and gel based fracturing, coiled tubing rig, enhanced recovery, and produced water treatments are current important technologies critical in developing unconventional gas resources. More advanced technologies with significant impacts are expected to be available in the next decades. Fit-to-purpose technology reduces the cost to recover gas from unconventional resources. The better the unconventional gas resources are characterized, the better we can tailor specific technology to recover the gas, and less cost are needed. Analogy assumption is a good start in deciding which critical technology to be transferred to undeveloped unconventional reservoirs. If the key properties of two unconventional gas basins or formations are more or less similar, it is expected that the impact of certain technology applied in one basin or formation will resemble the impact to the other basin or formation.

Yanty, Evi

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

A Study of Strategies for Oil and Gas Auctions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil and gas auctions help transact billions of dollars in property sales in the US each year. Value is lost by participants with ineffective strategies. Federal lease auctions have been investigated from public data, but research in this narrow area peaked in the 1980s. Private property auctions did not emerge as a transaction force until nearly a decade later; however, today they dwarf federal lease sales in volume and value. This is the first study to publish research on private auctions and the first to consolidate historical lease research findings with private auction strategies. This dissertation reviews past research, interviews industry professionals, analyzes case histories, conducts game experiments, and synthesizes these views for strategic application. Findings from these efforts include the following: Reducing uncertainty increases bid values; Federal lease bid values tend to be log normal; Aggressive bidding results in a poor portfolio performance; Increasing competition increases bid values; Inexperience increases aggressive bidding; A significant group of companies do not follow consistent auction strategies; Top winning bid drivers are aggressive 3P reserves and commodity prices; Top value risks are commodity prices, capital, and operating expenses; Properties with upside value receive higher bids using sealed-bid auctions; Auction players can bid significantly less and sustain a high win probability; More money is left on the table in federal lease sales than private auctions; Poor data is primary reason auctions fail to complete the transaction; Profit taking is primary reason for selling properties though an auction; Market metrics are useful in valuation analysis; Producing properties receiver higher bids than undeveloped properties with same common knowledge including total proved reserves; Oral auctions receive higher bids than sealed-bid auctions with same common knowledge; Competition increases bid values in sealed-bid auctions; Reserve size does not increase relative value in sealed-bids with same common knowledge other than a magnitude of volume.

Nordt, David Paul

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Evaluation of ceramic filters for high-temperature/high-pressure fine particulate control. Final report Dec 75-Jun 76  

SciTech Connect

High temperature gas turbines used to generate electric power require gas streams virtually free of particulate matter. Gas streams from high temperature, high pressure coal processes, such as low Btu gasification and pressurized fluidized bed combustion, require considerable particulate removal. In order to maintain high thermal efficiency the particulate clean-up must be done at the high temperatures of the process. Many new concepts for fine particulate control at elevated temperatures are presently being proposed. One such concept utilizes ceramic membrane filters. The report gives results of a study to analyze and evaluate ceramic membrane filters as a new, fine particulate (<3 um) control concept for high-temperature (approx. 900/sup 0/C), high-pressure processes. Several ceramic filters were identified as potential candidates for fine particulate removal. There does not seem to be any inherent material limitation to high-temperature operation; however, no evidence of high-temperature filter application was found. The filters typically are 2-6 mm thick, cylindrical, and available with various pore sizes, increasing upward from 0.5 um. These elements may be suitable for fine particulate control in hot gas streams. The most promising, although undeveloped, idea for a ceramic filter is to use ceramic honeycomb monoliths similar to those available for catalyst supports and heat exchangers. The walls of the monoliths are about 0.2-0.4 mm thick and of varying pore size and porosity. Geometric configurations are available which would force the gas to flow through the membrane walls. Pressure losses would be very small relative to those of standard ceramic filter elements. The application of ceramic monoliths to high-temperature fine particulate control appears very promising. It is strongly recommended that this concept be investigated further.

Poe, G.G.; Evans, R.M.; Bonnett, W.S.; Waterland, L.R.

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Environmental Baseline Survey Report for the Title Transfer of Land Parcel ED-4 at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This environmental baseline survey (EBS) report documents the baseline environmental conditions of a land parcel referred to as 'ED-4' (ED-4) at the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). DOE is proposing to transfer the title of this land to the Heritage Center, LLC. Parcel ED-4 is a land parcel that consists of two noncontiguous areas comprising a total of approximately 18 acres located east of the ETTP. The western tract of ED-4 encompasses approximately 8.5 acres in the northeastern quadrant of the intersection of Boulevard Road and Highway 58. The eastern tract encompasses an area of approximately 9.5 acres in the northwestern quadrant of the intersection of Blair Road and Highway 58 (the Oak Ridge Turnpike). Aerial photographs and site maps from throughout the history of the ETTP, going back to its initial development in the 1940s as the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP), indicate that this area has been undeveloped woodland with the exception of three support facilities for workers constructing the ORGDP since federal acquisition in 1943. These three support facilities, which were located in the western tract of ED-4, included a recreation hall, the Town Hall Camp Operations Building, and the Property Warehouse. A railroad spur also formerly occupied a portion of Parcel ED-4. These former facilities only occupied approximately 5 percent of the total area of Parcel ED-4. This report provides supporting information for the transfer of this government-owned property at ETTP to a non-federal entity. This EBS is based upon the requirements of Sect. 120(h) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). In order to support a Clean Parcel Determination (CPD) in accordance with CERCLA Sect. 120(h)(4)(d), groundwater and sediment samples were collected within, and adjacent to, the Parcel ED-4 study area. The potential for DOE to make a CPD for ED-4 is further supported by a No Further Investigation (NFI) determination made on land that adjoins ED-4 to the east (DOE 1997a) and to the south (DOE 1997b).

SAIC

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Measurement of Flow Phenomena in a Lower Plenum Model of a Prismatic Gas-Cooled Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mean-velocity-field and turbulence data are presented that measure turbulent flow phenomena in an approximately 1:7 scale model of a region of the lower plenum of a typical prismatic gas-cooled reactor (GCR) similar to a General Atomics Gas-Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GTMHR) design. The data were obtained in the Matched-Index-of-Refraction (MIR) facility at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and are offered for assessing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. This experiment has been selected as the first Standard Problem endorsed by the Generation IV International Forum. This paper reviews the experimental apparatus and procedures, presents a sample of the data set, and reviews the INL Standard Problem. Results concentrate on the region of the lower plenum near its far reflector wall (away from the outlet duct). The flow in the lower plenum consists of multiple jets injected into a confined cross flow - with obstructions. The model consists of a row of full circular posts along its centerline with half-posts on the two parallel walls to approximate flow scaled to that expected from the staggered parallel rows of posts in the reactor design. The model is fabricated from clear, fused quartz to match the refractive-index of the mineral oil working fluid so that optical techniques may be employed for the measurements. The benefit of the MIR technique is that it permits optical measurements to determine flow characteristics in complex passages in and around objects to be obtained without locating intrusive transducers that will disturb the flow field and without distortion of the optical paths. An advantage of the INL system is its large size, leading to improved spatial and temporal resolution compared to similar facilities at smaller scales. A three-dimensional (3-D) Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system was used to collect the data. Inlet jet Reynolds numbers (based on the jet diameter and the time-mean average flow rate) are approximately 4,300 and 12,400. Uncertainty analysis and a discussion of the standard problem are included. The measurements reveal undeveloped, non-uniform, turbulent flow in the inlet jets and complicated flow patterns in the model lower plenum. Data include three-dimensional vector plots, data displays along the coordinate planes (slices) and presentations that describe the component flows at specific regions in the model. Information on inlet conditions are also presented.

Hugh M. McIlroy, Jr.; Donald M. McEligot; Robert J. Pink

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Geologic technical assessment of the Stratton Ridge salt dome, Texas, for potential expansion of the U.S. strategic petroleum reserve.  

SciTech Connect

The Stratton Ridge salt dome is a large salt diapir located only some ten miles from the currently active Strategic Petroleum Reserve Site at Bryan Mound, Texas. The dome is approximately 15 miles south-southwest of Houston. The Stratton Ridge salt dome has been intensively developed, in the desirable central portions, with caverns for both brine production and product storage. This geologic technical assessment indicates that the Stratton Ridge salt dome may be considered a viable, if less-than-desirable, candidate site for potential expansion of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). Past development of underground caverns significantly limits the potential options for use by the SPR. The current conceptual design layout of proposed caverns for such an expansion facility is based upon a decades-old model of salt geometry, and it is unacceptable, according to this reinterpretation of salt dome geology. The easternmost set of conceptual caverns are located within a 300-ft buffer zone of a very major boundary shear zone, fault, or other structural feature of indeterminate origin. This structure transects the salt stock and subdivides it into an shallow western part and a deeper eastern part. In places, the distance from this structural boundary to the design-basis caverns is as little as 150 ft. A 300-ft distance from this boundary is likely to be the minimum acceptable stand-off, from both a geologic and a regulatory perspective. Repositioning of the proposed cavern field is possible, as sufficient currently undeveloped salt acreage appears to be available. However, such reconfiguration would be subject to limitations related to land-parcel boundaries and other existing infrastructure and topographic constraints. More broadly speaking, the past history of cavern operations at the Stratton Ridge salt dome indicates that operation of potential SPR expansion caverns at this site may be difficult, and correspondingly expensive. Although detailed information is difficult to come by, widely accepted industry rumors are that numerous existing caverns have experienced major operational problems, including salt falls, sheared casings, and unintended releases of stored product(s). Many of these difficulties may be related to on-going differential movement of individual salt spines or to lateral movement at the caprock-salt interface. The history of operational problems, only some of which appear to be a matter of public record, combined with the potential for encountering escaped product from other operations, renders the Stratton Ridge salt dome a less-than-desirable site for SPR purposes.

Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Snider, Anna C.; Looff, Karl M. (Geologic Consultant, Lovelady, TX)

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Basic Research Needs for Solar Energy Utilization. Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Solar Energy Utilization, April 18-21, 2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

World demand for energy is projected to more than double by 2050 and to more than triple by the end of the century. Incremental improvements in existing energy networks will not be adequate to supply this demand in a sustainable way. Finding sufficient supplies of clean energy for the future is one of society?s most daunting challenges. Sunlight provides by far the largest of all carbon-neutral energy sources. More energy from sunlight strikes the Earth in one hour (4.3 ? 1020 J) than all the energy consumed on the planet in a year (4.1 ? 1020 J). We currently exploit this solar resource through solar electricity ? a $7.5 billion industry growing at a rate of 35?40% per annum ? and solar-derived fuel from biomass, which provides the primary energy source for over a billion people. Yet, in 2001, solar electricity provided less than 0.1% of the world's electricity, and solar fuel from modern (sustainable) biomass provided less than 1.5% of the world's energy. The huge gap between our present use of solar energy and its enormous undeveloped potential defines a grand challenge in energy research. Sunlight is a compelling solution to our need for clean, abundant sources of energy in the future. It is readily available, secure from geopolitical tension, and poses no threat to our environment through pollution or to our climate through greenhouse gases. This report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Solar Energy Utilization identifies the key scientific challenges and research directions that will enable efficient and economic use of the solar resource to provide a significant fraction of global primary energy by the mid 21st century. The report reflects the collective output of the workshop attendees, which included 200 scientists representing academia, national laboratories, and industry in the United States and abroad, and the U.S. Department of Energy?s Office of Basic Energy Sciences and Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

Lewis, N. S.; Crabtree, G.; Nozik, A. J.; Wasielewski, M. R.; Alivisatos, P.; Kung, H.; Tsao, J.; Chandler, E.; Walukiewicz, W.; Spitler, M.; Ellingson, R.; Overend, R.; Mazer, J.; Gress, M.; Horwitz, J.; Ashton, C.; Herndon, B.; Shapard, L.; Nault, R. M.

2005-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

151

Black and White Sociology: Segregation of the Discipline  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The idea that theories of race, racial segregation and racism have played a central role in the development of sociology and that black and white sociologies have formed because of this condition is not new and has been in circulation among sociologists for some time. While a number of sociologists have examined how race has shaped the discipline, only a few have attempted to examine and define black sociology and white sociology. Despite the initial efforts of some, the two sociologies remain vague, undeveloped concepts, and thus open to skepticism and denunciation. No systematic historical-intellectual investigation of black sociology or white sociology exists and, subsequently, no in-depth comparative analysis of the two exists. Therefore, through a comparative-historical analysis and exercise in the sociology of knowledge, this work seeks to provide a more precise history and theory of black sociology and white sociology. This study argues that black sociology and white sociology represent two distinct intellectual perspectives---sets of ideas---and social practices shaped by past perspectives and practices and social-historical contexts, which are largely racially- defined. More specifically, I will demonstrate that black sociology and white sociology develop out of two approaches of thought and action primarily influenced by race, a black tradition of ideas and practices and a white tradition of thought and practices. To map these two traditions, I begin with a review and analysis of works that have discussed (directly or indirectly) black and white sociology and black and white sociologists. Next, I turn to a more focused analysis on the sociological perspectives and practices of W.E.B. Du Bois and Robert Park, examining the ideas and practices that shape each sociologist's thought and actions. I identify ways that Park incorporates and advances earlier ideas and practices of whites, and, conversely, how Du Bois incorporates and advances earlier perspectives and practices of blacks. Lastly, I point out how Du Bois' ideas and methods, shaped by an earlier black tradition, now informs what is described as black sociology, and how Park's ideas and methods, shaped by an earlier white tradition, now informs what is described as white sociology.

Elias, Sean

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

2011 Annual Ecological Survey: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) oversees and manages the DOE contract for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), a DOE Office of Science multi-program laboratory located in Richland, Washington. PNSO is responsible for ensuring that all activities conducted on the PNNL site comply with applicable laws, policies, and DOE Orders. The DOE Pacific Northwest Site Office Cultural and Biological Resources Management Plan (DOE/PNSO 2008) addresses the requirement for annual surveys and monitoring for species of concern and to identify and map invasive species. In addition to the requirement for an annual survey, proposed project activities must be reviewed to assess any potential environmental consequences of conducting the project. The assessment process requires a thorough understanding of the resources present, the potential impacts of a proposed action to those resources, and the ultimate consequences of those actions. The PNNL site is situated on the southeastern corner of the DOE Hanford Site, located at the north end of the city of Richland in south-central Washington. The site is bordered on the east by the Columbia River, on the west by Stevens Drive, and on the north by the Hanford Site 300 Area (Figure 1). The environmental setting of the PNNL site is described in Larson and Downs (2009). There are currently two facilities on the PNNL site: the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory and the Physical Sciences Facility. This report describes the annual survey of biological resources found on the undeveloped upland portions of the PNNL site. The annual survey is comprised of a series of individual field surveys conducted on various days in late May and throughout June 2011. A brief description of the methods PNNL ecologists used to conduct the baseline surveys and a summary of the results of the surveys are presented. Appendix A provides a list of plant and animal species identified in the upland areas of the PNNL site in 2011. Efforts in 2011 to control noxious weed populations (comprising plant species designated as Class B noxious weeds by the Washington State Noxious Weed Control Board) discovered in 2009 and initially treated with herbicides in 2010 are described in Appendix B.

Becker, James M.; Chamness, Michele A.

2012-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

153

STUDY OF TRANSPORTATION OF GTL PRODUCTS FROM ALASKAN NORTH SLOPE (ANS) TO MARKETS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Alaskan North Slope is one of the largest hydrocarbon reserves in the US where Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) technology can be successfully implemented. The proven and recoverable reserves of conventional natural gas in the developed and undeveloped fields in the Alaskan North Slope (ANS) are estimated to be 38 trillion standard cubic feet (TCF) and estimates of additional undiscovered gas reserves in the Arctic field range from 64 TCF to 142 TCF. Transportation of the natural gas from the remote ANS is the key issue in effective utilization of this valuable and abundance resource. The throughput of oil through the Trans Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS) has been on decline and is expected to continue to decline in future. It is projected that by the year 2015, ANS crude oil production will decline to such a level that there will be a critical need for pumping additional liquid from GTL process to provide an adequate volume for economic operation of TAPS. The pumping of GTL products through TAPS will significantly increase its economic life. Transporting GTL products from the North Slope of Alaska down to the Marine terminal at Valdez is no doubt the great challenge facing the Gas to Liquids options of utilizing the abundant natural gas resource of the North Slope. The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate and assess the economic feasibility of transporting GTL products through the TAPS. Material testing program for GTL and GTL/Crude oil blends was designed and implemented for measurement of physical properties of GTL products. The measurement and evaluation of the properties of these materials were necessary so as to access the feasibility of transporting such materials through TAPS under cold arctic conditions. Results of the tests indicated a trend of increasing yield strength with increasing wax content. GTL samples exhibited high gel strengths at temperatures as high as 20 F, which makes it difficult for cold restart following winter shutdowns. Simplified analytical models were developed to study the flow of GTL and GTL/crude oil blends through TAPS in both commingled and batch flow models. The economics of GTL transportations by either commingled or batching mode were evaluated. The choice of mode of transportation of GTL products through TAPS would depend on the expected purity of the product and a trade-off between loss in product value due to contamination and cost of keeping the product pure at the discharge terminal.

Godwin A. Chukwu, Ph.D., P.E.

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

What is the purpose of our national parks?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A lively discussion ensues today over the ''mandate'' of America's national parks. Utilitarians say parks are for people-the forest always returns no matter what we do. Consevationists say, let's balance use between recreation and protection of natural resources. Preservationists say, the parks were created to protect the natural resources and recreation must be subordinate. In a capitalistic frenzy following Independence in 1776, Americans consumed, wasted, and sold their forests and wildlife, precipitating a host of ills upon the land such as, drought, floods, and wildlife extinctions. During this period the first 3 public reserves--Hot Springs, Mariposa Bigtree Grove with Yosemite, and Yellowstone were set apartl by Congress for the masses- particularly the poor-as national healing meccas and public playgrounds. Although the nation's timber supply was in danger of depletion by lumber barons who were rapidly harvesting virgin forests, the idea of federal forest reservles was repugnant and resisted by Congress until 1891. During this time Forest Reserves weren't deliberately enacted into law but came in as an amendment to the Timber Culture Act allowing Presidents the right to reserve forests on the headwaters of rivers to prevent seasonal flooding. This was done for conservation--not preservation-reasons, especially during the Teddy Roosevelt/Gifford Pinchot years. Sponsors of the National Park Service bill of 1916 wanted to develop the National Parks for mass use to prevent commercial exploitation by adjacent states of these areas. The law clearly wasn't passed with an environmental agenda in mind. Mather and Albright acting in concert together developed the scenic areas of the parks for recreational use, but left the rest of the park undeveloped which satisfied most environmental groups. Franklin D. Roosevelt sought to help the nation come out of a depression and develop parks with CCC funds. Park visitation improved and rapidly grew following WWII with another infusion of development during the mid-1950's to 60's. An environmental movement took the nation by storm during the period of rapid growth in park visitation. National Parks began losing their scenic appeal from over development and mass visitation. Planning frameworks were developed with names like ROS, C-CAP, VIM, LAC, and VERP to cope with the destructiveness of resource damage from mass visitation. Psychological needs to relieve stress in natural environments have been responsible for millions of visitors seeking recreation in National Parks and retirement communities surrounding them. Parks have been losing species since the 1920's when animal counts began, and will continue unless a science program of species enrichment is adopted. This will require the Park Service to abandon the failing policies of 'natural regulation' and 'nonintervention.' A new policy of natural education should be attempted by the Park Service to instill understanding and overcome fears and discomforts with fauna and flora which exist in the general public.

Manning, Orlinda D.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Report Tunneling Cost Reduction Study prepared for Fermilab  

SciTech Connect

Fermi National Accelerator Laboratories has a need to review the costs of constructing the very long tunnels which would be required for housing the equipment for the proposed Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) project. Current tunneling costs are high, and the identification of potential means of significantly reducing them, and thereby helping to keep overall project costs within an acceptable budget, has assumed great importance. Fermilab has contracted with The Robbins Company to provide an up-to-date appraisal of tunneling technology, and to review the potential for substantially improving currently the state-of-practice performance and construction costs in particular. The Robbins Company was chosen for this task because of its long and successful experience in hard rock mechanical tunnel boring. In the past 40 years, Robbins has manufactured over 250 tunneling machines, the vast majority for hard rock applications. In addition to also supplying back-up equipment, Robbins has recently established a division dedicated to the manufacture of continuous conveying equipment for the efficient support of tunneling operations. The study extends beyond the tunnel boring machine (TBM) itself, and into the critical area of the logistics of the support of the machine as it advances, including manpower. It is restricted to proven methods using conventional technology, and its potential for incremental but meaningful improvement, rather than examining exotic and undeveloped means of rock excavation that have been proposed from time to time by the technical community. This is the first phase of what is expected to be a number of studies in increasing depth of technical detail, and as such has been restricted to the issues connected with the initial 34 kilometer circumference booster tunnel, and not the proposed 500 kilometer circumference tunnel housing the VLHC itself. The booster tunnel is entirely sited within low to medium strength limestone and dolomite formations, typical of the Chicago area. The rock is generally competent with widely spaced jointing, and slowdown of the operation for the installation of rock support is expected to be minimal. The tunneling system will have to be equipped with the necessary equipment for an efficient response to poor rock conditions however. Because the ground conditions are expected to be very favorable, a state-of-the-art TBM should have no difficulty in excavating at a high penetration rate of 10 meters per hour or more in rock of the average of the range of strengths stated to exist. Disc cutter changes will be few as the rock has very low abrasivity. However, experience has shown that overall tunneling rates are a relatively low percentage of the machine's penetration rate capability. Therefore the main focus of improvement is guaranteeing that the support systems, including mucking and advance of the utilities do not impede the operation. Improved mechanization of the support systems, along with automation where practicable to reduce manpower, is seen as the best means of raising the overall speed of the operation, and reducing its cost. The first phase of the study is mainly involved with establishing the baseline for current performance, and in identifying areas of improvement. It contains information on existing machine design concepts and provides data on many aspects of the mechanical tunneling process, including costs and labor requirements. While it contains suggestions for technical improvements of the various system, the time limitations of this phase have not permitted any detailed concept development. This should be a major part of the next phase.

1999-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

156

Concept Study: Exploration and Production in Environmentally Sensitive Arctic Areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Alaska North Slope offers one of the best prospects for increasing U.S. domestic oil and gas production. However, this region faces some of the greatest environmental and logistical challenges to oil and gas production in the world. A number of studies have shown that weather patterns in this region are warming, and the number of days the tundra surface is adequately frozen for tundra travel each year has declined. Operators are not allowed to explore in undeveloped areas until the tundra is sufficiently frozen and adequate snow cover is present. Spring breakup then forces rapid evacuation of the area prior to snowmelt. Using the best available methods, exploration in remote arctic areas can take up to three years to identify a commercial discovery, and then years to build the infrastructure to develop and produce. This makes new exploration costly. It also increases the costs of maintaining field infrastructure, pipeline inspections, and environmental restoration efforts. New technologies are needed, or oil and gas resources may never be developed outside limited exploration stepouts from existing infrastructure. Industry has identified certain low-impact technologies suitable for operations, and has made improvements to reduce the footprint and impact on the environment. Additional improvements are needed for exploration and economic field development and end-of-field restoration. One operator-Anadarko Petroleum Corporation-built a prototype platform for drilling wells in the Arctic that is elevated, modular, and mobile. The system was tested while drilling one of the first hydrate exploration wells in Alaska during 2003-2004. This technology was identified as a potentially enabling technology by the ongoing Joint Industry Program (JIP) Environmentally Friendly Drilling (EFD) program. The EFD is headed by Texas A&M University and the Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC), and is co-funded by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The EFD participants believe that the platform concept could have far-reaching applications in the Arctic as a drilling and production platform, as originally intended, and as a possible staging area. The overall objective of this project was to document various potential applications, locations, and conceptual designs for the inland platform serving oil and gas operations on the Alaska North Slope. The University of Alaska Fairbanks assisted the HARC/TerraPlatforms team with the characterization of potential resource areas, geotechnical conditions associated with continuous permafrost terrain, and the potential end-user evaluation process. The team discussed the various potential applications with industry, governmental agencies, and environmental organizations. The benefits and concerns associated with industry's use of the technology were identified. In this discussion process, meetings were held with five operating companies (22 people), including asset team leaders, drilling managers, HSE managers, and production and completion managers. Three other operating companies and two service companies were contacted by phone to discuss the project. A questionnaire was distributed and responses were provided, which will be included in the report. Meetings were also held with State of Alaska Department of Natural Resources officials and U.S. Bureau of Land Management regulators. The companies met with included ConcoPhillips, Chevron, Pioneer Natural Resources, Fairweather E&P, BP America, and the Alaska Oil and Gas Association.

Shirish Patil; Rich Haut; Tom Williams; Yuri Shur; Mikhail Kanevskiy; Cathy Hanks; Michael Lilly

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

157

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Surface Water Protection: A Watershed Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This surface water protection plan (plan) provides an overview of the management efforts implemented at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) that support a watershed approach to protect surface water. This plan fulfills a requirement in the Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1A to demonstrate a watershed approach for surface water protection that protects the environment and public health. This plan describes the use of a watershed approach within which the Laboratory's current surface water management and protections efforts have been structured and coordinated. With more than 800 million acres of land in the U.S. under federal management and stewardship, a unified approach across agencies provides enhanced resource protection and cost-effectiveness. The DOE adopted, along with other federal agencies, the Unified Federal Policy for a Watershed Approach to Federal Land and Resource Management (UFP) with a goal to protect water quality and aquatic ecosystems on federal lands. This policy intends to prevent and/or reduce water pollution from federal activities while fostering a cost-effective watershed approach to federal land and resource management. The UFP also intends to enhance the implementation of existing laws (e.g., the Clean Water Act [CWA] and National Environmental Policy Act [NEPA]) and regulations. In addition, this provides an opportunity for the federal government to serve as a model for water quality stewardship using a watershed approach for federal land and resource activities that potentially impact surface water and its uses. As a federal land manager, the Laboratory is responsible for a small but important part of those 800 million acres of land. Diverse land uses are required to support the Laboratory's mission and provide an appropriate work environment for its staff. The Laboratory comprises two sites: its main site in Livermore, California, and the Experimental Test Site (Site 300), near Tracy, California. The main site is largely developed yet its surface water system encompasses two arroyos, an engineered detention basin (Lake Haussmann), storm channels, and wetlands. Conversely, the more rural Site 300 includes approximately 7,000 acres of largely undeveloped land with many natural tributaries, riparian habitats, and wetland areas. These wetlands include vernal pools, perennial seeps, and emergent wetlands. The watersheds within which the Laboratory's sites lie provide local and community ecological functions and services which require protection. These functions and services include water supply, flood attenuation, groundwater recharge, water quality improvement, wildlife and aquatic habitats, erosion control, and (downstream) recreational opportunities. The Laboratory employs a watershed approach to protect these surface water systems. The intent of this approach, presented in this document, is to provide an integrated effort to eliminate or minimize any adverse environmental impacts of the Laboratory's operations and enhance the attributes of these surface water systems, as possible and when reasonable, to protect their value to the community and watershed. The Laboratory's watershed approach to surface water protection will use the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Watershed Framework and guiding principles of geographic focus, scientifically based management and partnerships1 as a foundation. While the Laboratory's unique site characteristics result in objectives and priorities that may differ from other industrial sites, these underlying guiding principles provide a structure for surface water protection to ensure the Laboratory's role in environmental stewardship and as a community partner in watershed protection. The approach includes pollution prevention, continual environmental improvement, and supporting, as possible, community objectives (e.g., protection of the San Francisco Bay watershed).

Coty, J

2009-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

158

Detroit Commuter Hydrogen Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was undertaken to demonstrate the viability of using hydrogen as a fuel in an internal combustion engine vehicle for use as a part of a mass transit system. The advantages of hydrogen as a fuel include renew-ability, minimal environmental impact on air quality and the environment, and potential to reduce dependence on foreign energy sources for the transportation sector. Recognizing the potential for the hydrogen fuel concept, the Southeast Michigan Congress of Governments (SEMCOG) determined to consider it in the study of a proposed regional mass transit rail system for southeast Michigan. SEMCOG wanted to evaluate the feasibility of using hydrogen fueled internal combustion engine (H2ICE) vehicles in shuttle buses to connect the Detroit Metro Airport to a proposed, nearby rail station. Shuttle buses are in current use on the airport for passenger parking and inter-terminal transport. This duty cycle is well suited to the application of hydrogen fuel at this time because of the ability to re-fuel vehicles at a single nearby facility, overcoming the challenge of restricted fuel availability in the undeveloped hydrogen fuel infrastructure. A cooperative agreement between SEMCOG and the DOE was initiated and two H2ICE buses were placed in regular passenger service on March 29, 2009 and operated for six months in regular passenger service. The buses were developed and built by the Ford Motor Company. Wayne County Airport Authority provided the location for the demonstration with the airport transportation contractor, Metro Cars Inc. operating the buses. The buses were built on Ford E450 chassis and incorporated a modified a 6.8L V-10 engine with specially designed supercharger, fuel rails and injectors among other sophisticated control systems. Up to 30 kg of on-board gaseous hydrogen were stored in a modular six tank, 350 bar (5000 psi) system to provide a 150 mile driving range. The bus chassis and body were configured to carry nine passengers with luggage. By collecting fuel use data for the two H2ICE buses, with both written driver logs and onboard telemetry devices, and for two conventional propane-gasoline powered buses in the same service, comparisons of operating efficiency and maintenance requirements were completed. Public opinion about the concept of hydrogen fuel was sampled with a rider survey throughout the demonstration. The demonstration was very effective in adding to the understanding of the application of hydrogen as a transportation fuel. The two 9 passenger H2ICE buses accumulated nearly 50,000 miles and carried 14,285 passengers. Data indicated the H2ICE bus fuel economy to be 9.4 miles/ gallon of gasoline equivalent (m/GGE) compared to the 10 passenger propane-gasoline bus average of 9.8 m/GGE over 32,400 miles. The 23- passenger bus averaged 7.4 m/GGE over 40,700 miles. Rider feedback from 1050 on-board survey cards was overwhelmingly positive with 99.6% indicating they would ride again on a hydrogen powered vehicle. Minimal maintenance was required for theses buses during the demonstration project, but a longer duration demonstration would be required to more adequately assess this aspect of the concept.

Brooks, Jerry; Prebo, Brendan

2010-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

159

Elk Valley Rancheria Energy Efficiency and Alternatives Analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Elk Valley Rancheria; Tribe; renewable energy; energy options analysis. The Elk Valley Rancheria, California ('Tribe') is a federally recognized Indian tribe located in Del Norte County, California, in the northwestern corner of California. The Tribe, its members and Tribal enterprises are challenged by increasing energy costs and undeveloped local energy resources. The Tribe currently lacks an energy program. The Tribal government lacked sufficient information to make informed decisions about potential renewable energy resources, energy alternatives and other energy management issues. To meet this challenge efficiently, the Tribe contracted with Frank Zaino and Associates, Inc. to help become more energy self-sufficient, by reducing their energy costs and promoting energy alternatives that stimulate economic development. Frank Zaino & Associates, Inc. provided a high level economic screening analysis based on anticipated electric and natural gas rates. This was in an effort to determine which alternative energy system will performed at a higher level so the Tribe could reduce their energy model by 30% from alternative fuel sources. The feasibility study will identify suitable energy alternatives and conservation methods that will benefit the Tribe and tribal community through important reductions in cost. The lessons learned from these conservation efforts will yield knowledge that will serve a wider goal of executing energy efficiency measures and practices in Tribal residences and business facilities. Pacific Power is the provider of electrical power to the four properties under review at $ 0.08 per Kilowatt-hour (KWH). This is a very low energy cost compared to alternative energy sources. The Tribe used baseline audits to assess current and historic energy usage at four Rancheria owned facilities. Past electric and gas billing statements were retained for review for the four buildings that will be audited. A comparative assessment of the various energy usages will determine the demand, forecast future need and identify the differences in energy costs, narrowing the focus of the work and defining its scope. The Tribe's peak demand periods will help determine the scope of need for alternative energy sources. The Tribe's Energy Efficiency and Alternatives Analysis report included several system investigations which include fuel cells, wind turbines, solar panels, hydro electric, ground source heat pumps, bio mass, cogeneration & energy conservation and implementation for the existing properties. The energy analysis included site visits to collect and analyze historical energy usage and cost. The analysis also included the study of the building systems for the Elk Valley Casino, Elk Valley Rancheria administration complex, United Indian Health Service/Small Community Center complex and the Tribal Gaming Commission Offices. The analysis involved identifying modifications, performing an engineering economic analysis, preparation of a rank ordered list of modifications and preparation of a report to provide recommendations and actions for the Tribe to implement.

Ed Wait, Elk Valley Rancheria; Frank Ziano & Associates, Inc.

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

160

Well Completion Report for Well ER-20-11, Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Well ER-20-11 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Management Operations Underground Test Area (UGTA) Activity at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly Nevada Test Site), Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in September 2012 as part of the Central and Western Pahute Mesa Corrective Action Unit Phase II drilling program. Well ER-20-11 was constructed to further investigate the nature and extent of radionuclidecontaminated groundwater encountered in two nearby UGTA wells, to help define hydraulic and transport parameters for the contaminated Benham aquifer, and to provide data for the UGTA hydrostratigraphic framework model. The 44.5-centimeter (cm) surface hole was drilled to a depth of 520.0 meters (m) and cased with 34.0-cm casing to 511.5 m. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 cm, and the borehole was drilled to a total depth of 915.6 m. The hole was completed to allow access for hydrologic testing and sampling in the target aquifer, which is a lava-flow aquifer known as the Benham aquifer. The completion casing string, set to the depth of 904.3 m, consists of a string of 6?-inch (in.) stainless-steel casing hanging from a string of 7?-in. carbon-steel casing. The stainless-steel casing has one slotted interval at 796.3 to 903.6 m. One piezometer string was installed, which consists of 2?-in. stainless-steel tubing that hangs from 2?-in. carbon-steel tubing via a crossover sub. This string was landed at 903.8 m and is slotted in the interval 795.3 to 903.1 m. Data collected during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3.0 m, various geophysical logs, fluid samples (for groundwater chemistry analysis and tritium measurements), and water-level measurements. The well penetrated 915.6 m of Tertiary volcanic rock, including one saturated lava flow aquifer. Measurements on samples taken from the undeveloped well indicated elevated tritium levels within the Benham aquifer. The maximum tritium level measured with field equipment was 146,131 picocuries per liter from a sample obtained at the depth of 912.0 m. The fluid level was measured in the piezometer string at a depth of 504.5 m on September 26, 2012. All Fluid Management Plan (FMP) requirements for Well ER-20-11 were met. Analysis of monitoring samples and FMP confirmatory samples indicated that fluids generated during drilling at Well ER-20-11 met the FMP criteria for discharge to an unlined sump or designated infiltration area. Well development, hydrologic testing, and sampling will be conducted at a later date.

NSTec Environmental Management

2013-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "undeveloped undeveloped undeveloped" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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161

A Resource Assessment Of Geothermal Energy Resources For Converting Deep Gas Wells In Carbonate Strata Into Geothermal Extraction Wells: A Permian Basin Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previously conducted preliminary investigations within the deep Delaware and Val Verde sub-basins of the Permian Basin complex documented bottom hole temperatures from oil and gas wells that reach the 120-180C temperature range, and occasionally beyond. With large abundances of subsurface brine water, and known porosity and permeability, the deep carbonate strata of the region possess a good potential for future geothermal power development. This work was designed as a 3-year project to investigate a new, undeveloped geographic region for establishing geothermal energy production focused on electric power generation. Identifying optimum geologic and geographic sites for converting depleted deep gas wells and fields within a carbonate environment into geothermal energy extraction wells was part of the project goals. The importance of this work was to affect the three factors limiting the expansion of geothermal development: distribution, field size and accompanying resource availability, and cost. Historically, power production from geothermal energy has been relegated to shallow heat plumes near active volcanic or geyser activity, or in areas where volcanic rocks still retain heat from their formation. Thus geothermal development is spatially variable and site specific. Additionally, existing geothermal fields are only a few 10’s of square km in size, controlled by the extent of the heat plume and the availability of water for heat movement. This plume radiates heat both vertically as well as laterally into the enclosing country rock. Heat withdrawal at too rapid a rate eventually results in a decrease in electrical power generation as the thermal energy is “mined”. The depletion rate of subsurface heat directly controls the lifetime of geothermal energy production. Finally, the cost of developing deep (greater than 4 km) reservoirs of geothermal energy is perceived as being too costly to justify corporate investment. Thus further development opportunities for geothermal resources have been hindered. To increase the effective regional implementation of geothermal resources as an energy source for power production requires meeting several objectives. These include: 1) Expand (oil and gas as well as geothermal) industry awareness of an untapped source of geothermal energy within deep permeable strata of sedimentary basins; 2) Identify and target specific geographic areas within sedimentary basins where deeper heat sources can be developed; 3) Increase future geothermal field size from 10 km2 to many 100’s km2 or greater; and 4) Increase the productive depth range for economic geothermal energy extraction below the current 4 km limit by converting deep depleted and abandoned gas wells and fields into geothermal energy extraction wells. The first year of the proposed 3-year resource assessment covered an eight county region within the Delaware and Val Verde Basins of West Texas. This project has developed databases in Excel spreadsheet form that list over 8,000 temperature-depth recordings. These recordings come from header information listed on electric well logs recordings from various shallow to deep wells that were drilled for oil and gas exploration and production. The temperature-depth data is uncorrected and thus provides the lower temperature that is be expected to be encountered within the formation associated with the temperature-depth recording. Numerous graphs were developed from the data, all of which suggest that a log-normal solution for the thermal gradient is more descriptive of the data than a linear solution. A discussion of these plots and equations are presented within the narrative. Data was acquired that enable the determination of brine salinity versus brine density with the Permian Basin. A discussion on possible limestone and dolostone thermal conductivity parameters is presented with the purpose of assisting in determining heat flow and reservoir heat content for energy extraction. Subsurface maps of temperature either at a constant depth or within a target geothermal reservoir are discusse

Erdlac, Richard J., Jr.

2006-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

162

Completion Report for Well ER-EC-11 Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Well ER-EC-11 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly Nevada Test Site), Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in September and October 2009 as part of the Pahute Mesa Phase II drilling program. A main objective was to investigate radionuclide migration down-gradient from Well Cluster ER-20-5 and Well ER-20-7 and across the northern Timber Mountain moat structural zone into the area referred to as the Bench, between Pahute Mesa and the Timber Mountain caldera complex. A secondary purpose of the well was to provide detailed hydrogeologic information for the shallow- to intermediate-depth Tertiary volcanic section in the Bench area. This well also provided detailed hydrogeologic information in the Tertiary volcanic section to reduce uncertainties within the Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley hydrostratigraphic framework model (Bechtel Nevada, 2002). The main 52.1-centimeter hole was drilled to a depth of 507.5 meters and then opened to a diameter of 66.0 centimeters. It was cased with 50.8-centimeter casing to 504.9 meters. The hole diameter was then decreased to 47.0 centimeters, and drilling continued to a total depth of 979.3 meters. It was then cased with 34.0-centimeter casing set at 965.5 meters. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters and the borehole was drilled to a total depth of 1,264.3 meters. The completion casing string, set to the depth of 1,262.5 meters, consists of 19.4-centimeter stainless-steel casing hanging from 19.4-centimeter carbon-steel casing. The stainless-steel casing has two slotted intervals open to the Tiva Canyon and Topopah Spring aquifers. Four piezometer strings were installed in Well ER-EC-11. A string of carbon-steel 6.0-centimeter tubing with one slotted interval was inserted outside the 50.8-centimeter casing, within the 66.0-centimeter borehole for access to the Timber Mountain aquifer, and landed at 475.3 meters. A second string of 6.0-centimeter tubing with one slotted interval was inserted outside the 34.0-centimeter casing, within the 47.0-centimeter borehole for access to the Benham aquifer, and landed at 911.7 meters. A third piezometer string consists of 7.3-centimeter stainless-steel tubing that hangs from 6.0-centimeter carbon-steel tubing via a crossover sub. This string was landed at 1,029.5 meters to monitor the Tiva Canyon aquifer. The deepest string of 7.3-centimeter tubing was landed at 1,247.8 meters to monitor the Topopah Spring aquifer. Data collected during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3.0 meters, 67 percussion gun and rotary sidewall core samples, various geophysical logs, fluid samples (for groundwater chemistry analysis and tritium measurements), and water-level measurements. The well penetrated 1,264.3 meters of Tertiary volcanic rock, including three saturated welded-tuff aquifers and one saturated lava-flow aquifer. A water level was measured in the Timber Mountain aquifer at 449.6 meters, during open-hole geophysical logging on September 20, 2009. The fluid level measured after the total depth was reached and the upper aquifer was cased off was 450.0 meters when measured in the open borehole on October 17, 2009. Measurements on samples taken from the undeveloped well indicated that tritium levels averaging approximately 12,430 picocuries per liter (less than Safe Drinking Water Act levels) were encountered within the Benham aquifer. Tritium was below the minimum detectable activity concentration for samples collected from the Tiva Canyon aquifer and the Topopah Spring aquifer.

NSTec Environmental Management

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Closure Plan for the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada Test Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RMWS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) is managed and operated by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec) for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). This document is the first update of the interim closure plan for the Area 3 RWMS, which was presented in the Integrated Closure and Monitoring Plan (ICMP) (DOE, 2005). The format and content of this plan follows the Format and Content Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Closure Plans (DOE, 1999a). The major updates to the plan include a new closure date, updated closure inventory, the new institutional control policy, and the Title II engineering cover design. The plan identifies the assumptions and regulatory requirements, describes the disposal sites and the physical environment in which they are located, presents the design of the closure cover, and defines the approach and schedule for both closing and monitoring the site. The Area 3 RWMS accepts low-level waste (LLW) from across the DOE Complex in compliance with the NTS Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSA/NSO, 2006). The Area 3 RWMS accepts both packaged and unpackaged unclassified bulk LLW for disposal in subsidence craters that resulted from deep underground tests of nuclear devices in the early 1960s. The Area 3 RWMS covers 48 hectares (119 acres) and comprises seven subsidence craters--U-3ax, U-3bl, U-3ah, U-3at, U-3bh, U-3az, and U-3bg. The area between craters U-3ax and U-3bl was excavated to form one large disposal unit (U-3ax/bl); the area between craters U-3ah and U-3at was also excavated to form another large disposal unit (U-3ah/at). Waste unit U-3ax/bl is closed; waste units U-3ah/at and U-3bh are active; and the remaining craters, although currently undeveloped, are available for disposal of waste if required. This plan specifically addresses the closure of the U-3ah/at and the U-3bh LLW units. A final closure cover has been placed on unit U-3ax/bl (Corrective Action Unit 110) at the Area 3 RWMS. Monolayer-evapotranspirative closure cover designs for the U-3ah/at and U-3bh units are provided in this plan. The current-design closure cover thickness is 3 meters (10 feet). The final design cover will have an optimized cover thickness, which is expected to be less than 3 m (10 ft). Although waste operations at the Area 3 RWMS have ceased at the end of June 2006, disposal capacity is available for future disposals at the U-3ah/at and U-3bh units. The Area 3 RWMS is expected to start closure activities in fiscal year 2025, which include the development of final performance assessment and composite analysis documents, closure plan, closure cover design for construction, cover construction, and initiation of the post-closure care and monitoring activities. Current monitoring at the Area 3 RWMS includes monitoring the cover of the closed mixed waste unit U-3ax/bl as required by the Nevada Department of Environmental Protection, and others required under federal regulations and DOE orders. Monitoring data, collected via sensors and analysis of samples, are needed to evaluate radiation doses to the general public, for performance assessment maintenance, to demonstrate regulatory compliance, and to evaluate the actual performance of the RWMSs. Monitoring provides data to ensure the integrity and performance of waste disposal units. The monitoring program is designed to forewarn management and regulators of any failure and need for mitigating actions. The plan describes the program for monitoring direct radiation, air, vadose zone, biota, groundwater, meteorology, and subsidence. The requirements of post-closure cover maintenance and monitoring will be determined in the final closure plan.

NSTec Environmental Management

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z