National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for underlying controlling biological

  1. Uncertainty in synthetic biology for release and possibilities for regulation under the Toxic Substances Control Act

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lightfoot, Shlomiya

    2014-01-01

    The emerging field of synthetic biology is developing rapidly and promises diverse applications. Many anticipated applications, particularly those involving release of engineered microbes into the environment or human ...

  2. Integrated Biological Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOHNSON, A.R.

    2003-10-09

    Biological control is any activity taken to prevent, limit, clean up, or remediate potential environmental, health and safety, or workplace quality impacts from plants, animals, or microorganisms. At Hanford the principal emphasis of biological control is to prevent the transport of radioactive contamination by biological vectors (plants, animals, or microorganisms), and where necessary, control and clean up resulting contamination. Other aspects of biological control at Hanford include industrial weed control (e.g.; tumbleweeds), noxious weed control (invasive, non-native plant species), and pest control (undesirable animals such as rodents and stinging insects, and microorganisms such as molds that adversely affect the quality of the workplace environment). Biological control activities may be either preventive (a priori) or in response to existing contamination spread (a posteriori). Surveillance activities, including ground, vegetation, flying insect, and other surveys, and a priori control actions, such as herbicide spraying and placing biological barriers, are important in preventing radioactive contamination spread. If surveillance discovers that biological vectors have spread radioactive contamination, a posteriori control measures, such as fixing contamination, followed by cleanup and removal of the contamination to an approved disposal location are typical response functions. In some cases remediation following the contamination cleanup and removal is necessary. Biological control activities for industrial weeds, noxious weeds and pests have similar modes of prevention and response.

  3. Biological Control of Saltcedar 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knutson, Allen E.; DeLoach, C. Jack; Muegge, Mark A.

    2003-10-21

    stream_source_info pdf_1854.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 8896 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name pdf_1854.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 A sustainable approach using insect... organisms to suppress saltcedar. This method is called biological control. To help control saltcedar, insects that feed only on the plant are being intro- duced into Texas and the western United States. S Invader of rivers, lakes and wetlands Saltcedar, also...

  4. BIOLOGICAL AND MICROBIAL CONTROL Potential of Entomopathogenic Nematodes for Biological Control of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    nematodes, biological control, cucumber BLACK PLASTIC MULCH and drip or trickle irrigation). Drip irrigation, installed simulta- neously under the plastic mulch, uses less water than conventional is concentrated around the base of the plants (Orzolek et al. 1996). Used in combination, black plastic mulch

  5. Robot Manipulator Control under Unix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayward, Vincent

    functions included in a library. Manipulator control is thus integrated within the lan- guage in the same94 Robot Manipulator Control under Unix RCCL: A Robot Control "C" Library Vincent Hayward for an easy inte- gration of sensors. The first part of the paper reviews the functional organization ofthe

  6. Signal processing underlying extrinsic control of stem cell fate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zandstra, Peter W.

    Signal processing underlying extrinsic control of stem cell fate Ryan E. Davey and Peter W to control stem cell fate. Keywords stem cells, systems biology, signaling networks, extrinsic control Curr and the discovery that both bone mor- phogenic protein and Wnt signaling also promote self- renewal in mouse ES

  7. Qubit dynamics under alternating controls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aiello, Clarice Demarchi

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis, we discuss two problems of quantum dynamics in the presence of alternating controls. Alternating controls arise in many protocols designed to extend the duration over which a qubit is a useful computational ...

  8. Dynamic control of catalysis within biological cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biman Jana; Biman Bagchi

    2011-05-26

    We develop a theory of enzyme catalysis within biological cells where the substrate concentration [S](t) is time dependent, in contrast to the Michaelis-Menten theory that assumes a steady state. We find that the time varying concentration can combine, in a non-linear way, with the ruggedness of the free energy landscape of enzymes (discovered both in single molecule studies and in simulations) to provide a highly efficient switch (or, bifurcation) between two catalytically active states, at a critical substrate concentration. This allows a dynamic control of product synthesis in cell.

  9. Second laws under control restrictions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Wilming; R. Gallego; J. Eisert

    2015-07-28

    The second law of thermodynamics, formulated as an ultimate bound on the maximum extractable work, has been rigorously derived in multiple scenarios. However, the unavoidable limitations that emerge due to the lack of control on small systems are often disregarded when deriving such bounds, which is specifically important in the context of quantum thermodynamics. Here, we study the maximum extractable work with limited control over the working system and its interaction with the heat bath. We derive a general second law when the set of accessible Hamiltonians of the working-system is arbitrarily restricted. We then apply our bound to particular scenarios that are important in realistic implementations: limitations on the maximum energy gap and local control over many-body systems. We hence demonstrate in what precise way the lack of control affects the second law. In particular, contrary to the unrestricted case, we show that the optimal work extraction is not achieved by simple thermal contacts. Our results do not only generalize the second law to scenarios of practical relevance, but also take first steps in the direction of local thermodynamics.

  10. CRITICAL REVIEW OF BIOLOGY AND CONTROL OF OYSTER DRILLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CRITICAL REVIEW OF BIOLOGY AND CONTROL OF OYSTER DRILLS Urosalpinx and Eupleura Marine Biological L, Farley, Director Critical Review of Biology and Control of Oyster Drills UROSALPINX and EUPLEURA 17 General 17 Nervous System 20 Circulatory System 20 Locomotory System 21 Drilling and Feeding

  11. DNA Nanomechanical Switches under Folding Kinetics Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meller, Amit

    DNA Nanomechanical Switches under Folding Kinetics Control Virgile Viasnoff,, Amit Meller operate at equilibrium under changes in solution composition. We propose an alternative DNA switch design after heat denaturation drives the switch to its lowest energy conformation, while rapid cooling (>100

  12. Some new directions in control theory inspired by systems biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sontag, Eduardo

    Some new directions in control theory inspired by systems biology E.D. Sontag Abstract: This paper new theoretical problems arise naturally when addressing questions in the field of systems biology are in the midst of revolutionary developments in the biological sciences. Literally each day brings new dis

  13. Electric Drive Vehicle Level Control Development Under Various...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Level Control Development Under Various Thermal Conditions Electric Drive Vehicle Level Control Development Under Various Thermal Conditions 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...

  14. Chemical and Biological Engineering Model Predictive Control: Background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    == - - = -- --- = DC C V F CC B k V F k Ckk V F A Bs s AsAfs s As s = f1 = f2 etcCAux Asss C f x f A , 1 ,1 1 11Chemical and Biological Engineering Model Predictive Control: Background B. Wayne Bequette "windup" problems Does not explicitly require a process model #12;Chemical and Biological Engineering

  15. Arms Control: US and International efforts to ban biological weapons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The Bacteriological (Biological) and Toxin Weapons Convention, the treaty that bans the development, production, and stockpiling and acquisition of biological weapons was opened for signature in 1972 and came into force in 1975 after being ratified by 22 governments, including the depository nations of the USA, the United Kingdom, and the former Soviet Union. In support of the Convention, the USA later established export controls on items used to make biological weapons. Further, in accordance with the 1990 President`s Enhanced Proliferation Control Initiative, actions were taken to redefine and expand US export controls, as well as to encourage multilateral controls through the Australia Group. Thus far, the Convention has not been effective in stopping the development of biological weapons. The principal findings as to the reasons of the failures of the Convention are found to be: the Convention lacks universality, compliance measures are effective, advantage of verification may outweigh disadvantages. Recommendations for mitigating these failures are outlined in this report.

  16. Characterization and Control of Biological Microrobots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    magnetic system is five orders-of-magnitude less than the propulsion force gener- ated by the flagellum proposed for propulsion: extracting energy from an ex- ternal magnetic field [4], or extracting energy from of Magnetotactic Bacterium (MTB) which can be considered as a biological microrobot. Magnetic dipole moment

  17. Thermodynamics of quantum systems under dynamical control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Gelbwaser-Klimovsky; Wolfgang Niedenzu; Gershon Kurizki

    2015-03-04

    In this review the debated rapport between thermodynamics and quantum mechanics is addressed in the framework of the theory of periodically-driven/controlled quantum-thermodynamic machines. The basic model studied here is that of a two-level system (TLS), whose energy is periodically modulated while the system is coupled to thermal baths. When the modulation interval is short compared to the bath memory time, the system-bath correlations are affected, thereby causing cooling or heating of the TLS, depending on the interval. In steady state, a periodically-modulated TLS coupled to two distinct baths constitutes the simplest quantum heat machine (QHM) that may operate as either an engine or a refrigerator, depending on the modulation rate. We find their efficiency and power-output bounds and the conditions for attaining these bounds. An extension of this model to multilevel systems shows that the QHM power output can be boosted by the multilevel degeneracy. These results are used to scrutinize basic thermodynamic principles: (i) Externally-driven/modulated QHMs may attain the Carnot efficiency bound, but when the driving is done by a quantum device ("piston"), the efficiency strongly depends on its initial quantum state. Such dependence has been unknown thus far. (ii) The refrigeration rate effected by QHMs does not vanish as the temperature approaches absolute zero for certain quantized baths, e.g., magnons, thous challenging Nernst's unattainability principle. (iii) System-bath correlations allow more work extraction under periodic control than that expected from the Szilard-Landauer principle, provided the period is in the non-Markovian domain. Thus, dynamically-controlled QHMs may benefit from hitherto unexploited thermodynamic resources.

  18. Actuator and Kinematic Redundancy in Biological Motor Control*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shadmehr, Reza

    ofthis mapping. We contend that these kinematic maps must be augmented by a mechanism that takesActuator and Kinematic Redundancy in Biological Motor Control* Reza Shadmehr Center for Net the derived kinematic relationships are used to set the bias of the dretch reflex feedback loop, while

  19. Controlled polymer synthesis--from biomimicry towards synthetic biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Ben G.

    Controlled polymer synthesis--from biomimicry towards synthetic biology George Pasparakis assembly of synthetic polymer structures is now possible with an unprecedented range of functional groups). Introduction Life depends on polymers, and the adage `the whole is greater than the sum of the parts

  20. Invasion theory and biological control William F. Fagan1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fagan, William

    the spatiotemporal dynamics that occur when a biocontrol agent spreads into a population of an invading pest species and the success of biocontrol agents. We conclude by outlining theoretical results delineating how stochastic- lishment, spatial spread and suppressive effects of biological control agents, Shea & Possingham (2000

  1. What is compost? Composting refers to biological decomposition and stabilization of organic materials by microorganisms under

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    What is compost? Composting refers to biological decomposition and stabilization of organic materials by microorganisms under aerobic conditions (in the presence of oxygen). During the composting is production of good-quality compost that is biologically stable, relatively uniform in appearance, free

  2. Putting the Squeeze on Biology: Biomolecules Under Pressure

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Sol Gruner

    2010-01-08

    Modest pressures encountered in the biosphere (i.e., below a few kbar) have extraordinary effects on biomembranes and proteins. These include pressure denaturation of proteins, dramatic changes in protein-protein association, substrate binding, membrane ion transport, DNA transcription, virus infectivity, and enzyme kinetics. Yet all of the biomaterials involved are highly incompressible. The challenge to the physicist is to understand the structural coupling between these effects and pressure to elucidate the relevant mechanisms. X-ray diffraction studies of membranes and proteins under pressure will be described. It is seen that it is not so much the magnitude of the changes, but rather the differential compressibilities of different parts of the structure that are responsible for effects.

  3. WILD PIGS: BIOLOGY, DAMAGE, CONTROL TECHINQUES AND MANAGEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayer, John; Brisbin, I. Lehr

    2009-12-31

    The existence of problems with wild pigs (Sus scrofa) is nothing new to the Western Hemisphere. Damage by these introduced animals was reported as far back as 1505 by the early Spanish colonies in the Caribbean, where wild pigs were killing the colonists cattle. Droves of these animals also ravaged cultivated crops of maize and sugarcane on islands in the West Indies during this same time period. These wild pigs reportedly were very aggressive and often attacked Spanish soldiers hunting rebellious Indians or escaped slaves on these islands, especially when these animals were cornered. The documentation of such impacts by introduced populations of this species in the United States has subsequently increased in recent years, and continued up through the present (Towne and Wentworth. 1950, Wood and Barrett 1979, Mayer and Brisbin 1991, Dickson et al. 2001). In spite of a fairly constant history in this country since the early 1900s, wild pigs have had a dramatic recent increase in both distribution and numbers in the United States. Between 1989 and 2009, the number of states reporting the presence of introduced wild pigs went from 19 up to as many as 44. This increase, in part natural, but largely manmade, has caused an increased workload and cost for land and resource managers in areas where these new populations are found. This is the direct result of the damage that these introduced animals do. The cost of both these impacts and control efforts has been estimated to exceed a billion dollars annually (Pimentel 2007). The complexity of this problem has been further complicated by the widespread appeal and economic potential of these animals as a big game species (Tisdell 1982, Degner 1989). Wild pigs are a controversial problem that is not going away and will likely only get worse with time. Not only do they cause damage, but wild pigs are also survivors. They reproduce at a rate faster than any other mammal of comparable size, native or introduced; they can eat just about anything; and, they can live just about anywhere. On top of that, wild pigs are both very difficult to control and, with the possible exception of island ecosystems, almost impossible to eradicate (Dickson et al. 2001, Sweeney et al. 2003). The solution to the wild pig problem has not been readily apparent. The ultimate answer as to how to control these animals has not been found to date. In many ways, wild pigs are America's most successful large invasive species. All of which means that wild pigs are a veritable nightmare for land and resource managers trying to keep the numbers of these animals and the damage that they do under control. Since the more that one knows about an invasive species, the easier it is to deal with and hopefully control. For wild pigs then, it is better to 'know thy enemy' than to not, especially if one expects to be able to successfully control them. In an effort to better 'know thy enemy,' a two-day symposium was held in Augusta, Georgia, on April 21-22, 2004. This symposium was organized and sponsored by U.S.D.A. Forest Service-Savannah River (USFS-SR), U. S. Department of Energy-Savannah River Operations Office (DOE-SR), the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), the South Carolina Chapter of the Soil & Water Conservation Society, and the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL). The goal of this symposium was to assemble researchers and land managers to first address various aspects of the biology and damage of wild pigs, and then review the control techniques and management of this invasive species. The result would then be a collected synopsis of what is known about wild pigs in the United States. Although the focus of the symposium was primarily directed toward federal agencies, presenters also included professionals from academic institutions, and private-sector control contractors and land managers. Most of the organizations associated with implementing this symposium were affiliated with the Savannah River Site (SRS), a 803 km{sup 2} federal nuclear facility, located in western South Carolina along the Savannah

  4. Performance Analysis of Manufacturing Systems Under Hybrid Control Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gershwin, Stanley B.

    is widely used in practice, and is seen as the \\state of the art" in lean manufacturing. We present severalPerformance Analysis of Manufacturing Systems Under Hybrid Control Policies by Asbjoern M. Bonvik of Manufacturing Systems Under Hybrid Control Policies by Asbjoern M. Bonvik Submitted to the Department

  5. Fast, Cheap, and Under Control: Evaluating Revision Data Reliably Daghstuhl: Mining Programs and Processes Fast, Cheap and Under Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Godfrey, Michael W.

    Fast, Cheap, and Under Control: Evaluating Revision Data Reliably Daghstuhl: Mining Programs and Processes Fast, Cheap and Under Control: Evaluating Revision Data Reliably Abram Hindle, Michael W. Godfrey of Waterloo Canada http://swag.uwaterloo.ca/ {ahindle,migod,holt}@cs.uwaterloo.ca Abram Hindle 1 #12;Fast

  6. 2/Donald M. Knutson-Abstract: Biological and chemical control agents for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2/Donald M. Knutson- Abstract: Biological and chemical control agents for control of dwarfZinclrocarpon g i l i i i , dwarf mistletoe, biological control, chemical control. INTRODUCTION Forest managers organisms and with chemicals that can be applied to infected trees and which selectively kill the dwarf

  7. Chemical and biological control of grape powdery mildew: 2008 field trials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janousek, Christopher N; Gubler, Douglas W

    2008-01-01

    Chemical and biological control of grape powdery mildew:Syngenta Gowan Co. N/A Chemical class (after Adaskaveg etmaterials of varied chemical classes, oils, and biocontrol

  8. 130 Florida Entomologist 93(1) March 2010 BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF TROPICAL SODA APPLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    130 Florida Entomologist 93(1) March 2010 BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF TROPICAL SODA APPLE (SOLANACEAE for natural ene- mies of the invasive plant tropical soda apple, Solanum viarum Dunal (Solanaceae) were con apple in Brazil and Paraguay (Medal et al. 1996). A biological control program was initiated

  9. Biological Control 41 (2007) 214222 www.elsevier.com/locate/ybcon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanks, Lawrence M.

    2007-01-01

    © 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. doi:10.1016/j.biocontrol.2007.01.010 Host defensive response as a biological control agent for management of the borer (Hanks et al., 1996), and has since become establishedVective biological control agent against P. semipunctata, with parasitism rates in the Weld exceeding 90% (Hanks et

  10. General Technical Report PSW-GTR-243 Biological Control of Tanoak and Bay Laurel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that are naturally occurring in the environment. This fungus is used as a biological control agent for woody for use as a biological control agent and has been tested as a stump treatment on many hardwood species of herbicides is not prudent or permitted, this biocontrol treatment would be an indispensable alternative

  11. Optimal control of a gasolinefueled car engine under pollution constraint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonnans, Frédéric

    Optimal control of a gasoline­fueled car engine under pollution constraint J. Fr'ed'eric Bonnans mass / air mass stoichiometric : Here, ``stoichiometric'' means that the combustion is complete pollutants that are stored. In addition, the tank size depends highly on temperature. The device does

  12. Optimal Control of Residential Energy Storage Under Price Fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optimal Control of Residential Energy Storage Under Price Fluctuations Peter van de ven Department habits. We formulate the problem of minimizing the cost of energy storage purchases subject to both user- gramming, energy storage, threshold policy. I. INTRODUCTION Wholesale energy prices exhibit significant

  13. WHAT IS COMPOST? Composting refers to the biological decomposition and stabilization of organic materials by microorganisms under

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    WHAT IS COMPOST? Composting refers to the biological decomposition and stabilization of organic materials by microorganisms under aerobic (in the presence of oxygen) conditions. During the composting, good quality compost is produced that is biologically stable, relatively uniform in appearance, free

  14. Do You Have Adequate Staffing to Keep Costs Under Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mergens, E. H.

    1989-01-01

    business, yet the management emphasis is on maintenance expenditures with considerably less on the other categories. Several other plants are in this company organization which were available for comparison. This is shown in Chart 5. The capacity... STAFFING TO KEEP COSTS UNDER CONTROL? E. H. MERGENS Manager, Energy Conservation Shell Oil Company Houston, Texas ABSTRACT As visual illustration of the revised staffing is shown in Charts 1 and 2. As Competitive pressures have forced companies...

  15. 1529-6466/03/0054-0008$05.00 Biologically Controlled Mineralization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dove, Patricia M.

    1529-6466/03/0054-0008$05.00 Biologically Controlled Mineralization in Prokaryotes Dennis A or Superkingdoms, the Bacteria and the Archaea, mediate the formation of a large number of diverse minerals. They are known to do this either through biologically induced mineralization (BIM) (Lowenstam 1981) (the subject

  16. Tunneling under Coherent Control by Sequences of Unitary Pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajdeep Saha; Victor S. Batista

    2010-09-07

    A general coherent control scenario to suppress, or accelerate, tunneling of quantum states decaying into a continuum, is investigated. The method is based on deterministic, or stochastic, sequences of unitary pulses that affect the underlying interference phenomena responsible for quantum dynamics, without inducing decoherence, or collapsing the coherent evolution of the system. The influence of control sequences on the ensuing quantum dynamics is analyzed by using perturbation theory to first order in the control pulse fields and compared to dynamical decoupling (DD) protocols and sequences of pulses that collapse the coherent evolution and induce quantum Zeno (QZE) or quantum anti-Zeno effects (AZE). The analysis reveals a subtle interplay between coherent and incoherent phenomena and demonstrating that dynamics analogous to evolution due to QZE or AZE can be generated from stochastic sequences of unitary pulses when averaged over all possible realizations.

  17. Breaking news: Biological control agent for Thaumastocoris peregrinus to be released in South Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Africa The Tree Protection Co-operative Programme (TPCP) based at FABI has milestone in terms of ensuring sustainable plantation forestry in South Africa was safe to release in South Africa as a biological control agent

  18. Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, Charlotte M

    Nightty Enrichment} is a FREE tutoring program to neip students succeed in ?rst year. Biology science courses. CUSINE offers eyening tutoring right in your own ...

  19. Mitochondrial DNA diversity of Cleruchoides noackae (Hymenoptera: Mymaridae): a potential biological control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    biological control agent for Thaumastocoris peregrinus (Hemiptera: Thaumastocoridae) R. L. Nadel · M. J agent, this factor will need to be considered in collecting and releasing C. noackae. Keywords Egg and Natural Resources, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia 123 BioControl (2012) 57:397­404 DOI

  20. Extreme homozygosity in Southern Hemisphere populations of Deladenus siricidicola, a biological control agent of Sirex noctilio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    control agent of Sirex noctilio X. Osmond Mlonyeni a , Brenda D. Wingfield a , Michael J. Wingfield biological control agent against this woodwasp. Nothing is known regarding the genetic diversity of D-9644/$ - see front matter Ó 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. doi:10.1016/j.biocontrol.2011

  1. Proceedings of the Sudden Oak Death Third Science Symposium In Vitro Testing of Biological Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the biocontrol agents tested. Key words: Phytophthora ramorum, Trichoderma spp., Streptomyces, biological control in response to biocontrol agents among isolates of P. ramorum belonging to different mating types and from for screening of biocontrol agents (BCAs) (table 1). To test the efficacy of biocontrol products in controlling

  2. Navigation Links Biology News

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Espinosa, Horacio D.

    Navigation Links Biology News Medicine News Biology Products Medicine Products Biology Definition Medicine Definition Biology Technology Medicine Technology Biology Dictionary Medicine Dictionary Biology Navigation Medical Navigation MHOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS Single-cell transfection tool enables added control

  3. Controlled synthesis of novel octapod platinum nanocrystals under microwave irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dai, Lei; Chi, Quan; Zhao, Yanxi; Liu, Hanfan; Zhou, Zhongqiang; Li, Jinlin; Huang, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Under microwave irradiation, novel octapod Pt nanocrystals were synthesized by reducing H{sub 2}PtCl{sub 6} in TEG with PVP as a stabilizer. The as-prepared Pt nanocrystals displayed a unique octapod nanostructure with five little mastoids in each concave center. The use of KI was crucial to the formation of novel Pt octapods. Novel Octapod Platinum Nanocrystals. - Highlights: • A novel octapod Pt nanocrystals different from the common octapod were obtained. • The use of KI was crucial to the formation of the novel Pt octapods. • Microwave was readily employed in controlled synthesis of the novel Pt octapods. - Abstract: Microwave was employed in the shape-controlled synthesis of Pt nanoparticles. Novel octapod Pt nanocrystals enclosed with (1 1 1) facets were readily synthesized with H{sub 2}PtCl{sub 6} as a precursor, tetraethylene glycol (TEG) as both a solvent and a reducing agent, polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as a stabilizer in the presence of an appropriate amount of KI under microwave irradiation for 140 s. The as-prepared Pt nanocrystals displayed a unique octapod nanostructure with five little mastoids in each concave center and exhibited higher electrocatalytic activity than commercial Pt black in the electro-oxidations of methanol and formic acid. The results demonstrated that the use of KI was crucial to the formation of Pt octapods. KI determined the formation of the novel octapod Pt nanocrystals by tuning up the reduction kinetics and adsorbing on the surfaces of growing Pt nanoparticles. The optimum molar ratio of H{sub 2}PtCl{sub 6}/KI/PVP was 1/30/45.

  4. Biology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & InspectionsBeryllium andSamplerBiological Imaging byU.S.

  5. Impact Highlight: Partial Biological Control of Tarnished Plant Bug in New Hampshire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Impact Highlight: Partial Biological Control of Tarnished Plant Bug in New Hampshire Dr. Alan Eaton in New Hampshire rose. In the late 1970's, Dr. William Day of the USDA Beneficial Insects Research Lab in 1990, to get it established in New Hampshire. He made three releases in 1990 & 91, and the insect

  6. Optimal release strategies for biological control agents: an application of stochastic dynamic programming to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Queensland, University of

    of releases), given constraints on time and the number of biocontrol agents available. By modelling within of pests and weeds. Biological control involves introducing natural enemies, biocontrol agents, to help decide what factors might assist the establish- ment of biocontrol agents, although some guidelines do

  7. Growth Inhibition of Dalmatian Toadflax, Linaria da/matiea (L.) Miller, in Response to Herbivory by the Biological Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Robert K. D.

    by the Biological Control Agent Meeinus janthinus Germar1 Marjolein Schat,2 Sharlene E. Sing,3 Robert K. D. Peterson of herbivory by a weed biological control agent, the stem-mining wee vil Mec/nus janthinus Germar herbivory on L. dalmatica, is a robust and relevant method for postrelease evaluations of weed biocontrol

  8. Host specificity testing of Gonatocerus spp. egg-parasitoids used in a classical biological control program against Homalodisca vitripennis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irvin, Nicola A.

    range of potential biological control agents. We implemented a rigorous host specificity testing for and verifying the existence and magnitude of non-target impacts of an arthropod biological control agent (ABCA Ó 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. doi:10.1016/j.biocontrol.2007.04.010 * Corresp

  9. An Optimal Resource Control Scheme under Fidelity and Energy Constraints in Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yanyong

    networks, Resource control, Fidelity, Energy efficiency I. INTRODUCTION As the technologies in MEMS1 An Optimal Resource Control Scheme under Fidelity and Energy Constraints in Sensor Networks control under the fidelity and energy constraints, we present a resource increase and decrease algorithm

  10. Biology and control of thrips attacking cotton in the vicinity of College Station, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfrimmer, Theodore Roscoe

    1953-01-01

    Advisor) May 1953 BIOLOGY AND CONTROL OF THRIE3 ATTACKING COTTON IK THE VICINITY OF COLIEGE STATION, TEXAS By THEODORE ROSCCE P iE M fR t \\ \\ A Dissertation Submitted, to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas... cages during 1950 . . . . . . . . . 69 3. Comparison of the dosage-mortality curves for the toxicities of several compounds, applied as dusts, against Frankliniella tritici and F. exigua in large cages during 1950 ............................ 70 4...

  11. Online regulations of low order systems under bounded control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arora, Sumit

    2004-09-30

    lead to undesirable e®ects on control system performance and stability. Some of them are: ² Actuator saturation may destabilize control systems through a decrease in feed- back gain. ² Severe performance degradation may occur when integrators are used... for the system are _1(t) = ¡@H@x 1 = 0; (3.19) 31 No switching Switching takes place when 02 = Fig. 14. The four possible modes for the evolution of the costate vector, p(t). and _2(t) = ¡@H@x 2 = ¡p1(t): (3.20) If initial values of costates are: p1(0) = ¼1, p2...

  12. Bifurcation in Parallel-Connected Buck Converters under Current-Mode Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tse, Chi K. "Michael"

    converter, boost converter and buck-boost converter) have been thoroughly studied in the past decade [1], [2Bifurcation in Parallel-Connected Buck Converters under Current-Mode Control H. H. C. Iu School a system of parallel-connected dc/dc buck converters under current-mode control. The effects of variations

  13. Electric Drive Vehicle Level Control Development Under Various Thermal

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|DepartmentStatementofApril 25,EVtheEnergy Climate ControlConditions |

  14. "Control of protein folding and misfolding in ionic liquid media, and a conjecture on early earth biology".

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angell, C. Austen

    "Control of protein folding and misfolding in ionic liquid media, and a conjecture on early earth, such as protein folding and fibrillization, are reproduced (with little change from biological behavior

  15. Biological Learning and Control: Shadmehr and Mussa-Ivaldi 1 9 Building generative models: structural learning, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shadmehr, Reza

    Biological Learning and Control: Shadmehr and Mussa-Ivaldi 1 9 Building generative models as a function of time (passive dynamics), and as a function of the input (active dynamics). What's more

  16. Disease Control / Moyens de lutte Biological control of fusarium head blight of wheat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsiang, Tom

    is a promising biocontrol agent against G. zeae and may be used as a control measure in an integrated FHB culture duale, la souche ACM941 a réduit de 52,6 % la croissance mycélienne de l'agent pathogène et en %. Les résultats de cette recherche suggèrent que la souche ACM941 de C. rosea est un agent de lutte

  17. Motivation to study security of control systems. Our Results/Contribution. Summary. Security constrained control under

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Fei

    Motivation to study security of control systems. Our Results/Contribution. Summary. Security Secure control systems UC Berkeley #12;Motivation to study security of control systems. Our Results/Contribution. Summary. Outline. Motivation to study security of control systems. Distributed control systems

  18. Impacts of Control and Communication System Vulnerabilities on Power Systems Under

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayat, Majeed M.

    1 Impacts of Control and Communication System Vulnerabilities on Power Systems Under Contingencies vulnerabilities such as failures of the communication and control systems that transmit and implement critical smart grids. In this paper the vulnerabilities in the control and communication system are coupled

  19. A web-controllable shaking table for remote structural testing under seismic loading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manasseh, Mazen, 1980-

    2004-01-01

    The thesis presents a remotely accessible system for controlling a shaker table laboratory experiment. The Shake Table WebLab is implemented at MIT's Civil Engineering Department under the Microsoft-sponsored iLab initiative ...

  20. Analysis of shared buer switches under non-uniform trac pattern and global ow control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atiquzzaman, Mohammed

    Analysis of shared buer switches under non-uniform trac pattern and global ¯ow control Mahmoud buer switches do not suer from head of line blocking which is a common problem in simple input buering. Shared buer switches have previously been studied under uniform and unbalanced trac patterns. However

  1. USE OF GCLS TO CONTROL LEAKAGE THROUGH GEOMEMBRANE DEFECTS UNDER HIGH HYDRAULIC HEADS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    USE OF GCLS TO CONTROL LEAKAGE THROUGH GEOMEMBRANE DEFECTS UNDER HIGH HYDRAULIC HEADS Christine T liners under conditions representative of dams (i.e., high hydraulic heads). Specifically, the objective of interface contact, hydraulic head, and GCL hydration procedures on the leakage rate were considered

  2. Modeling and Control of Aggregated Air Conditioning Loads Under Realistic Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Wei

    strategy is designed to track a desired demand curve and to ensure a stable and smooth response. IModeling and Control of Aggregated Air Conditioning Loads Under Realistic Conditions Chin-Yao Chang, Wei Zhang, Jianming Lian, and Karanjit Kalsi Abstract-- Demand-side control is playing an increasingly

  3. Joint Power Control and Beamforming Codebook Design for MISO Channels under the Outage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Wei

    Joint Power Control and Beamforming Codebook Design for MISO Channels under the Outage Criterion is formulated as the minimization of the outage probability subject to the transmit power constraint beamforming and power codebook sizes. We show that as the outage probability decreases, optimal joint design

  4. Joint Pricing-procurement Control under Fluctuating Raw Material and Jian Yang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Jian

    Joint Pricing-procurement Control under Fluctuating Raw Material Costs Yifeng Liu and Jian Yang procures raw material units, stores them, and processes them into finished products upon order arrivals. The raw material cost evolves in a Markovian fashion, whereas the demand process is influenced by both

  5. On Control under Communication Constraints in Autonomous Multi-robot Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansson, Karl Henrik

    On Control under Communication Constraints in Autonomous Multi-robot Systems ALBERTO SPERANZON­evasion game is considered as an ex- ample to study constrained communication in multi-robot systems, Sensors and Systems SE-100 44 Stockholm SWEDEN Academic thesis, which with the approval of Kungliga

  6. Power Smoothing and Limitation Control of a PMSG-Based Marine Current Turbine under Swell Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Power Smoothing and Limitation Control of a PMSG-Based Marine Current Turbine under Swell Waves la puissance maximale (MPPT) nécessiterait d'accélérer ou de décélérer fréquemment la turbine à par une turbine marine associée à un générateur synchrone à aimants permanents (GSAP). Un algorithme

  7. Dynamical mechanisms underlying contrast gain control in single neurons Yuguo Yu and Tai Sing Lee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Tai Sing

    to be adaptive to changes in the statistics of stimuli, in terms of both the average light intensity level see 3, they are adaptive to the contrast or the variance of time- varying input stimuli, exhibiting a contrast gain control threshold is shown to be a key factor underlying the adaptation of frequency tuning and amplitude gain

  8. A biped static balance control and torque pattern learning under unknown periodic external forces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ito, Satoshi

    A biped static balance control and torque pattern learning under unknown periodic external forces balancing task in which an unknown external force is exerted, using so-called `ankle strategy' model. When an external force is pe- riodic, a human adaptively maintains the balance, next learns how much force should

  9. Analysis and control of the thermal runaway of ceramic slab under microwave heating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheen, Dongwoo

    Analysis and control of the thermal runaway of ceramic slab under microwave heating Changjun Liu equation (HTE) is presented in this paper, and the temperature variation in a ceramic slab during microwave heating is obtained. The temperature variation in the ceramic slab during microwave heat- ing is simulated

  10. Modeling and Control of Aggregated Air Conditioning Loads Under Realistic Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Chin-Yao; Zhang, Wei; Lian, Jianming; Kalsi, Karanjit

    2013-02-24

    Demand-side control is playing an increasingly important role in smart grid control strategies. Modeling the dynamical behavior of a large population of appliances is especially important to evaluate the effectiveness of various load control strategies. In this paper, a high accuracy aggregated model is first developed for a population of HVAC units. The model efficiently includes statistical information of the population, systematically deals with heterogeneity, and accounts for a second-order effect necessary to accurately capture the transient dynamics in the collective response. Furthermore, the model takes into account the lockout effect of the compressor in order to represent the dynamics of the system under control more accurately. Then, a novel closed loop load control strategy is designed to track a desired demand curve and to ensure a stable and smooth response.

  11. Automatic control of electric thermal storage (heat) under real-time pricing. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daryanian, B.; Tabors, R.D.; Bohn, R.E. [Tabors Caramanis and Associates, Inc. (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Real-time pricing (RTP) can be used by electric utilities as a control signal for responsive demand-side management (DSM) programs. Electric thermal storage (ETS) systems in buildings provide the inherent flexibility needed to take advantage of variations in prices. Under RTP, optimal performance for ETS operations is achieved under market conditions where reductions in customers` costs coincide with the lowering of the cost of service for electric utilities. The RTP signal conveys the time-varying actual marginal cost of the electric service to customers. The RTP rate is a combination of various cost components, including marginal generation fuel and maintenance costs, marginal costs of transmission and distribution losses, and marginal quality of supply and transmission costs. This report describes the results of an experiment in automatic control of heat storage systems under RTP during the winter seasons of 1989--90 and 1990--91.

  12. Mechanical Properties and Plasticity of a Model Glass Loaded Under Stress Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladimir Dailidonis; Valery Ilyin; Pankaj Mishra; Itamar Procaccia

    2014-06-09

    Much of the progress achieved in understanding plasticity and failure in amorphous solids had been achieved using experiments and simulations in which the materials were loaded using strain control. There is paucity of results under stress control. Here we present a new method that was carefully geared to allow loading under stress control either at $T=0$ or at any other temperature, using Monte-Carlo techniques. The method is applied to a model perfect crystalline solid, to a crystalline solid contaminated with topological defects, and to a generic glass. The highest yield stress belongs to the crystal, the lowest to the crystal with a few defects, with the glass in between. Although the glass is more disordered than the crystal with a few defects, it yields stress is much higher than that of the latter. We explain this fact by considering the actual microscopic interactions that are typical to glass forming materials, pointing out the reasons for the higher cohesive nature of the glass. The main conclusion of this paper is that the instabilities encountered in stress-control condition are the identical saddle-node bifurcation seen in strain-control. Accordingly one can use the latter condition to infer about the former. Finally we discuss temperature effects and comment on the time needed to see a stress controlled material failure.

  13. Entanglement preservation for multilevel systems under non-ideal pulse control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Z Y

    2010-01-01

    We investigate how to effectively preserve the entanglement between two noninteracting multilevel oscillators coupled to a common reservoir under non-ideal pulse control. A universal characterization using fidelity is developed for the behavior of the system based on Nakajima-Zwanzig projection operator technique. Our analysis includes the validity of the approximation method and the decoherence-suppression by the non-ideal pulse control. The power of our strategy for protecting entanglement is numerically tested, showing potential applications for quantum information processing.

  14. Entanglement preservation for multilevel systems under non-ideal pulse control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. Y. Xu; M. Feng

    2010-05-18

    We investigate how to effectively preserve the entanglement between two noninteracting multilevel oscillators coupled to a common reservoir under non-ideal pulse control. A universal characterization using fidelity is developed for the behavior of the system based on Nakajima-Zwanzig projection operator technique. Our analysis includes the validity of the approximation method and the decoherence-suppression by the non-ideal pulse control. The power of our strategy for protecting entanglement is numerically tested, showing potential applications for quantum information processing.

  15. A feedback control strategy for the airfoil system under non-Gaussian colored noise excitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Yong E-mail: taogang@njust.edu.cn; Tao, Gang E-mail: taogang@njust.edu.cn

    2014-09-01

    The stability of a binary airfoil with feedback control under stochastic disturbances, a non-Gaussian colored noise, is studied in this paper. First, based on some approximated theories and methods the non-Gaussian colored noise is simplified to an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. Furthermore, via the stochastic averaging method and the logarithmic polar transformation, one dimensional diffusion process can be obtained. At last by applying the boundary conditions, the largest Lyapunov exponent which can determine the almost-sure stability of the system and the effective region of control parameters is calculated.

  16. The yield of Amorphous Solids Under Stress Control at Low Temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valery Ilyin; Itamar Procaccia; Carmel Shor; Murari Singh

    2015-04-21

    The yield of amorphous solids like metallic glasses under external stress was discussed asserting that it is related to the glass transition by increasing temperature, or that it can be understood using statistical theories of various sorts. Here we study the approach to stress-controlled yield and argue that neither assertions can be supported, at least at low temperatures. The yield of amorphous solids at low temperatures is a highly structured phenomenon, characterized by a specific series of mechanical instabilities, and having no similarity at all to fluidization by increased temperature, real or fictive. The series of instabilities followed by stress controlled yield at low but finite temperature protocols can be predicted by analyzing athermal quasi-static strain controlled protocols, making the latter highly relevant for the deep understanding of the mechanical properties of amorphous solids.

  17. Molecular Cell, Vol. 6, 349360, August, 2000, Copyright 2000 by Cell Press RNA Methylation under Heat Shock Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bardwell, James

    Heat Shock Control results will be applicable to homologs found in a wideHans Bu¨ gl,* Eric B. Fauman promoter of this operon is positively regulated by the Biophysics Research Division heat shock transcription factor 32 . Upon heat treatment, Department of Biological Chemistry ftsJ mRNA levels increase

  18. Method and apparatus for single-stepping coherence events in a multiprocessor system under software control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blumrich, Matthias A. (Ridgefield, CT); Salapura, Valentina (Chappaqua, NY)

    2010-11-02

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for single-stepping coherence events in a multiprocessor system under software control in order to monitor the behavior of a memory coherence mechanism. Single-stepping coherence events in a multiprocessor system is made possible by adding one or more step registers. By accessing these step registers, one or more coherence requests are processed by the multiprocessor system. The step registers determine if the snoop unit will operate by proceeding in a normal execution mode, or operate in a single-step mode.

  19. Effect of under-inhibition with methanol and ethylene glycol on the hydrate control process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yousif, M.H.

    1996-12-31

    Hydrate control can be achieved by chemical injection. Currently, methanol and ethylene glycol are the most widely used inhibitors in offshore hydrate control operations. To achieve effective hydrate inhibition, a sufficient amount of inhibitor must be injected to shift the thermodynamic equilibrium condition for hydrate formation outside the pipeline operating pressure and temperature. Recently published field experiments showed that hydrate blockages form more readily in under-inhibited systems than in systems completely without inhibitor. A laboratory study is conducted to determine the effect of low concentration (1--5wt%) methanol and ethylene glycol on the hydrate formation process. The results show that, although these chemicals are effective hydrate inhibitors when added in sufficient quantities, they actually enhance the rate of hydrate formation when added at low concentrations to the water. Furthermore, the presence of these chemicals seems to affect the size of the forming hydrate particles.

  20. Chance Constrained Optimal Power Flow: Risk-Aware Network Control under Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bienstock, Daniel; Harnett, Sean

    2012-01-01

    When uncontrollable resources fluctuate, Optimum Power Flow (OPF), routinely used by the electric power industry to re-dispatch hourly controllable generation (coal, gas and hydro plants) over control areas of transmission networks, can result in grid instability, and, potentially, cascading outages. This risk arises because OPF dispatch is computed without awareness of major uncertainty, in particular fluctuations in renewable output. As a result, grid operation under OPF with renewable variability can lead to frequent conditions where power line flow ratings are significantly exceeded. Such a condition, which is borne by simulations of real grids, would likely resulting in automatic line tripping to protect lines from thermal stress, a risky and undesirable outcome which compromises stability. Smart grid goals include a commitment to large penetration of highly fluctuating renewables, thus calling to reconsider current practices, in particular the use of standard OPF. Our Chance Constrained (CC) OPF correct...

  1. An Active Gain-control System for Avalanche Photo-Diodes under Moderate Temperature Variations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Kataoka; R. Sato; T. Ikagawa; J. Kotoku; Y. Kuramoto; Y. Tsubuku; T. Saito; Y. Yatsu; N. Kawai; Y. Ishikawa; N. Kawabata

    2006-02-17

    Avalanche photodiodes (APDs) are promising light sensor for various fields of experimental physics. It has been argued, however, that variation of APD gain with temperature could be a serious problem preventing APDs from replacing traditional photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) in some applications. Here we develop an active gain-control system to keep the APD gain stable under moderate temperature variations. As a performance demonstration of the proposed system, we have tested the response of a scintillation photon detector consisting of a 5x5 mm^2 reverse-type APD optically coupled with a CsI(Tl) crystal. We show that the APD gain was successfully controlled under a temperature variation of DT = 20deg, within a time-cycle of 6000 sec. The best FWHM energy resolution of 6.1+-0.2 % was obtained for 662 keV gamma-rays, and the energy threshold was as low as 6.5 keV, by integrating data from +20deg - 0deg cycles. The corresponding values for -20deg - 0deg cycles were 6.9+-0.2 % and 5.2 keV, respectively. These results are comparable, or only slightly worse than that obtained at a fixed temperature. Our results suggest new potential uses for APDs in various space researches and nuclear physics. As examples, we briefly introduce the NeXT and Cute-1.7 satellite missions that will carry the APDs as scientific instruments for the first time.

  2. Instrument for controlling the application of mechanical loads to biological and bicompatible test subjects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lintilhac, P.M.; Vesecky, T.B.

    1995-09-19

    An apparatus and methods are disclosed facilitating the application of forces and measurement of dimensions of a test subject. In one arrangement the test subject is coupled to a forcing frame and controlled forces applied thereto. Force applied to the test subject is measured and controlled. A dimensional characteristic of the test subject, such as growth, is measured by a linear variable differential transformer. The growth measurement data can be used to control the force applied. The transducer module receives force and dimensional data from the forcing frame. The transducer module is a separate, microprocessor-based unit that communicates the test data to a controller unit that controls the application of force to the test subject and receives the test data from the transducer module for force control, storage, and/or communication to the user. 8 figs.

  3. Instrument for controlling the application of mechanical loads to biological and bicompatible test subjects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lintilhac, Phillip M. (Shelburne, VT); Vesecky, Thompson B. (Essex Junction, VT)

    1995-01-01

    Apparatus and methods are disclosed facilitating the application of forces and measurement of dimensions of a test subject. In one arrangement the test subject is coupled to a forcing frame and controlled forces applied thereto. Force applied to the test subject is measured and controlled. A dimensional characteristic of the test subject, such as growth, is measured by a linear variable differential transformer. The growth measurement data can be used to control the force applied. The transducer module receives force and dimensional data from the forcing frame. The transducer module is a separate, microprocessor-based unit that communicates the test data to a controller unit that controls the application of force to the test subject and receives the test data from the transducer module for force control, storage, and/or communication to the user.

  4. Feedback-based Information Roadmap (FIRM): Graph-based Estimation and Control of Robotic Systems Under Uncertainty 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aghamohammadi, Aliakbar

    2014-05-07

    This dissertation addresses the problem of stochastic optimal control with imperfect measurements. The main application of interest is robot motion planning under uncertainty. In the presence of process uncertainty and imperfect measurements...

  5. Remote control and telescope auto-alignment system for multiangle LIDAR under development at CEILAP, Argentina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pallotta, Juan; Otero, Lidia; Chouza, Fernando; Raul, Delia; Gonzalez, Francisco; Etchegoyen, Alberto; Quel, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    At CEILAP (CITEDEF-CONICET), a multiangle LIDAR is under development to monitor aerosol extinction coefficients in the frame of the CTA (Cherenkov Telescope Array) Project. This is an initiative to build the next generation of ground-based instruments to collect very high energy gamma-ray radiation (>10 GeV). The atmospheric conditions are very important for CTA observations, and LIDARs play an important role in the measurement of the aerosol optical depth at any direction. The LIDAR being developed at CEILAP was conceived to operate in harsh environmental conditions during the shifts, and these working conditions may produce misalignments. To minimize these effects, the telescopes comprising the reception unit are controlled by a self-alignment system. This paper describes the self-alignment method and hardware automation.

  6. Quantity and Price Controls for the Correction of Externalities under Uncertain Damages: Evidence from a Laboratory Experimenta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

    Quantity and Price Controls for the Correction of Externalities under Uncertain Damages: Evidence theory predicts that quantity (e.g., tradable permits) and price (e.g., taxes) instruments uncertainty, experimental economics, externalities, price and quantity controls, tradable permit systems a

  7. Biological Control 36 (2006) 9199 www.elsevier.com/locate/ybcon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burns, Jacqueline K.

    2006-01-01

    management tools for R. mendax may negatively impact the importance of D. alloeum as a biocontrol agent 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. doi:10.1016/j.biocontrol.2005.07.016 Control strategies

  8. Optimal Control of Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Response under Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal

    2010-01-01

    Energy Resources and Demand Response under Uncertainty AfzalEnergy Resources and Demand Response under Uncertainty ?DER in conjunction with demand response (DR): the expected

  9. Lateral control of articulated vehicles for automated highway systems under uncertainty in vehicle parameters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daud, Omar

    1998-01-01

    is first developed and then the steering controller is augmented with an independent braking controller which provides differential torque for directly controlling the trailer yaw motion by applying unilateral tire braking on the trailer rear wheels...

  10. Optimal Control of Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Response under Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal

    2010-01-01

    Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Optimal Control of Distributed EnergyRio de Janeiro, Brazil Optimal Control of Distributed EnergyRio de Janeiro, Brazil Optimal Control of Distributed Energy

  11. Biology, control and synonomy of the red spider mites, Tetranychus opuntiae Banks and Tetranychus bimaculatus Harvey 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iglinsky, William

    1951-01-01

    * * * * * % * % * * * * * * * * * % * * * * * * * * * * * * * j * * * 74 pUUUP OSFE oVv ,HeleiAt AKi rSFeisAt BlEeVK Vo RV.S Vo EWS yVvS CvV.eFeKD yeEeleiSF '''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''' ''''''''''''''''' ' 120 U:P OvAKF tVlAEeVK Vo ,VEA.SEWnt CnvVJho lJWVvA.eiS Mn EWS NVEEVK CtAKE AKi OVkeleEn Vo Ov...* In laboratory experiments T. opuntiae was effectively controlled by parathion (1 per oent), DN (1 per cent), and aramite (4 per cent), each applied at the rate of 10 pounds per acre. Sulphur at 20 pounds per acre also resulted in effective control. When...

  12. Optimal Control of Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Response under Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal

    2010-01-01

    Control of Distributed Energy Resources and Demand ResponseControl of Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Responseinstalled distribution energy resources (DER) in the form of

  13. Optimal Control of Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Response under Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal

    2010-01-01

    Optimal Control of Distributed Energy Resources and DemandRenewable Energy, former Distributed Energy Program of theOptimal Control of Distributed Energy Resources and Demand

  14. Assessment of Controlling Processes for Field-Scale Uranium Reactive Transport under Highly Transient Flow Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Rui; Zheng, Chunmiao; Liu, Chongxuan; Greskowiak, Janek; Prommer, Henning; Zachara, John M.

    2014-02-13

    This paper presents the results of a comprehensive model-based analysis of a uranium tracer test conducted at the U.S Department of Energy Hanford 300 Area (300A) IFRC site. A three-dimensional multi-component reactive transport model was employed to assess the key factors and processes that control the field-scale uranium reactive transport. Taking into consideration of relevant physical and chemical processes, the selected conceptual/numerical model replicates the spatial and temporal variations of the observed U(VI) concentrations reasonably well in spite of the highly complex field conditions. A sensitivity analysis was performed to interrogate the relative importance of various processes and factors for reactive transport of U(VI) at the field-scale. The results indicate that multi-rate U(VI) sorption/desorption, U(VI) surface complexation reactions, and initial U(VI) concentrations were the most important processes and factors controlling U(VI) migration. On the other hand, cation exchange reactions, the choice of the surface complexation model, and dual-domain mass transfer processes, which were previously identified to be important in laboratory experiments, played less important roles under the field-scale experimental condition at the 300A site. However, the model simulations also revealed that the groundwater chemistry was relatively stable during the uranium tracer experiment and therefore presumably not dynamic enough to appropriately assess the effects of ion exchange reaction and the choice of surface complexation models on U(VI) sorption and desorption. Furthermore, it also showed that the field experimental duration (16 days) was not sufficiently long to precisely assess the role of a majority of the sorption sites that were accessed by slow kinetic processes within the dual domain model. The sensitivity analysis revealed the crucial role of the intraborehole flow that occurred within the long-screened monitoring wells and thus significantly affected both field-scale measurements and simulated U(VI) concentrations as a combined effect of aquifer heterogeneity and highly dynamic flow conditions. Overall, this study, which provides one of the few detailed and highly data-constrained uranium transport simulations, highlights the difference in controlling processes between laboratory and field scale that prevent a simple direct upscaling of laboratory-scale models.

  15. Quantum Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alessandro Sergi

    2009-07-11

    A critical assessment of the recent developments of molecular biology is presented. The thesis that they do not lead to a conceptual understanding of life and biological systems is defended. Maturana and Varela's concept of autopoiesis is briefly sketched and its logical circularity avoided by postulating the existence of underlying {\\it living processes}, entailing amplification from the microscopic to the macroscopic scale, with increasing complexity in the passage from one scale to the other. Following such a line of thought, the currently accepted model of condensed matter, which is based on electrostatics and short-ranged forces, is criticized. It is suggested that the correct interpretation of quantum dispersion forces (van der Waals, hydrogen bonding, and so on) as quantum coherence effects hints at the necessity of including long-ranged forces (or mechanisms for them) in condensed matter theories of biological processes. Some quantum effects in biology are reviewed and quantum mechanics is acknowledged as conceptually important to biology since without it most (if not all) of the biological structures and signalling processes would not even exist. Moreover, it is suggested that long-range quantum coherent dynamics, including electron polarization, may be invoked to explain signal amplification process in biological systems in general.

  16. EA-2011: Proposed Release of Three Parasitoids for the Biological Control

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i FramingBecker andfinding of nodraft EAEA.Chromium Plume ControlOak

  17. A new control strategy to improve the performance of PWM ac to dc converter under unbalanced operating condition 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choudhury, Shamim A.

    1992-01-01

    A NEW CONTROL STRATEGY TO IMPROVE THE PERFORMANCE OF PWM AC TO DC CONVERTER UNDER UNBALANCED OPERATING CONDITION A Thesis by SHAMIM A. CHOUDHURY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER 0 F S CIE'VCE t&fay 1992 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering A NEW CONTROL STRATEGY TO IMPROVE THE PERFORMANCE OF PWM AC TO DC CONVERTER UNDER UNBALANCED OPERATING CONDITION A Thesis by SHAMIM A. CHOUDHURY...

  18. Antinociceptive effects, metabolism and disposition of ketamine in ponies under target-controlled drug infusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knobloch, M.; Portier, C.J.; Levionnois, O.L.; Theurillat, R.; Thormann, W.; Spadavecchia, C.; Mevissen, M. . E-mail: meike.mevissen@vpi.unibe.ch

    2006-11-01

    Ketamine is widely used as an anesthetic in a variety of drug combinations in human and veterinary medicine. Recently, it gained new interest for use in long-term pain therapy administered in sub-anesthetic doses in humans and animals. The purpose of this study was to develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPk) model for ketamine in ponies and to investigate the effect of low-dose ketamine infusion on the amplitude and the duration of the nociceptive withdrawal reflex (NWR). A target-controlled infusion (TCI) of ketamine with a target plasma level of 1 {mu}g/ml S-ketamine over 120 min under isoflurane anesthesia was performed in Shetland ponies. A quantitative electromyographic assessment of the NWR was done before, during and after the TCI. Plasma levels of R-/S-ketamine and R-/S-norketamine were determined by enantioselective capillary electrophoresis. These data and two additional data sets from bolus studies were used to build a PBPk model for ketamine in ponies. The peak-to-peak amplitude and the duration of the NWR decreased significantly during TCI and returned slowly toward baseline values after the end of TCI. The PBPk model provides reliable prediction of plasma and tissue levels of R- and S-ketamine and R- and S-norketamine. Furthermore, biotransformation of ketamine takes place in the liver and in the lung via first-pass metabolism. Plasma concentrations of S-norketamine were higher compared to R-norketamine during TCI at all time points. Analysis of the data suggested identical biotransformation rates from the parent compounds to the principle metabolites (R- and S-norketamine) but different downstream metabolism to further metabolites. The PBPk model can provide predictions of R- and S-ketamine and norketamine concentrations in other clinical settings (e.g. horses)

  19. Optimal Waterflood Management under Geologic Uncertainty Using Rate Control: Theory and Field Applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alhuthali, Ahmed Humaid H.

    2010-01-16

    Waterflood optimization via rate control is receiving increased interest because of rapid developments in the smart well completions and I-field technology. The use of inflow control valves (ICV) allows us to optimize the production/injection rates...

  20. Analysis of an Up/Down Power Control Algorithm for the CDMA Reverse Link under Fading #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandayam, Narayan

    signal to interference ratio (SIR). On the reverse link, the base station controls the transmit power of the mobile stations so that each user meets its SIR requirement. Power control schemes can be centralized [1, power control is usually done based on (feedback) commands from the base station where the transmit

  1. Biological control of Cl/Br and low sulfate concentration in a 3.5-Gyr-old seawater from North Pole, Western Australia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rey, Patrice F.

    Biological control of Cl/Br and low sulfate concentration in a 3.5-Gyr-old seawater from North Pole hydrothermal alteration of the 3.49 Ga Dresser Formation, North Pole Dome, Western Australia. Texturally to be the cause of Cl/Br fractionation between hydrothermal fluids and the bNorth Pole seawaterQ end-member. We

  2. Marine Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaffino, Kyle

    2013-01-01

    this  door. ”   Marine  Biology   I  joined  the  military  RIVERSIDE   Marine  Biology   A Thesis submitted in partialBiology                                                                                                                        

  3. Optimal Control of Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Response under Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal

    2010-01-01

    Solution Procedure for SDP Energy Prices We use electricityLondon for assistance with energy price modeling. Siddiquiof DER under uncertain energy prices with demand response

  4. Apparatus and method to control atmospheric water vapor composition and concentration during dynamic cooling of biological tissues in conjunction with laser irradiations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, J. Stuart (Laguna Niguel, CA); Anvari, Bahman (Houston, TX); Tanenbaum, B. Samuel (Irvine, CA); Milner, Thomas E. (Austin, TX)

    1999-01-01

    Cryogen spray cooling of skin surface with millisecond cryogen spurts is an effective method for establishing a controlled temperature distribution in tissue and protecting the epidermis from nonspecific thermal injury during laser mediated dermatological procedures. Control of humidity level, spraying distance and cryogen boiling point is material to the resulting surface temperature. Decreasing the ambient humidity level results in less ice formation on the skin surface without altering the surface temperature during the cryogen spurt. For a particular delivery nozzle, increasing the spraying distance to 85 millimeters lowers the surface temperature. The methodology comprises establishing a controlled humidity level in the theater of operation of the irradiation site of the biological tissues before and/or during the cryogenic spray cooling of the biological tissue. At cold temperatures calibration was achieved by mounting a thermistor on a thermoelectric cooler. The thermal electric cooler was cooled from from 20.degree. C. to about -20.degree. C. while measuring its infrared emission.

  5. Method for use of hydraulically or electrically controlled solenoids under failed on conditions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bolenbaugh, Jonathan M.; Naqi, Syed

    2014-07-08

    A method to operate a clutch device in an electro-mechanical transmission mechanically-operatively coupled to an internal combustion engine and at least one electric machine includes, in response to a failure condition detected within a flow control device configured to facilitate flow of hydraulic fluid for operating the clutch device, selectively preventing the flow of hydraulic fluid from entering the flow control device and feeding the clutch device. Synchronization of the clutch device is initiated when the clutch device is intended for activation, and only if the clutch device is synchronized, the flow of hydraulic fluid is selectively permitted to enter the flow control device to activate the clutch device.

  6. Discrete-Time Poles and Dynamics of Discontinuous Mode Boost and Buck Converters Under Various Control Schemes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung-Chieh Fang

    2012-11-19

    Nonlinear systems, such as switching DC-DC boost or buck converters, have rich dynamics. A simple one-dimensional discrete-time model is used to analyze the boost or buck converter in discontinuous conduction mode. Seven different control schemes (open-loop power stage, voltage mode control, current mode control, constant power load, constant current load, constant-on-time control, and boundary conduction mode) are analyzed systematically. The linearized dynamics is obtained simply by taking partial derivatives with respect to dynamic variables. In the discrete-time model, there is only a single pole and no zero. The single closed-loop pole is a linear combination of three terms: the open-loop pole, a term due to the control scheme, and a term due to the non-resistive load. Even with a single pole, the phase response of the discrete-time model can go beyond -90 degrees as in the two-pole average models. In the boost converter with a resistive load under current mode control, adding the compensating ramp has no effect on the pole location. Increasing the ramp slope decreases the DC gain of control-to-output transfer function and increases the audio-susceptibility. Similar analysis is applied to the buck converter with a non-resistive load or variable switching frequency. The derived dynamics agrees closely with the exact switching model and the past research results.

  7. Biological Air Emissions Control

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Air quality standards are becoming more stringent for the U.S. wood products industry. Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) (including methanol,...

  8. 940 PHYTOPATHOLOGY Biological Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cotty, Peter J.

    Bolls Infected by the S Strain of Aspergillus flavus and Potential for Biocontrol with an Atoxigenic bolls infected by the S strain of Aspergillus flavus and potential for biocontrol with an atoxigenic concentrations over 0.5 µg/kg in milk (15). A. flavus is the primary causal agent of aflatoxin contamina- tion

  9. 720 PHYTOPATHOLOGY Biological Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handelsman, Jo

    : Partitioning Host Responses to the Pathogen and Biocontrol Agent Kevin P. Smith, Jo Handelsman, and Robert M agent. Phytopathology 87:720-729. Breeding plants to improve the effectiveness of biocontrol agents response to the pathogen and the dose of pathogen and biocontrol agent applied to the host. To assess

  10. Microfluidic devices for studying heterotypic cell-cell interactions and tissue specimen cultures under controlled microenvironments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zervantonakis, Ioannis K.

    Microfluidic devices allow for precise control of the cellular and noncellular microenvironment at physiologically relevant length- and time-scales. These devices have been shown to mimic the complex in vivo microenvironment ...

  11. High Performance Repetitive Control of an Active Filter under Varying Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammerton, James

    -Castell´o, Shane Malo, Robert Gri~n´o Institut d'Organitzaci´o i Control de Sistemes Industrials (IOC), Universitat proposed including parallel (shunt active filters), serial and hybrid serial-parallel connections, mixed

  12. Enhancement of mobility in an interacting colloidal system under feedback control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Gernert; Sabine H. L. Klapp

    2015-06-05

    Feedback control schemes are a promising way to manipulate transport properties of driven colloidal suspensions. In the present article we suggest a feedback scheme to enhance the collective transport of colloidal particles with repulsive interactions through a one-dimensional tilted washboard potential. The control is modelled by a harmonic confining potential, mimicking an optical "trap", with the center of this trap moving with the (instantaneous) mean particle position. Our theoretical analysis is based on the Smoluchowski equation combined with Dynamical Density Functional Theory (DDFT) for systems with hard-core or ultra-soft (Gaussian) interactions. For either type of interaction we find that the feedback control can lead to an enhancement of the mobility by several orders of magnitude relative to the uncontrolled case. The largest effects occur for intermediate stiffness of the trap and large particle numbers. Moreover, in some regions of the parameter space the feedback control induces oscillations of the mean velocity. Finally, we show that the enhancement of mobility is robust against a small time delay in implementing the feedback control.

  13. Secure estimation and control for cyber-physical systems under adversarial attacks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fawzi, Hamza; Diggavi, Suhas

    2012-01-01

    The vast majority of today's critical infrastructure is supported by numerous feedback control loops and an attack on these control loops can have disastrous consequences. This is a major concern since modern control systems are becoming large and decentralized and thus more vulnerable to attacks. This paper is concerned with the estimation and control of linear systems when some of the sensors or actuators are corrupted by an attacker. In the first part we look at the estimation problem where we characterize the resilience of a system to attacks and study the possibility of increasing its resilience by a change of parameters. We then propose an efficient algorithm to estimate the state despite the attacks and we characterize its performance. Our approach is inspired from the areas of error-correction over the reals and compressed sensing. In the second part we consider the problem of designing output-feedback controllers that stabilize the system despite attacks. We show that a principle of separation betwee...

  14. EA-2011: Proposed Release of Three Parasitoids for the Biological Control of the Emerald Ash Borer (Agrilus Planipennis) in the Continental United States

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service issued an EA (July 2007) that analyzed the potential environmental impacts of the release of three parasitoids into the continental U.S. for the biological control of the emerald ash borer, a nonnative invasive beetle. The DOE Oak Ridge Office reviewed the EA, adopted it, and issued a FONSI for the proposed release of the same parasitoids into the environment on the Oak Ridge Reservation.

  15. CHANCE CONSTRAINED OPTIMAL POWER FLOW: RISK-AWARE NETWORK CONTROL UNDER UNCERTAINTY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bienstock, Daniel

    which compromises stability. Smart grid goals include a commitment to large penetration of highly. A benefit of a cost-effective migration toward a more algorithmic-driven grid concerns the effective generation (coal, gas and hy- dro plants) over control areas of transmission networks, can result in grid

  16. Design of penalty functions for optimal control of linear dynamical systems under state and input constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    optimization problem. In penalty function methods, an augmented performance index is introduced by adding to the original cost of the optimal control problem, so-called penalty functions that have some diverging performance index is optimized, in the absence of constraints, yielding a biased estimate of the solution

  17. Electromagnetic Signature Technique as a Promising Tool to Verify Nuclear Weapons Storage and Dismantlement under a Nuclear Arms Control Regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bunch, Kyle J.; Williams, Laura S.; Jones, Anthony M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep

    2012-08-01

    The 2010 ratification of the New START Treaty has been widely regarded as a noteworthy national security achievement for both the Obama administration and the Medvedev-Putin regime, but deeper cuts are envisioned under future arms control regimes. Future verification needs will include monitoring the storage of warhead components and fissile materials and verifying dismantlement of warheads, pits, secondaries, and other materials. From both the diplomatic and technical perspectives, verification under future arms control regimes will pose new challenges. Since acceptable verification technology must protect sensitive design information and attributes, non-nuclear non-sensitive signatures may provide a significant verification tool without the use of additional information barriers. The use of electromagnetic signatures to monitor nuclear material storage containers is a promising technology with the potential to fulfill these challenging requirements. Research performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has demonstrated that low frequency electromagnetic signatures of sealed metallic containers can be used to confirm the presence of specific components on a “yes/no” basis without revealing classified information. Arms control inspectors might use this technique to verify the presence or absence of monitored items, including both nuclear and non-nuclear materials. Although additional research is needed to study signature aspects such as uniqueness and investigate container-specific scenarios, the technique potentially offers a rapid and cost-effective tool to verify reduction and dismantlement of U.S. and Russian nuclear weapons.

  18. Controlled synthesis of snowflake-like self-assemblies palladium nanostructures under microwave irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Ting; Ma, Yue; Yang, Hanmin, E-mail: yanghanmin@hotmail.com; Li, Jinlin

    2013-08-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We demonstrated the synthesis of snowflake-like palladium nanostructures for the first time. • We discussed the influencing factors on the synthesis of snowflake-like Pd nanostructures. • The molar ratio of H{sub 2}Pd{sub 4} to PVP at 5 is the optimal selection. • The growth process was discussed. - Abstract: Self-assembly snowflake-like palladium nanostructures were synthesized under microwave irradiation using H{sub 2}PdCl{sub 4} as precursor, benzyl alcohol as both solvent and reducing agent, and PVP as stabilizer. The Pd snowflake-like nanostructures were formed and then characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray powder diffraction. The TEM images showed that the Pd nano-snowflakes were self-assemblies organized by hundreds of small spherical nanoparticles. Pd snowflake-like nanostructures with well-defined shape and uniform size can be obtained by tuning the concentration of palladium precursor, the molar ratio of H{sub 2}PdCl{sub 4}/PVP, as well as the heating time by microwave irradiation. The possible growing process of the snowflake-like Pd structures was also proposed on the basis of investigating the properties of as-synthesized Pd nanostructures under different conditions.

  19. Discrete time robust control systems under structured perturbations: stability manifolds and extremal properties 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tin, Marie-Lyne Appoline

    1992-01-01

    , EhIMA I'OR COI&IPLEX POLYNOhllALS D. Vl'. R'I EX RL'Sl;L'I S 1. Vertes re&alta for real polynomials 2. Vertcs 1'&' sits fol' con&plea f&ol&'nonlials . CON('l. U'ilON IX I'ISRK '&L POI, 1 XOJIIAI. 1 7 7 11 18 19 20 2'& 24 2-1 2-1 2(i... interval control system 150 Image sct of the linear KJ n&anifolds at - ? r ' ~ linage set of the exposed edges at z = e"7 Image set of the exposed erlges at at z = e' "~' 153 155 35 36 hnage sct ol' the exposed erlt es at at = = e" h?age set...

  20. Concepts and Tests for the Remote-Controlled Dismantling of the Biological Shield and Form work of the KNK Reactor - 13425

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neff, Sylvia; Graf, Anja; Petrick, Holger; Rothschmitt, Stefan; Klute, Stefan

    2013-07-01

    The compact sodium-cooled nuclear reactor facility Karlsruhe (KNK), a prototype Fast Breeder, is currently in an advanced stage of dismantling. Complete dismantling is based on 10 partial licensing steps. In the frame of the 9. decommissioning permit, which is currently ongoing, the dismantling of the biological shield is foreseen. The biological shield consists of heavy reinforced concrete with built-in steel fitments, such as form-work of the reactor tank, pipe sleeves, ventilation channels, and measuring devices. Due to the activation of the inner part of the biological shield, dismantling has to be done remote-controlled. During a comprehensive basic design phase a practical dismantling strategy was developed. Necessary equipment and tools were defined. Preliminary tests revealed that hot wire plasma cutting is the most favorable cutting technology due to the geometrical boundary conditions, the varying distance between cutter and material, and the heavy concrete behind the steel form-work. The cutting devices will be operated remotely via a carrier system with an industrial manipulator. The carrier system has expandable claws to adjust to the varying diameter of the reactor shaft during dismantling progress. For design approval of this prototype development, interaction between manipulator and hot wire plasma cutting was tested in a real configuration. For the demolition of the concrete structure, an excavator with appropriate tools, such as a hydraulic hammer, was selected. Other mechanical cutting devices, such as a grinder or rope saw, were eliminated because of concrete containing steel spheres added to increase the shielding factor of the heavy concrete. Dismantling of the biological shield will be done in a ring-wise manner due to static reasons. During the demolition process, the excavator is positioned on its tripod in three concrete recesses made prior to the dismantling of the separate concrete rings. The excavator and the manipulator carrier system will be operated alternately. Main boundary condition for all the newly designed equipment is the decommissioning housing of limited space within the reactor building containment. To allow for a continuous removal of the concrete rubble, an additional opening on the lowest level of the reactor shaft will be made. All equipment and the interaction of the tools have to be tested before use in the controlled area. Therefore a full-scale model of the biological shield will be provided in a mock-up. The tests will be performed in early 2014. The dismantling of the biological shield is scheduled for 2015. (authors)

  1. Barlow, Gregory John. Design of Autonomous Navigation Controllers for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Using Multi-objective Genetic Programming. (under the direction of Edward Grant.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    Vehicles Using Multi-objective Genetic Programming. (under the direction of Edward Grant.) Unmanned aerial them to fly real UAVs. #12;DESIGN OF AUTONOMOUS NAVIGATION CONTROLLERS FOR UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLESAbstract Barlow, Gregory John. Design of Autonomous Navigation Controllers for Unmanned Aerial

  2. Seminars in Cell & Developmental Biology 16 (2005) 385396 The developmental context of cell-cycle control in plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray, J.A.H.

    2005-01-01

    -cycle control in plants Sarah M. de Jager, Spencer Maughan, Walter Dewitte, Simon Scofield, James A.H. Murray online 2 March 2005 Abstract Plant growth is characterised both by continued growth and organogenesis of cell cycle regulators in plants, creating a challenge to understand how these genes control plant

  3. Development and evaluation of a lignite-stillage carrier system for application and study of biological control agents 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Richard Worth

    1983-01-01

    Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Member) (Member) (Head of Department) December 1983 ABSTRACT Development and Evaluation of a Lignite-Sti liege Carrier System for Application and Study of Biological Agents. (December 1983.... The carrier system consisted of lignite granules amended with thin liquid sti llage. This carrier system supported fungal propagule production as high as 2. 0 x 10g propagules/g carrier. Thin liquid sti llage supported the production of 4. 0-4. 5 mg of g...

  4. Transurethral ultrasound applicators with dynamic multi-sector control for prostate thermal therapy: In vivo evaluation under MR guidance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinsey, Adam M.; Diederich, Chris J.; Rieke, Viola; Nau, William H.; Pauly, Kim Butts; Bouley, Donna; Sommer, Graham [Thermal Therapy Research Group, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States) and Joint Graduate Group in Bioengineering, University of California, Berkeley and San Francisco, California 94158 (United States); Department of Radiology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Thermal Therapy Research Group, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States); Department of Radiology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Comparative Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Radiology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2008-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to explore the feasibility and performance of a multi-sectored tubular array transurethral ultrasound applicator for prostate thermal therapy, with potential to provide dynamic angular and length control of heating under MR guidance without mechanical movement of the applicator. Test configurations were fabricated, incorporating a linear array of two multi-sectored tubular transducers (7.8-8.4 MHz, 3 mm OD, 6 mm length), with three 120 deg. independent active sectors per tube. A flexible delivery catheter facilitated water cooling (100 ml min{sup -1}) within an expandable urethral balloon (35 mm longx10 mm diameter). An integrated positioning hub allows for rotating and translating the transducer assembly within the urethral balloon for final targeting prior to therapy delivery. Rotational beam plots indicate {approx}90 deg. - 100 deg. acoustic output patterns from each 120 deg. transducer sector, negligible coupling between sectors, and acoustic efficiencies between 41% and 53%. Experiments were performed within in vivo canine prostate (n=3), with real-time MR temperature monitoring in either the axial or coronal planes to facilitate control of the heating profiles and provide thermal dosimetry for performance assessment. Gross inspection of serial sections of treated prostate, exposed to TTC (triphenyl tetrazolium chloride) tissue viability stain, allowed for direct assessment of the extent of thermal coagulation. These devices created large contiguous thermal lesions (defined by 52 deg. C maximum temperature, t{sub 43}=240 min thermal dose contours, and TTC tissue sections) that extended radially from the applicator toward the border of the prostate ({approx}15 mm) during a short power application ({approx}8-16 W per active sector, 8-15 min), with {approx}200 deg. or 360 deg. sector coagulation demonstrated depending upon the activation scheme. Analysis of transient temperature profiles indicated progression of lethal temperature and thermal dose contours initially centered on each sector that coalesced within {approx}5 min to produce uniform and contiguous zones of thermal destruction between sectors, with smooth outer boundaries and continued radial propagation in time. The dimension of the coagulation zone along the applicator was well-defined by positioning and active array length. Although not as precise as rotating planar and curvilinear devices currently under development for MR-guided procedures, advantages of these multi-sectored transurethral applicators include a flexible delivery catheter and that mechanical manipulation of the device using rotational motors is not required during therapy. This multi-sectored tubular array transurethral ultrasound technology has demonstrated potential for relatively fast and reasonably conformal targeting of prostate volumes suitable for the minimally invasive treatment of BPH and cancer under MR guidance, with further development warranted.

  5. Vibrations, Quanta and Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. F. Huelga; M. B. Plenio

    2013-06-27

    Quantum biology is an emerging field of research that concerns itself with the experimental and theoretical exploration of non-trivial quantum phenomena in biological systems. In this tutorial overview we aim to bring out fundamental assumptions and questions in the field, identify basic design principles and develop a key underlying theme -- the dynamics of quantum dynamical networks in the presence of an environment and the fruitful interplay that the two may enter. At the hand of three biological phenomena whose understanding is held to require quantum mechanical processes, namely excitation and charge transfer in photosynthetic complexes, magneto-reception in birds and the olfactory sense, we demonstrate that this underlying theme encompasses them all, thus suggesting its wider relevance as an archetypical framework for quantum biology.

  6. Endangered Species Act (ESA) Section 7(a)(2) Biological Opinion Issuance of Incidental Harassment Authorization under section 101(a)(5)(a) of the Marine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harassment Authorization under section 101(a)(5)(a) of the Marine Mammal Protection Act to TGS-NOPEC Geophysical Company ASA (TGS) for Marine 2D Seismic Activities in the Federal and International Waters ............................................................................................................... 11 1.3.1 TGS's Proposed Open-Water Activities

  7. Report on the research conducted under the funding of the Sloan foundation postdoctoral fellowship in Computational Molecular Biology [Systematic study of protein-protein complexes] Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheinerman, Felix

    2001-06-01

    A central question in molecular biology is what structural features are common at protein-protein interfaces and what energetic factors define the affinity and specificity of protein-protein association. Analysis of structural and mutational data on protein-protein interfaces revealed that protein-protein interfaces of different functional classes contain many more energetically important charged and polar residues than was previously thought. Since, in the context of protein folding studies, polar interactions are believed to destabilize the folded proteins, this observation raised the question as to the forces that determine the stability of protein complexes. To investigate this issue in detail, the authors developed a number of partitioning schemes that allowed them to investigate the role of selected residues, ion pairs, and networks of polar interactions in protein-protein association. The methods developed were applied to the analysis of four different protein-protein interfaces: the ribonuclease barnase and its inhibitor barstar, the human growth hormone and its receptor, subtype N9 influenze virus neuraminidase and NC41 antibody, and the Ras Binding Domain of kinase cRaf and a Ras homologue Rap1A. The calculations revealed a surprising variability in how polar interactions affect the stability of different complexes. The finding that positions of charged and polar residues on protein-protein interfaces are optimized with respect to electrostatic interactions suggests that this property can be employed for the discrimination between native conformations and trial complexes generated by a docking algorithm. Analysis indicated the presence of SH2 domains in Janus family of non-receptor protein tyrosine kinases.

  8. Investigation of Dynamic Aerodynamics and Control of Wind Turbine Sections Under Relevant Inflow/Blade Attitude Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naughton, Jonathan W.

    2014-08-05

    The growth of wind turbines has led to highly variable loading on the blades. Coupled with the relative reduced stiffness of longer blades, the need to control loading on the blades has become important. One method of controlling loads and maximizing energy extraction is local control of the flow on the wind turbine blades. The goal of the present work was to better understand the sources of the unsteady loading and then to control them. This is accomplished through an experimental effort to characterize the unsteadiness and the effect of a Gurney flap on the flow, as well as an analytical effort to develop control approaches. It was planned to combine these two efforts to demonstrate control of a wind tunnel test model, but that final piece still remains to be accomplished.

  9. MCCLERNON, CHRISTOPHER KYLE. Human performance effects of adaptive automation of various air traffic control information processing functions. (Under the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaber, David B.

    ABSTRACT MCCLERNON, CHRISTOPHER KYLE. Human performance effects of adaptive automation of various.) Advanced forms of automation are being considered for application to Air Traffic Control (ATC) in order there is only limited knowledge of the implications of, for example, Adaptive Automation (AA) on controller

  10. Open-field host specificity test of Gratiana boliviana (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), a biological control agent of tropical soda apple (Solanaceae) in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gandolfo, D.; McKay, F.; Medal, J.C.; Cuda, J.P.

    2007-03-15

    An open-field experiment was conducted to assess the suitability of the South American leaf feeding beetle Gratiana boliviana Spaeth for biological control of Solanum viarum Dunal in the USA. An open-field test with eggplant, Solanum melongena L., was conducted on the campus of the University of Buenos Aires, Argentina, and a S. viarum control plot was established 40 km from the campus. One hundred adult beetles were released in each plot at the beginning of the experiment during the vegetative stage of the plants, and forty additional beetles were released in the S. melongena plot at the flowering stage. All the plants in each plot were checked twice a week and the number of adults, immatures, and eggs recorded. Results showed almost a complete rejection of eggplant by G. boliviana. No noticeable feeding damage was ever recorded on eggplant. The experiment was ended when the eggplants started to senesce or were severely damaged by whiteflies and spider mites. The results of this open-field experiment corroborate previous quarantine/laboratory host-specificity tests indicating that a host range expansion of G. boliviana to include eggplant is highly unlikely. Gratiana boliviana was approved for field release in May 2003 in the USA. To date, no non-target effects have been observed either on eggplant or native species of Solanum. (author) [Spanish] Una prueba de campo fue conducida para evaluar la especificidad del escarabajo suramericano defoliador Gratiana boliviana Spaeth para control biologico de Solanum viarum Dunal en los Estados Unidos. La prueba con berenjena se realizo en el campo experimental de la Universidad de Buenos Aires, Argentina, y una parcela control con S. viarum fue establecida a 40 km. Cien escarabajos adultos fueron liberados en cada parcela al inicio del experimento durante la fase vegetativa, y cuarenta escarabajos adicionales fueron liberados en la parcela de berenjena durante la floracion. Todas las plantas en cada parcela fueron inspeccionadas dos veces a la semana y el numero de adultos, larvas, y posturas fueron registrados. Resultados indicaron un casi completo rechazo de la berenjena por G. boliviana. Ningun dano visible de defoliacion en la berenjena fue detectado. Las pruebas concluyeron cuando las plantas de berenjena alcazaron su madurez o fueron severamente danadas por mosca blanca y acaros. Resultados corroboran previas pruebas de especificidad en laboratorio/cuarentena que indican que la berenjena no es un hospedero de G. boliviana y que la posibilidad de llegar a ser una plaga de este cultivo es muy remota. Gratiana boliviana fue aprobado para ser liberado en el campo en mayo del 2003. Ningun dano ha sido observado hasta la fecha a plantas no blanco. (author)

  11. Biological Safety

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE's Biological Safety Program provides a forum for the exchange of best practices, lessons learned, and guidance in the area of biological safety. This content is supported by the Biosurety Executive Team. The Biosurety Executive Team is a DOE-chartered group. The DOE Office of Worker Safety and Health Policy provides administrative support for this group. The group identifies biological safety-related issues of concern to the DOE and pursues solutions to issues identified.

  12. A test platform for measuring the energy efficiency of AC induction motors under various loading conditions and control schemes/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Granata, John A. (John Anthony)

    2012-01-01

    A test platform was developed to measure and compare the energy efficiency of an AC induction motor under steady-state and cyclical loading conditions while operating in both a constant speed mode and while performing speed ...

  13. NOx control technology requirements under the United States 1990 Clean Air Act amendments compared to those in selected pacific rim countries. Report for September 1993-September 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, C.A.; Hall, R.E.; Stern, R.D.

    1994-09-01

    The paper compares nitrogen oxide (NOx) control technology requirements under the U.S. 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAAs) with those in selected Pacific Rim countries. The CAAAs require reduction of NOx emissions under Titles I (requiring control of NOx from all source types for the purpose of attaining ambient air quality standards for NOx and ozone) and IV (requiring control of NOx from coal-fired utility boilers for the reduction of acid rain precursors). Title IV sets national emission standards for dry-bottom wall-fired and tangentially fired boilers based on low NOx burner technology, defined by EPA to include separated overfire air. Emission standards for other boiler types are to be promulgated by 1997. Title I controls, based on reductions necessary to reduce local and regional ambient levels of NOx and ozone, involve Reasonably Available Control Technology (RACT) as defined by EPA`s Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards; however, emission levels are set by the states according to local conditions. Technologies defined as RACT include low NOx burner technology, selective non-catalytic modifications, and selective catalytic reduction. These and other combustion modifications and flue gas treatment technologies are described.

  14. BIOLOGICAL CONTROL Classical Biological Control of the Australian Weevil Gonipterus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanks, Lawrence M.

    was defoliating eucalypt trees in citrus orchard windrows. We imported, reared, and released a parasitoid and are abundant in urban and rural landscapes of coastal areas, the Central Valley, and the southern part eucalypts serve primarily as windbreaks for the many citrus orchards. The weevil went unnoticed until heavy

  15. NN Controller of the Constrained Robot under Unknown Constraint Shenghai Hu, Marcelo H. Ang Jr.*, and H. Krishnan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ang Jr.,, Marcelo H.

    the five-bar robot to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed controller. 1. Introduction To apply.*, and H. Krishnan Dept of Mechanical and Production Engineering National University of Singapore Singapore

  16. Experimental investigation of piston heat transfer under conventional diesel and reactivity-controlled compression ignition combustion regimes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Splitter, Derek A [ORNL; Hendricks, Terry Lee [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Ghandhi, Jaal B [University of Wisconsin

    2014-01-01

    The piston of a heavy-duty single-cylinder research engine was instrumented with 11 fast-response surface thermocouples, and a commercial wireless telemetry system was used to transmit the signals from the moving piston. The raw thermocouple data were processed using an inverse heat conduction method that included Tikhonov regularization to recover transient heat flux. By applying symmetry, the data were compiled to provide time-resolved spatial maps of the piston heat flux and surface temperature. A detailed comparison was made between conventional diesel combustion and reactivity-controlled compression ignition combustion operations at matched conditions of load, speed, boost pressure, and combustion phasing. The integrated piston heat transfer was found to be 24% lower, and the mean surface temperature was 25 C lower for reactivity-controlled compression ignition operation as compared to conventional diesel combustion, in spite of the higher peak heat release rate. Lower integrated piston heat transfer for reactivity-controlled compression ignition was found over all the operating conditions tested. The results showed that increasing speed decreased the integrated heat transfer for conventional diesel combustion and reactivity-controlled compression ignition. The effect of the start of injection timing was found to strongly influence conventional diesel combustion heat flux, but had a negligible effect on reactivity-controlled compression ignition heat flux, even in the limit of near top dead center high-reactivity fuel injection timings. These results suggest that the role of the high-reactivity fuel injection does not significantly affect the thermal environment even though it is important for controlling the ignition timing and heat release rate shape. The integrated heat transfer and the dynamic surface heat flux were found to be insensitive to changes in boost pressure for both conventional diesel combustion and reactivity-controlled compression ignition. However, for reactivity-controlled compression ignition, the mean surface temperature increased with changes in boost suggesting that equivalence ratio affects steady-state heat transfer.

  17. Negotiation-Based Task Scheduling and Storage Control Algorithm to Minimize User's Electric Bills under Dynamic Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    , snazaria, pedram}@usc.edu Abstract--Dynamic energy pricing is a promising technique in the Smart Grid the electricity bill. A general type of dynamic pricing scenario is assumed where the energy price is both time-based iterative approach has been proposed for joint residential task scheduling and energy storage control

  18. National Laboratory] Basic Biological Sciences(59) Biological...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Achievements of structural genomics Terwilliger, Thomas C. Los Alamos National Laboratory Basic Biological Sciences(59) Biological Science Biological Science Abstract Not...

  19. Control Optimization for a Chilled Water Thermal Storage System Under a Complicated Time-of-Use Electricity Rate Schedule 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, J.; Wei, G.; Turner, W.D.; Deng, S.; Claridge, D.E.; Contreras, O.

    2005-01-01

    .6 m) in diameter with a total volume capacity of 1,400,000 gallon (5,299,560 L). Under design conditions, the fully charged thermal storage tank can hold a cooling capacity of 12,000 ton-hr (42,204 kWh). The temperatures of the stratified chilled... of time for the tank to discharge is selected, as many higher-priced hours as possible. The time charge the tank is automatically determined as n, the average chiller production rate required e charging period is calculated from the total campus load...

  20. Cloning and characterization of EXC-1, an IRGP homologue that controls Intracellular Trafficking and the Maintenance of Shape in Small Biological Tubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grussendorf, Kelly Ann

    2013-08-31

    Biological tubes are ubiquitous structures that carry out vital roles. The formation and maintenance of these tubule structures is a fundamental process in most organisms. The goal of this work is to get a better understanding ...

  1. Biologically Effective Dose (BED) Correlation With Biochemical Control After Low-Dose Rate Prostate Brachytherapy for Clinically Low-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miles, Edward F.; Nelson, John W.; Alkaissi, Ali K.; Das, Shiva; Clough, Robert W.; Broadwater, Gloria; Anscher, Mitchell S.; Chino, Junzo P.; Oleson, James R.

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: To assess the correlation of postimplant dosimetric quantifiers with biochemical control of prostate cancer after low-dose rate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: The biologically effective dose (BED), dose in Gray (Gy) to 90% of prostate (D{sub 90}), and percent volume of the prostate receiving 100% of the prescription dose (V{sub 100}) were calculated from the postimplant dose-volume histogram for 140 patients undergoing low-dose rate prostate brachytherapy from 1997 to 2003 at Durham Regional Hospital and the Durham VA Medical Center (Durham, NC). Results: The median follow-up was 50 months. There was a 7% biochemical failure rate (10 of 140), and 91% of patients (127 of 140) were alive at last clinical follow-up. The median BED was 148 Gy (range, 46-218 Gy). The median D{sub 90} was 139 Gy (range, 45-203 Gy). The median V{sub 100} was 85% (range, 44-100%). The overall 5-year biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS) rate was 90.1%. On univariate Cox proportional hazards modeling, no pretreatment characteristic (Gleason score sum, age, baseline prostate-specific antigen, or clinical stage) was predictive of bRFS. The BED, D{sub 90}, and V{sub 100} were all highly correlated (Pearson coefficients >92%), and all were strongly correlated with bRFS. Using the Youden method, we identified the following cut points for predicting freedom from biochemical failure: D{sub 90} >= 110 Gy, V{sub 100} >= 74%, and BED >= 115 Gy. None of the covariates significantly predicted overall survival. Conclusions: We observed significant correlation between BED, D{sub 90}, and V{sub 100} with bRFS. The BED is at least as predictive of bRFS as D{sub 90} or V{sub 100}. Dosimetric quantifiers that account for heterogeneity in tumor location and dose distribution, tumor repopulation, and survival probability of tumor clonogens should be investigated.

  2. Biological preconcentrator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM); Bunker, Bruce C. (Albuquerque, NM); Huber, Dale L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-09-09

    A biological preconcentrator comprises a stimulus-responsive active film on a stimulus-producing microfabricated platform. The active film can comprise a thermally switchable polymer film that can be used to selectively absorb and desorb proteins from a protein mixture. The biological microfabricated platform can comprise a thin membrane suspended on a substrate with an integral resistive heater and/or thermoelectric cooler for thermal switching of the active polymer film disposed on the membrane. The active polymer film can comprise hydrogel-like polymers, such as poly(ethylene oxide) or poly(n-isopropylacrylamide), that are tethered to the membrane. The biological preconcentrator can be fabricated with semiconductor materials and technologies.

  3. Biomimetics Engineering from Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agogino, Alice M.

    Biomimetics or Engineering from Biology Hari Dharan Department of Mechanical Engineering University" ­ copying only? !!"Biologically-Inspired Design" !!"Engineering from Biology" Definition !!It is not "biology for engineers". !!It is not "imitating" or "copying" biology. !!It is not "reverse

  4. DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY AND MARINE BIOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olszewski Jr., Edward A.

    DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY AND MARINE BIOLOGY GRADUATE PROGRAM REVIEW 2000-2007 #12;i TABLE OF CONTENTS ....................................................................... 389 #12;ii EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Department of Biology and Marine Biology contributes importantly). The department began offering the Master of Science in Marine Biology in 1980, and the Master of Science

  5. Control of powdery mildew on pumpkin leaves: 2008 field trial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janousek, Christopher N; Su, Hai; Gubler, Douglas

    2009-01-01

    Unsprayed, water drenched control Water control (spray only)Unsprayed, water drenched control Water control (spray only)water drenched and water-sprayed controls. Biological and

  6. Millersvilie Find this handbook electronically on the Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardy, Christopher R.

    BIOLOGY STUDENT HANDBOOK 2014-2015 Millersvilie University Find this handbook electronically on the Biology homepage (www.millersville.edu/biology/) under "Quick Links". #12;Welcome! Welcome this Biology Student Handbook. We hope that you will find this handbook useful throughout your career

  7. Biology reflective assessment curriculum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bayley, Cheryl Ann

    2011-01-01

    Penick, J. E. (1998). Biology: A community context. Newof a standards-based high school biology curriculum.The American Biology Teacher Li, J. , Klahr, D. , & Siler,

  8. Establishment of Lipolexis oregmae (Hymenoptera: Aphidiidae) in a classical biological control program directed against the brown citrus aphid (Homoptera: Aphididae) in Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Persad, A.B.; Hoy, M.A.; Ru Nguyen

    2007-03-15

    The parasitoid Lipolexis oregmae Gahan (introduced as L. scutellaris Mackauer) was imported from Guam, evaluated in quarantine, mass reared, and released into citrus groves in Florida in a classical biological control program directed against the brown citrus aphid, Toxoptera citricida Kirkaldy. Releases of 20,200, 12,100, and 1,260 adults of L. oregmae were made throughout Florida during 2000, 2001, and 2002, respectively. To determine if L. oregmae had successfully established, surveys were conducted throughout the state beginning in the summer of 2001 and continuing through the summer of 2003. Parasitism during 2001 and 2002 was evaluated by holding brown citrus aphids in the laboratory until parasitoid adults emerged. Lipolexis oregmae was found in 10 sites in 7 counties and 4 sites in 3 counties with parasitism rates ranging from 0.7 to 3.3% in 2001 and 2002, respectively. Laboratory tests indicated that high rates of mortality occurred if field-collected parasitized aphids were held in plastic bags, so a molecular assay was used that allowed immature L. oregmae to be detected within aphid hosts immediately after collection. The molecular assay was used in 2003 with the brown citrus aphids and with other aphid species collected from citrus, weeds, and vegetables near former release sites; immatures of L. oregmae were detected in black citrus aphids, cowpea aphids, spirea aphids, and melon aphids, as well as in the brown citrus aphid, in 4 of 8 counties sampled, with parasitism ranging from 2.0 to 12.9%, indicating that L. oregmae is established and widely distributed. Samples taken in Polk County during Oct 2005 indicated that L. oregmae has persisted. The ability of L. oregmae to parasitize other aphid species on citrus, and aphids on other host plants, enhances the ability of L. oregmae to persist when brown citrus aphid populations are low. (author) [Spanish] El parasitoide Lipolexis oregmae Gahan (introducido como L. scutellaris Mackauer) fue importado de Guam, evaluado en cuarentena, criado en masa y liberado en huertos de citricos en un programa de control biologico clasico dirigido contra el afido pardo de citricos, Toxoptera citricida Kirkaldy. Se hicieron liberaciones de 20,200, 12,100, y 1,260 adultos de L. oregmae a traves de la Florida durante los anos de 2000, 2001, y 2002, respectivamente. Para determinar si L. oregmae ha logrado en establecer, se realizaron sondeos a traves del estado empezando en el verano del 2001 y continuando hasta el final del verano del 2003. El parasitismo durante 2001 y 2002 fue evaluado con el mantenimiento de individuos del afido pardo de los citricos en el laboratorio hasta que los adultos emergieron. Lipolexis oregmae fue encontrado en 10 sitios en 7 condados y con tasas de parasitismo en 4 sitios en 3 condados entre 0.7 a 3.3% en el 2001 y 2002, respectivamente. Las pruebas del laboratorio indicaron que las tasas altas de mortalidad fueron posibles si los afidos con parasitos recolectados en el campo fueron mantenidos en bolsas plasticas, entonces un ensayo molecular fue usado con lo que permitio la deteccion de inmaduros de L. oregmae dentro de los hospederos de afidos inmediatamente despues de la recoleccion. El ensayo molecular fue usado en el 2003 con individuos del afido pardo de los citricos y con otras especies de afidos recolectados sobre citricos, malezas y hortalizas cerca de los sitios donde los parasitoides fueron liberados anteriormente; inmaduros de L. oregmae fueron detectados en individuos del afido negro de los citricos, el afido del caupi, el afido spirea y el afido del melon, ademas del afido pardo de los citricos en 4 de los 8 condados muestreados, con la tasa del parasitismo entre 2.0 a12.9%, indicando que L. oregmae estaba estabecido y ampliamente distribuido. Las muestras tomadas en el Condado de Polk durante octobre del 2005 indicaron que L. oregmae ha persistido. La capacidad de L. oregmae para parasitar otras especies de afidos sobre citricos y otros afidos sobre otras plantas hospederas, incrementa la capacidad de L. oregmae para persistir cuand

  9. Biological particle identification apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salzman, Gary C. (Los Alamos, NM); Gregg, Charles T. (Los Alamos, NM); Grace, W. Kevin (Los Alamos, NM); Hiebert, Richard D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1989-01-01

    An apparatus and method for making multiparameter light scattering measurements from suspensions of biological particles is described. Fourteen of the sixteen Mueller matrix elements describing the particles under investigation can be substantially individually determined as a function of scattering angle and probing radiations wavelength, eight elements simultaneously for each of two apparatus configurations using an apparatus which incluees, in its simplest form, two polarization modulators each operating at a chosen frequency, one polarizer, a source of monochromatic electromagnetic radiation, a detector sensitive to the wavelength of radiation employed, eight phase-sensitive detectors, and appropriate electronics. A database of known biological particle suspensions can be assembled, and unknown samples can be quickly identified once measurements are performed on it according to the teachings of the subject invention, and a comparison is made with the database.

  10. Biological Sciences http://www.clas.wayne.edu/biology/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finley Jr., Russell L.

    Biological Sciences http://www.clas.wayne.edu/biology/ Divisions: Evolutionary and Organismal Biology Molecular Biology and Biotechnology Cellular, Developmental, and Neurobiology #12;Biological Sciences http://www.clas.wayne.edu/biology/ · Cell Biology and Cytogenetics (Beningo, Tucker, Greenberg

  11. Optimal Feedback Control for Anthropomorphic Manipulators Djordje Mitrovic, Sho Nagashima, Stefan Klanke, Takamitsu Matsubara, Sethu Vijayakumar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vijayakumar, Sethu

    anthropomorphic manipulators under the premise of minimal energy consumption and compliance during motion. We. We highlight the benefits of this biologically plausible motor control strategy over traditional (open loop) optimal controllers: The presented approach proves to be significantly more energy efficient

  12. Theory in Biology Computational

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldbeter, Albert

    Magazine R601 Theory in Biology Computational biology: A propagating wave of interest Albert Goldbeter Systems biology, computational biology, integrative biology... many names are being used and tendency to take a global view of problems in biology. This field is not entirely novel, but what is clear

  13. Probe into Gaseous Pollution and Assessment of Air Quality Benefit under Sector Dependent Emission Control Strategies over Megacities in Yangtze River Delta, China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Xinyi; Gao, Yang; Fu, Joshua S.; Li, Juan; Huang, Kan; Zhuang, G.; Zhou, Ying

    2013-11-01

    On February 29th 2012, China published its new National Ambient Air Quality Standard (CH-NAAQS) aiming at revising the standards and measurements for both gaseous pollutants including ozone (O3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and sulfur dioxide (SO2), and also particle pollutants including PM10 and PM2.5. In order to understand the air pollution status regarding this new standard, the integrated MM5/CMAQ modeling system was applied over Yangtze River Delta (YRD) within this study to examine the criteria gaseous pollutants listed in the new CH-NAAQS. Sensitivity simulations were also conducted to assess the responses of gaseous pollutants under 8 different sector-dependent emission reduction scenarios in order to evaluate the potential control strategies. 2006 was selected as the simulation year in order to review the air quality condition at the beginning of China’s 11th Five-Year-Plan (FYP, from 2006 to 2010), and also compared with air quality status in 2010 as the end of 11th FYP to probe into the effectiveness of the national emission control efforts. Base case simulation showed distinct seasonal variation for gaseous pollutants: SO2, and NO2 were found to have higher surface concentrations in winter while O3 was found to have higher concentrations in spring and summer than other seasons. According to the analyses focused on 3 megacities within YRD, Shanghai, Nanjing, and Hangzhou, we found different air quality conditions among the cities: NO2 was the primary pollutant that having the largest number of days exceeding the CH-NAAQS daily standard (80 ?g/m3) in Shanghai (59 days) and Nanjing (27 days); SO2 was the primary pollutant with maximum number of days exceeding daily air quality standard (150 ?g/m3) in Hangzhou (28 days), while O3 exceeding the daily maximum 8-hour standard (160 ?g/m3) for relatively fewer days in all the three cities (9 days in Shanghai, 14 days in Nanjing, and 11 days in Hangzhou). Simulation results from predefined potential applicable emission control scenarios suggested significant air quality improvements from emission reduction: 90% of SO2 emission removed from power plant in YRD would be able to reduce more than 85% of SO2 pollution, 85% NOx emission reduction from power plant would reduce more than 60% of NO2 pollution, in terms of reducing the number of days exceeding daily air quality standard. NOx emission reduction from transportation and industry were also found to effectively reduce NO2 pollution but less efficient than emission control from power plants. We also found that multi-pollutants emission control including both NOx and VOC would be a better strategy than independent NOx control over YRD which is China’s 12th Five-Year-Plan (from 2011 to 2015), because O3 pollution would be increased as a side effect of NOx control and counteract NO2 pollution reduction benefit.

  14. Biology 3515/Chemistry 3515 Biological Chemistry Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons, Jack

    Biology 3515/Chemistry 3515 Biological Chemistry Laboratory Spring 2013 (Draft Syllabus, 23 August 2012) Course Description and Objectives: This course is intended for students who have taken Biology and function, particularly for enzymes. Prerequisites: Biology 3510 or Chemistry 3510 Instructor: David P

  15. Genome Biology 2006, 7:320 commentreviewsreportsdepositedresearchinteractionsinformationrefereedresearch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feschotte, Cedric

    Genome Biology 2006, 7:320 commentreviewsreportsdepositedresearchinteractionsinformationrefereedresearch Meeting report Mobile DNA: genomes under the influence Cédric Feschotte and Ellen J Pritham Feschotte. Email: cedric@uta.edu Published: 30 June 2006 Genome Biology 2006, 7:320 (doi:10.1186/gb-2006

  16. Chemistry & Biology 16 Supplemental Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Jianjun

    Chemistry & Biology 16 Supplemental Data Inorganic Mercury Detection and Controlled Release Cheng, Gerard C. L. Wong, and Yi Lu SUPPLEMENTAL EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURES Materials The lipids 1, in Eagle's Menimum Essential Medium, supplemented with 100 units/mL aqueous penicillin G, 100 µg

  17. Splicing bioinformatics to biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Black, Douglas L; Graveley, Brenton R

    2006-01-01

    Splicing bioinformatics to biology Douglas L Black* andand Developmental Biology, University of Connecticut Health26 May 2006 Genome Biology 2006, 7:317 (doi:10.1186/gb-2006-

  18. Systems biology approach to bioremediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakraborty, R.; Wu, C. H.; Hazen, T. C.

    2012-01-01

    Bioremediation has historically been approached as a ?black box? in terms of our fundamental understanding. Thus it succeeds and fails, seldom without a complete understanding of why. Systems biology is an integrated research approach to study complex biological systems, by investigating interactions and networks at the molecular, cellular, community, and ecosystem level. The knowledge of these interactions within individual components is fundamental to understanding the dynamics of the ecosystem under investigation. Understanding and modeling functional microbial community structure and stress responses in environments at all levels have tremendous implications for our fundamental understanding of hydrobiogeochemical processes and the potential for making bioremediation breakthroughs and illuminating the ?black box?.

  19. Microfluidics for quantitative biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Micha

    2012-01-01

    CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Microfluidics for Quantitative BiologyChapter 1: Microfluidics.………………………………………………………..… 1 1.1OF THE DISSERTATION Microfluidics for Quantitative Biology

  20. Plant Vascular Biology 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Biao

    2014-11-17

    This grant supported the Second International Conference on Plant Vascular Biology (PVB 2010) held July 24-28, 2010 on the campus of Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. Biao Ding (Ohio State University; OSU) and David Hannapel (Iowa State University; ISU) served as co-chairs of this conference. Biao Ding served as the local organizer. PVB is defined broadly here to include studies on the biogenesis, structure and function of transport systems in plants, under conditions of normal plant growth and development as well as of plant interactions with pathogens. The transport systems cover broadly the xylem, phloem, plasmodesmata and vascular cell membranes. The PVB concept has emerged in recent years to emphasize the integrative nature of the transport systems and approaches to investigate them.

  1. computational modeling of biological systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    $author.value

    Faculty. Faculty listing for "computational modeling of biological systems" ... Research Interests: computational modeling of biological systems.

  2. Biology & Biomedical Sciences ACADEMIC PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gereau, Robert W. IV

    Biology & Biomedical Sciences ACADEMIC PROGRAM GUIDELINES Programs in Cell & Molecular Biology Developmental, Regenerative and Stem Cell Biology Molecular Cell Biology Molecular Genetics & Genomics Molecular Microbiology & Microbial Pathogenesis #12;PAGE 2 GUIDELINES TO THE PROGRAMS IN CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY

  3. A modeling and control framework for operating large-scale electric power systems under present and newly evolving competitive industry structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ilic, Marija

    1995-01-01

    This paper introduces a systematic, structure-based modeling framework for analysis and control of electric power systems for processes evolving over the mid-term and long-term time horizons. Much simpler models than the ...

  4. Mathematical Biology 3 Jurgen Jost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Anton

    Mathematical Biology 3 J¨urgen Jost Max Planck Institute for Mathematics in the Sciences Leipzig, Germany Mathematical Biology 3 ­ p. 1 #12;Biological networks In biology, we find many examples of interacting elements: Mathematical Biology 3 ­ p. 2 #12;Biological networks In biology, we find many examples

  5. 2003 Synthetic Biology study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Endy, Drew

    2007-08-14

    Biology is a technology for processing information, materials, and energy. As a technology platform, biological systems provide access to artifacts and processes across a range of scales (e.g., the ribosome is a programmable ...

  6. Commercial Fisheries Biological Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bureau of Commercial Fisheries Biological Laboratory Oxford, Maryland #12;Chart of the Tred Avon River, showing the location of the BCF Biological Laboratory and the orientation of this area modern laboratories for chem- ical, histological, microbiological, and physiological re- search

  7. Chemistry & Biology Brief Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Huimin

    Chemistry & Biology Brief Communication Cloning, IL 61801, USA 3Department of Chemistry 4Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

  8. Computational Biology | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computational Biology SHARE Computational Biology Computational Biology research encompasses many important aspects including molecular biophysics for bio-energy, genetic level...

  9. A Central Theory of Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torday, JS

    2015-01-01

    JS, Rehan VK. Evolutionary biology, cell–cell communication6] Torday JS. Evolutionary Biology Redux. Pers Biol Med 56,explanations in evolutionary biology. Hist Philos Life Sci

  10. Systems biology approach to bioremediation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakraborty, R.

    2013-01-01

    aspects of the systems biology approach (metagenomics withthe use of a number of sytems biology parameters can revealRL, Banfield JF: Systems Biology: functional analysis of

  11. Todd Newberry: Professor of Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newberry, Andrew Todd; Jarrell, Randall; Regional History Project, UCSC Library

    2006-01-01

    Todd Newberry, Professor of Biology: Cowell College page 12Jarrell: Why’s that? Todd Newberry, Professor of Biology:Biology Board page 14 Newberry: Well, besides the

  12. HARVARD UNIVERSITY CHEMICAL BIOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Church, George M.

    HARVARD UNIVERSITY CHEMICAL BIOLOGY PHD PROGRAM 2013-2014 Student Handbook #12;Program Contacts at the beginning of each semester. Laboratory Rotations Students in the Chemical Biology Program are expected an interest in having Chemical Biology Program Students in their labs. Students may rotate in the labs

  13. BIOLOGY SEMINAR PROMOTION LECTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shlizerman, Eli

    BIOLOGY SEMINAR PROMOTION LECTURE 12:00 PM SEMINAR HITCHCOCK HALL 132 REFRESHMENTS SERVED IN FOYER, November 24, 2014 "Life is flux" Dr. Jennifer Nemhauser Associate Professor Department of Biology drawn from molecular genetics, genomics, physiology and synthetic biology to build new tools to study

  14. Micro/nanofabricated environments for synthetic biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collier, Pat [ORNL; Simpson, Michael L [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    A better understanding of how confinement, crowding and reduced dimensionality modulate reactivity and reaction dynamics will aid in the rational and systematic discovery of functionality in complex biological systems. Artificial micro- and nanofabricated structures have helped elucidate the effects of nanoscale spatial confinement and segregation on biological behavior, particularly when integrated with microfluidics, through precise control in both space and time of diffusible signals and binding interactions. Examples of nanostructured interfaces for synthetic biology include the development of cell-like compartments for encapsulating biochemical reactions, nanostructured environments for fundamental studies of diffusion, molecular transport and biochemical reaction kinetics, and regulation of biomolecular interactions as functions of micro- and nanofabricated topological constraints.

  15. 2013 IREP Symposium-Bulk Power System Dynamics and Control -IX (IREP), August 25-30, 2013, Rethymnon, Greece Active network management: planning under

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ernst, Damien

    ]. Such incentives have resulted in the on-going installation of wind and solar power generation resources2013 IREP Symposium-Bulk Power System Dynamics and Control -IX (IREP), August 25-30, 2013-making policies [2], developed on the basis of the optimal power flow (OPF) problem formulation [4]. Liew

  16. TH-A-BRD-01: Radiation Biology for Radiation Therapy Physicists

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orton, C; Borras, C; Carlson, D

    2014-06-15

    Mechanisms by which radiation kills cells and ways cell damage can be repaired will be reviewed. The radiobiological parameters of dose, fractionation, delivery time, dose rate, and LET will be discussed. The linear-quadratic model for cell survival for high and low dose rate treatments and the effect of repopulation will be presented and discussed. The rationale for various radiotherapy techniques such as conventional fractionation, hyperfractionation, hypofractionation, and low and high dose rate brachytherapy, including permanent implants, will be presented. The radiobiological principles underlying radiation protection guidelines and the different radiation dosimetry terms used in radiation biology and in radiation protection will be reviewed. Human data on radiation induced cancer, including increases in the risk of second cancers following radiation therapy, as well as data on radiation induced tissue reactions, such as cardiovascular effects, for follow up times up to 20–40 years, published by ICRP, NCRP and BEIR Committees, will be examined. The latest risk estimates per unit dose will be presented. Their adoption in recent radiation protection standards and guidelines and their impact on patient and workers safety in radiotherapy will be discussed. Biologically-guided radiotherapy (BGRT) provides a systematic method to derive prescription doses that integrate patient-specific information about tumor and normal tissue biology. Treatment individualization based on patient-specific biology requires the identification of biological objective functions to facilitate the design and comparison of competing treatment modalities. Biological objectives provide a more direct approach to plan optimization instead of relying solely on dose-based surrogates and can incorporate factors that alter radiation response, such as DNA repair, tumor hypoxia, and relative biological effectiveness. We review concepts motivating biological objectives and provide examples of how they might be used to address clinically relevant problems. Underlying assumptions and limitations of existing models and their proper application will be discussed. This multidisciplinary educational session combines the fundamentals of radiobiology for radiation therapy and radiation protection with the practical application of biophysical models for treatment planning and evaluation. Learning Objectives: To understand fractionation in teletherapy and dose rate techniques in brachytherapy. To understand how the linear-quadratic models the effect of radiobiological parameters for radiotherapy. To understand the radiobiological basis of radiation protection standards applied to radiotherapy. To distinguish between stochastic effects and tissue reactions. To learn how to apply concepts of biological effective dose and RBE-weighted dose and to incorporate biological factors that alter radiation response. To discuss clinical strategies to increase therapeutic ratio, i.e., maximize local control while minimizing the risk of acute and late normal tissue effects.

  17. Nanostructure Control of Biologically Inspired Polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosales, Adrianne

    2013-01-01

    Ghosal, A. ; Fu, R. Q. ; Alamo, R. G. Macromolecules 2006,F. ; Bockstaller, M. R. ; Alamo, R. G. Macromolecules 2008,F. ; Bockstaller, M. R. ; Alamo, R. G. Macromolecules 2008,

  18. Optimal control for biological movement systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Weiwei

    2006-01-01

    discrete time nonlinear dynamical system with state variablecontrol of nonlinear dynamical systems. We illustrated itsConsider the nonlinear dynamical system described by the

  19. Nanostructure Control of Biologically Inspired Polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosales, Adrianne

    2013-01-01

    Small Angle Neutron Scattering………………..…………………………52 3.4.via small angle neutron scattering (SANS). Additionally, ourour small angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements have

  20. Nanostructure Control of Biologically Inspired Polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosales, Adrianne

    2013-01-01

    Block-Random Copolymers of Styrene, 4-Acetoxystyrene, and 4-Random Copolymers of Styrene and Hydrogenated Isoprene.Phase Behavior of Styrene/n-Butyl Acrylate Block and

  1. Nanostructure Control of Biologically Inspired Polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosales, Adrianne

    2013-01-01

    E. B. ; Wagener, K. B. Polymer 2008, 49, 2985-2995. Boz,T. ; Matyjaszewski, K. Polymer 2008, 49, 1567-1578. Kim,Flory, P. J. ; Jackson, J. B. Polymer 1963, 4, (2), 221-236.

  2. BIOLOGY, B.S. WITH TEACHER CERTIFICATE Biology (BIOT)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamburger, Peter

    BIOLOGY, B.S. WITH TEACHER CERTIFICATE Biology (BIOT) (Fall 2015-Summer 2016) IPFW Residency/Gen Ed Biology BS Core/Supporting Courses (64 credits) *Note: 3.0 GPA required in Biology Core 21800 Genetics & Molecular Biology ______ 4 BIOL 21900 Principles of Functional Biology ______ 3 BIOL

  3. Minor in Marine Biology Minor in Marine Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    Minor in Marine Biology Minor in Marine Biology General Goals of the Minor in Marine Biology About who choose the Minor in Marine Biology will learn about the biology, evolution and ecology of organisms that inhabit these environments and the ecological processes linking them. Marine biology draws

  4. Invasion Biology Mark A. Davis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Mark A.

    Invasion Biology Mark A. Davis 2 biology 2 MarkA.DavisInvasionBiology2 1 With the exception of climate change, biological invasions have probably received more attention during the past ten years than on the subject, Invasion Biology provides a comprehensive and up-to-date review of the science of biological

  5. Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    Dynamics Lab Fuel Cell Lab Fuel Cell Battery Lab Fluidization Lab Gas Processing Lab Interfacial Phenomena: Energy and Sustainability Fuel Cells Fluidization and Gasification Hybrid Systems Biological Engineering Lab Process Control & Optimization Lab Process Modeling, Monitoring and Control Lab Rheology Lab Riser

  6. Biological detector and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sillerud, Laurel; Alam, Todd M; McDowell, Andrew F

    2014-04-15

    A biological detector includes a conduit for receiving a fluid containing one or more magnetic nanoparticle-labeled, biological objects to be detected and one or more permanent magnets or electromagnet for establishing a low magnetic field in which the conduit is disposed. A microcoil is disposed proximate the conduit for energization at a frequency that permits detection by NMR spectroscopy of whether the one or more magnetically-labeled biological objects is/are present in the fluid.

  7. Biological detector and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sillerud, Laurel; Alam, Todd M; McDowell, Andrew F

    2013-02-26

    A biological detector includes a conduit for receiving a fluid containing one or more magnetic nanoparticle-labeled, biological objects to be detected and one or more permanent magnets or electromagnet for establishing a low magnetic field in which the conduit is disposed. A microcoil is disposed proximate the conduit for energization at a frequency that permits detection by NMR spectroscopy of whether the one or more magnetically-labeled biological objects is/are present in the fluid.

  8. Controlling Nutria Damage 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas Wildlife Services

    2007-03-13

    Nutria are large, semi-aquatic rodents resembling beavers or muskrats. They eat desirable vegetation, girdle trees and burrow into banks and dams. The biological, reproductive and behavioral characteristics of nutria are listed, as well as control...

  9. Biology | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atmospheric Sciences Materials Science and Engineering Mathematics Physics Environment Safety and Health More Science Home | Science & Discovery | More Science | Biology SHARE...

  10. Genomics and Systems Biology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Genomics and Systems Biology LANL leads the world in computational finishing of microbial genomes Read caption + In 2013, Los Alamos scientist Richard Sayre and his team...

  11. Biological Science courses BE 513 Molecuar and Celluar Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang-Yen, Christopher

    Biological Science courses BE 513 Molecuar and Celluar Biology BE 555 Nanoscale Systems Biology. BIOM 501 Mechanisms of Disease and Therapeutic BIOM 600 Cell Biology BMB 508 Molecular Biophysics I BMB 509 Macromolecular Biophysics II BMB 567 Bioinorganic Chemistry BMB 590 Biological Physics BMB 614

  12. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE BIOLOGY ECOLOGY & EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY OPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemp, Brian M.

    BACHELOR OF SCIENCE ­ BIOLOGY ECOLOGY & EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY OPTION A Bachelor of Science degree hours must be upper division coursework. A B.S. in Biology requires a minimum of 19 semester hours of core BIOLOGY courses (BIOLOGY 106, 107, 301, 372 and 405 or 403). An additional 21 semester hours

  13. Biology and Marine Biology Research Areas and Assistantship Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olszewski Jr., Edward A.

    1 Biology and Marine Biology Research Areas and Assistantship Application Name: LAST FIRST MIDDLE and Marine Biology faculty members will accept graduate students to work in the general research areas listed Next Page Revised 3/08 850 #12;2 Biology and Marine Biology Statement of Interest Statement of Interest

  14. Department of Biology Box 351800 University of Washington Seattle, WA 98195-1800 phone: (206) 543-1620 fax: (206) 543-3041 www.biology.washington.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shlizerman, Eli

    Department of Biology · Box 351800 · University of Washington · Seattle, WA 98195-1800 phone: (206) 543-1620 · fax: (206) 543-3041 · www.biology.washington.edu Education With over 1,700 undergraduate majors, the Department of Biology is the largest under- graduate degree program at the University

  15. Science Faculty Department of Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    Science Faculty Department of Biology Zoological Institute Community Ecology 1 December 2006 Hans-Sigrist-Symposium: Biological Invasions Hans-Sigrist-Stiftung 9.00 Prof. Dr. David M Richardson (Centre for Invasion Biology. Dr. Bruno Baur (Conservation Biology, Department of Integrative Biology, University of Basel

  16. Microfluidics for quantitative biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Micha

    2012-01-01

    by controlling volumetric fluxes with syringe pumps. 14, 24pumps, which are commonly used to control volumetric fluxes,

  17. Extracting information from biological networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chindelevitch, Leonid Alexandrovich

    2010-01-01

    Systems biology, the study of biological systems in a holistic manner, has been catalyzed by a dramatic improvement in experimental techniques, coupled with a constantly increasing availability of biological data. The ...

  18. COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING Biological Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING Biological Engineering Undergraduate Class of 2013 Post-Graduation Report The Department Biological and Environmental Engineering (BEE) offers a bachelor degree program in Biological Engineering and a bachelor degree program in Environmental Engineering. Cornell Career Services surveys

  19. Biological Conversion of Sugars To Hydrocarbons | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biological Conversion of Sugars To Hydrocarbons Biological Conversion of Sugars To Hydrocarbons PDF explaining the biological process of bioenergy Biological Conversion of Sugars...

  20. Adsorption of biometals to monosodium titanate in biological environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HOBBS, D.T.; MESSER, R. L. W.; LEWIS, J. B.; CLICK, D. R. LOCKWOOD, P. E.; WATAHA, J. C.

    2005-06-06

    Monosodium titanate (MST) is an inorganic sorbent/ion exchanger developed for the removal of radionuclides from nuclear wastes. We investigated the ability of MST to bind Cd(II), Hg(II), or Au(III) to establish the utility of MST for applications in environmental decontamination or medical therapy (drug delivery). Adsorption isotherms for MST were determined at pH 7-7.5 in water or phosphate-buffered saline. The extent of metal binding was determined spectroscopically by measuring the concentrations of the metals in solution before and after contact with the MST. Cytotoxic responses to MST were assessed using THP1 monocytes and succinate dehydrogenase activity. Monocytic activation by MST was assessed by TNF{alpha} secretion (ELISA) with or without lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activation. MST sorbed Cd(II), Hg(II), and Au(III) under conditions similar to that in physiological systems. MST exhibited the highest affinity for Cd(II) followed by Hg(II) and Au (III). MST (up to 100 mg/L) exhibited only minor (< 25% suppression of succinate dehydrogenase) cytotoxicity and did not trigger TNF{alpha} secretion nor modulate LPS-induced TNF{alpha} secretion from monocytes. MST exhibits high affinity for biometals with no significant biological liabilities in these introductory studies. MST deserves further scrutiny as a substance with the capacity to decontaminate biological environments or deliver metals in a controlled fashion.

  1. Work with Biological Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Work with Biological Materials Print Planning A complete Experiment Safety Sheet (ESS) is required before work can be done at the ALS. This ESS is either a part of the proposal...

  2. Confidence from uncertainty - A multi-target drug screening method from robust control theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luni, Camilla; Shoemaker, Jason E; Sanft, Kevin R; Petzold, Linda R; Doyle, Francis J

    2010-01-01

    method from robust control theory. BMC Systems Biology 2010method from robust control theory Camilla Luni 1 , Jason Eof a method from robust control theory, Structured Singular

  3. Exploring the Possible Use of Information Barriers for future Biological Weapons Verification Regimes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luke, S J

    2011-12-20

    This report describes a path forward for implementing information barriers in a future generic biological arms-control verification regime. Information barriers have become a staple of discussion in the area of arms control verification approaches for nuclear weapons and components. Information barriers when used with a measurement system allow for the determination that an item has sensitive characteristics without releasing any of the sensitive information. Over the last 15 years the United States (with the Russian Federation) has led on the development of information barriers in the area of the verification of nuclear weapons and nuclear components. The work of the US and the Russian Federation has prompted other states (e.g., UK and Norway) to consider the merits of information barriers for possible verification regimes. In the context of a biological weapons control verification regime, the dual-use nature of the biotechnology will require protection of sensitive information while allowing for the verification of treaty commitments. A major question that has arisen is whether - in a biological weapons verification regime - the presence or absence of a weapon pathogen can be determined without revealing any information about possible sensitive or proprietary information contained in the genetic materials being declared under a verification regime. This study indicates that a verification regime could be constructed using a small number of pathogens that spans the range of known biological weapons agents. Since the number of possible pathogens is small it is possible and prudent to treat these pathogens as analogies to attributes in a nuclear verification regime. This study has determined that there may be some information that needs to be protected in a biological weapons control verification regime. To protect this information, the study concludes that the Lawrence Livermore Microbial Detection Array may be a suitable technology for the detection of the genetic information associated with the various pathogens. In addition, it has been determined that a suitable information barrier could be applied to this technology when the verification regime has been defined. Finally, the report posits a path forward for additional development of information barriers in a biological weapons verification regime. This path forward has shown that a new analysis approach coined as Information Loss Analysis might need to be pursued so that a numerical understanding of how information can be lost in specific measurement systems can be achieved.

  4. 05/22/2006 12:33 PMnews @ nature.com -Chaos could keep fusion under control -A leaky magnetic bottle may prove key to making a reactor. Page 1 of 3http://www.nature.com/news/2006/060522/full/060522-2.html

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    prove key to making a reactor. Geoff Brumfiel Nuclear fusion reactors are all about control, but some05/22/2006 12:33 PMnews @ nature.com - Chaos could keep fusion under control - A leaky magnetic bottle may prove key to making a reactor. Page 1 of 3http://www.nature.com/news/2006/060522/full/060522

  5. Biology Mathematics Connection Program Integrating Mathematics and Biology Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biology Mathematics Connection Program Integrating Mathematics and Biology Program BMC pioneered a series of instructional modules for use in high school mathematics and biology classrooms to highlight the interconnections between the mathematical and biological sciences. IMB follows up by developing the BMC modules

  6. Marine Biology Is Marine Biology right for me?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    Marine Biology Is Marine Biology right for me? If you have an interest in learning about life in the sea then Marine Biology may be a good option for you. You will need good time management skills a marine biology degree are wide-ranging and provide a good basis for employment in almost any sector

  7. Soybean Insect Control Suggestions. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drees, B.M.

    1985-01-01

    Protecting Bees and Other Pollinators from Insecticides .............................. 10 Policy Statement for Making Chemical Control Recommendations ....................... 11 Soybean Insect Control Suggestions (chart) ... 12 Conversion Table... and maximum coverage. When making any insecticide applications, follow label directions. Refer to the ((Protecting Bees and other Pollinators from Insecticides" section of this bulletin to avoid bee losses. Biological Insecticides ':,.,.dcillus...

  8. 7th Annual Systems Biology Symposium: Systems Biology and Engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitski, Timothy P.

    2008-04-01

    Systems biology recognizes the complex multi-scale organization of biological systems, from molecules to ecosystems. The International Symposium on Systems Biology has been hosted by the Institute for Systems Biology in Seattle, Washington, since 2002. The annual two-day event gathers the most influential researchers transforming biology into an integrative discipline investingating complex systems. Engineering and application of new technology is a central element of systems biology. Genome-scale, or very small-scale, biological questions drive the enigneering of new technologies, which enable new modes of experimentation and computational analysis, leading to new biological insights and questions. Concepts and analytical methods in engineering are now finding direct applications in biology. Therefore, the 2008 Symposium, funded in partnership with the Department of Energy, featured global leaders in "Systems Biology and Engineering."

  9. Biology & Biomedical Sciences ACADEMIC PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gereau, Robert W. IV

    Biology & Biomedical Sciences ACADEMIC PROGRAM GUIDELINES Programs in Cell & Molecular Biology Molecular Microbiology & Microbial Pathogenesis Overview of the Programs in Cell and Molecular Biology Graduate training in Cell and Molecular Biology at Washington University is offered by the Programs in Cell

  10. POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT Insect Molecular Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT Insect Molecular Biology 03/21/2014 POSITION: Research Associate LOCATION in entomology, biochemistry, molecular biology and/or toxicology; extensive research experience in entomology, biochemistry, cell biology and/or molecular biology; excellent organizational, and written and interpersonal

  11. Biological Invasions 2: 279288, 2000. 2001 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rundell, Rebecca J.

    resource, it has also been proposed as a possible biocontrol agent against aquatic weeds. Various factors as a biological control agent for aquatic weeds. Introduction Human-mediated biological invasions are initiatedHawaiiBiologicalSurvey. effects(e.g., Cowie, inpressa). Organismsperceivedas having value as food resources or as biocontrol

  12. Biological effectiveness of neutrons: Research needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casarett, G.W.; Braby, L.A.; Broerse, J.J.; Elkind, M.M.; Goodhead, D.T.; Oleinick, N.L.

    1994-02-01

    The goal of this report was to provide a conceptual plan for a research program that would provide a basis for determining more precisely the biological effectiveness of neutron radiation with emphasis on endpoints relevant to the protection of human health. This report presents the findings of the experts for seven particular categories of scientific information on neutron biological effectiveness. Chapter 2 examines the radiobiological mechanisms underlying the assumptions used to estimate human risk from neutrons and other radiations. Chapter 3 discusses the qualitative and quantitative models used to organize and evaluate experimental observations and to provide extrapolations where direct observations cannot be made. Chapter 4 discusses the physical principles governing the interaction of radiation with biological systems and the importance of accurate dosimetry in evaluating radiation risk and reducing the uncertainty in the biological data. Chapter 5 deals with the chemical and molecular changes underlying cellular responses and the LET dependence of these changes. Chapter 6, in turn, discusses those cellular and genetic changes which lead to mutation or neoplastic transformation. Chapters 7 and 8 examine deterministic and stochastic effects, respectively, and the data required for the prediction of such effects at different organizational levels and for the extrapolation from experimental results in animals to risks for man. Gaps and uncertainties in this data are examined relative to data required for establishing radiation protection standards for neutrons and procedures for the effective and safe use of neutron and other high-LET radiation therapy.

  13. Nuclear reactor control apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sridhar, Bettadapur N. (Cupertino, CA)

    1983-11-01

    Nuclear reactor core safety rod release apparatus comprises a control rod having a detent notch in the form of an annular peripheral recess at its upper end, a control rod support tube for raising and lowering the control rod under normal conditions, latches pivotally mounted on the control support tube with free ends thereof normally disposed in the recess in the control rod, and cam means for pivoting the latches out of the recess in the control rod when a scram condition occurs. One embodiment of the invention comprises an additional magnetically-operated latch for releasing the control rod under two different conditions, one involving seismic shock.

  14. Fuel control system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Detweiler, C.A.

    1980-12-30

    A fuel control system for a turbocharged engine having fuel delivered to the carburetor under the control of a vacuum operated device which is under the further control of a device sensing pressures upstream and downstream of the turbo charger compressor and delivering a vacuum signal to the fuel control device in proportion to the manifold pressure even though the latter pressure may be a positive pressure.

  15. Bioforensics: Characterization of biological weapons agents by NanoSIMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, P K; Ghosal, S; Leighton, T J; Wheeler, K E; Hutcheon, I D

    2007-02-26

    The anthrax attacks of Fall 2001 highlight the need to develop forensic methods based on multiple identifiers to determine the origin of biological weapons agents. Genetic typing methods (i.e., DNA and RNA-based) provide one attribution technology, but genetic information alone is not usually sufficient to determine the provenance of the material. Non-genetic identifiers, including elemental and isotopic signatures, provide complementary information that can be used to identify the means, geographic location and date of production. Under LDRD funding, we have successfully developed the techniques necessary to perform bioforensic characterization with the NanoSIMS at the individual spore level. We have developed methods for elemental and isotopic characterization at the single spore scale. We have developed methods for analyzing spore sections to map elemental abundance within spores. We have developed rapid focused ion beam (FIB) sectioning techniques for spores to preserve elemental and structural integrity. And we have developed a high-resolution depth profiling method to characterize the elemental distribution in individual spores without sectioning. We used these newly developed methods to study the controls on elemental abundances in spores, characterize the elemental distribution of in spores, and to study elemental uptake by spores. Our work under this LDRD project attracted FBI and DHS funding for applied purposes.

  16. Fish Biology Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jochem, Frank J.

    Lab 10: Fish Biology Introduction The effective management of fish populations requires knowledge of the growth rate of the fish. This requires determination of the age of fish to develop a relationship between the size and age of fish. For an inventory, this information provides insights to evaluate the potential

  17. Chemistry & Biology Brief Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herschlag, Dan

    . In each of these cases the native hydroxyl group interacts with a purine exocy- clic amine. Our resultsChemistry & Biology Brief Communication 20 -Fluoro Substituents Can Mimic Native 20 -Hydroxyls signature for tertiary interac- tions between 20 -hydroxyl groups and exocyclic amino groups within RNA

  18. Chemistry & Biology Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Loren

    Chemistry & Biology Perspective The Origin of RNA and ``My Grandfather's Axe'' Nicholas V. Hud,1 *Correspondence: hud@gatech.edu http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chembiol.2013.03.012 The origin of RNA is one

  19. Chemistry and Chemical Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linhardt, Robert J.

    /polymeric materials for electronics or energy storage, and polyelectrolyte membranes for fuel cell applications. http projects in emerging fields of science and technology that lie at the intersection between chemistry Biology at Rensselaer invites applications from students interested in pursuing a Ph.D. degree

  20. Biological Engineering 2014-2015 BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM PROGRESS FORM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Biological Engineering 2014-2015 8 BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM PROGRESS FORM Applies to students Calculus for Engineers I* MATH 1910 (4) ______ _____ _____ Calculus for Engineers II* MATH 1920 (4) ______ _____ _____ Engineering Math* (Differential Equations) MATH 2930 (4) ______ _____ _____ Engineering Math* (Linear Algebra

  1. Novel mechanisms of endothelial-epithelial interactions underlying cancer metastasis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connor, Yamicia Doyasi

    2013-01-01

    Elucidation of molecular mechanisms underlying metastasis is the final frontier in cancer biology research. Identifying individual pathways in the metastatic cascade could lead to development of metastasis-specific ...

  2. ationships under Contrasting Herbivory tifieation: Predidions and Patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazumder, Asit

    -chlorophyll relationships under contrasting herbivory and thermal stratification: predictions and patterns. Can. j. Fish and thermal stratification reveal that systems lacking large Daphnia (SH systems) exhibit four times more Chl (nutrients), biological (herbivory), and physical (thermal stratification) characteristics among aquatic

  3. Controlling the Pecan Nut Casebearer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knutson, Allen E.; Ree, Bill

    2005-03-31

    One of the most important nut-infesting pests of pecan is the pecan nut casebearer. This publication describes the casebearer and its seasonal cycle, and offers advice on scouting, trapping, insecticide selection, and biological control....

  4. Biology 472 Spring 2009 Biology of Amphibians and Reptiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Kate

    Biology 472 Spring 2009 1 Biology of Amphibians and Reptiles Dr. Kate Jackson Office: Science 200 E Encyclopedia of Reptiles and Amphibians. Oxford University Press. (2) Stebbins, R. and R. T. Peterson. 2003 of assorted herps (from labs). #12;Biology 472 Spring 2009 2 · ...know how to access primary sources

  5. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE BIOLOGY GENERAL OPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemp, Brian M.

    * OR 201 Physics 4 hrs. PHYSICS 102* OR 202 Physics 4 hrs. General Biology Option Requirements: CellBACHELOR OF SCIENCE ­ BIOLOGY GENERAL OPTION A Bachelor of Science degree from Washington State Requirements: Grade BIOLOGY 106 General Biology 4 hrs. BIOLOGY 107 General Biology 4 hrs. BIOLOGY 301 General

  6. Modular architecture in biological networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramachandran, Gopal (Gopal Sebastian)

    2007-01-01

    In the past decade, biology has been revolutionized by an explosion in the availability of data. Translating this new wealth of information into meaningful biological insights and clinical breakthroughs will require a ...

  7. Experiment design for systems biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apgar, Joshua Farley

    2009-01-01

    Mechanism-based chemical kinetic models are increasingly being used to describe biological signaling. Such models serve to encapsulate current understanding of pathways and to enable insight into complex biological processes. ...

  8. Systems Biology | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ORNL brings together multidisciplinary expertise and special facilities in genomics, computational biology, plant sciences, microbiology, microbial ecology, biophysics,...

  9. Systems Biology | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ORNL brings together multidisciplinary expertise and special facilities in genomics, computational biology, plant sciences, microbiology, microbial ecology, biophysics,...

  10. Environmental Biology | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    microbiology, biogeochemistry, molecular biology, molecular dynamics, bioinformatics, genomics, neutron science, chemistry, and computing-and spans multiple scales, from the...

  11. Abengoa Mojave Final Biological Opinion

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Biological Opinion on Mojave Solar, LLC's Mojave Solar Project, San Bernardino County, California (8-8-11-F-3)

  12. Quantum physics meets biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markus Arndt; Thomas Juffmann; Vlatko Vedral

    2009-11-01

    Quantum physics and biology have long been regarded as unrelated disciplines, describing nature at the inanimate microlevel on the one hand and living species on the other hand. Over the last decades the life sciences have succeeded in providing ever more and refined explanations of macroscopic phenomena that were based on an improved understanding of molecular structures and mechanisms. Simultaneously, quantum physics, originally rooted in a world view of quantum coherences, entanglement and other non-classical effects, has been heading towards systems of increasing complexity. The present perspective article shall serve as a pedestrian guide to the growing interconnections between the two fields. We recapitulate the generic and sometimes unintuitive characteristics of quantum physics and point to a number of applications in the life sciences. We discuss our criteria for a future quantum biology, its current status, recent experimental progress and also the restrictions that nature imposes on bold extrapolations of quantum theory to macroscopic phenomena.

  13. Proportional Relationships in Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lega, Joceline

    Proportional Relationships in Biology #12;Bell Ringer... 1) Are 2/3 and 6/12 proportional? 1) No; 6/12 = 1/2 ! 2/3 2) Are 2/3 and 10/15 proportional? 1) Yes; 2/3 = (2*5)/(3*5) = 10/15 3) Are 2/3 and 4/9 proportional? 1) No; both are simplified #12;Proportional Shapes · What does it mean for two shapes

  14. Computational biology and high performance computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoichet, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Paper in Computational Biology The First Step Beyond theM . Glaeser, Mol. & Cell Biology, UCB and Life SciencesLBNL-44460 Computational Biology and High Performance

  15. Nutritional systems biology of type 2 diabetes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Y; Barrere-Cain, RE; Yang, X

    2015-01-01

    HF (2015) Circadian systems biology in Metazoa. BriefingsNutritional systems biology: defini- tions and approaches.PAPER Nutritional systems biology of type 2 diabetes Yuqi

  16. DEPARTMENT OF DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turc, Catalin

    Masters of Science Degree Plan A: Thesis DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY #12;DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY Masters of Science Degree (Plan A) Thesis The Plan A Master of Science Degree in Biology is a thesis,graduate degree program.The purpose of the program is to provide advanced exposure

  17. Translational Biology, Medicine, and Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    Translational Biology, Medicine, and Health PhDProgram Admissions The program seeks highly. PhD Program in Translational Biology, Medicine, and Health Focus Areas Cancer Development, Aging 24016 avanwart@vt.edu · www.tbmh.vt.edu www . tbmh.vt.edu #12;Translational Biology, Medicine

  18. Thin film composition with biological substance and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, Allison A. (Kennewick, WA); Song, Lin (Richland, WA)

    1999-01-01

    The invention provides a thin-film composition comprising an underlying substrate of a first material including a plurality of attachment sites; a plurality of functional groups chemically attached to the attachment sites of the underlying substrate; and a thin film of a second material deposited onto the attachment sites of the underlying substrate, and a biologically active substance deposited with the thin-film. Preferably the functional groups are attached to a self assembling monolayer attached to the underlying substrate. Preferred functional groups attached to the underlying substrate are chosen from the group consisting of carboxylates, sulfonates, phosphates, optionally substituted, linear or cyclo, alkyl, alkene, alkyne, aryl, alkylaryl, amine, hydroxyl, thiol, silyl, phosphoryl, cyano, metallocenyl, carbonyl, and polyphosphate. Preferred materials for the underlying substrate are selected from the group consisting of a metal, a metal alloy, a plastic, a polymer, a proteic film, a membrane, a glass or a ceramic. The second material is selected from the group consisting of inorganic crystalline structures, inorganic amorphus structures, organic crystalline structures, and organic amorphus structures. Preferred second materials are phosphates, especially calcium phosphates and most particularly calcium apatite. The biologically active molecule is a protein, peptide, DNA segment, RNA segment, nucleotide, polynucleotide, nucleoside, antibiotic, antimicrobal, radioisotope, chelated radioisotope, chelated metal, metal salt, anti-inflamatory, steriod, nonsteriod anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antihistamine, receptor binding agent, or chemotherapeutic agent, or other biologically active material. Preferably the biologically active molecule is an osteogenic factor the compositions listed above.

  19. Thin film composition with biological substance and method of making

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, A.A.; Song, L.

    1999-09-28

    The invention provides a thin-film composition comprising an underlying substrate of a first material including a plurality of attachment sites; a plurality of functional groups chemically attached to the attachment sites of the underlying substrate; and a thin film of a second material deposited onto the attachment sites of the underlying substrate, and a biologically active substance deposited with the thin-film. Preferably the functional groups are attached to a self assembling monolayer attached to the underlying substrate. Preferred functional groups attached to the underlying substrate are chosen from the group consisting of carboxylates, sulfonates, phosphates, optionally substituted, linear or cyclo, alkyl, alkene, alkyne, aryl, alkylaryl, amine, hydroxyl, thiol, silyl, phosphoryl, cyano, metallocenyl, carbonyl, and polyphosphate. Preferred materials for the underlying substrate are selected from the group consisting of a metal, a metal alloy, a plastic, a polymer, a proteic film, a membrane, a glass or a ceramic. The second material is selected from the group consisting of inorganic crystalline structures, inorganic amorphous structures, organic crystalline structures, and organic amorphous structures. Preferred second materials are phosphates, especially calcium phosphates and most particularly calcium apatite. The biologically active molecule is a protein, peptide, DNA segment, RNA segment, nucleotide, polynucleotide, nucleoside, antibiotic, antimicrobial, radioisotope, chelated radioisotope, chelated metal, metal salt, anti-inflammatory, steroid, nonsteroid anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antihistamine, receptor binding agent, or chemotherapeutic agent, or other biologically active material. Preferably the biologically active molecule is an osteogenic factor consisting of the compositions listed above.

  20. Amazing Images: Summer under the Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGraw, Kevin J.

    . A females likes them dark. If she mates with one and finds another with a darker breast, she'll bolt. "For bigger horns or giant tusks -- serves to indicate overall suitability for reproduction. The dark red on Keeping Control of Web New 'Biological' Robots Build Themselves People Respond to Computer's Flattery

  1. Biological Materials that REQUIRE an Export License ALL biological agents and biologically derived substances specifically developed, configured,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jornsten, Rebecka

    Biological Materials that REQUIRE an Export License · ALL biological agents and biologically nationals or to be exported. List of Biological Materials that MAY Require an Export License (including

  2. Biology/Marine Biology Prizes/Awards/Scholarships 2004/05 University Medal in Biology Anna London

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunawardena, Arunika

    Biology/Marine Biology Prizes/Awards/Scholarships 2004/05 University Medal in Biology Anna London University Medal in Marine Biology Jennifer Frail Hugh P. Bell Scholarships Ivy Whitehorn, Jennifer Frail

  3. Biology/Marine Biology Prizes/Awards/Scholarships 2003/04 University Medal in Biology Andrew Gillis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunawardena, Arunika

    Biology/Marine Biology Prizes/Awards/Scholarships 2003/04 University Medal in Biology Andrew Gillis University Medal in Marine Biology Kent Russell Hugh P. Bell Scholarships Andrew Gillis, Stephanie Wood

  4. Biology/Marine Biology Prizes/Awards/Scholarships 2006/07 University Medal in Biology Yassein Shamout

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunawardena, Arunika

    Biology/Marine Biology Prizes/Awards/Scholarships 2006/07 University Medal in Biology Yassein Shamout University Medal in Marine Biology Sophie Whoriskey Hugh P. Bell Scholarships Shana Watanabe

  5. Biology/Marine Biology Prizes/Awards/Scholarships 2007/08 University Medal in Biology Faiza Siddiqi, Ashley Smith

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunawardena, Arunika

    Biology/Marine Biology Prizes/Awards/Scholarships 2007/08 University Medal in Biology Faiza Siddiqi, Ashley Smith University Medal in Marine Biology Shana Watanabe Hugh P. Bell Scholarships Faiza Siddiqi

  6. Biology/Marine Biology Prizes/Awards/Scholarships 2005/06 University Medal in Biology Oliver Barker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunawardena, Arunika

    Biology/Marine Biology Prizes/Awards/Scholarships 2005/06 University Medal in Biology Oliver Barker University Medal in Marine Biology Katy Garant Hugh P. Bell Scholarships Oliver Barker, Alison Green, Carmen

  7. Biology/Marine Biology Prizes/Awards/Scholarships 2002/03 University Medal in Biology Kate Turner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunawardena, Arunika

    Biology/Marine Biology Prizes/Awards/Scholarships 2002/03 University Medal in Biology Kate Turner University Medal in Marine Biology Shane Gero University Medal in French Annette Woods University Medal

  8. Bankruptcy Control and the Theory of the Firm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muro, Sergio A.

    2008-01-01

    Bankruptcy Control and the Theory of the Firm Sergio A. Muromy own. Bankruptcy Control and the Theory of the Firm I.integrates organization theory, control and biology, see

  9. Novel Controls for Economic Dispatch of Combined Cooling, Heating...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and dynamic control technology for optimal economic use of CCHP systems under 5 MW. The control systems and technologies under development are expected to increase market...

  10. Biology/Marine Biology Prizes/Awards/Scholarships 2010/11 University Medal in Biology Jennifer Kalil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunawardena, Arunika

    Biology/Marine Biology Prizes/Awards/Scholarships 2010/11 University Medal in Biology Jennifer Kalil University Medal in Marine Biology John O'Brien University Silver Medal John O'Brien Hugh P. Bell Developmental Biology Prize Alexandra Preston Vemco Scholarship in Marine Biology Jessica Carriere

  11. Biology/Marine Biology Prizes/Awards/Scholarships 2011/12 University Medal in Biology Jaime Wertman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunawardena, Arunika

    Biology/Marine Biology Prizes/Awards/Scholarships 2011/12 University Medal in Biology Jaime Wertman University Medal in Marine Biology Cylia Civelek Hugh P. Bell Scholarships Sarah McBoyle, Lauren Kay, Daniel Developmental Biology Prize Siwar Arda Vemco Scholarship in Marine Biology Stacey Henderson Cecelia Rajaratnam

  12. Montana State University 1 Cell Biology and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Montana State University 1 Cell Biology and Neuroscience The department participates: MSU's programs in the biological sciences are distributed across multiple departments. MSU does not have a single Department of Biology. For additional options see Biological Sciences (http

  13. 7.013 Introductory Biology, Spring 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sive, Hazel L.

    The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological ...

  14. Autofermentative Biological Hydrogen Production by Cyanobacteria...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Autofermentative Biological Hydrogen Production by Cyanobacteria Autofermentative Biological Hydrogen Production by Cyanobacteria Presentation by Charles Dismukes, Rutgers...

  15. Biological and Environmental Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & InspectionsBeryllium andSamplerBiological Imaging by

  16. Physics of biological evolution 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Court, Steven James

    2014-11-27

    Part I: A remarkable feature of life on Earth is that despite the apparent observed diversity, the underlying chemistry that powers it is highly conserved. From the level of the nucleobases, through the amino acids and ...

  17. Systems and Control Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    ), the automobile companies Ford, GM) computer companies (IBM, Lucent, Bellcore) by the aerospace industry (GE, JPL areas require cross-disciplinary tools and methods for their solution. The Bachelor of Science program include the modeling, analysis, optimization and control of complex biological, energy, and industrial

  18. Controlling the Pecan Weevil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ree, Bill; Knutson, Allen E.; Harris, Marvin

    2005-04-05

    The pecan weevil is a key pest of pecan in portions of Texas. This publication discusses the biology of the pest and how to use integrated pest management practices for control. Photographs illustrate adult and larval stages and signs of pecan nut...

  19. Department of Biology and Marine Biology Merit Scholarship Fund: The Department of Biology and Marine Biology Merit Scholarship is hereby created as a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olszewski Jr., Edward A.

    Department of Biology and Marine Biology Merit Scholarship Fund: The Department of Biology and Marine Biology Merit Scholarship is hereby created as a named fund at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington. The scholarship is being created by the Department of Biology and Marine Biology and will be used

  20. Biological warfare in the littorals. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, R.W.

    1997-05-01

    Biological warfare (BW) has emerged as a significant threat to military operations and is particularly challenging at the operational level of warfare in a littoral environment. There are compelling reasons why an operational commander should be concerned about BW: global proliferation of biotechnology and biological weapons capabilities; suitability of BW for disrupting force projection across the littorals; and the vulnerability of American, allied and coalition forces to BW. The threat of facing an adversary capable and willing to use biological weapons will influence the commander`s application of the operational art across the six operational functions. Degradation of operational tempo, effects of psychological responses among the force, and stress on the organizational structure may challenge the command and control process. Operational intelligence will demand robust integration of technical analysis, intentions and warnings, meteorological information, and medical intelligence. The maneuver and movement processes will be taxed to function effectively when ports and airfields offer such lucrative BW targets. Biological weapons may dictate the location of operational fires assets as well as the make-up of the target lists. Operational logistics assumes great importance in the medical functions, decontamination processes, and troop replacement and unit reconstitution. Operational protection encompasses nearly every aspect of BW defense and will demand a balance between what is necessary and what is possible to protect. As daunting as the challenges appear, the operational-level commander has at his disposal many tools necessary to prepare for biological warfare in the littorals. Ultimately, the commander must convince his force, his allies, and his enemies that the command can fight effectively in a BW environment, on land and sea.

  1. Methods of increasing secretion of polypeptides having biological activity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Merino, Sandra

    2015-04-14

    The present invention relates to methods for producing a secreted polypeptide having biological activity, comprising: (a) transforming a fungal host cell with a fusion protein construct encoding a fusion protein, which comprises: (i) a first polynucleotide encoding a signal peptide; (ii) a second polynucleotide encoding at least a catalytic domain of an endoglucanase or a portion thereof; and (iii) a third polynucleotide encoding at least a catalytic domain of a polypeptide having biological activity; wherein the signal peptide and at least the catalytic domain of the endoglucanase increases secretion of the polypeptide having biological activity compared to the absence of at least the catalytic domain of the endoglucanase; (b) cultivating the transformed fungal host cell under conditions suitable for production of the fusion protein; and (c) recovering the fusion protein, a component thereof, or a combination thereof, having biological activity, from the cultivation medium.

  2. Methods of increasing secretion of polypeptides having biological activity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Merino, Sandra

    2014-10-28

    The present invention relates to methods for producing a secreted polypeptide having biological activity, comprising: (a) transforming a fungal host cell with a fusion protein construct encoding a fusion protein, which comprises: (i) a first polynucleotide encoding a signal peptide; (ii) a second polynucleotide encoding at least a catalytic domain of an endoglucanase or a portion thereof; and (iii) a third polynucleotide encoding at least a catalytic domain of a polypeptide having biological activity; wherein the signal peptide and at least the catalytic domain of the endoglucanase increases secretion of the polypeptide having biological activity compared to the absence of at least the catalytic domain of the endoglucanase; (b) cultivating the transformed fungal host cell under conditions suitable for production of the fusion protein; and (c) recovering the fusion protein, a component thereof, or a combination thereof, having biological activity, from the cultivation medium.

  3. Methods of increasing secretion of polypeptides having biological activity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Merino, Sandra

    2013-10-01

    The present invention relates to methods for producing a secreted polypeptide having biological activity, comprising: (a) transforming a fungal host cell with a fusion protein construct encoding a fusion protein, which comprises: (i) a first polynucleotide encoding a signal peptide; (ii) a second polynucleotide encoding at least a catalytic domain of an endoglucanase or a portion thereof; and (iii) a third polynucleotide encoding at least a catalytic domain of a polypeptide having biological activity; wherein the signal peptide and at least the catalytic domain of the endoglucanase increases secretion of the polypeptide having biological activity compared to the absence of at least the catalytic domain of the endoglucanase; (b) cultivating the transformed fungal host cell under conditions suitable for production of the fusion protein; and (c) recovering the fusion protein, a component thereof, or a combination thereof, having biological activity, from the cultivation medium.

  4. Methods of increasing secretion of polypeptides having biological activity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Merino, Sandra

    2014-05-27

    The present invention relates to methods for producing a secreted polypeptide having biological activity, comprising: (a) transforming a fungal host cell with a fusion protein construct encoding a fusion protein, which comprises: (i) a first polynucleotide encoding a signal peptide; (ii) a second polynucleotide encoding at least a catalytic domain of an endoglucanase or a portion thereof; and (iii) a third polynucleotide encoding at least a catalytic domain of a polypeptide having biological activity; wherein the signal peptide and at least the catalytic domain of the endoglucanase increases secretion of the polypeptide having biological activity compared to the absence of at least the catalytic domain of the endoglucanase; (b) cultivating the transformed fungal host cell under conditions suitable for production of the fusion protein; and (c) recovering the fusion protein, a component thereof, or a combination thereof, having biological activity, from the cultivation medium.

  5. The under-machine inspection system consists of a remotely controlled robot. This device is capable of accessing hard-to-reach areas and deal with poor lighting conditions, thus decreasing the risk of injury for the inspection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koschan, Andreas

    . Figure 1. An application of under machinery inspection 2.1 System components and capabilities The design and transmitting the picture to a remote station. · Power consumption-The power requirements should be designed stick. A Raytheon, PalmIR PRO camera is used to capture thermal images from under machinery. The camera

  6. Healthcare & Biology Licenses Available | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ID 200802058, 200802114) 200802139 Universal Gene Transfer Technology for Gram Positive Bacteria 200802151 Determining Optical Properties of Biological Tissues 200802153 Combined...

  7. CollegeofScience Biological Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    ,populations,and even ecosystems. Our courses will help prepare you for a career in biology,be it in biodiversity

  8. Michael Levitt and Computational Biology

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Levitt, PhD, professor of structural biology at the Stanford University School of Medicine, has won the 2013 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. ... Levitt ... shares the ... prize with...

  9. Insect Controls for Organic Gardeners. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Kenneth R.; Turney, H.A.

    1979-01-01

    ................................................................... 9 Acknowledgments ...................................................... 10 References ............................................................. 10 INSECT CONTROLS FOR ORGANIC GARDENERS Kenneth R. Lewis and H. A. Turney* Interest in organic... gardening has increased in recent years. Organic gardening means enriching the garden soil with natural products (mulches, composts and animal manures) and controlling insects, diseases and weeds with cultural, mechanical and biological methods rather...

  10. KPFM and PFM of Biological Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, Brian [University College, Dublin; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Surface potentials and electrostatic interactions in biological systems are a key element of cellular regulation and interaction. Examples include cardiac and muscular activity, voltage-gated ion channels, protein folding and assembly, and electroactive cells and electrotransduction. The coupling between electrical, mechanical, and chemical signals and responses in cellular systems necessitates the development of tools capable of measuring the distribution of charged species, surface potentials, and mechanical responses to applied electrical stimuli and vice versa, ultimately under physiological conditions. In this chapter, applications of voltage-modulated atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods including Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) and piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) to biological systems are discussed. KPFM is a force-sensitive non-contact or intermittent-contact mode AFM technique that allows electrostatic interactions and surface potentials to be addressed. Beyond long-range electrostatic interactions, the application of bias can lead to a mechanical response, e.g., due to linear piezoelectric coupling in polar biopolymers or via more complex electrotransduction and redox pathways in other biosystems. The use and development of PFM, based on direct electromechanical detection, to biological systems will also be addressed. The similarities and limitations of measuring surface potentials and electromechanical coupling in solution will be outlined.

  11. Computational adaptive optics for live three-dimensional biological imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agard, David

    Computational adaptive optics for live three- dimensional biological imaging Z. Kam*, B. Hanser , M. Under their design conditions, modern microscope optics produce nearly ideal aberration-free imaging to the coverslip. When focusing into thick samples, the 3D optical characteristics of the sample itself must

  12. Resource Letter: Bio-molecular Nano-machines: where Physics, Chemistry, Biology and Technology meet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debashish Chowdhury

    2008-07-17

    Cell is the structural and functional unit of life. This Resource Letter serves as a guide to the literature on nano-machines which drive not only intracellular movements, but also motility of the cell. These machines are usually proteins or macromolecular assemblies which require appropriate fuel for their operations. Although, traditionally, these machines were subjects of investigation in biology and biochemistry, increasing use of the concepts and techniques of physics in recent years have contributed to the quantitative understanding of the fundamental principles underlying their operational mechanisms. The possibility of exploiting these principles for the design and control of artificial nano-machines has opened up a new frontier in the bottom-up approach to nano-technology.

  13. ATTENTION BIOLOGY/MARINE BIOLOGY If you think that you qualify, bring this to the attention of a biology faculty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunawardena, Arunika

    ATTENTION BIOLOGY/MARINE BIOLOGY STUDENTS: If you think that you qualify, bring this to the attention of a biology faculty member and seek their nomination. The Gary Hicks Memorial Award The Gary in the Biology Department at Dalhousie University for 27 years where he taught developmental and plant biology

  14. Biology/Marine Biology Prizes/Awards/Scholarships 2008/09 University Medal in Biology Alyssa Byers-Heinlein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunawardena, Arunika

    Biology/Marine Biology Prizes/Awards/Scholarships 2008/09 University Medal in Biology Alyssa Byers-Heinlein University Medal in Marine Biology Matthew Morris Avery Prize Jessica Arbour Hugh P. Bell Scholarships, Elisabeth Oakham Vemco Scholarship in Marine Biology Matthew Morris #12;

  15. Biology/Marine Biology Prizes/Awards/Scholarships 2009/10 University Medal in Biology Jinnie Kim

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunawardena, Arunika

    Biology/Marine Biology Prizes/Awards/Scholarships 2009/10 University Medal in Biology Jinnie Kim University Medal in Marine Biology Jesse Kelly University Silver Medal Jinnie Kim Hugh P. Bell Scholarships Vemco Scholarship in Marine Biology Jessie Short #12;

  16. Journal of Theoretical Biology ] (

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keener, James P.

    control of flagellar hooks of Salmonella typhimurium J.P. Keenerà Department of Mathematics, University for the growth and length regulation of the hook component of the flagellar motor of Salmonella typhimurium. Introduction The flagellar motor of Salmonella typhimurium is morphologically divided into three primary parts

  17. Biological Engineering integrates life sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    of biological systems. Biological Engineering impacts the well-being of humans, plants, and animals through and global challenges such as ensuring safe and sustainable food and energy supplies, protecting natural agencies. Products of their efforts help ensure a safe and adequate supply of food and water, create new

  18. Research Councils UK Synthetic biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowther, Paul

    Research Councils UK Synthetic biology #12;Synthetic biology Research funded by the Research a variety of approaches to support innovation and deliver impact from research, including the development of collaborative research programmes, investment in major research capabilities, such as national research

  19. Cheatgrass Biology, Ecology, and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Cheatgrass Biology, Ecology, and Management Fabián Menalled menalled@montana.edu 406-994-4783 Montana State #12;http://ipm.montana.edu/cropweeds #12;#12;· Biology and identification of brome species secalinus Not found in MT #12;Cheatgrass Japanese brome #12;Pictures from Interactive Encyclopedia of North

  20. Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 12, 27562766, September 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Janet M.

    Sequence of the Dnm1p GTPase Regulates Self-Assembly and Controls a Rate-limiting Step in Mitochondrial assembles to form rings or collars that surround mitochondrial tubules. Based on previous findings, a K705AMolecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 12, 2756­2766, September 2001 The GTPase Effector Domain

  1. Computational Molecular Biology of Genome Expression and Regulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Computational Molecular Biology of Genome Expression and Regulation Michael Q. Zhang, Ph.D. Cold in genome expression and regulation network in which better modern statistical and machine learning referring to the cellular processes that lead to pro- tein production, is controlled and regulated

  2. BIOLOGICAL CONTROLWEEDS Arthropod Predators of Galerucella calmariensis L.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landis, Doug

    ,LythrumsalicariaL.Itiswellknownthatexistingnaturalenemy communities can reduce herbivore establishment and limit their impacts as weed biocontrol agents. Although´s 1999) biocontrol agent performance can be limited by pre- viously introduced or native natural enemies and success of some weed biological control agents, although em- pirical evidence is more limited (Goeden

  3. Arts & Sciences Biology, B.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    6/7/13 Arts & Sciences Biology, B.A. Broad Learning Goals A. Understand basic biological principles, and appreciate the breadth of modern biology. B. Understand and apply the scientific principle to conceptual or experimental problems in biology. C. Present biological data, and interpretations of the data, in written

  4. Loop Quantum Theory Applied to Biology and Nonlinear Whole Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi-Fang Chang

    2008-01-02

    The loop quantum theory, which constitutes a very small discontinuous space, as new method is applied to biology. The model of protein folding and lungs is proposed. In the model, some known results are used, and four approximate conclusions are obtained: their structures are quantized, their space regions are finite, various singularities correspond to folding and crossed points, and different types of catastrophe exist. Further, based on the inseparability and correlativity of the biological systems, the nonlinear whole biology is proposed, and four basic hypotheses are formed. It may unify reductionism and holism, structuralism and functionalism. Finally, the medical meaning of the theory is discussed briefly.

  5. Engineering of metabolic control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liao, James C.

    2004-03-16

    The invention features a method of producing heterologous molecules in cells under the regulatory control of a metabolite and metabolic flux. The method can enhance the synthesis of heterologous polypeptides and metabolites.

  6. Engineering of metabolic control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liao, James C.

    2006-10-17

    The invention features a method of producing heterologous molecules in cells under the regulatory control of a metabolite and metabolic flux. The method can enhance the synthesis of heterologous polypeptides and metabolites.

  7. Comparative Microbial Genomics group CenterforBiologicalSequenceanalysisDepartmentofSystemsBiology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ussery, David W.

    Comparative Microbial Genomics group CenterforBiologicalSequenceanalysisDepartmentofSystemsBiology Visualisation of Large Amounts of Data Dave Ussery 27 February, 2008 #12;Comparative Microbial Genomics group CenterforBiologicalSequenceanalysisDepartmentofSystemsBiology #12;Comparative Microbial Genomics group

  8. Method for biological purification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lucido, John A. (Mt. Sinai, NY); Keenan, Daniel (Rockville Centre, NY); Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY); Lin, Mow S. (Rocky Point, NY); Shelenkova, Ludmila (Yaphank, NY)

    2001-03-27

    An apparatus is disclosed for containing a microorganism culture in an active exponential growth and delivering a supply of microorganisms to an environment containing wastes for bio-augmenting the biodegradation of the wastes. The apparatus comprises a bioreactor and an operably connected controller. The bioreactor has a bioreactor chamber for containing a supply of microorganisms, a second chamber for containing a supply of water and inorganic nutrients, and a third chamber for containing a supply of organic nutrients. The bioreactor is operably connected to the controller in which a first pump is operably connected in fluid communication between the bioreactor chamber and the second chamber and third chamber, and a second pump is operably connected in fluid communication between the bioreactor chamber and the environment containing wastes to be biodegraded. The controller further includes a timer and regulator operably connected to the first and second pumps to effectively maintain the microorganisms in exponential growth in the bioreactor chamber and to deliver microorganisms to an environment to be treated. Also, disclosed is a method for bio-augmenting the biodegradation of wastes.

  9. Rank 1995-96 1996-97 1997-98 1998-99 1999-00 2000-01 2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 1 Biological Sciences Biological Sciences Biological Sciences Biological Sciences Biological Sciences Biological Sciences Biological Sciences Biological Sciences Biological Scien

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ullrich, Paul

    Engineering Sociology 3 Sociology 3 Animal Science Animal Science Biochemistry Animal Science Biochem Biological Sciences Biological Sciences Biological Sciences 2 Biochemistry Biochemistry Biochemistry Economics 4 Political Science 2 Political Science 2 Human Development Biochemistry Biochemistry Political

  10. The new biology: beyond the Modern Synthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R; Oakley, Todd H

    2007-01-01

    The Evolution of Biology. New York: Oxford University Press;2003. Woese CR: A new biology for a new century. Microbiol1961, 5:. Comfort A: The biology of senescence. 3rd edition.

  11. Monte Carlo simulation in systems biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schellenberger, Jan

    2010-01-01

    2 The history of Monte Carlo Sampling in Systems Biology 1.1simulation tools: the systems biology workbench and biospiceCellular and Molecular Biology. ASM Press, Washington

  12. Engineering supported membranes for cell biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Cheng-han; Groves, Jay T.

    2010-01-01

    membranes in structural biology. J Struct Biol 168:1–2 50.supported membranes for cell biology Cheng-han Yu • Jay T.range problems in cell biology. Because lateral mobility of

  13. Noah A. Rosenberg Department of Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenberg, Noah

    Noah A. Rosenberg Department of Biology Stanford University Stanford, CA 94305-5020 USA (650) 721 appointments 2011- Associate Professor, Department of Biology, Stanford University 2009-2011 Associate Professor, Departments of Human Genetics, Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, and Biostatistics, University

  14. THE BUREAU OF COMMERCIAL FISHERIES BIOLOGICAL LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE BUREAU OF COMMERCIAL FISHERIES BIOLOGICAL LABORATORY OXFORD, MARYLAND: PROGRAMS OF COMMERCIAL FISHERIES BIOLOGICAL LABORATORY OXFORD, MARYLAND: PROGRAMS AND PERSPECTIVES Circular 200 Washington, D.C. October 1964 #12;Cover Photo: The Bureau of Commercial Fisheries Biological Laboratory

  15. World Malaria Day at UC Davis: Current research in vector biology and genetics at UC Davis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    World Malaria Day at UC Davis: Current research in vector biology and genetics at UC Davis When-borne diseases in the world. Worldwide programs continue to rely on control programs based on the most recent

  16. Introduction to Stem Cell Biology in Vitro Threshold to the Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zandstra, Peter W.

    1 Introduction to Stem Cell Biology in Vitro Threshold to the Future C. EAVES,a,d C. MILLER,a E- ture delineation of mechanisms that control the normal behavior, pathology and future clinical

  17. Computational Proteomics: High-throughput Analysis for Systems Biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cannon, William R.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.

    2007-01-03

    High-throughput (HTP) proteomics is a rapidly developing field that offers the global profiling of proteins from a biological system. The HTP technological advances are fueling a revolution in biology, enabling analyses at the scales of entire systems (e.g., whole cells, tumors, or environmental communities). However, simply identifying the proteins in a cell is insufficient for understanding the underlying complexity and operating mechanisms of the overall system. Systems level investigations are relying more and more on computational analyses, especially in the field of proteomics generating large-scale global data.

  18. Developing Biological Specifications for Fish Friendly Turbines...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Developing Biological Specifications for Fish Friendly Turbines Developing Biological Specifications for Fish Friendly Turbines This factsheet explains studies conducted in a...

  19. The sequestration efficiency of the biological pump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeVries, Tim; Primeau, Francois; Deutsch, Curtis

    2012-01-01

    Preformed phosphate, soft tissue pump and atmospheric CO 2 ,efficiency of the biological pump Tim DeVries, 1 Francoisproduces a “biological pump” that reduces the concentration

  20. Computational biology and high performance computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoichet, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Biology and High Performance Computing Manfred Zorn, TeresaBiology and High Performance Computing Presenters: Manfred99-Portland High performance computing has become one of the

  1. Chemistry & Biology Deciphering the Late Biosynthetic Steps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Huimin

    Chemistry & Biology Article Deciphering the Late Biosynthetic Steps of Antimalarial Compound FR Engineering 2Institute for Genomic Biology 3Department of Microbiology 4Department of Chemistry 5Departments

  2. Renewable Hydrogen Production from Biological Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Hydrogen Production from Biological Systems Matthew Posewitz Colorado School of Mines DOE Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop September 24 th , 2013 H 2 production PSIIPSI...

  3. DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY Hurricane Savitz Hits Florida

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, John J.

    DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY Hurricane Savitz Hits Florida (Photo Credit: Michael Masellis, Biology Major Hurricane Savitz Hits Florida Future Science Teachers' Club Recent Grant Successes Forthcoming Publications

  4. Architecture & Civil Engineering Biology & Biochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Geoffrey R.

    Department Architecture & Civil Engineering Biology & Biochemistry Chemical Engineering Chemistry Computer Science Economics Education Electronic & Electrical Engineering Department Health Management Mathematical Sciences Mechanical Engineering Natural Sciences (please go to the Info Fair ­ no staff in office

  5. BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING Program of Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Andrew

    The Master of Science in Biological Engineering prepares students to conduct research involving Professor. Conformation of interfacial species, surface spectroscopies/microscopies, binary polymer Sciences. Composites, coating layer mechanical properties. Barbara J. W. Cole, Ph.D. (Washington, 1986

  6. Synthesizing Law for Synthetic Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torrance, Andrew W.

    2010-01-01

    , metabolic pathways, cells, viruses, and whole organisms rapidly, inexpensively, and easily. Already, a number of institutions have helped synthetic biology achieve considerable success, both in terms of science and public awareness. The BioBricks Foundation...

  7. Preparing for Transfer Biological Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Preparing for Transfer Majors: Biological Engineering Chemical Engineering Civil Engineering Computer Science Electrical & Computer Engineering Engineering Physics Environmental Engineering Information Science, Systems, & Technology Materials Science & Engineering Mechanical Engineering Operations

  8. Preparing for Transfer Biological Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Preparing for Transfer Majors: Biological Engineering Biomedical Engineering* Chemical Engineering Civil Engineering Computer Science Electrical & Computer Engineering Engineering Physics Environmental Engineering Information Science, Systems, & Technology Materials Science & Engineering Mechanical Engineering

  9. Modular design of biological systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norville, Julie Erin, 1980-

    2012-01-01

    The focus of my research is the development of technology for building compound biological systems from simpler pieces. I designed BioScaffold parts, a family of variable regions that can be inserted into a DNA sequence ...

  10. ADVANCEMENT COUNCIL Department of Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chalcraft, David R.

    Institute Mark Philips, B.S. North Carolina Biotechnology Center Francis J. Reilly, Jr. Ph.D. Logistics Management Institute Bobby J. Ward, Ph. D. Retired, CP&L Biologues A Newsletter of the Department of Biology

  11. Synthetic biology and crop engineering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 2: Frontiers and Horizons Session 2-A: Synthetic Biology and the Promise of Biofuels Jonathan Burbaum, Program Director, Department of Energy, Office of Science, ARPA–E

  12. Moving Mass Control for Underwater Vehicles C. A. Woolsey1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, Naomi

    into stabil- ity and control design. For example, Abzug mod- eled fuel sloshing in an aircraft, and they are impervious to corrosion and biological fouling [14]. An intriguing application for moving mass control

  13. Using Parasitoids to Control House Flies in Confined Animal Facilities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-11-30

    House flies are a common problem in confined animal facilities. One way to control them biologically is with parasitoid wasps. This publication explains how to use these wasps for fly control....

  14. Scaling Reinforcement Learning Paradigms for Motor Control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vijayakumar, Sethu; Peters, Jan; Schaal, Stefan

    Reinforcement learning offers a general framework to explain reward related learning in artificial and biological motor control. However, current reinforcement learning methods rarely scale to high dimensional movement systems ...

  15. Use of Institutional Controls

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-04-09

    The Policy ensures that the Department of Energy will use institutional controls in the management of resources, facilities and properties under its control, and in implementing its programmatic responsibilities. Certified 1-28-11. Superseded by Chg 1 (Admin Chg), dated 12-7-15.

  16. Use of Institutional Controls

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-04-09

    The Policy ensures that the Department of Energy will use institutional controls in the management of resources, facilities and properties under its control, and in implementing its programmatic responsibilities. Certified 1-28-11. Supersedes DOE P 454.1, dated 4-9-03.

  17. The Science Institutes at Yale's West Campus Chemical Biology Cancer Biology Energy Sciences Microbial Diversity Nanobiology Systems Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Science Institutes at Yale's West Campus Chemical Biology Cancer Biology Energy Sciences Microbial Diversity Nanobiology Systems Biology The Chemical Biology Institute at Yale's West Campus #12 and molecular assem- blies, large and small, to address challenging problems in health, energy

  18. Decentralised Compliant Control for Hexapod Robots: A Stick Insect Based Walking Model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosano-Matchain, Hugo Leonardo

    2007-01-01

    This thesis aims to transfer knowledge from insect biology into a hexapod walking robot. The similarity of the robot model to the biological target allows the testing of hypotheses regarding control and behavioural ...

  19. Petri net modelling of biological Claudine Chaouiya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breitling, Rainer

    Petri net modelling of biological networks Claudine Chaouiya Submitted: 31st March 2007; Received into the functioning of complex biological networks. In this context, Petri nets (PNs) have recently emerged of the computational systems biology. Keywords: dynamical modelling; Petri nets; biological networks INTRODUCTION

  20. MASTER OF SCIENCE STUDIES IN BIOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Don

    Ver. 1.15 MASTER OF SCIENCE STUDIES IN BIOLOGY GUIDE FOR APPLICANTS, GRADUATE STUDENTS AND GRADUATE Biology and Ecology Physiology and Cellular/Molecular Biology Research Tools COURSE LOADS AND RECOMMENDED.......................................................................................................................................12 Change of Thesis Advisor Registration for Biological Research Thesis Proposal Registration

  1. Supplemental Graduate Application DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamburger, Peter

    Supplemental Graduate Application DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY INDIANA UNIVERSITY-PURDUE UNIVERSITY FORT: ______________________ To assist with processing your application please fill out and submit this form to biology For questions, please refer to the Biology Graduate Programs Handbook or contact the Biology Graduate Program

  2. Biology Advising Office Building 44, Room 135

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clayton, Dale H.

    Biology Advising Office Building 44, Room 135 Mailing Address: Biology Advising Office, University of Utah, 257 South 1400 East, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112-0840 http://www.biology.utah.edu/undergraduate/advising.php Email: advising@biology.utah.edu Phone: (801) 581-6244 Fax: (801) 581-8571 Denise M. Brenis, Director

  3. Plant & Microbial Biology Spring 2012 Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildermuth, Mary C

    Lovley Department of Microbial Biology | University of Massachusetts, Amherst "Artificial Photosynthesis

  4. Acceptance Criteria Framework for Autonomous Biological Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dzenitis, J M

    2006-12-12

    The purpose of this study was to examine a set of user acceptance criteria for autonomous biological detection systems for application in high-traffic, public facilities. The test case for the acceptance criteria was the Autonomous Pathogen Detection System (APDS) operating in high-traffic facilities in New York City (NYC). However, the acceptance criteria were designed to be generally applicable to other biological detection systems in other locations. For such detection systems, ''users'' will include local authorities (e.g., facility operators, public health officials, and law enforcement personnel) and national authorities [including personnel from the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the BioWatch Program, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)]. The panel members brought expertise from a broad range of backgrounds to complete this picture. The goals of this document are: (1) To serve as informal guidance for users in considering the benefits and costs of these systems. (2) To serve as informal guidance for developers in understanding the needs of users. In follow-up work, this framework will be used to systematically document the APDS for appropriateness and readiness for use in NYC.

  5. Citrus growers vary in their adoption of biological control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grogan, Kelly A; Goodhue, Rachael E

    2012-01-01

    were their primary source of information, but 65.6% to 82.2%eth- nicity and primary information sources also in?uenced0.00 0.01 Primary information source (comparison base: pest

  6. Citrus growers vary in their adoption of biological control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grogan, Kelly A; Goodhue, Rachael E

    2012-01-01

    were their primary source of information, but 65.6% to 82.2%0.00 0.01 Primary information source (comparison base: pesteth- nicity and primary information sources also in?uenced

  7. Invited Invaders: Beetles used successfully in biological control of saltcedar 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2011-01-01

    , and a?er three to four years of repeated defoliation, the trees begin to die. In April ????, DeLoach and Dr. Allen Knutson, Texas AgriLife Extension Service entomologist at the Texas AgriLife Research and Extension Center at Dallas, released... from a ?eld cage along the Pecos in the summer of ????,? Muegge said, ?and the beetles now cover an area from Mentone down to near Barstow, and they have defoliated probably ?? to ?? river miles of saltcedar.? A?er four years, Muegge said...

  8. Invited Invaders: Beetles used sucessfully in biological control of saltcedar 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2011-01-01

    , and a?er three to four years of repeated defoliation, the trees begin to die. In April ????, DeLoach and Dr. Allen Knutson, Texas AgriLife Extension Service entomologist at the Texas AgriLife Research and Extension Center at Dallas, released... from a ?eld cage along the Pecos in the summer of ????,? Muegge said, ?and the beetles now cover an area from Mentone down to near Barstow, and they have defoliated probably ?? to ?? river miles of saltcedar.? A?er four years, Muegge said...

  9. Biology and chemical control of the spotted alfalfa aphid 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Downing, Douglas Holland

    1959-01-01

    Iy fxILAS R. . 1009% E. , 4 4, %ecto ', Cika4ttwk ee ehe Caadaate:!eho'o1 og kyrioelt~al?amoI. Noehagaal Collemo ef ~ 4a yaieial telftUjooat:et::ihe geiyat~eo Coo ~ deja''-et , . Of IC Qglt "I P Jaaoaof, , LWA 8, 1 I, h' . I '~ h I I... ther 1 . wyetted a~a~a aphid inl the 5gyii4 stataw. 'otww . 4$twe mm)ow&4;. , :, :, -, ':: inj. . . H~ tgygico deci~ Faba%mFg. 1954d %% ayhid nay a , ' oni4y. i4antiCia4: aa. th? 'tyalloa jalousie aybid, ", ' Xn CaNfocoia , :" -: ' diu'ides Hays...

  10. MIRO: MIDDLEWARE FOR CONTROLLING BIOLOGICALLY INSPIRED MOBILE ROBOTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weitzenfeld, Alfredo

    . These animals react both to fixed and mobile objects. Within the fixed group we find, for example, a water@itam.mx Abstract The study of animal behavior has inspired many robotic designs. In general, there are two ways. The goal within this architecture is to reduce robot complexity, size, cost and energy consumption

  11. BIOLOGICAL AND MICROBIAL CONTROL Host Range Testing of Diaphorencyrtus aligarhensis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoddle, Mark S.

    ,000 jobs (Richards et al. 2014). Many of California's commercial citrus orchards are in close proximity to urban areas, which can serve as reservoirs from which D. citri can migrate into produc- tion areas

  12. Hydrologic Flow Controls on Biologic Iron(III) Reduction in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgos, William

    for energy that likely increased cell synthesis, and decreased the concentration of sorbed Fe(II) that) in a goethite-coated sand was bioreduced by the DMRB Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 in a flow-through column

  13. Chemistry & Biology ATP-Independent Control of Autotransporter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Patricia L.

    infections lead to diverse human diseases, including bacterial meningitis, dysentery, whooping cough, peptic

  14. Vol. 90, No. 6, 2000 657 Biological Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Robert M.

    : inoculants, plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria. A major challenge in the development of biocontrol agents be considerable. In several studies, treatment with biocontrol agents was associated with substantial numerical, and deploying biocontrol agents. Boland (2) proposed that variation in environmental conditions within

  15. Biological Control Characterization of South African Cryphonectria cubensis Isolates Infected

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ), and a reduction in oxalate accumulation (18,22). For hypoviruses to serve optimaJly as biocontrol agents they have. Phytopathology 91 :628-632. Cryphonectria cubensis is the causal agent of a serious canker disease of Eucalyp

  16. BIOLOGICAL CONTROL Laboratory Evaluations of Four Entomopathogenic Nematodes for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Changlu

    States, and cause tremendous amounts of damage to buildings and loss to homeown- ers (Beal et al. 1994, compatible with many pesticides, and Þnding their hosts either actively or passively (Smart 1995). Termites

  17. Microfluidic Tools for Biological Sample Preparation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Visuri, S R; Ness, K; Dzenitis, J; Benett, B; Bettencourt, K; Hamilton, J; Fisher, K; Krulevitch, P

    2002-04-10

    Researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are developing means to collect and identify fluid-based biological pathogens in the forms of proteins, viruses, and bacteria. To support detection instruments, we are developing a flexible fluidic sample preparation unit. The overall goal of this Microfluidic Module is to input a fluid sample, containing background particulates and potentially target compounds, and deliver a processed sample for detection. We are developing techniques for sample purification, mixing, and filtration that would be useful to many applications including immunologic and nucleic acid assays. Sample preparation functions are accomplished with acoustic radiation pressure, dielectrophoresis, and solid phase extraction. We are integrating these technologies into packaged systems with pumps and valves to control fluid flow and investigating small-scale detection methods.

  18. Biology and Medicine Division annual report, 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-04-01

    This book briefly describes the activities of the Biology and Medicine Division of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. During the past year the Donner Pavilion program on the treatment of arteriovenous malformations in the brain has chalked up very significant successes. The disease control rate has been high and objective measures of success using cerebral angiography have been established. The new high resolution positron emitting tomographic imager has been demonstrated to operate successfully. In the Radiation Biophysics program, the availability of higher mass ions up to uranium has allowed us cell and tissue studies in a radiation domain that is entirely new. Using uranium beams, investigators have already made new and exciting findings that are described in the body of the report.

  19. Elliott J Blumenthal-Biology Lead Advisor and Associate Chair-Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamburger, Peter

    Elliott J Blumenthal- Biology Lead Advisor and Associate Chair- Biology Frank V Paladino- Chair, Department of Biology #12;Objectives for Orientation today To give a description of the Biology Program To give an overview of the various "CONCENTRATIONS" that are available for majors in Biology To describe

  20. Biology BS, Environmental Biology Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Biology BS, Environmental Biology Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course Number and Title Credits 170 4 DLN BIOL 191 General Biology I 4 DLN CHEM 111, 111L General Chemistry I with Lab 4 DLV Visual Sciences course in a second field 3 BIOL 192 General Biology II 4 BIOL 301 Cell Biology 3 CID BIOL 323

  1. 6/06/09 BA in General Biology Bachelor of Arts in General Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    6/06/09 BA in General Biology Bachelor of Arts in General Biology Department of Biology College of Science and Engineering Undergraduate Programs Students majoring in the General Biology degree program are required to complete 57 units in the major. In addition to the biological science courses, it includes

  2. Biology BS, Human Biology Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Biology BS, Human Biology Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course Number and Title Credits 170 4 DLN BIOL 191 General Biology I 4 DLN CHEM 111, 111L General Chemistry I with Lab 4 DLV Visual Sciences course in a second field 3 BIOL 192 General Biology II 4 BIOL 301 Cell Biology 3 CID BIOL 323

  3. Controlling Across Complex Networks Emerging links between networks and control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    & Computer Engineering Department MSC01 1100 1 University of New Mexico Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001 USA as biology, computer science, physics, and social science. Networks thus provide the means to understand, by considering the impact of link capacity, latency, and packet loss on control systems [2, 1

  4. Regulation of flexible arms under gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Luca, A.; Siciliano, B.

    1993-08-01

    A simple controller is presented for the regulation problem of robot arms with flexible links under gravity. It consists of a joint PD feedback plus a constant feedforward. Global asymptotic stability of the reference equilibrium state is shown under a structural assumption about link elasticity and a mild condition on the proportional gain. The result holds also in the absence of internal damping of the flexible arm. A numerical case study is presented.

  5. PACKAGE (Plasma Analysis, Chemical Kinetics and Generator Efficiency): a computer program for the calculation of partial chemical equilibrium/partial chemical rate controlled composition of multiphased mixtures under one dimensional steady flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yousefian, V.; Weinberg, M.H.; Haimes, R.

    1980-02-01

    The NASA CEC Code was the starting point for PACKAGE, whose function is to evaluate the composition of a multiphase combustion product mixture under the following chemical conditions: (1) total equilibrium with pure condensed species; (2) total equilibrium with ideal liquid solution; (3) partial equilibrium/partial finite rate chemistry; and (4) fully finite rate chemistry. The last three conditions were developed to treat the evolution of complex mixtures such as coal combustion products. The thermodynamic variable pairs considered are either pressure (P) and enthalpy, P and entropy, at P and temperature. Minimization of Gibbs free energy is used. This report gives detailed discussions of formulation and input/output information used in the code. Sample problems are given. The code development, description, and current programming constraints are discussed. (DLC)

  6. Method of controlling gene expression

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peters, Norman K. (Berkeley, CA); Frost, John W. (Menlo Park, CA); Long, Sharon R. (Palo Alto, CA)

    1991-12-03

    A method of controlling expression of a DNA segment under the control of a nod gene promoter which comprises administering to a host containing a nod gene promoter an amount sufficient to control expression of the DNA segment of a compound of the formula: ##STR1## in which each R is independently H or OH, is described.

  7. Boundary lubrication under water Wuge H. Briscoe1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Jacob

    LETTERS Boundary lubrication under water Wuge H. Briscoe1 , Simon Titmuss1 , Fredrik Tiberg1 {, Robert K. Thomas1 , Duncan J. McGillivray1 { & Jacob Klein1,2 Boundary lubrication, in which the rubbing. This process, wide- spread in engineering applications, is also predicted to occur in biological lubrication

  8. Chemical and Biological Engineering Department Code 1 Department of Chemical & Biological Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dandy, David

    Chemical and Biological Engineering Department Code 1 CODE of the Department of Chemical of Chemical & Biological Engineering. For clarity of presentation, some passages are copied directly from shall offer an undergraduate chemical and biological engineering program of technological, scientific

  9. WithCarbonSequestration Biological-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    342928Net energy ratio 2.603.303.60$/kg H2Total cost Central Hydrogen from Biomass via Gasification · Techno-Economic Analysis of H2 Production by Gasification of Biomass · Renewables Analysis · BiomassWithCarbonSequestration Biomass Hydro Wind Solar Coal Nuclear Natural Gas Oil Biological

  10. Biology 2250 Principles of Genetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Innes, David J.

    . David J. Innes B MendelianGenetics Tentative Lecture Dates and Topics Carr: Sept. 14 - 30 Structure1 Biology 2250 Principles of Genetics Instructors: Dr. Steven M. Carr B Molecular Genetics Dr and function of DNA and genes Innes: Oct. 7 ­ Nov. 12 Mendelian Genetics Carr: Nov. 18 ­ Dec. 2 Molecular

  11. Offered Fall Semester: Biological Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Offered Fall Semester: Biological Physics Physics 466 / Physics 566 (conjoint) provides a fundamental physical understanding of the operation of cells, biomolecules and molecular machines. MWF 4:10-5:00pm, Webster 11 (3 cr) Instructor: Fred Gittes, Clinical Professor of Physics and Astronomy: gittes

  12. DCC Case Study: Integrative Biology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donnelly, Martin; Boyd, Victoria; Spellman, Jill

    2008-04-03

    these illnesses. The main aim of the Integrative Biology (IB) project is to realise this potential by developing multi-scale models - spanning the range from genes to whole organs - and to provide data management features for its disparate users including...

  13. Poverty Grass Biology and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Poverty Grass Biology and Management Hilary Sandler, Katherine Ghantous, and Chelsea Hedderig UMass Cranberry Station, East Wareham, MA 02538 www.umass.edu/cranberry Background In the 1950's, Poverty grass identified as our "poverty grass" and has also been known as broom beardgrass. Little bluestem is often

  14. SYSTEMS BIOLOGY Accurate information transmission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsimring, Lev S.

    SYSTEMS BIOLOGY Accurate information transmission through dynamic biochemical signaling networks) and variability in cellular states (extrinsic noise) degrade information transmitted through signaling networks-induced information loss. In the extracellular signal­regulated kinase (ERK), calcium (Ca2+ ), and nuclear factor

  15. Biological Impacts of Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarty, John P.

    Biological Impacts of Climate Change John P McCarty, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, NE and reproduction depend on how well adapted individuals are to local climate patterns. Climate change can disrupt subsequent impacts on populations or species' distributions across geographic regions. Climate change may

  16. Advanced Topics in Computational Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lonardi, Stefano

    1 Advanced Topics in Computational Biology April 6, 2015 CS260 3D structure of genomes ... the next frontier in genomic is space #12;2 Genome (chromosome) 3D structure · Conformation of chromosomes in nuclei is critical to many cellular processes such as gene regulation, DNA replication, maintenance of genome

  17. Dream controller

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cheng, George Shu-Xing; Mulkey, Steven L; Wang, Qiang; Chow, Andrew J

    2013-11-26

    A method and apparatus for intelligently controlling continuous process variables. A Dream Controller comprises an Intelligent Engine mechanism and a number of Model-Free Adaptive (MFA) controllers, each of which is suitable to control a process with specific behaviors. The Intelligent Engine can automatically select the appropriate MFA controller and its parameters so that the Dream Controller can be easily used by people with limited control experience and those who do not have the time to commission, tune, and maintain automatic controllers.

  18. BioControl 47: 657666, 2002. 2002 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucas, Éric

    BioControl 47: 657­666, 2002. © 2002 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands present in the Mediterranean area, is an effective biological control agent of vegetable crop pests. kuehniella), raises the cost of production and limits their use as biological control agents. A meat

  19. Detection of Chemical/Biological Agents and Stimulants using Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harmon, S.H.; Hart, K.J.; Vass, A.A.; Wise, M.B.; Wolf, D.A.

    1999-06-14

    Detection of Chemical/Biological Agents and Simulants A new detector for chemical and biological agents is being developed for the U. S. Army under the Chemical and Biological Mass Spectrometer Block II program. The CBMS Block II is designed to optimize detection of both chemical and biological agents through the use of direct sampling inlets [I], a multi- ported sampling valve and a turbo- based vacuum system to support chemical ionization. Unit mass resolution using air as the buffer gas [2] has been obtained using this design. Software to control the instrument and to analyze the data generated from the instrument has also been newly developed. Detection of chemical agents can be accomplished. using the CBMS Block II design via one of two inlets - a l/ I 6'' stainless steel sample line -Chemical Warfare Air (CW Air) or a ground probe with enclosed capillary currently in use by the US Army - CW Ground. The Block II design is capable of both electron ionization and chemical ionization. Ethanol is being used as the Cl reagent based on a study indicating best performance for the Biological Warfare (BW) detection task (31). Data showing good signal to noise for 500 pg of methyl salicylate injected into the CW Air inlet, 50 ng of dimethylmethylphosphonate exposed to the CW Ground probe and 5 ng of methyl stearate analyzed using the pyrolyzer inlet were presented. Biological agents are sampled using a ''bio-concentrator'' unit that is designed to concentrate particles in the low micron range. Particles are collected in the bottom of a quartz pyrolyzer tube. An automated injector is being developed to deliver approximately 2 pL of a methylating reagent, tetramethylamonium- hydroxide to 'the collected particles. Pyrolysis occurs by rapid heating to ca. 55OOC. Biological agents are then characterized by their fatty acid methyl ester profiles and by other biomarkers. A library of ETOH- Cl/ pyrolysis MS data of microorganisms used for a recently published study [3] has been expanded with additional bacteria and fungi. These spectra were acquired on a Finnigan Magnum ion trap using helium buffer gas. A new database of Cl spectra of microorganisms is planned using the CBMS Block II instrument and air as the buffer gas. Using the current database, the fatty acid composition of the organisms was compared using the percentage of the ion current attributable to fatty acids. The data presented suggest promising rules for discrimination of these organisms. Strain, growth media and vegetative state do contribute to some of the distributions observed in the data. However, the data distributions observed in the current study only reflect our experience to date and do not fully represent the variability that might be expected in practice: Acquisition of MS/ MS spectra has begun (using He and air buffer gas) of the protonated molecular ion of a variety of fatty acids and for a number of ions nominally assigned as fatty acids from microorganisms. These spectra will be used to help verify fatty acid .

  20. Bridging gaps in synthetic biology oversight : iGEM as a testbed for proactive, adaptive risk management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNamara, Julie H. (Julie Hutton)

    2014-01-01

    On the surface, the emerging field of synthetic biology looks highly similar to that of genetic engineering. However, the two fields are based upon divergent underlying logic structures. Whereas genetic engineering affects ...

  1. The Science Institutes at Yale's West Campus Energy Sciences Cancer Biology Chemical Biology Microbial Diversity Nanobiology Systems Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Microbial Diversity Nanobiology Systems Biology The Energy Sciences Institute at Yale's West Campus #12The Science Institutes at Yale's West Campus Energy Sciences Cancer Biology Chemical Biology;#12;T he need for cheap, abundant energy is among the defining issues of our time. In the twentieth

  2. The Science Institutes at Yale's West Campus Nanobiology Cancer Biology Chemical Biology Energy Sciences Microbial Diversity Systems Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Science Institutes at Yale's West Campus Nanobiology Cancer Biology Chemical Biology Energy Sciences Microbial Diversity Systems Biology The Nanobiology Institute at Yale's West Campus #12;#12;I n energy. The potential for discovery is extraordinary. Yale scientists are exploring a new frontier within

  3. Computational Modelling in Systems and Synthetic Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romero-Campero, Francisco J.

    modules Networks Cells Colonies Systems Biology and Synthetic Biology #12;Stochasticity is important processes. Executable semantics. o Modularity in cellular systems, especially in gene regulatory networks been successfully applied. Monika Heiner, David Gilbert, Robin Donaldson. Petri Nets for Systems

  4. New Mexico State University Department of Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houde, Peter

    1 New Mexico State University Department of Biology Functions and Criteria for Faculty Evaluation of Biology, the College of Arts and Sciences, and New Mexico State University reward and retain faculty

  5. Authentic teaching and learning through synthetic biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuldell, Natalie

    Synthetic biology is an emerging engineering discipline that, if successful, will allow well-characterized biological components to be predictably and reliably built into robust organisms that achieve specific functions. ...

  6. Encyclopedia of Molecular Biology Thomas E. Creighton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oster, George

    Encyclopedia of Molecular Biology Thomas E. Creighton ISBN: 0-471-15302-8 ATP Synthase: Two rotary be divided into two operational regions denoted Encyclopedia of Molecular Biology, 4 Volume Set Thomas E

  7. Foundational platform for mammalian synthetic biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidsohn, Noah (Noah Justin)

    2013-01-01

    The emergent field of synthetic biology is different from many other biological engineering efforts, in that its roots, design principles, and forward engineering perspective have been adopted from electrical engineering ...

  8. Nanoindentation Under Dynamic Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wheeler, Jeffrey M

    2009-05-22

    and in analysis of the resulting data. Recent development has enabled investigation of materials under several dynamic conditions. The palladium-hydrogen system has a large miscibility gap, where the palladium lattice rapidly expands to form a hydrogen-rich ?...

  9. At the Biological Modeling and Simulation Frontier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    methods (Boolean networks, Petri nets (27), pi- calculi,C. Petri net modelling of biological networks. Brief

  10. Biology and the Foundation of Ethics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McShea, Daniel W.

    . Evolutionary ethics. Biology and Philosophy 1: 325-35. Van Ingen, J. 1994. Why Be Moral? New York: Peter Lang

  11. Module Identification for Biological Networks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yijie

    2015-08-12

    into the Deoxyri- bonucleic acid (DNA), which is a molecule that stores the genetic instructions used in all biological processes of all known living organisms. Human Genome Project (HGP) has achieved tremendous success in determining the DNA sequence and rec...- ognizing and mapping genes of the human genome based on both their physical and functional responsibilities. However, HGP collaborated all research pioneers around the world and still costed 13 years and $3 billions, which illustrates how difficult...

  12. Diffusion-controlled reactions modeling in Geant4-DNA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karamitros, M.; Luan, S.; Bernal, M.A.; Allison, J.; Baldacchino, G.; Davidkova, M.; Francis, Z.; Friedland, W.; Ivantchenko, V.; Ivantchenko, A.; Mantero, A.; Nieminem, P.; Santin, G.; Tran, H.N.; Stepan, V.; Incerti, S.

    2014-10-01

    Context Under irradiation, a biological system undergoes a cascade of chemical reactions that can lead to an alteration of its normal operation. There are different types of radiation and many competing reactions. As a result the kinetics of chemical species is extremely complex. The simulation becomes then a powerful tool which, by describing the basic principles of chemical reactions, can reveal the dynamics of the macroscopic system. To understand the dynamics of biological systems under radiation, since the 80s there have been on-going efforts carried out by several research groups to establish a mechanistic model that consists in describing all the physical, chemical and biological phenomena following the irradiation of single cells. This approach is generally divided into a succession of stages that follow each other in time: (1) the physical stage, where the ionizing particles interact directly with the biological material; (2) the physico-chemical stage, where the targeted molecules release their energy by dissociating, creating new chemical species; (3) the chemical stage, where the new chemical species interact with each other or with the biomolecules; (4) the biological stage, where the repairing mechanisms of the cell come into play. This article focuses on the modeling of the chemical stage. Method This article presents a general method of speeding-up chemical reaction simulations in fluids based on the Smoluchowski equation and Monte-Carlo methods, where all molecules are explicitly simulated and the solvent is treated as a continuum. The model describes diffusion-controlled reactions. This method has been implemented in Geant4-DNA. The keys to the new algorithm include: (1) the combination of a method to compute time steps dynamically with a Brownian bridge process to account for chemical reactions, which avoids costly fixed time step simulations; (2) a k–d tree data structure for quickly locating, for a given molecule, its closest reactants. The performance advantage is presented in terms of complexity, and the accuracy of the new algorithm is demonstrated by simulating radiation chemistry in the context of the Geant4-DNA project. Application The time-dependent radiolytic yields of the main chemical species formed after irradiation are computed for incident protons at different energies (from 50 MeV to 500 keV). Both the time-evolution and energy dependency of the yields are discussed. The evolution, at one microsecond, of the yields of hydroxyls and solvated electrons with respect to the linear energy transfer is compared to theoretical and experimental data. According to our results, at high linear energy transfer, modeling radiation chemistry in the trading compartment representation might be adopted.

  13. Autonomous observations of the ocean biological carbon pump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bishop, James K.B.

    2009-01-01

    efficiency of biological pump in the global ocean. JournalOcean Biological Carbon Pump Carbon Flux Explorerocean’s “biological carbon pump” (Broecker and Peng, 1982;

  14. Lex Genetica: The Law and Ethics of Programming Biological Code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burk, DL

    2015-01-01

    The law and ethics of programming biological code Dan L.biological artifacts. Such programming may include usagerelated to biological programming, the latter technology

  15. Systems biology of the cardiac hypoxia response in Drosophila

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feala, Jacob Daniel

    2008-01-01

    in Molecular Systems Biology , volume 3, article number 99,appear in Molecular Systems Biology. The dissertation authoret al. (2003) The systems biology markup language (SBML): a

  16. Booly : a new data integration platform for systems biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Do, Long Hoang

    2010-01-01

    for enabling conceptual biology. Bioinformatics 2005, 21for data integration in biology. Trends Biotechnol 1999, 17(the unification of biology. The Gene Ontology Consortium.

  17. Technoeconomic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen Production Technoeconomic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen Production Report documenting the biological and...

  18. Graduate Programs in Plant Biology and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildermuth, Mary C

    not re- biochemistry, cell and molecular biology (B22). pmb.berkeley.edu Plant&Microbial Biology #12;The to the environment will continue to fuel the expansion of plant research well into the future. The plant biology program focuses on contemporary ba- sic plant research, design of biotechnologies, and plant-microbe

  19. Evolution of biological complexity Christoph Adami*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ofria, Charles A.

    Evolution of biological complexity Christoph Adami* , Charles Ofria§ , and Travis C. Collier, Pasadena, CA 91125; and ¶Division of Organismic Biology, Ecology, and Evolution, University of California in the evolution of complexity in biological evolution, complexity needs to be both rigorously defined

  20. Chemical and Biological Engineering Summary of Actions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Chemical and Biological Engineering Summary of Actions 2014-2015 Concern Recommendation Action Follow-up 1. The department name is Chemical and Biological Engineering. An analysis of student Biological Engineering programs. 4. The second semester of the senior capstone sequence in Chemical

  1. REVIEW ARTICLE Profile likelihood in systems biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timmer, Jens

    REVIEW ARTICLE Profile likelihood in systems biology Clemens Kreutz1,2 , Andreas Raue1,3 , Daniel for Advanced Studies (FRIAS), University of Freiburg, Germany 3 Institute of Bioinformatics and Systems Biology of Freiburg, Germany 5 BIOSS Centre for Biological Signalling Studies, University of Freiburg, Germany

  2. Synthetic Biology for Therapeutic Applications Zhanar Abil,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Huimin

    Synthetic Biology for Therapeutic Applications Zhanar Abil, Xiong Xiong, and Huimin Zhao of Bioengineering, Department of Chemistry, Center for Biophysics and Computational Biology and Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 South Mathews Avenue, Urbana, Illinois

  3. Petra Anne Levin Department of Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petra Anne Levin Department of Biology Campus Box 1137 Washington University St. Louis, MO 63130 Fellow Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Biology Advisor: Dr. Alan Grossman 1996 Ph.D., Biology Harvard University, Cambridge, MA Dissertation: Asymmetric Division During Spore Formation

  4. A CONSTRAINED OBJECT APPROACH TO SYSTEMS BIOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krovi, Venkat

    A CONSTRAINED OBJECT APPROACH TO SYSTEMS BIOLOGY by Manu Pushpendran September 2006 A thesis towards Dr. Daniel Fischer for allowing me to audit his course on Computational Biology which helped me gain significant insights on many biological terms. Special thanks to Dr. Gokul Das from Roswell Park

  5. FACULTY EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravikumar, B.

    OF BIOLOGY Permanent Full-Time Position (Tenure-Track) Assistant Professor Starting mid-August 2014 REFER of Biology at Sonoma State University seeks applications from broadly trained biologists with teaching and research interests and expertise in molecular biology, for a tenure-track Assistant Professor position

  6. LifeMEETSscience Biochemistry, Molecular Biology & Biophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    LifeMEETSscience Biochemistry, Molecular Biology & Biophysics Science Meets Life. Minnesota with the guidance of internationally-renowned scientists in the Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Biophysics (BMBB that is a hallmark of the Twin Cities and Minnesota. The Biochemistry, Molecular Biology & Biophysics Graduate

  7. The Division of Biology & Biomedical Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gereau, Robert W. IV

    The Division of Biology & Biomedical Sciences what will YOU discover? #12;620students more than 470faculty 36departments 12programs and one YOU. DBBS Division of Biology and Biomedical Sciences Washington. The Division of Biology and Biomedical Sciences (DBBS) is ideally positioned to foster the interdisciplinary

  8. Biological and Synthetic Locomotion in Newtonian and Complex Fluids at Low Reynolds Number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pak, On Shun

    Fischer. Controlled propulsion of artificial magnetic nanos-of the magnetic field leads to propulsion in the oppositepredict the propulsion speed under different magnetic field

  9. Roadmap: Biology Organismal Biology Bachelor of Science [AS-BS-BSCI-ORBI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Biology ­ Organismal Biology ­ Bachelor of Science [AS-BS-BSCI-ORBI] College of Arts/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study for this major. However, courses General Elective 3 #12;Roadmap: Biology ­ Organismal Biology ­ Bachelor of Science [AS

  10. Symbolic Systems Biology: Theory and Methods, Jones and Bartlett Publishers 2010 On Statecharts for Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harel, David

    Symbolic Systems Biology: Theory and Methods, Jones and Bartlett Publishers 2010 On Statecharts for Biology Jasmin Fisher and David Harel Biology as Reactivity One of the central issues in software decade or so, we and others have carried out work on viewing biological systems as reactive systems

  11. REQUIREMENTS FOR MINOR IN FISHERY BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT OF FISH, WILDLIFE, AND CONSERVATION BIOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    REQUIREMENTS FOR MINOR IN FISHERY BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT OF FISH, WILDLIFE, AND CONSERVATION BIOLOGY for minor= 26 - 28 Aquatic and Fishery Electives for Fishery Biology Minor (Additional course work may 301/307, MATH 141/155/160) BZ 332 Phycology (F) FW 402 Fish Culture (S; FW 300) BZ 471 Stream Biology

  12. Biology BS, Molecular Cell Biology Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Biology BS, Molecular Cell Biology Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course Number and Title 160 or MATH 170 4 DLN BIOL 191 General Biology I 4 DLN CHEM 111, 111L General Chemistry I with Lab 4 in a first field 3 DLS Social Sciences course in a second field 3 BIOL 192 General Biology II 4 BIOL 301 Cell

  13. Approaches to Biology Teaching and Learning Cultural Competence in the College Biology Classroom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feature Approaches to Biology Teaching and Learning Cultural Competence in the College Biology Classroom Kimberly Tanner* and Deborah Allen *Department of Biology, San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA 94132; and Department of Biological Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716

  14. Approaches to Biology Teaching and Learning Making Biology Learning Relevant to Students: Integrating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feature Approaches to Biology Teaching and Learning Making Biology Learning Relevant to Students: Integrating People, History, and Context into College Biology Teaching Katayoun Chamany,*Deborah Allen College, The New School for Liberal Arts, New York, NY 10011; Department of Biological Sciences

  15. Molecular Biology The molecular biology major at Stetson University is designed for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miles, Will

    Molecular Biology The molecular biology major at Stetson University is designed for students interested in the interface between the life sciences and physical sciences. Molecular biology is an interdisciplinary science that uses the techniques of biology and chemistry to examine genetic inheritance

  16. A First Attempt to Bring Computational Biology into Advanced High School Biology Classrooms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Debra S.

    Education A First Attempt to Bring Computational Biology into Advanced High School Biology Department of Computer Science, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado, United States of America, 2Boulder of a computational ele- ment in secondary biology classrooms is of growing concern to the computational biology

  17. MSc Marine Biology Module description (A) MODULE A: FUNDAMENTALS OF MARINE BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    1 MSc Marine Biology ­ Module description (A) MODULE A: FUNDAMENTALS OF MARINE BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY (OBLIGATORY COURSES) A1. Principles of Marine Biology and Biological Oceanography (5 CP) A2. Principles of Marine Ecophysiology (5 CP) A3. Experimental Design and Data Analysis (5 CP) TIMING AND DURATION

  18. Stem cell biology is population biology: differentiation of hematopoietic multipotent progenitors to common lymphoid and myeloid progenitors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mangel, Marc; Bonsall, Michael B

    2013-01-01

    M: Hematopoietic Stem Cell Biology. New York: Humana Press;In Hematopoietic Stem Cell Biology. Edited by Kondo M. Newmodels in stem cell biology: replacement, quiescence, and

  19. Method of measurement in biological systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turteltaub, K.W.; Vogel, J.S.; Felton, J.S.; Gledhill, B.L.: Davis, J.C.; Stanker, L.H.

    1993-05-11

    A method is disclosed of quantifying molecules in biological substances, comprising: selecting a biological host in which radioisotopes are present in concentrations equal to or less than those in the ambient biosphere; preparing a long-lived radioisotope labeled reactive chemical specie; administering the chemical specie to the biological host in doses sufficiently low to avoid significant overt damage to the biological system; allowing a period of time to elapse sufficient for dissemination and interaction of the chemical specie with the host throughout the biological system of the host; isolating a reacted fraction of the biological substance from the host in a manner sufficient to avoid contamination of the substance from extraneous sources; converting the fraction of biological substance by suitable means to a material which efficiently produces charged ions in at least one of several possible ion sources without introduction of significant isotopic fractionation; and measuring the radioisotope concentration in the material by means of direct isotopic counting.

  20. Biology Division. Progress report, August 1, 1982-September 30, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    The Biology Division is the component of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory that investigates the potential adverse health effects of energy-related substances. The body of this report provides summaries of the aims, scope and progress of the research of groups of investigators in the Division during the period of August 1, 1982, through September 30, 1983. At the end of each summary is a list of publications covering the same period (published or accepted for publication). For convenience, the summaries are assembled under Sections in accordance with the current organizational structure of the Biology Division; each Section begins with an overview. It will be apparent, however, that currents run throughout the Division and that the various programs support and interact with each other.

  1. Biological Engineering Electives Biosystems Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    Control Theory (3) ECH 4323L Chemical Engineering Lab (1) ECH 4504 Chemical Kinetics & Reactor Design (4) ECH 4524 Heterogeneous Kinetics & Reactor Design (2) EGM 4313 Intermediate Engineering Analysis (4 Principles of Food Processing (4) FOS 4522C Seafood Technology (3) FOS 4722C Quality Control in Foods (3) FOS

  2. Optimization Under Generalized Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lodwick, Weldon

    11 Optimization Under Generalized Uncertainty Optimization Modeling Math 4794/5794: Spring 2013 Weldon A. Lodwick Weldon.Lodwick@ucdenver.edu 2/14/2013 Optimization Modeling - Spring 2013 #12 in the context of optimization problems. The theoretical frame-work for these notes is interval analysis. From

  3. UNDER REVIEW CONTACT ACCOUNTING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UNDER REVIEW CONTACT ACCOUNTING UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA BARBARA Accounting Office ALIEN@ucsbuxa.ucsb.edu. Last Modified By: HMW, 5/21/97 Page 1 of 25145 Payments to Aliens (Attachment B) 9/17/2007http to Aliens (Attachment B) 9/17/2007http://www.policy.ucsb.edu/vcas/accounting/5145_attach_b.html #12;

  4. Systems biology of Microbial Communities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Navid, A; Ghim, C; Fenley, A; Yoon, S; Lee, S; Almaas, E

    2008-04-11

    Microbes exist naturally in a wide range of environments, spanning the extremes of high acidity and high temperature to soil and the ocean, in communities where their interactions are significant. We present a practical discussion of three different approaches for modeling microbial communities: rate equations, individual-based modeling, and population dynamics. We illustrate the approaches with detailed examples. Each approach is best fit to different levels of system representation, and they have different needs for detailed biological input. Thus, this set of approaches is able to address the operation and function of microbial communities on a wide range of organizational levels.

  5. Semiconductor Nanocrystals for Biological Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, Aihua; Gu, Weiwei; Larabell, Carolyn; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2005-06-28

    Conventional organic fluorophores suffer from poor photo stability, narrow absorption spectra and broad emission feature. Semiconductor nanocrystals, on the other hand, are highly photo-stable with broad absorption spectra and narrow size-tunable emission spectra. Recent advances in the synthesis of these materials have resulted in bright, sensitive, extremely photo-stable and biocompatible semiconductor fluorophores. Commercial availability facilitates their application in a variety of unprecedented biological experiments, including multiplexed cellular imaging, long-term in vitro and in vivo labeling, deep tissue structure mapping and single particle investigation of dynamic cellular processes. Semiconductor nanocrystals are one of the first examples of nanotechnology enabling a new class of biomedical applications.

  6. Biological Safety | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p uBUSEnergy||slideshow explains theVersatileBiological

  7. Device Oriented Project Controller

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dalesio, Leo; Kraimer, Martin

    2013-11-20

    This proposal is directed at the issue of developing control systems for very large HEP projects. A de-facto standard in accelerator control is the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS), which has been applied successfully to many physics projects. EPICS is a channel based system that requires that each channel of each device be configured and controlled. In Phase I, the feasibility of a device oriented extension to the distributed channel database was demonstrated by prototyping a device aware version of an EPICS I/O controller that functions with the current version of the channel access communication protocol. Extensions have been made to the grammar to define the database. Only a multi-stage position controller with limit switches was developed in the demonstration, but the grammar should support a full range of functional record types. In phase II, a full set of record types will be developed to support all existing record types, a set of process control functions for closed loop control, and support for experimental beam line control. A tool to configure these records will be developed. A communication protocol will be developed or extensions will be made to Channel Access to support introspection of components of a device. Performance bench marks will be made on both communication protocol and the database. After these records and performance tests are under way, a second of the grammar will be undertaken.

  8. Rapid classification of biological components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Vicki S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Barrett, Karen B. (Meridian, ID); Key, Diane E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2010-03-23

    A method is disclosed for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an illustrative embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method involves attaching antigens of the surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein the locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to antigens in the array, thereby forming immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do not form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, thereby forming an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to a subject's identity.

  9. Rapid classification of biological components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Vicki S.; Barrett, Karen B.; Key, Diane E.

    2006-01-24

    A method is disclosed for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an illustrative embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, cocaine, methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method involves attaching antigens to the surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein the locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to antigens in the array, thereby forming immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, thereby forming an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  10. Rapid classification of biological components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Vicki S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Barrett, Karen B. (Meridian, ID); Key, Diane E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2010-03-23

    A method is disclosed for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an illustrative embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method involves attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein the locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to antigens in the array, thereby forming immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do not form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, thereby forming an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to a subject's identity.

  11. Quantum integrable systems. Quantitative methods in biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giovanni Feverati

    2011-01-19

    Quantum integrable systems have very strong mathematical properties that allow an exact description of their energetic spectrum. From the Bethe equations, I formulate the Baxter "T-Q" relation, that is the starting point of two complementary approaches based on nonlinear integral equations. The first one is known as thermodynamic Bethe ansatz, the second one as Kl\\"umper-Batchelor-Pearce-Destri- de Vega. I show the steps toward the derivation of the equations for some of the models concerned. I study the infrared and ultraviolet limits and discuss the numerical approach. Higher rank integrals of motion can be obtained, so gaining some control on the eigenvectors. After, I discuss the Hubbard model in relation to the N = 4 supersymmetric gauge theory. The Hubbard model describes hopping electrons on a lattice. In the second part, I present an evolutionary model based on Turing machines. The goal is to describe aspects of the real biological evolution, or Darwinism, by letting evolve populations of algorithms. Particularly, with this model one can study the mutual transformation of coding/non coding parts in a genome or the presence of an error threshold. The assembly of oligomeric proteins is an important phenomenon which interests the majority of proteins in a cell. I participated to the creation of the project "Gemini" which has for purpose the investigation of the structural data of the interfaces of such proteins. The objective is to differentiate the role of amino acids and determine the presence of patterns characterizing certain geometries.

  12. Engineering control of eukaryotic translation with application to the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldfless, Stephen J. (Stephen Jacob)

    2014-01-01

    Experimenter control of target gene expression is a fundamental component of molecular biology research. In many systems, tools exist that allow generalizable control of gene expression at the transcriptional or ...

  13. Method for photo-altering a biological system to improve biological effect

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hill, Richard A. (Irvine, CA); Doiron, Daniel R. (Santa Ynez, CA); Crean, David H. (Santa Barbara, CA)

    2000-08-01

    Photodynamic therapy is a new adjunctive therapy for filtration surgery that does not use chemotherapy agents or radiation, but uses pharmacologically-active sensitizing compounds to produce a titratable, localized, transient, post operative avascular conjunctiva. A photosensitizing agent in a biological system is selectively activated by delivering the photosensitive agent to the biological system and laser activating only a spatially selected portion of the delivered photosensitive agent. The activated portion of the photosensitive agent reacts with the biological system to obtain a predetermined biological effect. As a result, an improved spatial disposition and effectuation of the biological effect by the photosensitive agent in the biological system is achieved.

  14. Multiphase flow and control of fluid path in microsystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jhunjhunwala, Manish

    2005-01-01

    Miniaturized chemical-systems are expected to have advantages of handling, portability, cost, speed, reproducibility and safety. Control of fluid path in small channels between processes in a chemical/biological network ...

  15. Neuromechanics: an integrative approach for understanding motor control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Tom

    Neuromechanics: an integrative approach for understanding motor control Kiisa Nishikawa,1,Ã Andrew of Biology, University of North Carolina, Wilmington, NC 28409, USA Synopsis Neuromechanics seeks of neuromechanics include ameliorating human health problems (including prosthesis design and restoration

  16. Electrostatic thin film chemical and biological sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prelas, Mark A. (Columbia, MO); Ghosh, Tushar K. (Columbia, MO); Tompson, Jr., Robert V. (Columbia, MO); Viswanath, Dabir (Columbia, MO); Loyalka, Sudarshan K. (Columbia, MO)

    2010-01-19

    A chemical and biological agent sensor includes an electrostatic thin film supported by a substrate. The film includes an electrostatic charged surface to attract predetermined biological and chemical agents of interest. A charge collector associated with said electrostatic thin film collects charge associated with surface defects in the electrostatic film induced by the predetermined biological and chemical agents of interest. A preferred sensing system includes a charge based deep level transient spectroscopy system to read out charges from the film and match responses to data sets regarding the agents of interest. A method for sensing biological and chemical agents includes providing a thin sensing film having a predetermined electrostatic charge. The film is exposed to an environment suspected of containing the biological and chemical agents. Quantum surface effects on the film are measured. Biological and/or chemical agents can be detected, identified and quantified based on the measured quantum surface effects.

  17. On Biology as an Emergent Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Pierre Noyes

    2007-05-31

    Biology is considered here as an "emergent science" in the sense of Anderson and of Laughlin and Pines. It is demonstrated that a straightforward mathematical definition of "biological system" is useful in showing how biology differs in structure from the lower levels in Anderson's "More is Different" hierarchy. Using cells in a chemostat as a paradigmatic exemplar of a biological system, it is found that a coherent collection of metabolic pathways through a single cell in the chemostat also satisfies the proposed definition of a biological system. This provides a theoretical and mathematical underpinning for Young's fundamental model of biological organization and integration. Evidence for the therapeutic efficacy of Young's method of analysis is provided by preliminary results of clinical trials of a specific application of Young's model to the treatment of cancer cachexia.

  18. Voltage control for interconnected microgrids under adversarial actions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansson, Karl Henrik

    in renewable energy sources is growing worldwide. Most of these sources are small-scale inverter- based a local integration of renewable energy sources, which las led to the concept of microgrids (MGs) [1], [2. I. INTRODUCTION Motivated by environmental, economic and technological aspects, interests

  19. Performance of Networked Control Systems under Sporadic Feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lemmon, Michael

    Regenerative Braking power inverter storage Micro-Grid Renewable Generation PHEV Smart Grid - Distributed

  20. Assays under control with the programmable Pipetman Concept

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    ® takes advantage of a PC-to-pipette connection to outperform traditional motorized pipettes for manual-to-pipette connection for carrying out pipetting protocols. The process involves repetitive dispensing and serial dispensing function of the Pipetman Concept C1200, it is possible to dispense up to 12 aliquots of 100 µl

  1. Control of MTDC Transmission Systems under Local Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimarogonas, Dimos

    long- distance power transmission. One such example are large- scale off-shore wind farms, which often

  2. Bringing the Low NOx Diesel Under Control | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st Century Truck Programs. 2006deerpinson.pdf More Documents & Publications Diesel...

  3. Engineering Inspired from biological systems, nanotechnology (and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chemical Engineering Inspired from biological systems, nanotechnology (and more recently at Northeastern University in Boston. His research explores the use of nanotechnology in numerous applications

  4. 2013 Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop Summary Report ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    November 2013 summary report for the 2013 Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop. bioh2workshopfinalreport.pdf More Documents & Publications The Hydrogen Program at NREL: A...

  5. Carbonic Acid Shows Promise in Geology, Biology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Surprising Secrets of Carbonic Acid Probing the Surprising Secrets of Carbonic Acid Berkeley Lab Study Holds Implications for Geological and Biological Processes October 23,...

  6. School of Biological Sciences Student Handbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trudgett, Alan

    School of Biological Sciences Student Handbook 2014­2015 #12;Student Handbook 2014-2015 1 WELCOME............................................................................................41 #12;Student Handbook 2014-2015 2 Queen's University Library

  7. Jaagsiekte Sheep Retrovirus Biology and Oncogenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hofacre, Andrew; Fan, Hung

    2010-01-01

    J.C. Transformation and oncogenesis by jaagsiekte sheepRetrovirus Biology and Oncogenesis Andrew Hofacre and Hunginduced transformation or oncogenesis has been studied in a

  8. Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torquato, Salvatore

    Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering Undergraduate Handbook Academic Year 2014, pharmaceuticals, semiconductors, adhesives, biopolymers, artificial kidneys, oil refineries, solar panels

  9. Developing Biological Specifications for Fish Friendly Turbines

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Developing Biological Specifications for Fish Friendly Turbines The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Hydropower Turbine Sys- tem (AHTS) Program supports the research and...

  10. A Comprehensive Collection of Systems Biology Data Characterizing the Host Response to Viral Infection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aevermann, Brian; Pickett, Brett E.; Kumar, Sanjeev; Klem, Edward B.; Agnihothram, Sudhakar; Askovich, Peter S.; Bankhead, Armand; Bolles, Meagan; Carter, Victoria; Chang, Jean H.; Clauss, Therese RW; Dash, Pradyot; Diercks, Alan H.; Eisfeld, Amie J.; Ellis, Amy L.; Fan, Shufang; Ferris, Martin T.; Gralinski, Lisa; Green, Richard; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Hatta, Masato; Heegel, Robert A.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Jeng, Sophia; Josset, Laurence; Kaiser, Shari M.; Kelly, Sarah; Law, Gale L.; Li, Chengjun; Li, Jiangning; Long, Casey; Luna, Maria L.; Matzke, Melissa M.; McDermott, Jason E.; Menachery, Vineet; Metz, Thomas O.; Mitchell, Hugh D.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Navarro, Garnet; Neumann, Gabriele; Podyminogin, Rebecca L.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Rosenberger, Carrie; Sanders, Catherine J.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Sims, Amy; Sova, Pavel; Tam, Vincent C.; Tchitchek, Nicholas; Thomas, Paul G.; Tilton, Susan C.; Totura, Allison L.; Wang, Jing; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Wen, Ji; Weiss, Jeffrey M.; Yang, Feng; Yount, Boyd; Zhang, Qibin; Mcweeney, Shannon K.; Smith, Richard D.; Waters, Katrina M.; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Baric, Ralph; Aderem, Alan; Katze, Michael G.; Scheuermann, Richard H.

    2014-10-14

    The Systems Biology for Infectious Diseases Research program was established by the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases to investigate host-pathogen interactions at a systems level. This program generated 47 transcriptomic and proteomic datasets from 30 studies that investigate in vivo and in vitro host responses to viral infections. Human pathogens in the Orthomyxoviridae and Coronaviridae families, especially pandemic H1N1 and avian H5N1 influenza A viruses and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), were investigated. Study validation was demonstrated via experimental quality control measures and meta-analysis of independent experiments performed under similar conditions. Primary assay results are archived at the GEO and PeptideAtlas public repositories, while processed statistical results together with standardized metadata are publically available at the Influenza Research Database (www.fludb.org) and the Virus Pathogen Resource (www.viprbrc.org). By comparing data from mutant versus wild-type virus and host strains, RNA versus protein differential expression, and infection with genetically similar strains, these data can be used to further investigate genetic and physiological determinants of host responses to viral infection.

  11. A comprehensive collection of systems biology data characterizing the host response to viral infection

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aevermann, Brian D.; Pickett, Brett E.; Kumar, Sanjeev; Klem, Edward B.; Agnihothram, Sudhakar; Askovich, Peter S.; Bankhead, Armand; Bolles, Meagan; Carter, Victoria; Chang, Jean H.; et al

    2014-10-14

    The Systems Biology for Infectious Diseases Research program was established by the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases to investigate host-pathogen interactions at a systems level. This program generated 47 transcriptomic and proteomic datasets from 30 studies that investigate in vivo and in vitro host responses to viral infections. Human pathogens in the Orthomyxoviridae and Coronaviridae families, especially pandemic H1N1 and avian H5N1 influenza A viruses and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), were investigated. Study validation was demonstrated via experimental quality control measures and meta-analysis of independent experiments performed under similar conditions. Primary assay results are archivedmore »at the GEO and PeptideAtlas public repositories, while processed statistical results together with standardized metadata are publically available at the Influenza Research Database (www.fludb.org) and the Virus Pathogen Resource (www.viprbrc.org). As a result, by comparing data from mutant versus wild-type virus and host strains, RNA versus protein differential expression, and infection with genetically similar strains, these data can be used to further investigate genetic and physiological determinants of host responses to viral infection.« less

  12. A comprehensive collection of systems biology data characterizing the host response to viral infection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aevermann, Brian D.; Pickett, Brett E.; Kumar, Sanjeev; Klem, Edward B.; Agnihothram, Sudhakar; Askovich, Peter S.; Bankhead, Armand; Bolles, Meagan; Carter, Victoria; Chang, Jean H.; Clauss, Therese R. W.; Dash, Pradyot; Diercks, Alan H.; Eisfeld, Amie J.; Ellis, Amy L.; Fan, Shufang; Ferris, Martin T.; Gralinski, Lisa; Green, Richard; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Hatta, Masato; Heegel, Robert A.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Jeng, Sophia; Josset, Laurence; Kaiser, Shari M.; Kelly, Sarah; Law, Gale Lynn; Li, Chengjun; Li, Jiangning; Long, Casey; Luna, Maria L.; Matzke, Melissa M.; McDermott, Jason E.; Menachery, Vineet; Metz, Thomas O.; Mitchell, Hugh D.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Navarro, Garnet; Neumann, Gabriele; Podyminogin, Rebecca L.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Rosenberger, Carrie; Sanders, Catherine J.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Sims, Amy; Sova, Pavel; Tam, Vincent C.; Tchitchek, Nicholas; Thomas, Paul G.; Tilton, Susan C.; Totura, Allison L.; Wang, Jing; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Wen, Ji; Weiss, Jeffrey M.; Yang, Feng; Yount, Boyd; Zhang, Qibin; Mcweeney, Shannon K.; Smith, Richard D.; Waters, Katrina M.; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Baric, Ralph; Aderem, Alan; Katze, Michael G.; Scheuermann, Richard H.

    2014-10-14

    The Systems Biology for Infectious Diseases Research program was established by the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases to investigate host-pathogen interactions at a systems level. This program generated 47 transcriptomic and proteomic datasets from 30 studies that investigate in vivo and in vitro host responses to viral infections. Human pathogens in the Orthomyxoviridae and Coronaviridae families, especially pandemic H1N1 and avian H5N1 influenza A viruses and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), were investigated. Study validation was demonstrated via experimental quality control measures and meta-analysis of independent experiments performed under similar conditions. Primary assay results are archived at the GEO and PeptideAtlas public repositories, while processed statistical results together with standardized metadata are publically available at the Influenza Research Database (www.fludb.org) and the Virus Pathogen Resource (www.viprbrc.org). As a result, by comparing data from mutant versus wild-type virus and host strains, RNA versus protein differential expression, and infection with genetically similar strains, these data can be used to further investigate genetic and physiological determinants of host responses to viral infection.

  13. Construction and biological activities of the first infectious cDNA clones of the genus Foveavirus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meng, Baozhong; Venkataraman, Srividhya; Li, Caihong; Wang, Weizhou; Dayan-Glick, Cathy; Mawassi, Munir

    2013-01-20

    Grapevine rupestris stem pitting-associated virus (GRSPaV, genus Foveavirus, family Betaflexiviridae) is one of the most prevalent viruses in grapevines and is associated with three distinct diseases: rupestris stem pitting, vein necrosis and Syrah decline. Little is known about the biology and pathological properties of GRSPaV. In this work, we engineered a full-length infectious cDNA clone for GRSPaV and a GFP-tagged variant, both under the transcriptional control of Cauliflower mosaic virus 35 S promoter. We demonstrated that these cDNA clones were infectious in grapevines and Nicotiana benthamiana through fluorescence microscopy, RT-PCR, Western blotting and immuno electron microscopy. Interestingly, GRSPaV does not cause systemic infection in four of the most commonly used herbaceous plants, even in the presence of the movement proteins of two other viruses which are known to complement numerous movement-defective viruses. These infectious clones are the first of members of Foveavirus which would allow further investigations into mechanisms governing different aspects of replication for GRSPaV and perhaps related viruses.

  14. Continuum Electrostatics in Cell Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. John Gagliardi

    2010-02-06

    Recent experiments revealing possible nanoscale electrostatic interactions in force generation at kinetochores for chromosome motions have prompted speculation regarding possible models for interactions between positively charged molecules in kinetochores and negative charge on C-termini near the plus ends of microtubules. A clear picture of how kinetochores establish and maintain a dynamic coupling to microtubules for force generation during the complex motions of mitosis remains elusive. The current paradigm of molecular cell biology requires that specific molecules, or molecular geometries, for force generation be identified. However, it is possible to account for mitotic motions within a classical electrostatics approach in terms of experimentally known cellular electric charge interacting over nanometer distances. These charges are modeled as bound surface and volume continuum charge distributions. Electrostatic consequences of intracellular pH changes during mitosis may provide a master clock for the events of mitosis.

  15. Nonlinear Elasticity in Biological Gels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cornelis Storm; Jennifer J. Pastore; Fred C. MacKintosh; Tom C. Lubensky; Paul A. Janmey

    2004-06-01

    Unlike most synthetic materials, biological materials often stiffen as they are deformed. This nonlinear elastic response, critical for the physiological function of some tissues, has been documented since at least the 19th century, but the molecular structure and the design principles responsible for it are unknown. Current models for this response require geometrically complex ordered structures unique to each material. In this Article we show that a much simpler molecular theory accounts for strain stiffening in a wide range of molecularly distinct biopolymer gels formed from purified cytoskeletal and extracellular proteins. This theory shows that systems of semi-flexible chains such as filamentous proteins arranged in an open crosslinked meshwork invariably stiffen at low strains without the need for a specific architecture or multiple elements with different intrinsic stiffnesses.

  16. Chemical and Biological Engineering Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuel Cell Lab Fuel Cell Battery Lab Fluidization Lab Gas Processing Lab Interfacial Phenomena Lab Light's core areas of research competency: Energy and Sustainability Fuel Cells Fluidization and Gasification Polymer Reaction Engineering Lab Porous Media and Core Analysis Lab Process Control & Optimization Lab

  17. Quality Control and Captive Rearing Genetics of the Biological Control Agent Trichogramma pretiosum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez-Cabrera, Jaime

    2011-01-01

    pretiosum populations in Kauai, Hawaii consists entirely ofpretiosum found on Kauai, Hawaii. This population consistedwere collected in Kauai, Hawaii. From the parasitized eggs,

  18. Self-optimizing control: From key performance indicators to control of biological systems 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Introduction The national economy, the goverment, companies and businesses, consumers, chemical process plants cost function (performance index) ¥§¦ which is to be minimized with respect to the available degrees SKOGESTAD Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N­7491 Trondheim

  19. Selfoptimizing control: From key performance indicators to control of biological systems 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Introduction The national economy, the goverment, companies and businesses, consumers, chemical process plants cost function (performance index) J o which is to be minimized with respect to the available degrees SKOGESTAD Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N--7491 Trondheim

  20. Research Positions in Big Data Computational Biology Department of Computational and Systems Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benos, Takis

    Research Positions in Big Data Computational Biology Department of Computational and clinical data related to melanoma and chronic lung diseases. The ideal, and will have research experience in computational biology. 2. One Data Scientist

  1. Division of Biological and Medical Research annual research summary, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barr, S.H. (ed.)

    1984-08-01

    This research summary contains brief descriptions of research in the following areas: (1) mechanisms of hepatocarcinogenesis; (2) role of metals in cocarcinogenesis and the use of liposomes for metal mobilization; (3) control of mutagenesis and cell differentiation in cultured cells by tumor promoters; (4) radiation effects in mammalian cells; (5) radiation carcinogenesis and radioprotectors; (6) life shortening, tumor induction, and tissue dose for fission-neutron and gamma-ray irradiations; (7) mammalian genetics and biostatistics; (8) radiation toxicity studies; (9) hematopoiesis in chronic toxicity; (10) molecular biology studies; (11) chemical toxicology; (12) carcinogen identification and metabolism; (13) metal metabolism and toxicity; and (14) neurobehavioral chronobiology. (ACR)

  2. Development of an NC equipment level controller in a hierarchical shop floor control system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, William

    1993-01-01

    The methodology of developing an NC equipment controller in a Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) System, which is based on a philosophy of hierarchical shop floor control, is presented in this research. The underlying architecture consists...

  3. Volume 23 November 1, 2012 4165 Living matter--nexus of physics and biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gardel, Margaret

    Volume 23 November 1, 2012 4165 Living matter--nexus of physics and biology in the 21st century Margaret L. Gardel Institute for Biophysical Dynamics, James Franck Institute, and Department of Physics tissue architecture and mechanics. Elucidating the underlying physical principles of such living matter

  4. Project Controls

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    Project controls are systems used to plan, schedule, budget, and measure the performance of a project/program. The cost estimation package is one of the documents that is used to establish the baseline for project controls. This chapter gives a brief description of project controls and the role the cost estimation package plays.

  5. Molecular motors: design, mechanism and control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debashish Chowdhury

    2008-01-10

    Biological functions in each animal cell depend on coordinated operations of a wide variety of molecular motors. Some of the these motors transport cargo to their respective destinations whereas some others are mobile workshops which synthesize macromolecules while moving on their tracks. Some other motors are designed to function as packers and movers. All these motors require input energy for performing their mechanical works and operate under conditions far from thermodynamic equilibrium. The typical size of these motors and the forces they generate are of the order of nano-meters and pico-Newtons, respectively. They are subjected to random bombardments by the molecules of the surrounding aqueous medium and, therefore, follow noisy trajectories. Because of their small inertia, their movements in the viscous intracellular space exhibits features that are characteristics of hydrodynamics at low Reynold's number. In this article we discuss how theoretical modeling and computer simulations of these machines by physicists are providing insight into their mechanisms which engineers can exploit to design and control artificial nano-motors.

  6. A bioinformatics/computational biology postdoctoral research position available to analyze biological networks in plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Jiaheng

    and development of plants and algae. The Department of Plant Biology is co-located with the Carnegie Department biological networks in plants A bioinformatics postdoctoral position is available immediately in the laboratory of Dr. Sue Rhee at the Carnegie Institution, Department of Plant Biology (Stanford, CA

  7. UB DEPARTMENT OF CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING BS in Chemical and Biological Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krovi, Venkat

    UB DEPARTMENT OF CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING BS in Chemical and Biological EngineeringD (all in Chemical Engineering) · Average ChE starting salary: $66,000 (BS) · A five-year BS in Chemical by teaching assistants: 0 What Do Chemical and Biological Engineers Do? CBE graduates apply chemistry to make

  8. Progress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology 97 (2008) 115157 Scale relativity theory and integrative systems biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nottale, Laurent

    2008-01-01

    Progress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology 97 (2008) 115­157 Review Scale relativity theory and integrative systems biology: 2 Macroscopic quantum-type mechanics Laurent Nottalea,b , Charles Auffrayb Meudon, France b Functional Genomics and Systems Biology for Health, UMR 7091-LGN, CNRS/Pierre & Marie

  9. BIOLOGICAL OPINION ON ISSUANCE OF INCIDENTAL HARASSMENT AUTHORIZATIONS FOR OIL AND GAS EXPLORATION ACTIVITIES IN THE CHUKCHI AND BEAUFORT SEAS IN 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;BIOLOGICAL OPINION ON ISSUANCE OF INCIDENTAL HARASSMENT AUTHORIZATIONS FOR OIL AND GAS..............................................................................................................84 i #12;BIOLOGICAL OPINION ON ISSUANCE OF INCIDENTAL HARASSMENT AUTHORIZATIONS FOR OIL AND GAS" permits under section 101(a)(5) of the Marine Mammal Protection Act, as amended, for certain oil and gas

  10. A Probabilistic Particle Control Approximation of Chance Constrained Stochastic Predictive Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Brian C.

    and can control a ground vehicle while being robust to brake failures. I. INTRODUCTION Robust control such as failures. We demonstrate in simulation that the new method is able to control an aircraft in turbulence control ensures that failure is prevented under all possible uncertainties. In many cases, for example

  11. Invited Review The biology of kinetoplastid parasites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schnaufer, Achim

    . Their cell shapes change during a set of complex cell type differentiations in their life cycles and vector. The basics of this rich and complex cell and life cycle biology were described (with often rather developments in our understanding of this biology. Ultrastructural differences in the various cells of the life

  12. The Electronics Biological Matter Interface. Introduction.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruner, George

    , real­time monitoring of biological processes. Second, local electric fields generated by the devices. Electrophoresis, one of the fundamental tools of biotechnology, also relies on electric charges. Charge and biological matter is a subject of significant current interest. The fundamental science of this area

  13. Ninth International Workshop on Plant Membrane Biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    This report is a compilation of abstracts from papers which were discussed at a workshop on plant membrane biology. Topics include: plasma membrane ATP-ases; plant-environment interactions, membrane receptors; signal transduction; ion channel physiology; biophysics and molecular biology; vaculor H+ pumps; sugar carriers; membrane transport; and cellular structure and function.

  14. Genome Biology 2005, 6:312 commentreviewsreportsdepositedresearchinteractionsinformationrefereedresearch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kellis, Manolis

    Genome Biology 2005, 6-mail: bbernst@fas.harvard.edu. Manolis Kellis. E-mail: manoli@mit.edu Published: 1 March 2005 Genome Biology- tium, which aims to identify a comprehensive `Encyclopedia of DNA elements' in the human genome [http

  15. Book Review Geothermal Biology and Geochemis-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Book Review Geothermal Biology and Geochemis- try in Yellowstone National Park. (eds WP Inskeep of life. The legacy of chemical and biologi- cal research in geothermal regimes, while short in duration geothermal areas, including Yellowstone, are largely confined to the specialty literature of geochemical

  16. Biological Hydrogen Production Measured in Batch Anaerobic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biological Hydrogen Production Measured in Batch Anaerobic Respirometers B R U C E E . L O G A N The biological production of hydrogen from the fermentation of different substrates was examined in batch tests product for a sugar (4). The accumulation of hydrogen and other degradation byproducts during fermen

  17. Genome Biology 2004, 5:R43 commentreviewsreportsdepositedresearchrefereedresearchinteractionsinformation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wetenschappen, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 10, 3001 Heverlee (Leuven), Belgium. Current literature indices of selected public biological resources in a flexible text-mining system designed towards of selected public biological resources in a flexible text-mining system designed towards the analysis

  18. THE EMERGENCE OF MEANING IN BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE EMERGENCE OF MEANING IN BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS THESIS SUBMITTED FOR THE DEGREE OF "DOCTOR OF MEANING IN BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS THESIS SUBMITTED FOR THE DEGREE OF "DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY" BY URI HERSHBERG and what its functions are. Likewise we study the immune system as an example of cognitive perception

  19. MS.BIOLOGY.THESIS ACADEMIC LEARNING PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Laughlin, Jay

    , application and preservation of knowledge. Within this framework, the primary mission of the Department and animals Adherence to appropriate ethical practices in the thesis research E. Project Management Design.MS.BIOLOGY.THESIS EMBEDDED ASSESSMENT INSTRUMENT FOR DOMAIN(S): INTEGRITY/VALUES, PROJECT MANAGEMENT Program: M.S. Biology

  20. Robotics in Crop Production Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, University of Illinois at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robotics in Crop Production Tony Grift Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering such as harvesting of citrus fruits, grapes, and raisins. An important part of Automation is the use of robots. Robotics in agriculture is not a new concept; in controlled environments (green houses), it has a his- tory

  1. Max-Planck-Institut fr biologische Kybernetik Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and analysis of human psychophysical experiments. · Good understanding of the English language in speaking Position in Human Motion Simulation The Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics in Tübingen laws of perception will be implemented into the control framework of motion-based simulators. Human

  2. Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 20, 29432953, June 15, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hancock, William O.

    , play an inconsequential role in mediating MT bending in LLC-PK1 cells and that MT-based molecular mechanical forces control the spatial distribution of the MT array. INTRODUCTION Microtubules (MTs) are self-assemblingMolecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 20, 2943­2953, June 15, 2009 Anterograde Microtubule Transport

  3. Plant Molecular Biology 43: 621633, 2000. Dirk Inz (Ed.), The Plant Cell Cycle.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray, J.A.H.

    Plant Molecular Biology 43: 621­633, 2000. Dirk Inzé (Ed.), The Plant Cell Cycle. © 2000 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands. 621 The role and regulation of D-type cyclins in the plant.murray@biotech.cam.ac.uk) Key words: D-type cyclins, differentiation, G1/S control, plant cell cycle, proliferation

  4. Plant Molecular Biology 37: 155169, 1998. 155 c 1998 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in Belgium.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray, J.A.H.

    Plant Molecular Biology 37: 155­169, 1998. 155 cæ 1998 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed and displays conserved interactions with G1/S regulators and plant cyclin D (CycD) proteins Rachael Huntley1 in revised form 23 December 1997 Key words: evolution, G1-S control, plant cell cycle, retinoblastoma protein

  5. Biological Invasions 5: 179192, 2003. 2003 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    : biological invasion, introduced species, nativism, Nazis, racism, xenophobia Abstract Critics from the fields to control introduced species as infected by nativism, racism, and xenophobia. Many appeals against a particular aesthetic judgment is in no way underlain by xenophobia or racism. Certainly the Nazi drive

  6. Home Biology Medicine Technology Products News Definition Dictionary Movies Links Whole Site Goog

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiao, Jung-Chih

    Home Biology Medicine Technology Products News Definition Dictionary Movies Links Search RSS Whole Site Goog Navigation Links Biology News Medicine News Biology Products Medicine Products Biology Definition Medicine Definition Biology Technology Medicine Technology Biology Dictionary Medicine Dictionary

  7. Method of measurement in biological systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turteltaub, Kenneth W. (Livermore, CA); Vogel, John S. (Union City, CA); Felton, James S. (Danville, CA); Gledhill, Barton L. (Alamo, CA); Davis, Jay C. (Livermore, CA); Stanker, Larry H. (Livermore, CA)

    1993-05-11

    Disclosed is a method of quantifying molecules in biological substances, comprising: a. selecting a biological host in which radioisotopes are present in concentrations equal to or less than those in the ambient biosphere, b. preparing a long-lived radioisotope labeled reactive chemical specie, c. administering said chemical specie to said biological host in doses sufficiently low to avoid significant overt damage to the biological system thereof, d. allowing a period of time to elapse sufficient for dissemination and interaction of said chemical specie with said host throughout said biological system of said host, e. isolating a reacted fraction of the biological substance from said host in a manner sufficient to avoid contamination of said substance from extraneous sources, f. converting said fraction of biological substance by suitable means to a material which efficiently produces charged ions in at least one of several possible ion sources without introduction of significant isotopic fractionation, and, g. measuring the radioisotope concentration in said material by means of direct isotopic counting.

  8. Method of measurement in biological systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turteltaub, Kenneth W. (Livermore, CA); Vogel, John S. (Union City, CA); Felton, James S. (Danville, CA); Gledhill, Barton L. (Alamo, CA); Davis, Jay C. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01

    Disclosed is a method of quantifying molecules in biological substances comprising: a. selecting a biological host in which radioisotopes are present in concentrations equal to or less than those in the ambient biosphere, b. preparing a long-lived radioisotope labeled reactive chemical specie, c. administering said chemical specie to said biological host in doses sufficiently low to avoid significant overt damage to the biological system thereof, d. allowing a period of time to elapse sufficient for dissemination and interaction of said chemical specie with said host throughout said biological system of said host, e. isolating a reacted fraction of the biological substance from said host in a manner sufficient to avoid contamination of said substance from extraneous sources, f. converting said fraction of biological substance by suitable means to a material which efficiently produces charged ions in at least one of several possible ion sources without introduction of significant isotopic fractionation, and, g. measuring the radioisotope concentration in said material by means of direct isotopic counting.

  9. Method of measurement in biological systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turteltaub, K.W.; Vogel, J.S.; Felton, J.S.; Gledhill, B.L.; Davis, J.C.

    1994-12-27

    Disclosed is a method of quantifying molecules in biological substances comprising: a. selecting a biological host in which radioisotopes are present in concentrations equal to or less than those in the ambient biosphere, b. preparing a long-lived radioisotope labeled reactive chemical specie, c. administering the chemical specie to the biological host in doses sufficiently low to avoid significant overt damage to the biological system, d. allowing a period of time to elapse sufficient for dissemination and interaction of the chemical specie with the host throughout the biological system of the host, e. isolating a reacted fraction of the biological substance from the host in a manner sufficient to avoid contamination of the substance from extraneous sources, f. converting the fraction of biological substance by suitable means to a material which efficiently produces charged ions in at least one of several possible ion sources without introduction of significant isotopic fractionation, and, g. measuring the radioisotope concentration in the material by means of direct isotopic counting. 5 figures.

  10. Optimal Average Cost Manufacturing Flow Controllers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veatch, Michael H.

    policy the differ- ential cost is C1 on attractive control switching boundaries. Index Terms Average costOptimal Average Cost Manufacturing Flow Controllers: Convexity and Differentiability Michael H and differentiability of the differential cost function are investigated. It is proven that under an optimal control

  11. Flea Control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merchant, Michael E.

    2002-08-23

    This publication will help you identify fleas and learn their behaviors and potential dangers to pets and humans. Included are methods for controlling fleas indoors and out....

  12. Tick Control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merchant, Michael E.

    2002-08-23

    This publication will help you identify ticks and learn their behaviors and potential dangers. Included are methods for avoiding, controlling and removing ticks....

  13. Honors B.S. in Biology (Aug 2014) Overview: The H.B.S in Biology is a collaboration between the Honors College and the Biology Department to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clayton, Dale H.

    1 Honors B.S. in Biology (Aug 2014) Overview: The H.B.S in Biology is a collaboration between the Honors College and the Biology Department to reward students undertaking and completing a more rigorous, research-oriented curriculum while pursuing their Honors Bachelor's Degree in Biology at the University

  14. What rough beast? Synthetic Biology and the Future of Biosecurity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohr, Scott C.

    Synthetic biology seeks to create modular biological parts that can be assembled into useful devices, allowing the modification of biological systems with greater reliability, at lower cost, with greater speed, and by a ...

  15. Biology and Biodiversity of the Marine Leeches of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    1978. Morphology and biology of Mysidobdella borealis (Wasmann Journal of Biology 13: 297–311. S ELENSKY , W. D.C. M EYER . 1976. Taxonomy and biology of some Newfoundland

  16. BIOLOGY & MEDICINE DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978-1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2010-01-01

    on research needs in actinide biology (CONF-770491, Seattle,J. Radiation Oncology Biology Physics 3: Lindgren, Frank T.Radiation Oncology Biology, Physics 3: 81-85 Magee, J.L and

  17. Biochemistry & Molecular Biology Department of Environmental and Biomolecular Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Michael S.

    Biochemistry & Molecular Biology Department of Environmental and Biomolecular Systems Program Requirement Checklists Fall 2007 ­ Summer 2008 Master of Science ­ Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.............................................................2 Doctor of Philosophy ­ Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

  18. Aspects of the political economy of development and synthetic biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wellhausen, Rachel

    What implications might synthetic biology’s potential as a wholly new method of production have for the world economy, particularly developing countries? Theories of political economy predict that synthetic biology can ...

  19. Crafting life : a sensory ethnography of fabricated biologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roosth, Hannah Sophia

    2010-01-01

    This ethnography tracks a diverse set of practices I term "constructive biologies," by which I mean efforts in the post-genomic life sciences to understand how biology works by making new biological things. I examine five ...

  20. Spectrum of Controlling and Observing Complex Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan, Gang; Barzel, Baruch; Slotine, Jean-Jacques; Liu, Yang-Yu; Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo

    2015-01-01

    Observing and controlling complex networks are of paramount interest for understanding complex physical, biological and technological systems. Recent studies have made important advances in identifying sensor or driver nodes, through which we can observe or control a complex system. Yet, the observation uncertainty induced by measurement noise and the energy cost required for control continue to be significant challenges in practical applications. Here we show that the control energy cost and the observation uncertainty vary widely in different directions of the state space. In particular, we find that if all nodes are directly driven, control is energetically feasible, as the maximum energy cost increases sublinearly with the system size. If, however, we aim to control a system by driving only a single node, control in some directions is energetically prohibitive, increasing exponentially with the system size. For the cases in between, the maximum energy decays exponentially if we increase the number of driv...

  1. From Tucson to Genomics and Transgenics: The Vector Biology Network and the Emergence of Modern Vector Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    mosquitoes. A PL meeting at the Biology of Disease Vectors (as a tool in vector biology. Transformation of the vector ofelement. Insect Molecular Biology 10: 597–604. 11. Balter

  2. Flow cytometry aids basic cell biology research and drug discovery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Flow cytometry aids basic cell biology research and drug discovery Flow cytometry aids basic cell biology research and drug discovery Life Technologies Corporation and LANL have...

  3. BE.442 Molecular Structure of Biological Materials, Fall 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Shuguang, Dr.

    Basic molecular structural principles of biological materials. Molecular structures of various materials of biological origin, including collagen, silk, bone, protein adhesives, GFP, self-assembling peptides. Molecular ...

  4. Detter, John C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory] Basic Biological

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    State of the Art for Autonomous Detection Systems using Genomic Sequencing Detter, John C. Los Alamos National Laboratory Basic Biological Sciences(59) Biological Science...

  5. Importance of systems biology in engineering microbes for biofuel...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Importance of systems biology in engineering microbes for biofuel production Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Importance of systems biology in engineering microbes for...

  6. THE MOLECULAR BIOLOGY INSTITUTE AND THE DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grether, Gregory

    THE MOLECULAR BIOLOGY INSTITUTE AND THE DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY Three Nominees in Molecular Biology, Biochemistry and Chemistry at UCLA #12;

  7. BE.442 Molecular Structure of Biological Materials, Fall 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Shuguang, Dr.

    Basic molecular structural principles of biological materials. Molecular structures of various materials of biological origin, including collagen, silk, bone, protein adhesives, GFP, self-assembling peptides. Molecular ...

  8. Solar Energy Education. Renewable energy activities for biology...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    biology Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Solar Energy Education. Renewable energy activities for biology You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's...

  9. Biological and Biomimetic Low-Temperature Routes to Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biological and Biomimetic Low-Temperature Routes to Materials for Energy Applications Biological and Biomimetic Low-Temperature Routes to Materials for Energy Applications 2012 DOE...

  10. Systems biology analysis of Zymomonas mobilis ZM4 ethanol stress...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Systems biology analysis of Zymomonas mobilis ZM4 ethanol stress responses Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Systems biology analysis of Zymomonas mobilis ZM4 ethanol...

  11. Biologically Enhanced Carbon Sequestration: Research Needs and Opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2008-01-01

    Enhancement of soil carbon sequestration by amendment withBiologically Enhanced Carbon Sequestration: Research Needson Biologically Enhanced Carbon Sequestration, October 29,

  12. Nanotechnology: emerging tools for biology and medicine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Ian Y.

    Historically, biomedical research has been based on two paradigms. First, measurements of biological behaviors have been based on bulk assays that average over large populations. Second, these behaviors have then been ...

  13. Biological applications of weal polyelectrolyte multilayers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berg, Michael C., Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2005-01-01

    This thesis research focused on biological applications of ultra-thin weak polyelectrolyte multilayers with specific emphasis on cell patterning, drug delivery, and antibacterial coatings. All of these very different ...

  14. Synthetic approaches to understanding biological constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Velenich, Andrea

    Microbes can be readily cultured and their genomes can be easily manipulated. For these reasons, laboratory systems of unicellular organisms are increasingly used to develop and test theories about biological constraints, ...

  15. Physical sectioning in 3D biological microscopy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guntupalli, Jyothi Swaroop

    2009-05-15

    Our ability to analyze the microstructure of biological tissue in three dimensions (3D) has proven invaluable in modeling its functionality, and therefore providing a better understanding of the basic mechanisms of life. ...

  16. Fourth Annual Western Evolutionary Biology Meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    Fourth Annual Western Evolutionary Biology Meeting University of California Presentation of the fourth annual Western Evolutionary Biologist of the Year (WEBEY) Award. 5:00 PM Fourth Annual WEBEY Address, Maureen Stanton, UC Davis 6:00 PM

  17. VEHICLE OPERATING PROCEDURES DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronquist, Fredrik

    VEHICLE OPERATING PROCEDURES DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE GENERAL INFORMATION Vehicles resposniblity and disciplinary action. Vehicles may be used by faculty or staff from other departments complete the vehicle usage agreement form certifying that they have a valid driver's license

  18. THE BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF IONIZING RADIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    sickness · Chronic ­ Low dose over long period of time ­ Cancer, anemia, cataracts #12;Appearance of Biological Effects · Prompt/Acute effect ­ effects seen immediately after large doses of radiation if no treatment is given #12;Dose / Radiation Syndrome Relationship · Dose

  19. History of Human Biology (1929–2009)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, Michael H.

    2010-01-01

    The journal Human Biology was founded 80 years ago by Raymond Pearl, an eminent biologist and professor of biometry and vital statistics at Johns Hopkins University. In celebration of the 80th anniversary of the founding of this journal, I...

  20. Modular languages for systems and synthetic biology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Systems biology is a rapidly growing field which seeks a refined quantitative understanding of organisms, particularly studying how molecular species such as metabolites, proteins and genes interact in cells to form the ...